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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 10, 2021

File Nos. 333-155395

811-22250

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

Form N-1A

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933           
Post-Effective Amendment No. 470      
And      

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE INVESTMENT

COMPANY ACT OF 1940

     
Amendment No. 472      

PIMCO ETF TRUST        

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)        

650 Newport Center Drive        

Newport Beach, California 92660        

(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)        

Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code        

(888) 400-4383        

 

Douglas P. Dick, Esq.

Adam T. Teufel, Esq.

Dechert LLP

1900 K Street, N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20006

 

Peter G. Strelow

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC

650 Newport Center Drive

Newport Beach, California 92660

 
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)  

It is proposed that this filing will become effective:

 

☐  immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)    ☒  on August 11, 2021 pursuant to paragraph (b)
☐  60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)          on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
☐  75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)    ☐  on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485.

If appropriate, check the following box:

☐        this post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.

 


EXPLANATORY NOTE

This Post-Effective Amendment No. 470 to the Registration Statement of PIMCO ETF Trust (the “Trust” or the “Registrant”) on Form N-1A (File No. 333-155395) (the “Amendment”) is being filed pursuant to Rule 485(b) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, to register shares of the PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Trade Fund, a new series of the Registrant. This Amendment does not affect the currently effective prospectuses and Statement of Additional Information for other series of the Trust’s shares not included herein.


 

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PIMCO ETF Trust
Prospectus
August 10, 2021
 
TICKER
EXCHANGE
TAX-EXEMPT MUNICIPAL
PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund
MINO
NYSE Arca
Neither the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nor the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission has approved or disapproved these securities, or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 
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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

Investment Objective
The Fund seeks current income exempt from federal income tax and long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment): N/A
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fees
0.49%
Other Expenses(1)
0.05%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
0.54%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(2)(3)
(0.15)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement
0.39%
1 “Other Expenses” reflect estimated expenses for the Fund’s first fiscal year.
2 Pacific Investment Management Company LLC (“PIMCO”) has contractually agreed, through October 31, 2022, to waive its management fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata Trustees’ fees exceed 0.0049% of the Fund’s average net assets (the “Expense Limit”). Under the Expense Limitation Agreement, which renews annually for a full year unless terminated by PIMCO upon at least 30 days’ notice prior to the end of the contract term, PIMCO may recoup these waivers and reimbursements in future periods, not exceeding three years, provided that organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata Trustees’ fees, plus recoupment, do not exceed the Expense Limit (or the amount of the expense limit in place at the time the amount recouped was originally waived if lower than the Expense Limit).
3 PIMCO has contractually agreed, through October 31, 2023, to reduce its management fee by 0.10% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. In any month in which the investment management agreement is in effect, PIMCO is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of any portion of the management fee waived as set forth above (the “Fee Waiver Reimbursement Amount”) during the previous thirty-six months from the time of the waiver, provided that such amount paid to PIMCO will not: 1) together with any recoupment of organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata Trustee fees pursuant to the Expense Limitation Agreement, exceed the Expense Limit (calculated as a percentage of average daily net assets) (or the amount of the expense limit in place at the time the amount being recouped was originally waived if lower than the Expense Limit); 2) exceed the total Fee Waiver Reimbursement Amount; or 3) include any amounts previously reimbursed to PIMCO.
Example. The Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the costs of investing in other exchange-traded funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated, and then sell all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. Investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of Fund shares, which are not reflected in the Example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
$40
$136
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Example tables, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus. Thus no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing under normal circumstances at least 80% of its assets in debt securities whose interest is, in the opinion of bond counsel for the issuer at the time of issuance, exempt from federal income tax (“Municipal Bonds”). Municipal Bonds generally are issued by or on behalf of states and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities.
The Fund may invest up to 30% of its assets in high yield securities (those that are rated, at the time of purchase, below investment grade by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”), or equivalently rated by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”) or Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”), or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”)). In the event that ratings services assign different ratings to the same security, PIMCO will use the highest rating as the credit rating for that security. The Fund may also invest, without limitation, in higher rated securities. The Fund may invest without limitation in “private activity” bonds whose interest is a tax-preference item for purposes of the federal alternative minimum tax (“AMT”). For shareholders subject to the AMT, distributions derived from “private activity” bonds must be included in their AMT calculations, and as such a portion of the Fund’s distribution may be subject to federal income tax. The average portfolio duration of this Fund normally varies within (negative) 2 years to positive 2 years of the portfolio duration of the securities comprising the Bloomberg Barclays Municipal Bond Index, as calculated by PIMCO, which, as of June 30, 2021, was 5.96 years. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. PIMCO’s management of the Fund generally seeks to focus on bonds with the potential to offer attractive current income, typically looking for bonds that can provide consistently attractive current yields or that are trading at competitive market prices.
The Fund may invest significantly in Municipal Bonds of specific projects, including those that finance education, health care, housing, transportation, utilities and other similar projects, and industrial development bonds. The Fund may invest significantly in issuers of particular jurisdictions, such as California and New York.
The Fund may invest in other types of Fixed Income Instruments. “Fixed Income Instruments” include bonds, debt securities and other similar instruments issued by various U.S. and non-U.S. public- or private-sector entities. The Fund may also invest in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts or swap agreements. The Fund may purchase and

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

sell securities on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis. The Fund may, without limitation, seek to obtain market exposure to the securities in which it primarily invests by entering into a series of purchase and sale contracts or by using other investment techniques (such as buy backs or dollar rolls).
Principal Risks
It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value, yield and total return, are listed below.
Interest Rate Risk: the risk that fixed income securities will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates; a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration
New Fund Risk: the risk that a new fund’s performance may not represent how the fund is expected to or may perform in the long term. In addition, new funds have limited operating histories for investors to evaluate and new funds may not attract sufficient assets to achieve investment and trading efficiencies
Small Fund Risk: the risk that a smaller fund may not achieve investment or trading efficiencies. Additionally, a smaller fund may be more adversely affected by large purchases or redemptions of fund shares
Market Trading Risk: the risk that an active secondary trading market for Fund shares does not continue once developed, that the Fund may not continue to meet a listing exchange’s trading or listing requirements, or that Fund shares trade at prices other than the Fund’s net asset value, particularly during times of market stress
Municipal Bond Risk: the risk that by investing in Municipal Bonds the Fund may be affected significantly by the economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of issuers of Municipal Bonds to pay interest or repay principal
Municipal Project-Specific Risk: the risk that the Fund may be more sensitive to adverse economic, business or political developments if it invests a substantial portion of its assets in the bonds of specific projects (such as those relating to education, health care, housing, transportation, and utilities), industrial development bonds, or in bonds from issuers in a single state
California State-Specific Risk: the risk that by concentrating its investments in California Municipal Bonds, the Fund may be affected significantly by economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of California issuers to pay interest or repay principal
New York State-Specific Risk: the risk that by concentrating its investments in New York Municipal Bonds, the Fund may be affected significantly by economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of New York issuers to pay interest or repay principal
Call Risk: the risk that an issuer may exercise its right to redeem a fixed income security earlier than expected (a call). Issuers may call outstanding securities prior to their maturity for a number of reasons (e.g., declining interest rates, changes in credit spreads and improvements in the issuer’s credit quality). If an issuer calls a security that the Fund has invested in, the
Fund may not recoup the full amount of its initial investment and may be forced to reinvest in lower-yielding securities, securities with greater credit risks or securities with other, less favorable features
Credit Risk: the risk that the Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security, or the counterparty to a forward commitment transaction, is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, rating agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to meet its financial obligations
Market Risk: the risk that the value of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries
Issuer Risk: the risk that the value of a security may decline for a reason directly related to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services
Liquidity Risk: the risk that a particular investment may be difficult to purchase or sell and that the Fund may be unable to sell illiquid investments at an advantageous time or price or achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. Liquidity risk may result from the lack of an active market, reduced number and capacity of traditional market participants to make a market in fixed income securities, and may be magnified in a rising interest rate environment or other circumstances where investor redemptions from fixed income funds may be higher than normal, causing increased supply in the market due to selling activity
High Yield Risk: the risk that high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as “junk bonds”) are subject to greater levels of credit, call and liquidity risks. High yield securities are considered primarily speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to make principal and interest payments, and may be more volatile than higher-rated securities of similar maturity
Leveraging Risk: the risk that certain transactions of the Fund, such as reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions may give rise to leverage, magnifying gains and losses and causing the Fund to be more volatile than if it had not been leveraged. This means that leverage entails a heightened risk of loss
Derivatives Risk: the risk of investing in derivative instruments (such as futures and swaps), including leverage, liquidity, interest rate, market, credit and management risks, and valuation complexity. Changes in the value of a derivative may not correlate perfectly with, and may be more sensitive to market events than, the underlying asset, rate or index, and the Fund could lose more than the initial amount invested. The Fund’s use of derivatives may result in losses to the Fund, a reduction in the Fund’s returns and/or increased volatility. Over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives are also subject to the risk that a counterparty to the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations to the other party, as many of the protections afforded to centrally-cleared derivative transactions might not be available for OTC derivatives. The primary credit risk on derivatives that are exchange-traded or traded through a central clearing counterparty resides with the Fund’s clearing broker, or the clearinghouse. Changes in regulation relating to a fund’s use of derivatives and related instruments could potentially limit or impact the Fund’s ability to invest in derivatives, limit the Fund’s ability to

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Prospectus 

employ certain strategies that use derivatives and/or adversely affect the value of derivatives and the Fund’s performance
Management Risk: the risk that the investment techniques and risk analyses applied by PIMCO will not produce the desired results and that actual or potential conflicts of interest, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and the individual portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may cause PIMCO to restrict or prohibit participation in certain investments. There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved
LIBOR Transition Risk: the risk related to the anticipated discontinuation of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). Certain instruments held by the Fund rely in some fashion upon LIBOR. Although the transition process away from LIBOR has become increasingly well-defined in advance of the anticipated discontinuation date, there remains uncertainty regarding the nature of any replacement rate, and any potential effects of the transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or on certain instruments in which the Fund invests can be difficult to ascertain. The transition process may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR and may result in a reduction in value of certain instruments held by the Fund
Please see “Description of Principal Risks” in the Fund’s prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
Performance Information
The Fund does not have a full calendar year of performance. Thus, no bar chart or Average Annual Total Returns table is included for the Fund. Once the Fund commences operations, performance will be updated daily and quarterly and may be obtained as follows: daily and quarterly updates on the net asset value and performance page at https://www.pimco.com/en-us/investments/etf.
Investment Adviser/Portfolio Managers
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PIMCO serves as the investment adviser for the Fund. The Fund’s portfolio is jointly and primarily managed by David Hammer, Rachel Betton and Kyle Christine. Mr. Hammer is a Managing Director of PIMCO and managed the Fund since its inception. Ms. Betton is a Senior Vice President of PIMCO, and she managed the Fund since its inception. Mr. Christine is a Vice President of PIMCO, and he managed the Fund since its inception.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The Fund is an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the
Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than net asset value (“NAV”), shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid- ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at https://www.pimco.com/en-us/investments/etf.
Tax Information
The Fund’s taxable distributions are generally taxable to you as ordinary income, capital gains, or a combination of the two, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account, in which case distributions may be taxable upon withdrawal.
Dividends paid to shareholders of the Fund derived from interest from debt securities whose interest is, in the opinion of bond counsel for the issuer at the time of issuance, exempt from federal income tax (“Municipal Bonds”) are expected to be designated by the Fund as “exempt-interest dividends” and shareholders may generally exclude such dividends from gross income for federal income tax purposes.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, PIMCO or other related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares or related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
Summary Information About the Fund
This prospectus describes the PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund offered by PIMCO ETF Trust (the “Trust”). The Fund provides access to the professional investment advisory services offered by PIMCO.
ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly-traded securities and may be designed to track an index or to be actively managed. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Fund is not an index fund. The Fund is actively managed and does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought from and redeemed by the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Fund may be directly purchased from and redeemed by the Fund at NAV solely by a member or participant of a clearing agency registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which has a written agreement with the Fund’s Distributor that allows such member or participant to place orders for the purchase and redemption of Creation Units (as defined below) (“Authorized Participant”). Also unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.
Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed and traded at market prices on NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”) and other secondary markets. The market price for the Fund’s shares may be different from the Fund’s NAV. The Fund issues and redeems shares at NAV only in aggregations of a specified number of shares (“Creation Units”). Only Authorized Participants may purchase or redeem Creation Units directly with the Fund at NAV. These transactions are in exchange for cash and/or securities. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares of the Fund are not redeemable securities. Shareholders who are not Authorized Participants may not purchase or redeem shares directly from the Fund.
If the Fund were to effect redemptions with an Authorized Participant primarily for cash, the Fund may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. The sale of portfolio securities could cause the Fund to recognize gains that it might not otherwise have recognized if redemptions were effected in-kind, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required. Such gains will generally be distributed to shareholders to avoid taxation at the Fund level and to ensure compliance with other special tax rules that apply to the Fund. Moreover, the sale of portfolio securities will generally subject the Fund to transaction costs, which may be partially or totally offset by the variable transaction fee charged by the Fund to redeeming Authorized Participants.
An investment in the Fund alone should not constitute an entire investment program. This prospectus explains what you should know about the Fund before you invest. Please read it carefully. Certain affiliates of the Fund and PIMCO may purchase and resell Fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.
On each business day, before commencement of trading on NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on www.pimcoetfs.com the identities and quantities of the Fund’s portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of NAV at the end of the business day. The Fund fact sheet provides additional information regarding the Fund and may be requested by calling 1.888.400.4ETF (1.888.400.4383).

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Prospectus 

Description of Principal Risks
The value of your investment in the Fund changes with the market price of the Fund’s shares determined in the secondary market. Market price may be determined, in part, by the values of the Fund’s investments. Many factors can affect those values. The factors that are most likely to have a material effect on the Fund’s portfolio as a whole are called “principal risks.” The principal risks of the Fund are identified in the “Fund Summary.” The principal risks are described in more detail in this section. The Fund may be subject to additional risks other than those identified and described below because the types of investments made by the Fund can change over time. Securities and investment techniques mentioned in this section that appear in bold type are described in greater detail under “Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques.” That section and “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”) also include more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. There is no guarantee that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. It is possible to lose money by investing in the Fund.
Interest Rate Risk
Interest rate risk is the risk that fixed income securities and other instruments in the Fund’s portfolio will decline in value because of an increase in interest rates. As nominal interest rates rise, the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund is likely to decrease. A nominal interest rate can be described as the sum of a real interest rate and an expected inflation rate. Interest rate changes can be sudden and unpredictable, and the Fund may lose money as a result of movements in interest rates. The Fund may not be able to hedge against changes in interest rates or may choose not to do so for cost or other reasons. In addition, any hedges may not work as intended.
Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, usually making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations. The values of equity and other non-fixed income securities may also decline due to fluctuations in interest rates. Inflation-indexed bonds, including Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (“TIPS”), decline in value when real interest rates rise. In certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, inflation-indexed bonds may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar durations.
Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Inverse floating rate securities may decrease in value if interest rates increase. Inverse floating rate securities may also exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation with similar credit quality. When the Fund holds variable or floating rate securities, a decrease (or, in the case of inverse floating rate securities, an increase) in market interest rates will adversely affect the income received from such securities and the NAV of the Fund’s shares.
A wide variety of factors can cause interest rates or yields of U.S. Treasury securities (or yields of other types of bonds) to rise (e.g., central bank
monetary policies, inflation rates, general economic conditions, etc.). This is especially true under current conditions because interest rates and bond yields are near historically low levels. Thus, funds currently face a heightened level of risk associated with rising interest rates and/or bond yields. This could be driven by a variety of factors, including but not limited to central bank monetary policies, changing inflation or real growth rates, general economic conditions, increasing bond issuances or reduced market demand for low yielding investments.
During periods of very low or negative interest rates, the Fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Interest rates in the U.S. and many parts of the world, including certain European countries, are at or near historically low levels. Certain European countries have recently experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed income instruments. Very low or negative interest rates may magnify interest rate risk. Changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, may have unpredictable effects on markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from Fund performance to the extent the Fund is exposed to such interest rates.
Measures such as average duration may not accurately reflect the true interest rate sensitivity of the Fund. This is especially the case if the Fund consists of securities with widely varying durations. Therefore, if the Fund has an average duration that suggests a certain level of interest rate risk, the Fund may in fact be subject to greater interest rate risk than the average would suggest. This risk is greater to the extent the Fund uses leverage or derivatives in connection with the management of the Fund.
Convexity is an additional measure used to understand a security’s or Fund’s interest rate sensitivity. Convexity measures the rate of change of duration in response to changes in interest rates. With respect to a security’s price, a larger convexity (positive or negative) may imply more dramatic price changes in response to changing interest rates. Convexity may be positive or negative. Negative convexity implies that interest rate increases result in increased duration, meaning increased sensitivity in prices in response to rising interest rates. Thus, securities with negative convexity, which may include bonds with traditional call features and certain mortgage-backed securities, may experience greater losses in periods of rising interest rates. Accordingly, if the Fund holds such securities, the Fund may be subject to a greater risk of losses in periods of rising interest rates.
New Fund Risk
A new fund’s performance may not represent how the fund is expected to or may perform in the long term if and when it becomes larger and has fully implemented its investment strategies. Investment positions may have a disproportionate impact (negative or positive) on performance in new funds. New funds may also require a period of time before they are fully invested in securities that meet their investment objectives and policies and achieve a representative portfolio composition. Fund performance may be lower or higher during this “ramp-up” period, and may also be more volatile, than would be the case after the fund is fully invested. Similarly, a new fund’s investment strategy may require a longer period of time to show returns that are representative of the strategy. New funds have limited performance histories for investors to evaluate and new funds may

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

not attract sufficient assets to achieve investment and trading efficiencies. If a new fund were to fail to successfully implement its investment strategies or achieve its investment objective, performance may be negatively impacted, and any resulting liquidation could create negative transaction costs for the fund and tax consequences for investors.
Small Fund Risk
A smaller fund may not grow to or maintain an economically viable size to achieve investment or trading efficiencies, which may negatively impact performance and/or force the fund to liquidate. Additionally, a smaller fund may be more adversely affected by large purchases or redemptions of fund shares, which can occur at any time and may impact the fund in the same manner as a high volume of purchases or redemptions.
Market Trading Risk
The Fund is subject to secondary market trading risks. Once operational, shares of the Fund are listed for trading on an exchange, however, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market for such shares will develop or continue. Shares of the Fund may be listed or traded on U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges other than the Fund’s primary U.S. listing exchange. There can be no guarantee that the Fund’s shares will continue trading on any exchange or in any market or that the Fund’s shares will continue to meet the listing or trading requirements of any exchange or market. The Fund’s shares may experience higher trading volumes on one exchange as compared to another and investors are subject to the execution and settlement risks of the market where their broker directs trades.
Secondary market trading in the Fund’s shares may be halted by an exchange because of market conditions. Pursuant to exchange or market rules, trading in the Fund’s shares on an exchange or in any market may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility. If secondary market trading is halted or an exchange closes earlier than anticipated, you may be unable to purchase or sell Fund shares. There can be no guarantee that the Fund’s exchange listing or ability to trade its shares will continue or remain unchanged. In the event the Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an “exchange-traded” fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.
Buying or selling the Fund’s shares on an exchange may require the payment of brokerage commissions. In addition, an investor who buys or sells may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on their trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. Due to the costs inherent in buying or selling the Fund’s shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. Investment in the Fund’s shares may not be advisable for investors who expect to engage in frequent trading.
Shares of the Fund may trade on an exchange at prices at, above or below their most recent NAV, which could result in an investor buying shares of the Fund at a higher price than the Fund’s NAV or selling shares of the
Fund at a lower price than the Fund’s NAV. The market prices of Fund shares will fluctuate, sometimes rapidly and materially, in response to changes in the Fund’s NAV, the value of Fund holdings and supply and demand for Fund shares. Although the creation/redemption feature of the Fund generally makes it more likely that Fund shares will trade close to NAV, market volatility, lack of an active trading market for Fund shares, disruptions at market participants (such as Authorized Participants or market makers) and any disruptions in the ordinary functioning of the creation/redemption process may result in Fund shares trading significantly above (at a “premium”) or below (at a “discount”) NAV. Additionally, to the extent the Fund holds securities traded in markets that close at a different time from the Fund’s listing exchange, liquidity in such securities may be reduced after the applicable closing times, and during the time when the Fund’s listing exchange is open but after the applicable market closing, fixing or settlement times, bid/ask spreads and the resulting premium or discount to the Fund’s shares’ NAV may widen. You may be unable to sell your shares or may incur significant losses if you transact in Fund shares in these and other circumstances. Neither PIMCO nor the Trust can predict whether Fund shares will trade above, below or at NAV. The Fund’s investment results are based on the Fund’s daily NAV. Investors transacting in Fund shares in the secondary market, where market prices may differ from NAV, may experience investment results that differ from results based on the Fund’s daily NAV. There are various methods by which investors can purchase and sell shares and various orders that may be placed. Investors should consult their financial intermediary before purchasing or selling shares of the Fund.
The Fund has a limited number of intermediaries that act as Authorized Participants, and none of these Authorized Participants are or will be obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these intermediaries exit the business or are unable to or choose not to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able and willing to create or redeem, shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. Additionally, while Fund shares are listed for trading on an exchange, there can be no assurance that active trading markets for Fund shares will be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. Decisions by market makers or Authorized Participants to reduce their role or “step away” from these activities in times of market stress may inhibit the effectiveness of the creation/redemption process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of a Fund’s holdings and the Fund’s NAV. Such reduced effectiveness could result in the Fund’s shares trading at a discount to its NAV and also in greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads for the Fund’s shares.
Call Risk
Call risk refers to the possibility that an issuer may exercise its right to redeem a fixed income security earlier than expected (a call). Issuers may call outstanding securities prior to their maturity for a number of reasons (e.g., declining interest rates, changes in credit spreads and improvements in the issuer’s credit quality). If an issuer calls a security in which the Fund has invested, the Fund may not recoup the full amount of its initial investment and may be forced to reinvest in lower-yielding securities,

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securities with greater credit risks or securities with other, less favorable features.
Credit Risk
The Fund could lose money if the issuer or guarantor of a fixed income security (including a security purchased with securities lending collateral), or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or a loan of portfolio securities, is unable or unwilling, or is perceived (whether by market participants, rating agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. The downgrade of the credit of a security held by the Fund may decrease its value. Securities are subject to varying degrees of credit risk, which are often reflected in credit ratings. Measures such as average credit quality may not accurately reflect the true credit risk of the Fund. This is especially the case if the Fund consists of securities with widely varying credit ratings. Therefore, if the Fund has an average credit rating that suggests a certain credit quality, the Fund may in fact be subject to greater credit risk than the average would suggest. This risk is greater to the extent the Fund uses leverage or derivatives in connection with the management of the Fund. Municipal Bonds are subject to the risk that litigation, legislation or other political events, local business or economic conditions, or the bankruptcy of the issuer could have a significant effect on an issuer’s ability to make payments of principal and/or interest.
High Yield Risk
Funds that invest in high yield securities and unrated securities of similar credit quality (commonly known as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds”) may be subject to greater levels of credit risk, call risk and liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in such securities. These securities are considered predominantly speculative with respect to an issuer’s continuing ability to make principal and interest payments, and may be more volatile than other types of securities. An economic downturn or individual corporate developments could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce the Fund’s ability to sell these securities at an advantageous time or price. An economic downturn would generally lead to a higher non-payment rate and, a high yield security may lose significant market value before a default occurs. High yield securities structured as zero-coupon bonds or pay-in-kind securities tend to be especially volatile as they are particularly sensitive to downward pricing pressures from rising interest rates or widening spreads and may require the Fund to make taxable distributions of imputed income without receiving the actual cash currency. Issuers of high yield securities may have the right to “call” or redeem the issue prior to maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in other high yield securities or similar instruments that may pay lower interest rates. The Fund may also be subject to greater levels of liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in high yield securities. In addition, the high yield securities in which the Fund invests may not be listed on any exchange and a secondary market for such securities may be comparatively illiquid relative to markets for other more liquid fixed income securities. Consequently, transactions in high yield securities may involve greater costs than transactions in more actively traded securities. A lack of publicly-available information, irregular trading activity and wide bid/ask spreads among other factors, may, in certain
circumstances, make high yield debt more difficult to sell at an advantageous time or price than other types of securities or instruments. These factors may result in the Fund being unable to realize full value for these securities and/or may result in the Fund not receiving the proceeds from a sale of a high yield security for an extended period after such sale, each of which could result in losses to the Fund. Because of the risks involved in investing in high yield securities, an investment in the Fund should be considered speculative.
Market Risk
The market price of securities owned by the Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, adverse changes to credit markets or adverse investor sentiment generally. The value of a security may also decline due to factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities. Credit ratings downgrades may also negatively affect securities held by the Fund. Even when markets perform well, there is no assurance that the investments held by the Fund will increase in value along with the broader market.
In addition, market risk includes the risk that geopolitical and other events will disrupt the economy on a national or global level. For instance, war, terrorism, market manipulation, government defaults, government shutdowns, political changes or diplomatic developments, public health emergencies (such as the spread of infectious diseases, pandemics and epidemics) and natural/environmental disasters can all negatively impact the securities markets, which could cause the Fund to lose value. These events could reduce consumer demand or economic output, result in market closures, travel restrictions or quarantines, and significantly adversely impact the economy. The current contentious domestic political environment, as well as political and diplomatic events within the United States and abroad, such as presidential elections in the U.S. or abroad or the U.S. government’s inability at times to agree on a long-term budget and deficit reduction plan, has in the past resulted, and may in the future, result in a government shutdown, or otherwise adversely affect the U.S. regulatory landscape, the general market environment and/or investor sentiment, which could have an adverse impact on a Fund’s investments and operations. Additional and/or prolonged U.S. federal government shutdowns may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. Governmental and quasi- governmental authorities and regulators throughout the world have previously responded to serious economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes, including but not limited to, direct capital infusions into companies, new monetary programs and dramatically lower interest rates. An unexpected or sudden reversal of these

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policies, or the ineffectiveness of these policies, could increase volatility in securities markets, which could adversely affect the Fund’s investments. Any market disruptions could also prevent the Fund from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner. Funds that have focused their investments in a region enduring geopolitical market disruption will face higher risks of loss, although the increasing interconnectivity between global economies and financial markets can lead to events or conditions in one country, region or financial market adversely impacting a different country, region or financial market. Thus, investors should closely monitor current market conditions to determine whether the Fund meets their individual financial needs and tolerance for risk.
Current market conditions may pose heightened risks with respect to the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities. As discussed more under “Interest Rate Risk,” interest rates in the U.S. are at or near historically low levels. Any interest rate increases in the future could cause the value of the Fund’s investment in fixed income securities to decrease. As such, fixed income securities markets may experience heightened levels of interest rate, volatility and liquidity risk. If rising interest rates cause the Fund to lose enough value, the Fund could also face increased shareholder redemptions, which could force the Fund to liquidate investments at disadvantageous times or prices, therefore adversely affecting the Fund and its shareholders.
Exchanges and securities markets may close early, close late or issue trading halts on specific securities or generally, which may result in, among other things, the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or financial instruments at an advantageous time or accurately price its portfolio investments. In addition, the Fund may rely on various third-party sources to calculate its NAV. As a result, the Fund is subject to certain operational risks associated with reliance on service providers and service providers’ data sources. In particular, errors or systems failures and other technological issues may adversely impact the Fund’s calculations of its NAV, and such NAV calculation issues may result in inaccurately calculated NAVs, delays in NAV calculation and/or the inability to calculate NAVs over extended periods. The Fund may be unable to recover any losses associated with such failures.
Municipal Bond Risk
The Fund that invests in Municipal Bonds may be affected significantly by the economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of issuers of Municipal Bonds to pay interest or repay principal. In addition, the ability of an issuer to make payments or repay interest may be affected by litigation or bankruptcy. In the event of bankruptcy of such an issuer, the Fund investing in the issuer’s securities could experience delays in collecting principal and interest, and the Fund may not, in all circumstances, be able to collect all principal and interest to which it is entitled. To enforce its rights in the event of a default in the payment of interest or repayment of principal, or both, the Fund may, in some instances, take possession of, and manage, the assets securing the issuer’s obligations on such securities, which may increase the Fund’s operating expenses. Any income derived from the Fund’s ownership or operation of such assets may not be tax- exempt. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk.
Because many Municipal Bonds are issued to finance similar projects (such as those relating to education, health care, housing, transportation, and
utilities), conditions in those sectors may affect the overall municipal securities market. In addition, changes in the financial condition of an individual municipal issuer can affect the overall municipal market. Municipal Bonds backed by current or anticipated revenues from a specific project or specific assets can be negatively affected by the discontinuance of the supporting taxation or the inability to collect revenues for the specific project or specific assets. Municipal Bonds are subject to the risk that the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) may determine that an issuer has not complied with applicable tax requirements and that interest from the Municipal Bond is taxable, which may result in a significant decline in the value of the security. Municipal Bonds may be less liquid than taxable bonds and there may be less publicly available information on the financial condition of Municipal Bond issuers than for issuers of other securities, and the investment performance of the Fund investing in Municipal Bonds may therefore be more dependent on the analytical abilities of PIMCO than if the Fund held other types of investments such as stocks or taxable bonds. The secondary market for Municipal Bonds also tends to be less well-developed or liquid than many other securities markets, a by-product of lower capital commitments to the asset class by the dealer community, which may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to sell Municipal Bonds it holds at attractive prices or value Municipal Bonds.
The Fund may invest in municipal securities (including taxable municipal securities) issued by Puerto Rico. The Fund’s investments in municipal securities issued by Puerto Rico may be particularly affected by political, economic, regualtory or restructuring developments affecting the ability of Puerto Rican municipal issuers to pay interest or repay principal.
California State-Specific Risk
The Fund that concentrates its investments in California Municipal Bonds may be affected significantly by economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of California issuers to pay interest or repay principal. Certain issuers of California Municipal Bonds have experienced serious financial difficulties in the past and reoccurrence of these difficulties may impair the ability of certain California issuers to pay principal or interest on their obligations. Provisions of the California Constitution and State statutes which limit the taxing and spending authority of California governmental entities may impair the ability of California issuers to pay principal and/or interest on their obligations. While California’s economy is broad, it does have major concentrations in high technology, aerospace and defense-related manufacturing, trade, entertainment, real estate and financial services, and may be sensitive to economic problems affecting those industries. Future California political and economic developments, constitutional amendments, legislative measures, executive orders, administrative regulations, litigation and voter initiatives could have an adverse effect on the debt obligations of California issuers.
New York State-Specific Risk
The Fund that concentrates its investments in New York Municipal Bonds may be affected significantly by economic, regulatory or political developments affecting the ability of New York issuers to pay interest or repay principal. While New York’s economy is broad, it does have concentrations in the financial services industry, and may be sensitive to economic problems affecting that industry. Certain issuers of New York

