10-K 1 lrad20140930_10k.htm FORM 10-K lrad20140930_10k.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 


 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014

 

Commission File Number 0-24248

 

 


 

LRAD CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 


 

   

DELAWARE

87-0361799

(State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

   

16990 Goldentop Road,

San Diego, California

92127

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (858) 676-1112

 


 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:

 

   

Title of each class

Name of exchange on which registered 

Common stock, $.00001 par value per share

NASDAQ Capital Market

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT: None

 


 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ☐    No  ☒

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  ☐    No  ☒

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  

 

Large accelerated filer  ☐

Accelerated filer  ☐

Non-accelerated filer  ☐

Smaller reporting company   ☒

       
    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ☐    No  ☒

 

The aggregate market value of the voting common stock held by nonaffiliates of the registrant as of March 31, 2014 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was $59,189,336 based upon the closing price of the shares on the NASDAQ Capital Market on that date. This calculation does not reflect a determination that such persons are affiliates for any other purpose.

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:

 

33,236,489 shares of common stock, par value $.00001 per share, as of November 13, 2014.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement filed with the Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A in connection with the registrant’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed subsequent to the date of this report, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report. The definitive proxy statement will be filed with the Commission not later than 120 days after the conclusion of the registrant’s fiscal year ended September 30, 2014.

 



 

 

 
 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     

 

 

Page 

PART I

ITEM 1.

Business

1

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

6

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

14

ITEM 2.

Properties

14

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

14

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

14

 

PART II

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

15

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

16

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

16

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

22

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

22

ITEM 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

22

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

22

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

23

 

PART III

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

24

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

24

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

24

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

24

ITEM 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

24

 

PART IV

ITEM 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

25

 

Consolidated Financial Statements

F-1

 

Signatures

S-1

 

 
 

 

 

PART I

 

Forward Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements relating to future events or the future performance of our company. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not the only means of identifying forward-looking statements. Such statements are predictions and actual events or results may differ materially. In evaluating such statements, you should specifically consider various factors identified in this report, including the matters set forth below in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements.

 

For purposes of this Annual Report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our” and the “Company” refer to LRAD Corporation and its consolidated subsidiary.

 

Item 1.

Business.

 

Overview

 

LRAD Corporation develops and delivers innovative directed acoustic products that beam, focus and control sound over short and long distances. By placing sound only where needed, we not only enhance many typical speaker applications, but we offer novel sound applications that conventional speakers cannot achieve. In 2007, we completely redesigned our directional LRAD® products, introducing the LRAD-X® product line in 2008, with improved quality and functionality. Beginning in 2012, using the technology that we developed for our directional speakers, we designed and developed a new line of omnidirectional speakers which project sound from 60 to 360 degrees, to enter the global mass notification marketplace. In 2014, we introduced the LRAD 450XL, the most powerful acoustic hailing device in the market given its size and weight. We offer a variety of directional and omnidirectional sound products which meet a broad range of requirements from communicating with and deterring threats over distances up to 600 meters with our hand-held LRAD 100X to distances up to 5,500 meters with our LRAD 2000X. Our Long Range Acoustic Device® or LRAD pioneered a new worldwide market for directional long-range acoustic hailing devices (“AHDs”) which we now sell into over 70 countries. We have been at the forefront developing new acoustic innovations and we believe we have established a significant competitive advantage in our principal markets.

 

Technology and Products 

 

Our LRAD represents a technological breakthrough that creates a directed acoustic beam using minimal power to communicate at operational ranges with authority and superior intelligibility even in high ambient noise environments. Our LRAD was initially developed for the U.S. Navy to fulfill a capability gap identified after the USS Cole attack in 2000 and has been deployed by the U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, as well as international military services and commercial maritime, commercial security, and public safety organizations around the globe since early 2003. In fiscal 2008, we completed the redesign and redevelopment of our LRAD products and introduced our current generation of products called LRAD-X, which feature improved voice intelligibility, output and durability. LRAD hailing, notification and warning systems feature a 15 to 30 degree acoustic beam and a broadcast range up to 5,500 meters. LRAD systems also feature a rugged construction that allows the product to meet the stringent environmental requirements of military applications. LRAD systems can emit powerful voice commands, prerecorded messages in multiple languages and deterrent tones to create large safety zones allowing operators to determine the intent, influence the behavior and gain compliance from approaching vessels, vehicles or personnel.

 

Our LRAD-X product line provides a complete range of systems from single user portable to permanently installed, remotely operated. In recent years, we have added new models to meet the needs of specific customer requirements and to enable us to expand our technology into new markets. We have also added new features such as wireless capability, recordable microphones, integrated and remote electronics packages, and various amplifier configurations. In 2014, we introduced the LRAD 450XL; the latest addition to our LRAD directed product line-up. The LRAD 450XL uses new patent pending speaker technology and is the most powerful acoustic hailing device in the market today given its size and weight. We continue to enhance our product design to improve the durability and performance of our units. Our LRAD products have been competitively selected over other commercially available systems by U.S. and several foreign militaries.

 

In 2012, utilizing our advanced speaker technology developed for our directed products, we designed and developed an omnidirectional speaker, the LRAD 360X. Unlike most of the current mass notification systems marketed today, which are primarily sirens, our products provide the same highly intelligible voice clarity as the rest of the LRAD product line. The LRAD 360X is designed to transmit highly intelligible voice communications and warnings over a 360-degree area, unlike the more directional LRAD products. In 2013 and 2014, we continued to develop additional products to expand our omnidirectional product offering to meet the needs of the growing global mass notification market.

 

 
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Our LRAD-X product line currently includes the following:

 

LRAD Directional Products:

 

 

LRAD 2000X—launched in 2012 to meet the requirements of larger security applications—is our largest and loudest AHD and broadcasts highly intelligible voice communication that can be clearly heard and understood over distances up to 5,500 meters. This unit is designed to be highly effective in perimeter and border security applications.

 

 

LRAD 1000X—selected by the U.S. Navy as its AHD for Block 0 of the Shipboard Protection System—can be manually operated to provide long distance hailing and warning with highly intelligible voice communication. This unit is available in both fully-integrated and remotely-operated electronics.

 

 

LRAD 500X—selected by the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army as their AHD for small vessels and vehicles—is lightweight and can be easily transported to provide security personnel long-range communications and a highly effective hailing and warning capability where needed.

 

 

LRAD 450XL—designed, developed and launched in 2014—is the loudest long range AHD for its size and weight. The LRAD 450XL uses an enhanced patent pending technology to provide powerful output in a smaller form factor with the same high level of clarity and intelligibility consistent with the LRAD product line. The LRAD 450XL was designed to provide an effective communication solution for small vessels, military and law enforcement vehicles, remote weapon stations and helicopters.

 

 

LRAD 300X—a lightweight mid-range AHD developed for small vessels and manned and unmanned vehicles and aircraft—is available with both fully integrated and remotely-operated electronics.

 

 

LRAD 100X—a self-contained, battery powered, portable system designed for use in a variety of mass notification, law enforcement and commercial security applications—is ideally suited for short-range perimeter security and communications.

 

 

LRAD-RX—selected by the U.S. Navy after a competitive bid as its AHD for Block 2 of the Shipboard Protection System— is our solution for remotely controlled security. The LRAD-RX enables system operators to detect and communicate with an intruder over long distances. It features an LRAD 1000X emitter head, integrated camera, high-intensity searchlight and our proprietary, robust, and Internet protocol-addressable full pan and tilt drive system for precise aiming and tracking. The LRAD-RX can also be integrated with radar to provide automated intruder alerts. Because of its automated capabilities, the LRAD-RX is intended to reduce manpower requirements and false alarms while providing an intelligent, cost-effective security solution.

 

LRAD Omnidirectional Products:

 

 

LRAD 360X—launched in 2012—is designed to provide 360 degrees of coverage and with features needed for mass notification and emergency warning capabilities. The LRAD 360X is targeted for market applications including campus, border and perimeter security, tsunami, hurricane and tornado warnings, bird safety and control and asset protection.

 

 

LRAD 360Xm—launched in 2013—is a smaller form factor of the LRAD 360X, providing the same highly intelligible voice clarity of the LRAD 360X over areas not requiring large scale coverage. Market applications include campus, perimeter security and large metropolitan areas where warnings need to be localized due to building and other obstructions. In 2014, we developed a portable version of the LRAD 360m in a carrying case with a telescoping tripod that can be set-up in minutes and can provide immediate communication where needed.

 

 

LRAD 360XT—launched in 2013 and redesigned in 2014—is our mobile mass notification solution. A ruggedized trailer that uses a telescoping, folding mast to deploy an LRAD 360X to a maximum height of 30 feet which can provide emergency warnings and instructions where it is needed with area coverage up to 5.3 kilometers.

 

 

LRAD 60DX—launched in 2014—is a 60 degree directional mass notification speaker that can be mounted on various platforms to provide communication in areas requiring more directional coverage.

 

 

LRAD SB—launched in 2014—is a vehicle mounted speaker system that can be secured to any armored, VIP or other government or corporate vehicle to create a 360 degree deterrent zone to safely and effectively warn and ward off threats.

 

 

SoundSaber®—redesigned and reengineered in fiscal 2013 to improve the quality, ruggedness, and output—is a 90 degree mass notification system with highly intelligible voice communication that is well suited for military base communications, air craft carriers, and other public address applications.

 

Recent Developments

 

In the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, we accomplished the following:

 

 

Achieved fifth consecutive year of profitability and recorded the second highest annual revenue in the Company’s history, a 44% increase over the prior year, in spite of difficult global market conditions and ongoing United States defense budget uncertainty and sequestration which has reduced U.S. military/government spending.

 

 
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Achieved net income of 14% of net revenues and increased working capital by 17%.

 

 

Enhanced our existing product offerings and continued to expand our omnidirectional product line-up by introducing the LRAD 360Xm in late 2013 and the LRAD 360XT, LRAD 60DX, and LRAD SB in 2014. We anticipate strong growth with our product offerings in the expanding worldwide mass notification market.

 

 

Expanded our business development team from a total of 7 to 9 people at September 30, 2014, including new management personnel.

 

 

Continued to evaluate and develop our distribution channels by signing new third party sales representatives and resellers.

 

 

Continued to grow our international business which represented 78% of total 2014 revenues.

 

 

Continued to manage our balance sheet and control expenses while investing in new product development, markets and personnel.

 

In October 2014, we announced the introduction of the LRAD 450XL the world’s loudest AHD for its size and weight. The LRAD 450XL uses enhanced patent pending technology.

 

Strategy

 

We believe we have been instrumental in developing a market and increasing demand for AHDs in a number of business segments and markets. We are building on our leadership position in the field of directed or focused sound for both short-range and long-range communication with high clarity and intelligibility. Our overall strategy is to offer an increasing variety of directional and omnidirectional sound and other products for an increasing range of applications. In executing our strategy, we use direct sales to governments, military, large end-users, system integrators and defense-related companies, and we have built a worldwide distribution channel consisting of partners and resellers that have significant expertise and experience selling integrated communications solutions into our various target markets. Since our primary sales opportunities are with militaries and governments, we are subject to each customer’s unique budget cycle, which leads to extremely long selling cycles and uneven revenue flow, complicating our product planning.

 

We have two major initiatives for fiscal 2015. First, we plan to continue to grow revenue by increasing direct sales to domestic and international militaries and large commercial and defense-related companies desiring to use our directed sound technology in their integrated product offerings. This includes a continued strong effort to pursue U.S. military opportunities where our products have proven beneficial in the past, but revenues have declined in recent years due to budget constraints. Second, we plan to expand our presence and increase market share in the global mass notification market. With the recent launch of several new omnidirectional products well suited for this market, we intend to target opportunities that can benefit by our clear, intelligible product offerings. Our business development personnel focus primarily on the government, military, law enforcement, homeland and international security, private and commercial security, maritime security and wildlife preservation and control markets. While we have been developing these markets for the past several years, we have only begun to realize the significant potential in these worldwide market opportunities. In 2013, we hired new independent consultants to help us further the development of the U.S. military markets and we developed new channel partners in Central and South America. In 2013, we entered the large mass notification market with the LRAD 360X. We have designed and developed a complimentary product line-up to the LRAD 360X to increase our presence in this global market. While this is a more mature marketplace with established manufacturers and suppliers, we believe that our superior technology and product offerings give us an opportunity to break-in and succeed in this large, expanding market. We also plan to continue our focus on expanding and strengthening domestic and international sales channels by adding key channel partners, distributors and dealers.

 

Our research and development strategy is to continue developing innovative directed acoustic solutions (e.g. the LRAD 450XL) for introduction into our target markets, as well as to round out our omnidirectional product offering to include a more comprehensive, integrated solution. In 2008, we made significant improvements to the performance and quality of our existing directed sound products and introduced our line of LRAD-X products. The introduction of our redesigned and reengineered product line has allowed us to expand our business and maintain an industry leadership position. We have ongoing development efforts to further improve our products’ performance, quality and features. We also engage in ongoing value engineering to reduce the cost and simplify the manufacturing of our products. In 2013, we began development of products and software targeted at the mass notification market. Our mass notification products represent a much more complex, integrated offering. In 2015, we intend to continue to invest engineering resources and capital as we continue to develop our product line-up.

 

Manufacturing and Suppliers 

 

Manufacturing. We believe maintaining quality manufacturing capacity is essential to the performance of our products and the growth of our business. Our technologies are different from mass produced sound transducer designs, and our manufacturing and assembly involves unique processes and materials. We contract with third party suppliers to produce various components and sub-assemblies. At our San Diego, California facility, we complete the final assembly of, and test and ship our products for both commercial and government systems. We have refined our internal processes to improve how we design, test and qualify product designs. We continue to implement rigorous manufacturing and quality processes to track production and field failures. We also perform third party testing and certification of our products to ensure that they meet rigid military and commercial specifications. We have developed custom manufacturing equipment used to automate the production of key sub-assemblies reducing the labor component and permitting higher volume production. We implement design and component changes periodically to reduce our product costs and improve product reliability and manufacturability.

 

 
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Suppliers. Our products have a large number of components and sub-assemblies produced by outside suppliers mostly located within 50 miles of our facility to take advantage of flexible turnaround, minimize inventories and to maximize our supply-chain. We purchase a number of key components and sub-assemblies from foreign suppliers. Consequently, we are subject to the impact economic conditions can have on such suppliers and the fluctuations of foreign currency exchange rates which could impact our lead times and product cost. We have developed strong relationships with a number of our key suppliers. If these suppliers should experience quality problems or part shortages, our production schedules could be significantly delayed or our costs significantly increased.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

We market and sell products and services through our sales force based in California, Colorado, Florida, Rhode Island, Texas and Wisconsin. Our corporate and administrative offices are located in San Diego, California.

