10-K 1 syy-20130629x10k.htm 10-K 67ed01e6d56f43c

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

________________

Form 10-K

 

 

(Mark One)

 

 

R

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

For the fiscal year ended June 29, 2013

 

 

OR

 

 

£

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission File Number 1-6544

________________

Untitled.jpg

Sysco Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

74-1648137

(State or other jurisdiction of

(IRS employer

incorporation or organization)

identification number)

1390 Enclave Parkway

77077-2099

Houston, Texas

(Zip Code)

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code:

(281) 584-1390

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

Title of Each Class

Name of each exchange on

which registered

Common Stock, $1.00 par value

New York Stock Exchange

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

Indicate by checkmark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes R    No £

 

Indicate by checkmark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes £    No R

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes R    No £

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant  has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). 

Yes R   No £

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  £

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.  See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

 

 

Large Accelerated Filer  R

Accelerated Filer  £

Non-accelerated Filer   £    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller Reporting Company   £

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes £     No R

 

The aggregate market value of the voting stock of the registrant held by stockholders who were not affiliates (as defined by regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission) of the registrant was approximately $18,334,353,000 as of December 29, 2012 (based on the closing sales price on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape on December 28, 2012, as reported by The Wall Street Journal (Southwest Edition)).  As of August 14, 2013, the registrant had issued and outstanding an aggregate of 588,347,435 shares of its common stock.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:

Portions of the company’s 2013 Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission no later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year covered by this Form 10-K are incorporated by reference into Part III.

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page No.

 

PART I

Item 1.

Business

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

11 

Item 2.

Properties

12 

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

13 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

13 

 

PART II

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities

13 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

16 

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

17 

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

44 

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

48 

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

96 

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

96 

Item 9B.

Other Information

96 

 

PART III

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

96 

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

96 

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

96 

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

96 

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

97 

 

PART IV

 

Item 15.

Exhibits

97 

Signatures

98 

 

 

 


 

PART I

 

 

Item 1.  Business

 

Unless this Form 10-K indicates otherwise or the context otherwise requires, the terms “we,” “our,” “us,” “Sysco,” or “the company” as used in this Form 10-K refer to Sysco Corporation together with its consolidated subsidiaries and divisions.    

 

Overview

 

Sysco Corporation, acting through its subsidiaries and divisions, is the largest North American distributor of food and related products primarily to the foodservice or food-away-from-home industry.  We provide products and related services to approximately 425,000 customers, including restaurants, healthcare and educational facilities, lodging establishments and other foodservice customers.

 

Founded in 1969, Sysco commenced operations as a public company in March 1970 when the stockholders of nine companies exchanged their stock for Sysco common stock.  Since our formation, we have grown from $115.0 million to $44.4 billion in annual sales, both through internal expansion of existing operations and through acquisitions.

 

Sysco’s fiscal year ends on the Saturday nearest to June 30th.  This resulted in a 52-week year ending June 29, 2013 for fiscal 2013, June 30, 2012 for fiscal 2012 and, July 2, 2011 for fiscal 2011.

 

Sysco Corporation is organized under the laws of Delaware.  The address and telephone number of our executive offices are 1390 Enclave Parkway, Houston, Texas 77077-2099, (281) 584-1390.  This annual report on Form 10-K, as well as all other reports filed or furnished by Sysco pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, are available free of charge on Sysco’s website at www.sysco.com as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Operating Segments

 

Sysco provides food and related products to the foodservice or food-away-from-home industry.  Under the accounting provisions related to disclosures about segments of an enterprise, we have aggregated our operating companies into a number of segments, of which only Broadline and SYGMA are reportable segments as defined by accounting standards.  Broadline operating companies distribute a full line of food products and a wide variety of non-food products to their customers.  SYGMA operating companies distribute a full line of food products and a wide variety of non-food products to chain restaurant customer locations.  Our other segments include our specialty produce and lodging industry products segments, a company that distributes specialty imported products and a company that distributes to international customers.  Specialty produce companies distribute fresh produce and, on a limited basis, other foodservice products.  Our lodging industry products company distributes personal care guest amenities, equipment, housekeeping supplies, room accessories and textiles to the lodging industry.  Selected financial data for each of our reportable segments as well as financial information concerning geographic areas can be found in Note 21, “Business Segment Information, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8.

 

Customers and Products

 

Sysco’s customers in the foodservice industry include restaurants, hospitals and nursing homes, schools and colleges, hotels and motels, industrial caterers and other similar venues where foodservice products are served.  Services to our customers are supported by similar physical facilities, vehicles, material handling equipment and techniques, and administrative and operating staffs.

 

The products we distribute include:

 

·

a full line of frozen foods, such as meats, seafood, fully prepared entrees, fruits, vegetables and desserts;

·

a full line of canned and dry foods;

·

fresh meats and seafood;

·

dairy products;

·

beverage products;

·

imported specialties; and

·

fresh produce.

 

We also supply a wide variety of non-food items, including:

 

·

paper products such as disposable napkins, plates and cups;

·

tableware such as china and silverware;

·

cookware such as pots, pans and utensils;

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·

restaurant and kitchen equipment and supplies; and

·

cleaning supplies.

 

A comparison of the sales mix in the principal product categories during the last three years is presented below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

Canned and dry products

19 

%

 

19 

%

 

19 

%

Fresh and frozen meats

19 

 

 

19 

 

 

18 

 

Frozen fruits, vegetables, bakery and other

14 

 

 

14 

 

 

14 

 

Dairy products

10 

 

 

10 

 

 

11 

 

Poultry

10 

 

 

10 

 

 

10 

 

Fresh produce

 

 

 

 

 

Paper and disposables

 

 

 

 

 

Seafood

 

 

 

 

 

Beverage products

 

 

 

 

 

Janitorial products

 

 

 

 

 

Equipment and smallwares

 

 

 

 

 

Medical supplies (1)

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

 -

 

 

100 

%

 

100 

%

 

100 

%

 

(1) Sales are less than 1% of total

 

Our distribution centers, which we refer to as operating companies, distribute nationally-branded merchandise, as well as products packaged under our private brands.  Products packaged under our private brands have been manufactured for Sysco according to specifications that have been developed by our quality assurance team.  In addition, our quality assurance team certifies the manufacturing and processing plants where these products are packaged, enforces our quality control standards and identifies supply sources that satisfy our requirements.

 

We believe that prompt and accurate delivery of orders, competitive pricing, close contact with customers and the ability to provide a full array of products and services to assist customers in their foodservice operations are of primary importance in the marketing and distribution of foodservice products to our customers.  Our operating companies offer daily delivery to certain customer locations and have the capability of delivering special orders on short notice.  Through our approximately 12,600 sales and marketing representatives and support staff of Sysco and our operating companies, we stay informed of the needs of our customers and acquaint them with new products and services.  Our operating companies also provide ancillary services relating to foodservice distribution, such as providing customers with product usage reports and other data, menu-planning advice, food safety training and assistance in inventory control, as well as access to various third party services designed to add value to our customers’ businesses.

 

No single customer accounted for 10% or more of Sysco’s total sales for the fiscal year ended June 29, 2013.

 

Based upon available information, we estimate that sales by type of customer during the past three fiscal years were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Type of Customer

2013

 

2012

 

2011

Restaurants

61 

%

 

63 

%

 

62 

%

Hospitals and nursing homes

 

 

10 

 

 

11 

 

Hotels and motels

 

 

 

 

 

Schools and colleges

 

 

 

 

 

Other

20 

 

 

16 

 

 

16 

 

Totals

100 

%

 

100 

%

 

100 

%

 

Sources of Supply

 

We purchase from thousands of suppliers,  both domestic and international, none of which individually accounts for more than 10% of our purchasesThese suppliers consist generally of large corporations selling brand name and private label merchandise, as well as independent regional brand and private label processors and packers.  Purchasing is generally carried out through both centrally developed purchasing programs and direct purchasing programs established by our various operating companies.

 

We administer a consolidated product procurement program designed to develop, obtain and ensure consistent quality food and non-food products.  The program covers the purchasing and marketing of Sysco Brand merchandise as well as products from a number of national brand suppliers, encompassing substantially all product lines.  Sysco’s operating companies purchase product from the suppliers participating in these consolidated programs and from other suppliers, although Sysco Brand products are only available to the operating companies through these consolidated programs.  We also focus on increasing profitability by lowering operating

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costs and by lowering aggregate inventory levels, which reduces future facility expansion needs at our broadline operating companies, while providing greater value to our suppliers and customers.  This includes the construction and operation of regional distribution centers (RDCs), which aggregate inventory demand to optimize the supply chain activities for certain products for all Sysco broadline operating companies in the region.  Currently, we have two RDCs in operation, one in Virginia and one in Florida.

 

Working Capital Practices

 

Our growth is funded through a combination of cash flow from operations, commercial paper issuances and long-term borrowings.  See the discussion in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, Liquidity and Capital Resources” at Item 7 regarding our liquidity, financial position and sources and uses of funds.

 

Credit terms we extend to our customers can vary from cash on delivery to 30 days or more based on our assessment of each customer’s credit worthiness.  We monitor each customer’s account and will suspend shipments if necessary.

 

A majority of our sales orders are filled within 24 hours of when customer orders are placed.  We generally maintain inventory on hand to be able to meet customer demand.  The level of inventory on hand will vary by product depending on shelf-life, supplier order fulfillment lead times and customer demand.  We also make purchases of additional volumes of certain products based on supply or pricing opportunities.

 

We take advantage of suppliers’ cash discounts where appropriate and otherwise generally receive payment terms from our suppliers ranging from weekly to 30 days or more.

 

Corporate Headquarters And Shared Services Center

 

Our corporate staff makes available a number of services to our operating companies.  Members of the corporate staff possess experience and expertise in, among other areas, accounting and finance, treasury, legal, cash management, information technology, employee benefits, engineering, real estate and construction, risk management and insurance, sales and marketing, payroll, human resources, training and development, strategy, and tax compliance services.  The corporate office also makes available warehousing and distribution services, which provide assistance in operational best practices including space utilization, energy conservation, fleet management and work flow.

 

Our shared services center performs support services for employees, suppliers and customers, payroll administration, human resources, customer and vendor contract administration, financial services such as vendor payments, invoicing, cash application, certain credit services, accounting and sales and use tax administration, procurement and maintenance support and sales support for some of our operating companies.    