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Municipal Bonds have experienced serious financial difficulties in the past and reoccurrence of these difficulties may impair the ability of certain New York issuers to pay principal or interest on their obligations. The financial health of New York City affects that of the State, and when New York City experiences financial difficulty it may have an adverse effect on New York Municipal Bonds held by such Fund. The growth rate of New York has at times been somewhat slower than the nation overall. The economic and financial condition of New York also may be affected by various financial, social, economic and political factors.
Issuer Risk
The value of a security may decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets. A change in the financial condition of a single issuer may affect securities markets as a whole.
Liquidity Risk
The Securities and Exchange Commission defines liquidity risk as the risk that a Fund could not meet requests to redeem shares issued by the Fund without significant dilution of remaining investors’ interests in the Fund. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Illiquid investments are investments that the Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Illiquid investments may become harder to value, especially in changing markets. A Fund’s investments in illiquid investments may reduce the returns of the Fund because it may be unable to sell the illiquid investments at an advantageous time or price or possibly require the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations, which could prevent the Fund from taking advantage of other investment opportunities. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. Bond markets have consistently grown over the past three decades while the capacity for traditional dealer counterparties to engage in fixed income trading has not kept pace and in some cases has decreased. As a result, dealer inventories of corporate bonds, which provide a core indication of the ability of financial intermediaries to “make markets,” are at or near historic lows in relation to market size. Because market makers seek to provide stability to a market through their intermediary services, the significant reduction in dealer inventories could potentially lead to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets. Such issues may be exacerbated during periods of economic uncertainty.
In such cases, the Fund, due to regulatory limitations on investments in illiquid investments and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain sector. To the extent that the Fund’s principal investment strategies involve securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations, foreign (non-U.S.) securities, Rule 144A securities, illiquid sectors of fixed income securities, derivatives or securities with
substantial market and/or credit risk, the Fund will tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk. Further, fixed income securities with longer durations until maturity face heightened levels of liquidity risk as compared to fixed income securities with shorter durations until maturity. Finally, liquidity risk also refers to the risk of unusually high redemption requests, redemption requests by certain large shareholders such as institutional investors or asset allocators, or other unusual market conditions that may make it difficult for the Fund to sell investments within the allowable time period to meet redemptions. Meeting such redemption requests could require the Fund to sell securities at reduced prices or under unfavorable conditions, which would reduce the value of the Fund. It may also be the case that other market participants may be attempting to liquidate fixed income holdings at the same time as the Fund, causing increased supply in the market and contributing to liquidity risk and downward pricing pressure. Certain accounts or PIMCO affiliates may from time to time own (beneficially or of record) or control a significant percentage of the Fund’s shares. Redemptions by these shareholders of their holdings in the Fund may impact the Fund’s liquidity and NAV. These redemptions may also force the Fund to sell securities, which may negatively impact the Fund’s brokerage costs.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends on, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index. The various derivative instruments that the Fund may use are referenced under “Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques—Derivatives” in this prospectus and described in more detail under “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI. The Fund typically uses derivatives as a substitute for taking a position in the underlying asset, as part of strategies designed to gain exposure to, for example, issuers, portions of the yield curve, indexes, sectors, currencies, and/or geographic regions, and/or to reduce exposure to other risks, such as interest rate, credit, or currency risk. The Fund may also use derivatives for leverage, in which case their use would involve leveraging risk, and in some cases, may subject the Fund to the potential for unlimited loss. The use of derivatives may cause the Fund’s investment returns to be impacted by the performance of securities the Fund does not own and result in the Fund’s total investment exposure exceeding the value of its portfolio.
The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this section, such as liquidity risk (which may be heightened for highly-customized derivatives), interest rate risk, market risk, credit risk and management risk, as well as risks arising from changes in applicable requirements. They also involve the risk of improper valuation and the risk that changes in the value of a derivative instrument may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index. By investing in a derivative instrument, the Fund could lose more than the initial amount invested and derivatives may increase the volatility of the Fund, especially in unusual or extreme market conditions. Also, suitable derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances and there can be no assurance that the Fund will engage in these transactions to reduce exposure to other risks when that would be

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beneficial or that, if used, such strategies will be successful. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may increase or accelerate the amount of taxes payable by shareholders. Over-the-counter (“OTC”) derivatives are also subject to the risk that a counterparty to the transaction will not fulfill its contractual obligations to the other party, as many of the protections afforded to centrally-cleared derivative transactions might not be available for OTC derivatives. The primary credit risk on derivatives that are exchange-traded or traded through a central clearing counterparty resides with the Fund’s clearing broker, or the clearinghouse.
Participation in the markets for derivative instruments involves investment risks and transaction costs to which the Fund may not be subject absent the use of these strategies. The skills needed to successfully execute derivative strategies may be different from those needed for other types of transactions. If the Fund incorrectly forecasts the value and/or creditworthiness of securities, currencies, interest rates, counterparties or other economic factors involved in a derivative transaction, the Fund might have been in a better position if the Fund had not entered into such derivative transaction. In evaluating the risks and contractual obligations associated with particular derivative instruments, it is important to consider that certain derivative transactions may be modified or terminated only by mutual consent of the Fund and its counterparty. Therefore, it may not be possible for the Fund to modify, terminate, or offset the Fund’s obligations or the Fund’s exposure to the risks associated with a derivative transaction prior to its scheduled termination or maturity date, which may create a possibility of increased volatility and/or decreased liquidity to the Fund. In such case, the Fund may lose money. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, appropriate derivative transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, the Fund may wish to retain its position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other appropriate counterparty can be found. When such markets are unavailable, the Fund will be subject to increased liquidity and investment risk. When a derivative is used as a hedge against a position that the Fund holds, any loss generated by the derivative generally should be substantially offset by gains on the hedged investment, and vice versa. Although hedging can reduce or eliminate losses, it can also reduce or eliminate gains. Hedges are sometimes subject to imperfect matching between the derivative and the underlying instrument, and there can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging transactions will be effective.
The regulation of the derivatives markets has increased over the past several years, and additional future regulation of the derivatives markets may make derivatives more costly, may limit the availability or reduce the liquidity of derivatives, or may otherwise adversely affect the value or performance of derivatives. Any such adverse future developments could impair the effectiveness or raise the costs of the Fund’s derivative transactions, impede the employment of the Fund’s derivatives strategies, or adversely affect the Fund’s performance. For instance, in October 2020, the SEC adopted a final rule related to the use of derivatives, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements and certain other transactions by registered investment companies. In connection with the final rule, the SEC and its
staff will rescind and withdraw applicable guidance and relief regarding asset segregation and coverage transactions reflected in the Fund’s asset segregation and cover practices discussed herein. Subject to certain exceptions, and after an eighteen-month transition period, the final rule requires the Fund to trade derivatives and other transactions that create future payment or delivery obligations (except reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions) subject to value-at-risk leverage limits and certain derivatives risk management program and reporting requirements. These requirements may limit the ability of the Fund to invest in derivatives, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions, limit the Fund’s ability to employ certain strategies that use these instruments and/or adversely affect the Fund’s performance, efficiency in implementing its strategy, liquidity and/or ability to pursue its investment objectives and may increase the cost of the Fund’s investments and cost of doing business, which could adversely affect investors.
Leveraging Risk
Certain transactions may give rise to a form of leverage. Such transactions may include, among others, reverse repurchase agreements, loans of portfolio securities, and the use of when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment transactions. The Fund’s use of derivatives may also create leveraging risk. In accordance with current federal securities laws, rules and staff positions, PIMCO will attempt to mitigate the Fund’s leverage risk by segregating or “earmarking” liquid assets or otherwise covering transactions that may give rise to such risk. The Fund also may be exposed to leveraging risk by borrowing money for investment purposes. Leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions to satisfy its obligations or to meet segregation requirements when it may not be advantageous to do so. Leverage, including borrowing, may cause the Fund to be more volatile than if the Fund had not been leveraged. This is because leverage tends to exaggerate the effect of any increase or decrease in the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities. Certain types of leveraging transactions, such as short sales that are not “against the box,” (i.e., short sales where the Fund does not hold the security or have the right to acquire it without payment of further consideration) could theoretically be subject to unlimited losses in cases where the Fund, for any reason, is unable to close out the transaction. In addition, to the extent the Fund borrows money, interest costs on such borrowings may not be recovered by any appreciation of the securities purchased with the borrowed amounts and could exceed the Fund’s investment returns, resulting in greater losses. Moreover, to make payments of interest and other loan costs, the Fund may be forced to sell portfolio securities when it is not otherwise advantageous to do so.
Management Risk
The Fund is subject to management risk because it is an actively managed investment portfolio. PIMCO and each individual portfolio manager will apply investment techniques and risk analysis in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these decisions will produce the desired results. Certain securities or other instruments in which the Fund seeks to invest may not be available in the quantities desired. In addition, regulatory restrictions, actual or potential conflicts of interest or other considerations may cause PIMCO to restrict or prohibit

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participation in certain investments. In such circumstances, PIMCO or the individual portfolio managers may determine to purchase other securities or instruments as substitutes. Such substitute securities or instruments may not perform as intended, which could result in losses to the Fund. The Fund is also subject to the risk that deficiencies in the internal systems or controls of PIMCO or another service provider will cause losses for the Fund or hinder Fund operations. For example, trading delays or errors (both human and systemic) could prevent the Fund from purchasing a security expected to appreciate in value. To the extent the Fund employs strategies targeting perceived pricing inefficiencies, arbitrage strategies or similar strategies, it is subject to the risk that the pricing or valuation of the securities and instruments involved in such strategies may change unexpectedly, which may result in reduced returns or losses to the Fund. Additionally, legislative, regulatory, or tax restrictions, policies or developments may affect the investment techniques available to PIMCO and each individual portfolio manager in connection with managing the Fund and may also adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective. There also can be no assurance that all of the personnel of PIMCO will continue to be associated with PIMCO for any length of time. The loss of services of one or more key employees of PIMCO could have an adverse impact on the Fund’s ability to realize its investment objective.
Municipal Project-Specific Risk
The Fund may be more sensitive to adverse economic, business or political developments if it invests a substantial portion of its assets in the bonds of specific projects (such as those relating to education, health care, housing, transportation, and utilities), industrial development bonds, or in general obligation bonds, particularly if there is a large concentration from issuers in a single state. This is because the value of municipal securities can be significantly affected by the political, economic, legal, and legislative realities of the particular issuer’s locality or municipal sector events. In addition, a significant restructuring of federal income tax rates or even serious discussion on the topic in Congress could cause municipal bond prices to fall. The demand for municipal securities is strongly influenced by the value of tax-exempt income to investors. Lower income tax rates could reduce the advantage of owning municipal securities. Similarly, changes to state or federal regulation tied to a specific sector, such as the hospital sector, could have an impact on the revenue stream for a given subset of the market.
Municipal securities are also subject to interest rate, credit, and liquidity risk.
Interest Rate Risk. The value of municipal securities, similar to other fixed income securities, will likely drop as interest rates rise in the general market. Conversely, when rates decline, bond prices generally rise.
Credit Risk. The risk that a borrower may be unable to make interest or principal payments when they are due. Funds that invest in municipal securities rely on the ability of the issuer to service its debt. This subjects the Fund to credit risk in that the municipal issuer may be fiscally unstable or exposed to large liabilities that could impair its ability to honor its obligations. Municipal issuers with significant debt service requirements, in the near-to mid-term; unrated issuers and those with less capital and liquidity to absorb additional expenses may be most at risk. The Fund that
invests in lower quality or high yield municipal securities may be more sensitive to the adverse credit events in the municipal market. The treatment of municipalities in bankruptcy is more uncertain, and potentially more adverse to debt holders, than for corporate issues.
Liquidity Risk. The risk that investors may have difficulty finding a buyer when they seek to sell, and therefore, may be forced to sell at a discount to the market value. Liquidity may sometimes be impaired in the municipal market and funds that primarily invest in municipal securities may find it difficult to purchase or sell such securities at opportune times. Liquidity can be impaired due to interest rate concerns, credit events, or general supply and demand imbalances. These adverse developments sometimes cause the Fund to endure higher redemption rates. Depending on the particular issuer and current economic conditions, municipal securities could be deemed more volatile investments.
In addition to general municipal market risks, different municipal sectors may face different risks. For instance, general obligation bonds are secured by the full faith, credit, and taxing power of the municipality issuing the obligation. As such, timely payment depends on the municipality’s ability to raise tax revenue and maintain a fiscally sound budget. The timely payments may also be influenced by any unfunded pension liabilities or other post-employee benefit plan (“OPEB”) liabilities.
Revenue bonds are secured by special tax revenues or other revenue sources. If the specified revenues do not materialize, then the bonds may not be repaid.
Private activity bonds are yet another type of municipal security. Municipalities use private activity bonds to finance the development of industrial facilities for use by private enterprise. Principal and interest payments are to be made by the private enterprise benefitting from the development, which means that the holder of the bond is exposed to the risk that the private issuer may default on the bond.
Moral obligation bonds are usually issued by special purpose public entities. If the public entity defaults, repayment becomes a “moral obligation” instead of a legal one. The lack of a legally enforceable right to payment in the event of default poses a special risk for a holder of the bond because it has little or no ability to seek recourse in the event of default.
Municipal notes are similar to general municipal debt obligations, but they generally possess shorter terms. Municipal notes can be used to provide interim financing and may not be repaid if anticipated revenues are not realized.
Tax-Efficient Investing Risk
The Fund may engage in investment strategies intended to manage capital gain distributions. For example, the Fund may attempt to use losses from sales of securities that have declined to offset future gains that would otherwise be taxable. Any such strategy may be unsuccessful or only partially successful, and investors may experience adverse tax effects, including, but not limited to potentially greater tax liability than other PIMCO-advised funds. Additionally, such strategies may reduce investment returns or result in investment losses, which could cause the Fund and investors to lose money. Further, the Fund’s focus on income generation

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may result in a higher overall tax liability as income may be taxed at a higher rate than capital gains.
LIBOR Transition Risk
Certain instruments in which the Fund may invest rely in some fashion upon the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”). LIBOR is an average interest rate, determined by the ICE Benchmark Administration that banks charge one another for the use of short-term money. On July 27, 2017, the Chief Executive of the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), the United Kingdom’s financial regulatory body and regulator of LIBOR, announced that after 2021 it will cease its active encouragement of banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR due to the absence of an active market for interbank unsecured lending and other reasons. On March 5, 2021, the ICE Benchmark Administration ( “IBA”), the administrator of LIBOR, announced that it will cease publication of many of its LIBOR settings after December 31, 2021, and that it will cease publication of certain commonly-used tenors of U.S. dollar LIBOR after June 30, 2023. While the FCA may consult on the issue of requiring the IBA to produce certain LIBOR tenors on a synthetic basis, it has announced that all 35 LIBOR settings will either cease to be provided by any administrator or will no longer be representative as of the dates published by the IBA. The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation have issued guidance encouraging market participants to adopt alternatives to LIBOR in new contracts as soon as practicable and no later than December 31, 2021. Although the transition process away from LIBOR has become increasingly well-defined in advance of the anticipated discontinuation date, there remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of LIBOR and the nature of any replacement rate. Any potential effects of the transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or on certain instruments in which the Fund invests can be difficult to ascertain, and they may vary depending on factors that include, but are not limited to: (i) existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts and (ii) whether, how, and when industry participants develop and adopt new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products and instruments. For example, certain of the Fund’s investments may involve individual contracts that have (i) no existing fallback provision or language that contemplates the discontinuation of LIBOR or (ii) inadequate fallback provisions or language that does not contemplate a permanent discontinuation of LIBOR, and those investments could experience increased volatility or reduced liquidity as a result of the transition process. In addition, interest rate provisions included in such contracts may need to be renegotiated in contemplation of the transition away from LIBOR. The transition may also result in a reduction in the value of certain instruments held by the Fund or a reduction in the effectiveness of related Fund transactions such as hedges. In addition, an instrument’s transition to a replacement rate could result in variations in the reported yields of the Fund that holds such instrument. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, could result in losses to the Fund.
Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
Please see “Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings” in the SAI for information about the availability of the complete schedule of the Fund’s holdings.

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Prospectus 

Management of the Fund
Investment Manager
PIMCO serves as the investment manager for the Fund. Subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, PIMCO is responsible for managing the investment activities of the Fund and the Fund’s business affairs and other administrative matters.
PIMCO is located at 650 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660. Organized in 1971, PIMCO provides investment management and advisory services to private accounts of institutional and individual clients and to mutual funds. As of December 31, 2020, PIMCO had approximately $2.21 trillion in assets under management.
Management Fees
The Fund pays for the advisory and supervisory and administrative services it requires under what is essentially an all-in fee structure. The Fund will pay monthly Management Fees to PIMCO at the annual rate (stated as a percentage of the average daily net assets of the Fund taken separately) of 0.49%.
In addition to providing investment advisory services, PIMCO provides or procures supervisory and administrative services for shareholders and also bears the costs of various third-party services required by the Fund, including audit, custodial, portfolio accounting, legal, transfer agency and printing costs. The Fund bears other expenses which are not covered under the management fee which may vary and affect the total level of expenses paid by shareholders, such as taxes and governmental fees, brokerage fees, commissions and other transaction expenses, costs of borrowing money, including interest expenses, securities lending expenses, extraordinary expenses (such as litigation and indemnification expenses) and fees and expenses of the Trust’s Independent Trustees and their counsel. PIMCO generally earns a profit on the management fee paid by the Fund. Also, under the terms of the investment management agreement, PIMCO, and not Fund shareholders, would benefit from any price decreases in third-party services, including decreases resulting from an increase in net assets.
A discussion of the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Fund’s investment management agreement will be available in the Fund’s first annual or semi-annual report to shareholders.
Expense Limitation Agreement
PIMCO has contractually agreed, through October 31, 2022 to waive a portion of the Fund’s Management Fee, or reimburse the Fund, to the extent that the Fund’s organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata share of Trustee fees exceed 0.0049% (the “Expense Limit”) (calculated as a percentage of average daily net assets). The Expense Limitation Agreement will automatically renew for one-year terms unless PIMCO provides written notice to the Trust at least 30 days prior to the end of the then current term. In any month in which the investment management agreement is in effect, PIMCO is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of any portion of the Management Fee waived or reimbursed as set forth above (the “Reimbursement Amount”) during the previous thirty-six months from the time of the waiver, provided that such amount paid to PIMCO will not: 1) together with any organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata Trustee fees, exceed, for such month, the Expense Limit (or the amount of the expense limit in place at the time the amount being recouped was originally waived if lower than the Expense Limit); 2) exceed the total Reimbursement Amount; or 3) include any amounts previously reimbursed to PIMCO.
Fee Waiver Agreement
PIMCO has contractually agreed, through October 31, 2023, to waive or reduce its management fee by 0.10% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. In any month in which the investment management agreement is in effect, PIMCO is entitled to reimbursement by the Fund of any portion of the management fee waived as set forth above (the “Fee Waiver Reimbursement Amount”) during the previous thirty-six months from the time of the waiver, provided that such amount paid to PIMCO will not: 1) together with any recoupment of organizational expenses, pro rata share of expenses related to obtaining or maintaining a Legal Entity Identifier and pro rata Trustee fees pursuant to the Expense Limitation Agreement, exceed the Expense Limit (or the amount of the expense limit in place at the time the amount being recouped was originally waived if lower than the Expense Limit); 2) exceed the total Fee Waiver Reimbursement Amount; or 3) include any amounts previously reimbursed to PIMCO.
Individual Portfolio Managers
The following individuals have primary responsibility for managing the Fund.

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

Fund
Portfolio Manager
Since
Recent Professional Experience
PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund
David Hammer
*
Managing Director, PIMCO. Mr. Hammer is the head of the municipal bond portfolio management team. Mr. Hammer first joined PIMCO in 2012 as a Senior Vice President. In 2014, he joined Morgan Stanley as Managing Director, Head of Municipal Trading and Research, responsible for institutional and retail municipal trading, risk management and municipal credit research. He re-joined PIMCO in 2015. Prior to first joining PIMCO in 2012, he was an Executive Director at Morgan Stanley, where he served as head of the high yield and distressed municipal bond trading group.
Rachel Betton
*
Senior Vice President, PIMCO. Ms. Betton is a member of the municipal bond portfolio management team. Prior to joining PIMCO in 2013, she was a municipal high yield and distressed trader at Morgan Stanley. Additionally, she was a public finance banker, focusing on municipal asset-backed securitizations and revenue- backed credits in the Midwest. She has investment and financial services experience since 2006 and holds an undergraduate degree from Wesleyan University.
Kyle Christine
*
Vice President, PIMCO. Mr. Christine is a municipal bond portfolio manager. Prior to joining PIMCO in 2017, he was an institutional high yield and taxable municipal bond trader at Morgan Stanley. He has eight years of investment and financial services experience and holds an undergraduate degree from Union College (NY).
* Inception of the Fund.
Please see the SAI for additional information about other accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the portfolio managers’ compensation and the portfolio managers’ ownership of shares of the Fund.
The Trustees are responsible generally for overseeing the management of the Trust. The Trustees authorize the Trust to enter into service agreements with the Investment Adviser, the Distributor (as defined below) and other service providers in order to provide, and in some cases authorize service providers to procure through other parties, necessary or desirable services on behalf of the Trust and the Fund. Shareholders are not parties to or third-party beneficiaries of such service agreements. Neither this prospectus nor summary prospectus, the Trust’s SAI, any contracts filed as exhibits to the Trust’s registration statement, nor any other communications, disclosure documents or regulatory filings from or on behalf of the Trust or the Fund creates a contract between or among any shareholder of the Fund, on the one hand, and the Trust, the Fund, a service provider to the Trust or the Fund, and/or the Trustees or officers of the Trust, on the other hand. The Trustees (or the Trust and its officers, service providers or other delegates acting under authority of the Trustees) may amend this, or use a new prospectus, summary prospectus or SAI with respect to the Fund or the Trust, and/or amend, file and/or issue any other communications, disclosure documents or regulatory filings, and may amend or enter into any contracts to which the Trust or the Fund is a party, and interpret the investment objective(s), policies, restrictions and contractual provisions applicable to the Fund, without shareholder input or approval, except in circumstances in which shareholder approval is specifically required by law (such as changes to fundamental investment policies) or where a shareholder approval requirement is specifically disclosed in the Trust’s then-current prospectus or SAI.
Distributor
The Trust’s Distributor is PIMCO Investments LLC (the “Distributor”). The Distributor, located at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, is a broker-dealer registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The Distributor distributes Creation Units for the Fund and does not maintain a secondary market in shares of the Fund.
Distribution and Servicing Plan
The Trust has adopted a Distribution and Servicing Plan (the “12b-1 Plan”) for shares of the Fund pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The 12b-1 Plan permits compensation in connection with the distribution and marketing of Fund shares and/or the provision of certain shareholder services. The 12b-1 Plan permits the Fund to pay compensation at an annual rate of up to 0.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 Plan fee at this time.
The 12b-1 fee may only be imposed or increased when the Board of Trustees determines that it is in the best interests of shareholders to do so. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time they will increase the cost of an investment in the Fund. The 12b-1 Plan fee may cost an investor more than other types of sales charges.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
PIMCO or the Distributor (for purposes of this subsection only, collectively, “PIMCO”) makes payments to broker-dealers or other financial intermediaries (each, an “Intermediary”) related to activities that are designed to make registered representatives, other professionals and individual investors more knowledgeable about the Fund or for other activities, such as participation in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, the

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support of technology platforms and/or reporting systems. PIMCO also makes payments to Intermediaries for certain printing, publishing and mailing costs associated with the Fund or materials relating to ETFs in general. In addition, PIMCO makes payments to Intermediaries that make Fund shares available to their clients, including on no transaction fee platforms, or for otherwise promoting the Fund. Such payments, which may be significant to the Intermediary, are not made by the Fund. Rather, such payments are made by PIMCO from its own resources, which may come directly or indirectly in part from management fees paid by the Fund. Payments of this type are sometimes referred to as marketing support or revenue-sharing payments. An Intermediary may make decisions about which investment options it recommends or makes available, or the level of services provided, to its customers based on the marketing support payments it is eligible to receive. Therefore, such payments to an Intermediary create conflicts of interest between the Intermediary and its customers and may cause the Intermediary to recommend the Fund over another investment. More information regarding these payments is contained in the SAI. A shareholder should contact his or her Intermediary’s salesperson or other investment professional for more information regarding any such payments the Intermediary firm may receive from PIMCO.

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the Fund are listed for trading on a national securities exchange during the trading day. The Fund’s primary listing exchange is NYSE Arca. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. The Trust does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the Fund purchased on an exchange. Buying or selling the Fund’s shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. Due to these brokerage costs, if any, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment returns. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price and the ask price). The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. The spread varies over time for shares of the Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.
Shares of the Fund may be acquired through the Distributor or redeemed directly with the Fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed in the “Creations and Redemptions” section of the SAI. Once created, shares of the Fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
The Trust’s Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares (“frequent trading”) that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities presented by a lag between a change in the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the Fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the Fund’s NAV (“market timing”). The Trust believes this is appropriate because an ETF, such as the Fund, is intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV. Since the Fund issues and redeems Creation Units at NAV plus applicable transaction fees, and the Fund’s shares may be purchased and sold on NYSE Arca at prevailing market prices, the risks of frequent trading are limited.
The New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
A “Business Day” with respect to the Fund is each day NYSE is open. Orders from Authorized Participants to create or redeem Creation Units will only be accepted on a Business Day. On days when NYSE closes earlier than normal, the Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the SAI for more information.
Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered
investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.
The Trust typically does not offer or sell its shares to non- U.S. resident Authorized Participants. For purposes of this policy, a U.S. resident Authorized Participant is defined as an Authorized Participant that has a U.S. address of record at the time of sale.
Book Entry
Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the Fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Share Prices
The trading prices of the Fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the Fund’s daily NAV per share and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday indicative value (“IIV”) of the Fund may be disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the Fund’s shares are primarily listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IIV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash included in the Fund’s IIV basket. The IIV does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities and instruments held by the Fund at a particular point in time or the best possible valuation of the current portfolio. Unlike the Fund’s NAV, the IIV may not reflect estimated accrued interest, dividends and other income, or Fund expenses. Therefore, the IIV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the NAV, which is computed only once a day. The IIV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities and instruments included in the Fund’s IIV basket. The Fund is not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IIV and makes no representation or warranty as to its accuracy. An inaccuracy in the IIV could result from various factors, including the difficulty of pricing portfolio instruments on an intraday basis.