 

We sell directly to governments, military, large end-users and defense-related companies. We use independent representatives on a commission basis to assist us in our direct sales efforts. We also use a channel distribution model in which we sell our products directly to a small network of independent resellers and system integrators around the world, who then sell our products (or our products integrated with other systems) to end-user customers. We are focusing our internal business development resources on building relationships with defense integrators and other large direct customers.

 

We have established a global reputation for providing high quality, innovative sound solutions that has made LRAD an internationally recognized product brand. We actively promote our brands on our products and we intend to continue to increase the use of our trademarks throughout our product distribution chain and believe growing brand awareness will assist in expanding our business.

 

Customer Concentration

 

For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, revenues from one customer accounted for 16% of revenues, with no other single customer accounting for more than 10% of revenues. For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013, revenues from three customers accounted for 15%, 14% and 10% of revenues, respectively, with no other single customer accounting for more than 10% of revenues.

 

Our revenues to date have relied on a few major customers. The loss of any customer could have a materially adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Our goal is to diversify sound technology revenues in future periods.

 

Backlog

 

Our order backlog for products that are deliverable in the next 12 months was approximately $5,543,000 at September 30, 2014, compared to $4,279,000 at September 30, 2013. The amount of backlog at any point in time is dependent upon scheduled delivery dates to our customers and product lead times. Our backlog orders are supported firm purchase orders.

 

Warranties

 

We generally warrant our products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period up to one year from the date of purchase. The warranty is generally a limited warranty, and in some instances imposes certain shipping costs on the customer. We generally provide direct warranty service, but at times we may establish warranty service through third party resellers of our product or others. Our international warranties are generally similar to the warranties we offer in the U.S.

 

We also provide repair and maintenance agreements and extended warranty contracts at market rates, with terms ranging from one year to several years, as an additional source of revenue and to provide increased customer satisfaction.

 

Competition

 

Our technologies and products compete with those of other companies. The commercial and government audio industry markets are fragmented and include numerous manufacturers with audio products that vary widely in price, quality and distribution channels. Many of our present and potential future competitors have, or may have, substantially greater resources to devote to product development. We believe we compete primarily on the originality of our products, the uniqueness of our technology and designs, the ability to meet customer needs and, most importantly, the quality, ruggedness and superior performance of our products which have been developed by incorporating feedback from our customers and our desire to provide the highest quality product to our markets.

 

 
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Our LRAD products are the leading acoustic hailing and warning products in the market today for military and commercial applications. The broad category of government audio industry speakers includes competitors such as IML Sound Commander, Ultra Electronics USSI and others. We do not believe these competitors have achieved significant global market penetration in the government or commercial directed hailing markets to date. We believe our LRAD product line has demonstrated acceptance and has performed extremely well in harsh environments and can continue to compete on the basis of technical features, performance, ease of use, quality and cost. As we continue to grow this market, future competitors with greater resources may enter with new technologies and capabilities, which could impact our competitiveness.

 

With the introduction of the omnidirectional LRAD products, we have entered the more mature and established mass notification market, which has a number of large competitors including Federal Signal Corporation, Whelen Engineering Company Inc., Siemens AG and others. The omnidirectional LRAD products provide the same vocal clarity and intelligibility over long distances as our directed LRAD products. We believe the highly intelligible voice of our omnidirectional products gives us a competitive advantage against these larger organizations. We believe the domestic and international markets for mass notification systems are substantial and growing.

 

Seasonality

 

Government business tends to be seasonal due to government procurement and budget cycles, with the quarter ending September 30, which coincides with the United States government budget year, usually producing relatively higher sales, and the quarter ending December 31, usually producing relatively lower sales. We have not experienced any significant seasonality trends to date, but we may experience increased seasonality in the future.

 

Government Regulation

 

We are subject to a variety of government laws and regulations that apply to companies engaged in international operations, including, among others, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, U.S. Department of Commerce export controls, local government regulations and procurement policies and practices (including regulations relating to import-export control, investments, exchange controls and repatriation of earnings). We maintain controls and procedures to comply with laws and regulations associated with our international operations. If we are unable to remain compliant with such laws and regulations, our business may be adversely affected.

 

Our products are being produced to comply with standard product safety requirements for sale in the United States and similar requirements for sale in Europe and Canada. We expect to meet the electrical and other regulatory requirements for electronic systems or components we sell throughout the world.

 

Financial Information about Segments and Geographic Areas

 

Financial information regarding our segments and the geographic areas in which we operate is contained in Note 15, Major Customers, Suppliers, Segment and Related Information, to our consolidated financial statements.

 

Intellectual Property Rights and Proprietary Information

 

We operate in an industry where innovation, investment in new ideas and protection of resulting intellectual property rights are important drivers of success. We rely on a variety of intellectual property protections for our products and technologies, including patent, trademark and trade secret laws and contractual obligations, and we pursue a policy of vigorously enforcing such rights.

 

In addition to such factors as innovation, technological expertise and experienced personnel, we believe that a strong product offering that is continually upgraded and enhanced will keep us competitive, and we will seek patent protection on important technological improvements that we make. We have an ongoing policy of filing patent applications to seek protection for novel features of our products and technologies. Prior to the filing and granting of patents, our policy is to disclose key features to patent counsel and maintain these features as trade secrets prior to product introduction. Patent applications may not result in issued patents covering all important claims and could be denied in their entirety. We also file for trade name and trademark protection when appropriate. We are the owner of federally registered trademarks including LRAD®, LONG RANGE ACOUSTIC DEVICE®, LRAD-X®, LRAD-RX® and SOUNDSABER®, many of which have earned worldwide brand recognition.

 

Our policy is to enter into nondisclosure agreements with each employee and consultant or third party to whom any of our proprietary information is disclosed. These agreements prohibit the disclosure of confidential information to others, both during and subsequent to employment or the duration of the working relationship. These agreements may not prevent disclosure of confidential information or provide adequate remedies for any breach.

 

 
5

 

 

Research and Development

 

The sound reproduction market is subject to rapid changes in technology and design with frequent improvements and new product introductions. We believe our future success will depend on our ability to enhance and improve existing technologies and to introduce new technologies and products on a competitive basis that meet the needs of our customers. Accordingly, we are continuing to engage in significant research and new product development activities.

 

For the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, we spent approximately $2.5 million and $1.8 million, respectively, on company-sponsored research and development. Future levels of research and development expenditures will vary depending on the timing of further new product development and the availability of funds to carry on additional research and development on currently owned technologies or in other areas.

 

Executive Officers

 

The current executive officers of LRAD Corporation and their ages and business experience are set forth below.

 

Thomas R. Brown, age 64, has been a director since March 2006 and was appointed as President and Chief Executive Officer in August 2006. Mr. Brown served as President of BrownThompson Executive Search, a financial executive search firm, from April 2005 to August 2006. Mr. Brown was employed by Sony Electronics, Inc. from February 1988 to September 2004. From April 2001 to September 2004, Mr. Brown was Executive Vice President and Deputy President of the Engineering and Manufacturing division of Sony Electronics, Inc., where he was responsible for supply chain operations including Information Technology, Procurement, Customer Service, North American Manufacturing Operations and Finance. From April 2000 to September 2004, Mr. Brown was concurrently the Executive Vice President and President of Information Technology Division for Sony Electronics, where he was responsible for establishing the North American personal computer manufacturing division. Mr. Brown is a member of the board of directors of Mad Catz Interactive, Inc. (NYSE MKT/TSX: MCZ), a provider of innovative interactive entertainment products. Mr. Brown holds a B.A. in Economics from Rutgers University.

 

Katherine H. McDermott, age 54, was appointed as Controller/Chief Accounting Officer in June 2007 and was promoted to Chief Financial Officer in September 2007. Ms. McDermott served as the Chief Financial Officer for National Pen Company from 2005 to 2006 and the vice president of finance for Lantronix, Inc., a publicly traded technology company, from 2000 to 2005. Ms. McDermott held a variety of senior financial positions with Bausch & Lomb from 1988 to 1999 and began her career holding a number of financial positions with a component division of General Motors from 1982 to 1988. Ms. McDermott holds a B.A. in Business Administration from St. Bonaventure University and an MBA from the William E. Simon School of Business Administration at the University of Rochester.

 

Executive officers serve at the discretion of the board of directors.

 

Employees

 

At September 30, 2014, we employed a total of 41 people. Of such employees, 9 were in research and development, 15 were in production, quality assurance and materials control, 7 were in general and administrative and 10 were in sales and marketing. We also contract technical and production personnel from time to time on an as needed basis and use outside consultants for various services. We have not experienced any work stoppages and are not a party to a collective bargaining agreement, and we consider our relations with our employees to be favorable.

 

Available Information

 

Our shares of common stock trade on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “LRAD.” Our address is 16990 Goldentop Road, Ste. A, San Diego, California, 92127, our telephone number is 858-676-1112, and our website is located at www.lradx.com. We make available, free of charge through our website, our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, reports filed by our directors, executive officers and certain significant shareholders pursuant to Section 16 of the Securities Exchange Act and all amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934 as soon as reasonably practical after the reports are electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this report nor is it part of this report.

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors.

 

An investment in our company involves a high degree of risk. In addition to the other information included in this report, you should carefully consider the following risk factors in evaluating an investment in our company. You should consider these matters in conjunction with the other information included or incorporated by reference in this report. Our results of operations or financial condition could be seriously harmed, and the trading price of our common stock may decline due to any of these or other risks.

 

 
6

 

 

General economic conditions may adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition

 

Our operations and performance depend significantly on worldwide economic conditions and their impact on levels of capital investment and government spending. Global economic conditions could adversely influence demand for our products leading to reduced levels of investments, reductions in government spending and budgets and changes in spending priorities and behavior. We could also be adversely affected by the negative impact on economic growth resulting from federal income tax increases and U.S. government spending restrictions that have been occurring during recent years.

 

We have had a history of net losses and we may not be able to sustain profitability.

 

Prior to our fiscal year ended September 30, 2010, we had a history of operating losses, primarily attributable to the design, development and launch of our former hypersonic sound product. In fiscal 2010, we achieved profitability for the first time in our history and while we have been able to maintain profitability through 2014, our ability to maintain future profitability is dependent on a variety of factors, many outside of our control. At September 30, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of $59,346,666. We need to continue to generate sufficient revenue to be profitable in future periods. Failure to sustain profitability may require us to raise additional funding, which could have a material negative impact on the market value of our common stock.

 

We may need additional capital for growth.

 

We may need additional capital to support our growth. While we expect to generate these funds from operations, we may not be able to do so. Principal factors that could affect the availability of our internally generated funds include:

 

 

failure of sales to government, military and commercial markets to meet planned projections;

 

 

government spending levels impacting sales of our products;

 

 

working capital requirements to support business growth;

 

 

our ability to control spending;

 

 

introduction of new competing technologies;

 

 

product mix and effect on margins; and

 

 

acceptance of our existing and future products in existing and new markets.

 

Should we require additional funds, general market conditions or the then-current market price of our common stock may not support capital raising transactions and any such financing may require advance approval of our stockholders under the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market. Our ability to obtain financing may be further constrained by prevailing economic conditions. We may be required to reduce costs, including the scaling back of research and development into new products, which could have a negative impact on our ability to compete and to innovate. If we raise additional funds by selling additional shares of our capital stock or securities convertible into or exercisable for common stock (assuming we are able to obtain additional financing), the ownership interest of our stockholders will be diluted, which could have a material negative impact on the market value of our common stock.

 

One customer accounted for a total of 16% of our total revenues for fiscal year 2014. We expect to continue to be dependent on a limited number of customers.

 

One customer accounted for 16% of total revenues for fiscal year 2014, and three customers accounted for 15%, 14% and 10% of total revenues for fiscal year 2013, respectively. Historically, our revenues have been dependent upon a limited number of customers. We do not have long term purchase commitments with these or other significant customers, and our customers have the right to cease doing business with us at any time. Military contracts that we have been awarded have terms of indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity during the term of the contract, so there are no guaranteed purchases on these contracts. No assurance can be given that these or other customers will continue to do business with us or that they will maintain their historical levels of business. If our relationship with any material customer were to cease, then our revenues would decline and negatively impact our results of operations. Any such decline could result in us increasing our accumulated deficit and a need to raise additional capital to fund our operations. If our expectations regarding future sales are inaccurate, we may be unable to reduce costs in a timely manner to adjust for sales shortfalls.

 

Disruption and fluctuations in financial and currency markets could have a negative effect on our business.

 

Financial markets in the United States, Europe and Asia have experienced extreme volatility in recent years. Governments have taken unprecedented actions intended to address these market conditions. It is difficult to assess the extent to which these conditions have impacted our business, and the affect this has had on certain of our customers and suppliers. These economic developments affect businesses such as ours in a number of ways. The tightening of credit in financial markets adversely affects the ability of commercial customers to finance purchases and operations and could result in a decrease in orders and spending for our products as well as create supplier disruptions. Reductions in tax revenues, rating downgrades and other economic developments could also reduce future government spending on our products. There can be no assurance that there will not be a further deterioration in financial markets, which can then lead to challenges in the operation of our business. We are unable to predict the likely effects that current or worsening economic conditions will have on our business and financial condition.

 

 
7

 

 

We purchase a number of key components and sub-assemblies from foreign suppliers. Consequently, we are subject to the impact economic conditions can have on such suppliers and fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. Increases in our cost of purchasing these items could negatively impact our financial results if we are not able to pass these increased costs on to our customers.

 

We have current government contracts and our future growth is dependent, in large part, on continued sales to U.S. and international governments and businesses that sell to governments.

 

In fiscal 2014, direct and indirect sales to the U.S. government accounted for approximately 16% of our total net sales, compared to 33% of our total net sales in fiscal 2013 and 59% in fiscal 2012. Sales to international governments and police have increased in recent years, including a large $17.6 million product and multi-year maintenance order, of which $12.1 million in product was delivered in March 2011, and a $4.0 million product shipment to a government in the Middle East in April 2014. Changes in defense spending could have an adverse effect on our current and future revenues. Sales of our products to U.S. government agencies and organizations are subject to the overall U.S. government budget and congressional appropriation decisions and processes which are driven by numerous factors, including geo-political events and macroeconomic conditions, and are beyond our control. Recently mandated cuts in U.S. Department of Defense spending, including sequestration spending cuts, and the additional spending restrictions which began at the end of calendar 2013, could affect future U.S. Department of Defense military initiatives and homeland security spending. Even awards granted, such as our $12.2 million contract from the U.S. Navy awarded in June 2013, may not have orders issued against it due to spending constraints. Similar issues apply to sales to international governments. We have no assurance that military interest in communication devices to minimize unnecessary force will continue or will provide future growth opportunities for our business.