 

Capital Improvements

 

To maximize productivity and customer service, we continue to modernize, expand and construct new distribution facilities.  During fiscal 2013, 2012 and 2011, approximately $511.9 million, $784.5 million and $636.4 million, respectively, were invested in delivery fleet, facilities, technology and other capital asset enhancements.  We estimate our capital expenditures in fiscal 2014 should be in the range of $550 million to $600 million.    During the three years ended June 29, 2013, capital expenditures were financed primarily by internally generated funds, our commercial paper program and bank and other borrowings.  We expect to finance our fiscal 2014 capital expenditures from the same sources.

 

Employees

 

As of June 29, 2013, we had approximately 48,100 full-time employees, approximately 17% of whom were represented by unions, primarily the International Brotherhood of TeamstersContract negotiations are handled by each individual operating company.  Approximately 35% of our union employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements which have expired or will expire during fiscal 2014 and are subject to renegotiation.  Since June 29, 2013,  two contracts covering approximately 300 of such employees have been renegotiated.  We consider our labor relations to be satisfactory.

 

Competition

 

Industry sources estimate that there are more than 15,000 companies engaged in the distribution of food and non-food products to the foodservice industry in the United States.  Our customers may also choose to purchase products directly from retail outlets or negotiate prices directly with our suppliers.  While we compete primarily with local and regional distributors, a few organizations compete with us on a national basis.  We believe that the principal competitive factors in the foodservice industry are effective customer contacts, the ability to deliver a wide range of quality products and related services on a timely and dependable basis and competitive prices.  An additional competitive factor for our larger chain restaurant customers is the ability to provide a national distribution network.  We consider our primary market to be the foodservice market in the United States and Canada and estimate that we serve about 18% of this approximately $235 billion annual market.  We believe, based upon industry trade data, that our sales to the United States and Canada food-away-from-home industry were the highest of any foodservice distributor during fiscal 2013.  While adequate industry statistics are not available, we believe that in most instances our local operations are among the leading

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distributors of food and related non-food products to foodservice customers in their respective trading areas.  We believe our competitive advantages include our more than 7,000 marketing associates, our diversified product base, which includes a differentiated group of high quality Sysco brand products, the diversity in the types of customers we serve, our economies of scale and our wide geographic presence in the United States and Canada, which mitigates some of the impact of regional economic declines that may occur over time and provides a national distribution network for larger chain restaurant customers.  We believe our liquidity and access to capital provides us the ability to continuously invest in business improvements.  We are the only publicly-traded distributor in the food-away-from-home industry in the United States.  While our public company status provides us with some advantages, including access to capital, we believe it also provides us with some disadvantages that our competitors do not have in terms of additional costs related to complying with regulatory requirements.

 

Government Regulation

 

Our company is required to comply, and it is our policy to comply, with all applicable laws in the numerous countries throughout the world in which we do business. In many jurisdictions, compliance with competition laws is of special importance to us, and our operations may come under special scrutiny by competition law authorities due to our competitive position in those jurisdictions.  In general, competition laws are designed to protect businesses and consumers from anti-competitive behavior.

 

In the United States, as a marketer and distributor of food products, we are subject to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  The FDA regulates food safety through various statutory and regulatory mandates, including manufacturing and holding requirements for foods through good manufacturing practice regulations, hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) requirements for certain foods, and the food and color additive approval process.  The agency also specifies the standards of identity for certain foods, prescribes the format and content of information required to appear on food product labels, regulates food contact packaging and materials, and maintains a Reportable Food Registry for the industry to report when there is a reasonable probability that an article of food will cause serious adverse health consequences. For certain product lines, we are also subject to the Federal Meat Inspection Act, the Poultry Products Inspection Act, the Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act, the Packers and Stockyard Act and regulations promulgated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to interpret and implement these statutory provisions. The USDA imposes standards for product safety, quality and sanitation through the federal meat and poultry inspection program.  The USDA reviews and approves the labeling of these products and also establishes standards for the grading and commercial acceptance of produce shipments from our suppliers. We are also subject to the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, which imposes certain registration and record keeping requirements on facilities that manufacture, process, pack or hold food for human or animal consumption.  

 

We and our products are also subject to state and local regulation through such measures as the licensing of our facilities; enforcement by state and local health agencies of state and local standards for our products; and regulation of our trade practices in connection with the sale of our products. Our facilities are subject to inspections and regulations issued pursuant to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Act by the U.S. Department of Labor. These regulations require us to comply with certain manufacturing, health and safety standards to protect our employees from accidents and to establish hazard communication programs to transmit information on the hazards of certain chemicals present in products we distribute.

 

We are also subject to regulation by numerous federal, state and local regulatory agencies, including, but not limited to, the U.S. Department of Labor, which sets employment practice standards for workers, and the U.S. Department of Transportation, which regulates transportation of perishable and hazardous materials and waste, and similar state, provincial and local agencies.

 

The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) prohibits bribery of public officials to obtain or retain business in foreign jurisdictions. The FCPA also requires us to keep accurate books and records and to maintain internal accounting controls to detect and prevent bribery and to ensure that transactions are properly authorized. We have implemented and continue to develop a robust anti-corruption compliance program applicable to our global operations to detect and prevent bribery and to comply with these and other anti-corruption laws in countries where we operate.

 

Outside the United States, our business is subject to numerous similar statutes and regulations, as well as other legal and regulatory requirements.

 

All of our company's facilities and other operations in the United States and elsewhere around the world are subject to various environmental protection statutes and regulations, including those relating to the use of water resources and the discharge of wastewater. Further, most of our distribution facilities have ammonia-based refrigeration systems and tanks for the storage of diesel fuel and other petroleum products which are subject to laws regulating such systems and storage tanks.  Our policy is to comply with all such legal requirements. We are subject to other federal, state, provincial and local provisions relating to the protection of the environment or the discharge of materials; however, these provisions do not materially impact the use or operation of our facilities. 

 

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General

 

We have numerous trademarks that are of significant importance, including the SYSCO® trademark and our privately-branded product trademarks that include the SYSCO® trademark.  These trademarks and the private brands on which they are used are widely recognized within the foodservice industry.  Approximately half of our privately-branded sales are from products labeled with our SYSCO® trademark without any other trademark.  We believe the loss of the SYSCO®  trademark would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.  Our U.S. trademarks are effective for a ten-year period and the company generally renews its trademarks before their expiration dates unless a particular trademark is no longer in use.  The company does not have any material patents or licenses.

 

We are not engaged in material research and development activities relating to the development of new products or the improvement of existing products.

 

Our sales do not generally fluctuate significantly on a seasonal basis; therefore, the business of the company is not deemed to be seasonal.

 

As of June 29, 2013, we operated 193 distribution facilities throughout the United States, Bahamas, Canada, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

 

 

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

 

The following discussion of “risk factors” identifies the most significant factors that may adversely affect our business, operations, financial position or future financial performance. This information should be read in conjunction with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the consolidated financial statements and related notes contained in this report. The following discussion of risks is not all inclusive but is designed to highlight what we believe are the most significant factors to consider when evaluating our business. These factors could cause our future results to differ from our expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements identified on page 43 and from historical trends.

 

Industry and General Economic Risks

 

Periods of significant or prolonged inflation or deflation affect our product costs and may negatively impact our profitability

 

Volatile food costs have a direct impact on our industry. Periods of product cost inflation may have a negative impact on our profit margins and earnings to the extent that we are unable to pass on all or a portion of such product cost increases to our customers, which may have a negative impact on our business and our profitability. In addition, periods of rapidly increasing inflation may negatively impact our business due to the timing needed to pass on such increases, as well as the impact it may have on discretionary spending by consumers. Conversely, our business may be adversely impacted by periods of product cost deflation because we make a significant portion of our sales at prices that are based on the cost of products we sell plus a percentage margin. As a result, our profit levels may be negatively impacted during periods of product cost deflation, even though our gross profit percentage may remain relatively constant.

 

Our results and financial condition are directly affected by the volatility in the global economic environment, local market conditions and low consumer confidence, which can adversely affect our sales, margins and net income

 

The foodservice distribution industry is characterized by relatively high inventory turnover with relatively low profit margins and is especially susceptible to trends and uncertainty in economic activity, such as the general economic slowdown in the US from 2008 to 2011.  The global economic environment has recently been characterized by weak economies, persistently high unemployment rates, inflationary pressures and volatility in financial markets worldwide. In addition, our results of operations are substantially affected by local operating and economic conditions, which can vary substantially by market.  The difficult economic conditions can affect us in the following ways:

 

·

Unfavorable conditions can depress sales and/or gross margins in a given market.

·

Food cost and fuel cost inflation experienced by the consumer can lead to reductions in the frequency of dining out and the amount spent by consumers for food-away-from-home purchases which could negatively impact our business by reduced demand for our products

·

Heightened uncertainty in the financial markets negatively affects consumer confidence and discretionary spending and can cause disruptions with our customers and suppliers.

·

Liquidity issues and the inability of our customers, vendors and suppliers to consistently access credit markets to obtain cash to support operations can cause temporary interruptions in our ability to conduct day-to-day transactions involving the payment to or collection of funds from our customers, vendors and suppliers.

 

5


 

The uncertainty in the global economic environment has adversely affected both business and consumer confidence and spending, and uncertainty about the long-term investment environment could further depress capital investment and economic activity.  

 

Competition in our industry may adversely impact our margins and our ability to retain customers, and makes it difficult for us to maintain our market share, growth rate and profitability 

 

The foodservice distribution industry is highly competitive, with numerous regional and local competitors, and is a mature industry characterized by slowing revenue growth. Additionally, increased competition from non-traditional sources (such as club stores and commercial wholesale outlets with lower cost structures), group purchasing organizations or consolidation among competitors have served to further increase pressure on the industry’s profit margins, and continued margin pressure within the industry may have a material adverse impact on our operating results and profitability. New and increased competitive sources may result in increased focus on pricing and on limiting price increases, or may require increased discounting. Such competition may result in margin erosion and/or make it difficult for us to attract and retain customers.

 

Although our sales historically have grown faster than the market, in recent years we have experienced slowing revenue growth rates. These trends have placed pressure on our profit margins and made it more difficult to achieve growth and pass along cost increases.  We expect these trends to continue for the foreseeable future.  If we are unable to effectively differentiate ourselves from our competitors, our market share, sales and profitability, through increased expenditures or decreased prices, could be adversely impacted.