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Premiums and Discounts
There may be differences between the daily market price on secondary markets for shares of the Fund and the Fund’s NAV. NAV is the price per share at which the Fund issues and redeems shares. See “How Net Asset Value Is Determined” below. The Fund’s market price may be at, above or below its NAV. The NAV of the Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The market price of the Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand. Information regarding the Fund’s NAV and market price can be found at https://www.pimco.com/en-us/investments/etf.
Premiums or discounts are the differences (expressed as a percentage) between the NAV and the market price of the Fund on a given day, generally at the time the NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that the Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that the Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant. Information regarding the frequency of daily premiums or discounts, generally at the time the NAV is calculated, can be found at www.pimcoetfs.com
Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents
To reduce expenses, it is intended that only one copy of the Fund’s prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report, when available, will be mailed to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please contact the financial intermediary through which you hold your shares.
How Net Asset Value Is Determined
The NAV of the Fund is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund’s portfolio investments and other assets attributable to the Fund, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding of the Fund.
On each day that the NYSE is open, Fund shares are ordinarily valued as of the close of regular trading (“NYSE Close”). Information that becomes known to the Fund or its agents after the time as of which NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of a security or the NAV determined earlier that day. If regular trading on the NYSE closes earlier than scheduled, the Fund reserves the right to either (i) calculate its NAV as of the earlier closing time or (ii) calculate its NAV as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day. The Fund generally does not calculate its NAV on days during which the NYSE is closed. However, if the NYSE is closed on a day it would normally be open for business, the Fund reserves the right to calculate its NAV as of the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day or such other time that the Fund may determine.
For purposes of calculating NAV, portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available are valued at market value. Market value is generally determined on the basis of official closing prices or the last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, based on quotes obtained from established market makers or prices (including evaluated prices) supplied by the Fund’s approved pricing services, quotation reporting systems and other third-party sources (together, “Pricing
Services”). The Fund will normally use pricing data for domestic equity securities received shortly after the NYSE Close and does not normally take into account trading, clearances or settlements that take place after the NYSE Close. A foreign (non-U.S.) equity security traded on a foreign exchange or on more than one exchange is typically valued using pricing information from the exchange considered by PIMCO to be the primary exchange. If market value pricing is used, a foreign (non-U.S.) equity security will be valued as of the close of trading on the foreign exchange, or the NYSE Close, if the NYSE Close occurs before the end of trading on the foreign exchange. Domestic and foreign (non-U.S.) fixed income securities, non-exchange-traded derivatives, and equity options are normally valued on the basis of quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or Pricing Services using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Prices obtained from Pricing Services may be based on, among other things, information provided by market makers or estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics. Certain fixed income securities purchased on a delayed delivery basis are marked to market daily until settlement at the forward settlement date. Exchange-traded options, except equity options, futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the relevant exchange. Swap agreements are valued on the basis of bid quotes obtained from brokers and dealers or market-based prices supplied by Pricing Services or other pricing sources. With respect to any portion of the Fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies (other than ETFs), the Fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such investments.
If a foreign (non-U.S.) equity security’s value has materially changed after the close of the security’s primary exchange or principal market but before the NYSE Close, the security may be valued at fair value based on procedures established and approved by the Board of Trustees. Foreign (non-U.S.) equity securities that do not trade when the NYSE is open are also valued at fair value. With respect to foreign (non-U.S.) equity securities, the Fund may determine the fair value of investments based on information provided by Pricing Services and other third-party vendors, which may recommend fair value or adjustments with reference to other securities, indexes or assets. In considering whether fair valuation is required and in determining fair values, the Fund may, among other things, consider significant events (which may be considered to include changes in the value of U.S. securities or securities indexes) that occur after the close of the relevant market and before the NYSE Close. The Fund may utilize modeling tools provided by third-party vendors to determine fair values of non-U.S. securities. For these purposes, any movement in the applicable reference index or instrument (“zero trigger”) between the earlier close of the applicable foreign market and the NYSE Close may be deemed to be a significant event, prompting the application of the pricing model (effectively resulting in daily fair valuations). Foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges may permit trading in foreign (non-U.S.) equity securities on days when the Trust is not open for business, which may result in the Fund’s portfolio investments being affected when you are unable to buy or sell shares.
Senior secured floating rate loans for which an active secondary market exists to a reliable degree will be valued at the mean of the last available bid/ask prices in the market for such loans, as provided by a Pricing Service. Senior secured floating rate loans for which an active secondary market

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

does not exist to a reliable degree will be valued at fair value, which is intended to approximate market value. In valuing a senior secured floating rate loan at fair value, the factors considered may include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) the creditworthiness of the borrower and any intermediate participants, (b) the terms of the loan, (c) recent prices in the market for similar loans, if any, and (d) recent prices in the market for instruments of similar quality, rate, period until next interest rate reset and maturity.
Investments valued in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are converted to the U.S. dollar using exchange rates obtained from Pricing Services. As a result, the value of such investments, and in turn, the NAV of the Fund’s shares may be affected by changes in the value of currencies in relation to the U.S. dollar. The value of investments traded in markets outside the United States or denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be affected significantly on a day that the Trust is not open for business. As a result, to the extent that the Fund holds foreign (non-U.S.) investments, the value of those investments may change at times when shareholders are unable to buy or sell shares and the value of such investments will be reflected in the Fund’s next calculated NAV.
Investments for which market quotes or market based valuations are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction. The Board of Trustees has adopted methods for valuing securities and other assets in circumstances where market quotes are not readily available, and has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for applying the fair valuation methods. In the event that market quotes or market based valuations are not readily available, and the security or asset cannot be valued pursuant to a Board approved valuation method, the value of the security or asset will be determined in good faith by the Valuation Oversight Committee of the Board of Trustees, generally based on recommendations provided by PIMCO. Market quotes are considered not readily available in circumstances where there is an absence of current or reliable market-based data (e.g., trade information, bid/ask information, broker quotes, Pricing Services’ prices), including where events occur after the close of the relevant market, but prior to the NYSE Close, that materially affect the values of the Fund’s securities or assets. In addition, market quotes are considered not readily available when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the exchanges or markets on which the securities trade do not open for trading for the entire day and no other market prices are available. The Board of Trustees has delegated to PIMCO the responsibility for monitoring significant events that may materially affect the values of the Fund’s securities or assets and for determining whether the value of the applicable securities or assets should be reevaluated in light of such significant events.
When the Fund uses fair valuation to determine the value of a portfolio security or other asset for purposes of calculating its NAV, such investments will not be priced on the basis of quotes from the primary market in which they are traded, but rather may be priced by another method that the Board of Trustees or persons acting at their direction believe reflects fair value. Fair valuation may require subjective determinations about the value of a security. While the Trust’s policy is intended to result in a calculation of the Fund’s NAV that fairly reflects security values as of the time of pricing, the Trust cannot ensure that fair values determined by the Board of
Trustees or persons acting at their direction would accurately reflect the price that the Fund could obtain for a security if it were to dispose of that security as of the time of pricing (for instance, in a forced or distressed sale). The prices used by the Fund may differ from the value that would be realized if the securities were sold.
Fund Distributions
The Fund distributes substantially all of its net investment income to shareholders in the form of dividends. The Fund intends to declare and distribute income dividends monthly to shareholders of record. In addition, the Fund distributes any net capital gains earned from the sale of portfolio securities to shareholders no less frequently than annually. Net short-term capital gains may be paid more frequently. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the Fund.
No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.
Tax Consequences
The following information is meant as a general summary for U.S. taxpayers. Please see the SAI for additional information. You should rely on your own tax adviser for advice about the particular federal, state and local tax consequences to you of investing in the Fund.

 

Taxes on Fund Distributions. If you are subject to U.S. federal income tax, you will be subject to tax on taxable Fund distributions other than exempt-interest dividends paid by the Fund, as discussed below. For federal income tax purposes, taxable Fund distributions will be taxable to you as either ordinary income or capital gains.
 
Fund taxable dividends (i.e., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to you as ordinary income. Federal taxes on Fund distributions of gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long you have owned your shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year will generally be taxable to you as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less.
The tax treatment of income, gains and losses attributable to foreign currencies (and derivatives on such currencies), and various other special tax rules applicable to certain financial transactions and instruments could affect the amount, timing and character of the Fund’s distributions. In some cases, these tax rules could also result in a retroactive change in the tax character of prior distributions and may also possibly cause all, or a portion,

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of prior distributions to be reclassified as returns of capital for tax purposes. See “Returns of Capital” below.
Taxable Fund distributions are taxable to you even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to your investment and thus were included in the price you paid for your shares. For example, if you purchase shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution, you will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of your investment back as a taxable distribution.

 

Taxes when you sell your shares. Any gain resulting from the sale of Fund shares will generally be subject to federal income tax. Currently, any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares is generally treated as a long-term gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale of Fund shares held for one year or less is generally treated as short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale of shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid with respect to such shares.

 

Returns of Capital. If the Fund’s distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder’s cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

 

Medicare Tax. An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds certain threshold amounts.

 

Important Tax Reporting Considerations. The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 requires reporting of adjusted cost basis information for covered securities, which generally include shares of a regulated investment company acquired after January 1, 2012, to the IRS. Shareholders should contact their financial intermediaries with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

 

Backup Withholding. Shareholders may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all taxable distributions payable to shareholders if they fail to provide the Fund with their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or if they have been notified by the IRS that they are subject to backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld may be credited against U.S. federal income tax liability.

 

Foreign Withholding Taxes. A Fund may be subject to foreign withholding or other foreign taxes, which in some cases can be significant on any income or gain from investments in foreign securities. In that case, the Fund’s total return on those securities
 

 

would be decreased. Each Fund may generally deduct these taxes in computing its taxable income. Rather than deducting these foreign taxes, if more than 50% of the value of a Fund’s total assets at the close of its taxable year consists of stock or securities of foreign corporations or foreign governments, or if at least 50% of the value of a Fund’s total assets at the close of each quarter of its taxable year is represented by interests in other regulated investment companies, such Fund may make an election to treat a proportionate amount of eligible foreign taxes as constituting a taxable distribution to each shareholder, which would, subject to certain limitations, generally allow the shareholder to either (i) credit that proportionate amount of taxes against U.S. Federal income tax liability as a foreign tax credit or (ii) to take that amount as an itemized deduction. Although in some cases the Fund may be able to apply for a refund of a portion of such taxes, the ability to successfully obtain such a refund may be uncertain.

 

A Note on the Fund. Dividends paid to shareholders of the Fund and derived from Municipal Bond interest are expected to be reported by the Fund as “exempt-interest dividends” and shareholders may generally exclude such dividends from gross income for federal income tax purposes. However, there can be no assurance that the Fund will satisfy the requirements to pay dividends eligible to be reported as “exempt-interest dividends” with respect to a particular taxable year. The federal tax exemption for “exempt-interest dividends” from Municipal Bonds does not necessarily result in the exemption of such dividends from state and local taxes. The Fund may invest a portion of its assets in securities that generate income that is not exempt from federal or state income tax. Dividends derived from taxable interest or capital gains will be subject to federal income tax. The Fund seeks to produce income that is generally exempt from federal income tax and will not benefit investors in tax-sheltered retirement plans or individuals not subject to federal income tax.
 
Any loss realized upon the sale or exchange of Tax-Exempt Municipal Fund shares with a tax holding period of six months or less will be disallowed to the extent of any distributions treated as exempt interest dividends with respect to such shares.
Foreign shareholders may be subject to U.S. tax withholding of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) on distributions from the Fund. Additionally, the Fund is required to withhold U.S. tax (at a 30% rate) on payments of taxable dividends made to certain non-U.S. entities that fail to comply (or be deemed compliant) with extensive reporting and withholding requirements designed to inform the U.S. Department of the Treasury of U.S.-owned foreign investment accounts. Shareholders may be requested to provide additional information to enable the Fund to determine whether withholding is required.
This “Tax Consequences” section relates only to federal income tax; the consequences under other tax laws may differ. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors as to the possible application of foreign, state and local income tax laws to Fund dividends and capital distributions. Please see “Taxation” in the SAI for additional information regarding the tax aspects of investing in the Fund.

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Characteristics and Risks of Securities and Investment Techniques
This section provides additional information about some of the principal investments and related risks of the Fund described under “Fund Summary” and “Description of Principal Risks” above. It also describes characteristics and risks of additional securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund from time to time.
Most of these securities and investment techniques described herein are discretionary, which means that PIMCO can decide whether to use them or not. This prospectus does not attempt to disclose all of the various types of securities and investment techniques that may be used by the Fund. As with any fund, investors in the Fund rely on the professional investment judgment and skill of PIMCO and the individual portfolio managers. Please see “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI for more detailed information about the securities and investment techniques described in this section and about other strategies and techniques that may be used by the Fund.
Investors should be aware that the investments made by the Fund and the results achieved by the Fund at any given time are not expected to be the same as those made by other funds for which PIMCO acts as investment adviser, including funds with names, investment objectives and policies similar to the Fund. This may be attributable to a wide variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the use of a different portfolio management team or strategy, when a particular fund commenced operations or the size of a particular fund, in each case as compared to other similar funds.
Significant purchases and redemptions of its Creation Units for cash may adversely impact the Fund’s portfolio management. For example, the Fund may be forced to sell a comparatively large portion of its portfolio to meet significant Creation Unit redemptions for cash, or hold a comparatively large portion of its portfolio in cash due to significant Creation Unit purchases for cash, in each case when the Fund otherwise would not seek to do so. Such transactions may cause the Fund to make investment decisions at inopportune times or prices or miss attractive investment opportunities. Such transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income if sales of securities resulted in gains and the Fund redeems Creation Units for cash, or otherwise cause the Fund to perform differently than intended. Similarly, significant purchases of its Creation Units for cash may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and, as a result, holds a proportionally larger cash position than under ordinary circumstances. While such risks may apply to Fund of any size, such risks are heightened in Fund with fewer assets under management. In addition, new Fund may not be able to fully implement their investment strategy immediately upon commencing investment operations, which could reduce investment performance.
Certain PIMCO-advised funds (the “PIMCO Funds of Funds”) invest substantially all or a significant portion of their assets in other PIMCO-advised Funds, including the Fund (“Underlying PIMCO Funds”). In some cases, the PIMCO Funds of Funds and certain Funds managed by investment advisers affiliated with PIMCO (“Affiliated Fund of Fund”) may be the predominant or sole shareholders of a particular Underlying PIMCO Fund. Investment decisions made with respect to the PIMCO Funds of
Funds and Affiliated Funds of Funds could, under certain circumstances, negatively impact the Underlying PIMCO Funds with respect to the expenses and investment performance of the Underlying PIMCO Funds. For instance, large purchases or redemptions of exchange-traded shares of an Underlying PIMCO Fund by the PIMCO Funds of Funds and Affiliated Funds of Funds, whether as part of a reallocation or rebalancing strategy or otherwise, may indirectly result in the Underlying PIMCO Fund having to sell securities or invest cash when it otherwise would not do so. Such transactions could increase an Underlying PIMCO Fund’s transaction costs and accelerate the realization of taxable income if sales of securities resulted in gains and the Fund redeems Creation Units for cash. Additionally, as the PIMCO Funds of Funds and Affiliated Funds of Funds may invest substantially all or a significant portion of their assets in Underlying PIMCO Funds, the Underlying PIMCO Funds may not acquire securities of other registered open-end investment companies in reliance on Section 12(d)(1)(F) or Section 12(d)(1)(G) of the 1940 Act, thus limiting the Underlying PIMCO Funds’ investment flexibility.
Investment Selection
In selecting securities for the Fund, PIMCO develops an outlook for interest rates, currency exchange rates and the economy, analyzes credit and call risks, and uses other security selection techniques. The proportion of the Fund’s assets committed to investment in securities with particular characteristics (such as quality, sector, interest rate or maturity) varies based on PIMCO’s outlook for the U.S. economy and the economies of other countries in the world, the financial markets and other factors.
With respect to fixed income investing, PIMCO attempts to identify areas of the bond market that are undervalued relative to the rest of the market. PIMCO identifies these areas by grouping Fixed Income Instruments into sectors such as money markets, governments, corporates, mortgages, asset-backed and international. In seeking to identify undervalued currencies, PIMCO may consider many factors, including but not limited to longer-term analysis of relative interest rates, inflation rates, real exchange rates, purchasing power parity, trade account balances and current account balances, as well as other factors that influence exchange rates such as flows, market technical trends and government policies. Sophisticated proprietary software then assists in evaluating sectors and pricing specific investments. Once investment opportunities are identified, PIMCO will shift assets among sectors depending upon changes in relative valuations, credit spreads and other factors. There is no guarantee that PIMCO’s investment selection techniques will produce the desired results.
Fixed Income Instruments
“Fixed Income Instruments,” as used generally in this prospectus, includes:

 

securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises (“U.S. Government Securities”);

 

corporate debt securities of U.S. and non-U.S. issuers, including convertible securities and corporate commercial paper;

 

mortgage-backed and other asset-backed securities;

 

inflation-indexed bonds issued both by governments and corporations;
 

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structured notes, including hybrid or “indexed” securities and event-linked bonds;

 

bank capital and trust preferred securities;

 

loan participations and assignments;

 

delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities;

 

bank certificates of deposit, fixed time deposits and bankers’ acceptances;

 

repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments and reverse repurchase agreements on Fixed Income Instruments;

 

debt securities issued by states or local governments and their agencies, authorities and other government-sponsored enterprises;

 

obligations of non-U.S. governments or their subdivisions, agencies and government-sponsored enterprises; and

 

obligations of international agencies or supranational entities.
 
Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.
The Fund, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, or exemptive relief therefrom, may invest in derivatives based on Fixed Income Instruments.
Duration
Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Similarly, a fund with a longer average portfolio duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a fund with a shorter average portfolio duration. By way of example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of eight years would be expected to fall approximately 8% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Similarly, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of fifteen years would be expected to fall approximately 15% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Conversely, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of negative three years would be expected to rise approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. The maturity of a security, another commonly used measure of price sensitivity, measures only the time until final payment is due, whereas duration takes into account the pattern of all payments of interest and principal on a security over time, including how these payments are affected by prepayments and by changes in interest rates, as well as the time until an interest rate is reset (in the case of variable-rate securities). PIMCO uses an internal model for calculating duration, which may result in a different value for the duration of an index compared to the duration calculated by the index provider or another third party.
U.S. Government Securities
U.S. Government Securities are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or government-sponsored enterprises. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund’s shares. U.S. Government Securities are subject to market and interest rate risk, as well as varying degrees of credit risk. Some U.S. Government Securities are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Other types of U.S. Government
Securities are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States (but not issued by the U.S. Treasury). These securities may have less credit risk than U.S. Government Securities not supported by the full faith and credit of the United States. Such other types of U.S. Government Securities are: (1) supported by the ability of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury; (2) supported only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality or government-sponsored corporation; or (3) supported by the United States in some other way. These securities may be subject to greater credit risk. U.S. Government Securities include zero coupon securities, which do not distribute interest on a current basis and tend to be subject to greater market risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.
Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. Under the direction of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, FNMA and FHLMC have entered into a joint initiative to develop a common securitization platform for the issuance of a uniform mortgage-backed security (the “Single Security Initiative”) that aligns the characteristics of FNMA and FHLMC certificates. The Single Security Initiative was implemented in June 2019, and the effects it may have on the market for mortgage-backed securities are uncertain.
Municipal Bonds
Municipal Bonds are generally issued by states, territories, possessions and local governments and their agencies, authorities and other instrumentalities. Municipal Bonds are subject to interest rate, credit and market risk, uncertainties related to the tax status of a Municipal Bond or the rights of investors invested in these securities. The ability of an issuer to make payments could be affected by litigation, legislation or other political events or the bankruptcy of the issuer. In addition, imbalances in supply and demand in the municipal market may result in a deterioration of liquidity and a lack of price transparency in the market. At certain times, this may affect pricing, execution and transaction costs associated with a particular trade. The secondary market for municipal bonds, particularly the lower rated bonds, also tends to be less well-developed and less liquid than many other securities markets, which may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to sell its bonds at attractive prices or value municipal bonds. The value of certain municipal securities, in particular general obligation debt, may also be adversely affected by rising health care costs, increasing unfunded pension liabilities, changes in accounting standards and by the

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phasing out of federal programs providing financial support. Lower rated Municipal Bonds are subject to greater credit and market risk than higher quality Municipal Bonds. The types of Municipal Bonds in which the Fund may invest include municipal lease obligations, municipal general obligation bonds, municipal essential service revenue bonds, municipal cash equivalents, and pre-refunded and escrowed to maturity Municipal Bonds. The Fund may also invest in industrial development bonds, which are Municipal Bonds issued by a government agency on behalf of a private sector company and, in most cases, are not backed by the credit of the issuing municipality and may therefore involve more risk. The Fund may also invest in securities issued by entities whose underlying assets are Municipal Bonds.
Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date on or before the final maturity of principal and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities (“Agency Securities”)). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in a designated escrow account, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Issuers of municipal bonds refund in advance of maturity the outstanding higher cost debt and issue new, lower cost debt, placing the proceeds of the lower cost issuance into an escrow account to pre-refund the older, higher cost debt. Investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by the Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if the Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale.
The Fund may invest in trust certificates issued in tender option bond programs. In these programs, a trust typically issues two classes of certificates and uses the proceeds to purchase municipal securities having relatively long maturities and bearing interest at a fixed interest rate substantially higher than prevailing short-term tax-exempt rates. There is a risk that a Fund investing in a tender option bond program will not be considered the owner of a tender option bond for federal income tax purposes, and thus will not be entitled to treat such interest as exempt from federal income tax. Certain tender option bonds may be illiquid or may become illiquid as a result of, among other things, a credit rating downgrade, a payment default or a disqualification from tax-exempt status. A Fund’s investment in the securities issued by a tender option bond trust may involve greater risk and volatility than an investment in a fixed rate bond, and the value of such securities may decrease significantly when market interest rates increase. Tender option bond trusts could be terminated due to market, credit or other events beyond a Fund’s control, which could require the Fund to dispose of portfolio investments at inopportune times and prices. A Fund may use a tender option bond program as a way of achieving leverage in its portfolio, in which case the Fund will be subject to leverage risk.
In December 2013, regulators finalized rules implementing Section 619 (the “Volcker Rule”) and Section 941 (the “Risk Retention Rules”) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Both the Volcker Rule and the Risk Retention Rules apply to tender option bond programs and place restrictions on the way certain sponsors may participate in tender option bond programs. Specifically, the Volcker Rule generally prohibits banking entities from engaging in proprietary trading or from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in, or sponsoring, a hedge fund or private equity fund (“covered fund”), subject to certain exemptions and limitations. Tender option bond programs generally are considered to be covered funds under the Volcker Rule and, thus, may not be sponsored by a banking entity absent an applicable exemption. The Volcker Rule does not provide for any exemption that would allow banking entities to sponsor tender option bonds in the same manner as they did prior to the Volcker Rule’s compliance date, which was July 21, 2017.
Reinvestment
The Fund may be subject to the risk that the returns of the Fund will decline during periods of falling interest rates because the Fund may have to reinvest the proceeds from matured, traded or called debt obligations at interest rates below the Fund’s current earnings rate. For instance, when interest rates decline, an issuer of debt obligations may exercise an option to redeem securities prior to maturity, thereby forcing the Fund to invest in lower-yielding securities. The Fund also may choose to sell higher-yielding portfolio securities and to purchase lower-yielding securities to achieve greater portfolio diversification, because the Fund’s portfolio manager believes the current holdings are overvalued or for other investment-related reasons. A decline in the returns received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have an adverse effect on the Fund’s NAV, yield and total return.
Focused Investment
To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular sector, the Fund may be susceptible to loss due to adverse developments affecting that sector. These developments include, but are not limited to, governmental regulation; inflation; rising interest rates; cost increases in raw materials, fuel and other operating expenses; technological innovations that may render existing products and equipment obsolete; competition from new entrants; high research and development costs; increased costs associated with compliance with environmental or other governmental regulations; and other economic, business or political developments specific to that sector. Furthermore, the Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets in companies in related sectors that may share common characteristics, are often subject to similar business risks and regulatory burdens, and whose securities may react similarly to the types of developments described above, which will subject the Fund to greater risk. The Fund also will be subject to focused investment risk to the extent that it invests a substantial portion of its assets in a particular issuer, market, asset class, country or geographic region.
Corporate Debt Securities
Corporate debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligation and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market

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liquidity. When interest rates rise, the value of corporate debt securities can be expected to decline. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to be more sensitive to interest rate movements than those with shorter maturities. In addition, certain corporate debt securities may be highly customized and as a result may be subject to, among others, liquidity and pricing transparency risks.
Loan Participations and Assignments
The Fund may invest in fixed- and floating-rate loans, which investments generally will be in the form of loan participations and assignments of all or portions of such loans. Participations and assignments involve special types of risk, including extension risk, prepayment risk, credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. Loans are subject to the risk that scheduled interest or principal payments will not be made in a timely manner or at all, either of which may adversely affect the value of the loan. In addition, the collateral underlying a loan may be unavailable or insufficient to satisfy a borrower’s obligation, and the Fund could become part owner of any collateral if a loan is foreclosed, subjecting the Fund to costs associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. If the Fund purchases a participation, it may only be able to enforce its rights through the lender, and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities
Variable and floating rate securities are securities that pay interest at rates that adjust whenever a specified interest rate changes and/or that reset on predetermined dates (such as the last day of a month or a calendar quarter). In addition to senior loans, variable- and floating-rate instruments may include, without limit, instruments such as catastrophe and other event-linked bonds, bank capital securities, unsecured bank loans, corporate bonds, money market instruments and certain types of mortgage- related and other asset-backed securities. The Fund may invest in floating rate debt instruments (“floaters”) and engage in credit spread trades. A credit spread trade is an investment position relating to a difference in the prices or interest rates of two bonds or other securities, in which the value of the investment position is determined by changes in the difference between the prices or interest rates as the case may be, of the respective securities. Variable and floating rate securities generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes but may decline in value if their interest rates do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, floating rate securities will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. The Fund may also invest in inverse floating rate debt instruments (“inverse floaters”). An inverse floater may exhibit greater price volatility than a fixed rate obligation of similar credit quality. The Fund may invest up to 5% of their respective total assets in any combination of mortgage-related or other asset-backed IO, PO or inverse floater securities. Additionally, the Fund may also invest, without limitation, in residual interest bonds. Residual interest bonds are a type of inverse floater. See “Municipal Bonds.”
High Yield Securities
The Fund may invest in high yield securities. Securities rated lower than Baa by Moody’s, or equivalently rated by S&P or Fitch, are sometimes referred to as “high yield securities” or “junk bonds.” Investing in these securities
involves special risks in addition to the risks associated with investments in higher-rated fixed income securities. While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields, high yield securities typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. High yield securities may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. The Fund may invest in securities that are in default with respect to the payment of interest or repayment of principal, or present an imminent risk of default with respect to such payments. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment.
The market values of high yield securities tend to reflect individual developments of the issuer to a greater extent than do higher-quality securities, which tend to react mainly to fluctuations in the general level of interest rates. In addition, lower-quality debt securities tend to be more sensitive to general economic conditions. Certain emerging market governments that issue high yield securities in which the Fund may invest are among the largest debtors to commercial banks, foreign governments and supranational organizations, such as the World Bank, and may not be able or willing to make principal and/or interest payments as they come due.
Inflation-Indexed Bonds
Inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, which are more fully described below) are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. If the index measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds (other than municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds) will be adjusted downward, and consequently the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of TIPS. For bonds that do not provide a similar guarantee, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. TIPS may also be divided into individual zero-coupon instruments for each coupon or principal payment (known as “iSTRIPS”). An iSTRIP of the principal component of a TIPS issue will retain the embedded deflation floor that will allow the holder of the security to receive the greater of the original principal or inflation-adjusted principal value at maturity. iSTRIPS may be less liquid than conventional TIPS because they are a small component of the TIPS market.
Municipal inflation-indexed securities are municipal bonds that pay coupons based on a fixed rate plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (“CPI”). With regard to municipal inflation-indexed bonds and certain corporate inflation-indexed bonds, the inflation adjustment is typically reflected in the semi-annual coupon payment. As a result, the principal value of municipal inflation-indexed bonds and such corporate inflation-indexed bonds does not adjust according to the rate of inflation. At the same time, the value of municipal inflation-indexed securities and such corporate inflation-indexed securities generally will not increase if the

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rate of inflation decreases. Because municipal inflation-indexed securities and corporate inflation-indexed securities are a small component of the municipal bond and corporate bond markets, respectively, they may be less liquid than conventional municipal and corporate bonds.
The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. If nominal interest rates increase at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates may rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds. Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.
Repurchase Agreements
The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements, in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or broker-dealer, that agrees to repurchase the security at the Fund’s cost plus interest within a specified time. If the party agreeing to repurchase should default, the Fund will seek to sell the securities which it holds. This could involve procedural costs or delays in addition to a loss on the securities if their value should fall below their repurchase price.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements, Dollar Rolls and Other Borrowings
The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls, subject to the Fund’s limitations on borrowings. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a security by the Fund and its agreement to repurchase the instrument at a specified time and price. A dollar roll is similar except that the counterparty is not obligated to return the same securities as those originally sold by the Fund but only securities that are “substantially identical.” Reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls may be considered borrowing for some purposes. In accordance with current federal securities laws, rules and staff positions, the Fund will segregate or “earmark” assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls. Reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other forms of borrowings may create leveraging risk for the Fund.
The Fund may borrow money to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. This means that, in general, the Fund may borrow money from banks for any purpose in an amount up to 1/3 of the Fund’s total assets, less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities. The Fund may also borrow money for temporary administrative purposes in an amount not to exceed 5% of the Fund’s total assets. In addition, the Fund may borrow from certain other PIMCO funds in inter-fund lending transactions to the extent permitted by an exemptive order from the SEC.
Derivatives
The Fund may, but is not required to, use derivative instruments for risk management purposes or as part of its investment strategies. Generally, derivatives are financial contracts whose value depends upon, or is derived from, the value of an underlying asset, reference rate or index, and may relate to stocks, bonds, interest rates, spreads between different interest rates, currencies or currency exchange rates, commodities, and related
indexes. Examples of derivative instruments include options contracts, futures contracts, options on futures contracts and swap agreements (including, but not limited to, credit default swaps and swaps on ETFs). The Fund may invest some or all of its assets in derivative instruments, subject to the Fund’s objective and policies. A portfolio manager may decide not to employ any of these strategies and there is no assurance that any derivatives strategy used by the Fund will succeed. A description of these and other derivative instruments that the Fund may use are described under “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI.
The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other more traditional investments. Certain derivative transactions may have a leveraging effect on the Fund. For example, a small investment in a derivative instrument may have a significant impact on the Fund’s exposure to interest rates, currency exchange rates or other investments. As a result, a relatively small price movement in a derivative instrument may cause an immediate and substantial loss or gain. The Fund may engage in such transactions regardless of whether the Fund owns the asset, instrument or components of the index underlying the derivative instrument. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in these types of instruments. If it does, the Fund’s investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own. A description of various risks associated with particular derivative instruments is included in “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI. The following provides a more general discussion of important risk factors relating to all derivative instruments that may be used by the Fund.
CPI Swap. A CPI swap is a fixed maturity, OTC derivative transaction in which the investor receives the “realized” rate of inflation as measured by the CPI over the life of the swap. The investor in turn pays a fixed annualized rate over the life of the swap. This fixed rate is often referred to as the “breakeven inflation” rate and is generally representative of the difference between treasury yields and TIPS yields of similar maturities at the initiation of the swap. CPI swaps are typically in “bullet” format, where all cash flows are exchanged at maturity. In addition to counterparty risk, CPI swaps are also subject to inflation risk, where the swap can potentially lose value if the realized rate of inflation over the life of the swap is less than the fixed market implied inflation rate (fixed breakeven rate) that the investor agrees to pay at the initiation of the swap.
Management Risk. Derivative products are highly specialized instruments that require investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with stocks and bonds. The use of a derivative requires an understanding not only of the underlying instrument but also of the derivative itself, without the benefit of observing the performance of the derivative under all possible market conditions.
Credit Risk. The use of certain derivative instruments involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a “counterparty”) to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract’s terms. Additionally, a short position in a credit default swap could result in losses if the Fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the company on which the credit default swap is based.