 

We must expand our customer base in order to grow our business.

 

To grow our business, we must fulfill orders from our existing customers, obtain additional orders from our existing customers, develop relationships with new customers and obtain and fulfill orders from new customers. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to increase our customer base. Further, even if we do obtain new customers, we cannot guarantee that those customers will purchase from us enough quantities of our product or at product prices that will enable us to recover our costs in acquiring those customers and fulfilling those orders. Whether we will be able to sell more of our products will depend on a number of factors, including:

 

 

our ability to design and manufacture reliable products that have the features that are required by our customers;

 

 

the global economy;

 

 

our ability to expand relationships with existing customers and to develop relationships with new customers that will lead to additional orders for our products;

 

 

our ability to develop and expand new markets for directed sound products; and

 

 

our ability to develop international product distribution directly or through strategic partners.

 

The growth of our LRAD product revenues is dependent on continued acceptance of our products by government, military and developing force protection and emergency response agencies. If these agencies do not purchase our LRAD products, our revenues will be adversely affected.

 

Although our LRAD products are designed for use by government and commercial customers, the government and military market represents a significant revenue opportunity for our products. Revenues from government agencies fluctuate each year depending on available funding and demand from our government customers. While acceptance of our products has been increasing, there are many more prospective customers within this market that could provide future growth for us, as well as international government markets which often follow the lead of the U.S. Furthermore, the force protection and emergency response market is itself an emerging market that is changing rapidly. If our LRAD products are not widely accepted by the government, military and the developing force protection and emergency response markets, we may not be able to identify other markets, and we may fail to achieve our sales projections.

 

Perceptions that long-range hailing devices are unsafe or may be used in an abusive manner may hurt sales of our LRAD products which could cause our revenues to decline.

 

Potential customers for our LRAD products, including government, military and force protection and emergency response agencies, may be influenced by claims or perceptions that long-range hailing devices are unsafe or may be used in an abusive manner. These claims or perceptions, while unsubstantiated, could reduce our product sales.

 

 
8

 

 

A significant portion of our revenue is derived from our core product category.

 

We are dependent on our core directional product category to generate our revenues. While we have expanded our product offering to include omnidirectional products, no assurance can be given that our core directional products will continue to have market acceptance or that they will maintain their historical levels of sales. The loss or reduction of sales of this product category could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.

 

We may not be successful in penetrating the Mass Notification Market.

 

In 2012, we launched our first omnidirectional speaker, and have subsequently expanded our offering of omnidirectional products intended to increase LRAD sales in the mass notification market. The mass notification market is substantial in size and is projecting growth over the next five years to help provide public safety and communication during natural disasters and emergency situations. There are a number of large, credible companies already established in this market. We believe the clear, intelligible voice capability of our LRAD products, and our unique design and durability make our product offerings very competitive in this market. We have added selling resources to focus on this market and we have invested and plan to invest additional resources in tooling and software development to become successful in this market. However, we are a smaller company entering a market with established competitors that have greater resources and presence in this global market.

 

Our margins could be impacted as we expand into the Mass Notification Market.

 

Our sales strategy for fiscal 2015 and beyond is to increase our market share of the growing mass notification market with our omnidirectional products. A number of large companies compete in this market and dominate the market share. We believe we have a strong product that can successfully compete against these larger players, but we expect to confront pricing pressures, given this highly competitive environment, which may negatively impact our overall margins.

 

We may incur significant and unpredictable warranty costs.

 

Our products are substantially different from proven, mass produced sound transducer designs and are often employed in harsh environments. We may incur substantial and unpredictable warranty costs from post-production product or component failures. We generally warrant our products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period up to one year from the date of purchase. We also sell extended repair and maintenance contracts with terms ranging from one to several years, which provide repair and maintenance services after expiration of the original limited warranty. At September 30, 2014, we had a warranty reserve of $314,311. While our warranty experience with our LRAD product line has been very favorable, as we build more complexity into the product, and as we expand our supplier base, issues could arise that could affect future warranty costs, which could adversely affect our financial position, results of operations and business prospects.

 

We could incur additional charges for excess and obsolete inventory.

 

While we strive to effectively manage our inventory, rapidly changing technology, and uneven customer demand may result in short product cycles and the value of our inventory may be adversely affected by changes in technology that affect our ability to sell the products in our inventory. If we do not effectively forecast and manage our inventory, we may need to write off inventory as excess or obsolete, which in turn can adversely affect cost of sales and gross profit.

 

We have previously experienced, and may in the future experience, reductions in sales of older generation products as customers delay or defer purchases in anticipation of new product introductions. We currently have established reserves for slow moving or obsolete inventory of $354,486. The reserves we have established for potential losses due to obsolete inventory may, however, prove to be inadequate and may give rise to additional charges for obsolete or excess inventory.

 

We do not have the ability to accurately predict future operating results. Our quarterly and annual revenues are likely to fluctuate significantly due to many factors, any of which could result in our failure to achieve our revenue expectations.

 

We expect our proprietary directed acoustic products and technologies will be the source of substantially all our revenues for at least the near future. Revenues from these products and technologies are expected to vary significantly due to a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. Any one or more of the factors listed below or other factors could cause us to fail to achieve our revenue expectations. These factors include:

 

 

our ability to develop and supply sound reproduction components to customers, distributors or original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) or to license our technologies;

 

 

market acceptance of and changes in demand for our products or products of our customers;

 

 

gains or losses of significant customers, distributors or strategic relationships;

 

 

unpredictable volume and timing of customer orders;

 

 
9

 

 

 

delays in funding approval by U.S. and foreign government and military customers;

 

 

the availability, pricing and timeliness of delivery of components for our products and OEM products;

 

 

fluctuations in the availability of manufacturing capacity or manufacturing yields and related manufacturing costs;

 

 

the timing of new technological advances, product announcements or introductions by us, by OEMs or licensees and by our competitors;

 

 

production delays by customers, distributors, OEMs, or by us or our suppliers;

 

 

increased competition in this market:

 

 

the conditions of other industries, such as military and commercial industries, into which our technologies may be sold;

 

 

general electronics industry conditions, including changes in demand and associated effects on inventory and inventory practices;

 

 

general economic conditions that could affect the timing of customer orders and capital spending and result in order cancellations or rescheduling; and

 

 

general political conditions in this country and in various other parts of the world that could affect spending for the products that we offer.

 

Some or all of these factors could adversely affect demand for our products or technologies, and therefore adversely affect our future operating results.

 

Most of our operating expenses are relatively fixed in the short term. We may be unable to rapidly adjust spending to compensate for any unexpected sales shortfalls, which could harm our quarterly operating results. We do not have the ability to predict future operating results with any certainty.

 

Many potential competitors who have greater resources and experience than we do may develop products and technologies that make ours obsolete or inferior.

 

Technological competition from larger and more well established electronic and loudspeaker manufacturers is expected to increase. Most of the companies with which we expect to compete have substantially greater capital resources, research and development staffs, marketing and distribution programs and facilities, and many of them have substantially greater experience in the production and marketing of products. In addition, one or more of our competitors may have developed or may succeed in developing technologies and products that are more effective than any of ours, rendering our technology and products obsolete or noncompetitive.

 

Adverse resolution of disputes, litigation and claims may harm our business, operating results or financial condition.

 

We settled a derivative lawsuit in 2013 and may become a party to other litigation, disputes and claims in the normal course of our business. Litigation is by its nature uncertain and unpredictable and there can be no assurance that the ultimate resolution of such claims will not exceed the amounts accrued for such claims, if any. Litigation can be expensive, lengthy, and disruptive to normal business operations. An unfavorable resolution of a legal matter could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, or financial condition. For additional information regarding certain lawsuits and other disputes in which we are involved, see Part I, Item 3 “Legal Proceedings”.

 

Our competitive position will be seriously damaged if we cannot protect intellectual property rights and trade secrets in our technology.

 

We rely on a combination of contracts, trademarks and trade secret laws to establish and protect our proprietary rights in our technology. However, we may not be able to prevent misappropriation of our intellectual property, and our competitors may be able to independently develop competing technologies, or the agreements we enter into may not be enforceable. A competitor may independently develop or patent technologies that are substantially equivalent to, or superior to, our technology. If this happens, our competitive position could be significantly harmed.

 

We may face personal injury and other liability claims that harm our reputation and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

While our products have been engineered to reduce the risk of damage to human hearing or human health, we could be exposed to claims of hearing damage if the product is not properly operated. A person injured in connection with the use of our products may bring legal action against us to recover damages on the basis of theories including personal injury, negligent design, dangerous product or inadequate warning. We may also be subject to lawsuits involving allegations of misuse of our products. Our product liability insurance coverage may be insufficient to pay all such claims. Product liability insurance may also become too costly for us or may become unavailable for us in the future. We may not have sufficient resources to satisfy any product liability claims not covered by insurance which would materially and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition. Significant litigation could also result in negative publicity and a diversion of management’s attention and resources.

 

 
10

 

 

Our international operations could be harmed by factors including political instability, natural disasters, fluctuations in currency exchange rates, and changes in regulations that govern international transactions.

 

We sell our products worldwide. In fiscal 2014, revenues outside of the U.S. accounted for approximately 78% of net revenues, compared to 59% of net revenues in fiscal 2013. The risks inherent in international trade may reduce our international sales and harm our business and the businesses of our customers and our suppliers. These risks include:

 

 

changes in tariff regulations;

 

 

political instability, war, terrorism and other political risks;

 

 

foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;

 

 

establishing and maintaining relationships with local distributors and dealers;

 

 

lengthy shipping times and accounts receivable payment cycles;

 

 

import and export control and licensing requirements;

 

 

compliance with a variety of U.S. laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, by us or key subcontractors;

 

 

compliance with a variety of foreign laws and regulations, including unexpected changes in taxation and regulatory requirements;

 

 

greater difficulty in safeguarding intellectual property than in the U.S.; and

 

 

difficulty in staffing and managing geographically diverse operations.

 

These and other risks may preclude or curtail international sales or increase the relative price of our products compared to those manufactured in other countries, reducing the demand for our products. Failure to comply with U.S. and foreign governmental laws and regulations applicable to international business, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or U.S. export control regulations, could have an adverse impact on our business with the U.S. and foreign governments.

 

Current environmental laws, or laws enacted in the future, may harm our business.

 

Our operations are subject to environmental regulation in areas in which we conduct business. Our product design and procurement operations must comply with new and future requirements relating to the materials composition of our products, including restrictions on lead, cadmium and other substances. We do not expect that the impact of these environmental laws and other similar legislation adopted in the U.S. and other countries will have a substantial unfavorable impact on our business. However, the costs and timing of costs under environmental laws are difficult to predict.

 

Errors or defects contained in our products, failure to comply with applicable safety standards or a product recall could result in delayed shipments or rejection of our products, damage to our reputation and expose us to regulatory or other legal action.

 

Any defects or errors in the operation of our products may result in delays in their introduction. In addition, errors or defects may be uncovered after commercial shipments have begun, which could result in the rejection of our products by our customers, damage to our reputation, lost sales, diverted development resources and increased customer service and support costs and warranty claims, any of which could harm our business. Third parties could sustain injuries from our products, and we may be subject to claims or lawsuits resulting from such injuries. There is a risk that these claims or liabilities may exceed, or fall outside the scope of, our insurance coverage. We may also be unable to obtain adequate liability insurance in the future. Because we are a small company, a product recall would be particularly harmful to us because we have limited financial and administrative resources to effectively manage a product recall and it would detract management’s attention from implementing our core business strategies. A significant product defect or product recall could materially and adversely affect our brand image, causing a decline in our sales, and could reduce or deplete our financial resources.

 

Costs associated with our multi-year maintenance contract with a foreign military customer could be higher than expected.

 

We are obligated under a seven-year repair and maintenance agreement with a foreign military customer to service $12.1 million of product sold in the quarter ended March 31, 2011. We have contracted with a third party service provider to administer the required services under the terms of the maintenance agreement. The revenue from the maintenance agreement with our customer is fixed and paid annually upon completion of each year of service for the seven-year period through 2019. It is possible that the cost to repair and maintain the products and the cost to contract with our third party service provider could exceed the revenue generated by the maintenance agreement.

 

 
11

 

 

We rely on outside manufacturers and suppliers to provide a large number of components and sub-assemblies incorporated in our products.

 

Our products have a large number of components and sub-assemblies produced by outside suppliers. In addition, for certain of these items, we qualify only a single source, which can magnify the risk of shortages and decrease our ability to negotiate with our suppliers on the basis of price. If shortages occur, or if we experience quality problems with suppliers, then our production schedules could be significantly delayed or costs significantly increased, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, liquidity, results of operation and financial position.

 

Although we assemble our products internally, we have some sub-assemblies and components produced by third party manufacturers. We may be required to outsource manufacturing if sales of our products increase significantly. We may be unable to obtain acceptable manufacturing sources on a timely basis. In addition, from time to time we may change manufacturers and any new manufacturer engaged by us may not perform as expected. An extended interruption in the supply of our products could result in a substantial loss of sales. Furthermore, any actual or perceived degradation of product quality as a result of our reliance on third party manufacturers may have an adverse effect on sales or result in increased warranty costs, product returns and buybacks. Failure to maintain quality manufacturing could reduce future revenues, adversely affecting our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We derive revenue from government contracts and subcontracts, which are often non-standard, may involve competitive bidding, may be subject to cancellation with or without penalty and may produce volatility in earnings and revenue.

 

Our sales to government customers have involved, and are expected in the future to involve, providing products and services under contracts or subcontracts with U.S. federal, state, local and foreign government agencies. Obtaining contracts and subcontracts from government agencies is challenging, and contracts often include provisions that are not standard in private commercial transactions. For example, government contracts may:

 

 

include provisions that allow the government agency to terminate the contract without penalty under some circumstances;

 

 

be subject to purchasing decisions of agencies that are subject to political influence;

 

 

contain onerous procurement procedures; and

 

 

be subject to cancellation if government funding becomes unavailable.

 

Securing government contracts can be a protracted process involving competitive bidding. In many cases, unsuccessful bidders may challenge contract awards, which can lead to increased costs, delays and possible loss of the contract for the winning bidder.

 

Our success is dependent on the performance of our executive team, and the cooperation, performance and retention of our executive officers and key employees.