 

We may not be able to fully compensate for increases in fuel costs, and forward purchase commitments intended to contain fuel costs could result in above market fuel costs

 

The price and supply of fuel can fluctuate significantly based on international, political and economic circumstances, as well as other factors outside our control, such as actions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, or OPEC, and other oil and gas producers, regional production patterns, weather conditions and environmental concerns. On average, on-highway diesel fuel prices increased approximately 2% and 14% in fiscal 2013 and 2012, respectively, as compared to the prior year. Volatile fuel prices have a direct impact on our industry. The cost of fuel affects the price paid by us for products as well as the costs incurred by us to deliver products to our customers. Although we have been able to pass along a portion of increased fuel costs to our customers in the past, there is no guarantee that we can do so again if another period of high fuel costs occurs. If fuel costs increase again in the future, we may experience difficulties in passing all or a portion of these costs along to our customers, which may have a negative impact on our business and our profitability. We routinely enter into forward purchase commitments for a portion of our projected monthly diesel fuel requirements at prices equal to the then-current market price for diesel. If fuel prices decrease significantly, these forward purchases may prove ineffective and result in our paying higher than market costs for a portion of our diesel fuel. 

 

Business and Operational Risks

 

Our ability to meet our long-term strategic objectives to grow the profitability of our business depends largely on the success of the Business Transformation Project

 

Our multi-year Business Transformation Project consists of:

 

·

the design and deployment of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system to implement an integrated software system to support a majority of our business processes and further streamline our operations;

·

an operating cost transformation initiative to lower our cost structure;  

·

a product cost reduction and category management initiative to use market data and customer insights to make changes to product pricing and product assortment; and

·

several other initiatives. 

 

Although we expect the investment in the Business Transformation Project to provide meaningful benefits to the company over the long-term, the costs exceeded the benefits during the testing stages of implementation of ERP, including in fiscal 2013.  Successfully managing deployment is critical to our business success.  While we expect all of the components of the Business Transformation Project to enhance our value proposition to customers and suppliers and improve our long-term profitability, there can be no assurance that we will realize our expectations within the time frame we have established, if at all.

 

The actual cost of the ERP system may be greater or less than currently expected and continued delays in the execution of deployment may adversely affect our business and results of operations

 

ERP implementations are complex and time-consuming projects that involve substantial investments in system software and implementation activities over a multi-year timeframe. Our cost estimates related to our ERP system are based on assumptions which are subject to wide variability, require a great deal of judgment, and are inherently uncertain.  Thus, the actual costs of the project in fiscal 2014 (and beyond) may be greater or less than currently expected.  We have encountered, and we may continue to encounter,

6


 

the need for changes in design or revisions of the project calendar and budget, including incurring expenses at an earlier or later time than currently anticipated.  For example, we deployed our ERP system to three additional locations in fiscal 2013 and are experiencing improved functionality in many areas compared to past deployments; however, while the majority of the system functionality is performing as designed, we have identified areas of improvement to certain components of the system that we want to address before we continue deploying to additional locations.     

 

In addition, implementation of the systems require significant management attention and resources over an extended period of time and any significant design errors or further delay in the implementation of the systems could materially and adversely affect our operating results and impact our ability to manage our business. Continued delays in deployment, additional operating problems discovered in the underlying information technology systems’ processes, cost overages or limitations on the extent of the business transformation during the ERP implementation process adversely affect our business and results of operations. In addition, because the implementation is expected to continue to involve a significant financial commitment, our business, results of operations and liquidity may also be adversely affected if the ERP system, and the associated process changes, do not prove to be cost effective or do not result in the cost savings and other benefits at the levels that we anticipate. There can be no guarantee that we will be able to realize the intended results of the system software and implementation activities. We expect costs to continue to outweigh benefits for fiscal 2014 as we continue deployment.

 

We may not realize anticipated benefits from our operating cost reduction efforts 

 

We have implemented a number of cost reduction initiatives that we believe are necessary to position our business for future success and growth. Our future success and earnings growth depend upon our ability to achieve a lower cost structure and operate efficiently in the highly competitive food and beverage industry, particularly in an environment of increased competitive activity and reduced profitability. A variety of factors could cause us not to realize some of the expected cost savings, including, among other things, delays in the anticipated timing of activities related to our cost savings initiatives, lack of sustainability in cost savings over time and unexpected costs associated with operating our business.  If we are unable to realize the anticipated benefits from our cost cutting efforts, we could become cost disadvantaged in the marketplace, and our competitiveness and our profitability could decrease.     Furthermore, even if we realize the anticipated benefits of our cost reduction efforts, we may experience an adverse impact on our employees and customers which could negatively affect our sales and profits.

 

We may not realize the full anticipated benefits from our category management initiative

 

We are in the midst of deploying our category management initiative which encompasses a rigorous process whereby we use market data and customer insights to optimize the product assortment available to our customers, strengthen strategic relationships with our suppliers, and increase our sales and profit margins.  If our sales associates are not able to effectively gain acceptance of the new product assortment from our customers, or we and our suppliers are not able to absorb the significant administrative and process changes required, then we may not be able to successfully execute the category management initiative in the timeline we anticipate and we may not capture the financial and other benefits at the levels that we anticipate, or at all. Furthermore, even if we realize the anticipated benefits of our category management initiative, we may experience an adverse impact on our employees and customers which could negatively affect our sales and profits.

 

Conditions beyond our control can interrupt our supplies and increase our product costs 

 

We obtain substantially all of our foodservice and related products from third-party suppliers. For the most part, we do not have long-term contracts with our suppliers committing them to provide products to us, however we believe the number of long-term contracts will increase as we progress with our category management initiative.  Although our purchasing volume can provide benefits when dealing with suppliers, suppliers may not provide the foodservice products and supplies needed by us in the quantities and at the prices requested. We are also subject to delays caused by interruption in production and increases in product costs based on conditions outside of our control. These conditions include work slowdowns, work interruptions, strikes or other job actions by employees of suppliers, short-term weather conditions or more prolonged climate change, crop conditions, water shortages, transportation interruptions, unavailability of fuel or increases in fuel costs, product recalls, competitive demands and natural disasters or other catastrophic events (including, but not limited to food-borne illnesses). Further, increased frequency or duration of extreme weather conditions could also impair production capabilities, disrupt our supply chain or impact demand for our products. Input costs could increase at any point in time for a large portion of the products that we sell for a prolonged period.  Our inability to obtain adequate supplies of foodservice and related products as a result of any of the foregoing factors or otherwise could mean that we could not fulfill our obligations to customers, and customers may turn to other distributors.

 

Adverse publicity about us or lack of confidence in our products could negatively impact our reputation and reduce earnings

 

Maintaining a good reputation and public confidence in the safety of the products we distribute is critical to our business, particularly to selling Sysco Brand products. The Sysco brand name, trademarks and logos and our reputation are powerful sales and marketing tools, and we devote significant resources to promoting and protecting them. Anything that damages our reputation or the public’s confidence in our products, whether or not justified, including adverse publicity about the quality, safety or integrity of our

7


 

products or relating to activities by our operations, employees or agents could tarnish our reputation and reduce the value of our brand, and could quickly affect our revenues and profits.

 

Reports, whether true or not, of food-borne illnesses (such as e-coli, avian flu, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, hepatitis A, trichinosis or salmonella) and injuries caused by food tampering could also severely injure our reputation or negatively impact the public’s confidence in our products. If patrons of our restaurant customers become ill from food-borne illnesses, our customers could be forced to temporarily close restaurant locations and our sales and profitability would be correspondingly decreased. In addition, instances of food-borne illnesses or food tampering or other health concerns (even those unrelated to the use of Sysco products), or public concern regarding the safety of our products, can result in negative publicity about the food service distribution industry and cause our sales and profitability to decrease dramatically.

 

Damage to our reputation and loss of brand equity could reduce demand for our products and services. This reduction in demand, together with the dedication of time and expense necessary to defend our reputation, could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations, as well as require additional resources to rebuild our reputation and restore the value of our brand. Our business prospects, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected if our public image or reputation were to be tarnished by negative publicity including dissemination via print, broadcast or social media, or other forms of Internet-based communications. Adverse publicity about regulatory or legal action against us could damage our reputation and image, undermine our customers’ confidence and reduce short-term or long-term demand for our products and services, even if the regulatory or legal action is unfounded or not material to our operations. Any of these events could have a material negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

If sales to our independent restaurant customers continue to grow at a lower rate than sales to our large regional and national customers, our operating income may decline

 

Similar to industry trends, we are currently growing our large regional and national customers sales at a faster rate than our sales to independent restaurant locations.  Gross margin from our large regional and national customers is generally lower than that of our independent restaurant customers because we typically provide a higher level of services to these customers and are able to earn a higher gross margin as a result. If sales to our independent restaurant customers do not grow at the same or a greater rate as sales to our large regional and national customers, unless we are able to successfully increase prices or reduce our cost structure, our operating income may decline.

 

As we grow sales to large regional and national customers at a faster pace than we grow sales to independent restaurant customers, we face the risk that large regional and national customers will increase their proportion of our total sales, thus subjecting us to greater risk if we lose one or more of these customers and possibly enabling these larger customers to exert greater pressure on us to reduce our prices

 

If sales to our large regional and national customers continues to increase at a faster pace of growth than sales to our independent restaurant customers, we may become more dependent on large regional and national customers as they begin to represent a greater proportion of our total sales, and any loss of sales to these customers could have a material negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.  Additionally, as a result of our greater dependence on these customers, we could be pressured by them to lower our prices.  In that event, we would need to achieve additional cost savings to offset these price reductions or our gross margins and profitability would be materially adversely affected. We may be unable to change our cost structure and pricing practices rapidly enough to successfully compete in such an environment.

 

Expanding into international markets and complementary lines of business presents unique challenges, and our expansion efforts with respect to international operations and complementary lines of business may not be successful

 

In addition to our domestic activities, an element of our strategy includes the possibility of further expansion of operations into international markets. Our ability to successfully operate in international markets may be adversely affected by local laws and customs, legal and regulatory constraints, including compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, political and economic conditions and currency regulations of the countries or regions in which we currently operate or intend to operate in the future. Risks inherent in our existing and future international operations also include, among others, the costs and difficulties of managing international operations, difficulties in identifying and gaining access to local suppliers, suffering possible adverse tax consequences, maintaining product quality and greater difficulty in enforcing intellectual property rights. Additionally, foreign currency exchange rates and fluctuations may have an impact on our future costs or on future sales and cash flows from our international operations.

 

Another element of our strategy includes the possibility of expansion into businesses that are closely related or complementary to, but not currently part of, our core foodservice distribution business. Our ability to successfully operate in these complementary business markets may be adversely affected by legal and regulatory constraints, including compliance with regulatory programs to which we become subject. Risks inherent in branching out into such complementary markets also include the costs and difficulties of managing operations outside of our core business, which may require additional skills and competencies, as well as difficulties in identifying and gaining access to suppliers or customers in new markets.