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Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when a particular derivative instrument is difficult to purchase or sell. If a derivative transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid (as is the case with many privately negotiated derivatives), it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price.
Leverage Risk. Because many derivatives have a leverage component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index could result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. When the Fund uses derivatives for leverage, investments in that Fund will tend to be more volatile, resulting in larger gains or losses in response to market changes. In accordance with current federal securities laws, rules and staff positions, to limit leverage risk, the Fund will segregate or “earmark” assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under derivative instruments.
Lack of Availability. Because the markets for certain derivative instruments (including markets located in foreign countries) are relatively new and still developing, suitable derivatives transactions may not be available in all circumstances for risk management or other purposes. Upon the expiration of a particular contract, a portfolio manager may wish to retain the Fund’s position in the derivative instrument by entering into a similar contract, but may be unable to do so if the counterparty to the original contract is unwilling to enter into the new contract and no other suitable counterparty can be found. There is no assurance that the Fund will engage in derivatives transactions at any time or from time to time. The Fund’s ability to use derivatives may also be limited by certain regulatory and tax considerations.
Correlation Risk. In certain cases, the value of derivatives may not correlate perfectly, or at all, with the value of the assets, reference rates or indexes they are designed to closely track. For example, a swap agreement on an ETF would not correlate perfectly with the index upon which the ETF is based because the fund’s return is net of fees and expenses. In this regard, the Fund seeks to achieve their investment objectives, in part, by investing in derivatives positions that are designed to closely track the performance (or inverse performance) of an index on a daily basis. However, the overall investment strategies of the Fund are not designed or expected to produce returns which replicate the performance (or inverse performance) of the particular index, and the degree of variation could be substantial, particularly over longer periods. There are a number of factors which may prevent the Fund, or derivatives or other strategies used by the Fund, from achieving a desired correlation (or inverse correlation) with an index. These may include, but are not limited to: (i) the impact of fund fees, expenses and transaction costs, including borrowing and brokerage costs/ bid-ask spreads, which are not reflected in index returns; (ii) differences in the timing of daily calculations of the value of an index and the timing of the valuation of derivatives, securities and other assets held by the Fund and the determination of the NAV of Fund shares; (iii) disruptions or illiquidity in the markets for derivative instruments or securities in which the Fund invests; (iv) the Fund having exposure to or holding less than all of the securities in the underlying index and/or having exposure to or holding
securities not included in the underlying index; (v) large or unexpected movements of assets into and out of the Fund (due to share purchases or redemptions, for example), potentially resulting in the Fund being over- or under-exposed to the index; (vi) the impact of accounting standards or changes thereto; (vii) changes to the applicable index that are not disseminated in advance; (viii) a possible need to conform the Fund’s portfolio holdings to comply with investment restrictions or policies or regulatory or tax law requirements; and (ix) fluctuations in currency exchange rates.
Market and Other Risks. Like most other investments, derivative instruments are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to the Fund’s interest. If a portfolio manager incorrectly forecasts the values of securities, currencies or interest rates or other economic factors in using derivatives for the Fund, the Fund might have been in a better position if it had not entered into the transaction at all. While some strategies involving derivative instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. The Fund may also have to buy or sell a security at a disadvantageous time or price because the Fund is legally required to maintain offsetting positions or asset coverage in connection with certain derivatives transactions. The regulation of the derivatives markets has increased over the past several years, and additional future regulation of the derivatives markets may make derivatives more costly, may limit the availability or reduce the liquidity of derivatives, or may otherwise adversely affect the value or performance of derivatives. Any such adverse future developments could impair the effectiveness or raise the costs of the Fund’s derivative transactions, or impede the employment of the Fund’s derivatives strategies, or adversely affect the Fund’s performance.
Other risks in using derivatives include the risk of mispricing and improper valuation of derivatives. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to the Fund. In addition, the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause the Fund to realize higher amounts of short-term capital gains (generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates) than if the Fund had not used such instruments.
Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities
The Fund may also enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities, in which a lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its respective investments in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company’s financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). In accordance with current federal securities laws, rules and staff positions, to the extent that the Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate or “earmark” assets determined to be liquid by PIMCO in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are subject to credit, interest rate and liquidity risk and the risks of being a lender.

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions
The Fund may purchase or sell securities which it is eligible to purchase or sell on a when-issued basis, may purchase and sell such securities for delayed delivery and may make contracts to purchase or sell such securities for a fixed price at a future date beyond normal settlement time (forward commitments). When-issued transactions, delayed delivery purchases and forward commitments involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund’s other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund’s overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made, although the Fund may earn income on securities it has segregated or “earmarked” to cover these positions. When the Fund has sold a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery, or forward commitment basis, the Fund does not participate in future gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a transaction fails to pay for the securities, the Fund could suffer a loss. Additionally, when selling a security on a when-issued, delayed delivery or forward commitment basis without owning the security, the Fund will incur a loss if the security’s price appreciates in value such that the security’s price is above the agreed-upon price on the settlement date.
Investment in Other Funds
Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act restricts investments by registered investment companies and companies relying on Sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the Fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in an SEC exemptive order issued to PIMCO and the Trust, including that such investment companies enter into an agreement with the Trust.
The Fund may invest in, to the extent permitted by Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act, other affiliated and unaffiliated funds, such as open-end or closed-end management investment companies, including other exchange traded funds, provided that the Fund’s investment in units or shares of investment companies and other open-end collective investment vehicles will not exceed 10% of the Fund’s total assets. Other unaffiliated investment companies are not required to make their shares available for purchase by the Fund, and there is no guarantee that such investment will be, or will continue to be, available. The Fund may invest securities lending collateral in one or more money market funds to the extent permitted by Rule 12d1-1 under the 1940 Act, including series of PIMCO Funds, an affiliated open-end management investment company managed by PIMCO. As a shareholder of a fund, the Fund may indirectly bear investment advisory fees, supervisory and administrative fees, service fees and other fees which are in addition to the fees the Fund pays its service providers.
Subject to the restrictions and limitations of the 1940 Act and the rules and regulations thereunder and any exemptive relief therefrom, the Fund may, in the future, elect to pursue its investment objective either by investing directly in securities, or by investing in one or more underlying investment vehicles or companies that have substantially similar investment objectives and policies as the Fund.
Illiquid Investments
The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets (taken at the time of investment) in illiquid investments that are assets. Certain illiquid investments may require pricing at fair value as determined in good faith under the supervision of the Board of Trustees. A portfolio manager may be subject to significant delays in disposing of illiquid investments, and transactions in illiquid investments may entail registration expenses and other transaction costs that are higher than those for transactions in liquid investments. The term “illiquid investments” for this purpose means investments that the Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Restricted securities, i.e., securities subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale, may be illiquid. However, some restricted securities (such as securities issued pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and certain commercial paper) may be treated as liquid (i.e., classified by the Fund in a liquidity category other than “illiquid” pursuant to the Fund’s liquidity risk management procedures), although they may be relatively less liquid than registered securities traded on established secondary markets. Additional discussion of illiquid investments and related regulatory limits and requirements is available under “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI.
Loans of Portfolio Securities
For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and other financial institutions provided a number of conditions are satisfied, including that the loan is fully collateralized. Please see “Investment Objectives and Policies” in the SAI for details. When the Fund lends portfolio securities, its investment performance will continue to reflect changes in the value of the securities loaned, and the Fund will also receive a fee or interest on the collateral. Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in the collateral or delay in recovery of the collateral if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. The Fund may pay lending fees to a party arranging the loan, which may be an affiliate of the Fund. Cash collateral received by a Fund in securities lending transactions may be invested in short-term liquid fixed income instruments or in money market or short-term mutual funds, or similar investment vehicles, including affiliated money market or short-term mutual funds. The Fund bears the risk of such investments.
Portfolio Turnover
The length of time the Fund has held a particular security is not generally a consideration in investment decisions. A change in the securities held by the Fund is known as “portfolio turnover.” When a portfolio manager deems it appropriate and particularly during periods of volatile market movements, the Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. To the extent that Creation Unit purchases from and redemptions by the Fund are effected in cash, frequent purchases and redemptions may increase the rate of portfolio turnover. Higher portfolio turnover (e.g., an annual rate greater than 100% of the average value of the Fund’s portfolio) involves correspondingly greater expenses to the Fund, including brokerage commissions or dealer markups and other transaction costs on the sale of securities and reinvestments in

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Prospectus 

other securities. Such sales may also result in realization of taxable capital gains, including short-term capital gains (which are generally taxed at ordinary income tax rates). The trading costs and tax effects associated with portfolio turnover may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. Please see the Fund’s “Fund Summary-Portfolio Turnover” or the “Financial Highlights” in this prospectus for the portfolio turnover rates of the Fund that was operational during the last fiscal year. In addition, large movements of cash into or out of the Fund may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective or maintain a consistent level of operating expenses.
Temporary Defensive Positions
For temporary defensive purposes, the Fund may invest without limit in U.S. debt securities, including taxable securities and short-term money market securities, in attempting to respond to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions, as determined by PIMCO. When the Fund engages in such strategies, it may not achieve its investment objective.
Changes in Investment Objectives and Policies
The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. Unless otherwise stated, all other investment policies of the Fund may be changed by the Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. In addition, the Trust may determine to cease operating the Fund as an “exchange-traded” fund and cause the Fund’s shares to stop trading on a securities exchange.
Percentage Investment Limitations
Unless otherwise stated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments listed in this prospectus will apply at the time of investment. The Fund would not violate these limitations unless an excess or deficiency occurs or exists immediately after and as a result of an investment. The Fund has adopted a fundamental investment policy to invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its assets in Municipal Bonds. For purposes of this policy, the term “assets” means net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes.
Credit Ratings and Unrated Securities
Rating agencies are private services that provide ratings of the credit quality of fixed income securities, including convertible securities. Appendix A to this prospectus describes the various ratings assigned to fixed income securities by Moody’s, S&P and Fitch. Ratings assigned by a rating agency are not absolute standards of credit quality and do not evaluate market risks. Rating agencies may fail to make timely changes in credit ratings and an issuer’s current financial condition may be better or worse than a rating indicates. The ratings of a fixed income security may change over time. Moody’s, S&P and Fitch monitor and evaluate the ratings assigned to securities on an ongoing basis. As a result, debt instruments held by the Fund could receive a higher rating or a lower rating during the period in which they are held by the Fund.
The Fund will not necessarily sell a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings, and develops its own analysis of issuer credit quality.
The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if PIMCO determines, in its sole discretion, that the security is of comparable quality to a rated security that the Fund may purchase. In making ratings determinations, PIMCO may take into account different factors than those taken into account by rating agencies, and PIMCO’s rating of a security may differ from the rating that a rating agency may have given the same security. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that the portfolio manager may not accurately evaluate the security’s comparative credit rating. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent that the Fund invests in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund’s success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on the portfolio manager’s creditworthiness analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher-quality and rated securities.
Other Investments and Techniques
The Fund may invest in other types of securities and use a variety of investment techniques and strategies which are not described in this prospectus. These securities and techniques may subject the Fund to additional risks. Please see the SAI for additional information about the securities and investment techniques described in this prospectus and about additional securities and techniques that may be used by the Fund.
Cyber Security
As the use of technology has become more prevalent in the course of business, the Fund has become potentially more susceptible to operational and information security risks resulting from breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional cyber events that may, among other things, cause a Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption and/or destruction or lose operational capacity, result in the unauthorized release or other misuse of confidential information, or otherwise disrupt normal business operations. Cyber security breaches may involve unauthorized access to the Fund’s digital information systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding), but may also result from outside attacks such as denial-of-service attacks (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). In addition, cyber security breaches involving the Fund’s third party service providers (including but not limited to advisers, sub-advisers, administrators, transfer agents, custodians, distributors and other third parties), trading counterparties or issuers in which the Fund invests can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Moreover, cyber security breaches involving trading counterparties or issuers in which the Fund invests could adversely impact such counterparties or issuers and cause the Fund’s investment to lose value.
Cyber security failures or breaches may result in financial losses to the Fund and its shareholders. These failures or breaches may also result in disruptions to business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses; interference with the Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, process shareholder transactions or otherwise transact business with shareholders; impediments to trading; violations of applicable privacy and other laws; regulatory fines; penalties; reputational damage; reimbursement or other

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

compensation costs; additional compliance and cyber security risk management costs and other adverse consequences. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent any cyber incidents in the future.
Like with operational risk in general, the Fund has established business continuity plans and risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security. However, there are inherent limitations in these plans and systems, including that certain risks may not have been identified, in large part because different or unknown threats may emerge in the future. As such, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially because the Fund does not directly control the cyber security systems of issuers in which the Fund may invest, trading counterparties or third party service providers to the Fund. There is also a risk that cyber security breaches may not be detected. The Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.

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Prospectus 

Financial Highlights
Because the Fund has not operated for a full fiscal period as of the date of this prospectus, audited financial highlights are not available.

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Prospectus 

Appendix A
Description of Securities Ratings
The Fund’s investments may range in quality from securities rated in the lowest category in which the Fund is permitted to invest to securities rated in the highest category (as rated by Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s or Fitch, or, if unrated, determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality). The percentage of the Fund’s assets invested in securities in a particular rating category will vary. The following terms are generally used to describe the credit quality of fixed income securities:
High Quality Debt Securities are those rated in one of the two highest rating categories (the highest category for commercial paper) or, if unrated, deemed comparable by PIMCO.
Investment Grade Debt Securities are those rated in one of the four highest rating categories, or if unrated deemed comparable by PIMCO.
Below Investment Grade High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”), are those rated lower than Baa by Moody’s, BBB by Standard & Poor’s or Fitch, and comparable securities. They are deemed predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s ability to repay principal and interest.
The following is a description of Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s and Fitch’s rating categories applicable to fixed income securities.
Moody’s Investors Service, Inc.
Global Long-Term Rating Scale
Ratings assigned on Moody’s global long-term rating scales are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations issued by non-financial corporates, financial institutions, structured finance vehicles, project finance vehicles, and public sector entities. Long-term ratings are assigned to issuers or obligations with an original maturity of one year or more and reflect both on the likelihood of a default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment.
Aaa: Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, subject to the lowest level of credit risk.
Aa: Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.
A: Obligations rated A are judged to be upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.
Baa: Obligations rated Baa are judged to be medium-grade and subject to moderate credit risk and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.
Ba: Obligations rated Ba are judged to be speculative and are subject to substantial credit risk.
B: Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.
Caa: Obligations rated Caa are judged to be speculative of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.
Ca: Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.
C: Obligations rated C are the lowest rated and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.
Moody’s appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category. Additionally, a “(hyb)” indicator is appended to all ratings of hybrid securities issued by banks, insurers, finance companies, and securities firms.*
* By their terms, hybrid securities allow for the omission of scheduled dividends, interest, or principal payments, which can potentially result in impairment if such an omission occurs. Hybrid securities may also be subject to contractually allowable write-downs of principal that could result in impairment. Together with the hybrid indicator, the long-term obligation rating assigned to a hybrid security is an expression of the relative credit risk associated with that security.
Medium-Term Note Program Ratings
Moody’s assigns provisional ratings to medium-term note (MTN) programs and definitive ratings to the individual debt securities issued from them (referred to as drawdowns or notes).
MTN program ratings are intended to reflect the ratings likely to be assigned to drawdowns issued from the program with the specified priority of claim (e.g., senior or subordinated). To capture the contingent nature of a program rating, Moody’s assigns provisional ratings to MTN programs. A provisional rating is denoted by a (P) in front of the rating.
The rating assigned to a drawdown from a rated MTN or bank/deposit note program is definitive in nature, and may differ from the program rating if the drawdown is exposed to additional credit risks besides the issuer’s default, such as links to the defaults of other issuers, or has other structural features that warrant a different rating. In some circumstances, no rating may be assigned to a drawdown.
Moody’s encourages market participants to contact Moody’s Ratings Desks or visit www.moodys.com directly if they have questions regarding ratings for specific notes issued under a medium-term note program. Unrated notes issued under an MTN program may be assigned an NR (not rated) symbol.
Global Short-Term Rating Scale
Ratings assigned on Moody’s global short-term rating scales are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations issued by non-financial corporates, financial institutions, structured finance vehicles, project finance vehicles, and public sector entities. Short-term ratings are assigned to obligations with an original maturity of thirteen months or less and reflect both on the likelihood of a default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment.
Moody’s employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:
P-1: Ratings of Prime-1 reflect a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

P-2: Ratings of Prime-2 reflect a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.
P-3: Ratings of Prime-3 reflect an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.
NP: Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.
National Scale Long-Term Ratings
Moody’s long-term National Scale Ratings (NSRs) are opinions of the relative creditworthiness of issuers and financial obligations within a particular country. NSRs are not designed to be compared among countries; rather, they address relative credit risk within a given country. Moody’s assigns national scale ratings in certain local capital markets in which investors have found the global rating scale provides inadequate differentiation among credits or is inconsistent with a rating scale already in common use in the country.
In each specific country, the last two characters of the rating indicate the country in which the issuer is located or the financial obligation was issued (e.g., Aaa.ke for Kenya).
Aaa.n: Issuers or issues rated Aaa.n demonstrate the strongest creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Aa.n: Issuers or issues rated Aa.n demonstrate very strong creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
A.n: Issuers or issues rated A.n present above-average creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Baa.n: Issuers or issues rated Baa.n represent average creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Ba.n: Issuers or issues rated Ba.n demonstrate below-average creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
B.n: Issuers or issues rated B.n demonstrate weak creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Caa.n: Issuers or issues rated Caa.n demonstrate very weak creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Ca.n: Issuers or issues rated Ca.n demonstrate extremely weak creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
C.n: Issuers or issues rated C.n demonstrate the weakest creditworthiness relative to other domestic issuers and issuances.
Moody’s appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.
National Scale Short-Term Ratings
Moody’s short-term NSRs are opinions of the ability of issuers or issuances in a given country, relative to other domestic issuers or issuances, to repay debt obligations that have an original maturity not exceeding thirteen months. Short-term NSRs in one country should not be compared with short-term NSRs in another country, or with Moody’s global ratings.
There are four categories of short-term national scale ratings, generically denoted N-1 through N-4 as defined below.
In each specific country, the first two letters indicate the country in which the issuer is located (e.g., KE-1 through KE-4 for Kenya).
N-1: N-1 issuers or issuances represent the strongest likelihood of repayment of short-term senior unsecured debt obligations relative to other domestic issuers.
N-2: N-2 issuers or issuances represent an above average likelihood of repayment of short-term senior unsecured debt obligations relative to other domestic issuers.
N-3: N-3 issuers or issuances represent an average likelihood of repayment of short-term senior unsecured debt obligations relative to other domestic issuers.
N-4: N-4 issuers or issuances represent a below average likelihood of repayment of short-term senior unsecured debt obligations relative to other domestic issuers.
The short-term rating symbols P-1.za, P-2.za, P-3.za and NP.za are used in South Africa.
Short-Term Obligation Ratings
The Municipal Investment Grade (MIG) scale is used for US municipal cash flow notes, bond anticipation notes and certain other short-term obligations, which typically mature in three years or less. Under certain circumstances, the MIG scale is used for bond anticipation notes with maturities of up to five years.
MIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.
MIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.
MIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and market access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.
SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.
Demand Obligation Ratings
In the case of variable rate demand obligations (VRDOs), a two-component rating is assigned. The components are a long-term rating and a short-term demand obligation rating. The long-term rating addresses the issuer’s ability to meet scheduled principal and interest payments. The short-term demand obligation rating addresses the ability of the issuer or the liquidity provider to make payments associated with the purchase-price-upon-demand feature (“demand feature”) of the VRDO. The short-term demand obligation rating uses the Variable Municipal Investment Grade (VMIG) scale.
VMIG 1: This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

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VMIG 2: This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.
VMIG 3: This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.
SG: This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have a sufficiently strong short-term rating or may lack the structural or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.
Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services
Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings
Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on S&P Global Ratings’ (“S&P”) analysis of the following considerations:

 

Likelihood of payment—capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitments on an obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

 

Nature and provisions of the financial obligation and the promise S&P imputes; and

 

Protection afforded by, and relative position of, the financial obligation in the event of a bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors’ rights.
 
Issue ratings are an assessment of default risk, but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above. (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.)
Investment Grade
AAA: An obligation rated ‘AAA’ has the highest rating assigned by S&P. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is extremely strong.
AA: An obligation rated ‘AA’ differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is very strong.
A: An obligation rated ‘A’ is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is still strong.
BBB: An obligation rated ‘BBB’ exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
Speculative Grade
Obligations rated ‘BB’, ‘B’, ‘CCC’, ‘CC’, and ‘C’ are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. ‘BB’ indicates the least degree of speculation and ‘C’ the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposure to adverse conditions.
BB: An obligation rated ‘BB’ is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions that could lead to the obligor’s inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
B: An obligation rated ‘B’ is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated ‘BB’, but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor’s capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
CCC: An obligation rated ‘CCC’ is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
CC: An obligation rated ‘CC’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment. The ‘CC’ rating is used when a default has not yet occurred, but S&P expects default to be a virtual certainty, regardless of the anticipated time to default.
C: An obligation rated ‘C’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, and the obligation is expected to have lower relative seniority or lower ultimate recovery compared with obligations that are rated higher.
D: An obligation rated ‘D’ is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the ‘D’ rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P believes that such payments will be made within five business days in the absence of a stated grace period or within the earlier of the stated grace period or 30 calendar days. The ‘D’ rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. A rating on an obligation is lowered to ‘D’ if it is subject to a distressed debt restructuring.
NR: This indicates that a rating has not been assigned or is no longer assigned.
Plus (+) or minus (-): The ratings from ‘AA’ to ‘CCC’ may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the rating categories.
Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings
A-1: A short-term obligation rated ‘A-1’ is rated in the highest category by S&P. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on these obligations is extremely strong.

August 10, 2021 |  ProspectusA-3 

 

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

A-2: A short-term obligation rated ‘A-2’ is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is satisfactory.
A-3: A short-term obligation rated ‘A-3’ exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken an obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
B: A short-term obligation rated ‘B’ is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties that could lead to the obligor’s inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.
C: A short-term obligation rated ‘C’ is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.
D: A short-term obligation rated ‘D’ is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the ‘D’ rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The ‘D’ rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. A rating on an obligation is lowered to ‘D’ if it is subject to a distressed debt restructuring.
Dual Ratings: Dual ratings may be assigned to debt issues that have a put option or demand feature. The first component of the rating addresses the likelihood of repayment of principal and interest as due, and the second component of the rating addresses only the demand feature. The first component of the rating can relate to either a short-term or long-term transaction and accordingly use either short-term or long-term rating symbols. The second component of the rating relates to the put option and is assigned a short-term rating symbol (for example, ‘AAA/A-1+’ or ‘A-1+/A-1’). With U.S. municipal short-term demand debt, the U.S. municipal short-term note rating symbols are used for the first component of the rating (for example, ‘SP-1+/A-1+’).
Active Qualifiers
S&P uses the following qualifiers that limit the scope of a rating. The structure of the transaction can require the use of a qualifier such as a ‘p’ qualifier, which indicates the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only. A qualifier appears as a suffix and is part of the rating.
L: Ratings qualified with ‘L’ apply only to amounts invested up to federal deposit insurance limits.
p: This suffix is used for issues in which the credit factors, the terms, or both, that determine the likelihood of receipt of payment of principal are different from the credit factors, terms or both that determine the likelihood of receipt of interest on the obligation. The ‘p’ suffix indicates that the rating addresses the principal portion of the obligation only and that the interest is not rated.
prelim: Preliminary ratings, with the ‘prelim’ suffix, may be assigned to obligors or obligations, including financial programs, in the circumstances described below. Assignment of a final rating is conditional on the receipt by S&P of appropriate documentation. S&P reserves the right not to issue a final rating. Moreover, if a final rating is issued, it may differ from the preliminary rating.

 

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations, most commonly structured and project finance issues, pending receipt of final documentation and legal opinions.

 

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to obligations that will likely be issued upon the obligor’s emergence from bankruptcy or similar reorganization, based on late-stage reorganization plans, documentation and discussions with the obligor. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligors. These ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the reorganized or post-bankruptcy issuer as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s).

 

Preliminary ratings may be assigned to entities that are being formed or that are in the process of being independently established when, in S&P’s opinion, documentation is close to final. Preliminary ratings may also be assigned to the obligations of these entities.

 

Preliminary ratings may be assigned when a previously unrated entity is undergoing a well-formulated restructuring, recapitalization, significant financing or other transformative event, generally at the point that investor or lender commitments are invited. The preliminary rating may be assigned to the entity and to its proposed obligation(s). These preliminary ratings consider the anticipated general credit quality of the obligor, as well as attributes of the anticipated obligation(s), assuming successful completion of the transformative event. Should the transformative event not occur, S&P would likely withdraw these preliminary ratings.