 

Our business and operations are substantially dependent on the performance of our current executive team including our President and Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer. We do not maintain “key person” life insurance on any of our executive officers. The loss of one or several key employees could seriously harm our business. We cannot assure that employees will not leave and subsequently compete against us.

 

We are also dependent on our ability to retain and motivate high quality personnel, especially sales and skilled engineering personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we may not be able to attract, assimilate or retain other highly qualified managerial, sales and technical personnel in the future. The inability to attract and retain the necessary managerial, sales and technical personnel could cause our business, operating results or financial condition to suffer.

 

We may not successfully address the problems encountered in connection with any potential future acquisitions.

 

We expect to continue considering opportunities to acquire or make investments in other technologies, products and businesses that could enhance our capabilities, complement our current products or expand the breadth of our markets or customer base. We have little experience in acquiring other businesses and technologies. Potential and completed acquisitions and strategic investments involve numerous risks and if we fail to properly evaluate and execute acquisitions and strategic investments, our management team may be distracted from our day-to-day operations, our business may be disrupted and our operating results may suffer. In addition, if we finance acquisitions by issuing equity or convertible debt securities, our stock value could be diluted.

 

Our disclosure controls and procedures may not prevent or detect all acts of fraud.

 

Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to reasonably assure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management and is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Our management expects that our disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, they cannot provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within our company have been prevented or detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of a simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by an unauthorized override of the controls. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and we cannot assure that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Accordingly, because of the inherent limitations in a cost effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

 
12

 

 

Failure to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting could harm stockholder and business confidence in our financial reporting, our ability to obtain financing and other aspects of our business.

 

Maintaining an effective system of internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the related rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC require us to include in our Form 10-K a report by management regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. The report includes, among other things, an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of the respective fiscal year, including a statement as to whether or not our internal control over financial reporting is effective. This assessment must include disclosure of any material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting identified by management. While our management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of September 30, 2014, it is possible that material weaknesses will be identified in the future. In addition, components of our internal control over financial reporting may require improvement from time to time. If management is unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective in any future period, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have an adverse effect on the Company’s stock price.

 

Our common stock could be delisted from the Nasdaq Stock Market.

 

Nasdaq’s continued listing standards for our common stock require, among other things, that (i) we maintain a closing bid price for our common stock of at least $1.00, and (ii) we maintain: (A) stockholders’ equity of $2.5 million; (B) market value of listed securities of $35 million; or (C) net income from continuing operations of $500,000 in the most recently completed fiscal year or in two of the last three most recently completed fiscal years. We received a notice from Nasdaq that we had failed to meet the listing standards by failing to maintain a bid price of $1.00 late in our 2010 fiscal year and again in May 2013. Future failures to satisfy any continued listing requirements could lead to the receipt of a deficiency notice from Nasdaq and ultimately to a delisting from trading of our common stock. If our common stock were delisted from Nasdaq, among other things, this could result in a number of negative implications, including reduced liquidity in our common stock as a result of the loss of market efficiencies associated with Nasdaq and the loss of federal preemption of state securities laws as well as the potential loss of confidence by suppliers, customers and employees, the loss of analyst coverage and institutional investor interest, fewer business development opportunities, greater difficulty in obtaining financing and breaches of certain contractual obligations.

 

Sales of common stock issuable on the exercise of outstanding options and warrants, may depress the price of our common stock.

 

As of September 30, 2014, we had outstanding options granted to our employees and directors to purchase 2,530,535 shares of our common stock, and had outstanding warrants issued to investors to purchase 1,627,945 shares of our common stock. At September 30, 2014, the exercise prices for the options and common stock warrants ranged from $0.93 to $3.13 per share. The issuance of shares of common stock upon the exercise of outstanding options or warrants could cause substantial dilution to holders of our common stock, and the sale of those shares in the market could cause the market price of our common stock to decline. The potential dilution from these shares could negatively affect the terms on which we could obtain equity financing.

 

We may issue preferred stock in the future, and the terms of the preferred stock may reduce the value of your common stock.

 

We are authorized to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock in one or more series. Our board of directors may determine the terms of future preferred stock offerings without further action by our stockholders. If we issue additional preferred stock, it could affect the rights or reduce the value of our common stock. In particular, specific rights granted to future holders of preferred stock could be used to restrict our ability to merge with or sell our assets to a third party. These terms may include voting rights, preferences as to dividends and liquidation, conversion and redemption rights, and sinking fund provisions.

 

Our stock price is volatile and may continue to be volatile in the future.

 

The market price of our common stock has fluctuated significantly to date. In the future, the market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations due to general market conditions and in response to quarter-to-quarter variations in:

 

 

our anticipated or actual operating results;

 

 
13

 

 

 

developments concerning our sound reproduction technologies;

 

 

technological innovations or setbacks by us or our competitors;

 

 

announcements of merger or acquisition transactions;

 

 

changes in personnel within our company; and

 

 

other events or factors and general economic and market conditions.

 

The stock market in recent years has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected the market price of many technology companies, and that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of companies.

 

Changes in laws or regulations or the manner of their interpretation or enforcement could adversely impact our financial performance and restrict our ability to operate our business or execute our strategies.

 

New laws, regulations and standards, or changes in existing laws or regulations or the manner of their interpretation or enforcement, could increase our cost of doing business and restrict our ability to operate our business or execute our strategies. This includes, among other things, compliance costs and enforcement under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd Frank Act”), XBRL interactive SEC filings, new SEC regulations and NASDAQ Stock Market rules. For example, under Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC has adopted additional disclosure requirements related to the source of certain “conflict minerals” for issuers for which such “conflict minerals” are necessary to the functionality or production of a product manufactured, or contracted to be manufactured, by that issuer. The metals covered by the rules include tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, commonly referred to as “3TG.” Our suppliers may use some or all of these materials in their production processes. The rules require us to conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry to determine if we know or have reason to believe any of the minerals used in the production process may have originated from the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country. If we are not able to determine the minerals did not originate from a covered country or conclude that there is no reason to believe that the minerals used in the production process may have originated in a covered country, we would be required to perform supply chain due diligence on members of our supply chain. Global supply chains can have multiple layers, thus the costs of complying with these new requirements could be substantial. These new requirements may also reduce the number of suppliers who provide conflict free metals, and may affect our ability to obtain products in sufficient quantities or at competitive prices. Compliance costs and the unavailability of raw materials could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

We continually evaluate and monitor developments with respect to new and proposed rules and cannot predict or estimate the amount of the additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs. These new or changed laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices.

 

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2.

Properties

 

Our executive offices, sales, research and development and production facilities are located at 16990 Goldentop Road, Ste. A, San Diego, California. The lease of 31,360 square feet commenced July 1, 2012 and expires June 30, 2018. The aggregate monthly payments, with abatements, averaged $16,306 per month in the first year, and is $25,088, $26,656, $28,224, $29,792 and $31,360 per month for the second through sixth years of the lease, plus other certain costs and charges as specified in the lease agreement, including the Company’s proportionate share of the building operating expenses and real estate taxes.

 

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

 

We may at times be involved in litigation in the ordinary course of business. We will also, from time to time, when appropriate in management’s estimation, record adequate reserves in our financial statements for pending litigation.

 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosure

 

Not applicable.

 

 
14

 

 

PART II

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is traded and quoted on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “LRAD.” The market for our common stock has often been sporadic and limited.

 

The following table sets forth the high and low reported sales prices for our common stock for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2013 and 2014:

 

   

Sales Prices

 
   

High

   

Low

 

Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2013

               

First Quarter

  $ 1.30     $ 0.83  

Second Quarter

  $ 1.30     $ 0.95  

Third Quarter

  $ 1.36     $ 0.91  

Fourth Quarter

  $ 1.59     $ 1.14  

Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2014

               

First Quarter

  $ 2.16     $ 1.31  

Second Quarter

  $ 2.24     $ 1.74  

Third Quarter

  $ 2.12     $ 1.77  

Fourth Quarter

  $ 3.88     $ 1.84  

 

The above quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail markup, markdown or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

 

Holders

 

We had 33,236,489 shares issued and outstanding by 963 holders of record of our common stock at November 13, 2014.

 

Dividends 

 

We have never paid a cash dividend on our common stock or preferred stock and do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the information set forth in Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

No securities were sold within the past three years that were not registered under the Securities Act and not previously reported.

 

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

On August 6, 2013, we announced that our Board of Directors approved a share buyback program under which the Company may repurchase up to $3 million of its outstanding common shares. In November 2013, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of an additional $1 million of the Company’s outstanding common shares. The repurchase authorization expires December 31, 2014. During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company purchased 277,157 shares at an average price paid per share of $1.86 for a total cost of $516,353. During the year ended September 30, 2013, no shares were repurchased. At September 30, 2014, all repurchased shares were retired.

 

 
15

 

 

                   

Total number of

   

Maximum dollar

 
                   

shares purchased

   

value of shares that

 
   

Total number of

   

Average price

   

as part of publicly

   

may yet be purchased

 

Period

 

shares purchased

   

paid per share

   

announced programs

   

under the program

 
                                 

July 1, 2014 - July 31, 2014

    4,812       $1.90       4,812       $3,514,376  

August 1, 2014 - August 31, 2014

    16,263       $1.89       16,263       $3,483,648  

September 1, 2014 - September 30, 2014

    ----       ----       ----       $3,483,648  

Total

    21,075               21,075          

 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

 

Information requested by this Item is not included as we are electing scaled disclosure requirements available to Smaller Reporting Companies.

 

Item 7.      Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

The discussion and analysis set forth below should be read in conjunction with the information presented in other sections of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including “Item 1. Business,” “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” This discussion contains forward-looking statements which are based on our current expectations and industry experience, as well as our perception of historical trends, current market conditions, current economic data, expected future developments and other factors that we believe are appropriate under the circumstances. These statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those suggested in the forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

Our Company develops and delivers highly intelligible, directed acoustic products that beam, focus and control sound over short and long distances. By placing sound only where needed, we not only enhance many typical speaker applications, but we offer novel sound applications that conventional speakers cannot achieve. We offer a variety of directional sound products, which meet a broad range of requirements from communicating with and deterring threats over distances up to 600 meters with our hand-held LRAD 100X to distances up to 5,500 meters with our LRAD 2000X. In 2008, we completed the redesign of our LRAD products, introducing the LRAD-X product line, with improved quality and functionality. In 2012, we launched our first omnidirectional product, the LRAD 360X, and began to expand our business into the mass notification market. In 2013 and 2014, we continued to expand and enhance our directed and omnidirectional product line-ups. Through increased focus and investment in worldwide sales and marketing activities, our Long Range Acoustic Device® or LRAD® pioneered a new worldwide market, selling into over 70 countries, for directional and omnidirectional long-range acoustic hailing devices (“AHDs”).

 

Our revenues increased from $17,087,930 in the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013 to $24,591,342 in the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014. This growth was driven by a 92% increase in revenues from international markets, primarily in the public safety market for crowd and riot control, as well as international militaries, perimeter and border security, mass notification, oil and gas security, maritime security, bird mitigation and more. Direct and indirect revenues from the U.S. Military continued to decrease with a reduction of approximately $2.3 million or 51% compared to fiscal 2013 due to federal defense budget constraints and sequestration. Gross profit remained strong at 56% of revenues, compared to 48% of net revenues in fiscal 2013, primarily due to fixed overhead absorption, and a higher mix of direct customer sales where a commission is paid, rather than sales through our reseller network at lower reseller pricing. Operating expenses increased by $3.2 million or 43%, primarily due to accrued bonus for meeting established performance targets, increased salaries and benefits due to staff additions, primarily in business development, and third party commission expense. Net income grew by $2.1 million or 164% in fiscal 2014, compared to the prior year. We increased our working capital by $4.0 million during fiscal 2014. Future cash flows from operating activities are expected to fluctuate based on working capital requirements, operating expense levels and other factors. We believe we have adequate financial resources to fund operations for the next twelve months.

 

Our LRAD-X product line uses directionality and focused acoustic output to clearly transmit critical information, instructions and warnings up to 5,500 meters. The LRAD-X product line features improved voice intelligibility and meets the military’s stringent environmental requirements in a number of packages and form factors. Through the use of powerful voice commands, prerecorded messages in multiple languages, and deterrent tones, the LRAD creates large safety zones while determining the intent and influencing the behavior of an intruder. We continue to expand our LRAD-X product line to provide a complete range of systems from single operator portable to permanently installed, remotely operated. Our LRAD products have been competitively selected over other commercially available systems by the United States military and by several international militaries.

 

 
16

 

 

We incurred $2,481,235 of research and development expense during fiscal 2014. We designed, developed and launched the LRAD 450XL unit which is the loudest long range AHD for its size and weight, using and enhanced patent pending technology to provide outstanding output in a smaller form factor, with the same high level of clarity and intelligibility consistent with our full LRAD product line. We continued development of variations of our LRAD 360X based on multiple stacking configurations, a smaller sized unit with multiple stacking configurations, a unit mounted to a mobile trailer, and a vehicle mounted unit providing 360-degree perimeter security. We also added a 60 degree speaker and enhanced our SoundSaber product which distributes 90-degree output to provide a complete product offering. We seek to continually improve the quality and manufacturability of our products to retain our competitive advantage in the AHD market. We believe our improved products provide increased sales opportunities into government and commercial markets and demonstrate our ability to remain the leader in the AHD market. We intend to continue to innovate during fiscal 2015 with consistent levels of research and development expenditures.

 

Business Outlook

 

Our product line-up continues to gain notoriety and acceptance worldwide through media exposure and word of mouth as a result of positive responses and increased acceptance of our products by our customers. We believe we have a solid technology and product foundation with our LRAD-X directed product line, which we have expanded over the years to service new markets and customers for greater business growth. Over the past two years, we have launched a line-up of omnidirectional products targeted to meet the needs of the large, growing mass notification market. We believe that we have strong market opportunities within the worldwide government and military sector, as well as increased commercial applications as a result of continued global threats to governments, commerce and law enforcement, and in wildlife preservation and control applications. We intend to continue to expand our selling efforts internationally, especially in the Middle East and South America where we believe there is greater opportunity for the sale of our products. We also plan to continue to expand our presence in the mass notification market with our omnidirectional product line. Our selling network has expanded through the addition of business development employees as well as continuing to improve and increase our relationships with key integrators and sales representatives within the United States and in a number of worldwide locations. However, we may continue to face challenges in fiscal 2015 due to continuing economic and geopolitical conditions in some international regions. We anticipate continued uncertainty with U.S. Military spending due to ongoing defense budget delays and spending reductions. We continue to pursue large business opportunities, but it is difficult to anticipate how long it will take to close these opportunities, or if they will ever ultimately come to fruition. It is also difficult to determine whether our omnidirectional product will be accepted as a viable solution in the mass notification market, which includes a number of large, well-known competitors.