8


 

 

If we fail to comply with requirements imposed by applicable law or other governmental regulations, we could become subject to lawsuits, investigations and other liabilities and restrictions on our operations that could significantly and adversely affect our business

 

We are subject to governmental regulation at the federal, state, international, national, provincial and local levels in many areas of our business, such as food safety and sanitation, minimum wage, overtime, wage payment, wage and hour and employment discrimination, immigration, human health and safety, and due to the services we provide in connection with governmentally funded entitlement programs. From time to time, both federal and state governmental agencies have conducted audits of our billing practices as part of investigations of providers of services under governmental contracts, or otherwise. We also receive requests for information from governmental agencies in connection with these audits. While we attempt to comply with all applicable laws and regulations, we cannot represent that we are in full compliance with all applicable laws and regulations or interpretations of these laws and regulations at all times or that we will be able to comply with any future laws, regulations or interpretations of these laws and regulations.  We have received notice from the State of California and certain county district attorneys alleging violations of statutes related to the use of drop sites, which are temporary facilities for holding products prior to distributing them to customers.  We are fully cooperating with these parties in their investigations.  We have discontinued the use of drop sites across the enterprise.  While we believe we have mitigated the risk, we may face fines and penalties. 

 

If we fail to comply with applicable laws and regulations or encounter disagreements with respect to our contracts subject to governmental regulations, including those referred to above, we may be subject to investigations, criminal sanctions or civil remedies, including fines, injunctions, prohibitions on exporting, seizures or debarments from contracting with the government. The cost of compliance or the consequences of non-compliance, including debarments, could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, governmental units may make changes in the regulatory frameworks within which we operate that may require either the corporation as a whole or individual businesses to incur substantial increases in costs in order to comply with such laws and regulations.

 

Product liability claims could materially impact our business

 

We, like any other seller of food, face the risk of exposure to product liability claims in the event that the use of products sold by Sysco causes injury or illness. We cannot be sure that consumption of our products will not cause a health-related illness in the future or that we will not be subject to claims or lawsuits relating to such matters. Further, even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued, the negative publicity surrounding any assertion that our products caused illness or injury could adversely affect our reputation with existing and potential customers and our corporate and brand image.   With respect to product liability claims, we believe we have sufficient primary or excess umbrella liability insurance. However, this insurance may not continue to be available at a reasonable cost or, if available, may not be adequate to cover all of our liabilities. We generally seek contractual indemnification and insurance coverage from parties supplying our products, but this indemnification or insurance coverage is limited, as a practical matter, to the creditworthiness of the indemnifying party and the insured limits of any insurance provided by suppliers. If Sysco does not have adequate insurance or contractual indemnification available, product liability relating to defective products could materially reduce our net earnings and earnings per share.

 

We must finance and integrate acquired businesses effectively

 

Historically, a portion of our growth has come through acquisitions. If we are unable to integrate acquired businesses successfully or realize anticipated economic, operational and other benefits and synergies in a timely manner, our earnings per share may be materially adversely impacted. Integration of an acquired business may be more difficult when we acquire a business in a market in which we have limited expertise, or with a culture different from Sysco’s. A significant expansion of our business and operations, in terms of geography or magnitude, could strain our administrative and operational resources. Significant acquisitions may also require the issuance of material additional amounts of debt or equity, which could materially alter our debt to equity ratio, increase our interest expense and decrease earnings per share, and make it difficult for us to obtain favorable financing for other acquisitions or capital investments.

 

We need access to borrowed funds in order to grow, and any default by us under our indebtedness could have a material adverse impact on cash flow and liquidity

 

A substantial part of our growth historically has been the result of acquisitions and capital expansion. We anticipate additional acquisitions and capital expansion in the future. As a result, our inability to finance acquisitions and capital expenditures through borrowed funds could restrict our ability to expand. Moreover, any default under the documents governing our indebtedness could have a significant adverse effect on our cash flows, as well as the market value of our common stock.

 

9


 

Our level of indebtedness and the terms of our indebtedness could adversely affect our business and liquidity position

 

As of June 29, 2013, we had approximately $3 billion of total indebtedness. We have a Board-approved commercial paper program allowing us to issue short-term unsecured notes in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1.3 billion; a revolving credit facility supporting our U.S. and Canadian commercial paper programs in the amount of $1.0 billion set to expire on December 29, 2016, with $925 million extended to December 29, 2017; certain uncommitted bank lines of credit providing for unsecured borrowings for working capital of up to $95.0 million; and a €75.0 million (Euro) multicurrency revolving credit facility for use by our Irish subsidiary set to expire September 25, 2013, which is subject to extension.  Our indebtedness may further increase from time to time for various reasons, including fluctuations in operating results, working capital needs, capital expenditures and potential acquisitions or joint ventures. Our increased level of indebtedness and the ultimate cost of such indebtedness could have a negative impact on our liquidity, cost of capital and financial results.  In the future, our cash flow and capital resources may not be sufficient for payments of interest on and principal of our debt, and any alternative financing measures available may not be successful and may not permit us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations.

 

We rely on technology in our business and any technology disruption or delay in implementing new technology could have a material negative impact on our business

 

 Our ability to decrease costs and increase profits, as well as our ability to serve customers most effectively, depends on the reliability of our technology network. We use software and other technology systems, among other things, to generate and select orders, to load and route trucks, to make purchases, manage our warehouses and to monitor and manage our business on a day-to-day basis.  Any disruption to these computer systems could adversely impact our customer service, decrease the volume of our business and result in increased costs and lower profits.

 

Furthermore, process changes will be required as we continue to use our existing warehousing, delivery, and payroll systems to support operations as we implement the ERP system. While Sysco has invested and continues to invest in technology security initiatives and disaster recovery plans, these measures cannot fully insulate us from technology disruption that could result in adverse effects on operations and profits.

 

We may be required to pay material amounts under multiemployer defined benefit pension plans

 

 We contribute to several multiemployer defined benefit pension plans based on obligations arising under collective bargaining agreements covering union-represented employees. Approximately 10% of our current employees are participants in such multiemployer plans. In fiscal 2013, our total contributions to these plans were approximately $66 million, which included payments for withdrawal liabilities of $32 million. The costs of providing benefits through such plans have increased in recent years. The amount of any increase or decrease in our required contributions to these multiemployer plans will depend upon many factors, including the outcome of collective bargaining, actions taken by trustees who manage the plans, government regulations, the actual return on assets held in the plans and the potential payment of a withdrawal liability if we choose to exit.  Based upon the information available to us from plan administrators, we believe that several of these multiemployer plans are underfunded. The unfunded liabilities of these plans may result in increased future payments by us and the other participating employers. Underfunded multiemployer pension plans may impose a surcharge requiring additional pension contributions. Our risk of such increased payments may be greater if any of the participating employers in these underfunded plans withdraws from the plan due to insolvency and is not able to contribute an amount sufficient to fund the unfunded liabilities associated with its participants in the plan. Based on the latest information available from plan administrators, we estimate our share of the aggregate withdrawal liability on the multiemployer plans in which we participate could have been as much as $220 million as of June 29, 2013.  A significant increase to funding requirements could adversely affect the Company’s financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Our funding requirements for our company-sponsored qualified pension plan may increase should financial markets experience future declines

 

At the end of fiscal 2012, we decided to freeze future benefit accruals under the company-sponsored qualified pension plan (Retirement Plan) as of December 31, 2012 for all U.S.-based salaried and non-union hourly employees.  Effective January 1, 2013, these employees were eligible for additional contributions under an enhanced, defined contribution plan.  While these actions will serve to limit future growth in our pension liabilities, we had a sizable pension obligation of $2.7 billion as of June 29, 2013 therefore financial market factors could impact our funding requirements.  Although recent pension funding relief legislation has served to defer some required funding, additional contributions may be required if our plan is not fully funded when the provisions that provided the relief are phased out.  See Note 13, “Company-Sponsored Employee Benefit Plans” to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 for a discussion of the funded status of the Retirement Plan.  

 

The amount of our annual contribution to the plan is dependent upon, among other things, the returns on the plan’s assets and discount rates used to calculate the plan’s liability. Our Retirement Plan holds investments in both equity and fixed income securities.  Fluctuations in asset values can cause the amount of our anticipated future contributions to the plan to increase.  The projected liability of the plan will be impacted by the fluctuations of interest rates on high quality bonds in the public markets as these are inputs in

10


 

determining our minimum funding requirements. Specifically, decreases in these interest rates may have an adverse impact on our funding obligations. To the extent financial markets experience future declines similar to those experienced in fiscal 2008 through the beginning of fiscal 2010, and/or interest rates on high quality bonds in the public markets decline, our required contributions may increase for future years as our funded status decreases, which could have an adverse impact on our liquidity. 

 

Failure to successfully renegotiate union contracts could result in work stoppages

 

As of June 29, 2013, approximately 8,100 employees at 51 operating companies were members of 57 different local unions associated with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and other labor organizations. In fiscal 2014, 19 agreements covering approximately 2,800 employees have expired or will expire. Since June 29, 2013, two contract covering approximately 300 of such employees have been renegotiated. Failure of our operating companies to effectively renegotiate these contracts could result in work stoppages. Although our operating subsidiaries have not experienced any significant labor disputes or work stoppages to date, and we believe they have satisfactory relationships with their unions, a work stoppage due to failure of multiple operating subsidiaries to renegotiate union contracts could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

A shortage of qualified labor could negatively impact our business and materially reduce earnings

 

Our operations rely heavily on our employees, particularly drivers, and any shortage of qualified labor could significantly affect our business. Our recruiting and retention efforts and efforts to increase productivity gains may not be successful and there may be a shortage of qualified drivers in future periods. Any such shortage would decrease Sysco’s ability to effectively serve our customers. Such a shortage would also likely lead to higher wages for employees and a corresponding reduction in our net earnings.