 

A preliminary recovery rating may be assigned to an obligation that has a preliminary issue credit rating.
 
t: This symbol indicates termination structures that are designed to honor their contracts to full maturity or, should certain events occur, to terminate and cash settle all their contracts before their final maturity date.
cir: This symbol indicates a Counterparty Instrument Rating (CIR), which is a forward-looking opinion about the creditworthiness of an issuer in a securitization structure with respect to a specific financial obligation to a counterparty (including interest rate swaps, currency swaps, and liquidity facilities). The CIR is determined on an ultimate payment basis; these opinions do not take into account timeliness of payment.
Inactive Qualifiers (no longer applied or outstanding)
*:This symbol indicated that the rating was contingent upon S&P receipt of an executed copy of the escrow agreement or closing documentation confirming investments and cash flows. Discontinued use in August 1998.
c: This qualifier was used to provide additional information to investors that the bank may terminate its obligation to purchase tendered bonds if the long-term credit rating of the issuer was lowered to below an investment-

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Prospectus 

grade level and/or the issuer’s bonds were deemed taxable. Discontinued use in January 2001.
G: The letter ‘G’ followed the rating symbol when a fund’s portfolio consisted primarily of direct U.S. government securities.
pi: This qualifier was used to indicate ratings that were based on an analysis of an issuer’s published financial information, as well as additional information in the public domain. Such ratings did not, however, reflect in-depth meetings with an issuer’s management and therefore, could have been based on less comprehensive information than ratings without a ‘pi’ suffix. Discontinued use as of December 2014 and as of August 2015 for Lloyd’s Syndicate Assessments.
pr: The letters ‘pr’ indicate that the rating was provisional. A provisional rating assumed the successful completion of a project financed by the debt being rated and indicates that payment of debt service requirements was largely or entirely dependent upon the successful, timely completion of the project. This rating, however, while addressing credit quality subsequent to completion of the project, made no comment on the likelihood of or the risk of default upon failure of such completion.
q: A ‘q’ subscript indicates that the rating is based solely on quantitative analysis of publicly available information. Discontinued use in April 2001.
r: The ‘r’ modifier was assigned to securities containing extraordinary risks, particularly market risks, that are not covered in the credit rating. The absence of an ‘r’ modifier should not be taken as an indication that an obligation would not exhibit extraordinary non-credit related risks. S&P discontinued the use of the ‘r’ modifier for most obligations in June 2000 and for the balance of obligations (mainly structured finance transactions) in November 2002.
Fitch Ratings
Long-Term Credit Ratings
Investment Grade
Rated entities in a number of sectors, including financial and non-financial corporations, sovereigns, insurance companies and certain sectors within public finance, are generally assigned Issuer Default Ratings (“IDRs”). IDRs are also assigned to certain entities or enterprises in global infrastructure, project finance, and public finance. IDRs opine on an entity’s relative vulnerability to default (including by way of a distressed debt exchange) on financial obligations. The threshold default risk addressed by the IDR is generally that of the financial obligations whose non-payment would best reflect the uncured failure of that entity. As such, IDRs also address relative vulnerability to bankruptcy, administrative receivership or similar concepts.
In aggregate, IDRs provide an ordinal ranking of issuers based on the agency’s view of their relative vulnerability to default, rather than a prediction of a specific percentage likelihood of default.
AAA: Highest credit quality. ‘AAA’ ratings denote the lowest expectation of default risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.
AA: Very high credit quality. ‘AA’ ratings denote expectations of very low default risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial
commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.
A: High credit quality. ‘A’ ratings denote expectations of low default risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.
BBB: Good credit quality. ‘BBB’ ratings indicate that expectations of default risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.
Speculative Grade
BB: Speculative. ‘BB’ ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to default risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial flexibility exists that supports the servicing of financial commitments.
B: Highly speculative. ‘B’ ratings indicate that material default risk is present, but a limited margin of safety remains. Financial commitments are currently being met; however, capacity for continued payment is vulnerable to deterioration in the business and economic environment.
CCC: Substantial credit risk. Default is a real possibility.
CC: Very high levels of credit risk. Default of some kind appears probable.
C: Near default.
A default or default-like process has begun, or the issuer is in standstill, or for a closed funding vehicle, payment capacity is irrevocably impaired. Conditions that are indicative of a ‘C’ category rating for an issuer include:
a. the issuer has entered into a grace or cure period following non-payment of a material financial obligation;
b. the issuer has entered into a temporary negotiated waiver or standstill agreement following a payment default on a material financial obligation;
c. the formal announcement by the issuer or their agent of a distressed debt exchange;
d. a closed financing vehicle where payment capacity is irrevocably impaired such that it is not expected to pay interest and/or principal in full during the life of the transaction, but where no payment default is imminent
RD: Restricted default. ‘RD’ ratings indicate an issuer that in Fitch Ratings’ opinion has experienced an uncured payment default or distressed debt exchange on a bond, loan or other material financial obligation but which has not entered into bankruptcy filings, administration, receivership, liquidation or other formal winding-up procedure, and which has not otherwise ceased operating. This would include:
i. the selective payment default on a specific class or currency of debt;
ii. the uncured expiry of any applicable grace period, cure period or default forbearance period following a payment default on a bank loan, capital markets security or other material financial obligation;
iii. the extension of multiple waivers or forbearance periods upon a payment default on one or more material financial obligations, either in series or in parallel; ordinary execution of a distressed debt exchange on one or more material financial obligations.

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PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund 

D: Default. ‘D’ ratings indicate an issuer that in Fitch Ratings’ opinion has entered into bankruptcy filings, administration, receivership, liquidation or other formal winding-up procedure or that has otherwise ceased business. Default ratings are not assigned prospectively to entities or their obligations; within this context, non-payment on an instrument that contains a deferral feature or grace period will generally not be considered a default until after the expiration of the deferral or grace period, unless a default is otherwise driven by bankruptcy or other similar circumstance, or by a distressed debt exchange.
In all cases, the assignment of a default rating reflects the agency’s opinion as to the most appropriate rating category consistent with the rest of its universe of ratings, and may differ from the definition of default under the terms of an issuer’s financial obligations or local commercial practice.
The modifiers “+” or “-” may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. For example, the rating category ‘AA’ has three notch-specific rating levels (‘AA+’; ‘AA’; ‘AA-’; each a rating level). Such suffixes are not added to ‘AAA’ ratings and ratings below the ‘CCC’ category.
Recovery Ratings
Recovery Ratings are assigned to selected individual securities and obligations, most frequently for individual obligations of corporate finance issuers with IDRs in speculative grade categories.
Among the factors that affect recovery rates for securities are the collateral, the seniority relative to other obligations in the capital structure (where appropriate), and the expected value of the company or underlying collateral in distress.
The Recovery Rating scale is based on the expected relative recovery characteristics of an obligation upon the curing of a default, emergence from insolvency or following the liquidation or termination of the obligor or its associated collateral.
Recovery Ratings are an ordinal scale and do not attempt to precisely predict a given level of recovery. As a guideline in developing the rating assessments, the agency employs broad theoretical recovery bands in its ratings approach based on historical averages and analytical judgment, but actual recoveries for a given security may deviate materially from historical averages.
RR1: Outstanding recovery prospects given default. ‘RR1’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 91%-100% of current principal and related interest.
RR2: Superior recovery prospects given default. ‘RR2’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 71%-90% of current principal and related interest.
RR3: Good recovery prospects given default. ‘RR3’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 51%-70% of current principal and related interest.
RR4: Average recovery prospects given default. ‘RR4’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 31%-50% of current principal and related interest.
RR5: Below average recovery prospects given default. ‘RR5’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 11%-30% of current principal and related interest.
RR6: Poor recovery prospects given default. ‘RR6’ rated securities have characteristics consistent with securities historically recovering 0%-10% of current principal and related interest.
Short-Term Credit Ratings
A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-term deposit ratings may be adjusted for loss severity. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as “short term” based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign, and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in U.S. public finance markets.
F1: Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added “+” to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.
F2: Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.
F3: Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.
B: Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.
C: High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.
RD: Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Typically applicable to entity ratings only.
D: Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a short-term obligation.

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INVESTMENT MANAGER
PIMCO, 650 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, CA 92660
DISTRIBUTOR
PIMCO Investments LLC, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019
CUSTODIAN
State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111
TRANSFER AGENT
State Street Bank & Trust Co., State Street Financial Center, One Lincoln Street, Boston, MA 02111
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1100 Walnut Street, Suite 1300, Kansas City, MO 64106-2197
LEGAL COUNSEL
Dechert LLP, 1900 K Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006
For further information about the PIMCO ETF Trust, call 1.888.400.4ETF or visit our website at www.pimcoetfs.com.

 

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PIMCO ETF Trust
650 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660
The Trust’s SAI and, once available, annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders include additional information about the Fund. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, which means it is part of this Prospectus for legal purposes. The Fund’s annual report, once it is available, will discuss the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
You may get free copies of any of these materials or request other information about the Fund by calling the Trust at 1.888.400.4ETF (1.888.400.4383) by visiting www.pimcoetfs.com or by writing to:
PIMCO ETF Trust
650 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660
You may access reports and other information about the Trust on the EDGAR Database on the Commission’s web site at www.sec.gov. You may get copies of additional information about the Trust, including its SAI, with payment of a duplication fee, by e-mailing your request to publicinfo@sec.gov.
You can also visit our web site at www.pimcoetfs.com for additional information about the Fund, including the SAI and, once available, the annual and semi-annual reports, which are available for download free of charge.
Reference the Trust’s Investment Company Act file number in your correspondence.
Investment Company Act File Number: 811-22250
ETF0004_081021


Table of Contents

PIMCO ETF Trust

Statement of Additional Information

October 30, 2020 (as supplemented August 10, 2021)

This Statement of Additional Information is not a prospectus, and should be read in conjunction with the prospectuses of PIMCO ETF Trust (the “Trust”), as described below and as supplemented from time to time. The Trust is an open-end management investment company currently consisting of 15 separate portfolios (each such portfolio discussed in this Statement of Additional Information is referred to herein as a “Fund” and collectively as the “Funds”), including:

 

Index Funds and Ticker Symbols

PIMCO 0-5 Year High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    HYS    PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund    ZROZ
PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund    STPZ    PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund    TIPZ
PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund    LTPZ    PIMCO Investment Grade Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund    CORP
Actively Managed Funds and Ticker Symbols
PIMCO Active Bond Exchange-Traded Fund    BOND    PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund    MUNI
PIMCO Enhanced Low Duration Active Exchange-Traded Fund    LDUR    PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund    MINO
PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund    MINT    PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund    PPRM
PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active ESG Exchange-Traded Fund    EMNT    PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund    SMMU
PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund    GOVY      

Shares of the PIMCO 0-5 Year High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Investment Grade Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through a prospectus dated October 30, 2020, shares of the PIMCO Active Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Low Duration Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active ESG Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through a separate prospectus dated October 30, 2020, and shares of the PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund are offered through a separate prospectus dated August 10, 2021, each as supplemented from time to time (collectively, the “Prospectuses”). Copies of the Prospectuses may be obtained free of charge at the address and telephone number listed below.

Each Fund operates as an exchange-traded fund (“ETF”). As identified and described in more detail within the Prospectuses and this Statement of Additional Information, certain Funds are ETFs that seek to replicate the performance of a specified index (collectively, the “Index Funds”). Other Funds are actively managed ETFs that do not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index (collectively, the “Active Funds”). Once a Fund commences operations, the shares described in the Prospectuses and in this Statement of Additional Information are listed and trade on NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), a national securities exchange (the “Listing Exchange”) and other secondary markets.

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC (“PIMCO” or the “Manager”), 650 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach, California 92660, is the investment manager of the Funds.


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

THE TRUST

     1  

EXCHANGE LISTING AND TRADING

     1  

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

     2  

U.S. Government Securities

     2  

Municipal Bonds

     3  

Mortgage-Related Securities and Asset-Backed Securities

     11  

Real Estate Assets and Related Derivatives

     19  

Bank Obligations

     20  

Loans and Other Indebtedness, Loan Participations and Assignments

     20  

Trade Claims

     23  

Corporate Debt Securities

     23  

High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”) and Securities of Distressed Companies

     23  

Creditor Liability and Participation on Creditors Committees

     24  

Variable and Floating Rate Securities

     25  

Inflation-Indexed Bonds

     25  

Event-Linked Exposure

     26  

Convertible Securities

     26  

Equity Securities

     28  

Preferred Securities

     29  

Depositary Receipts

     29  

Foreign Securities

     29  

Foreign Currency Transactions

     30  

Foreign Currency Exchange-Related Securities

     40  

Borrowing

     41  

Commodities

     42  

Derivative Instruments

     42  

Structured Products

     54  

Bank Capital Securities

     55  

Trust Preferred Securities

     56  

Exchange-Traded Notes

     56  

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities

     57  

When-Issued, Delayed Delivery and Forward Commitment Transactions

     57  

Short Sales

     58  

144A Securities

     58  

Regulation S Securities

     58  

Illiquid Investments

     59  

Repurchase Agreements

     59  

Loans of Portfolio Securities

     59  

Investments in Business Development Companies (“BDCs”)

     59  

Environment, Social Responsibility and Governance Policies

     60  

Investment Companies

     60  

Government Intervention in Financial Markets

     61  

Temporary Investment

     61  

Increasing Government and Other Public Debt

     62  

Inflation and Deflation

     62  

Regulatory Risk

     62  

Liquidation of Funds

     64  

Participation in Litigation or Arbitration Proceedings

     64  

Fund Operations

     64  

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

     66  

Fundamental Investment Restrictions

     66  

Non-Fundamental Investment Restrictions

     66  


Table of Contents

UNDERLYING INDEXES FOR INDEX FUNDS

     70  

ICE BofA 0-5 Year US High Yield Constrained Index

     70  

ICE BofA 1-5 Year US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     71  

ICE BofA 15+ Year US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     71  

ICE BofA Long US Treasury Principal STRIPS Index

     71  

ICE BofA US Corporate Index

     72  

ICE BofA US Inflation-Linked Treasury Index

     72  

MANAGEMENT OF THE TRUST

     73  

Trustees and Officers

     73  

Leadership Structure and Risk Oversight Function

     73  

Qualifications of the Trustees

     74  

Trustees of the Trust

     74  

Executive Officers

     77  

Securities Ownership

     79  

Trustee Ownership of the Investment Manager and Principal Underwriter, and Their Control Persons

     79  

Standing Committees

     81  

Trustee Retirement Policy

     82  

Compensation Table

     82  

Investment Manager

     82  

Investment Management Agreement

     83  

Management Fee Rates

     83  

Management Fee Payments

     84  

Management Fees Waived

     85  

Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures

     86  

OTHER PIMCO INFORMATION

     87  

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

     87  

Other Accounts Managed

     87  

Conflicts of Interest

     90  

Portfolio Manager Compensation

     95  

Securities Ownership

     96  

CREATIONS AND REDEMPTIONS

     97  

Distributor

     98  

Continuous Offering

     99  

Fund Deposit

     99  

Procedures for Creating Creation Units

     100  

Placement of Creation Orders Using Clearing Process

     101  

Placement of Creation Orders Outside Clearing Process—Domestic Funds

     102  

Placement of Creation Orders Outside Clearing Process—Global Funds

     102  

Acceptance of Creation Orders

     103  

Creation Transaction Fee

     103  

Redemption of Creation Units

     104  

Redemption Transaction Fee

     104  

Placement of Redemption Orders Using Clearing Process

     105  

Placement of Redemption Orders Outside Clearing Process—Domestic Funds

     106  

Placement of Redemption Orders Outside Clearing Process—Global Funds

     106  

Distribution and Servicing (12b-1) Plan

     107  

Additional Information About the Shares

     108  

Request for Multiple Copies of Shareholder Documents

     110  

PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS AND BROKERAGE

     110  

Investment Decisions and Portfolio Transactions

     110  

Brokerage and Research Services

     111  

Brokerage Commissions Paid

     112  


Table of Contents

Holdings of Securities of the Trust’s Regular Brokers and Dealers

     113  

Portfolio Turnover

     115  

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings

     116  

Large Trade Notifications

     117  

NET ASSET VALUE

     117  

TAXATION

     118  

Sales of Shares

     120  

Potential Pass-Through of Tax Credits

     120  

Backup Withholding

     120  

Options, Futures and Forward Contracts, and Swap Agreements

     120  

Short Sales

     121  

Foreign Currency Transactions

     121  

Foreign Taxation

     122  

Original Issue Discount and Market Discount

     122  

Constructive Sales

     123  

Tax-Exempt Shareholders

     123  

IRAs and Other Retirement Plans

     123  

Non-U.S. Shareholders

     123  

Other Taxation

     124  

OTHER INFORMATION

     124  

Capitalization

     124  

Voting Rights

     125  

Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

     125  

Code of Ethics

     129  

Securities Depository for Shares of the Funds

     129  

Disclaimers

     130  

Custodian and Transfer Agent

     131  

Securities Lending Agent

     131  

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     132  

Counsel

     132  

Registration Statement

     132  

Financial Statements

     132  

 


Table of Contents

THE TRUST

The Trust is a Delaware statutory trust established under a Declaration of Trust dated November 14, 2008, as amended and restated November 4, 2014. Each Fund operates as an ETF and is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The offering of the Trust’s shares is registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “1933 Act”).

Each Fund offers and issues shares at their net asset value per share (“NAV”) only in aggregations of a specified number of shares (“Creation Units”), generally in exchange for a basket of securities (the “Deposit Securities”) together with a deposit of a specified cash payment (the “Cash Component”). Alternatively, each Fund may issue and redeem Creation Units in exchange for a specified all-cash payment (“Cash Deposit”). Shares are redeemable by the applicable Fund only in Creation Units, and, generally, in exchange for securities and/or cash. Shares trade in the secondary market and elsewhere at market prices that may be at, above or below NAV. Creation Units typically are a specified number of shares, generally 20,000, 50,000, 70,000, 90,000 or 100,000 and multiples thereof.

The Trust may issue and redeem shares in-kind and/or for cash. A Fund may charge creation/redemption transaction fees for each creation and redemption. In all cases, redemption transaction fees will be limited in accordance with the requirements of the SEC applicable to management investment companies offering redeemable securities. See the “Creations and Redemptions” section below.

The investment objective of each Index Fund is to provide total return that closely corresponds, before fees and expenses, to the total return of the Fund’s underlying index (each an “Underlying Index” and collectively the “Underlying Indexes”) representing a segment of the U.S. fixed income securities market as described in more detail below. The Index Funds issue and redeem shares in exchange for in-kind securities or instruments and/or for cash. Unlike conventional ETFs, the Active ETFs are not index funds. The Active Funds are actively managed ETFs that do not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The Active Funds issue and redeem shares in exchange for cash and/or in-kind securities or instruments.

The PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO 0-5 Year High Yield Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Investment Grade Corporate Bond Index Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Active Bond Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Low Duration Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active ESG Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund are diversified.

EXCHANGE LISTING AND TRADING

Shares of each Fund are listed for trading and trade throughout the day on the Listing Exchange and other secondary markets. Shares of a Fund may also be listed on certain foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Listing Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of shares of the Funds will continue to be met. The Listing Exchange may, but is not required to, remove the shares of a Fund from listing if: (i) the Listing Exchange becomes aware that the Fund is no longer eligible to operate in reliance on Rule 6c-11 under the 1940 Act to the extent such Fund’s listing is conditioned upon reliance on Rule 6c-11; (ii) the Fund no longer complies with the applicable rules for continued listing on the Listing Exchange; (iii) following the initial 12-month period beginning upon the commencement of trading of Fund shares, there are fewer than 50 beneficial owners of shares of the Fund; or (iv) any other event shall occur or condition shall exist that, in the opinion of the Listing Exchange, makes further dealings on the Listing Exchange inadvisable. The Listing Exchange will remove the shares of a Fund from listing and trading upon termination of the Fund. In the event a Fund ceases to be listed on an exchange, the Fund may cease operating as an “exchange-traded” fund and operate as a mutual fund, provided that shareholders are given advance notice.

As in the case of other publicly-traded securities, when you buy or sell shares through a financial intermediary you may incur a brokerage commission determined by that financial intermediary.

In order to provide additional information regarding the intraday value of shares of each Fund, the Listing Exchange or a market data vendor may disseminate every 15 seconds through the facilities of the Consolidated Tape Association or other widely disseminated means an updated IIV for each Fund as calculated by an information provider or market data vendor. The


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Trust is not involved in or responsible for any aspect of the calculation or dissemination of the IIV and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the IIV.

With regard to the Index Funds, an IIV is based on a securities component and a cash component (or an all cash amount) which comprises that day’s Fund Deposit (as defined below), as disseminated prior to that Business Day’s commencement of trading (the “Index Funds IIV Basket”). With regard to the Active Funds, an IIV is based on the current market value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the Fund’s calculation of NAV at the end of the Business Day (as defined below), as disclosed on the Fund’s website prior to that Business Day’s commencement of trading (the “Active Funds IIV Basket”). Unlike a Fund’s NAV, the IIV may not reflect estimated accrued interest, dividends and other income, or Fund expenses.

The Trust reserves the right to adjust the share prices of a Fund in the future to maintain convenient trading ranges for investors. Any adjustments would be accomplished through stock splits or reverse stock splits, which would have no effect on the net assets of the Fund.

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

The investment objectives and general investment policies of each Fund are described in the Prospectuses. Consistent with each Fund’s investment policies, each Fund may invest in “Fixed Income Instruments,” which are defined in the Prospectuses. Additional information concerning the characteristics of certain of the Funds’ investments, strategies and risks is set forth below.

U.S. Government Securities

U.S. Government securities are obligations of and, in certain cases, guaranteed by, the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities. The U.S. Government does not guarantee the net asset value of a Fund’s shares. Some U.S. Government securities, such as Treasury bills, notes and bonds, and securities guaranteed by the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States; others, such as those of the Federal Home Loan Banks, are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Department of the Treasury (the “U.S. Treasury”); others, such as those of the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”), are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchase the agency’s obligations; and still others, such as securities issued by members of the Farm Credit System, are supported only by the credit of the agency, instrumentality or corporation. U.S. Government securities may include zero coupon securities, which do not distribute interest on a current basis and tend to be subject to greater risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.

Securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. GNMA, a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government) include the FNMA and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”). Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but its participation certificates are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. Instead, they are supported only by the discretionary authority of the U.S. Government to purchase the agency’s obligations. Under the direction of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”), FNMA and FHLMC have entered into a joint initiative to develop a common securitization platform for the issuance of a uniform mortgage-backed security (“UMBS”) (the “Single Security Initiative”) that aligns the characteristics of FNMA and FHLMC certificates. The Single Security Initiative was implemented in June 2019, and the effects it may have on the market for mortgage-backed securities are uncertain.

Because certain Underlying Indexes of the Index Funds are comprised solely of U.S. Treasury obligations (including the Underlying Indexes for the PIMCO 1-5 Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded, PIMCO 15+ Year U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded, PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon U.S. Treasury Index Exchange-Traded and PIMCO Broad U.S. TIPS Index Exchange-Traded Funds), such Index Funds do not currently invest in: (i) the securities of any issuer determined by PIMCO to be engaged principally in the provision of healthcare services, the manufacture of alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, pharmaceuticals, military equipment, the operation of gambling casinos or in the production or trade of pornographic materials; or (ii) tobacco settlement revenue bonds, which are Municipal Bonds (defined below) secured by a state or local government’s proportionate share in the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement between various U.S. states and territories and various tobacco manufacturers.

 

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Municipal Bonds

Certain Funds may invest in securities issued by states, territories, possessions, municipalities and other political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities of states, territories, possessions and multi-state agencies or authorities. It is a policy of each of the PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Municipal Income Opportunities Active Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund (each a “Municipal Fund,” and collectively, the “Municipal Funds”) to have at least 80% of its net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes invested in investments, the income of which is exempt from federal income tax (“Municipal Bonds”). The ability of a Municipal Fund to invest in securities other than Municipal Bonds is limited by a requirement of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Internal Revenue Code”), that at least 50% of the applicable Municipal Fund’s total assets be invested in Municipal Bonds at the end of each quarter of a Municipal Fund’s tax year.

Municipal Bonds share the attributes of debt/fixed income securities in general, but are generally issued by states, municipalities and other political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities of states and multi-state agencies or authorities. The Municipal Bonds which the Funds may purchase include general obligation bonds and limited obligation bonds (or revenue bonds), including industrial development bonds issued pursuant to former federal tax law. General obligation bonds are obligations involving the credit of an issuer possessing taxing power and are payable from such issuer’s general revenues and not from any particular source. Limited obligation bonds are payable only from the revenues derived from a particular facility or class of facilities or, in some cases, from the proceeds of a special excise or other specific revenue source or annual revenues. Tax-exempt private activity bonds and industrial development bonds generally are also revenue bonds and thus are not payable from the issuer’s general revenues. The credit and quality of private activity bonds and industrial development bonds are usually related to the credit of the corporate user of the facilities. Payment of interest on and repayment of principal of such bonds is the responsibility of the corporate user (and/or any guarantor).

Each Fund that may invest in Municipal Bonds, and in particular the Municipal Funds, may invest 25% or more of its total assets in Municipal Bonds that finance similar projects, such as those relating to education, health care, housing, transportation, and utilities, and 25% or more of its total assets in industrial development bonds. A Fund may be more sensitive to adverse economic, business or political developments if it invests a substantial portion of its assets in the bonds of similar projects or industrial development bonds.

Each Fund that may invest in Municipal Bonds may invest in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds. Pre-refunded Municipal Bonds are tax-exempt bonds that have been refunded to a call date prior to the final maturity of principal, or, in the case of pre-refunded Municipal Bonds commonly referred to as “escrowed-to-maturity bonds,” to the final maturity of principal, and remain outstanding in the municipal market. The payment of principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by a Fund is funded from securities in a designated escrow account that holds U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations of the U.S. Government (including its agencies and instrumentalities (“Agency Securities”)). As the payment of principal and interest is generated from securities held in an escrow account established by the municipality and an independent escrow agent, the pledge of the municipality has been fulfilled and the original pledge of revenue by the municipality is no longer in place. The escrow account securities pledged to pay the principal and interest of the pre-refunded Municipal Bond do not guarantee the price movement of the bond before maturity. Issuers of Municipal Bonds refund in advance of maturity the outstanding higher cost debt and issue new, lower cost debt, placing the proceeds of the lower cost issuance into an escrow account to pre-refund the older, higher cost debt. Investments in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds held by a Fund may subject the Fund to interest rate risk, market risk and credit risk. In addition, while a secondary market exists for pre-refunded Municipal Bonds, if a Fund sells pre-refunded Municipal Bonds prior to maturity, the price received may be more or less than the original cost, depending on market conditions at the time of sale. To the extent permitted by the SEC and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), a Fund’s investment in pre-refunded Municipal Bonds backed by U.S. Treasury and Agency securities in the manner described above, will, for purposes of diversification tests applicable to certain Funds, be considered an investment in the respective U.S. Treasury and Agency securities. Tax legislation in 2017 eliminated the tax exemption for advance refunding of municipal bonds on a go-forward basis.

Under the Internal Revenue Code, certain limited obligation bonds are considered “private activity bonds” and interest paid on such bonds is treated as an item of tax preference for purposes of calculating federal alternative minimum tax liability. The PIMCO Intermediate Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Short Term Municipal Bond Active Exchange-Traded Fund do not intend to invest in securities whose interest is subject to the federal alternative minimum tax.

Certain Funds may invest in Build America Bonds. Build America Bonds are tax credit bonds created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which authorizes state and local governments to issue Build America Bonds as taxable bonds in 2009 and 2010, without volume limitations, to finance any capital expenditures for which such issuers could otherwise

 

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issue traditional tax-exempt bonds. State and local governments may receive a direct federal subsidy payment for a portion of their borrowing costs on Build America Bonds equal to 35% of the total coupon interest paid to investors. The state or local government issuer can elect to either take the federal subsidy or pass the 35% tax credit along to bondholders.    A Fund’s investments in Build America Bonds will result in taxable income and the Fund may elect to pass through to shareholders the corresponding tax credits. The tax credits can generally be used to offset federal income taxes and the alternative minimum tax, but such credits are generally not refundable. Build America Bonds involve similar risks as Municipal Bonds, including credit and market risk. They are intended to assist state and local governments in financing capital projects at lower borrowing costs and are likely to attract a broader group of investors than tax-exempt Municipal Bonds. For example, taxable funds, including Funds other than the Municipal Funds, may choose to invest in Build America Bonds. Although Build America Bonds were only authorized for issuance during 2009 and 2010, the program may have resulted in reduced issuance of tax-exempt Municipal Bonds during the same period. As a result, Funds that invest in tax-exempt Municipal Bonds, such as the Municipal Funds, may have increased their holdings of Build America Bonds and other investments permitted by the Funds’ respective investment objectives and policies during 2009 and 2010. The Build America Bond program expired on December 31, 2010, at which point no further issuance of new Build America Bonds was permitted. As of the date of this Statement of Additional Information, there is no indication that Congress will renew the program to permit issuance of new Build America Bonds.

The Funds may invest in municipal lease obligations. Municipal leases are instruments, or participations in instruments, issued in connection with lease obligations or installment purchase contract obligations of municipalities (“municipal lease obligations”). Although municipal lease obligations do not constitute general obligations of the issuing municipality, a lease obligation may be backed by the municipality’s covenant to budget for, appropriate funds for and make the payments due under the lease obligation. However, certain municipal lease obligations contain “non-appropriation” clauses, which provide that the municipality has no obligation to make lease or installment purchase payments in future years unless money is appropriated for such purpose in the relevant years. In deciding whether to purchase a lease obligation, the Funds will assess the financial condition of the borrower or obligor, the merits of the project, the level of public support for the project, other credit characteristics of the obligor, and the legislative history of lease financing in the state. Municipal lease obligations may be less readily marketable than other municipal securities.

