10-K/A 1 form10ka.htm ROYAL BANCSHARES OF PENNSYLVANIA INC 10-K A 12-31-2012 form10ka.htm


UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D. C.  20549


 
FORM 10-K/A
(Amendment No. 2)
(Mark One)
x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012

or

o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _______________________ to _______________________

Commission File Number 0-26366

ROYAL BANCSHARES OF PENNSYLVANIA, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Pennsylvania
 
23-2812193
(State of other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
732 Montgomery Avenue, Narberth, Pennsylvania
 
19072
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
 
(610) 668-4700
 
 
(Issuer’s telephone number, including area code)
 
 

 
(Former name, former address and former year, if changed since last report)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
Title of Each Class
 
 
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC
 
Class A Common Stock ($2.00 par value)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
Title of Each Class
 
 
 
None
 
Class B Common Stock ($0.10 par value)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
o Yes   x No
 


 
 

 
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act.
o Yes x No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 of 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes   x   No  o
 
Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding twelve months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes  x     No  o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes o   No x
 
The aggregate market value of the Registrant’s Common Stock held by non-affiliates is $9,601,130 based on the June 30, 2012 closing price of the Registrant’s Common Stock of $1.81 per share.
 
As of February 28, 2013, the Registrant had 10,933,150 and 2,020,449 shares outstanding of Class A and Class B common stock, respectively.
 
Documents Incorporated by Reference
 
None
 
 
 

 
 
Explanatory Note
 
Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. (the “Company” or “Royal”) is filing this Amendment No. 2 on Form 10-K/A to its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012 (the “Original Form 10-K Filing”), which was originally filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 27, 2013, and amended by the 10-K/A filed by Royal on April 30, 2013 (“Amendment No.1”), solely to (i) revise the information contained in the column titled “Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings” in the Summary Compensation Table and footnote 2 thereto contained in Item 11of Part III of Amendment No. 1 and (ii) reflect changes in the number of shares as to which Evelyn R. Tabas has shared voting power as reported in the table titled “Principal Shareholders” and in the table showing the shares owned by directors and executive officers in Item 12 of Part III of Amendment No. 1. In addition, in accordance with Rule 12b-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), Item 15 of Part IV of the Original Form 10-K Filing has been amended and restated solely to include as exhibits new certifications by the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer.
 
Except as expressly set forth herein, this Amendment does not reflect events occurring after the date of the Original Form 10-K Filing or modify or update any of the other disclosures contained therein in any way other than as required to reflect the amendments discussed above.  Accordingly, this Amendment No. 2 should be read in conjunction with the Original Form 10-K Filing, Amendment No. 1, and the Company’s other filings with the SEC.
 
 
 

 
 
Table of Contents
 
 
 
PART III.
 
ITEM 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
 
General
 
Rules and Responsibilities
 
The primary purpose of the Corporation’s Compensation Committee is to periodically review and recommend to the independent directors of the Corporation the compensation for the Corporation’s directors and certain senior executive officers (the “Tier 1 Executives”), and to periodically review the compensation of the other executive officers and employees of the Corporation as determined by the Salary Committee created during 2009 (discussed below).  The Committee also has overall responsibility for recommending, approving and evaluating the compensation plans, policies and programs of the Corporation and its subsidiaries.  Direct responsibilities of the Committee include:
 
 
At least annually reviewing and approving corporate goals and objectives relevant to the compensation of the Tier 1 Executives, evaluating the performance of Tier 1 Executives in light of such goals and objectives, and recommending to the independent directors the compensation levels of the Tier 1 Executives, including base salary, annual incentive opportunity level, long-term incentive opportunity level, and the terms of any agreements, based on such evaluation.  In recommending the long-term incentive component of the compensation of the Tier 1 Executives, the Committee considers the Corporation’s performance and relative shareholder return, the value of similar incentive awards to senior executive officers at comparable companies, the awards given to the Tier 1 Executives in past years, and other factors it deems appropriate.
 
 
At least annually reviewing the material performance criteria used by the Salary Committee in evaluating executive officers other than the Tier 1 Executives and the material criteria used in establishing appropriate compensation, retention, incentive, severance, and benefit policies and programs applicable to such executive officers.
 
 
Periodically reviewing and making recommendations to the board of directors with respect to the adoption of or substantive changes in material employee benefit plans, bonus, incentive compensation, severance, equity-based or other compensation, or incentive plans of the Corporation and its subsidiaries.
 
 
Administering and having authority to recommend awards, subject to approval of the board of directors, under the Corporation’s long-term incentive plans, subject to the terms of the applicable plans.
 
 
 
Annually reviewing and determining the compensation of directors, subject to the approval of independent directors acting in executive session.
 
 
For so long as the Corporation has outstanding securities issued to the United States Department of the Treasury under the Troubled Asset Relief Program’s (“TARP”) Capital Purchase Program, reviewing executive compensation to ensure compliance with applicable legal requirements of that program.
 
The role of management is to provide the Committee with reviews and recommendations for the Committee’s consideration, and to manage the Corporation’s executive compensation programs, policies and governance (as they relate to compensation).  Direct responsibilities of management in this process include:
 
 
Providing an ongoing review of the effectiveness of the compensation programs, including competitiveness, and alignment with the Corporation’s objectives.
 
 
Recommending changes, if necessary, to ensure achievement of all program objectives.
 
 
Recommending compensation levels and/or incentive awards for key executive officers other than the Tier 1 Executives.
 
As described below, the Chief Executive Officer serves on the Salary Committee, which is responsible for determining certain compensation-related matters for officers of the Bank who are not Tier 1 Executives.

During 2009, the Compensation Committee recommended to the board of directors, and the board of directors approved, the creation of a separate “Salary Committee” to determine certain compensation-related matters for employees other than the Tier 1 Executive Officers.  With respect to these other employees, the Salary Committee generally sets: (i) the overall compensation strategy for each of these employees in order to align the compensation mix (including differences in the relative mix of compensation between these various levels of executive management) with the Corporation’s overall philosophy; (ii) the performance standards for each of these employees by title; and (iii) the base and annual target incentive compensation for each of these employees (including the types of performance criteria to be used to determine incentive compensation, which shall align the performance of these employees to the Corporation’s overall performance objectives established by the board of directors).  The Salary Committee currently consists of the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Administrative and Risk Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, and the head of Human Resources.
 