 

Our products have varying gross margins and therefore, product sales mix materially affects gross profit. In addition, the margins differ based on the channel of trade through which the products are sold. We continue to implement product updates and changes, including raw material and component changes that may impact product costs. We could also have increased competition in our market that could cause pricing pressure. We do not believe that historical gross profit margins should be relied upon as an indicator of future gross profit margins.

 

We increased the number of business development personnel at the company from 7 to 9 during 2014 and increased our participation in trade shows and demonstrations. We may expend additional resources on marketing our products in future periods. This would increase our selling, general and administrative expenses in fiscal 2015. Also, commission expense will fluctuate based on the level of commissionable sales incurred.

 

Research and development (“R&D”) expenses vary period to period due to the timing of projects, the availability of funds, and the timing, extent and use of outside consulting, design and development firms. In fiscal 2014, R&D expenses were primarily for in-house development; however, we continue to supplement our in-house development with third party consulting resulting in higher expenses. Based on current plans and engineering staffing, we expect fiscal year 2015 R&D expenses will also include third party consulting and will be comparable or somewhat higher than in fiscal year 2014.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates 

 

We have identified the policies below as critical to our business operations and to understanding our results of operations. Our accounting policies are more fully described in our financial statements and related notes located in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” The impact and any associated risks related to these policies on our business operations are discussed in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and throughout “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” when such policies affect our reported and expected financial results.

 

The methods, estimates and judgments we use in applying our accounting policies, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, have a significant impact on the results we report in our financial statements. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. These estimates affect the carrying values of assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

 
17

 

 

Revenue Recognition. We derive our revenues primarily from two sources: (i) product revenues and (ii) contracts, license fees, other services and freight. Product revenues from customers, including resellers and system integrators, are recognized in the periods that products are shipped (free on board (“FOB”) shipping point) or received by customers (FOB destination), when the fee is fixed or determinable, when collection of resulting receivables is probable and we have no remaining obligations. Most revenues to resellers and system integrators are based on firm commitments from the end user, and as a result, resellers and system integrators carry little or no inventory. Revenues from associated engineering and installation contracts are recognized based on milestones or completion of the contracted services. Our customers do not have the right to return product unless the product is found to be defective.

 

We also sell extended repair and maintenance contracts with terms ranging from one to several years, which provide repair and maintenance services after expiration of the original one year warranty term. Revenues from separately priced extended repair and maintenance contracts are recognized on a straight-line basis, over the contract period, and classified as contract and other revenues.

 

Share-Based Compensation. We account for share-based compensation in accordance with the provisions of Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 718, “Compensation—Stock Compensation” (“ASC 718”) using the modified prospective method which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards made to employees and directors based on estimated fair values. ASC 718 requires the use of subjective assumptions, including expected stock price volatility and the estimated term of each award. We estimate the fair value of stock options granted using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which is then amortized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service periods of the awards, which is generally the vesting period. This model also utilizes the fair value of our common stock and requires that, at the date of grant, we use the expected term of the share-based award, the expected volatility of the price of our common stock over the expected term, the risk free interest rate and the expected dividend yield of our common stock to determine the estimated fair value. We determine the amount of share-based compensation expense based on awards that we ultimately expect to vest, reduced for estimated forfeitures. ASC 718 requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates.

 

Allowance for doubtful accounts. Our products are sold to customers in many different markets and geographic locations. We estimate our bad debt reserve on a case-by-case basis due to a limited number of customers. We base these estimates on many factors including customer credit worthiness, past transaction history with the customer, current economic industry trends and changes in customer payment terms. Our judgments and estimates regarding collectability of accounts receivable have an impact on our financial statements.

 

Valuation of Inventory. Our inventory is comprised of raw materials, assemblies and finished products. We must periodically make judgments and estimates regarding the future utility and carrying value of our inventory. The carrying value of our inventory is periodically reviewed and impairments, if any, are recognized when the expected future benefit from our inventory is less than its carrying value.

 

Valuation of Intangible Assets. Intangible assets consist of patents and trademarks that are amortized over their estimated useful lives. We must make judgments and estimates regarding the future utility and carrying value of intangible assets. The carrying values of such assets are periodically reviewed and impairments, if any, are recognized when the expected future benefit to be derived from an individual intangible asset is less than its carrying value. This generally occurs when certain assets are no longer consistent with our business strategy and whose expected future value has decreased.

 

Accrued Expenses. We establish a warranty reserve based on anticipated warranty claims at the time product revenue is recognized. This reserve requires us to make estimates regarding the amount and costs of warranty repairs we expect to make over a period of time. Factors affecting warranty reserve levels include the number of units sold, anticipated cost of warranty repairs, and anticipated rates of warranty claims. Warranty expense is recorded in cost of revenues. We evaluate the adequacy of this reserve each reporting period.

 

We use the recognition criteria of ASC 450-20, “Loss Contingencies” to estimate the amount of bonuses when it becomes probable a bonus liability will be incurred and we recognize expense ratably over the service period. We accrue bonus expense each quarter based on estimated year-end results, and then adjust the actual in the fourth quarter based on our final results compared to targets.

 

Deferred Tax Asset. We have provided a full valuation reserve related to our substantial deferred tax assets. In the future, if sufficient evidence of our ability to generate sufficient future taxable income in certain tax jurisdictions becomes apparent, we may be required to reduce our valuation allowances, resulting in income tax benefits in our consolidated statement of operations. We evaluate quarterly the realizability of the deferred tax assets and assess the need for a valuation allowance. Utilizing the net operating loss (“NOL”) carry forwards in future years could be substantially limited due to restrictions imposed under federal and state laws upon a change in ownership or control. Included in the NOL carryforward are deductions from stock options that, if recognized, will be recorded as a credit to additional paid-in capital rather than through our results of operations.

 

 
18

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

New pronouncements issued for future implementation are discussed in Note 3, Recent Accounting Pronouncements, to our consolidated financial statements.

 

Segment and Related Information

 

We are engaged in the design, development and commercialization of directed sound technologies and products. We present our business as one reportable segment due to the similarity in nature of products marketed, financial performance measures (revenue growth and gross margin), methods of distribution (direct and indirect) and customer markets (each product is sold by the same personnel to government and commercial customers, domestically and internationally). Our chief operating decision making officer reviews financial information on sound products on a consolidated basis. See Note 15 to our consolidated financial statements for further discussion.

 

 Comparison of Results of Operations for Fiscal Years Ended September 30, 2014 and 2013

 

The following table provides for the periods indicated certain items of our consolidated statements of operations expressed in dollars and as a percentage of net sales. The financial information and discussion below should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes contained in this Annual Report.

 

   

Year ended

                 
   

September 30, 2014

   

September 30, 2013

                 
           

% of Total

           

% of Total

   

Increase/(Decrease)

 
   

Amount

   

Revenues

   

Amount

   

Revenues

   

Amount

   

%

 

Revenues:

                                               

Product sales

  $ 23,382,521       95.1 %   $ 16,001,820       93.6 %   $ 7,380,701       46.1 %

Contract and other

    1,208,821       4.9 %     1,086,110       6.4 %     122,711       11.3 %

Total revenues

    24,591,342       100.0 %     17,087,930       100.0 %     7,503,412       43.9 %
                                                 

Cost of revenues

    10,828,287       44.0 %     8,842,631       51.7 %     1,985,656       22.5 %

Gross profit

    13,763,055       56.0 %     8,245,299       48.3 %     5,517,756       66.9 %
                                                 

Operating expenses:

                                               

Selling, general and administrative

    7,959,003       32.4 %     5,438,406       31.8 %     2,520,597       46.3 %

Research and development

    2,481,235       10.1 %     1,841,369       10.8 %     639,866       34.7 %

Total operating expenses

    10,440,238       42.5 %     7,279,775       42.6 %     3,160,463       43.4 %
                                                 

Income from operations

    3,322,817       13.5 %     965,524       5.7 %     2,357,293       244.1 %
                                                 

Other income

    20,523       0.1 %     299,190       1.7 %     (278,667 )     (93.1 %)
                                                 

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

    3,343,340       13.6 %     1,264,714       7.4 %     2,078,626       164.4 %

Income tax expense

    16,252       0.1 %     1,902       0.0 %     14,350       754.5 %

Net income

  $ 3,327,088       13.5 %   $ 1,262,812       7.4 %   $ 2,064,276       163.5 %

 

 Revenues

 

Revenues increased $7,503,412, or 43.9% in the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, as a result of an 92% increase in international revenue, primarily in the public safety market for crowd and riot control and military vehicles, as well as other diverse markets such as border and perimeter security, Navy and Coast Guard ships, tsunami warning and emergency notification systems, wildlife control, maritime security, marine surveillance and oil and gas. The international growth is partially offset by a 51% reduction in U.S. Military sales due to federal defense budget constraints and sequestration.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit for the year ended September 30, 2014 increased by $5,517,756, or 66.9%, primarily due to increased revenue, favorable channel mix, and increased fixed overhead absorption, partially offset by an increase in manufacturing overhead costs which were variable with the increased volume, and warranty expense as a result of a higher reserve related to increased shipments. The favorable gross profit was partially offset by a $395,790 increase in third party commission expense reported in operating expenses, as there was a higher mix of direct customer sales where a commission is paid, rather than sales through our reseller network at lower reseller pricing.

 

 
19

 

 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $2,520,597, or 46.3%, primarily due to $1,818,845 for accrued bonus for meeting established performance targets, $550,464 for salaries and consulting fees as a result of adding business development personnel, $395,790 for commissions paid to our third party sales representatives, $178,360 for travel expense due to increased business development personnel, $46,665 for marketing expenses primarily for trade shows, and $72,803 of other increases. These expenses were partially offset by a decrease of $361,266 for legal and other professional fees related to a lawsuit in the prior year and $181,064 for lower non-cash share-based compensation expense.

 

We incurred non-cash share-based compensation expenses of $500,083 and $681,147 in the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The decrease is due to options becoming fully vested, partially offset by new grants in November 2013.

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

R&D expenses increased by $639,866, or 34.7%, primarily due to $704,915 for accrued bonus for meeting established performance targets and $88,550 for increased salaries and benefits, partially offset by $75,328 lower impairment of patents, $66,898 lower development and testing costs and $11,373 of other expense reductions.

 

Included in R&D expenses for the year ended September 30, 2014 was $73,041 of non-cash share-based compensation expenses, compared to $47,895 for the year ended September 30, 2013.

 

During fiscal years 2014 and 2013, we reviewed the ongoing value of our capitalized intangible assets and identified some of these assets as being no longer consistent with our business strategy. As a result of this review, we reduced the value of these patents by $4,580 and $81,307 for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

Other Income

 

Other income decreased due to $270,559 in income recognized in relation to a terminated license agreement in the year ended September 30, 2013. We also recognized interest income of $20,523 in the year ended September 30, 2014, compared to $28,631 in the year ended September 30, 2013.

 

Net Income

 

The increase in net income was primarily due to the increase in revenues and gross margin, partially offset by an increase in operating expenses. In addition, we recognized income tax expense of $16,252 in the year ended September 30, 2014 compared to $1,902 in the year ended September 30, 2013. For additional details, refer to Note 10, Income Taxes.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Cash at September 30, 2014 was $23,894,744, compared to $15,805,195 at September 30, 2013. Other than cash and expected future cash flows from operating activities in subsequent periods, we have no other unused sources of liquidity at this time.

 

Principal factors that could affect the availability of our internally generated funds include:

 

 

ability to meet sales projections;

 

 

government spending levels;

 

 

introduction of competing technologies;

 

 

product mix and effect on margins;

 

 

ability to reduce and manage inventory levels; and

 

 

product acceptance in new markets.

 

Principal factors that could affect our ability to obtain cash from external sources include:

 

 

volatility in the capital markets; and

 

 

market price and trading volume of our common stock.

 

Our Board of Directors approved a share buyback program under which the Company may utilize up to $4 million in cash to repurchase outstanding common shares using available cash and from future cash flow from operations through December 31, 2014. Based on our current cash position, our order backlog, and assuming the accuracy of our currently planned expenditures, we believe we have sufficient capital to fund planned levels of operations for at least the next twelve months. However, we operate in a rapidly evolving and often unpredictable business environment that may change the timing or amount of expected future cash receipts and expenditures. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we may not be required to raise additional funds through the sale of equity or debt securities or from credit facilities. Additional capital, if needed, may not be available on satisfactory terms, if at all.

 

 
20

 

 

Cash Flows

 

Our cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities, as reflected in the consolidated statements of cash flows, are summarized in the table below:

 

   

Year ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Cash provided by (used in):

               

Operating activities

    8,402,855       1,755,699  

Investing activities

    (341,847 )     (150,459 )

Financing activities

    28,541       340,450  

 

Operating Activities

 

Net income of $3,327,088 for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014 was adjusted for non-cash items that include share-based compensation expense, depreciation and amortization, inventory obsolescence and impairment of patents. Cash generated from operating activities reflected an increase in accrued and other liabilities of $2,942,897, primarily related to bonus accrual for meeting performance targets, decrease in accounts receivable of $678,253, primarily due to prepayment terms for certain shipments in the fourth quarter; a decrease in inventory of $655,047 due to year-end shipments, a decrease in prepaid expenses and other of $479,928 and prepaid expenses and other – non-current of $148,093 due to the timing of payments. Cash used in operating activities included decreased accounts payable of $765,906 due to payment of inventories needed for year-end shipments and warranty settlements of $56,267 for the year. Net income of $1,262,812 for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013 was adjusted for non-cash items that include share-based compensation expense, depreciation and amortization, inventory obsolescence and impairment of patents. Cash generated from operating activities reflected a decrease in accounts receivable of $559,962, primarily due to receipt of a slow receivable and prepayment terms for certain shipments in the fourth quarter; an increase in accounts payable of $600,690, primarily due to increased inventory purchases based on forecasted orders and accrued settlement fees for the derivative lawsuit; and an increase in accrued and other liabilities of $205,072, primarily due to accrued outside sales commissions, partially offset by a reduction in deferred revenue for a terminated license agreement. Cash used in operating activities included increased inventories of $1,331,575 based on our current sales forecast and prepaid expenses and other increased by $562,052 due to a receivable from our insurance company for the derivative lawsuit and an increased prepayment for directors and officers insurance based on fee increases and increased coverage.