Projects financed with certificates of participation generally are not subject to state constitutional debt limitations or other statutory requirements that may apply to other municipal securities. Payments by the public entity on the obligation underlying the certificates are derived from available revenue sources. That revenue might be diverted to the funding of other municipal service projects. Payments of interest and/or principal with respect to the certificates are not guaranteed and do not constitute an obligation of a state or any of its political subdivisions.

Municipal leases may also be subject to “abatement risk.” The leases underlying certain municipal lease obligations may state that lease payments are subject to partial or full abatement. That abatement might occur, for example, if material damage to or destruction of the leased property interferes with the lessee’s use of the property. However, in some cases that risk might be reduced by insurance covering the leased property, or by the use of credit enhancements such as letters of credit to back lease payments, or perhaps by the lessee’s maintenance of reserve monies for lease payments. While the obligation might be secured by the lease, it might be difficult to dispose of that property in case of a default.

The Funds may purchase unrated municipal lease obligations if determined by PIMCO to be of comparable quality to rated securities in which the Fund is permitted to invest. A Fund may also acquire illiquid municipal lease obligations, subject to regulatory limitations on investments in illiquid investments generally. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity.

The Funds may seek to enhance their yield through the purchase of private placements. These securities are sold through private negotiations, usually to institutions or mutual funds, and may have resale restrictions. Their yields are usually higher than comparable public securities to compensate the investor for their limited marketability. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity.

Some longer-term Municipal Bonds give the investor the right to “put” or sell the security at par (face value) within a specified number of days following the investor’s request - usually one to seven days. This demand feature enhances a security’s liquidity by shortening its effective maturity and enables it to trade at a price equal to or very close to par. If a demand feature terminates prior to being exercised, a Fund would hold the longer-term security, which could experience substantially more volatility.

 

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The Funds that may invest in Municipal Bonds may invest in municipal warrants, which are essentially call options on Municipal Bonds. In exchange for a premium, municipal warrants give the purchaser the right, but not the obligation, to purchase a Municipal Bond in the future. A Fund may purchase a warrant to lock in forward supply in an environment where the current issuance of bonds is sharply reduced. Like options, warrants may expire worthless and they may have reduced liquidity. A Fund will not invest more than 5% of its net assets in municipal warrants.

The Funds that may invest in Municipal Bonds may invest in Municipal Bonds with credit enhancements such as letters of credit, municipal bond insurance and Standby Bond Purchase Agreements (“SBPAs”). Letters of credit are issued by a third party, usually a bank, to enhance liquidity and ensure repayment of principal and any accrued interest if the underlying Municipal Bond should default. Municipal bond insurance, which is usually purchased by the bond issuer from a private, nongovernmental insurance company, provides an unconditional and irrevocable guarantee that the insured bond’s principal and interest will be paid when due. Insurance does not guarantee the price of the bond or the share price of any fund. The credit rating of an insured bond reflects the credit rating of the insurer, based on its claims-paying ability. The obligation of a municipal bond insurance company to pay a claim extends over the life of each insured bond. Although defaults on insured Municipal Bonds have been low to date and municipal bond insurers have met their claims, there is no assurance this will continue. A higher-than-expected default rate could strain the insurer’s loss reserves and adversely affect its ability to pay claims to bondholders. A significant portion of insured Municipal Bonds that have been issued and are outstanding are insured by a small number of insurance companies, an event involving one or more of these insurance companies, such as a credit rating downgrade, could have a significant adverse effect on the value of the Municipal Bonds insured by that insurance company and on the Municipal Bond markets as a whole. Downgrades of certain insurance companies have negatively impacted the price of certain insured Municipal Bonds. Given the large number of potential claims against the insurers of Municipal Bonds, there is a risk that they will not be able to meet all future claims. An SBPA is a liquidity facility provided to pay the purchase price of bonds that cannot be re-marketed. The obligation of the liquidity provider (usually a bank) is only to advance funds to purchase tendered bonds that cannot be remarketed and does not cover principal or interest under any other circumstances. The liquidity provider’s obligations under the SBPA are usually subject to numerous conditions, including the continued creditworthiness of the underlying borrower.

Certain Funds may invest in trust certificates issued in tender option bond programs. In a tender option bond transaction (“TOB”), a tender option bond trust (“TOB Trust”) issues floating rate certificates (“TOB Floater”) and residual interest certificates (“TOB Residual”) and utilizes the proceeds of such issuance to purchase a fixed-rate municipal bond (“Fixed Rate Bond”) that either is owned or identified by a Fund. The TOB Floater is generally issued to third party investors (typically a money market fund) and the TOB Residual is generally issued to the Fund that sold or identified the Fixed Rate Bond. The TOB Trust divides the income stream provided by the Fixed Rate Bond to create two securities, the TOB Floater, which is a short-term security, and the TOB Residual, which is a longer-term security. The interest rates payable on the TOB Residual issued to a Fund bear an inverse relationship to the interest rate on the TOB Floater. The interest rate on the TOB Floater is reset by a remarketing process typically every 7 to 35 days. After income is paid on the TOB Floater at current rates, the residual income from the Fixed Rate Bond goes to the TOB Residual. Therefore, rising short-term rates result in lower income for the TOB Residual, and vice versa. In the case of a TOB Trust that utilizes the cash received (less transaction expenses) from the issuance of the TOB Floater and TOB Residual to purchase the Fixed Rate Bond from a Fund, the Fund may then invest the cash received in additional securities, generating leverage for the Fund. Other PIMCO-managed accounts may also contribute municipal bonds to a TOB Trust into which a Fund has contributed Fixed Rate Bonds. If multiple PIMCO-managed accounts participate in the same TOB Trust, the economic rights and obligations under the TOB Residual will be shared among the funds ratably in proportion to their participation in the TOB Trust.

The TOB Residual may be more volatile and less liquid than other municipal bonds of comparable maturity. In most circumstances the TOB Residual holder bears substantially all of the underlying Fixed Rate Bond’s downside investment risk and also benefits from any appreciation in the value of the underlying Fixed Rate Bond. Investments in a TOB Residual typically will involve greater risk than investments in Fixed Rate Bonds.

The TOB Residual held by a Fund provides the Fund with the right to: (1) cause the holders of the TOB Floater to tender their notes at par, and (2) cause the sale of the Fixed-Rate Bond held by the TOB Trust, thereby collapsing the TOB Trust. TOB Trusts are generally supported by a liquidity facility provided by a third party bank or other financial institution (the “Liquidity Provider”) that provides for the purchase of TOB Floaters that cannot be remarketed. The holders of the TOB Floaters have the right to tender their certificates in exchange for payment of par plus accrued interest on a periodic basis (typically weekly) or on the occurrence of certain mandatory tender events. The tendered TOB Floaters are remarketed by a remarketing agent, which is typically an affiliated entity of the Liquidity Provider. If the TOB Floaters cannot be remarketed, the TOB Floaters are purchased by the TOB Trust either from the proceeds of a loan from the Liquidity Provider or from a liquidation of the Fixed Rate Bond.

 

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The TOB Trust may also be collapsed without the consent of a Fund, as the TOB Residual holder, upon the occurrence of certain “tender option termination events” (or “TOTEs”) as defined in the TOB Trust agreements. Such termination events typically include the bankruptcy or default of the municipal bond, a substantial downgrade in credit quality of the municipal bond, or a judgment or ruling that interest on the Fixed Rate Bond is subject to federal income taxation. Upon the occurrence of a termination event, the TOB Trust would generally be liquidated in full with the proceeds typically applied first to any accrued fees owed to the trustee, remarketing agent and liquidity provider, and then to the holders of the TOB Floater up to par plus accrued interest owed on the TOB Floater and a portion of gain share, if any, with the balance paid out to the TOB Residual holder. In the case of a mandatory termination event (“MTE”), after the payment of fees, the TOB Floater holders would be paid before the TOB Residual holders (i.e., the Fund). In contrast, in the case of a TOTE, after payment of fees, the TOB Floater holders and the TOB Residual holders would be paid pro rata in proportion to the respective face values of their certificates. If there are insufficient proceeds from the liquidation of the TOB Trust, the party that would bear the losses would depend upon whether a Fund holds a non-recourse TOBs Residual or a recourse TOBs Residual. If a Fund holds a non-recourse TOBs Residual, the Liquidity Provider or holders of the TOBs Floaters would bear the losses on those securities and there would be no recourse to the Fund’s assets. If a Fund holds a recourse TOBs Residual, the Fund (and, indirectly, holders of the Fund’s shares) would typically bear the losses. In particular, if the Fund holds a recourse TOBs Residual, it will typically have entered into an agreement pursuant to which the Fund would be required to pay to the Liquidity Provider the difference between the purchase price of any TOBs Floaters put to the Liquidity Provider by holders of the TOBs Floaters and the proceeds realized from the remarketing of those TOBs Floaters or the sale of the assets in the TOBs Issuer. A Fund may invest in both non-recourse and recourse TOBs Residuals to leverage its portfolio.

In December 2013, regulators finalized rules implementing Section 619 (the “Volcker Rule”) and Section 941 (the “Risk Retention Rules”) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). Both the Volcker Rule and the Risk Retention Rules apply to tender option bond programs and place restrictions on the way certain sponsors may participate in tender option bond programs. Specifically, the Volcker Rule generally prohibits banking entities from engaging in proprietary trading or from acquiring or retaining an ownership interest in, or sponsoring, a hedge fund or private equity fund (“covered fund”), subject to certain exemptions and limitations. Tender option bond programs generally are considered to be covered funds under the Volcker Rule, and, thus, may not be sponsored by a banking entity absent an applicable exemption. The Volcker Rule does not provide for any exemption that would allow banking entities to sponsor tender option bonds in the same manner as they did prior to the Volcker Rule’s compliance date, which was July 21, 2017.

The Risk Retention Rules took effect in December 2016 and require the sponsor to a TOB Trust to retain at least five percent of the credit risk of the underlying assets supporting the TOB Trust’s Municipal Bonds. The Risk Retention Rules may adversely affect the Funds’ ability to engage in TOB Trust transactions or increase the costs of such transactions in certain circumstances.

The Funds have restructured their TOB Trusts in conformity with regulatory guidelines. Under the new TOB Trust structure, the Liquidity Provider or remarketing agent will no longer purchase the tendered TOB Floaters, even in the event of failed remarketing. This may increase the likelihood that a TOB Trust will need to be collapsed and liquidated in order to purchase the tendered TOB Floaters. The TOB Trust may draw upon a loan from the Liquidity Provider to purchase the tendered TOB Floaters. Any loans made by the Liquidity Provider will be secured by the purchased TOB Floaters held by the TOB Trust and will be subject to an increased interest rate based on the number of days the loan is outstanding.

The Funds that may invest in Municipal Bonds also may invest in participation interests. Participation interests are various types of securities created by converting fixed rate bonds into short-term, variable rate certificates. These securities have been developed in the secondary market to meet the demand for short-term, tax-exempt securities. The Funds will invest only in such securities deemed tax-exempt by a nationally recognized bond counsel, but there is no guarantee the interest will be exempt because the IRS has not issued a definitive ruling on the matter.

Municipal Bonds are subject to credit and market risk. Generally, prices of higher quality issues tend to fluctuate less with changes in market interest rates than prices of lower quality issues and prices of longer maturity issues tend to fluctuate more than prices of shorter maturity issues.

The recent economic downturn and budgetary constraints have made Municipal Bonds more susceptible to downgrade, default and bankruptcy. In addition, difficulties in the Municipal Bond markets could result in increased illiquidity, volatility and credit risk, and a decrease in the number of Municipal Bond investment opportunities. The value of Municipal Bonds may also be affected by uncertainties involving the taxation of Municipal Bonds or the rights of Municipal Bond holders in the event of a bankruptcy. Proposals to restrict or eliminate the federal income tax exemption for interest on Municipal

 

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Bonds are introduced before Congress from time to time. These legal uncertainties could affect the Municipal Bond market generally, certain specific segments of the market, or the relative credit quality of particular securities.

The Funds may purchase and sell portfolio investments to take advantage of changes or anticipated changes in yield relationships, markets or economic conditions. The Funds also may sell Municipal Bonds due to changes in PIMCO’s evaluation of the issuer or cash needs resulting from redemption requests for Fund shares. The secondary market for Municipal Bonds typically has been less liquid than that for taxable debt/fixed income securities, and this may affect a Fund’s ability to sell particular Municipal Bonds at then-current market prices, especially in periods when other investors are attempting to sell the same securities. Additionally, Municipal Bonds rated below investment grade (i.e., high yield Municipal Bonds) may not be as liquid as higher-rated Municipal Bonds. Reduced liquidity in the secondary market may have an adverse impact on the market price of a Municipal Bond and on a Fund’s ability to sell a Municipal Bond in response to changes or anticipated changes in economic conditions or to meet the Fund’s cash needs. Reduced liquidity may also make it more difficult to obtain market quotations based on actual trades for purposes of valuing a Fund’s portfolio. For more information on high yield securities please see “High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”) and Securities of Distressed Companies” below.

Prices and yields on Municipal Bonds are dependent on a variety of factors, including general money-market conditions, the financial condition of the issuer, general conditions of the Municipal Bond market, the size of a particular offering, the maturity of the obligation and the rating of the issue. A number of these factors, including the ratings of particular issues, are subject to change from time to time. Information about the financial condition of an issuer of Municipal Bonds may not be as extensive as that which is made available by corporations whose securities are publicly traded.

Each Fund that may invest in Municipal Bonds may purchase custodial receipts representing the right to receive either the principal amount or the periodic interest payments or both with respect to specific underlying Municipal Bonds. In a typical custodial receipt arrangement, an issuer or third party owner of Municipal Bonds deposits the bonds with a custodian in exchange for two classes of custodial receipts. The two classes have different characteristics, but, in each case, payments on the two classes are based on payments received on the underlying Municipal Bonds. In no event will the aggregate interest paid with respect to the two classes exceed the interest paid by the underlying Municipal Bond. Custodial receipts are sold in private placements. The value of a custodial receipt may fluctuate more than the value of a Municipal Bond of comparable quality and maturity.

The perceived increased likelihood of default among issuers of Municipal Bonds has resulted in constrained illiquidity, increased price volatility and credit downgrades of issuers of Municipal Bonds. Local and national market forces—such as declines in real estate prices and general business activity—may result in decreasing tax bases, fluctuations in interest rates, and increasing construction costs, all of which could reduce the ability of certain issuers of Municipal Bonds to repay their obligations. Certain issuers of Municipal Bonds have also been unable to obtain additional financing through, or must pay higher interest rates on, new issues, which may reduce revenues available for issuers of Municipal Bonds to pay existing obligations. In addition, events have demonstrated that the lack of disclosure rules in this area can make it difficult for investors to obtain reliable information on the obligations underlying Municipal Bonds. Adverse developments in the Municipal Bond market may negatively affect the value of all or a substantial portion of a fund’s holdings in Municipal Bonds.

Obligations of issuers of Municipal Bonds are subject to the provisions of bankruptcy, insolvency and other laws affecting the rights and remedies of creditors. Congress or state legislatures may seek to extend the time for payment of principal or interest, or both, or to impose other constraints upon enforcement of such obligations. There is also the possibility that as a result of litigation or other conditions, the power or ability of issuers to meet their obligations for the payment of interest and principal on their Municipal Bonds may be materially affected or their obligations may be found to be invalid or unenforceable. Such litigation or conditions may from time to time have the effect of introducing uncertainties in the market for Municipal Bonds or certain segments thereof, or of materially affecting the credit risk with respect to particular bonds. Adverse economic, business, legal or political developments might affect all or a substantial portion of a Fund’s Municipal Bonds in the same manner.

From time to time, proposals have been introduced before Congress for the purpose of restricting or eliminating the federal income tax exemption for interest on certain types of Municipal Bonds. Additionally, certain other proposals have been introduced that would have the effect of taxing a portion of exempt interest and/or reducing the tax benefits of receiving exempt interest. It can be expected that similar proposals may be introduced in the future. As a result of any such future legislation, the availability of such Municipal Bonds for investment by the Funds and the value of such Municipal Bonds held by the Funds may be affected. In addition, it is possible that events occurring after the date of a Municipal Bond’s issuance, or after a Fund’s acquisition of such obligation, may result in a determination that the interest paid on that obligation is taxable, in certain cases retroactively.

 

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Puerto Rico. Each Fund investing in municipal securities issued by Puerto Rico may be particularly affected by political, economic, environmental, social, regulatory or restructuring developments affecting the ability of Puerto Rican municipal issuers to pay interest or repay principal. In addition, as a result of the ongoing financial challenges faced by Puerto Rico, including those following the outbreak of COVID-19, the Commonwealth’s economic circumstances may change negatively and more rapidly than usual, and the Commonwealth may be less able to maintain up-to-date information for the public.

During the last recession, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (“Commonwealth” or “Puerto Rico”) experienced a significant economic downturn. Few signs of improvement have appeared, and any recovery may be slow as the Commonwealth continues to face significant fiscal challenges, including substantial underfunding of the Commonwealth’s retirement systems, sizeable debt service obligations, and a high level of unemployment. Moreover, the high level of public debt in the Commonwealth affects long-term growth prospects and could cause the Commonwealth to experience additional financial hardship. The amount of its outstanding public debt will make it difficult for Puerto Rico to make full repayment. Certain issuers of Puerto Rico municipal securities have failed to make payments on obligations that have come due, and additional missed payments and defaults may occur in the future. These financial challenges have been compounded by two hurricanes that impacted the Commonwealth in 2017 and a series of earthquakes in December 2019 and January 2020, which caused more than $80 billion and $200 million in damage, respectively, as well as increased costs and declining revenues following the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020. As a result of these and other factors, the Commonwealth is facing significant budget shortfalls and the most severe fiscal crisis that it has endured in decades.

On June 30, 2016, the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (“PROMESA”) was signed into law by President Obama. PROMESA established a federally-appointed oversight board (the “Oversight Board”) to oversee the Commonwealth’s financial operations and allows the Commonwealth and its instrumentalities, with approval of the Oversight Board, to file cases to restructure debt and other obligations in a “Title III” proceeding. Title III incorporates many provisions of the federal Bankruptcy Code and incorporates legal mechanisms for a litigation stay and restructuring of pension and debt obligations, among other provisions. Title III petitions were filed for, among others, the Commonwealth, the Puerto Rico Sales Tax Financing Corporation, and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, three of the largest issuers of Commonwealth debt. It is possible that petitions under Title III or other provisions of PROMESA, including Title VI, for additional Commonwealth instrumentalities will be filed in the future. These restructuring proceedings create uncertainty as to the treatment of claims of varying degrees of seniority in the levels and priorities of payment from the affected entities. As of the date of the Statement of Additional Information, negotiations between Puerto Rico and its instrumentalities and their respective creditors to restructure outstanding debt obligations remain ongoing, and it is not possible to predict whether Puerto Rico and its instrumentalities will be able to come to similar agreements with other creditors.

There can be no assurances that the Commonwealth will not continue to face severe fiscal stress or that such circumstances will not become even more difficult in the future. Furthermore, there can be no guarantee that future developments will not have a materially adverse impact on the Commonwealth’s finances. Any further deterioration in the Commonwealth’s financial condition may have a negative effect on the payment of principal and interest, the marketability, liquidity or value of the securities issued by the Commonwealth, which could reduce the performance of a Fund.

The Commonwealth has faced a number of significant fiscal challenges, including a structural imbalance between its General Fund revenues and expenditures. Such challenges contributed to the passage of PROMESA, which established the Oversight Board and empowered it to approve Puerto Rico’s fiscal plans and budgets. The Oversight Board is comprised of seven members appointed by the President who are nominated through a bipartisan selection process. The budget process requires the Oversight Board, the Governor, and the Commonwealth’s Legislative Assembly to develop a budget that complies with the fiscal plan developed by the Oversight Board and Governor.

Investors should be aware that Puerto Rico relies heavily on transfers from the federal government related to specific programs and activities in the Commonwealth. These transfers include, among others, entitlements for previously performed services, or those resulting from contributions to programs such as Social Security, Veterans’ Benefits, Medicare and U.S. Civil Service retirement pensions, as well as grants such as Nutritional Assistance Program grants and Pell Grant scholarships for higher education. There is considerable uncertainty about which federal policy changes may be enacted in the coming years and the economic impact of those changes. Due to the Commonwealth’s dependence on federal transfers, any actions that reduce or alter these transfers may cause increased fiscal stress in Puerto Rico, which may have a negative impact on the value of the Commonwealth’s municipal securities.

The Commonwealth’s retirement systems, which include the Employees Retirement System, the Teachers Retirement System, and the Judiciary Retirement System, are severely underfunded and are projected to deplete their assets in the near

 

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future. As of the end of fiscal year 2016, the pension systems reported a net pension liability of approximately $44.9 billion. In 2017, the Legislative Assembly enacted laws to reform the operation and funding of the Pension Systems, which eliminated employer contributions. The Commonwealth’s pension systems operate on a “pay-as-you-go” basis, and the General Fund has assumed any payments that the pension systems could not make. As a result, the Commonwealth may have fewer resources funding for other priorities, including payments on its outstanding debt obligations. Alternatively, the Commonwealth may be forced to raise revenue or issue additional debt. Either outcome could increase the pressure on the Commonwealth’s budget, which could have an adverse impact on a Fund’s investments in Puerto Rico.

As of May 30, 2018, the Commonwealth’s consolidated outstanding debt and pension liabilities have grown to over $120 billion, with more than $70 billion in financial debt and more than $50 billion in pension liabilities. In 2017, the Oversight Board filed petitions pursuant to Title III of PROMESA in federal court on behalf the Commonwealth and certain of its instrumentalities, including the Puerto Rico Sales Tax Financing Corporation (“COFINA”), the Employee Retirement System, the Puerto Rico Highways and Transportation Authority, and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Utility (“PREPA”), to begin proceedings to restructure their outstanding debt. As a result of these petitions, the ability of the creditors of the Commonwealth and its instrumentalities that have filed for Title III to take action with respect to outstanding obligations has been temporarily stayed. The judge assigned to oversee the Title III proceedings initiated a confidential mediation process administered by five federal judges. In addition, the judge has concurrently overseen legal proceedings related to the Title III petitions and mediation, including litigation related to a proposed loan from the Commonwealth to PREPA and whether COFINA bonds were validly issued under the Commonwealth’s constitution.

With respect to the litigation regarding the Commonwealth’s outstanding debt, creditors and the Commonwealth had agreed on a Plan of Adjustment that would restructure $35 billion of its outstanding debt. Under the Plan of Adjustment filed in March 2021, $35 billion of the Commonwealth’s outstanding obligations would be reduced by approximately 80% to $7.4 billion and annual debt service payments would be limited to a percentage revenues. The Plan of Adjustment also provides for reductions outstanding pension payments owed by the Commonwealth. The Plan of Adjustment is subject to review by the judge overseeing the Commonwealth’s Title III proceedings, and it is not presently possible to predict whether the agreement will be finalized at the current terms. Consummation of the Plan of Adjustment may also require legislation to be passed in Puerto Rico that allows for the issuance of new debt to facilitate the restructuring. The Plan of Adjustment includes an 8.5% reduction of the monthly public pension payments above $1,500. The Commonwealth government, including the Governor, have publicly opposed any provision in the Plan of Adjustment that would impair public pension benefits. In June 2021, the Commonwealth enacted a law that would create a new public pension trust that would not be subject to the reductions contemplated in the Plan of Adjustment, and the Oversight Board sued in July 2021 to enjoin the implementation of the new law. While is not presently possible to predict whether the new law will take effect, the new law could have the effect of creating billions in new obligations for the Commonwealth.

With respect to the ongoing litigation between the Commonwealth and COFINA, agents for the Commonwealth and COFINA reached an agreement in principle on June 7, 2018, to share sales and use tax revenue and the Pledged Sales Tax Base Amount. The Oversight Board and the COFINA bondholders reached an agreement in August 2018 to restructure the COFINA bonds into a new issuance of bonds. Under the agreement, the senior and junior COFINA bondholders would be entitled to recover specified percentages of the value of their original investments. This agreement is subject to approval by the judge overseeing COFINA’s Title III proceedings. On October 19, 2018, the Oversight Board filed a proposed Plan of Adjustment for COFINA (which is based both on the settlement between COFINA and the Commonwealth regarding ownership of the sales tax and the agreement with the COFINA bondholders) and a proposed Disclosure Statement to be utilized in connection with solicitations to approve the Plan of Adjustment. The judge overseeing the Title III proceedings approved the Disclosure Statement on November 20, 2018 and the Plan of Adjustment on February 4, 2019. The Plan of Adjustment restructures which restructured approximately $17.0 billion of COFINA debt and provides the Commonwealth with an average annual savings of $456 million through 2057, an overall savings of approximately 32%.

With respect to PREPA’s Title III proceeding, a preliminary agreement has been reached between the PREPA bondholders, on one side, and PREPA, the Oversight Board, and Fiscal Agency and Financial Advisory Authority, on the other side, to restructure the outstanding PREPA bonds. Under the preliminary agreement, PREPA’s obligations with respect to outstanding bonds would be reduced by up to 32.5%. The preliminary agreement is subject to review by the judge overseeing PREPA’s Title III proceedings, and it is not presently possible to predict whether the agreement will be finalized.

In addition to the litigation described above, the Commonwealth, its officials and employees are named as defendants in legal proceedings that occur in the normal course of governmental operations. Some of these proceedings involve claims for substantial amounts, which if decided against the Commonwealth might require the Commonwealth to make significant future expenditures or substantially impair future revenue sources. Because of the prospective nature of these proceedings, it is not

 

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presently possible to predict the ultimate outcome of such proceedings, estimate the potential impact on the ability of the Commonwealth to pay debt service costs on its obligations, or determine what impact, if any, such proceedings may have on a Fund’s investments.

The 2021 fiscal plan was certified by the Oversight Board on April 23, 2021 (“2021 Fiscal Plan”). The 2021 Fiscal Plan forecasts that the Commonwealth’s economy would grow by 1.0% during 2021, due largely to budgetary reforms and economic relief provided in response to COVID-19. The 2021 Fiscal Plan contemplates approximately $43.5 billion in federal disaster relief to address damage caused by recent natural disasters and COVID-19. Apart from federal aid, the 2021 Fiscal Plan projects General Fund revenues of approximately $11.6 billion. The budget for fiscal year 2021 had been certified on June 30, 2020, which provides for $10.2 billion in revenues. Against these revenues, the budget provides General Fund expenditures of approximately $10 billion. Allocations in the fiscal year 2021 budget to education, health care, and economic development were approximately $2.0 billion, $937 million, and $1.2 billion, respectively.

In September 2017, two successive hurricanes – Irma and Maria – caused severe damage to Puerto Rico. Hurricane Irma passed to the north of the Commonwealth, but Hurricane Maria made direct landfall, and the damage caused by both storms was extensive. The Commonwealth’s infrastructure was severely damaged by high winds and substantial flooding, including damage to the Commonwealth’s water, power, and telecommunications infrastructure and resulted in more than 1 million people losing power. Current estimates suggest that Hurricane Maria caused approximately $80 billion in damage and has caused a real decline in gross national product in the year following the storms. In February 2018, Congress appropriated approximately $90 billion for disaster recovery efforts for areas affected by the hurricanes, including approximately $11 billion to Puerto Rico. In addition, while the Commonwealth’s population has declined every year since 2013, the trend was accelerated after the damage caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria displaced residents.

In late December 2019 and January 2020, a series of earthquakes, including a magnitude 6.4 earthquake—the strongest to hit the island in more than a century—caused an estimated $200 million in damage. The aftershocks from these earthquakes may continue for years, and it is not currently possible to predict the extent of the damage that could arise from any aftershocks. The length of time needed to rebuild Puerto Rico’s infrastructure is unclear, but could amount to years, during which the Commonwealth is likely to be in an uncertain economic state. The full extent of the natural disaster’s impact on Puerto Rico’s economy and foreign investment in Puerto Rico is difficult to estimate, but is expected to have substantially adverse effects on Puerto Rico’s economy. In addition to diverting funds to relief and recovery efforts, Puerto Rico is expected to lose substantial revenue as a result of decreased tourism and general business operations. There can be no assurances that Puerto Rico will receive the necessary aid to rebuild from the damage caused by the hurricanes or earthquakes or that future catastrophic weather events or natural disasters will not cause similar damage.

In addition, in early 2020, Commonwealth was significantly impacted by a pandemic, which had a substantially adverse effect on the health of the population and economic activity. In March 2020, the Oversight Board authorized the Commonwealth to implement a $787 million relief package to fight the pandemic and its economic impacts, of which $500 million was incremental new spending made available through a special appropriation. Any reduction in the Commonwealth’s revenues as a result of the pandemic could have a negative ability on the Commonwealth to meet its debt service obligations, including with respect to debt held by a Fund. Further, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”) in March 2020, which provided for approximately $2.2 trillion in disaster relief. Among other things, the CARES Act established the Coronavirus Relief Fund (“CRF”), from which Puerto Rico has received $2.2 billion. In March 2021, the American Rescue Plan was signed into law, which provides an additional $350 billion in emergency funding for state, local, territorial, and Tribal governments, including $4.5 billion specifically for relief to U.S. territories. It is not presently possible to predict whether the CRF and American Rescue Plan funds allocated to the Commonwealth will be sufficient to address its economic challenges. The rate and level at which the federal government and the Commonwealth have taken on new debt could have a negative impact on their fiscal health, which could lead to prolonged challenges for their respective economies. A failure by Puerto Rico to meet its debt obligations could lead to a significant decline in the value, liquidity, and marketability of Fund investments.