During 2009, the Committee retained the services of Mosteller and Associates as compensation consultants to assist in the continual development and evaluation of compensation policies and the Committee’s determinations of compensation awards.  The role of Mosteller and Associates is to provide independent, third-party advice and expertise in executive compensation issues.  Mosteller and Associates was solely an advisor to the Committee, and did not provide other services to the Corporation or Bank. Mosteller and Associates provided salary surveys and other compensation consulting services during 2012 for the Compensation and Salary Committees.
 
 
Discussion of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis with Management and Advisors
 
The Committee Chair has discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis with members of management, including the Chairman and President and Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation.  The Committee Chair has also discussed the Compensation Disclosure and Analysis with the Corporation’s outside legal counsel, Stevens & Lee, P.C., and Mosteller and Associates, a compensation advisor to the Committee.
 
Executive Compensation Program Objectives
 
1.  Compensation Objectives
 
The chief compensation objectives of the Corporation for executive officers and directors are to (i) establish compensation programs that are competitive in the banking industry so that the Corporation can attract, motivate and retain talented, competent and experienced management and directorship, (ii) set compensation based upon certain performance measurements so that pay is aligned with performance, (iii) benchmark the Corporation’s performance against peer groups (see below for description) to verify that pay levels versus performance are consistent with pay/performance levels in the banking industry, and (iv) align the objectives of the Corporation’s management and directorship with the objectives of the Corporation’s shareholders.
 
Overall, the Corporation strives to design its compensation program to permit the Corporation to:
 
 
support its business plan and strategy by clearly setting forth what is expected of executives with respect to financial results and goals and by rewarding achievement of said results and goals;
 
 
allow for recruiting and retaining executive talent; and
 
 
align management performance and their interests with the interests of the Corporation’s shareholders.
 
During 2009, the Committee engaged Mosteller and Associates to update its previous report, issued in June 2007, on executive compensation for the Corporation. The updated Mosteller Report, dated July 14, 2009 and revised in December 2009 (the “Mosteller Report”), included an analysis of the Tier 1 executive positions at the Corporation compared to published databases including Watson Wyatt (regional banks in Mid-Atlantic region and nationwide with asset size from $900 million to $2 billion); CompAnalyst (financial services firms in Mid-Atlantic with average asset size $1-$10 billion); ERI (financial services firms in Mid-Atlantic with average asset size $1.5 billion) and to a custom peer group consisting of 19 regional banks  selected by Mosteller which were deemed by Mosteller to be regionally comparable to the Corporation. The data from the custom peer group was accorded the greatest weight by the consultant.  The data for the peer group was gathered from each institution’s 2009 proxy statements and included executive compensation reported for 2008.
 
Of the nineteen regional financial institutions selected by the consultant, thirteen of the institutions were located in Pennsylvania, two in New Jersey, one in Maryland, one in Delaware, and two in New York.  The institutions ranged in asset size from $950 million to $2.1 billion.
 
The depository institutions used in the peer group were as follows:
 
 
1st National Community Bancorp
Abington Bancorp
ACNB Corp.
Alliance Financial Corp.
AmeriServ Financial Corp.
The Bancorp, Inc.
Bryn Mawr Bank Corp.
Canandaigua National Corp.
Center Bancorp, Inc.
Citizens & Northern Corp.
First Chester County Corp.
Orrstown Financial Corp.
Parkvale Financial Corp.
Peapack-Gladstone Financial Corp.
Metro Bancorp
Republic First Bancorp Inc.
Shore Bancshares, Inc.
Univest Corporation of PA.
VIST Financial Corp.
   
 
Certain of the major conclusions included in the 2009 Mosteller Report utilized by the Committee were as follows:
 
 
Base pay for the five Tier 1 executive positions was competitive with base salaries in the peer group, with the exception of the base salary for the Chief Executive Officer, which was substantially below peer levels.
 
 
With respect to total compensation, based on peer group comparison, Royal was substantially below market for the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer positions and below, but within 20% of, the market for the other three Tier 1 Executive positions.  The absence of an annual bonus was a major reason for the disparity between the Corporation’s Tier 1 Executives and comparable peer positions.
 
Given the Company’s operating losses in recent years, base salaries for named executive officer positions have not increased substantially, and there have been no cash bonuses or stock awards made to our named executive officers.  Accordingly, the Committee has not to date updated the Mosteller Report from 2009.  The Committee may update the Mosteller Report or seek other independent peer group information or analyses in 2013 or thereafter consistent with improvements in profitability.
 
2.   Intent of Program Design
 
The Corporation has historically sought to achieve its compensation objectives by offering the following key elements of executive compensation:
 
 
base salary;
 
 
performance-based bonus program, paid in cash;
 
 
periodic (generally annual) grants of long-term, equity-based compensation;  This is comprised generally of stock option grants, however, a portion of this element may be paid in the form of restricted stock and other types of long-term, equity-based components (subject to Committee recommendation and independent director approval).  Awards of restricted stock will be generally performance-based, requiring the achievement of specific goals; and
 
 
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan.
 
The Corporation intends that the design of the elements of its compensation program reward executive management and directorship for profitability, longevity, profitable growth, price appreciation of the Corporation’s stock and having high standards of ethics and integrity.
 
The Corporation recently adopted a policy of tying incentive compensation to the attainment of long-term strategic objectives as approved from time to time by the Board of Directors.  Accordingly, the incentive compensation formula and current total compensation parameters have been frozen pending a return to profitability, and, at such time, the ability to receive bonuses or other forms of equity compensation will be aligned with the attainment of specific metric objectives contained in the Corporation’s annually updated strategic plan.  All performance pay plans also contain provisions that the amount due an executive under the plan can be reduced or eliminated altogether for unethical behavior.
 
 
To encourage employee retention and long-term service to the Corporation, the Corporation offers an omnibus long-term incentive plan, intended to focus executives on market appreciation of the stock price, thereby further aligning the interests of the executives with those of the Corporation’s shareholders under which the Committee could recommend the issuance of stock options, restricted stock (generally performance-based, requiring the achievement of specific goals primarily tied to the Corporation’s long-term strategic plan) and other long term equity compensation (subject to subsequent full Board of Directors approval).  In addition, the Corporation provides a Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan and employment contracts to certain executive officers.
 
As further described herein, certain elements of the Corporation’s executive compensation program are affected by the Corporation’s participation in the TARP Capital Purchase Program.  Those restrictions and limitations will generally continue to apply during the time that the Department of the Treasury continues to hold the Series A Preferred Stock issued in February 2009.
 
3.  Elements of Compensation
 
Base Salary
 
The objective of base salary is to reflect job duties, inherent value of the executive to the Corporation, and performance of the executive considering market competitiveness.
 
