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U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Comments on Proposed Rule:
Short Sales

Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99


Author: dianecasper@home.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:46 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:46:02 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.69.210.190 submit_by = dianecasper@home.com Name = Diane Banner Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: Qjonny@home.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:34 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:34:50 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.4.252.212 submit_by = Qjonny@home.com Name = Shawn Batchelder Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: genison@earthlink.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:12 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:12:41 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 168.191.252.215 submit_by = genison@earthlink.net Name = Lloyd D. Blocker Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jerrinb23@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:41 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:41:12 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.112.158.227 submit_by = jerrinb23@hotmail.com Name = jerrin brown Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: KNTSKC@AOL.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:37 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:37:03 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.192.29 submit_by = KNTSKC@AOL.com Name = Kent Christenberry Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: dcodd@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:44 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:44:04 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 162.74.99.5 submit_by = dcodd@hotmail.com Name = David Codd Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: crc222@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:39 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:39:47 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.112.158.227 submit_by = crc222@hotmail.com Name = chad curtis Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jdavis@mail.sdsu.edu at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:15 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:15:37 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.30.136.65 submit_by = jdavis@mail.sdsu.edu Name = Joel Davis Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: allan.degrandis@em.fcnbd.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:18 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:18:00 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.193.176 submit_by = allan.degrandis@em.fcnbd.com Name = allan De Grandis Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: durkin@saber.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:11 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:11:02 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 206.102.25.25 submit_by = durkin@saber.net Name = Arun Durkin-Bali Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: zteam@dotplanet.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:58 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:58:50 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.27.60.123 submit_by = zteam@dotplanet.com Name = Rey Eduvas Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: Mustang51pilot@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:02 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:02:08 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 152.163.205.33 submit_by = Mustang51pilot@aol.com Name = Joseph H. Fahey, Jr. Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: goodin@surfsouth.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:16 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:16:10 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 168.18.243.12 submit_by = goodin@surfsouth.com Name = jason goodin Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: markag@wonderstats.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:41 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:41:36 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 63.211.165.94 submit_by = markag@wonderstats.com Name = Mark Goodwin Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jguib@mediaone.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:36 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:36:52 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 165.207.2.11 submit_by = jguib@mediaone.net Name = Joseph Guibord Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: hatchelh@spawar.navy.mil at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:33 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:33:16 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 198.253.38.119 submit_by = hatchelh@spawar.navy.mil Name = Henry Hatchell Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation. I feel that the MM's have to be stopped. If not, investor will STOP investing. It is that simple!! I know I WILL STOP because the SHORTS and MM's are OUT OF CONTROL. THey can destroy a company's stock value overnight.


Author: tothehilt@nv.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:19 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:19:24 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.15.118.129 submit_by = tothehilt@nv.net Name = Lance Hilt Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: flecksman@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:02 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:02:07 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.197.47 submit_by = flecksman@aol.com Name = Daniel J. Homer Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: cyber-trading@austin.rr.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:57 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:57:23 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.27.60.123 submit_by = cyber-trading@austin.rr.com Name = tuan hong Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: pcjockey@ragingbull.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:31 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:31:48 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.243.60.13 submit_by = pcjockey@ragingbull.com Name = Jeff Howe Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: naut@sirius.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:58 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:58:21 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.27.60.123 submit_by = naut@sirius.com Name = naut Humom Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: thomwayne@mn.mediaone.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:59 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:59:32 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.27.60.123 submit_by = thomwayne@mn.mediaone.net Name = thong huynh Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: motorwerkes@adelphia.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:18 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:18:01 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.49.18.18 submit_by = motorwerkes@adelphia.net Name = Richard Hydro Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: cathejay@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:42 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:42:41 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.198.56 submit_by = cathejay@aol.com Name = catherine johnson Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jcjurchisin@worldnet.att.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:50 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:50:14 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 146.167.38.208 submit_by = jcjurchisin@worldnet.att.net Name = Craig M Jurchisin Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: Kukamunga@RagingBull.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:53 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:53:32 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 152.163.197.62 submit_by = Kukamunga@RagingBull.com Name = AL LABUR Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: theliz@mypointsconnect.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:24 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:24:26 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.4.252.72 submit_by = theliz@mypointsconnect.com Name = Liz Lynch Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jonathan.meuleners@unisys.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:37 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:37:57 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 192.62.16.162 submit_by = jonathan.meuleners@unisys.com Name = jonathan meuleners Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: jamm@flinet.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:40 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:40:14 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 136.182.2.222 submit_by = jamm@flinet.com Name = Jackie Miller Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: dmodysy@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:55 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:55:12 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 152.163.206.184 submit_by = dmodysy@aol.com Name = David A. Morris Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: m_muqtadir@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:15 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:15:09 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.48.33.11 submit_by = m_muqtadir@hotmail.com Name = Mohammad Muqtadir Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: kowen@master-bilt.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:01 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:01:36 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 208.61.206.99 submit_by = kowen@master-bilt.com Name = Kenneth W. Owen Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: Qjonny@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:36 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:36:20 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.4.252.212 submit_by = Qjonny@hotmail.com Name = Robert Quail Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: odoctah@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:24 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:24:46 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.193.57 submit_by = odoctah@aol.com Name = Robert Rich Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: lrritchie@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:33 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:33:33 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 147.182.5.50 submit_by = lrritchie@hotmail.com Name = Lee R. Ritchie Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: roland4266@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:51 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:50:59 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 205.188.199.200 submit_by = roland4266@aol.com Name = Bryant Roland Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: seyi@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:44 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:44:27 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 204.143.13.97 submit_by = seyi@hotmail.com Name = Seyi T Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: slptg@cc.usu.edu at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 7:06 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 07:06:53 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 199.156.184.234 submit_by = slptg@cc.usu.edu Name = Bronson Smart Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: swiftowl@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:46 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:46:16 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.41.0.151 submit_by = swiftowl@aol.com Name = Ward D. Smith Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: debistudebaker@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:53 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:53:46 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 146.163.10.93 submit_by = debistudebaker@hotmail.com Name = Deborah L. Studebaker Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: miket1@juno.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:20 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:20:16 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 206.26.224.250 submit_by = miket1@juno.com Name = Michael Theriault Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: TeamZ19@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:41 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:41:16 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.4.252.212 submit_by = TeamZ19@hotmail.com Name = Stanley Thread Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: tutt876@aol.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:59 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:59:21 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.129.30.16 submit_by = tutt876@aol.com Name = Carl F. Tuttle Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: unswamp@olynet.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:47 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:47:30 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 63.89.187.71 submit_by = unswamp@olynet.com Name = Roy E. Underwood Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: stuv@arkansas.net at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:59 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:59:41 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 216.152.17.90 submit_by = stuv@arkansas.net Name = Stuart K. Vann Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: lvdonuts@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:33 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:33:37 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 63.165.76.2 submit_by = lvdonuts@hotmail.com Name = Eliud Vera Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation. Please stop the bleeding...