The damage caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria, the earthquakes and aftershocks, and the pandemic is expected to have substantially adverse effects on the Commonwealth’s economy. In addition to diverting funds to relief and recovery efforts, the Commonwealth is expected to lose revenue as a result of decreased tourism and general business operations. There can be no assurances that the Commonwealth will receive the necessary aid to rebuild from the damage caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria, the earthquakes and aftershocks, and the pandemic, and it is not currently possible to predict the long-term impact that these and other natural disasters or public health emergencies will have on the Commonwealth’s economy. All these developments have a material adverse effect on the Commonwealth’s finances and negatively impact the payment of principal and interest, the marketability, liquidity and value of securities issued by the Commonwealth that are held by a Fund.

 

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Moreover, future weather events, natural disasters, or public health emergencies could negatively impact Puerto Rico’s ability to resolve ongoing debt negotiations.

As of June 25, 2021, Puerto Rico’s general obligation debt was assigned a credit rating of Ca by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) and D by Fitch Ratings (“Fitch”). In 2018, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“S&P”) discontinued their unenhanced ratings of Puerto Rico’s general obligation debt. As a result, general obligation bonds issued by Puerto Rico are currently considered below-investment-grade securities. These ratings reflect only the views of the respective rating agency, an explanation of which may be obtained from each such rating agency. There is no assurance that these ratings will continue for any given period of time or that they will not be revised or withdrawn entirely by the rating agency if, in the judgment of such rating agency, circumstances so warrant. A downward revision or withdrawal of any such rating may have an adverse effect on the market prices of the securities issued by the Commonwealth and its political subdivisions, instrumentalities, and authorities.

Mortgage-Related Securities and Asset-Backed Securities

Mortgage-related securities are interests in pools of residential or commercial mortgage loans, including mortgage loans made by savings and loan institutions, mortgage bankers, commercial banks and others. Such mortgage loans may include non-performing loans, which are loans considered in default or close to default, and reperforming loans (“RPLs”), which are loans that have previously been delinquent but are current at the time securitized. Pools of mortgage loans are assembled as securities for sale to investors by various governmental, government-related and private organizations. See “Mortgage Pass-Through Securities.” Certain of the Funds also may invest in debt securities which are secured with collateral consisting of mortgage-related securities (see “Collateralized Mortgage Obligations”).

The financial downturn of the late 2000s adversely affected the market for mortgage-related securities. The downturn saw dramatic declines in the housing market, with falling home prices and increasing foreclosures and unemployment, and significant asset write-downs by financial institutions. Between 2008 and 2009, the market for mortgage-related securities (and other asset-backed securities) was particularly adversely impacted by, among other factors, the failure of certain large financial institutions and the events leading to the conservatorship and the control by the U.S. Government of FNMA and FHLMC, as described below. These events, coupled with the general economic downturn, resulted in a substantial level of uncertainty in the financial markets, particularly with respect to mortgage-related investments. There is no assurance that the U.S. Government would take similar or further action to support the mortgage-related securities industry, as it has in the past, should the economy experience another downturn. Further, any future government actions may significantly alter the manner in which the mortgage-related securities market functions. Each of these factors could ultimately increase the risk that a Fund could realize losses on mortgage-related securities.

Mortgage Pass-Through Securities. Interests in pools of mortgage-related securities differ from other forms of debt securities, which normally provide for periodic payment of interest in fixed amounts with principal payments at maturity or specified call dates. Instead, these securities provide a monthly payment which consists of both interest and principal payments. In effect, these payments are a “pass-through” of the monthly payments made by the individual borrowers on their residential or commercial mortgage loans, net of any fees paid to the issuer or guarantor of such securities. Additional payments are caused by repayments of principal resulting from the sale of the underlying property, refinancing or foreclosure, net of fees or costs which may be incurred. Some mortgage-related securities (such as securities issued by GNMA) are described as “modified pass-through.” These securities entitle the holder to receive all interest and principal payments owed on the mortgage pool, net of certain fees, at the scheduled payment dates regardless of whether or not the mortgagor actually makes the payment.

The rate of pre-payments on underlying mortgages will affect the price and volatility of a mortgage-related security, and may have the effect of shortening or extending the effective duration of the security relative to what was anticipated at the time of purchase. To the extent that unanticipated rates of pre-payment on underlying mortgages increase the effective duration of a mortgage-related security, the volatility of such security can be expected to increase. The residential mortgage market in the United States has experienced in the past, and could experience in the future, difficulties that may adversely affect the performance and market value of certain of the Funds’ mortgage-related investments. Delinquencies, defaults and losses on residential mortgage loans may increase substantially over certain periods. A decline in or flattening of housing values may exacerbate such delinquencies and losses on residential mortgages. Borrowers with adjustable rate mortgage loans are more sensitive to changes in interest rates, which affect their monthly mortgage payments, and may be unable to secure replacement mortgages at comparably low interest rates. As a result of the 2008 financial crisis, a number of residential mortgage loan originators experienced serious financial difficulties or bankruptcy. Owing largely to the foregoing, reduced investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-related securities and increased investor yield requirements caused limited liquidity in the

 

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secondary market for certain mortgage-related securities, which adversely affected the market value of mortgage-related securities. It is possible that such limited liquidity in such secondary markets could recur or worsen in the future.

Agency Mortgage-Related Securities. The principal governmental guarantor of mortgage-related securities is GNMA. GNMA is a wholly owned U.S. Government corporation within the Department of Housing and Urban Development. GNMA is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the United States Government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by GNMA (such as savings and loan institutions, commercial banks and mortgage bankers) and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration (the “FHA”), or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (the “VA”).

Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government) include FNMA and FHLMC. FNMA is a government-sponsored corporation. FNMA purchases conventional (i.e., not insured or guaranteed by any government agency) residential mortgages from a list of approved seller/servicers which include state and federally chartered savings and loan associations, mutual savings banks, commercial banks and credit unions and mortgage bankers. Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA, but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. FHLMC was created by Congress in 1970 for the purpose of increasing the availability of mortgage credit for residential housing. It is a government-sponsored corporation that issues Participation Certificates (“PCs”), which are pass-through securities, each representing an undivided interest in a pool of residential mortgages. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but PCs are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.

FNMA and FHLMC also securitize RPLs. For example, in FNMA’s case, the RPLs are single-family, fixed rate reperforming loans that generally were previously placed in a mortgage backed securities trust guaranteed by FNMA, purchased from the trust by FNMA and held as a distressed asset after four or more months of delinquency, and subsequently became current (i.e., performing) again. Such RPLs may have exited delinquency through efforts at reducing defaults (e.g., loan modification). In selecting RPLs for securitization, FNMA follows certain criteria related to length of time the loan has been performing, the type of loan (single-family, fixed rate), and the status of the loan as first lien, among other things. FNMA may include different loan structures and modification programs in the future.

On September 6, 2008, the FHFA placed FNMA and FHLMC into conservatorship. As the conservator, FHFA succeeded to all rights, titles, powers and privileges of FNMA and FHLMC and of any stockholder, officer or director of FNMA and FHLMC with respect to FNMA and FHLMC and the assets of FNMA and FHLMC. FHFA selected a new chief executive officer and chairman of the board of directors for each of FNMA and FHLMC.

In connection with the conservatorship, the U.S. Treasury entered into a Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement with each of FNMA and FHLMC pursuant to which the U.S. Treasury will purchase up to an aggregate of $100 billion of each of FNMA and FHLMC to maintain a positive net worth in each enterprise. This agreement contains various covenants that severely limit each enterprise’s operations. In exchange for entering into these agreements, the U.S. Treasury received $1 billion of each enterprise’s senior preferred securities and warrants to purchase 79.9% of each enterprise’s common stock. In 2009, the U.S. Treasury announced that it was doubling the size of its commitment to each enterprise under the Senior Preferred Stock Program to $200 billion. The U.S. Treasury’s obligations under the Senior Preferred Stock Program are for an indefinite period of time for a maximum amount of $200 billion per enterprise. In 2009, the U.S. Treasury further amended the Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement to allow the cap on the U.S. Treasury’s funding commitment to increase as necessary to accommodate any cumulative reduction in FNMA’s and FHLMC’s net worth through the end of 2012. In August 2012, the Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement was further amended to, among other things, accelerate the wind down of the retained portfolio, terminate the requirement that FNMA and FHLMC each pay a 10% dividend annually on all amounts received under the funding commitment, and require the submission of an annual risk management plan to the U.S. Treasury.

FNMA and FHLMC are continuing to operate as going concerns while in conservatorship and each remain liable for all of its obligations, including its guaranty obligations, associated with its mortgage-backed securities. The Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement is intended to enhance each of FNMA’s and FHLMC’s ability to meet its obligations. The FHFA has indicated that the conservatorship of each enterprise will end when the director of FHFA determines that FHFA’s plan to restore the enterprise to a safe and solvent condition has been completed.

Under the Federal Housing Finance Regulatory Reform Act of 2008 (the Reform Act”), which was included as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008, FHFA, as conservator or receiver, has the power to repudiate any contract entered into by FNMA or FHLMC prior to FHFA’s appointment as conservator or receiver, as applicable, if FHFA determines, in its sole discretion, that performance of the contract is burdensome and that repudiation of the contract promotes the orderly

 

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administration of FNMA’s or FHLMC’s affairs. The Reform Act requires FHFA to exercise its right to repudiate any contract within a reasonable period of time after its appointment as conservator or receiver.

FHFA, in its capacity as conservator, has indicated that it has no intention to repudiate the guaranty obligations of FNMA or FHLMC because FHFA views repudiation as incompatible with the goals of the conservatorship. However, in the event that FHFA, as conservator or if it is later appointed as receiver for FNMA or FHLMC, were to repudiate any such guaranty obligation, the conservatorship or receivership estate, as applicable, would be liable for actual direct compensatory damages in accordance with the provisions of the Reform Act. Any such liability could be satisfied only to the extent of FNMA’s or FHLMC’s assets available therefor.

In the event of repudiation, the payments of interest to holders of FNMA or FHLMC mortgage-backed securities would be reduced if payments on the mortgage loans represented in the mortgage loan groups related to such mortgage-backed securities are not made by the borrowers or advanced by the servicer. Any actual direct compensatory damages for repudiating these guaranty obligations may not be sufficient to offset any shortfalls experienced by such mortgage-backed security holders.

Further, in its capacity as conservator or receiver, FHFA has the right to transfer or sell any asset or liability of FNMA or FHLMC without any approval, assignment or consent. Although FHFA has stated that it has no present intention to do so, if FHFA, as conservator or receiver, were to transfer any such guaranty obligation to another party, holders of FNMA or FHLMC mortgage-backed securities would have to rely on that party for satisfaction of the guaranty obligation and would be exposed to the credit risk of that party.

In addition, certain rights provided to holders of mortgage-backed securities issued by FNMA and FHLMC under the operative documents related to such securities may not be enforced against FHFA, or enforcement of such rights may be delayed, during the conservatorship or any future receivership. The operative documents for FNMA and FHLMC mortgage-backed securities may provide (or with respect to securities issued prior to the date of the appointment of the conservator may have provided) that upon the occurrence of an event of default on the part of FNMA or FHLMC, in its capacity as guarantor, which includes the appointment of a conservator or receiver, holders of such mortgage-backed securities have the right to replace FNMA or FHLMC as trustee if the requisite percentage of mortgage-backed securities holders consent. The Reform Act prevents mortgage-backed security holders from enforcing such rights if the event of default arises solely because a conservator or receiver has been appointed. The Reform Act also provides that no person may exercise any right or power to terminate, accelerate or declare an event of default under certain contracts to which FNMA or FHLMC is a party, or obtain possession of or exercise control over any property of FNMA or FHLMC, or affect any contractual rights of FNMA or FHLMC, without the approval of FHFA, as conservator or receiver, for a period of 45 or 90 days following the appointment of FHFA as conservator or receiver, respectively.

FHFA and the White House have made public statements regarding plans to consider ending the conservatorships of FNMA and FHLMC. In the event that FNMA and FHLMC are taken out of conservatorship, it is unclear how the capital structure of FNMA and FHLMC would be constructed and what effects, if any, there may be on FNMA’s and FHLMC’s creditworthiness and guarantees of certain mortgage-backed securities. It is also unclear whether the U.S. Treasury would continue to enforce its rights or perform its obligations under the Senior Preferred Stock Programs. Should FNMA’s and FHLMC’s conservatorship end, there could be an adverse impact on the value of their securities, which could cause losses to a Fund.

In June 2019, under the Single Security Initiative, FNMA and FHLMC started issuing UMBS in place of their current offerings of to-be-announced (“TBA”)-eligible securities. The Single Security Initiative seeks to support the overall liquidity of the TBA market and aligns the characteristics of FNMA and FHLMC certificates. The effects that the Single Security Initiative may have on the market for TBA and other mortgage-backed securities are uncertain.

Government-Sponsored Enterprise (“GSE”) Credit Risk Transfer Securities and GSE Credit-Linked Notes. GSE credit risk transfer securities are notes issued directly by a GSE, such as FNMA or FHLMC, and GSE credit-linked notes are notes issued by a special purpose vehicle (“SPV”) sponsored by a GSE. Investors in these notes provide credit protection for the applicable GSE’s mortgage-related securities guarantee obligations. In this regard, a noteholder receives compensation for providing credit protection to the GSE and, when a specified level of losses on the relevant mortgage loans occurs, the principal balance and certain payments owed to the noteholder may be reduced. In addition, noteholders may receive a return of principal prior to the stated maturity date reflecting prepayment on the underlying mortgage loans and in any other circumstances that may be set forth in the applicable loan agreement. The notes may be issued in different tranches representing the issuance of different levels of credit risk protection to the GSE on the underlying mortgage loans and the notes are not secured by the reference mortgage loans.

 

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GSE Credit Risk Transfer Securities Structure. In this structure, the GSE receives the note sale proceeds. The GSE pays noteholders monthly interest payments and a return of principal on the stated maturity date based on the initial investment amount, as reduced by any covered losses on the reference mortgage loans.

GSE Credit-Linked Notes Structure. In this structure, the SPV receives the note sale proceeds and the SPV’s obligations to the noteholder are collateralized by the note sale proceeds. The SPV invests the proceeds in cash or other short-term assets. The SPV also enters into a credit protection agreement with the GSE pursuant to which the GSE pays the SPV monthly premium payments and the SPV compensates the GSE for covered losses on the reference mortgage loans. The SPV pays noteholders monthly interest payments based on the premium payments paid by the GSE and the performance on the invested note sale proceeds. The noteholders also receive a return of principal on a stated maturity date based on the initial investment amount, as reduced by any covered losses on the reference mortgage loans paid by the SPV or the GSE.

Risks Related to GSE Credit Risk Transfer Securities and GSE Credit-Linked Notes. GSE credit risk transfer securities are general obligations issued by a GSE and are unguaranteed and unsecured. GSE credit-linked notes are similar, except that the notes are issued by an SPV, rather than by a GSE, and the obligations of the SPV are collateralized by the note proceeds as invested by the SPV, which are invested in cash or short-term securities. Although both GSE credit risk transfer securities and GSE credit-linked notes are unguaranteed, obligations of an SPV are also not backstopped by the Department of Treasury or an obligation of a GSE.

The risks associated with these investments are different than the risks associated with an investment in mortgage-backed securities issued by GSEs or a private issuer. If a GSE fails to pay principal or interest on its credit risk transfers or goes through a bankruptcy, insolvency or similar proceeding, holders of such credit risk transfers will have no direct recourse to the underlying mortgage loans. In addition, some or all of the mortgage default risk associated with the underlying mortgage loans is transferred to noteholders. As a result, there can be no assurance that losses will not occur on an investment in GSE credit risk transfer securities or GSE credit-linked notes and Funds investing in these instruments may be exposed to the risk of loss on their investment. In addition, these investments are subject to prepayment risk.

In the case of GSE credit-linked notes, if a GSE fails to make a premium or other required payment to the SPV, the SPV may be unable to pay a noteholder the entire amount of interest or principal payable to the noteholder. In the event of a default on the obligations to noteholders, the SPV’s principal and interest payment obligations to noteholders will be subordinated to the SPV’s credit protection payment obligations to the GSE. Payment of such amounts to noteholders depends on the cash available in the trust from the loan proceeds and the GSE’s premium payments.

Any income earned by the SPV on investments of loan proceeds is expected to be less than the interest payments amounts to be paid to noteholders of the GSE credit-linked notes and interest payments to noteholders will be reduced if the GSE fails to make premium payments to the SPV. An SPV’s investment of loan proceeds may also be concentrated in the securities of a few number of issuers. A noteholder bears any investment losses on the allocable portion of the loan proceeds.

An SPV that issues GSE credit-linked notes may fall within the definition of a “commodity pool” under the Commodity Exchange Act. Certain GSEs are not registered as commodity pool operators in reliance on CFTC no-action relief, subject to certain conditions similar to those under CFTC Rule 4.13(a)(3), with respect to the operation of the SPV. If the GSE or SPV fails to comply with such conditions, noteholders that are investment vehicles, such as the Funds (as applicable), may become ineligible to claim an exclusion from CFTC regulation, to the extent they are currently eligible to claim the exclusion. These Funds may consider steps in order to continue to qualify for exemption from CFTC regulation, or may determine to operate subject to CFTC regulation, which could cause such a Fund to incur increased costs.

Privately Issued Mortgage-Related Securities. Commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers also create pass-through pools of conventional residential mortgage loans. Such issuers may be the originators and/or servicers of the underlying mortgage loans as well as the guarantors of the mortgage-related securities. Pools created by such non-governmental issuers generally offer a higher rate of interest than government and government-related pools because there are no direct or indirect government or agency guarantees of payments in the former pools. However, timely payment of interest and principal of these pools may be supported by various forms of insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance and letters of credit, which may be issued by governmental entities or private insurers. Such insurance and guarantees and the creditworthiness of the issuers thereof will be considered in determining whether a mortgage-related security meets the Trust’s investment quality standards. There can be no assurance that insurers or guarantors can meet their obligations under the insurance policies or guarantee arrangements. The Funds may buy mortgage-related securities without insurance or guarantees if, through an examination of the loan experience and practices of the originators/servicers and poolers, PIMCO determines that the securities

 

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meet the Trust’s quality standards. Securities issued by certain private organizations may not be readily marketable. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity.

Privately issued mortgage-related securities are not subject to the same underwriting requirements for the underlying mortgages that are applicable to those mortgage-related securities that have a government or government-sponsored entity guarantee. As a result, the mortgage loans underlying privately issued mortgage-related securities may, and frequently do, have less favorable collateral, credit risk or other underwriting characteristics than government or government-sponsored mortgage-related securities and have wider variances in a number of terms including interest rate, term, size, purpose and borrower characteristics. Mortgage pools underlying privately issued mortgage-related securities more frequently include second mortgages, high loan-to-value ratio mortgages and manufactured housing loans, in addition to commercial mortgages and other types of mortgages where a government or government-sponsored entity guarantee is not available. The coupon rates and maturities of the underlying mortgage loans in a privately-issued mortgage-related securities pool may vary to a greater extent than those included in a government guaranteed pool, and the pool may include subprime mortgage loans. Subprime loans are loans made to borrowers with weakened credit histories or with a lower capacity to make timely payments on their loans. For these reasons, the loans underlying these securities have had in many cases higher default rates than those loans that meet government underwriting requirements.

The risk of non-payment is greater for mortgage-related securities that are backed by loans that were originated under weak underwriting standards, including loans made to borrowers with limited means to make repayment. A level of risk exists for all loans, although, historically, the poorest performing loans have been those classified as subprime. Other types of privately issued mortgage-related securities, such as those classified as pay-option adjustable rate or Alt-A have also performed poorly. Even loans classified as prime have experienced higher levels of delinquencies and defaults. The substantial decline in real property values across the U.S. has exacerbated the level of losses that investors in privately issued mortgage-related securities have experienced. It is not certain when these trends may reverse. Market factors that may adversely affect mortgage loan repayment include adverse economic conditions, unemployment, a decline in the value of real property, or an increase in interest rates.

Privately issued mortgage-related securities are not traded on an exchange and there may be a limited market for the securities, especially when there is a perceived weakness in the mortgage and real estate market sectors. Without an active trading market, mortgage-related securities held in a Fund’s portfolio may be particularly difficult to value because of the complexities involved in assessing the value of the underlying mortgage loans.

The Funds may purchase privately issued mortgage-related securities that are originated, packaged and serviced by third party entities. It is possible these third parties could have interests that are in conflict with the holders of mortgage-related securities, and such holders (such as a Fund) could have rights against the third parties or their affiliates. For example, if a loan originator, servicer or its affiliates engaged in negligence or willful misconduct in carrying out its duties, then a holder of the mortgage-related security could seek recourse against the originator/servicer or its affiliates, as applicable. Also, as a loan originator/servicer, the originator/servicer or its affiliates may make certain representations and warranties regarding the quality of the mortgages and properties underlying a mortgage-related security. If one or more of those representations or warranties is false, then the holders of the mortgage-related securities (such as a Fund) could trigger an obligation of the originator/servicer or its affiliates, as applicable, to repurchase the mortgages from the issuing trust.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, many of the third parties that are legally bound by trust and other documents have failed to perform their respective duties, as stipulated in such trust and other documents, and investors have had limited success in enforcing terms. To the extent third party entities involved with privately issued mortgage-related securities are involved in litigation relating to the securities, actions may be taken that are adverse to the interests of holders of the mortgage-related securities, including the Funds. For example, third parties may seek to withhold proceeds due to holders of the mortgage-related securities, including the Funds, to cover legal or related costs. Any such action could result in losses to the Funds.

Mortgage-related securities that are issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, are not subject to the Funds’ industry concentration restrictions, set forth under “Investment Restrictions” by virtue of the exclusion from that test available to all U.S. Government securities. The assets underlying privately issued mortgage-related securities may be represented by a portfolio of residential or commercial mortgages (including both whole mortgage loans and mortgage participation interests that may be senior or junior in terms of priority of repayment) or portfolios of mortgage pass-through securities issued or guaranteed by GNMA, FNMA or FHLMC. Mortgage loans underlying a mortgage-related security may in turn be insured or guaranteed by the FHA or the VA. In the case of privately issued mortgage-related securities whose underlying assets are neither U.S. Government securities nor U.S. Government-insured mortgages, to the extent that real

 

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properties securing such assets may be located in the same geographical region, the security may be subject to a greater risk of default than other comparable securities in the event of adverse economic, political or business developments that may affect such region and, ultimately, the ability of residential homeowners to make payments of principal and interest on the underlying mortgages.

PIMCO seeks to manage the portion of any Fund’s assets committed to privately issued mortgage-related securities in a manner consistent with the Fund’s investment objective, policies and overall portfolio risk profile. In determining whether and how much to invest in privately issued mortgage-related securities, and how to allocate those assets, PIMCO will consider a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to: (1) the nature of the borrowers (e.g., residential vs. commercial); (2) the collateral loan type (e.g., for residential: First Lien – Jumbo/Prime, First Lien – Alt-A, First Lien – Subprime, First Lien – Pay-Option or Second Lien; for commercial: Conduit, Large Loan or Single Asset / Single Borrower); and (3) in the case of residential loans, whether they are fixed rate or adjustable mortgages. Each of these criteria can cause privately issued mortgage-related securities to have differing primary economic characteristics and distinguishable risk factors and performance characteristics.

Collateralized Mortgage Obligations (“CMOs”). A CMO is a debt obligation of a legal entity that is collateralized by mortgages and divided into classes. Similar to a bond, interest and prepaid principal is paid, in most cases, on a monthly basis. CMOs may be collateralized by whole mortgage loans or private mortgage bonds, but are more typically collateralized by portfolios of mortgage pass-through securities guaranteed by GNMA, FHLMC, or FNMA, and their income streams.

CMOs are structured into multiple classes, often referred to as “tranches,” with each class bearing a different stated maturity and entitled to a different schedule for payments of principal and interest, including pre-payments. Actual maturity and average life will depend upon the pre-payment experience of the collateral. In the case of certain CMOs (known as “sequential pay” CMOs), payments of principal received from the pool of underlying mortgages, including pre-payments, are applied to the classes of CMOs in the order of their respective final distribution dates. Thus, no payment of principal will be made to any class of sequential pay CMOs until all other classes having an earlier final distribution date have been paid in full.

In a typical CMO transaction, a corporation (“issuer”) issues multiple series (e.g., A, B, C, Z) of CMO bonds (“Bonds”). Proceeds of the Bond offering are used to purchase mortgages or mortgage pass-through certificates (“Collateral”). The Collateral is pledged to a third party trustee as security for the Bonds. Principal and interest payments from the Collateral are used to pay principal on the Bonds in the order A, B, C, Z. The Series A, B, and C Bonds all bear current interest. Interest on the Series Z Bond is accrued and added to principal and a like amount is paid as principal on the Series A, B, or C Bond currently being paid off. When the Series A, B, and C Bonds are paid in full, interest and principal on the Series Z Bond begins to be paid currently. CMOs may be less liquid and may exhibit greater price volatility than other types of mortgage- or asset-backed securities.

As CMOs have evolved, some classes of CMO bonds have become more common. For example, the Funds may invest in parallel-pay and planned amortization class (“PAC”) CMOs and multi-class pass-through certificates. Parallel-pay CMOs and multi-class pass-through certificates are structured to provide payments of principal on each payment date to more than one class. These simultaneous payments are taken into account in calculating the stated maturity date or final distribution date of each class, which, as with other CMO and multi-class pass-through structures, must be retired by its stated maturity date or final distribution date but may be retired earlier. PACs generally require payments of a specified amount of principal on each payment date. PACs are parallel-pay CMOs with the required principal amount on such securities having the highest priority after interest has been paid to all classes. Any CMO or multi-class pass through structure that includes PAC securities must also have support tranches—known as support bonds, companion bonds or non-PAC bonds—which lend or absorb principal cash flows to allow the PAC securities to maintain their stated maturities and final distribution dates within a range of actual prepayment experience. These support tranches are subject to a higher level of maturity risk compared to other mortgage-related securities, and usually provide a higher yield to compensate investors. If principal cash flows are received in amounts outside a pre-determined range such that the support bonds cannot lend or absorb sufficient cash flows to the PAC securities as intended, the PAC securities are subject to heightened maturity risk. Consistent with a Fund’s investment objectives and policies, PIMCO may invest in various tranches of CMO bonds, including support bonds.

Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities. Commercial mortgage-backed securities include securities that reflect an interest in, and are secured by, mortgage loans on commercial real property. Many of the risks of investing in commercial mortgage-backed securities reflect the risks of investing in the real estate securing the underlying mortgage loans. These risks reflect the effects of local and other economic conditions on real estate markets, the ability of tenants to make loan payments, and the ability of a property to attract and retain tenants. Commercial mortgage-backed securities may be less liquid and exhibit greater price volatility than other types of mortgage- or asset-backed securities.

 

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Other Mortgage-Related Securities. Other mortgage-related securities include securities other than those described above that directly or indirectly represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, mortgage loans on real property, including mortgage dollar rolls, CMO residuals or stripped mortgage-backed securities (“SMBS”). Other mortgage-related securities may be equity or debt securities issued by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, homebuilders, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks, partnerships, trusts and special purpose entities of the foregoing.

Mortgage-related securities include, among other things, securities that reflect an interest in reverse mortgages. In a reverse mortgage, a lender makes a loan to a homeowner based on the homeowner’s equity in his or her home. While a homeowner must be age 62 or older to qualify for a reverse mortgage, reverse mortgages may have no income restrictions. Repayment of the interest or principal for the loan is generally not required until the homeowner dies, sells the home, or ceases to use the home as his or her primary residence.

There are three general types of reverse mortgages: (1) single-purpose reverse mortgages, which are offered by certain state and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations; (2) federally-insured reverse mortgages, which are backed by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; and (3) proprietary reverse mortgages, which are privately offered loans. A mortgage-related security may be backed by a single type of reverse mortgage. Reverse mortgage-related securities include agency and privately issued mortgage-related securities. The principal government guarantor of reverse mortgage-related securities is GNMA.

Reverse mortgage-related securities may be subject to risks different than other types of mortgage-related securities due to the unique nature of the underlying loans. The date of repayment for such loans is uncertain and may occur sooner or later than anticipated. The timing of payments for the corresponding mortgage-related security may be uncertain. Because reverse mortgages are offered only to persons 62 and older and there may be no income restrictions, the loans may react differently than traditional home loans to market events. Additionally, there can be no assurance that service providers to reverse mortgage trusts (“RMTs”) will diligently and appropriately execute their duties with respect to servicing such trusts. As a result, investors (which may include the Funds) in notes issued by RMTs may be deprived of payments to which they are entitled. This could result in losses to the Funds. Investors, including the Funds, may determine to pursue negotiations or legal claims or otherwise seek compensation from RMT service providers in certain instances. This may involve the Funds incurring costs and expenses associated with such actions.