The Committee has and continues to rely, in large part, on the Mosteller Report to determine base salary for the Tier 1 Executives.  The amount of any increase in the base salaries from year to year and the base salaries are evaluated by the Committee using a number of factors, including the following:
 
 
Requirements and responsibilities of the position along with, if available, salary norms for executives in comparable positions at peers;
 
 
Expertise of the individual executive;
 
 
Market competition for services of similar executives;
 
 
Advice from Mosteller and Associates, and any other third-party advisor that the Committee may engage; and
 
 
Recommendations of the Chief Executive Officer (except with respect to his own compensation).
 
Base salaries are generally reviewed annually, with third-party analysis performed generally every two to three years.  The most recent third-party analysis of base salaries was performed by Mosteller and Associates commencing in the second quarter of 2009 and resulting in the issuance of the Mosteller Report (referenced above).
 
For 2012, the Committee elected not to increase the base salaries of, and not to award any cash or other bonuses or grant any long-term equity based compensation to, the Corporation’s named executive officers, except for Robert Kuehl when he was appointed as Chief Administrative Officer of the Corporation in July 2012 and Michael Thompson when he was appointed as Chief Financial Officer of the Corporation in September 2012.
 
 
Performance-Based Bonus Plan
 
The Corporation’s objective under the Performance-Based Bonus Plan (“Bonus Plan”) is to ensure that executive officers and staff are focused on profitability. The Committee has shifted its emphasis on payouts under the Bonus Plan to the attainment of the long-term strategic objectives of the Corporation as approved by the board of directors, which are updated at least annually.  As a result, the Committee intends that executive incentive compensation be tied to the attainment of those strategic objectives as well as the attainment of specific individual milestones in connection with the attainment of such strategic objectives and that, generally, and that the award of performance-based incentive compensation will be suspended until the Corporation returns to profitability.  The Committee reserves the right, however, to recommend to the independent directors an award for exceptional performance in individual circumstances.
 
For 2012, there were no payments made to any employee, including any of the named executives, under the Bonus Plan or otherwise.  In addition, as previously noted, during any time that the Corporation is participating in the TARP Capital Purchase Program, the Corporation would be prohibited from making any bonus payments to its five most highly compensated employees other than in long-term restricted stock.  For 2012, the Committee did not recommend the issuance of any long-term restricted stock to any employee in lieu of payments under the Bonus Plan.
 
Long-term Incentive Compensation (Equity-based Plan)
 
The long-term incentive program, which is an equity-based omnibus long-term incentive plan approved by shareholders in 2007 (the “LTIP”), permits a periodic award, generally intended to be annual, to the named executive officers and other key staff members.  The chief program objective is to align executive officer compensation over a multi-year period directly with the interests of shareholders by rewarding the creation and preservation of long-term shareholder value.  In addition to providing for the issuance of incentive and nonqualified stock options, the LTIP contains a restricted stock component, which over the life of the LTIP may not exceed 250,000 shares of the 1,000,000 total shares authorized under the LTIP.  A restricted stock award is an award of common stock that is subject to restrictions on transfer until certain vesting requirements are satisfied, which may include one or more performance goals set by the Committee.  The Committee recommends, subject to board of directors approval, the terms and conditions of each restricted stock award.  By permitting the use of vesting provisions and performance criteria for awards, the program is intended to encourage executive officers to create and maintain stock value, while also providing an incentive to continue employment with the Corporation, thus helping the Corporation to retain talented, motivated and forward-thinking executives.
 
Under the LTIP, if a participant terminates employment or service due to death, disability, retirement, or is involuntarily terminated other than for cause, the participant may exercise a vested stock option at any time within five years after such termination (unless a shorter time period is provided in the grant agreement), up to the expiration date of the term of such stock option.  If a participant voluntarily terminates employment or service (other than by reason of retirement), the participant may exercise a vested stock option at any time within three months after such termination (unless a shorter time period is provided in the grant agreement), up to the expiration date of the term of such stock option.  If a participant’s termination is for cause, the participant forfeits all outstanding stock options.  The board of directors also has the ability to terminate outstanding stock options if the board of directors determines that the participant has engaged in a “harmful activity” in relation to the Corporation (generally, certain unauthorized uses of confidential information or the solicitation of employees or customers during or for a period of six months following employment).
 
 
The exercise or strike price for a stock option under the LTIP is set at fair market value, defined as the closing trading price for the Corporation’s stock on the NASDAQ Stock Market on the date of grant.  The Corporation will not grant stock options with exercise prices below fair market value.  The Corporation will not reduce the exercise price of outstanding options below the fair market value exercise price that was set at the original time of grant.
 
No shares of restricted stock were granted under the LTIP to any participant, including the Tier 1 Executives, during 2012, 2011 or 2010.
 
No stock options were granted under the LTIP to any participant, including the Tier 1 Executives during 2012, 2011 and 2010.
 
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan
 
The Corporation maintains a non-contributory, non-qualified, defined benefit pension plan commonly known as a Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan or SERP.  Twenty-six persons are currently participants in the SERP of which eleven are active employees and the remaining fifteen are either retired or no longer employed.  The SERP is a non-qualified, defined benefit plan.  The Committee selects key employees to participate in the SERP based on their perceived value to the Corporation, their position and labor market competition for individuals in similar job positions and similar talent.  Messrs. Tabas, McSwiggan and Stempel participate in the SERP and due to their retirements in 2012, will receive benefits in 2013.  The SERP provides retirement benefits under trust contracts, funded by death benefits payable under corporate owned and bank owned life insurance contracts.  For additional information, please see the information under the caption “Retirement Plans.”
 
4.  Compliance with Current Treasury Programs on Executive Compensation

In connection with our issuance to the United States Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) of Series A Preferred Stock and an accompanying warrant on February 20, 2009, we agreed that our compensation, bonus, incentive and other benefit plans, arrangements and agreements, including severance and employment agreements, will comply with the executive compensation and corporate governance requirements of Section 111(b) of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (the “EESA”) and applicable guidance or regulations issued by the Secretary of the Treasury. Those restrictions include, among other things, limits on compensation to exclude incentives for “senior executive officers,” as defined below, to take unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the institution receiving funds made available by the Treasury under the Capital Purchase Program or any other obligation arising from financial assistance provided under the TARP created by the EESA during the period while any TARP obligation remains outstanding.

