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Office of Acquisitions

Office of Acquisitions

 

The Office of Acquisitions develops and executes programs for the SEC's acquisitions policy, procurement and contract administration, acquisitions workforce training and certification, and government purchase card.

 

Request for Information on SEC Contracts


If you are interested in obtaining information pertaining to SEC contracts, you must make a request through the SEC’s Freedom of Information and Privacy Act (FOIA) Office. See FOIA link at the bottom of this webpage. Please note that for privacy reasons, federal law prohibits some contract information from being released to the general public, and only information on awarded contracts is allowed to be released.

 

Where to Find SEC Solicitations and Justifications for Other than Full and Open Competition


If you are interested in searching, monitoring, or retrieving opportunities solicited by the SEC contracting community or information regarding justifications for SEC contracts awarded as other than full and open competition, please visit Federal Business Opportunities at www.fbo.gov.

Unsolicited Proposals


If you have a unique product or service that you feel would help SEC accomplish its mission you may consider submission of an unsolicited proposal.  SEC encourages the submission of unsolicited proposals meeting the criteria specified in FAR Part 15.6.

Before beginning the unsolicited proposal process, carefully review the specific criteria of FAR Part 15.6 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). This regulation can be accessed at https://acquisition.gov/far/

What are the limitations?

  • The proposal must meet the criteria in FAR part 15.6,
  • The proposal must be prepared independent of government advice or supervision,
  • SEC does not pay for preparation of unsolicited proposals,
  • Unsolicited proposals are contingent on the availability of funds,
  • Award of a contract based on an unsolicited proposal is contingent upon the absence of other possible vendors, and
  • SEC does not pay for any work done prior to award of a contract based on an unsolicited proposal.

Unsolicited proposals should be directed to:

Judith Blake, Office of Acquisitions
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
100 F Street, NE
Washington, DC  20549-5628  
blakej@sec.gov
Telephone: (202) 551-7300

Doing Business with the SEC

If you are a small business interested in doing business with the SEC, please click the following links for more information:

Whistleblower Protection


The SEC includes the below paragraph in its applicable nondisclosure forms and agreements to comply with the requirements of the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 and Section 715 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012:

These provisions and restrictions [of the nondisclosure agreement] are consistent with and do not supersede, conflict with, or otherwise alter the employee obligations, rights, or liabilities created by existing statute or Executive order relating to (1) classified information, (2) communications to Congress, (3) the reporting to an Inspector General of a violation of any law, rule, or regulation, or mismanagement, a gross waste of funds, an abuse of authority, or a substantial and specific danger to public health or safety, or (4) any other whistleblower protection [collectively, including but not limited to Executive Order No.13526 (75 Fed. Reg. 707), or any successor thereto; section 7211 of title 5, United States Code (governing disclosures to Congress); section 1034 of title 10, United States Code, as amended by the Military Whistleblower Protection Act (governing disclosure to Congress by members of the military); section 2302(b)(8) of title 5, United States Code, as amended by the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 (governing disclosures of  illegality, waste, fraud, abuse or public health or safety threats); the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982 (50 U.S.C. 421 et seq.) (governing disclosures that could expose confidential Government agents); sections 7(c) and 8H of the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) (relating to disclosures to an inspector general, the inspectors general of the Intelligence Community, and Congress); section 103H(g)(3) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 403–3h(g)(3) (relating to disclosures to the inspector general of the Intelligence Community); sections 17(d)(5) and 17(e)(3) of the Central Intelligence Agency Act of 1949 (50 U.S.C. 403q(d)(5) and 403q(e)(3)) (relating to disclosures to the Inspector General of the Central Intelligence Agency and Congress); and the statutes which protect against disclosure that may compromise the national security, including sections 641, 793, 794, 798, and 952 of title 18, United States Code, and section 4(b) of the Subversive Activities Control Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b))]. The definitions, requirements, obligations, rights, sanctions, and liabilities created by controlling Executive orders and statutory provisions, including those listed above, are incorporated into this agreement and are controlling.
 
Last modified: April 9, 2014