CMO Residuals. CMO residuals are mortgage securities issued by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, homebuilders, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks and special purpose entities of the foregoing.

The cash flow generated by the mortgage assets underlying a series of CMOs is applied first to make required payments of principal and interest on the CMOs and second to pay the related administrative expenses and any management fee of the issuer. The residual in a CMO structure generally represents the interest in any excess cash flow remaining after making the foregoing payments. Each payment of such excess cash flow to a holder of the related CMO residual represents income and/or a return of capital. The amount of residual cash flow resulting from a CMO will depend on, among other things, the characteristics of the mortgage assets, the coupon rate of each class of CMO, prevailing interest rates, the amount of administrative expenses and the pre-payment experience on the mortgage assets. In particular, the yield to maturity on CMO residuals is extremely sensitive to pre-payments on the related underlying mortgage assets, in the same manner as an interest-only (“IO”) class of stripped mortgage-backed securities. See “Stripped Mortgage-Backed Securities” below. In addition, if a series of a CMO includes a class that bears interest at an adjustable rate, the yield to maturity on the related CMO residual will also be extremely sensitive to changes in the level of the index upon which interest rate adjustments are based. As described below with respect to stripped mortgage-backed securities, in certain circumstances a Fund may fail to recoup fully its initial investment in a CMO residual.

CMO residuals are generally purchased and sold by institutional investors through several investment banking firms acting as brokers or dealers. Transactions in CMO residuals are generally completed only after careful review of the characteristics of the securities in question. In addition, CMO residuals may, or pursuant to an exemption therefrom, may not have been registered under the 1933 Act. CMO residuals, whether or not registered under the 1933 Act, may be subject to certain restrictions on transferability. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity.

Adjustable Rate Mortgage-Backed Securities. Adjustable rate mortgage-backed securities (“ARMBSs”) have interest rates that reset at periodic intervals. Acquiring ARMBSs permits a Fund to participate in increases in prevailing current

 

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interest rates through periodic adjustments in the coupons of mortgages underlying the pool on which ARMBSs are based. Such ARMBSs generally have higher current yield and lower price fluctuations than is the case with more traditional fixed income debt securities of comparable rating and maturity. In addition, when prepayments of principal are made on the underlying mortgages during periods of rising interest rates, a Fund can reinvest the proceeds of such prepayments at rates higher than those at which they were previously invested. Mortgages underlying most ARMBSs, however, have limits on the allowable annual or lifetime increases that can be made in the interest rate that the mortgagor pays. Therefore, if current interest rates rise above such limits over the period of the limitation, a Fund, when holding an ARMBS, does not benefit from further increases in interest rates. Moreover, when interest rates are in excess of coupon rates (i.e., the rates being paid by mortgagors) of the mortgages, ARMBSs behave more like fixed income securities and less like adjustable rate securities and are subject to the risks associated with fixed income securities. In addition, during periods of rising interest rates, increases in the coupon rate of adjustable rate mortgages generally lag current market interest rates slightly, thereby creating the potential for capital depreciation on such securities.

Stripped Mortgage-Backed Securities. SMBS are derivative multi-class mortgage securities. SMBS may be issued by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. Government, or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks and special purpose entities of the foregoing.

SMBS are usually structured with two classes that receive different proportions of the interest and principal distributions on a pool of mortgage assets. A common type of SMBS will have one class receiving some of the interest and most of the principal from the mortgage assets, while the other class will receive most of the interest and the remainder of the principal. In the most extreme case, one class will receive all of the interest (the “IO” class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only or “PO” class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including pre-payments) on the related underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on a Fund’s yield to maturity from these securities. If the underlying mortgage assets experience greater than anticipated pre-payments of principal, a Fund may fail to recoup some or all of its initial investment in these securities even if the security is in one of the highest rating categories.

Collateralized Bond Obligations, Collateralized Loan Obligations and other Collateralized Debt Obligations. Certain Funds may invest in each of collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), other collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) and other similarly structured securities. CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a trust which is often backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment grade fixed income securities. The collateral can be from many different types of fixed income securities such as high yield debt, residential privately issued mortgage-related securities, commercial privately issued mortgage-related securities, trust preferred securities and emerging market debt. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. Other CDOs are trusts backed by other types of assets representing obligations of various parties. CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs may charge management fees and administrative expenses.

For CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs, the cash flows from the trust are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the “equity” tranche which bears the bulk of defaults from the bonds or loans in the trust and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default in all but the most severe circumstances. Since they are partially protected from defaults, senior tranches from a CBO trust, CLO trust or trust of another CDO typically have higher ratings and lower yields than their underlying securities, and can be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CBO, CLO or other CDO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults, as well as aversion to CBO, CLO or other CDO securities as a class.

The risks of an investment in a CBO, CLO or other CDO depend largely on the type of the collateral securities and the class of the instrument in which a Fund invests. Normally, CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs are privately offered and sold, and thus, are not registered under the securities laws. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity. In addition to the normal risks associated with fixed income securities discussed elsewhere in this Statement of Additional Information and the Funds’ Prospectuses (e.g., prepayment risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk, structural risk, legal risk and interest rate risk (which may be exacerbated if the interest rate payable on a structured financing changes based on multiples of changes in interest rates or inversely to changes in interest rates)), CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs carry additional risks including, but are not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the quality

 

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of the collateral may decline in value or default; (iii) the risk that a Fund may invest in CBOs, CLOs or other CDOs that are subordinate to other classes; and (iv) the complex structure of the security may not be fully understood at the time of investment and may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results.

Asset-Backed Securities. Asset-backed securities (“ABS”) are bonds backed by pools of loans or other receivables. ABS are created from many types of assets, including, but not limited to, auto loans, accounts receivable such as credit card receivables and hospital account receivables, home equity loans, student loans, boat loans, mobile home loans, recreational vehicle loans, manufactured housing loans, aircraft leases, computer leases and syndicated bank loans. ABS are issued through special purpose vehicles that are bankruptcy remote from the issuer of the collateral. The credit quality of an ABS transaction depends on the performance of the underlying assets. To protect ABS investors from the possibility that some borrowers could miss payments or even default on their loans, ABS include various forms of credit enhancement.

Some ABS, particularly home equity loan transactions, are subject to interest-rate risk and prepayment risk. A change in interest rates can affect the pace of payments on the underlying loans, which in turn, affects total return on the securities. ABS also carry credit or default risk. If many borrowers on the underlying loans default, losses could exceed the credit enhancement level and result in losses to investors in an ABS transaction. Additionally, the value of ABS is subject to risks associated with the servicers’ performance. In some circumstances, a servicer’s or originator’s mishandling of documentation related to the underlying collateral (e.g., failure to properly document a security interest in the underlying collateral) may affect the rights of the security holders in and to the underlying collateral. Finally, ABS have structure risk due to a unique characteristic known as early amortization, or early payout, risk. Built into the structure of most ABS are triggers for early payout, designed to protect investors from losses. These triggers are unique to each transaction and can include: a big rise in defaults on the underlying loans, a sharp drop in the credit enhancement level, or even the bankruptcy of the originator. Once early amortization begins, all incoming loan payments (after expenses are paid) are used to pay investors as quickly as possible based upon a predetermined priority of payment.

Consistent with a Fund’s investment objectives and policies, PIMCO also may invest in other types of asset-backed securities.

Real Estate Assets and Related Derivatives

Certain Funds may generally gain exposure to the real estate sector by investing in real estate-linked derivatives (Index Funds and Active Funds, excluding the PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Enhanced Short Maturity Active ESG Exchange-Traded Fund, PIMCO Government Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund and PIMCO Prime Limited Maturity Active Exchange-Traded Fund), real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and common, preferred and convertible securities of issuers in real estate-related industries. These Funds may also invest in loans or other investments secured by real estate and may, as a result of default, foreclosure or otherwise, take possession of and hold real estate as a direct owner (see “Loans and Other Indebtedness, Loan Participations and Assignments” below). Each of these types of investments are subject, directly or indirectly, to risks associated with ownership of real estate, including changes in the general economic climate or local conditions (such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for space), loss to casualty or condemnation, increases in property taxes and operating expenses, zoning law amendments, changes in interest rates, overbuilding and increased competition, including competition based on rental rates, variations in market value, changes in the financial condition of tenants, changes in operating costs, attractiveness and location of the properties, adverse changes in the real estate markets generally or in specific sectors of the real estate industry and possible environmental liabilities. Real estate-related investments may entail leverage and may be highly volatile.

REITs are pooled investment vehicles that own, and typically operate, income-producing real estate. If a REIT meets certain requirements, including distributing to shareholders substantially all of its taxable income (other than net capital gains), then it is generally not taxed on the income distributed to shareholders. REITs are subject to management fees and other expenses, and so the Funds that invest in REITs will bear their proportionate share of the costs of the REITs’ operations. Dividends received by a Fund from a REIT generally will not constitute qualified dividend income. REITs may not provide complete tax information to a Fund until after the calendar year-end. Consequently, because of the delay, it may be necessary for a Fund to request permission from the IRS to extend the deadline for issuance of Form 1099-DIV.

There are three general categories of REITs: Equity REITs, Mortgage REITs and Hybrid REITs. Equity REITs invest primarily in direct fee ownership or leasehold ownership of real property; they derive most of their income from rents. Mortgage REITs invest mostly in mortgages on real estate, which may secure construction, development or long-term loans, and the main source of their income is mortgage interest payments. Hybrid REITs hold both ownership and mortgage interests in real estate.

 

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Along with the risks common to different types of real estate-related securities, REITs, no matter the type, involve additional risk factors. These include poor performance by the REIT’s manager, changes to the tax laws, and failure by the REIT to qualify for tax-free distribution of income or exemption under the 1940 Act. Furthermore, REITs are not diversified and are heavily dependent on cash flow. Investments in REIT equity securities could require a Fund to accrue and distribute income not yet received by the Fund. On the other hand, investments in REIT equity securities can also result in a Fund’s receipt of cash in excess of the REIT’s earnings; if the Fund distributes such amounts, such distribution could constitute a return of capital to Fund shareholders for federal income tax purposes.

A Fund or some of the REITs in which a Fund may invest may be permitted to hold senior or residual interests in real estate mortgage investment conduits (“REMICs”) or debt or equity interests in taxable mortgage pools (“TMPs”). A Fund may also hold interests in “Re-REMICs,” which are interests in securitizations formed by the contribution of asset backed or other similar securities into a trust which then issues securities in various tranches. The Funds may participate in the creation of a Re-REMIC by contributing assets to the trust and receiving junior and/or senior securities in return. An interest in a Re-REMIC security may be riskier than the securities originally held by and contributed to the trust, and the holders of the Re-REMIC securities will bear the costs associated with the securitization.

Bank Obligations

Bank obligations in which the Funds may invest include certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, and fixed time deposits. Certificates of deposit are negotiable certificates issued against funds deposited in a commercial bank for a definite period of time and earning a specified return. Bankers’ acceptances are negotiable drafts or bills of exchange, normally drawn by an importer or exporter to pay for specific merchandise, which are “accepted” by a bank, meaning, in effect, that the bank unconditionally agrees to pay the face value of the instrument on maturity. Fixed time deposits are bank obligations payable at a stated maturity date and bearing interest at a fixed rate. Fixed time deposits may be withdrawn on demand by the investor, but may be subject to early withdrawal penalties which vary depending upon market conditions and the remaining maturity of the obligation. There are no contractual restrictions on the right to transfer a beneficial interest in a fixed time deposit to a third party, although there is no market for such deposits. A Fund may limit investments in fixed time deposits which: (1) are not subject to prepayment; or (2) provide for withdrawal penalties upon prepayment (other than overnight deposits). Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity.

The activities of U.S. banks and most foreign banks are subject to comprehensive regulations which, in the case of U.S. regulations, have undergone substantial changes in the past decade and are currently subject to legislative and regulatory scrutiny. The enactment of new legislation or regulations, as well as changes in interpretation and enforcement of current laws, may affect the manner of operations and profitability of U.S. and foreign banks. Significant developments in the U.S. banking industry have included increased competition from other types of financial institutions, increased acquisition activity and geographic expansion. Banks may be particularly susceptible to certain economic factors, such as interest rate changes and adverse developments in the market for real estate. Fiscal and monetary policy and general economic cycles can affect the availability and cost of funds, loan demand and asset quality and thereby impact the earnings and financial conditions of banks.

Subject to the Trust’s limitation on concentration as described in the “Investment Restrictions” section below, there is no additional limitation on the amount of a Fund’s assets which may be invested in obligations of foreign banks which meet the conditions set forth herein.

Obligations of foreign banks involve somewhat different investment risks than those affecting obligations of U.S. banks, including the possibilities that their liquidity could be impaired because of future political and economic developments, that their obligations may be less marketable than comparable obligations of U.S. banks, that a foreign jurisdiction might impose withholding taxes on interest income payable on those obligations, that foreign deposits may be seized or nationalized, that foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls may be adopted which might adversely affect the payment of principal and interest on those obligations and that the selection of those obligations may be more difficult because there may be less publicly available information concerning foreign banks or the accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, practices and requirements applicable to foreign banks may differ from those applicable to United States banks. Foreign banks are not generally subject to examination by any U.S. Government agency or instrumentality.

Loans and Other Indebtedness, Loan Participations and Assignments

Each Fund may purchase indebtedness and participations in commercial loans, as well as interests and/or servicing or similar rights in such loans. Such instruments may be secured or unsecured and may be newly-originated (and may be specifically designed for a Fund). Indebtedness is different from traditional debt securities in that debt securities are part of a

 

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large issue of securities to the public whereas indebtedness may not be a security and may represent a specific commercial loan to a borrower. Loan participations typically represent direct participation, together with other parties, in a loan to a corporate borrower, and generally are offered by banks or other financial institutions or lending syndicates. The Funds may participate in such syndications, or can buy part of a loan, becoming a part lender. When purchasing indebtedness and loan participations, a Fund assumes the credit risk associated with the corporate borrower and may assume the credit risk associated with an interposed bank or other financial intermediary. The indebtedness and loan participations that a Fund may acquire may not be rated by any nationally recognized rating service.

A loan is often administered by an agent bank acting as agent for all holders. The agent bank administers the terms of the loan, as specified in the loan agreement. In addition, the agent bank is normally responsible for the collection of principal and interest payments from the corporate borrower and the apportionment of these payments to the credit of all institutions which are parties to the loan agreement. Unless, under the terms of the loan or other indebtedness, a Fund has direct recourse against the corporate borrower, the Fund may have to rely on the agent bank or other financial intermediary to apply appropriate credit remedies against a corporate borrower.

A financial institution’s employment as agent bank might be terminated in the event that it fails to observe a requisite standard of care or becomes insolvent. A successor agent bank would generally be appointed to replace the terminated agent bank, and assets held by the agent bank under the loan agreement should remain available to holders of such indebtedness. However, if assets held by the agent bank for the benefit of a Fund were determined to be subject to the claims of the agent bank’s general creditors, the Fund might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on a loan or loan participation and could suffer a loss of principal and/or interest. In situations involving other interposed financial institutions (e.g., an insurance company or governmental agency) similar risks may arise.

Purchasers of loans and other forms of direct indebtedness depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the corporate borrower for payment of principal and interest. If a Fund does not receive scheduled interest or principal payments on such indebtedness, the Fund’s share price and yield could be adversely affected. Loans that are fully secured offer a Fund more protection than an unsecured loan in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured loan would satisfy the corporate borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral can be liquidated. In the event of the bankruptcy of a borrower, a Fund could experience delays or limitations in its ability to realize the benefits of any collateral securing a loan.

The Funds may acquire loan participations with credit quality comparable to that of issuers of its securities investments. Indebtedness of companies whose creditworthiness is poor involves substantially greater risks, and may be highly speculative. Some companies may never pay off their indebtedness, or may pay only a small fraction of the amount owed. Consequently, when acquiring indebtedness of companies with poor credit, a Fund bears a substantial risk of losing the entire amount of the instrument acquired. The Funds may make purchases of indebtedness and loan participations to achieve income and/or capital appreciation.

Certain Funds that are diversified limit the amount of their total assets that they will invest in any one issuer and all Funds limit the amount of their total assets that they will invest in issuers within the same industry (see “Investment Restrictions”). For purposes of these limits, a Fund generally will treat the corporate borrower as the “issuer” of indebtedness held by the Fund. In the case of loan participations where a bank or other lending institution serves as a financial intermediary between a Fund and the corporate borrower, if the participation does not shift to the Fund the direct debtor-creditor relationship with the corporate borrower, the Fund will treat both the lending bank or other lending institution and the corporate borrower as “issuers” for purposes of a Fund’s policy with respect to diversification under Fundamental Investment Restriction 2 below in accordance with written guidance from the staff of the SEC. Treating a financial intermediary as an issuer of indebtedness may restrict a Fund’s ability to invest in indebtedness related to a single financial intermediary even if the underlying borrowers represent many different companies.

Loans and other types of direct indebtedness (which a Fund may originate, acquire or otherwise gain exposure to) may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what PIMCO believes to be a fair price. In addition, valuation of illiquid indebtedness involves a greater degree of judgment in determining a Fund’s net asset value than if that value were based on available market quotations, and could result in significant variations in the Fund’s daily share price. At the same time, some loan interests are traded among certain financial institutions and accordingly may be deemed liquid. As the market for different types of indebtedness develops, the liquidity of these instruments is expected to improve. Please refer to “Illiquid Investments” below for further discussion of regulatory

 

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considerations and constraints relating to investment liquidity. Acquisitions of loan participations are considered to be debt obligations for purposes of the Trust’s investment restriction relating to the lending of funds or assets by a Fund.

Acquisition of loans through a purchase of a loan or a direct assignment of a financial institution’s interests with respect to the loan may involve additional risks to the Funds. The purchaser of an assignment typically succeeds to all the rights and obligations under the loan agreement with the same rights and obligations as the assigning lender. Assignments may, however, be arranged through private negotiations between potential assignees and potential assignors, and the rights and obligations acquired by the purchaser of an assignment may differ from, and be more limited than, those held by the assigning lender. For example, if a loan is foreclosed, a Fund could become owner, in whole or in part, of any collateral, which could include, among other assets, real estate or other real or personal property, and would bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and holding or disposing of the collateral. In addition, it is conceivable that under emerging legal theories of lender liability, a Fund could be held liable as co-lender. It is unclear whether loans and other forms of direct indebtedness offer securities law protections against fraud and misrepresentation. In the absence of definitive regulatory guidance, the Funds rely on PIMCO’s research in an attempt to avoid situations where fraud or misrepresentation could adversely affect the Funds.

Certain Funds may make, participate in or acquire debtor-in-possession financings (commonly known as “DIP financings”). DIP financings are arranged when an entity seeks the protections of the bankruptcy court under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. These financings allow the entity to continue its business operations while reorganizing under Chapter 11. Such financings constitute senior liens on unencumbered security (i.e., security not subject to other creditors’ claims). There is a risk that the entity will not emerge from Chapter 11 and be forced to liquidate its assets under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. In the event of liquidation, a Fund’s only recourse will be against the property securing the DIP financing.

Certain Funds may act as the originator for direct loans to a borrower. Direct loans between a Fund and a borrower may not be administered by an underwriter or agent bank. The Funds may provide financing to commercial borrowers directly or through companies acquired (or created) and owned by or otherwise affiliated with one or more Funds. The terms of the direct loans are negotiated with borrowers in private transactions. A direct loan may be secured or unsecured.

In determining whether to make a direct loan, a Fund will rely primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower and/or any collateral for payment of interest and repayment of principal. In making a direct loan, a Fund is exposed to the risk that the borrower may default or become insolvent and, consequently, that the Fund will lose money on the loan. Furthermore, direct loans may subject a Fund to liquidity and interest rate risk and certain direct loans may be deemed illiquid. Direct loans are not publicly traded and may not have a secondary market. The lack of a secondary market for direct loans may have an adverse impact on the ability of a Fund to dispose of a direct loan and/or to value the direct loan.

When engaging in direct lending, a Fund’s performance may depend, in part, on the ability of the Fund to originate loans on advantageous terms. In originating and purchasing loans, a Fund will often compete with a broad spectrum of lenders. Increased competition for, or a diminishment in the available supply of, qualifying loans could result in lower yields on and/or less advantageous terms of such loans, which could reduce Fund performance.

As part of its lending activities, a Fund may originate loans to companies that are experiencing significant financial or business difficulties, including companies involved in bankruptcy or other reorganization and liquidation proceedings. Although the terms of such financing may result in significant financial returns to the Fund, they involve a substantial degree of risk. The level of analytical sophistication, both financial and legal, necessary for successful financing to companies experiencing significant business and financial difficulties is unusually high. Different types of assets may be used as collateral for a Fund’s loans and, accordingly, the valuation of and risks associated with such collateral will vary by loan. There is no assurance that a Fund will correctly evaluate the value of the assets collateralizing the Fund’s loans or the prospects for a successful reorganization or similar action. In any reorganization or liquidation proceeding relating to a company that the Fund funds, the Fund may lose all or part of the amounts advanced to the borrower or may be required to accept collateral with a value less than the amount of the loan advanced by the Fund or its affiliates to the borrower. Furthermore, in the event of a default by a borrower, a Fund may have difficulty disposing of the assets used as collateral for a loan.

Various state licensing requirements could apply to a Fund with respect to the origination, acquisition, holding, servicing, foreclosure and/or disposition of loans and similar assets. The licensing requirements could apply depending on the location of the borrower, the location of the collateral securing the loan, or the location where the Fund or PIMCO operates or has offices. In states in which it is licensed, a Fund or PIMCO will be required to comply with applicable laws and regulations, including consumer protection and anti-fraud laws, which could impose restrictions on the Fund’s or PIMCO’s ability to take certain actions to protect the value of its holdings in such assets and impose compliance costs. Failure to comply with such laws and regulations could lead to, among other penalties, a loss of a Fund’s or PIMCO’s license, which in turn could require

 

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the Fund to divest assets located in or secured by real property located in that state. These risks will also apply to issuers and entities in which a Fund invests that hold similar assets, as well as any origination company or servicer in which the Fund owns an interest.

Loan origination and servicing companies are routinely involved in legal proceedings concerning matters that arise in the ordinary course of their business. These legal proceedings range from actions involving a single plaintiff to class action lawsuits with potentially tens of thousands of class members. In addition, a number of participants in the loan origination and servicing industry (including control persons of industry participants) have been the subject of regulatory actions by state regulators, including state Attorneys General, and by the federal government. Governmental investigations, examinations or regulatory actions, or private lawsuits, including purported class action lawsuits, may adversely affect such companies’ financial results. To the extent a Fund seeks to engage in origination and/or servicing directly, or has a financial interest in, or is otherwise affiliated with, an origination or servicing company, the Fund will be subject to enhanced risks of litigation, regulatory actions and other proceedings. As a result, a Fund may be required to pay legal fees, settlement costs, damages, penalties or other charges, any or all of which could materially adversely affect the Fund and its holdings.

Trade Claims

The Funds may purchase trade claims and similar obligations or claims against companies in bankruptcy proceedings. Trade claims are non-securitized rights of payment arising from obligations that typically arise when vendors and suppliers extend credit to a company by offering payment terms for products and services. If the company files for bankruptcy, payments on these trade claims stop and the claims are subject to compromise along with the other debts of the company. Trade claims may be purchased directly from the creditor or through brokers. There is no guarantee that a debtor will ever be able to satisfy its trade claim obligations. Trade claims are subject to the risks associated with low-quality obligations.

Corporate Debt Securities

A Fund’s investments in U.S. dollar or foreign currency-denominated corporate debt securities of domestic or foreign issuers are limited to corporate debt securities (corporate bonds, debentures, notes and other similar corporate debt instruments, including convertible securities) which meet the minimum ratings criteria set forth for the Fund, or, if unrated, are in PIMCO’s opinion comparable in quality to corporate debt securities in which the Fund may invest.

The rate of interest on a corporate debt security may be fixed, floating or variable, and may vary inversely with respect to a reference rate. The rate of return or return of principal on some debt obligations may be linked or indexed to the level of exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and a foreign currency or currencies. Debt securities may be acquired with warrants attached.

Securities rated Baa and BBB are the lowest which are considered “investment grade” obligations. Moody’s describes securities rated Baa as judged to be medium-grade and subject to moderate credit risk and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics. S&P describes securities rated BBB as exhibiting adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. Fitch describes securities rated BBB as having good credit quality with current low expectations of default. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity. For a discussion of securities rated below investment grade, see “High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”) and Securities of Distressed Companies” below. The Funds may invest in debt securities that are rated in any category established by one or more independent rating organizations or that are unrated.

High Yield Securities (“Junk Bonds”) and Securities of Distressed Companies

Investments in securities rated below investment grade that are eligible for purchase by certain Funds are described as “speculative” by Moody’s, S&P and Fitch. Investment in lower rated corporate debt securities (“high yield securities” or “junk bonds”) and securities of distressed companies generally provides greater income and increased opportunity for capital appreciation than investments in higher quality securities, but they also typically entail greater price volatility and principal and income risk. Securities of distressed companies include both debt and equity securities. High yield securities and debt securities of distressed companies are regarded as predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. Issuers of high yield and distressed company securities may be involved in restructurings or bankruptcy proceedings that may not be successful. Analysis of the creditworthiness of issuers of debt securities that are high yield or debt securities of distressed companies may be more complex than for issuers of higher quality debt securities.

 

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High yield securities and debt securities of distressed companies may be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than investment grade securities. The prices of these securities have been found to be less sensitive to interest-rate changes than higher-rated investments, but more sensitive to adverse economic downturns or individual corporate developments. A projection of an economic downturn, for example, could cause a decline in prices of high yield securities and debt securities of distressed companies because the advent of a recession could lessen the ability of a highly leveraged company to make principal and interest payments on its debt securities, and a high yield security may lose significant market value before a default occurs. If an issuer of securities defaults, in addition to risking payment of all or a portion of interest and principal, the Funds by investing in such securities may incur additional expenses to seek recovery of their respective investments. In the case of securities structured as zero-coupon or pay-in-kind securities, their market prices are affected to a greater extent by interest rate changes, and therefore tend to be more volatile than securities which pay interest periodically and in cash. PIMCO seeks to reduce these risks through diversification, credit analysis and attention to current developments and trends in both the economy and financial markets.

High yield and distressed company securities may not be listed on any exchange and a secondary market for such securities may be comparatively illiquid relative to markets for other more liquid fixed income securities. Consequently, transactions in high yield and distressed company securities may involve greater costs than transactions in more actively traded securities, which could adversely affect the price at which the Funds could sell a high yield or distressed company security, and could adversely affect the daily net asset value of the shares. A lack of publicly-available information, irregular trading activity and wide bid/ask spreads among other factors, may, in certain circumstances, make high yield debt more difficult to sell at an advantageous time or price than other types of securities or instruments. These factors may result in a Fund being unable to realize full value for these securities and/or may result in a Fund not receiving the proceeds from a sale of a high yield or distressed company security for an extended period after such sale, each of which could result in losses to the Fund. In addition, adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may decrease the values and liquidity of high yield and distressed company securities, especially in a thinly-traded market. When secondary markets for high yield and distressed company securities are less liquid than the market for other types of securities, it may be more difficult to value the securities because such valuation may require more research, and elements of judgment may play a greater role in the valuation because there is less reliable, objective data available. PIMCO seeks to minimize the risks of investing in all securities through diversification, in-depth analysis and attention to current market developments.

The use of credit ratings as the sole method of evaluating high yield securities and debt securities of distressed companies can involve certain risks. For example, credit ratings evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments of a debt security, not the market value risk of a security. Also, credit rating agencies may fail to change credit ratings in a timely fashion to reflect events since the security was last rated. PIMCO does not rely solely on credit ratings when selecting debt securities for the Funds, and develops its own independent analysis of issuer credit quality. If a credit rating agency changes the rating of a debt security held by a Fund, the Fund may retain the security if PIMCO deems it in the best interest of shareholders.

Creditor Liability and Participation on Creditors’ Committees

Generally, when a Fund holds bonds or other similar fixed income securities of an issuer, the Fund becomes a creditor of the issuer. If a Fund is a creditor of an issuer it may be subject to challenges related to the securities that it holds, either in connection with the bankruptcy of the issuer or in connection with another action brought by other creditors of the issuer, shareholders of the issuer or the issuer itself. Although under no obligation to do so, PIMCO, as investment adviser to a Fund, may from time to time have an opportunity to consider, on behalf of a Fund and other similarly situated clients, negotiating or otherwise participating in the restructuring of the Fund’s portfolio investment or the issuer of such investment. PIMCO, in its judgment and d