Under the EESA, the applicable executive compensation restrictions apply in 2012 to the compensation of our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and our next three most highly compensated executive officers (collectively, the “senior executive officers”). In some cases, as a result of the passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 discussed below, the executive compensation restrictions may also apply to certain non-senior executive officers. In addition, in connection with the issuance of the Series A Preferred Stock to Treasury, each of the senior executive officers and certain other employees were required to execute a waiver of any claim against Treasury or the Corporation for any changes to such person’s compensation or benefits that are required to comply with Treasury regulations.
 
 
On February 17, 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (“ARRA”) was signed into law. The ARRA amended Section 111(b) of the EESA in its entirety.  The ARRA had significant implications on the compensation arrangements of institutions, such as the Corporation, which accepted government funds under the Capital Purchase Program or other assistance under TARP. The ARRA directs the Secretary of the Treasury to establish standards and promulgate regulations on executive compensation practices of TARP Capital Purchase Program recipients, which generally had the effect of restricting program participants’ compensation practices. The ARRA’s restrictions apply to the Corporation, its compensation policies and its executive officers and certain other highly compensated employees in several ways, including the following:

 
Bonuses and Incentive Compensation: The Corporation is generally prohibited from paying or accruing certain bonus, retention award or incentive compensation to certain highly compensated employees. This restriction applies to the Corporation’s five most highly compensated employees (or such higher number as the Secretary of the Treasury may determine is in the public interest).  The statute also permits bonus, retention or incentive compensation paid to subject employees in the form of restricted stock provided that: the vesting period is a minimum of two years; the restricted stock does not fully vest during the period in which Treasury retains its investment (for each 25% of total assistance repaid, 25% of the award may become vested); and the amount of restricted stock granted is not greater than 1/3 of the total amount of annual compensation of the employee receiving the restricted stock.  The Corporation is generally prohibited from paying or accruing any bonus, retention award, or incentive compensation to the Corporation’s five most highly compensated employees (whether or not they are also executive officers).
 
 
Severance Payments: The TARP Capital Purchase Program previously imposed limitations on the ability of the Corporation to make “golden parachute payments” to the Corporation’s top five senior executive officers (i.e., an individual who is the CEO, CFO, or one of the next three most highly compensated executive officers, who are identified in the Corporation’s Annual Report or Proxy Statement for a given year, reporting compensation for the immediately preceding fiscal year). The ARRA expanded the application of the golden parachute limitations to the next five most highly compensated employees of the Corporation. A “golden parachute payment” includes any payment for departure from a company for any reason, except for payments for services performed or benefits accrued.  It includes the acceleration of vesting of equity awards or other compensation.  A golden parachute payment does not include certain payments from qualified or similar plans; for current or prior services that would be made regardless of whether the employee departs; or from welfare benefit plans and deferred compensation plans if specific requirements are satisfied.
 
 
Clawbacks: The ARRA requires recipients to recover (or “clawback”) any bonus, retention award, or incentive compensation paid to any one of its top five senior executive officers or to any of the next five most highly compensated employees and its next 20 most highly compensated employees based on statements of earnings, revenues, gains, or other criteria that are later found to be based on materially inaccurate financial statements or any other materially inaccurate performance metric criteria. Furthermore, the ARRA requires the Secretary of the Treasury to review bonuses, retention awards and other compensation paid to the senior executive officers and the next 20 most highly compensated employees to determine whether such payments were consistent with the purposes of the EESA, the ARRA, and TARP Capital Purchase Program and in the public interest. The Corporation is required to exercise its claw-back rights except in limited circumstances.
 
 
 
Anti-Manipulation. The ARRA prohibits any compensation plan that would encourage manipulation of reported earnings to enhance the compensation of any of the Corporation’s employees.
 
 
No Gross-Ups.  The Corporation is prohibited from providing any gross-ups to its senior executive officers and next 20 most highly compensated employees. For this purpose, a “gross-up” is defined as any reimbursement for taxes owed with respect to any compensation, other than certain payments under a tax equalization agreement.
 
The ARRA also affects certain other executive compensation policies and practices:

 
The Corporation’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are required to provide a written certification to the SEC of compliance with the executive compensation restrictions described in the EESA, as modified by the ARRA.
 
 
The Board of Directors enacted a company-wide policy regarding excessive or luxury expenditures on October 21, 2009. This includes policies on entertainment, events, office and facility renovations, air and other travel and other activities or events that are not reasonable expenditures for staff development, reasonable performance incentives or other similar measures conducted in the normal course of business. The Corporation’s excessive and luxury expenditures policy is posted on its website at www.royalbankamerica.com under the heading “Regulatory Filings” located on the “Investor Relations” page.
 
 
For years in which Treasury owns shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Corporation may not claim a deduction on compensation paid to a senior executive officer in excess of the $500,000 compensation deduction limit of Section 162(m)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code. Moreover, the exception contained in Section 162(m) of the Code for performance-based pay not counting against this limit, will not be available.
 
 
For years in which Treasury owns shares of the Series A Preferred Stock, the Corporation is required to submit a proposal allowing our shareholders to cast an advisory vote on the compensation paid to our named executive officers pursuant to the policies and programs described in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis and disclosed in the tables and narrative disclosure included in this Proxy Statement.
 
The compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to employees of the Corporation, including the named executive officers, for 2012 was subject to and complied with the requirements applicable to participants in the TARP Capital Purchase Program.
 
In connection with our participation in the Capital Purchase Program, the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors discussed, evaluated, and reviewed with the Corporation’s Senior Risk Officer all of the Corporation’s employee compensation programs in light of the risks posed to the Corporation by such programs and how to limit such risks and to assess whether any aspect of these programs would encourage any of our employees to manipulate reported earnings to enhance their compensation. The Compensation Committee of the board of directors also discussed, evaluated, and reviewed with the Corporation’s Senior Risk Officer all of the compensation programs in which the named executive officers participate to assess whether any aspect of these programs would encourage any of our named executive officers to take any unnecessary or excessive risks that could threaten the value of the Corporation.  The Compensation Committee met with the Corporation’s Senior Risk Officer on June 27, 2012 and December 19, 2012 with respect to the foregoing.
 
 
At the end of this review, the Compensation Committee concluded that none of our current compensation programs for our named executive officers encourage excessive and unnecessary risk-taking that would threaten the value of the Corporation and that none of our employee compensation programs pose any unnecessary risks to the Corporation or encourage the manipulation of earnings to enhance the compensation of our employees. A summary of the Compensation Committee’s rationale for this conclusion for each compensation program is set forth below.
 