 

We had accounts receivable of $4,284,051 and $4,958,532 at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The level of trade accounts receivable at September 30, 2014 represented approximately 64 days of revenues for the year compared to 106 days of revenues at September 30, 2013. The decrease in days was due to a lower ending receivables balance, which was due to a higher level of prepayments from customers on higher revenues in fiscal 2014, compared to a higher receivable balance on lower revenues in the prior year. Terms with individual customers vary greatly. We typically require thirty-day terms from our customers. Our receivables can vary dramatically due to overall sales volume and due to quarterly variations in sales and timing of shipments to and receipts from large customers.

 

At September 30, 2014 and 2013, our working capital was $27,679,999 and $23,703,975, respectively. This increase was primarily a result of the increases in cash.

 

Investing Activities

 

We use cash in investing activities primarily for the purchase of laboratory and computer equipment, product tooling, software and investment in new patents. Cash used in investing activities for capital expenditures was $326,957 and $147,504 in the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. In 2014, the Company’s purchases were primarily for new production equipment and tooling for new products. Cash used for investment in new patents and trademarks was $14,890 and $2,955 in the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We anticipate continued expenditures for patents and capital expenditures in fiscal 2015 as we continue to invest in new products and technologies.

 

Financing Activities

 

In the years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, we received proceeds from the exercise of stock options of $544,893 and $340,450, respectively. In July 2013, the Board of Directors approved a share buyback program under which the Company may repurchase up to $3 million of its outstanding common shares. In November 2013, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of an additional $1 million of the Company’s outstanding common shares. The repurchase authorization expires December 31, 2014. During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company purchased 277,157 shares at an average price paid per share of $1.86 for a total cost of $516,352. During the year ended September 30, 2013, no shares were repurchased. At September 30, 2014, all repurchased shares were retired.

 

 
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Commitments

 

We are committed for our facility lease as more fully described in Note 11, Commitments and Contingencies, to our consolidated financial statements.

 

We have a bonus plan for employees, in accordance with their terms of employment, whereby they can earn a percentage of their salary at three different levels based on meeting three different targeted objectives for earnings per share. The number of shares outstanding used for the calculation is as of October 1, 2013. In fiscal 2014, the Company accrued $2,711,223 for bonuses and related payroll taxes based on the level of targeted objectives achieved for the year. The bonuses will be paid in the quarter ending December 31, 2014. No bonus expense was accrued in fiscal 2013 as we did not meet our targeted objectives.

 

In April 2009, our Board of Directors adopted a Change in Control Severance Benefit Plan. The Change of Control Plan provides that in the event of a qualifying termination, each of the two participating executives will be entitled to receive (i) a lump sum payment equal to twenty-four months’ base salary (less applicable tax and other withholdings), (ii) a lump sum payment equal to the officer’s target bonus for the year in which the officer is terminated, (iii) continuation of health benefits for twenty-four months and (iv) accelerated vesting of any unvested stock options and other securities or similar incentives held at the time of termination. A qualifying termination under the Change of Control Plan is any involuntary termination without cause or any voluntary termination for good reason, in each case occurring within three months before or twelve months after a change of control of LRAD.

 

We entered into an employment agreement in September 2006 with our president and chief executive officer that provides for severance benefits in the form of up to a maximum of six months’ salary and health benefit continuation if his employment is terminated without cause or he resigns for good reason. There are no other employment agreements with executive officers or other employees providing future benefits or severance arrangements.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements, financings or other relationships with unconsolidated entities or other persons.

 

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

 

Information requested by this Item is not included as we are electing scaled disclosure requirements available to Smaller Reporting Companies.

 

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

The financial statements required by this item begin on page F-1 with the index to financial statements followed by the consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

There have been no disagreements or any reportable events requiring disclosure under Item 304(b) of Regulation S-K.

 

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures.

 

We are required to maintain disclosure controls and procedures designed to ensure that material information related to us, including our consolidated subsidiaries, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC rules and forms.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)) that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act Reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Our disclosure controls and procedures are also designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act Reports is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

 

 
22

 

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 30, 2014 and, based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this report, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at a reasonable assurance level.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f). Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2014 based on the guidelines established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”). Our internal control over financial reporting includes policies and procedures that provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external reporting purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. Based on this evaluation, management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of September 30, 2014.

 

This Annual Report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the SEC that permit the company to provide only management’s report in this Annual Report.

 

Changes in Internal Controls

 

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting since June 30, 2014, in connection with the evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 or 15d-15, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. Our process for evaluating controls and procedures is continuous and encompasses constant improvement of the design and effectiveness of established controls and procedures and the remediation of any deficiencies, which may be identified during this process.

 

Item 9B.

Other Information.

 

None

 

 
23

 

 

PART III

 

Certain information required by this Part III is omitted from this report and is incorporated by reference to our Definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the SEC in connection with the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held in 2015 (the “Proxy Statement”).

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

The information with respect to our executive officers is set forth in the section entitled “Executive Officers” in Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The information required by this item with respect to our directors and corporate governance matters is incorporated by reference to the information under the captions “Election of Directors,” “Board and Committee Matters and Corporate Governance Matters” and “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” contained in Proxy Statement.

 

Item 11.

Executive Compensation.

 

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the information in the Proxy Statement under the caption “Executive Compensation.”

 

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

 

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the information in the Proxy Statement under the captions “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information.”

 

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

 

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the information in the Proxy Statement under the captions “Certain Transactions” and “Independence of the Board of Directors.”

 

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services.

 

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to the Proxy Statement, under the heading “Principal Accountant Fees and Services.”

 

 
24

 

 

PART IV

 

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

The financial statements required by this item are submitted in a separate section beginning on page F-1 of this annual report.

 

Financial Statement Schedules:

 

None.

 

Exhibits:

 

The following exhibits are incorporated by reference or filed as part of this report.  

   
   

3.

Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws

   

3.1

Certificate of Incorporation dated March 1, 1992. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 on Form 10-SB effective August 1, 1994.

   

3.1.1

Amendment to Certificate of Incorporation dated March 24, 1997 and filed with Delaware on April 22, 1997. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1.1 on Form 10-QSB for the quarter ended March 31, 1997, dated May 13, 1997.

   

3.1.2

Certificate of Amendment to Certificate of Incorporation filed with Delaware on September 26, 2002. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1.6 on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2002, dated December 23, 2002.

   

3.1.3

Amendment to Certificate of Incorporation dated March 24, 2010. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 on Form 8-K dated March 31, 2010.

   

3.2

Restated Bylaws. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2006, dated May 10, 2006.

   

10.

Material Contracts

   

10.1

American Technology Corporation 2005 Equity Incentive Plan (as Amended March 15, 2007). Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 14, 2007.+

   

10.2

Form of Stock Option Agreement under the 2005 Equity Incentive Plan for grants on or after August 5, 2005. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2005 dated August 9, 2005.+

   

10.3

Form of Stock Award Agreement under the 2005 Equity Incentive Plan. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.12 on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2005 dated August 9, 2005.+

   

10.4

Employment Letter between American Technology Corporation and Thomas R. Brown dated August 23, 2006. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 on Form 8-K filed August 25, 2006.+

   

10.5

Employment Letter between American Technology Corporation and Katherine H. McDermott dated June 21, 2007. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.37 on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2007 filed January 7, 2008.+

   

10.6

Change in Control Severance Benefit Plan, issued April 30, 2009. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2009 filed December 1, 2009.+

   

10.7

Form of Warrant, issued February 4, 2011. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 on Form 8-K filed February 8, 2011.

   

10.8

Form of Warrant Amendment, effective as of February 4, 2011. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 on Form 10-Q filed May 4, 2011.

   

10.9

Registration Rights Agreement, dated February 4, 2011. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 on Form 8-K filed February 8, 2011.

   

10.10

Lease between LRAD Corporation and The Realty Associates Fund VIII, LP dated November 16, 2011. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 on Form 10-K filed December 5, 2011.

   

10.11

Investor Settlement Agreement between LRAD Corporation and the Stockholders of LRAD Corporation identified therein dated May 21, 2013. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 on Form 8-K filed May 22, 2013.

   

10.12

Form of Indemnification Agreement. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 on Form 8-K filed June 27, 2013.

 

 
25

 

 

10.13

Non-Employee Director Compensation Summary. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 on Form 10-K filed November 21, 2013.+

   

21.

Subsidiaries of the Registrant

   

21.1

Subsidiary of LRAD Corporation. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 21.1 on Form 10-K filed November 21, 2013.

   

23.

Consents of Experts and Counsel

   

23.1

Consent of Squar, Milner, Peterson, Miranda & Williamson, LLP.*

   

24.

Power of Attorney

   

24.1

Power of Attorney. Included on signature page.*

   

31.

Certifications

   

31.1

Certification of Thomas R. Brown, Principal Executive Officer, pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) or 15d-14(a) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.*

   

31.2

Certification of Katherine H. McDermott, Principal Financial Officer, pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) or 15d-14(a) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.*

   

32.1

Certification pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, executed by Thomas R. Brown, Principal Executive Officer, and Katherine H. McDermott, Principal Financial Officer.*

   

99.

Additional Exhibits

   

101.INS

XBRL Instance Document

   

101.SCH

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

   

101.CAL

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

   

101.DEF

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

   

101.LAB

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

   

101.PRE

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 


*

Filed herewith.

+

Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

 

 
26

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

F-1

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2014 and 2013

F-2

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended September 30, 2014 and 2013

F-3

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended September 30, 2014 and 2013

F-4

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended September 30, 2014 and 2013

F-5

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

F-6 –  F-19

 

 
F-i

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

LRAD Corporation:

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of LRAD Corporation as of September 30, 2014 and 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of LRAD Corporation as of September 30, 2014 and 2013, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

 

/s/ SQUAR, MILNER,  PETERSON, MIRANDA & WILLIAMSON, LLP

 

San Diego, California

November 20, 2014

 

 
F-1

 

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 

 Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 
                 

ASSETS

               

Current assets:

               

Cash

  $ 23,894,744     $ 15,805,195  

Accounts receivable, less allowance of $0 and $3,772 for doubtful accounts

    4,284,051       4,958,532  

Inventories, net

    3,895,736       4,587,750  

Prepaid expenses and other

    523,947       1,003,875  

Total current assets

    32,598,478       26,355,352  
                 

Property and equipment, net

    360,084       237,377  

Intangible assets, net

    53,835       51,650  

Prepaid expenses and other - noncurrent

    766,423       914,516  

Total assets

  $ 33,778,820     $ 27,558,895  
                 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

               

Current liabilities:

               

Accounts payable

  $ 830,503     $ 1,596,409  

Accrued liabilities

    4,087,976       1,054,968  

Total current liabilities

    4,918,479       2,651,377  

Other liabilities - noncurrent

    157,550       146,109  

Total liabilities

    5,076,029       2,797,486  

Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)

               
                 

Stockholders' equity:

               

Preferred stock, $0.00001 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding

    -       -  

Common stock, $0.00001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized; 33,236,489 and 32,900,705 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

    332       329  

Additional paid-in capital

    88,049,125       87,434,834  

Accumulated deficit

    (59,346,666 )     (62,673,754 )

Total stockholders' equity

    28,702,791       24,761,409  

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

  $ 33,778,820     $ 27,558,895  

 

See accompanying notes

 

 
F-2

 

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 

Consolidated Statements of Operation

 

 

   

Years Ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 
                 

Revenues:

               

Product sales

  $ 23,382,521     $ 16,001,820  

Contract and other

    1,208,821       1,086,110  

Total revenues

    24,591,342       17,087,930  

Cost of revenues

    10,828,287       8,842,631  

Gross profit

    13,763,055       8,245,299  
                 

Operating expenses:

               

Selling, general and administrative

    7,959,003       5,438,406  

Research and development

    2,481,235       1,841,369  

Total operating expenses

    10,440,238       7,279,775  
                 

Income from operations

    3,322,817       965,524  
                 

Other income

    20,523       299,190  
                 

Income from operations before income taxes

    3,343,340       1,264,714  

Income tax expense

    16,252       1,902  

Net income

  $ 3,327,088     $ 1,262,812  
                 
                 

Net income per common share - basic and diluted

  $ 0.10     $ 0.04  

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

               

Basic

    33,077,556       32,464,935  

Diluted

    33,437,124       32,920,019  

 

See accompanying notes

 

 
F-3

 

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

                   

Additional

           

Total

 
   

Common Stock

   

Paid-in

   

Accumulated

   

Stockholders'

 
   

Shares

   

Amount

   

Capital

   

Deficit

   

Equity

 

Balances, September 30, 2012

    32,374,499     $ 324     $ 86,358,011     $ (63,936,566 )   $ 22,421,769  

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options , net

    526,206       5       340,445       -       340,450  

Share-based compensation expense

    -       -       736,378       -       736,378  

Net income

    -       -       -       1,262,812       1,262,812  

Balances, September 30, 2013

    32,900,705     $ 329     $ 87,434,834     $ (62,673,754 )   $ 24,761,409  

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options, net

    612,941       6       544,887       -       544,893  

Share-based compensation expense

    -       -       585,753       -       585,753  

Repurchase of common stock

    (277,157 )     (3 )     (516,349 )     -       (516,352 )

Net income

    -       -       -       3,327,088       3,327,088  

Balances, September 30, 2014

    33,236,489     $ 332     $ 88,049,125     $ (59,346,666 )   $ 28,702,791  

 

See accompanying notes

 

 
F-4

 

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

 

   

Years Ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Operating Activities:

               

Net income

  $ 3,327,088     $ 1,262,812  
                 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

               

Depreciation and amortization

    209,975       146,307  

Provision for doubtful accounts

    (3,772 )     (600 )

Warranty provision

    157,819       19,254  

Inventory obsolescence

    36,967       (143,686 )

Share-based compensation

    585,753       736,378  

Loss on sale or impairment of patents

    6,980       86,445  

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

               

Accounts receivable

    678,253       559,962  

Inventories

    655,047       (1,331,575 )

Prepaid expenses and other

    479,928       (562,052 )

Prepaid expenses and other - noncurrent

    148,093       187,500  

Accounts payable

    (765,906 )     600,690  

Warranty settlements

    (56,267 )     (10,808 )

Accrued and other liabilities

    2,942,897       205,072  

Net cash provided by operating activities

    8,402,855       1,755,699  
                 

Investing Activities:

               

Capital expenditures

    (326,957 )     (147,504 )

Patent costs paid

    (14,890 )     (2,955 )

Net cash used in investing activities

    (341,847 )     (150,459 )
                 

Financing Activities:

               

Repurchase of common stock

    (516,352 )     -  

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

    544,893       340,450  

Net cash provided by financing activities

    28,541       340,450  
                 

Net increase in cash

    8,089,549       1,945,690  

Cash, beginning of period

    15,805,195       13,859,505  

Cash, end of period

  $ 23,894,744     $ 15,805,195  
                 
Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Flow Information                

Cash paid (refunded) for taxes

  $ 14,445     $ (38,662 )

  

See accompanying notes

 

 
F-5

 

 

 

LRAD Corporation

 

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

1. OPERATIONS

 

LRAD Corporation, a Delaware corporation (the “Company”), is engaged in design, development and commercialization of directed sound technologies and products. The principal markets for the Company’s proprietary sound reproduction technologies and products are in North and South America, Europe, Middle East and Asia.