 

A cybersecurity incident and other technology disruptions could negatively impact our business and our relationships with customers

 

We use computers in substantially all aspects of our business operations. We also use mobile devices, social networking and other online activities to connect with our employees, suppliers, business partners and our customers. Such uses give rise to cybersecurity risks, including security breach, espionage, system disruption, theft and inadvertent release of information. Our business involves the storage and transmission of numerous classes of sensitive and/or confidential information and intellectual property, including customers’ and suppliers personal information, private information about employees, and financial and strategic information about the Company and its business partners. Further, as the Company pursues its strategy to grow through acquisitions and to pursue new initiatives that improve our operations and cost structure, the Company is also expanding and improving its information technologies, resulting in a larger technological presence and corresponding exposure to cybersecurity risk. If we fail to assess and identify cybersecurity risks associated with acquisitions and new initiatives, we may become increasingly vulnerable to such risks. Additionally, while we have implemented measures to prevent security breaches and cyber incidents, our preventative measures and incident response efforts may not be entirely effective. The theft, destruction, loss, misappropriation, or release of sensitive and/or confidential information or intellectual property, or interference with our information technology systems or the technology systems of third parties on which we rely, could result in business disruption, negative publicity, brand damage, violation of privacy laws, loss of customers, potential liability and competitive disadvantage.

 

Our authorized preferred stock provides anti-takeover benefits that may not be viewed as beneficial to stockholders

 

Under our Restated Certificate of Incorporation, Sysco’s Board of Directors is authorized to issue up to 1,500,000 shares of preferred stock without stockholder approval. Issuance of these shares could make it more difficult for anyone to acquire Sysco without approval of the Board of Directors, depending on the rights and preferences of the stock issued. In addition, if anyone attempts to acquire Sysco without approval of the Board of Directors of Sysco, the existence of this undesignated preferred stock could allow the Board of Directors to adopt a shareholder rights plan without obtaining stockholder approval, which could result in substantial dilution to a potential acquirer. As a result, hostile takeover attempts that might result in an acquisition of Sysco, that could otherwise have been financially beneficial to our stockholders, could be deterred.

 

 

Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None. 

 

11


 

 

Item 2.  Properties

 

The table below shows the number of distribution facilities occupied by Sysco in each state, province or country and the aggregate square footage devoted to cold and dry storage as of June 29, 2013. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

Number of Facilities

 

Cold Storage
(Square Feet in thousands)

 

Dry Storage
(Square Feet in thousands)

 

Segment Served*

Alabama

 

184 

 

130 

 

BL

Alaska

 

41 

 

28 

 

BL

Arizona

 

129 

 

117 

 

BL, O

Arkansas

 

131 

 

88 

 

BL, O

California

17 

 

1,284 

 

1,225 

 

BL, S, O

Colorado

 

274 

 

212 

 

BL, S, O

Connecticut

 

160 

 

110 

 

BL, O

District of Columbia

 

 

 

BL

Florida

15 

 

1,199 

 

889 

 

BL, S, O

Georgia

 

294 

 

431 

 

BL, S, O

Idaho

 

84 

 

88 

 

BL

Illinois

 

402 

 

535 

 

BL, S, O

Indiana

 

100 

 

109 

 

BL

Iowa

 

93 

 

95 

 

BL

Kansas

 

177 

 

171 

 

BL

Kentucky

 

92 

 

106 

 

BL

Louisiana

 

134 

 

113 

 

BL

Maine

 

59 

 

50 

 

BL

Maryland

 

291 

 

252 

 

BL

Massachusetts

 

249 

 

229 

 

BL, S

Michigan

 

320 

 

300 

 

BL, S

Minnesota

 

239 

 

194 

 

BL

Mississippi

 

95 

 

69 

 

BL

Missouri

 

106 

 

94 

 

BL, S

Montana

 

120 

 

121 

 

BL

Nebraska

 

143 

 

129 

 

BL

Nevada

 

193 

 

156 

 

BL, O

New Jersey

 

140 

 

453 

 

BL, O

New Mexico

 

120 

 

108 

 

BL

New York

 

417 

 

361 

 

BL, O

North Carolina

 

332 

 

303 

 

BL, S, O

North Dakota

 

46 

 

59 

 

BL

Ohio

 

407 

 

423 

 

BL, S, O

Oklahoma

 

192 

 

149 

 

BL, S, O

Oregon

 

177 

 

160 

 

BL, S

Pennsylvania

 

459 

 

405 

 

BL, S

Rhode Island

 

 

 -

 

BL

South Carolina

 

191 

 

98 

 

BL

Tennessee

 

406 

 

426 

 

BL, O

Texas

19 

 

1,107 

 

1,053 

 

BL, S, O

Utah

 

161 

 

107 

 

BL

Virginia

 

564 

 

410 

 

BL

Washington

 

134 

 

92 

 

BL

Wisconsin

 

287 

 

299 

 

BL, O

Bahamas

 

90 

 

23 

 

BL

Alberta, Canada

 

209 

 

202 

 

BL

British Columbia, Canada

 

280 

 

232 

 

BL, O

Manitoba, Canada

 

78 

 

74 

 

BL

New Brunswick, Canada

 

85 

 

41 

 

BL

Newfoundland, Canada

 

33 

 

22 

 

BL

Nova Scotia, Canada

 

31 

 

42 

 

BL

Ontario, Canada

10 

 

435 

 

394 

 

BL, O

Quebec, Canada

 

148 

 

202 

 

BL

Saskatchewan, Canada

 

40 

 

54 

 

BL

 

12


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location

Number of Facilities

 

Cold Storage
(Square Feet in thousands)

 

Dry Storage
(Square Feet in thousands)

 

Segment Served*

Ireland

 

94 

 

71 

 

BL

Northern Ireland

 

 

 

BL

Puerto Rico

 

 

 -

 

O

Total

193 

 

13,276 

 

12,319 

 

 

 

*  Segments served include Broadline (BL), SYGMA (S) and Other (O).

 

We own approximately 21,070,000 square feet of our distribution facilities (or 82.3% of the total square feet), and the remainder is occupied under leases expiring at various dates from fiscal 2014 to fiscal 2032, exclusive of renewal options. 

 

We own our approximately 625,000 square foot headquarters office complex in Houston, Texas.  In addition, we own our approximately 669,000 square foot shared services complex in Cypress, Texas.

 

We are currently constructing a fold-out facility in Ontario, Canada.  

 

As of June 29, 2013, our fleet of approximately 9,100 delivery vehicles consisted of tractor and trailer combinations, vans and panel trucks, most of which are either wholly or partially refrigerated for the transportation of frozen or perishable foods.  We own approximately 94% of these vehicles and lease the remainder.

 

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings

 

None.

 

 

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

 

PART II

 

 

Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities

 

The principal market for Sysco’s common stock (SYY) is the New York Stock Exchange.  The table below sets forth the high and low sales prices per share for our common stock as reported on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape and the cash dividends declared for the periods indicated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends

 

Common Stock Prices

 

Declared

 

High

 

Low

 

Per Share

Fiscal 2012:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

$

31.73 

 

$

25.48 

 

$

0.26 

Second Quarter

 

29.62 

 

 

25.09 

 

 

0.27 

Third Quarter

 

31.18 

 

 

28.70 

 

 

0.27 

Fourth Quarter

 

30.20 

 

 

27.05 

 

 

0.27 

Fiscal 2013:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

$

31.41 

 

$

28.23 

 

$

0.27 

Second Quarter

 

32.40 

 

 

29.75 

 

 

0.28 

Third Quarter

 

35.62 

 

 

30.55 

 

 

0.28 

Fourth Quarter

 

35.40 

 

 

33.07 

 

 

0.28 

 

The number of record owners of Sysco’s common stock as of August 14, 2013 was 12,469.

 

13


 

We  made the following share repurchases during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Period

(a) Total Number of Shares Purchased

 

(b) Average Price Paid per Share

 

(c) Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs

 

(d) Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs

Month #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31 – April 27

1,600,486 

 

$

34.66 

 

1,572,700 

 

11,813,900 

Month #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 28 – May 25

1,716,725 

 

 

34.78 

 

1,500,000 

 

10,313,900 

Month #3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 26 – June 29

8,616,830 

 

 

34.19 

 

8,599,703 

 

1,714,197 

Total

11,934,041 

 

$

34.33 

 

11,672,403 

 

1,714,197 

 

On November 16, 2011, the Board of Directors approved the repurchase of 20,000,000 shares.  Pursuant to the repurchase program, shares may be acquired in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions at the company’s discretion, subject to market conditions and other factors

 

In July 2004, the Board of Directors authorized us to enter into agreements from time to time to extend our ongoing repurchase program to include repurchases during company announced “blackout periods” of such securities in compliance with Rule 10b5-1 promulgated under the Exchange Act.

 

Stock Performance Graph

 

The following performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, each as amended, except to the extent that Sysco specifically incorporates such information by reference into such filing.

 

 

The following stock performance graph compares the performance of Sysco’s Common Stock to the S&P 500 Index and to the S&P 500 Food/Staple Retail Index for Sysco’s last five fiscal years.

 

 The graph assumes that the value of the investment in our Common Stock, the S&P 500 Index, and the S&P 500 Food/Staple Index was $100 on the last trading day of fiscal 2008, and that all dividends were reinvested.  Performance data for Sysco, the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Food/Staple Retail Index is provided as of the last trading day of each of our last five fiscal years.

 

 

 

 

14


 

Picture 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6/28/08

6/27/09

7/3/10

7/2/11

6/30/12

6/29/13

Sysco Corporation

$100

$85

$108

$124

$122

$144

S&P 500

100

74

84

112

116

140

S&P 500 Food/Staple Retail Index

100

82

83

108

125

151

 

 

15


 

 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

2010
(53 Weeks)

 

2009

 

(In thousands except for per share data)

Sales

$

44,411,233 

 

 

$

42,380,939 

 

 

$

39,323,489 

 

 

$

37,243,495 

 

 

$

36,853,330 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating income

 

1,658,478 

 

 

 

1,890,632 

 

 

 

1,931,502 

 

 

 

1,975,868 

 

 

 

1,872,211 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings before income taxes

 

1,547,455 

 

 

 

1,784,002 

 

 

 

1,827,454 

 

 

 

1,849,589 

 

 

 

1,770,834 

 

Income taxes

 

555,028 

 

 

 

662,417 

 

 

 

675,424 

 

 

 

669,606 

 

 

 

714,886 

 

Net earnings

$

992,427 

 

 

$

1,121,585 

 

 

$

1,152,030 

 

 

$

1,179,983 

 

 

$

1,055,948 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

$

1.68 

 

 

$

1.91 

 

 

$

1.96 

 

 

$

1.99 

 

 

$

1.77 

 

Diluted earnings per share

 

1.67 

 

 

 

1.90 

 

 

 

1.96 

 

 

 

1.99 

 

 

 

1.77 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends declared per share

$

1.11 

 

 

$

1.07 

 

 

$

1.03 

 

 

$

0.99 

 