Compensation Program
Reason Why Program Does Not Encourage Excessive and Unnecessary Risk or the Manipulation of Earnings
     
Base Salary and Health and Welfare Benefits
Compensation levels are generally fixed for these programs and changes are primarily driven by comparisons to peers. Current compensation levels are comparable to or below our peers.
  While increases in base salary may result from individual performance, the Corporation’s overall performance and salaries paid by peers are primarily considered before granting such an increase.
     
SERP
Long vesting periods discourage our employees from engaging in activities that could result in their termination, including activities that pose excessive and unnecessary risks to the Corporation’s value.
  Caps exist on the amounts distributed.
     
Performance-Based Bonus Plan
Awards are subject to recovery by the Corporation in the event the payment was based on materially inaccurate financial statements or any other materially inaccurate performance metric criteria.
  This Plan has been suspended until profitability improves.
  ARRA prohibits bonus payments to the five most highly compensated employees.
  Awards are subject to forfeiture in the event of unethical behavior.
     
Long-Term Incentive
Compensation Plan (Equity Based)
Awards are subject to recovery by the Corporation in the event the payment was based on materially inaccurate financial statements or any other materially inaccurate performance metric criteria.
 
  Vesting schedules can be matched to align with timetables for Corporation’s long-term goals.
  The five most highly compensated employees are not eligible to receive stock options under ARRA.
  The size and the vesting of any restricted stock awards to the Corporation’s five most highly compensated employees are restricted under ARRA.
  No awards were made under Plan for 2012.
 
 
III. Director Compensation

Similar to executive officers and staff, the Corporation desires to attract and retain talented, motivated and competent directors for its board of directors.  The Corporation has established key objectives for board compensation of encouraging longevity and attendance at meetings. To facilitate this, the Corporation has designed compensation and long-term incentives for its board members. Please see the below “Director Compensation Table” section for more information and narrative.

IV. Tables and other narrative disclosures

Summary Compensation Table

Below is the “Summary Compensation Table for the principal executive officer, the principal financial officer, two other most highly compensated executive officers serving at the end of 2012, and one other former executive officer who retired during 2012.

Summary Compensation Table
                                   
Change In Pension Value
             
     
 
   
 
               
Non -Equity
   
and Nonqualified
   
All Other
       
     
 
   
 
   
Stock
   
Option
   
Incentive Plan
   
Deferred Compensation
   
Compensation
   
Total
 
Name and Principal
   
Salary
   
Bonus
   
Awards
   
Awards
   
Compensation
   
Earnings
             
Position
Year
 
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($) (1)
   
($)
   
($) (2)
   
($) (3)
   
($)
 
                                                   
Robert R. Tabas
2012
    256,750       -       -       -       -       218,375       110       475,235  
Principal Executive Officer
2011
    256,750       -       -       -       -       365,533       2,500       624,783  
Chairman and CEO (4)
2010
    256,750       -       -       -       -       164,273       -       421,023  
                                                                   
James J. McSwiggan
2012
    197,616       -       -       -       -       173,219       186,523       557,358  
President and COO (5)
2011
    367,000       -       -       -       -       475,540       2,500       845,040  
 
2010
    367,000       -       -       -       -       221,240       -       588,240  
                                                                   
Murray Stempel III
2012
    225,560       -       -       -       -       209,660       110       435,330  
Vice Chairman (6)
2011
    225,560       -       -       -       -       338,750       2,500       566,810  
 
2010
    225,560       -       -       -       -       159,514       -       385,074  
                                                                   
Robert A. Kuehl
2012
    229,260       -       -       -       -       -       110       229,370  
Chief Administrative Officer (7)
2011
    206,000       -       -       -       -       -       2,500       208,500  
 
2010
    200,049       -       -       -       -       -       -       200,049  
                                                                   
Michael S. Thompson
2012
    180,000       -       -       -       -       -       31,666       211,666  
Principal Finanical Officer
                                                                 
Chief Financial Officer (8)
                                                                 

 
(1)
Amounts calculated using the provisions of Financial Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718.  Amounts represent the aggregate grant date fair value of stock options and restricted stock awards made during the applicable fiscal year.  The assumptions used in the calculation of these amounts are included in Note 16 “Stock Compensation Plans” in the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” included in the Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012.
 
(2)
The Corporation’s non-qualified deferred compensation plan provides retirement benefits that are based upon years of service and the employee’s compensation. The increase in value reflects the increase in number of years of service in 2012 and the change in the discount rate. See Note 16 “Pension Plans” within the Annual Report on Form 10-K. Amounts listed for 2010 and 2011 have been revised from amounts previously disclosed to correct errors in prior year's actuarial calculations.
 
(3)
Please see the table below for a breakdown of the terms and amounts comprising All Other Compensation.
 
(4)
Mr. Tabas served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation during 2012 and until the appointment of F. Kevin Tylus as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation on February 20, 2013.  Mr. Tabas also served Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Royal Bank America until the appointment of F. Kevin Tylus as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Bank on December 18, 2012.  Mr. Tabas continues to serve as Chairman and a director of both the Corporation and Royal Bank America.
 
 
 
(5)
Mr. McSwiggan retired effective June 30, 2012.  In connection with his retirement, Mr. McSwiggan and the Corporation entered into a six-month consulting agreement effective July 1, 2012.  Amounts paid to Mr. McSwiggan under his consulting agreement from July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 are included under the column All Other Compensation.
 
(6)
Mr. Stempel served as Vice Chairman of the Corporation and Royal Bank America until his retirement from that position on December 31, 2012.  Mr. Stempel continues to serve as a director of the Corporation and Royal Bank America.
 
(7)
Mr. Kuehl served as the Chief Financial Officer of the Corporation and Royal Bank America until September 2012 when he was appointed Chief Administrative Officer of the Corporation and Royal Bank America.
 
(8)
Mr. Thompson served as the Corporation’s Chief Accounting Officer until September 2012 when he was appointed Chief Financial Officer of the Corporation and Royal Bank America.
 
           The following table sets forth information identifying the items and amounts that comprise All Other Compensation reflected in the “Summary Compensation Table” above.