 

2. BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION

 

The Company has a currently inactive wholly owned subsidiary, LRAD International Corporation, which the Company formed to conduct international marketing, sales and distribution activities. The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of this subsidiary after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

USE OF ESTIMATES

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions (e.g., share-based compensation valuation, allowance for doubtful accounts, valuation of inventory and intangible assets, warranty reserve, accrued bonus and valuation allowance related to deferred tax assets) that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and affect the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could materially differ from those estimates.

 

CONCENTRATION OF CREDIT RISK

 

The Company maintains cash and cash equivalent accounts with Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insured financial institutions. The FDIC coverage includes all deposit accounts up to $250,000 per depositor for each insured bank. In addition, the Company’s security account is protected by coverage offered by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation up to $500,000, which is inclusive of up to $250,000 of protection for claims for cash. The Company’s exposure for amounts in excess of these insured limits at September 30, 2014 was approximately $23,400,000. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts.

 

The Company sells its products to a large number of geographically diverse customers. The Company routinely assesses the financial strength of its customers and generally does not require collateral or other security to support customer receivables. At September 30, 2014, accounts receivable from three customers accounted for 22%, 18% and 10% of total accounts receivable with no other single customer accounting for more than 10% of the accounts receivable balance. At September 30, 2013, accounts receivable from two customers each accounted for 36% of total accounts receivable with no other single customer accounting for more than 10% of the accounts receivable balance.

 

CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS, AND RESTRICTED CASH

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less, when purchased, to be cash equivalents.

 

The Company considers any amounts pledged as collateral or otherwise restricted for use in current operations to be restricted cash. Restricted cash is classified as a current asset unless amounts are not expected to be released and available for use in operations within one year.

 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE AND ALLOWANCE FOR DOUBTFUL ACCOUNTS

 

The Company carries its accounts receivable at their historical cost, less an allowance for doubtful accounts. On a periodic basis, the Company evaluates its accounts receivable and establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses considering the following factors when determining if collection of a receivable is reasonably assured: customer credit-worthiness, past transaction history with the customer, current economic industry trends and changes in customer payment terms. If the Company has no previous experience with the customer, the Company may obtain reports from various credit organizations to ensure that the customer has a history of paying its creditors. The Company may also request financial information to ensure that the customer has the means of making payment. If these factors do not indicate collection is reasonably assured, revenue is deferred until collection becomes reasonably assured, which is generally upon receipt of cash. There was no deferred revenue at September 30, 2014 or 2013 as a result of collection issues. If the financial condition of the Company’s customers were to deteriorate, adversely affecting their ability to make payments, additional allowances would be required. The Company determines allowances on a customer specific. The Company had allowances for doubtful accounts of $0 and $3,772 at September 30, 2014 and 2013.

 

 
F-6

 

 

CONTRACT MANUFACTURERS

 

The Company employs contract manufacturers for production of certain components and sub-assemblies. The Company may provide parts and components to such parties from time to time, but recognizes no revenue or markup on such transactions. During fiscal 2014, the Company performed assembly of products in-house using components and sub-assemblies from a variety of contract manufacturers and suppliers.

 

INVENTORIES

 

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using a standard cost system whereby differences between the standard cost and purchase price are recorded as a purchase price variance in cost of revenues. Inventory is comprised of raw materials, assemblies and finished products intended for sale. The Company periodically makes judgments and estimates regarding the future utility and carrying value of inventory. The carrying value of inventory is periodically reviewed and impairments, if any, are recognized when the expected net realizable value is less than carrying value. The Company has inventory reserves for estimated obsolescence or unmarketable inventory, which is equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the estimated market value, based upon assumptions about future demand and market conditions. The Company increased and decreased its inventory reserve by $36,967 and $143,686 during the years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, based on expected usage of components resulting from changes in product lines and customer demand.

 

EQUIPMENT AND DEPRECIATION

 

Equipment is stated at cost. Depreciation on machinery and equipment and office furniture and equipment is computed over the estimated useful lives of two to seven years using the straight-line method. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the life of the lease. Upon retirement or disposition of equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation is removed, and a gain or loss is recorded.

 

INTANGIBLES

 

Intangible assets, which consist of patents and trademarks, are carried at cost less accumulated amortization. Intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives, which have been estimated to be 15 years. The carrying value of intangibles is periodically reviewed and impairments, if any, are recognized when the future undiscounted cash flows realized from the assets is less than its carrying value.

 

LEASES

 

Leases entered into are classified as either capital or operating leases. At the time a capital lease is entered into, an asset is recorded, together with its related long-term obligation to reflect the purchase and financing. At September 30, 2014 and 2013, the Company had no capital lease obligations.

 

REVENUE RECOGNITION

 

The Company derives its revenue primarily from two sources: (i) product revenues, and (ii) contracts, license fees, other services, and freight.

 

Product revenues from customers, including resellers and system integrators, are recognized in the periods that products are shipped (FOB shipping point) or received by customers (FOB destination), when the fee is fixed or determinable, when collection of resulting receivables is reasonably assured, and there are no remaining obligations for the Company. Most revenues to resellers and system integrators are based on firm commitments from the end user; as a result, resellers and system integrators carry little or no inventory. Revenues from associated engineering and installation contracts are recognized based on milestones or completion of the contracted services. The Company’s customers do not have the right to return product unless the product is found to be defective.

 

The Company also sells extended repair and maintenance contracts with terms ranging from one to several years which provide repair and maintenance services after expiration of the original one year warranty term. Revenues from separately priced extended repair and maintenance contracts are recognized on a straight-line basis over the contract period and classified as contract and other revenues.

 

 
F-7

 

 

SHIPPING AND HANDLING COSTS

 

Shipping and handling costs are included in cost of revenues. Shipping and handling costs invoiced to customers are included in revenue. Actual shipping and handling costs were $255,680 and $142,453 for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

ADVERTISING

 

Advertising costs are charged to expense as incurred. The Company expensed $61,588 and $74,452 for the years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, for advertising costs.

 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COSTS

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred.

 

WARRANTY RESERVES

 

The Company warrants its products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period of one year from the date of purchase. The warranty is generally limited. The Company currently provides direct warranty service. Some agreements with OEM customers, from time to time, may require that certain quantities of product be made available for use as warranty replacements. International market warranties are generally similar to the U.S. market. The Company also sells extended warranty contracts and maintenance agreements.

 

The Company establishes a warranty reserve based on anticipated warranty claims at the time product revenues are recognized. Factors affecting warranty reserve levels include the number of units sold, anticipated cost of warranty repairs and anticipated rates of warranty claims. The Company evaluates the adequacy of the provision for warranty costs each reporting period. In the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, the Company increased its reserve by $101,552. The warranty reserve was $314,311 and $212,759 at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

INCOME TAXES

 

The Company determines its income tax provision using the asset and liability method. Temporary differences are differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their reported amounts in the financial statements that will result in taxable or deductible amounts in future years. A valuation allowance is recorded by the Company to the extent it is more likely than not that a deferred tax asset will not be realized. Additional information regarding income taxes appears in Note 10, Income Taxes.

 

IMPAIRMENT OF LONG-LIVED ASSETS

 

Long-lived assets and identifiable intangibles held for use are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. If the sum of undiscounted expected future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset, or if changes in facts and circumstances indicate this, an impairment loss is measured and recognized using the asset’s fair value.

 

SEGMENT INFORMATION

 

The Company presents its business as one reportable segment due to the similarity in nature of products provided, financial performance measures (revenue growth and gross margin), methods of distribution (direct and indirect) and customer markets (each product is sold by the same personnel to government and commercial customers, domestically and internationally). The Company’s chief operating decision making officer reviews financial information on sound products on a consolidated basis. See Note 15, Major Customers, Suppliers, Segment and Related Information, for additional information.

 

NET INCOME PER SHARE

 

Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted net income per share reflects the potential dilution of securities that could occur if outstanding securities convertible into common stock were exercised or converted. See Note 14, Net Income Per Share, for additional information.

 

FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSLATION

 

The Company’s functional currency is U.S. dollars as substantially all of the Company’s operations use this denomination. Foreign sales to date have been denominated in U.S. dollars. Transactions undertaken in other currencies, which have not been material, are translated using the exchange rate in effect as of the transaction date. Any exchange gains and losses are included in the statements of operations.

 

 
F-8

 

 

SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION

 

The Company recognized share-based compensation expense related to non-qualified stock options issued to employees and directors over the expected vesting term of the stock-based instrument based on the grant date fair value. Forfeitures are estimated at the time of the grant and revised in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates or if the Company updates its estimated forfeiture rate. See Note 12, Share-based Compensation, for additional information.

 

REGISTRATION PAYMENT ARRANGEMENTS

 

In connection with the issuance of warrants on February 4, 2011 (“2011 Warrants”), the Company entered into a Registration Rights Agreement with the warrant holders (“Warrant Holders”), whereby the Company agreed to prepare and file, within 30 days following the issuance of the 2011 Warrants, a registration statement covering the resale of the shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the 2011 Warrants. If the Warrant Holders are unable to re-sell the shares purchased upon exercise of the 2011 Warrants, the Company would be obligated to pay liquidated damages to the purchasers in the amount of $0.01335 per day per applicable share until 180 days after the date the registration statement is required to be filed, and $0.0267 per day per applicable share thereafter, but not to exceed a total of $0.534 per applicable share or a maximum of $869,323. This obligation will be effective for the five year term of the Warrants, or until all 2011 Warrants have been exercised. No liquidated damages have been accrued as of September 30, 2014 as it was not deemed to be probable that any such damages will be incurred.

 

RECLASSIFICATIONS

 

Where necessary, the prior year’s information has been reclassified to conform to the fiscal 2014 statement presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on previously reported results of operations or accumulated deficit.

 

SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Management has evaluated events subsequent to September 30, 2014 through the date the accompanying consolidated financial statements were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and noted that there have been no events or transactions which would affect the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the year ended September 30, 2014.

 

3. RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accountings Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASU 2014-09”), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. ASU 2014-09 will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. generally accepted accounting principles when it becomes effective. ASU 2014-09 is effective for the Company starting in the first quarter of fiscal 2018. Early application is not permitted. ASU 2014-09 permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. The Company has not yet selected a transition method nor has it determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.

 

In June 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-12, Compensation – Stock Compensation: Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide that a Performance Target Could be Achieved after the Requisite Service Period (“ASU 2014-12”). The guidance requires that a performance target that affects vesting, and that could be achieved after the requisite service period, be treated as a performance condition. The guidance will be effective for the Company in the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2016, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this guidance, if any, on its financial statements.

 

Management is evaluating the significance of the recent accounting pronouncement ASU 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements – Going Concern (subtopic 205-40); disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern, and has not yet concluded whether the pronouncement will have a significant effect on the Company’s future financial statements.

 

4. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

 

At September 30, 2014, for certain financial instruments, including accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses, the carrying amounts approximate fair value due to their relatively short maturities.

 

As of September 30, 2014 and 2013, the Company had no financial instruments that are required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis.

 

 
F-9

 

 

5. INVENTORIES

 

Inventories consisted of the following:

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Raw materials

  $ 3,462,869     $ 3,941,203  

Finished goods

    634,246       605,240  

Work in process

    153,107       358,826  

Inventories, gross

    4,250,222       4,905,269  

Reserve for obsolescence

    (354,486 )     (317,519 )

Inventories, net

  $ 3,895,736     $ 4,587,750  

 

 

The Company had raw materials located at supplier locations of $54,989 and $63,429 at September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

The Company relies on one supplier for compression drivers for its LRAD product and is making efforts to obtain alternative suppliers to reduce such reliance. The Company’s ability to manufacture its LRAD product could be adversely affected if it were to lose this sole source supplier and was unable to find an alternative supplier.

 

6. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment consisted of the following:

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 
                 

Machinery and equipment

  $ 903,798     $ 607,803  

Office furniture and equipment

    720,548       769,799  

Leasehold improvements

    61,863       55,298  

Property and equipment, gross

    1,686,209       1,432,900  

Accumulated depreciation

    (1,326,125 )     (1,195,523 )

Property and equipment, net

  $ 360,084     $ 237,377  

 

   

Year ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Depreciation expense

  $ 204,250     $ 122,990  

 

 

7. INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

Intangible assets consisted of the following:

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Cost

  $ 86,498     $ 93,938  

Accumulated amortization

    (32,663 )     (42,288 )

Intangible assets, net

  $ 53,835     $ 51,650  

 

   

Year ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Amortization expense

  $ 5,725     $ 23,317  

Loss on sale or impairment of patents

    4,580       81,307  

Net sale or impairment of patents

  $ 10,305     $ 104,624  

 

 Each quarter, the Company reviews the ongoing value of its capitalized patent costs. In the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, some of these assets were identified as being associated with patents no longer consistent with the Company’s business strategy. As a result of this review, the Company recorded a loss as shown above from the impairment of patents that were previously capitalized.

 

 
F-10

 

 

Estimated Amortization Expense Years Ended September 30,

       

2015

  $ 5,631  

2016

    5,631  

2017

    5,631  

2018

    5,631  

2019

    5,631  

Thereafter

    25,680  
    $ 53,835  

 

 

8. PREPAID MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT

 

At March 31, 2011, prepaid expenses included $1,500,000 paid to a third party service provider in connection with the Company’s obligations under a sales contract to a foreign military service to provide repair and maintenance services over an eight year period for products sold thereunder. The total prepaid expense is being amortized on a straight-line basis at an annual rate of $187,500 over the eight-year contract period to correspond with the revenues for these services, and is being recognized as a component of cost of sales. Accordingly, as of September 30, 2014, $187,500 of the total prepayment was classified as a current asset and $656,250 was classified as noncurrent.