 

$

0.94 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

$

12,663,947 

 

 

$

12,137,207 

 

 

$

11,427,190 

 

 

$

10,336,436 

 

 

$

10,160,321 

 

Capital expenditures

 

511,862 

 

 

 

784,501 

 

 

 

636,442 

 

 

 

594,604 

 

 

 

464,561 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current maturities of long-term debt

$

207,301 

 

 

$

254,650 

 

 

$

207,031 

 

 

$

7,970 

 

 

$

9,163 

 

Long-term debt

 

2,639,986 

 

 

 

2,763,688 

 

 

 

2,279,517 

 

 

 

2,472,662 

 

 

 

2,467,486 

 

Total long-term debt

 

2,847,287 

 

 

 

3,018,338 

 

 

 

2,486,548 

 

 

 

2,480,632 

 

 

 

2,476,649 

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

5,191,810 

 

 

 

4,685,040 

 

 

 

4,705,242 

 

 

 

3,827,526 

 

 

 

3,449,702 

 

Total capitalization

$

8,039,097 

 

 

$

7,703,378 

 

 

$

7,191,790 

 

 

$

6,308,158 

 

 

$

5,926,351 

 

Ratio of long-term debt to

capitalization

 

35.4 

%

 

 

39.2 

%

 

 

34.6 

%

 

 

39.3 

%

 

 

41.8 

%

 

 

16


 

 

Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Our discussion below of our results includes certain non-GAAP financial measures that we believe provide important perspective with respect to underlying business trends.  Any non-GAAP financial measure will be denoted as an adjusted measure and our fiscal 2013 comparisons to fiscal 2012 exclude the impact from Business Transformation Project costs, multiemployer pension plan charges, severance charges, executive retirement plans restructuring, a  one-time acquisition related charge and facility closure charges. Collectively, these are referred to as Excluded Charges.   Our fiscal 2012 comparisons to fiscal 2011 exclude the impact from Business Transformation Project costs, multiemployer pension plan charges, severance charges, corporate-owned life insurance (COLI) policies and certain tax benefits.  More information on the rationale for the use of these measures and reconciliations to GAAP numbers can be found under “Non-GAAP Reconciliations.”

 

Overview

 

Sysco distributes food and related products to restaurants, healthcare and educational facilities, lodging establishments and other foodservice customers.  Our operations are primarily located throughout the United States, Bahamas, Canada, Ireland and Northern Ireland and include broadline companies (which include our custom-cut meat operations), SYGMA (our chain restaurant distribution subsidiary), specialty produce companies, hotel supply operations, a company that distributes specialty imported products and a company that distributes to international customers.

 

We consider our primary market to be the foodservice market in the United States and Canada and estimate that we serve about 18% of this approximately $235 billion annual market.  According to industry sources, the foodservice, or food-away-from-home, market represents approximately 48% of the total dollars spent on food purchases made at the consumer level in the United States. 

 

Industry sources estimate the total foodservice market in the United States experienced a real sales increase of approximately 1.3% in calendar year 2012 and a decline of  0.1% in calendar year 2011.  Real sales changes do not include the impact of inflation or deflation.

 

General economic conditions and consumer confidence can affect the frequency of purchases and amounts spent by consumers for food-away-from-home and, in turn, can impact our customers and our sales.  We believe the current general economic conditions, including pressure on consumer disposable income, have contributed to a decline in the foodservice market.  Historically, we have grown at a faster rate than the overall industry and believe we have continued to grow our market share in this fragmented industry. 

 

Highlights

 

Fiscal 2013 was a year in which we progressed with our Business Transformation Project while facing a challenging business and economic environment.  The foodservice industry has not fully participated in the overall economic recovery primarily due to constrained consumer spending for food-away-from-home.  Our results of operations reflect these challenges as well as expenses related to our Business Transformation Project, payroll costs, charges from the withdrawal from multiemployer pension plans and increased fuel expense.  We believe our sales growth and expense management on a cost per cases basis was acceptable, however gross profit did not grow as we planned due partially to competitive pressures and a shift in customer mix.  We will remain focused on the execution of our business plan and initiatives from our Business Transformation Project, with the goal for these items to contribute to the long-term success of our customers and in turn, growth in our earnings.  We acquired 14 companies during fiscal 2013, which represents annualized sales in excess of $1 billion.  We expect these acquisitions will contribute to our sales growth, enhance our international market presence and product assortment.

 

Comparison of results from fiscal 2013 to fiscal 2012:

 

·

Sales increased 4.8%, or $2.0 billion to $44.4 billion.

·

Operating income decreased 12.3%, or $232.2 million, to $1.7 billion.

·

Adjusted operating income decreased 1.7%, or $36.4 million, to $2.1 billion.

·

Net earnings decreased 11.5%, or $129.2 million, to $1.0 billion. 

·

Adjusted net earnings increased 0.1%, or $1.4 million, to $1.3 billion.

·

Basic earnings per share in fiscal 2013 was $1.68, a 12.0% decrease from the comparable prior year period amount of  $1.91 per share.  Diluted earnings per share in fiscal 2013 was $1.67, a 12.1%  decrease from the comparable prior year period amount of $1.90 per share. 

·

Adjusted diluted earnings per share was $2.14 in fiscal 2013, a 0.5% decrease from  the comparable prior year amount of  $2.15 per share.

 

See “Non-GAAP Reconciliations” for an explanation of these non-GAAP financial measures.

 

17


 

Trends and Strategy

 

Trends

 

General economic conditions and consumer confidence can affect the frequency of purchases and amounts spent by consumers for food-away-from-home and, in turn, can impact our customers and our sales.  Consumer confidence has improved since 2008, however it remains below its historical highs. We believe that the consumer is currently concerned about lingering unemployment levels and lack of growth in personal income.  We believe these items and other current general economic conditions, have negatively impacted consumer confidence and contributed to a slow rate of recovery in the foodservice market.  While these trends can be cyclical in nature, greater consumer confidence will be required to reverse the trend.  According to industry sources, real sales growth for the total foodservice market in the United States is expected to be modest over the long-term.  Non-traditional competitors are becoming more of a factor in terms of competition within our industry, and consumer spending trends are gradually shifting more to fresh, natural and sustainably-produced products.  We believe these industry trends reinforce the need for us to transform our business so that we can be in a position to provide greater value to our customers and reduce our overall cost structure. 

 

Our gross margin performance has been influenced by multiple factors.  Our sales growth in fiscal 2013 was greater with our large regional and national customers.  Gross margin from these types of customers is generally lower than our independent restaurant customers.  If sales from our independent restaurant customers do not grow at the same rate or a greater rate than sales from these large regional and national customers, our gross margins may decline.  Additional pressure exists on our gross margin from competitive pricing pressures.  Low growth in the foodservice market is contributing to increased competition which is in turn pressuring gross profits.  We expect this pricing pressure will likely continue.  Inflation can be a factor that contributes to gross margin pressure; however, inflation rates remained relatively stable throughout fiscal 2013 at a rate between 2.0% to 2.5%.  Inflation was present in certain product categories such as poultry and meat, but was not significant in the majority of our product categories.  While we cannot predict whether inflation will continue at current levels, periods of high inflation, either overall or in certain product categories, can have a negative impact on us and our customers, as high food costs can reduce consumer spending in the food-away-from-home market, and may negatively impact our sales, gross profit, operating income and earnings. 

 

We have experienced higher operating expenses this fiscal year as compared to fiscal 2012.  Our Business Transformation Project has been a primary contributor to this increase.  This project is a key part of our strategy to control costs and grow our market share over the long-term.  This project includes an integrated software system that went into deployment in August 2012, resulting in increased deployment expenses and software amortization.  In fiscal 2012, we were still building and testing our software and therefore had a greater amount of capitalized costs.  We believe expenses related to the project in fiscal 2014 will be similar to the costs incurred in fiscal 2013.  Operating expenses have also increased due to provisions related to multiemployer pension plan withdrawals.  These pension plan provisions generally occur when a collective bargaining agreement is being renewed.  Pay-related expenses have increased primarily from acquired companies and within delivery areas of our business, however these have been partially offset by lower costs in the selling and information technology areas due to initiatives from our Business Transformation Project.  Fuel costs have increased due to both increases diesel prices and gallon usage.

 

Our retirement-related expenses consist primarily of costs from our company-sponsored qualified pension plan (Retirement Plan),  our Supplement Executive Retirement Plan (SERP) and our defined contribution plan.  The net impact in fiscal 2013 of our retirement-related expenses as compared to fiscal 2012 was an increase of $31.3 million.  At the end of fiscal 2012, we decided to freeze future benefit accruals under the Retirement Plan as of December 31, 2012 for all United States-based (U.S.-based) salaried and non-union hourly employees.  Effective January 1, 2013, these employees were eligible for additional contributions under an enhanced, defined contribution plan.  Absent the Retirement Plan freeze discussed above, net company-sponsored pension costs would have increased $106.9 million in fiscal 2013, however because of the freeze the costs decreased as compared to fiscal 2012.  Our expenses related to our defined contribution plan increased in fiscal 2013.  During fiscal 2013, we approved a plan to restructure our executive nonqualified retirement program, including the SERP, by freezing benefits.  We believe this restructuring more closely aligns our executive plans with our non-executive plans.  As a result of this restructuring, we incurred $21.0 million in charges in fiscal 2013.  We expect our retirement-related expenses will decrease in the range of $75 million to $85 million in fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013.  A greater portion of the decrease will occur in the second half of fiscal 2014 due to operation of our enhanced, defined contribution plan for a one-year period.    Excluding the $21.0 million restructuring charge in fiscal 2013, the decrease is expected to be $50 million to $60 million in fiscal 2014.  Over the long-term, we believe the changes to all of these retirement programs will result in reduced volatility of retirement-related expenses and a reduction in total retirement-related expenses.

 

We expect gross margin pressure to persist in fiscal 2014; however, we intend to achieve sales case growth and to reduce costs per case to improve our earnings performance trends in fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013.

