Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3)

Last Update: October 27, 2015

Exchange Act Rule 14a-4(a)(3) concerns the “unbundling” of separate matters that are submitted to a shareholder vote by a registrant or any other person soliciting proxy authority. These interpretations relate to unbundling under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) in the context of mergers, acquisitions, and similar transactions and replace the “September 2004 Interim Supplement to Publicly Available Telephone Interpretations (Regarding Unbundling under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) in the M&A Context).” The bracketed date following each interpretation is the latest date of publication or revision.

Questions and Answers of General Applicability

Section 201. Unbundling under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) in the M&A Context

Question 201.01

Question: Rule 14a-4(a)(3) requires that the form of proxy “identify clearly and impartially each separate matter intended to be acted upon.” Rule 14a-4(b)(1) further requires that the form of proxy provide a means for shareholders “to specify by boxes a choice … with respect to each separate matter referred to therein as intended to be acted upon.” In a merger, acquisition, or similar transaction in which shareholders of the target are receiving equity securities of the acquiror, amendments to the organizational documents of the acquiror can often be required by the transaction agreement. Under these proxy rules, under what circumstances must a target seeking shareholder approval of such a transaction present separately on its form of proxy a proposal or proposals relating to the amendments to the organizational documents of the acquiror? In other words, when are these amendments which are embedded within the transaction agreement a “separate matter” for target shareholders?

Answer: As a preliminary matter, if a material amendment to the acquiror’s organizational documents would require the approval of its shareholders under state law, the rules of a national securities exchange, or its organizational documents if presented on a standalone basis, the acquiror’s form of proxy must present any such amendment separately from any other material proposal, including, if applicable, approval of the issuance of securities in a triangular merger or approval of the transaction agreement in a direct merger. See Question 101.02 relating to “Unbundling under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) Generally.” As a general principle, however, only material matters must be unbundled, and acquirors should consider whether the provisions in question substantively affect shareholder rights. Examples of provisions meeting this standard that may be adopted in connection with a transaction include governance- and control-related provisions, such as classified or staggered boards, limitations on the removal of directors, supermajority voting provisions, delaying the annual meeting for more than a year, eliminating the ability to act by written consent, or changes in minimum quorum requirements. In contrast, provisions such as name changes, restatements of charters, or technical changes, such as those resulting from anti-dilution provisions, would likely be immaterial.

If, consistent with the guidance in Question 101.02, the acquiror is required under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) to present an amendment or multiple amendments separately on its form of proxy, or would be so required if it were conducting a solicitation subject to Regulation 14A, then a target subject to Regulation 14A also must present any such amendment separately on its form of proxy. This is because the amendment, which is a term of the transaction agreement that target shareholders are being asked to approve, would effect a material change to the equity security that target shareholders are receiving in the transaction. Target shareholders should have an opportunity to express their views separately on these material provisions that will establish their substantive rights as shareholders, even if as a matter of state law these provisions might not require a separate vote. Similarly, if the acquiror presents a material amendment on its form of proxy as the only matter to be approved by acquiror’s shareholders, then the target must present the amendment separately on its form of proxy. The target need not present as a separate matter on its form of proxy an amendment to increase the number of authorized shares of the acquiror’s equity securities, provided that the increase is limited to the number of shares reasonably expected to be issued in the transaction.

In all cases, the parties are free to condition completion of a transaction on shareholder approval of any separate proposals. Any such conditions should be clearly disclosed and indicated on the form of proxy. [October 27, 2015]

Question 201.02

Question: Does the answer to Question 201.01 change if the parties form a new entity to act as an acquisition vehicle that will issue equity securities in the transaction?

Answer: No. In that case, the party whose shareholders are expected to own the largest percentage of equity securities of the new entity following consummation of the transaction would be considered the acquiror for purposes of this analysis. As in Question 201.01, the acquiror must present separately on its form of proxy any material provision or provisions of the new entity’s organizational documents that are a term of the transaction agreement, if the provision or provisions represent a material change from the acquiror’s organizational documents, and the change would require the approval of the acquiror’s shareholders under state law, the rules of a national securities exchange, or its organizational documents if proposed to be made directly to its own organizational documents. Provisions that are required by law in the jurisdiction of incorporation of the new entity need not be presented separately on the form of proxy. As in Question 201.01, if the acquiror is or would be required under Rule 14a-4(a)(3) to present separately on its form of proxy any provision of the new entity’s organizational documents that is a term of the transaction agreement, then a target subject to Regulation 14A must also present the same provision separately on its form of proxy. [October 27, 2015]