Author: HIGHRISE1@WEBTV.NET at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:47 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:47:43 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 209.240.200.113 submit_by = HIGHRISE1@WEBTV.NET Name = HOWARD W. WALDHOLZ Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: Oldman190@hotmail.com at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:35 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:35:33 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 24.4.252.212 submit_by = Oldman190@hotmail.com Name = Jim Walters Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: DianaWhite-Bey@DHCD.DCGOV.ORG at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:57 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:57:48 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 151.200.108.30 submit_by = DianaWhite-Bey@DHCD.DCGOV.ORG Name = Diane M. White-James-Bey Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.


Author: liz-young@ouhsc.edu at Internet Date: 07/06/2000 6:56 AM Normal TO: RULE-COMMENTS at 03SEC Subject: Rule S7-24-99 ------------------------------- Message Contents On Thu Jul 6 06:56:51 2000, The following information was submitted: Host: 157.142.40.108 submit_by = liz-young@ouhsc.edu Name = Liz Young Professional_Affiliation = Investor Subject = Short Sales (Release No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99) Comments = I am writing you this letter to show that I am in favor of the proposed Concept Release (No. 34-42037; File No. S7-24-99). It is known that the life blood of a small company is access to capital for creation and growth. It is also known that investors who place funds in such companies expect and deserve protection from fraud and manipulation. Small business is a critical building block for jobs and wealth in our economy. MMs have steadily been selling more shares than they have bought, defying the laws of supply and demand, solid company fundamentals and favorable company press releases, resulting in plummeting stock prices. The laws of supply and demand have been denied and investors deprived of fair value. Meanwhile, the company valuation of stock has been greatly reduced and with it, access to investment capital for acquisitions and growth. The MMs are supposed to provide a fair market trading mechanism, yet ,when they become invested through shorting, they actually have a vested interest in seeing the price fall. This practice must be brought under some form of control.  The Securities Act provides certain protective language as it relates to investors. Section 15A(b)(6) of the Securities Act says that the rules of a national securities association must be designed, among other things to prevent fraudulent and manipulative acts and practices and to protect investors and the public interest, and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market. Section 15A(b)(11) requires that association rules be designed to produce fair and information quotations, and to prevent fictitious and misleading quotations. In spite of the intent expressed by these two sections of the Securities Act, and unlike the Nasdaq, NYSE and AMEX, MMs are not required by the SEC to disclose short positions on OTCBB stocks. The MMs can short, even naked short, at will with no checks and balances on OTCBB stocks. This leaves the OTCBB listed companies prey to market manipulation on a scale only limited by the greed and imagination of the MMs. The MMs just keep selling the targeted companies stocks with the idea that they will never have to produce real shares. Their apparent goal is to force the company to fail by depriving it of working capital and discouraging investment. It is my belief billions of dollars are being stolen from investors in this manner. For the MMs, it's a wonderful business; sort of like selling insurance, but never having to pay claims. They get the money, but have no expense or expectation of delivering anything tangible in return. This unfair and counter productive practice cannot go on.  MMs must be held accountable by requiring mandatory disclosure of MM short positions on all OTCBB listed stocks. In this manner, excessive shorting can be made known to the investing public, monitored for excess and corrected by the SEC/NASD. Then and only then can investors in these stocks be treated with the appropriate protection against fraud and manipulation.

http://www.sec.gov/rules/0706b02.htm


Modified:07/06/2000