 

18


 

Strategy

 

We are focused on optimizing our core broadline business in the United States, Canada and Ireland, while continuing to explore appropriate opportunities to profitably grow our market share and create shareholder value by expanding beyond our core business.  Day-to-day, our business decisions are driven by our mission to market and deliver great products to our customers with exceptional service, with the aspirational vision of becoming each of our customers’ most valued and trusted business partner.  We have identified five strategies to help us achieve our mission and vision:

 

·

Profoundly enrich the experience of doing business with Sysco:  Our primary focus is to help our customers succeed.  We believe that by building on our current competitive advantages, we will be able to further differentiate our offering to customers.  Our competitive advantages include our sales force of over 7,000 marketing associates; our diversified product base, which includes quality-assured Sysco brand products; the suite of services we provide to our customers such as business reviews and menu analysis; and our wide geographic presence in the United States and Canada.  In addition, we have a portfolio of businesses spanning broadline, specialty meat, chain restaurant distribution, specialty produce, hotel amenities, specialty import and export which serves our customers’ needs across a wide array of business segments.  Through our Sysco Ventures platform, we are developing a suite of technology solutions that help support the administrative needs of our customers.  We believe this strategy of enriching the experience of doing business with Sysco will increase customer retention and profitably accelerate sales growth with both existing and new customers.

 

·

Continuously improve productivity in all areas of our business:  Our multi-year Business Transformation Project is designed to improve productivity and reduce costs.  An integrated software system is included in this project and will support a majority of our business processes to further streamline our operations and reduce costs.  These systems are commonly referred to as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.  We view the technology as an important enabler of this project; however the larger outcome of this project will be from transformed processes that standardize portions of our operations.  This includes a shared business service center to centrally manage certain back-office functions that are currently performed at a majority of our operating companies.  This project includes other components to lower our cost structure through improved productivity without impacting our service to our customers.  We continue to optimize warehouse and delivery activities across the corporation to achieve a more efficient delivery of products to our customers and we seek to improve sales productivity and lower general and administrative costs.  We also have a product cost reduction and category management initiative to use market data and customer insights to make changes to product pricing and product assortment. 

 

·

Expand our portfolio of products and services by initiating a customer-centric innovation program:  We continually explore opportunities to provide new and improved products, technologies and services to our customers. 

 

·

Explore, assess and pursue new businesses and markets: This strategy is focused on identifying opportunities to expand the core business through growth in new international markets and in adjacent areas that complement our core foodservice distribution business.  As a part of our ongoing strategic analysis, we regularly evaluate business opportunities, including potential acquisitions and sales of assets and businesses.

 

·

Develop and effectively integrate a comprehensive, enterprise-wide talent management process:  Our ability to drive results and grow our business is directly linked to having the best talent in the industry.  We are committed to the continued enhancement of our talent management programs in terms of how we recruit, select, train and develop our associates throughout Sysco as well as succession planning.  Our ultimate objective is to provide our associates with outstanding opportunities for professional growth and career development.  

 

Business Transformation Project

 

Our multi-year Business Transformation Project consists of:

 

·

the design and deployment of an ERP system to implement an integrated software system to support a majority of our business processes and further streamline our operations;

·

a cost transformation initiative to lower our cost structure;

·

a product cost reduction and category management initiative to use market data and customer insights to make changes to product pricing and product assortment; and

·

several other initiatives.

 

We deployed our ERP system to three additional locations in fiscal 2013 and experienced improved functionality in many areas compared to past deployments.  Our shared services center, Sysco Business Services, continues to expand and provide a broader array of centralized administrative services.  The majority of the system functionality is performing as designed; however, we have identified areas for improvement to certain components of the system that we want to address before we continue deploying to additional locations.  These improvements include simplifying certain processes to improve response times and reduce system loads.  We believe that this will improve system stability and result in improved ability to scale the system as we move forward.  While these

19


 

improvements are being made, we will continue implementing individual modules such as our human resource module and continue with other Business Transformation initiatives.  We intend to deploy the system to one additional location around the end of this calendar year.  If our updates are successful, we anticipate that further deployment will resume early in calendar 2014.  Our deployment schedule will be further defined at that time. 

 

Our cost transformation initiative seeks to lower our cost structure by $300 million to $350 million annually by fiscal 2015.  These include initiatives to increase our productivity in the warehouse and delivery activities including fleet management and maintenance activities.  It also involves improving sales productivity and reducing general and administrative expenses, partially through aligning compensation and benefit plans.  Efforts from our cost transformation initiatives in fiscal 2013 spanned many areas of operations.  We completed the implementation of maintenance management tools in our United States Broadline (U.S. Broadline) companies.  A customer relationship management tool has been implemented in our U.S. Broadline companies that will improve sales productivity.  We restructured our information technology department and contracted with a third party provider for information technology managed services.  For our U.S. Broadline companies, we accelerated the implementation of our human resource module from our ERP system which is expected to be complete by the third quarter of fiscal 2014.  Also, in our U.S. Broadline companies we began centralizing field finance work to our shared services center.  We believe this transition will be complete by December 2013.  We have begun implementing enhancements to our routing technology and processes to improve delivery efficiencies and expect this initiative to be complete by fiscal 2015.  Lastly, our retirement programs have been restructured, which we believe will result in reduced volatility of retirement-related expenses and a reduction in total retirement-related expenses in the long-term. 

 

Our product cost reduction and category management initiative is designed to lower our total product costs by $250 million to $300 million annually by fiscal 2015 and to align our product assortment with current customer demandWe are using market data and customer insights to make changes to our product assortment while building strategic partnerships with our suppliers.  We believe there are opportunities to more effectively provide the products that our customers want, commit to greater volumes with our suppliers and create mutual benefits for all parties.  We believe that procuring greater quantities with select vendors will result in reduced prices for our product purchases.  In fiscal 2013, our product cost reduction and category management initiative was active in reducing SKUs in our inventory and increasing participation in our centralized purchasing initiative.  We are in the process of piloting four product categories in our category management initiative and have received encouraging acceptance rates from our customers of our new assortment of products.  Our suppliers have engaged in the process and appreciate building strategic partnerships that include customer insights into current trends and product innovations..

 

Expenses related to the Business Transformation Project were $330.5 million in fiscal 2013 or $0.36 per share, $193.1 million in fiscal 2012 or $0.21 per share and $102.6 million in fiscal 2011 or $0.11 per share.  The increase in costs in 2013 was largely attributable to deployment costs and software amortization, which began in August 2012.  Software amortization totaled $76.8 million in 2013.  The increase in costs in 2012 was due to increased project spending, reduced capitalization of expenditures and expenses due to the ramp up of our shared services center.  We anticipate that project expenses for fiscal 2014 will be similar to fiscal 2013.  Despite the increase in expense, our cash outlay for our Business Transformation Project, which excludes non-cash software amortization, decreased approximately $48 million as compared to fiscal 2012. 

 

Our goal for our Business Transformation Project is to generate approximately $550 million to $650 million in annual benefits to be achieved by fiscal 2015.  In fiscal 2013, we believe we exceeded our goal of realizing approximately 25% of the total benefit.  In fiscal 2014, we believe we can obtain approximately 50% to 70% of the total targeted benefit.  If we are successful in obtaining these benefits in fiscal 2014, some of the trends in gross profits and operating expenses noted above could be favorably impacted.    

 

Our original goal was to grow our diluted earnings per share to $2.50 to $2.75 by fiscal 2015.  Despite the success of our Business Transformation Project, our diluted earnings per share has not grown as originally anticipated due to the difficult economic environment and the general operating performance of our underlying business that did not meet our expectations.  We no longer believe we will achieve our original goal of producing diluted earnings per share to $2.50 to $2.75 by fiscal 2015.

 

 

 

20


 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth the components of our consolidated results of operations expressed as a percentage of sales for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

Sales

100.0 

%

 

100.0 

%

 

100.0 

%

Cost of sales

82.3 

 

 

81.9 

 

 

81.2 

 

Gross profit

17.7 

 

 

18.1 

 

 

18.8 

 

Operating expenses

14.0 

 

 

13.6 

 

 

13.9 

 

Operating income

3.7 

 

 

4.5 

 

 

4.9 

 

Interest expense

0.3 

 

 

0.3 

 

 

0.3 

 

Other expense (income), net

(0.0)

 

 

(0.0)

 

 

(0.0)

 

Earnings before income taxes

3.4 

 

 

4.2 

 

 

4.6 

 

Income taxes

1.2 

 

 

1.6 

 

 

1.7 

 

Net earnings

2.2 

%

 

2.6 

%

 

2.9 

%

 

The following table sets forth the change in the components of our consolidated results of operations expressed as a percentage increase or decrease over the prior year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013

 

2012

Sales

 

 

 

4.8 

%

 

7.8 

%

Cost of sales

 

 

 

5.3 

 

 

8.7 

 

Gross profit

 

 

 

2.5 

 

 

3.8 

 

Operating expenses

 

 

 

7.3 

 

 

5.9 

 

Operating income

 

 

 

(12.3)

 

 

(2.1)

 

Interest expense

 

 

 

13.3 

 

 

(4.1)

 

Other expense (income), net

 

 

 

158.2 

(1)

 

(52.4)

(1)

Earnings before income taxes

 

 

 

(13.3)

 

 

(2.4)

 

Income taxes

 

 

 

(16.2)

 

 

(1.9)

 

Net earnings

 

 

 

(11.5)

%

 

(2.6)

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

 

 

 

(12.0)

%

 

(2.6)

%

Diluted earnings per share

 

 

 

(12.1)

 

 

(3.1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average shares outstanding

 

 

 

0.3 

 

 

0.2 

 

Diluted shares outstanding

 

 

 

0.6 

 

 

0.1 

 

 

 

(1)     Other expense (income), net was income of $17.5 million in fiscal 2013, $6.8 million in fiscal 2012 and $14.2 million in fiscal 2011.

 

Sales

 

Sales for fiscal 2013 were 4.8% higher than fiscal 2012.  Sales for fiscal 2013 increased as a result of product cost inflation and the resulting increase in selling prices, sales from acquisitions that occurred within the last 12 months and case volume growth.  Our sales growth in fiscal 2013 was greater with our large regional and national customers as compared to sales growth with our independent restaurant customers.  We believe our independent sales growth has been negatively influenced by lower consumer sentiment.   Case volumes excluding acquisitions within the last 12 months improved 1.3% in fiscal 2013.  Our case volumes represent our results from our Broadline and SYGMA segments only.  Sales from acquisitions within the last 12 months favorably impacted sales by 1.5% for fiscal 2013.  Our acquisition activity has been greater in fiscal 2013 as compared to fiscal 2012.  We estimate the carryover impact into fiscal 2014 will cause sales to increase by approximately 1.0%.  We expect to continue the trend of closing acquisitions in fiscal 2014 that will continue to add at least 1.0% in total annualized sales from new acquisitions in fiscal 2014.  Changes in product costs, an internal measure of inflation or deflation, were estimated as inflation of 2.2% during fiscal 2013.  Case volumes including acquisitions within the last 12 months improved approximately 2.6% in fiscal 2013.   The changes in the exchange rates used to translate our foreign sales into U.S. dollars did not have a significant impact on sales when compared to fiscal 2012

 

Sales for fiscal 2012 were 7.8%  higher than fiscal 2011.  Sales for fiscal 2012 increased as a result of product cost inflation, and the resulting increase in selling prices, along with improving case volumesChanges in product cost, an internal measure of inflation, were approximately 5.5% during fiscal 2012Case volumes including acquisitions within the last 12 months improved approximately

21


 

3.0% during fiscal 2012.  Case volumes excluding acquisitions within the last 12 months improved approximately 2.5% during fiscal 2012.  Sales from acquisitions in the last 12 months favorably impacted sales by 0.7% for fiscal 2012.   The changes in the exchange rates used to translate our foreign sales into U.S. dollars did not have a significant impact on sales when compared to fiscal 2011

 

Operating Income

 

Cost of sales primarily includes our product costs, net of vendor consideration, and includes in-bound freight.  Operating expenses include the costs of facilities, product handling, delivery, selling and general and administrative activities.  Fuel surcharges are reflected within sales and gross profit; fuel costs are reflected within operating expenses.