Components of All Other Compensation
 
             401 (k)                          
     
Automobile
   
Employer
   
Director
   
Club dues
   
Other
       
 
 
 
Benefit
   
Contribution
   
Fees
   
Allowance
   
Compensation
   
Total
 
Name
Year
 
($) (1)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($) (2)
   
($)
 
                                         
Robert R. Tabas
2012
    -       110       -       -       -       110  
 
2011
    -       2,500       -       -       -       2,500  
 
2010
    -       -       -       -       -       -  
                                                   
James J. McSwiggan
2012
    -       -       -       -       186,523       186,523  
 
2011
    -       2,500       -       -       -       2,500  
 
2010
    -       -       -       -               -  
                                                   
Murray Stempel III
2012
    -       110       -       -       -       110  
 
2011
    -       2,500       -       -       -       2,500  
 
2010
    -       -       -       -       -       -  
                                                   
Robert A. Kuehl
2012
    -       110       -       -       -       110  
 
2011
    -       2,500       -       -       -       2,500  
 
2010
    -       -       -       -       -       -  
                                                   
Michael S. Thompson
2012
    4,783       110       -       -       26,773       31,666  
                                                   
 
 
(1)
For Mr. Thompson, the Automobile Benefit reflects the value of the benefit for the use of a company owned vehicle.
 
(2)
For Mr. McSwiggan, the Other Compensation reflects the fees received as a resulting of a consulting agreement following his retirement on June 30, 2012 and the payout of unused PTO.  For Mr. Thompson, the Other Compensation reflects a retention payment and previously unpaid PTO.

The table does not include benefits provided all employees under plans such as medical health coverage, disability coverage, life insurance and benefits made available under cafeteria plans.
 
 
Grants of Plan-Based Awards- 2012

Management of the Corporation utilizes input from professional advisors, publications and similar sources in determining practices and terms of the LTIP to develop recommendations to the Committee.  This would also include recommending new key staff as participants in the LTIP.  Management may also from time to time give the Committee input on the aggregate amount of options and/or restricted stock to be awarded under the LTIP during a fiscal year, and changes to award allocation methods.  Management does not make any recommendation on awards for the Chief Executive Officer.  The Committee then takes the input from management and consults with its compensation consultant, Mosteller and Associates, and other advisors in formulating the Committee’s recommendation to the independent directors for the adoption of any plan changes, allocation changes or awards of stock options and or restricted stock. In general, any actions that the Committee takes with respect to the grants of awards and the terms and conditions of such awards and the modification thereof are subject to the review and approval by the full board.  The grants are issued on the date the board of directors provides its approval after considering the Committee’s recommendation.

There were no grants of stock options to the named executive officers during 2012.

Outstanding Equity Awards Table
 
The table that follows provides information on outstanding stock options awarded to the named executives as of December 31, 2012.  Each stock option grant vests ratably 20% per year beginning on the first anniversary of the grant date.  Each restricted stock award vests three years from the grant date.
 
 
Outstanding Equity Awards Table
 
                                       
   
Option Awards
 
Stock Awards
 
               
Equity Incentive
                     
               
Plan Awards
                     
   
Number of
   
Number of
   
Number of
           
Number of
   
Market Value
 
   
Securities
   
Securities
   
Securities
           
Shares or Units
   
of Shares or
 
   
Underlying
   
Underlying
   
Underlying
   
Option
     
of Stock That
   
Units of Stock
 
   
Unexercised
   
Unexercised
   
Unexercised
   
Exercise
 
Option
 
Have Not
   
That Have
 
Name and Principal
 
Options (#)
   
Options (#)
   
Unearned
   
Price
 
Expiration
 
Vested
   
Not Vested
 
Position
 
Exercisable
   
Unexercisable
   
Options(#)
   
($)
 
Date
    (#)    
($)
 
                                         
Robert R. Tabas
    9,497       -       -     $ 18.27  
04/21/13
    -     $ -  
Principal Executive Officer
    20,679       -       -     $ 22.38  
04/22/14
    -     $ -  
Chairman and CEO
    9,333       -       -     $ 21.88  
06/16/15
    -     $ -  
      11,901       -       -     $ 21.78  
06/29/16
    -     $ -  
      5,486       -       -     $ 20.08  
07/18/17
    -     $ -  
      7,480       1,870       -     $ 4.50  
10/07/18
    -     $ -  
                                                   
Murray Stempel, III
    7,914       -       -     $ 18.27  
04/21/13
    -     $ -  
Vice Chairman
    17,231       -       -     $ 22.38  
04/22/14
    -     $ -  
      7,779       -       -     $ 21.88  
06/16/15
    -     $ -  
      10,160       -       -     $ 21.78  
06/29/16
    -     $ -  
      4,600       -       -     $ 20.08  
07/18/17
    -     $ -  
      6,240       1,560       -     $ 4.50  
10/07/18
    -     $ -  
                                                   
Robert A Kuehl
    5,200       1,300       -     $ 4.50  
10/07/18
    -     $ -  
Chief Administrative Officer
                                                 
                                                   
Michael S. Thompson
    975       -       -     $ 18.27  
04/21/13
    -     $ -  
Principal Financial Officer
    2,219       -       -     $ 22.38  
04/22/14
    -     $ -  
Chief Financial Officer
    2,022       -       -     $ 21.88  
06/16/15
    -     $ -  
      2,112       -       -     $ 21.78  
06/29/16
    -     $ -  
      1,109       -       -     $ 20.08  
07/18/17
    -     $ -  
      3,760       940       -     $ 4.50  
10/07/18
    -     $ -  
                                                   


Option Exercises and Stock Vested Table

There were no stock options exercised by any of the named executive officers and no stock awards vested for any of the named executive officers during 2012.

Retirement Plans – Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation

In order to be competitive in the labor market for executive officers and other key staff, the Corporation provides retirement benefits under the SERP.  In addition to being competitive, offering the SERP helps meet the Corporation’s objective of retaining and attracting executive talent.

The SERP is a non-contributory, non-qualified, defined benefit pension plan.  This plan provides for retirement benefits to certain employees.  The SERP is unfunded, but death benefits payable under certain life insurance contracts which will reimburse the Corporation for retirement benefits paid to participants.

Benefits under the SERP are based on a percentage of the participant’s average highest consecutive three years base salary, and for certain executive officers 25% of the average of the performance bonus paid during the highest consecutive three years of base salary, multiplied by a percentage set for each class of participant.  Except for eleven employees who are vested in the SERP, any participant must be employed until retirement age to receive plan benefits.  Any participant who was added to the SERP on or after January 1, 2003 must have 10 consecutive years of service with the Corporation in order to be eligible for retirement benefits under the SERP.  Benefits payable under the SERP are limited by annual caps.  For the below chart, all of the persons named in the “Summary Compensation Table” are in Group 1. The caps and percentages applicable to each group are set forth below:

Class
 
Annual Cap
     
Percentage of Base
   
Percentage of Bonus
 
                     
Group 1
  $ 185,000  
Base component
    50 %     25 %
    $ 80,000  
Bonus component
               
                           
Group 2
  $ 50,000         35 %     0 %
                           
Group 3
  $ 20,000         20 %     0 %
 
Retirement age under the SERP is 60 years of age.  Actuarial equivalent means with respect to a given benefit, any other benefit provided under the terms of the SERP which has the same present or equivalent value on the date the given benefit payment commences, based on the use of actuarial equivalent factors adopted by the Corporation and being used to value the SERP liabilities at the time of the calculation.  Actuarial equivalence was determined using a 4% annual interest rate and current IRS mortality tables. The Corporation has engaged a third-party administrator who provides any required actuarial services.