 

9. ACCRUED AND OTHER LIABILITIES—NONCURRENT

 

Accrued liabilities consisted of the following:

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 
                 

Payroll and related

  $ 3,033,223     $ 650,125  

Deferred revenue and other

    567,639       18,532  

Warranty reserve

    288,480       189,277  

Accrued contract costs

    197,034       197,034  

Income tax liability

    1,600       -  

Total

  $ 4,087,976     $ 1,054,968  
                 
                 

Other liabilities - noncurrent consisted of the following:

               
                 

Deferred rent

  $ 131,719     $ 122,627  

Extended warranty

    25,831       23,482  

Total

  $ 157,550     $ 146,109  

 

 

Payroll and related

 

Accrued payroll and related consists primarily of accrued bonus and related taxes, vacation and outside commissions at September 30, 2014 and accrued vacation and outside commissions at September 30, 2013.

 

Deferred Revenue

 

Deferred revenue at September 30, 2014 included prepayments on current orders scheduled for delivery in the quarter ended December 31, 2014.

 

 
F-11

 

 

Warranty Reserve

 

Details of the estimated warranty reserve were as follows:

 

   

Years ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Beginning balance

  $ 212,759     $ 204,313  

Warranty provision

    157,819       19,254  

Warranty settlements

    (56,267 )     (10,808 )

Ending balance

  $ 314,311     $ 212,759  

 

   

September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Short-term warranty reserve

  $ 288,480     $ 189,277  

Long-term warranty reserve

    25,831       23,482  
    $ 314,311     $ 212,759  

 

The Company establishes a warranty reserve based on anticipated warranty claims at the time product revenue is recognized. Factors affecting warranty reserve levels include the number of units sold, anticipated cost of warranty repairs and anticipated rates of warranty claims. The Company evaluates the adequacy of the provision for warranty costs each reporting period. In the fiscal year ended September 30, 2014, the Company increased its reserve by $101,552, primarily due to increased units sold.

 

Accrued contract costs

 

Accrued contract costs consist of accrued expenses for contracting a third party service provider to fulfill repair and maintenance obligations required under a contract through 2019 with a foreign military for units sold in the year ended September 30, 2011. Payments to the service provider will be made annually upon completion of each year of service. These services are being recorded in cost of revenues to correspond with the revenues for these services.

 

 10. INCOME TAXES

 

Income taxes consisted of the following:

 

   

Years ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Current tax expense

               

Federal

  $ -     $ -  

State

    16,000       2,000  
      16,000       2,000  

Deferred (benefit) expense

               

Federal

    (2,309,000 )     (779,000 )

State

    (408,000 )     (138,000 )
      (2,717,000 )     (917,000 )

Change in valuation allowance

    2,717,000       917,000  

Provision for income taxes

  $ 16,000     $ 2,000  

 

 
F-12

 

 

A reconciliation of income taxes at the federal statutory rate of 34% to the effective tax rate was as follows:

 

   

Years ended September 30,

 
   

2014

   

2013

 

Income taxes computed at the federal statutory rate

  $ 1,137,000     $ 430,000  

Change in valuation allowance

    (2,717,000 )     (917,000 )

Expired net operating loss carryforwards

    1,285,000       -  

Nondeductible compensation, interest expense and other

    8,000       8,000  

State income taxes, net of federal tax benefit

    102,000       70,000  

Change in R&D credit carryover

    79,000       (56,000 )

Stock options and other prior year true-ups

    105,000       462,000  

State business credit utilization

    -       (4,000 )

Prior year tax adjustments

    -       9,000  

Other

    17,000       -  
    $ 16,000     $ 2,000  

 

The types of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their approximate tax effects that give rise to a significant portion of the net deferred tax asset at September 30, 2014 and 2013 were as follows:

 

   

At September 30,

 

Deferred tax assets:

 

2014

   

2013

 

Net operating loss carryforwards

  $ 16,920,000     $ 19,576,000  

Research and development credit

    2,182,000       2,257,000  

Share-based compensation

    414,000       526,000  

Equipment

    (6,000 )     (18,000 )

Patents

    174,000       230,000  

Accruals and other

    630,000       463,000  

State tax deduction

    (3,000 )     (2,000 )

Federal AMT Credit

    49,000       49,000  

Allowances

    131,000       127,000  

Gross deferred tax asset

    20,491,000       23,208,000  

Less valuation allowance

    (20,491,000 )     (23,208,000 )
    $ -     $ -  

 

 At September 30, 2014, the Company had net deferred tax assets of approximately $20,491,000. The deferred tax assets are primarily composed of federal and state NOL carryforwards and federal and state research and development (“R&D”) credit carryforwards. At September 30, 2014, the Company, for federal income tax purposes, had NOL carryforwards of approximately $47,830,000, which expire through 2028. The Company recognizes windfall tax benefits associated with the exercise of stock options directly to stockholders’ equity only when realized. Accordingly, deferred tax assets are not recognized for NOL carryforwards resulting from windfall tax benefits occurring from October 1, 2008 onward. At September 30, 2014, deferred tax assets do not include excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation of approximately $970,000.

 

Due to uncertainties surrounding the Company’s ability to generate future taxable income to realize these assets, a full valuation allowance has been established to offset net deferred tax assets as realization of such assets has not met the threshold under ASC 740-10, “Income Taxes.” The future utilization of the Company’s NOL carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be subject to a substantial annual limitation as a result of ownership changes that could occur in the future. The Company has an estimated $1,673,000 and $771,000 of federal and state R&D tax credits, respectively, at September 30, 2014, a portion of which began to expire in the 2012 tax year. Further, due to a change in California tax law in fiscal year 2008, NOL carryforwards were not able to be used in tax years 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011, and R&D credit utilization was limited to fifty percent of the Company’s net tax in tax years 2008 and 2009. The Company is evaluating the deferred asset balance to determine if a valuation allowance will be required in future periods.

 

 
F-13

 

 

The Company recorded a tax provision during the year ended September 30, 2014 for Alternative Minimum Tax for California. The Company did not record a tax provision during the year ended September 30, 2014 for Federal taxes as the Company’s annual effective tax rate is zero. During the quarter ended June 30, 2012, the Company amended its federal tax return for the year ended September 30, 2008 to make an election to carry back its fiscal year ended September 30, 2008 applicable NOL for a period of 3 years, and carry forward the loss for up to 20 years, as per Section 172(b)(1)(H) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (“Section 172”), as amended per the American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009 for eligible small businesses. The Company also amended its federal tax returns for the years ended September 30, 2009 and 2010 and filed its federal tax return for the year ended September 30, 2011, during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012, resulting in a federal income tax benefit of $152,333. Of this benefit, $112,009 was received from the Internal Revenue Service in the year ended September 30, 2012, and the remaining $40,324 was received in the year ended September 30, 2013.

 

As of September 30, 2014, the Company had no unrecognized tax benefits and there were no material changes during the year. Due to the valuation allowance, future changes in the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits will not impact its effective tax rate. The Company’s practice is to recognize interest and/or penalties related to income tax matters in income tax expense.

 

The Company is subject to taxation in the U.S. and various state jurisdictions. All of the Company’s historical tax years are subject to examination by the Internal Revenue Service and various state jurisdictions due to the generation of NOL and credit carryforwards.

 

11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Facility Lease

 

On November 29, 2011, the Company entered into a new lease for 31,360 square feet to replace the prior San Diego facility as the Company’s executive offices, research and development, assembly and operational facilities. The lease commenced July 1, 2012 and will expire June 30, 2018. The aggregate monthly payments, with abatements, averaged $16,306 per month in the first year, and is $25,088, $26,656, $28,224, $29,792 and $31,360 per month for the second through sixth years of the lease, plus certain other costs and charges as specified in the lease agreement, including the Company’s proportionate share of the building operating expenses and real estate taxes.

 

Operating Leases

 

Total operating lease expense, including facilities and business equipment commitments, recorded by the Company for the years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 was $337,099 and $269,273, respectively.

 

The obligations under all operating leases are as follows:

 

Years ending September 30:

       

2015

  $ 355,915  

2016

    374,731  

2017

    389,276  

2018

    285,804  

2019

    -  
    $ 1,405,726  

 

 Employment Agreements

 

The Company entered into an employment agreement in September 2006 with its president and chief executive officer that provides for severance benefits of up to a maximum of six months’ salary and health benefit continuation if his employment is terminated without cause or he resigns for good reason. There are no other employment agreements with executive officers or other employees providing future benefits or severance arrangements.

 

Bonus Plan

 

The Company has established a bonus plan for its employees, in accordance with their terms of employment, whereby they can earn a percentage of their salary at three different levels based on meeting three different targeted objectives for earnings per share. The number of shares outstanding used for the calculation is as of October 1, 2013. In fiscal 2014, the Company accrued $2,711,223 for bonuses and related payroll taxes based on the level of targeted objectives achieved for the year. The bonuses will be paid in the quarter ending December 31, 2014. No bonus expense was accrued in fiscal 2013.

 

 
F-14

 

 

Change of Control Severance Benefit Plan

 

The Company has a Change of Control Plan that provides that in the event of a qualifying termination, each of the two participating executives will be entitled to receive (i) a lump sum payment equal to twenty-four months’ base salary (less applicable tax and other withholdings), (ii) a lump sum payment equal to the officer’s target bonus for the year in which the officer is terminated, (iii) continuation of health benefits for twenty-four months and (iv) accelerated vesting of any unvested stock options and other securities or similar incentives held at the time of termination. A qualifying termination under the Change of Control Plan is any involuntary termination without cause or any voluntary termination for good reason, in each case occurring within three months before or twelve months after a change of control of the Company.

 

Employee Benefit—401K Plan

 

The Company has a defined contribution plan (401(k)) covering its employees. Matching contributions are made on behalf of all participants at the discretion of the board of directors. During the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, the Company made matching contributions of $201,056 and $124,391, respectively.

 

Litigation

 

The Company may at times be involved in litigation in the ordinary course of business. The Company will, from time to time, when appropriate in management’s estimation, record adequate reserves in the Company’s financial statements for pending litigation.

 

Guarantees and Indemnifications

 

The Company enters into indemnification provisions under (i) its agreements with other companies in its ordinary course of business, typically with business partners, contractors, customers and landlords and (ii) its agreements with investors. Under these arrangements, the Company may indemnify other parties such as business partners, customers, underwriters, and investors for certain losses suffered, claims of intellectual property infringement, negligence and intentional acts in the performance of services, and violations of laws including certain violations of securities laws. The Company’s obligation to provide such indemnification in such circumstances would arise if, for example, a third party sued a customer for intellectual property infringement and the Company agreed to indemnify the customer against such claims. The Company is unable to estimate with any reasonable accuracy the liability that may be incurred pursuant to such indemnification obligations. Some of the factors that would affect this assessment include, but are not limited to, the nature of the claim asserted, the relative merits of the claim, the financial ability of the parties, the nature and amount of damages claimed, insurance coverage that the Company may have to cover such claims, and the willingness of the parties to reach settlement, if any. Because of the uncertainty surrounding these circumstances, the Company’s indemnification obligations could range from immaterial to having a material adverse impact on its financial position and its ability to continue in the ordinary course of business. The Company has not incurred material costs to defend lawsuits or settle claims related to these indemnification agreements in the past, and the Company had no liabilities recorded for these agreements as of September 30, 2014, or 2013.

 

Under its bylaws, the Company has agreed to indemnify its officers and directors for certain events or occurrences arising as a result of the officer or director serving in such capacity. In addition, the Company executed indemnification agreements in June 2013 with the then current Directors and Officers of the Company, indemnifying them from any expenses arising out of any claims. All new Directors and Officers subsequent to June 2013 have and will also execute indemnification agreements. The term of the indemnification period is for the officer or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited. However, the Company has a director and officers’ liability insurance policy that limits its exposure and enables it to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As a result of its insurance policy coverage, the Company does not believe that a material loss exposure related to these agreements is either probable or can be reasonably estimated. Accordingly, the Company has no liability recorded for these agreements as of September 30, 2014, or 2013.

 

12. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION

 

Stock Option Plans

 

At September 30, 2014, the Company had one equity incentive plan. The 2005 Equity Incentive Plan (“2005 Equity Plan”), as amended, authorizes for issuance as stock options, stock appreciation rights, or stock awards for an aggregate of 3,250,000 shares of common stock to employees, directors or consultants. The total 2005 Equity Plan reserve includes these shares and shares reserved under other plans prior to the 2005 Equity Plan, allowing for the issuance of up to 4,999,564 shares. At September 30, 2014, there were options outstanding covering 2,530,535 shares of common stock under the 2005 Equity Plan and 763,634 shares of common stock available for grant for a total of 3,294,169 currently available under the 2005 Equity Plan.

 

 
F-15

 

 

Share-Based Compensation

 

The Company’s employee stock options have various restrictions that reduce option value, including vesting provisions and restrictions on transfer and hedging, among others, and are often exercised prior to their contractual maturity.

 

The Company recorded $585,753 and $736,378 of stock compensation expense for the years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The weighted average estimated fair value of employee stock options granted during the year ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 was calculated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following weighted average assumptions (annualized percentages):

 

   

2014

   

2013

 

Volatility

    54.0% - 76.0%       74.0% - 81.0%  

Risk-free interest rate

    0.6%-2.0%       0.9%-1.7%  

Forfeiture rate

    10.0%       10.0%  

Dividend yield

    0.0%       0.0%  

Expected life in years

    3.2 - 6.5       6.4  

 

The Company has never paid cash dividends. Expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s common stock over the period commensurate with the expected life of the options. The risk-free interest rate is based on rates published by the Federal Reserve Board. The contractual term of the options was ten years through November 20, 2013 and then changed to seven years. The expected life is based on observed and expected time to post-vesting exercise. The expected forfeiture rate is based on past experience and employee retention data. Forfeitures are estimated at the time of the grant and revised in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. Such revision adjustments to expense will be recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period in which the estimate is changed.

 

As of September 30, 2014, there was approximately $400,000 of total unrecognized compensation costs related to outstanding employee stock options. This amount is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.4 years. To the extent the forfeiture rate is different from what the Company anticipated; stock-based compensation related to these awards will be different from the Company’s expectations.

 

Stock Option Summary Information

 

A summary of activity for the Company’s stock option plans as of September 30, 2014 and 2013 is presented below:

 

   

Number

   

Weighted Average

 
   

of Shares

   

Exercise Price

 

Outstanding October 1, 2013

    2,394,476     $ 1.89  

Granted

    786,000     $ 1.77  

Forfeited/expired

    (37,000 )   $ 2.00  

Exercised

    (612,941 )   $ 0.89  

Outstanding September 30, 2014

    2,530,535     $