 

Fiscal 2013 vs. Fiscal 2012

 

The following table sets forth the change in the components of operating income and adjusted operating income expressed as a percentage increase or decrease over the prior year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013

 

2012

 

Change in Dollars

 


% Change

 

(In thousands)

Gross profit

$

7,867,591 

 

$

7,676,577 

 

$

191,014 

 

2.5 

%

Operating expenses

 

6,209,113 

 

 

5,785,945 

 

 

423,168 

 

7.3 

 

Operating income

$

1,658,478 

 

$

1,890,632 

 

$

(232,154)

 

(12.3)

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

$

7,867,591 

 

$

7,676,577 

 

$

191,014 

 

2.5 

%

Adjusted operating expenses (Non-GAAP)

 

5,783,854 

 

 

5,556,468 

 

 

227,386 

 

4.1 

 

Adjusted operating income (Non-GAAP)

$

2,083,737 

 

$

2,120,109 

 

$

(36,372)

 

(1.7)

%

 

The decrease in operating income in fiscal 2013 as compared to fiscal 2012 was primarily driven by increased expenses, including charges related to our Business Transformation Project and increased pay-related expenses. 

 

Gross profit dollars increased in fiscal 2013 as compared to fiscal 2012 primarily due to increased sales.  Gross margin, which is gross profit as a percentage of sales, was 17.72% in fiscal 2013, a decline of 39 basis points from the gross margin of 18.11% in fiscal 2012.  This decline in gross margin was partially the result of increased growth from large regional and national customers.  Gross margin from these types of customers is generally lower than other types of customers.  As seen in our results during fiscal 2013, if sales from our independent restaurant customers do not grow at the same rate sales from these large regional and national customers, our gross margins may decline.  Increased competition resulting from a slow-growth market also contributed to the decline in gross margins.

 

 We estimate that Sysco’s product cost inflation was 2.2% during fiscal 2013.  Based on our product sales mix for fiscal 2013, we were most impacted by higher levels of inflation in the poultry and meat product categories.  While we cannot predict whether inflation will occur, prolonged periods of high inflation, either overall or in certain product categories, can have a negative impact on us and our customers, as high food costs can reduce consumer spending in the food-away-from-home market, and may negatively impact our sales, gross profit and earnings. 

 

Operating expenses for fiscal 2013 increased 7.3%, or $423.2 million, over fiscal 2012, primarily due to increased expenses from our Business Transformation Project, pay-related expenses, charges related to multiemployer pension plan withdrawals, depreciation and amortization expense and fuel.  Adjusted operating expenses increased 4.1%, or $227.4 million, in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  The increase in adjusted operating expenses was primarily due to increased pay-related expenses, depreciation and amortization expense and fuel.

 

Expenses related to our Business Transformation Project, inclusive of pay-related and software amortization expense, were $330.5 million in fiscal 2013 and $193.1 million in fiscal 2012, representing an increase of $137.4 million.  The increase in fiscal 2013 resulted in part from the initiation of software amortization as the system was placed into service in August 2012.  The increase in depreciation and amortization expense related to the Business Transformation Project was $59.6 million in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  Our project was not in the deployment stage during any period of fiscal 2012; therefore, a greater portion of the costs were capitalized in fiscal 2012.  We anticipate that project expenses for fiscal 2014 will be similar to fiscal 2013.    

 

Pay-related expenses, excluding labor costs associated with our Business Transformation Project and retirement-related expenses, increased by $48.3 million in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  The increase was primarily due to added costs from companies acquired in the last 12 months and increased delivery and warehouse compensation.  Delivery and warehouse compensation includes activity-based pay which will increase when our case volumes increase.  Additionally, pay rates have been higher particularly in geographies where oil and gas exploration occurs due to labor shortages.  These increases were partially offset by reduced sales and information

22


 

technology pay-related expenses as a result of some of our Business Transformation initiatives.  During fiscal 2013, we streamlined our sales management organization and modified marketing associate compensation plans.  We also restructured our information technology department during the mid-point of fiscal 2013, reducing headcount as a result.

 

Our retirement-related expenses consist primarily of costs from our Retirement Plan, SERP and our defined contribution plan.  The net impact in fiscal 2013 of our retirement-related expenses as compared to fiscal 2012 was an increase of $31.3 million, consisting of $48.1 million increased costs from the defined contribution plan, a $20.8 million decrease in our net company-sponsored pension costs and approximately $4 million for other costs.  At the end of fiscal 2012, Sysco decided to freeze future benefit accruals under the Retirement Plan as of December 31, 2012 for all U.S.-based salaried and non-union hourly employees.  Effective January 1, 2013, these employees were eligible for additional contributions under an enhanced, defined contribution plan.  Absent the Retirement Plan freeze, net company-sponsored pension costs would have increased $106.9 million in fiscal 2013.  During fiscal 2013, we approved a plan to restructure our executive nonqualified retirement program including the SERP and our executive deferred compensation plan.  A non-qualified defined contribution plan became effective on January 1, 2013 as a replacement plan and benefits were frozen under the SERP at the end of fiscal 2013.  We believe this restructuring more closely aligned our executive plans with our non-executive plans.  As a result of this restructuring, we incurred $21.0 million in charges in fiscal 2013.  We expect our retirement-related expenses in fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013 will decrease in the range of $75 million to $85 million primarily from reduced expenses of our Retirement Plan, partially offset by increased defined contribution plan expenses.  A greater portion of the decrease will occur in the second half of fiscal 2014 due to operation of our enhanced, defined contribution plan for a one-year period.  Excluding the $21.0 million restructuring charge in fiscal 2013 and the decrease in fiscal 2014 is expected to be $50 million to $60 million.  Over the long-term, we believe the changes to all of these retirement programs will result in reduced volatility of retirement-related expenses and a reduction in total retirement-related expenses.

 

Depreciation and amortization expense increased by $95.6 million in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  The increase related to our Business Transformation Project is described above.  The remaining increase of $36.0 million in fiscal 2013 was primarily related to assets that were not placed in service in fiscal 2012 that were in service in fiscal 2013, primarily from new facilities, property from new acquisitions and expansions. 

  

From time to time, we may voluntarily withdraw from multiemployer pension plans to minimize or limit our future exposure to these plans.  In fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2012, we recorded provisions of $41.9 million and $21.9 million, respectively, related to multiemployer pension plan withdrawals. 

 

Fuel costs increased by $18.9 million in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  The increase was primarily due to increased contracted diesel prices and increased gallon usage.  Our costs per gallon increased 2.8% in fiscal 2013 over fiscal 2012.  Our activities to mitigate fuel costs include reducing miles driven by our trucks through improved routing techniques, improving fleet utilization by adjusting idling time and maximum speeds and using fuel surcharges.  We routinely enter into forward purchase commitments for a portion of our projected monthly diesel fuel requirements with a goal of mitigating a portion of the volatility in fuel prices. 

 

Our fuel commitments will result in either additional fuel costs or avoided fuel costs based on the comparison of the prices on the fixed price contracts and market prices for the respective periods.  In fiscal 2013, the forward purchase commitments resulted in an estimated $17.8 million of avoided fuel costs as the fixed price contracts were generally lower than market prices for the contracted volumes.  In fiscal 2012, the forward purchase commitments resulted in an estimated $20.2 million of avoided fuel costs as the fixed price contracts were generally lower than market prices for the contracted volumes.

 

As of June 29, 2013, we had forward diesel fuel commitments totaling approximately $204.0 million through August 2014.  These contracts will lock in the price of approximately 60% to 65% of our fuel purchase needs for the remainder of the fiscal year at prices slightly lower than the current market price for diesel.  Assuming that fuel prices do not rise significantly over recent levels during fiscal 2014, fuel costs, exclusive of any amounts recovered through fuel surcharges, are expected to increase by approximately $10 to $20 million as compared to fiscal 2013.  Our estimate is based upon current, published quarterly market price projections for diesel, the cost committed to in our forward fuel purchase agreements currently in place for fiscal 2014 and estimates of fuel consumption.  Actual fuel costs could vary from our estimates if any of these assumptions change, in particular if future fuel prices vary significantly from our current estimates.  We continue to evaluate all opportunities to offset potential increases in fuel expense, including the use of fuel surcharges and overall expense management. 

 

We also measure our expense performance on a cost per case basis.  This metric is calculated by taking the total operating expense of our Broadline companies, excluding charges multiemployer pension plans and severance charges,  divided by the number of cases sold.  We seek to grow our sales and either minimize or reduce our costs on a per case basis.    Our fiscal 2013 cost per case decreased by more than $0.03 per case as compared to fiscal 2012 primarily from reduced pay-related expenses from our sales and information technology areas, partially offset by increased costs from delivery and warehouse pay-related expenses, increased retirement-related expenses and fuel increases.  We expect to continue to reduce our Broadline companies cost per case in fiscal 2014 by approximately $0.05 per case partially from reduced retirement-related expenses.

 

23


 

Fiscal 2012 vs. Fiscal 2011    

 

The following table sets forth the change in the components of operating income and adjusted operating income expressed as a percentage increase or decrease over the prior year:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

Change in Dollars

 


% Change

 

(In thousands)

Gross profit

$

7,676,577 

 

$

7,394,712 

 

$

281,865 

 

3.8 

%

Operating expenses

 

5,785,945 

 

 

5,463,210 

 

 

322,735 

 

5.9 

 

Operating income