The below table provides information on the estimated present value of retirement benefits payable under the SERP, the only retirement benefits offered by the Corporation outside of its 401(k) plan.  The value is based on the actuarial present value of the accumulated benefits provided under the plan.  Should a participant elect to retire at the early retirement age of 55, the benefits payable under the SERP are reduced by an actuarial equivalent of the amount of benefits that would be payable at normal retirement age of 60.
 
 
Please see above for information on how benefits payable under the SERP are calculated and applicable caps on benefits.  Retirement benefits are paid annually for the life of the participant, with a minimum guarantee of 10 years of benefits.  The Corporation accrues an expense each year for the cost of the SERP.  See below for information on how the accrual is made.

Using an average base salary of $198,133 and performance bonus of $141,782, which were derived from an average of the three highest consecutive years over a ten year period, Mr. Tabas would be entitled to a normal retirement benefit of 50% of $198,133, or $99,067 and 25% of $141,782, or $35,445.  The base salary cap of $185,000 and the performance bonus of $80,000 would not apply in this example.  In addition, as Mr. Tabas retired on December 31, 2012, plan rules require that the total benefit is reduced due to the Early Retirement Factor.  Therefore, the total annual benefit payable to Mr. Tabas is $98,345.

Using an average base salary of $236,500 and performance bonus of $192,419, which were derived from an average of the three highest consecutive years over a ten year period, Mr. McSwiggan would be entitled to a normal retirement benefit of 50% of $236,500, or $118,250 and 25% of $192,419, or $48,105.  The base salary cap of $185,000 and the performance bonus of $80,000 would not apply in this example. In addition, as Mr. McSwiggan retired on June 30, 2012, plan rules require that the total benefit is reduced due to the Early Retirement Factor.  Therefore, the total annual benefit payable to Mr. McSwiggan is $120,412.

Using an average base salary of $166,500 and performance bonus of $139,473, which were derived from an average of the three highest consecutive years over a ten year period, Mr. Stempel would be entitled to a normal retirement benefit of 50% of $166,500 or $83,250 and 25% of $139,473 or $34,868.  The base salary cap of $185,000 and the performance bonus of $80,000 would not apply in this example. In addition, as Mr. Stempel retired on December 31, 2012, plan rules require that the total benefit is reduced due to the Early Retirement Factor.  Therefore, the total annual benefit payable to Mr. Stempel is $91,735.

The preceding describes the actual annual retirement benefits that will be paid under the SERP to the named executives since each of them have retired.  As of December 31, 2012, Mr. Thompson and Mr. Kuehl were not participants in the Corporation’s SERP.

The non-qualified deferred Compensation table presented on the next page is the aggregate amount of the present value accruals from the date the named executive became a participant in the SERP through December 31, 2012.
 
 
Non- Qualified Deferred Compensation Table
 
Name and Principal Position
Plan Name
 
Number of
Years
Credited
Service (#)
   
Present
Value of Accumulated Benefit ($)
   
Payments
During
Last Fiscal
Year ($)
 
                     
Robert R. Tabas
Royal Bank America
    26     $ 1,700,108     $ -  
Principal Executive Officer
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan
                       
Chairman and CEO
                         
                           
James J. McSwiggan
Royal Bank America
    21     $ 2,095,590     $ -  
President and COO
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan
                       
                           
Murray Stempel, III
Royal Bank America
    19     $ 1,555,131     $ -  
Vice Chairman
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan
                       
                           
 
Under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the present value of the benefits to be received by the SERP participants over their actuarial lives, must be accrued and expensed by the Corporation during each year of the participant’s employment years with the Corporation.

Other than the SERP (described above), the Corporation does not maintain any non-qualified deferred compensation plans at this time.

Other Potential Post-Employment Payments

On February 20, 2009, the Corporation sold preferred stock to the Treasury under the TARP Capital Purchase Program.  As a result, pursuant to Section 111 of the EESA, the Corporation is prohibited from making any payments or accelerating any vesting with respect to the named executive officers and any of next five most highly compensated employees in connection with a separation from service or change in control (except for payments on account of death or disability or for services performed or benefits accrued) during the period in which any obligation arising from the sale of securities to Treasury remains outstanding.  In addition, as described in more detail in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” the Corporation’s participation in the TARP Capital Purchase Program may prohibit the named executive officers from participating in the Corporation’s bonus and incentive programs as set forth in their employment contracts.

If the Corporation’s obligations to Treasury were no longer outstanding, following a Change in Control as defined in the Corporation’s equity compensation plans, all outstanding unvested stock options held by named executive officers would immediately vest.  The Corporation does not presently have any other employment or change in control agreements that would result in potential post-employment payment obligations for the named executive officers.

Director Compensation Table

Director compensation is based on analysis conducted by the Corporation’s management and the Committee, and focuses on director compensation practices of its peers, especially those peers of similar asset size as the Corporation.  Fees paid to non-employee board members are as follows:
 
 
 
a)
Annual retainer of $10,000 (This retainer is paid quarterly.  Should a board member miss three meetings during a calendar year, any unpaid quarterly retainer is forfeited.); and

 
b)
A board meeting attendance fee of $1,250 per meeting (The board member must be present in person at the meeting in order to be entitled to receive the fee).
 
In previous years, board members received annual grants of stock options.  The exercise price for each option grant is set in the same manner as the Option Plan, detailed above.  However, no stock options have been granted for board service since 2008.

In addition, fees are paid to sub-committees of the board.  The Chair of the respective sub-committee may also be paid a fee different from non-Chair sub-committee members.  The principal committees and sub-committees of the board are the (i) Executive Loan Committee; (ii) Audit Committee; (iii) Compensation Committee; (iv) Investment Committee; (v) Nominating and Governance Committee; (vi) and Special Assets Committee.   Independent directors also receive fees for meetings of the independent directors which they attend.  With the exception of the Chair of the Audit Committee, the presiding director for the independent directors meetings and the Chair of the Compensation Committee, each outside director is paid $500 per committee meeting. Outside directors are compensated at the reduced per meeting rates of $300 for teleconference committee meetings and $400 for web-based meetings. The Chair of the Audit Committee is paid $750 per meeting, plus a monthly retainer of $1,000. The Lead Independent Director is paid a monthly retainer of $1,500.  The presiding director for meetings of the independent directors is paid $750 per meeting.

The following table provides information on payments made to all outside directors by the Corporation and subsidiaries during 2012.

Director Compensation Table
 
                                           
                           
Change in
             
                           
Pension
             
                           
Value and
             
   
Fees
               
Non-Equity
   
Nonqualified
             
   
Earned
         
 
   
Incentive
   
Deferred
   
All
       
   
or Paid
   
Stock
   
Option
   
Plan
   
Compensation
   
Other
       
 
 
in Cash
   
Awards
   
Awards
   
Compensation
   
Earnings
   
Compensation
   
Total
 
Director Name
 
($)
   
($) (1)
   
($) (1)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
   
($)
 
                                           
Edward F. Bradley
  $ 57,650     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 57,650  
William R. Hartman
  $ 58,100     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 58,100  
Wayne R. Huey, Jr.
  $ 13,300     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 13,300  
Anthony J. Micale (2)
  $ 29,717     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 29,717  
Michael J. Piracci
  $ 38,150     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 38,150  
Jay H. Shah (3)
  $ 7,100     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 7,100  
Linda Tabas Stempel
  $ 28,000     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 28,000  
Edward B. Tepper
  $ 42,500     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 42,500  
Gerard M. Thomchick
  $ 38,250     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 38,250  
Howard Wurzak
  $ 39,950     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 39,950  
 
 
(1)
No stock awards or stock options were made during 2012.
 
(2)
Mr. Micale’s service as a director ended in August of 2012 due to his resignation.
 
(3)
Mr. Shah’s service as a director ended in March of 2012 due to his resignation.

 
Outstanding Stock Options Held by Directors

The following table provides information on total outstanding stock options held by outside directors under the Director Plan at March 31, 2013:
 
Director Stock Options Table  
               
Number of
 
   
Number of
   
Number of
   
Securities
 
   
Securities
   
Securities
   
Underlying
 
   
Underlying
   
Underlying
   
Unexercised
 
   
Unexercised
   
Unexercised
   
Options (#)
 
   
Options (#)
   
Options (#)
   
Total
 
 Director Name
 
Exercisable
   
Unexercisable
   
Outstanding
 
                   
Edward F. Bradley
    -       -       -  
William R. Hartman
    -       -       -  
Wayne R. Huey, Jr.
    -       -       -  
Michael J. Piracci
    -       -       -  
Linda Tabas Stempel
    8,069       -       8,069  
Edward B. Tepper
    9,739       -       9,739  
Gerard M. Thomchick
    -       -       -  
Howard Wurzak
    9,739       -       9,739  
 
Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation
 
No member of the board of directors who served on the Compensation Committee during the fiscal year 2012 was an officer or employee of the Corporation or any if its subsidiaries. None of our executive officers serves as a member of the board of directors or Compensation Committee of any other entity that has one or more of its executive officers serving on our board of directors or Compensation Committee.

Compensation Committee Report

The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis above with management, and, based upon such review and discussion, has recommended to the Board of Directors that Compensation and Discussion and Analysis be included in this proxy statement and the Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012.

Additionally, the Compensation Committee certifies that as a participant in the U.S. Treasury’s TARP Capital Purchase Program:

1)   It has reviewed with the senior risk officer the senior executive officer (“SEO”) compensation plans and has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that these plans do not encourage SEOs to take unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the Corporation;
 
2)  It has reviewed with the senior risk officer the employee compensation plans and has made all reasonable efforts to limit any unnecessary risks these plans pose to the Corporation; and

3)  It has reviewed the employee compensation plans to eliminate any features of these plans that would encourage the manipulation of reported earnings of the Corporation to enhance the compensation of any employee.

Submitted by the Compensation Committee of the Corporation’s board of directors:

 
Edward B. Tepper, Chairman
 
William R. Hartman
 
Gerard M. Thomchick
 
 
ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS
 
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
 
The following tables provide certain information regarding securities issued or issuable under the Company’s equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2012:
 
Outside Director Stock Option Plan
 
Number of Securities
to be issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Weighted average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Number of securities
remaining available for
issuance under equity
plans (excluding
securities reflected in
first column)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plan approved by security holders
 
 
58,306
 
 
$
21.15
 
 
 
-
 
Equity compensation plan not approved by security holders
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
Total
 
 
58,306
 
 
$
21.15
 
 
 
-
 
 
Employee Stock Option Plan
 
Number of Securities
to be issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Weighted average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Number of securities
remaining available for
issuance under equity
plans (excluding
securities reflected in
first column)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plan approved by security holders
 
 
217,561
 
 
$
21.50
 
 
 
-
 
Equity compensation plan not approved by security holders
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
Total
 
 
217,561
 
 
$
21.50
 
 
 
-
 
 
Long Term Incentive Plan
 
Number of Securities
to be issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Weighted average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
 
 
Number of securities
remaining available for
issuance under equity
plans (excluding
securities reflected
in first column)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plan approved by security holders
 
 
86,226
 
 
$
9.22
 
 
 
808,928
 
Equity compensation plan not approved by security holders
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
 
 
-
 
Total
 
 
86,226
 
 
$
9.22
 
 
 
808,928
 
 
Information concerning the directors of the Corporation, including the three persons nominated for election to the board of directors as Class II directors at the meeting, the eight continuing directors and the executive officers of the Corporation and all directors and officers as a group, is set forth in the following table, including the number of shares of common stock of the Corporation beneficially owned, as of March 31, 2013, by each of them.  The table includes options exercisable within 60 days of March 31, 2013, stock options unexercised but currently exercisable, and stock beneficially owned. Unless otherwise indicated in a footnote, shares reported in this table are owned directly by the reporting person and such person holds sole voting and investment power with respect to such shares.  The percent of class assumes all options exercisable within 60 days of March 31, 2013, have been exercised and, therefore, on a pro forma basis, 11,119,551 shares of Class A common Stock would be outstanding.  The information is furnished as of March 31, 2013, on which date 2,020,449 Class B shares were issued and outstanding.
 
 
               
Class A Shares
   
Class B Shares
 
         
Director
   
Beneficially
   
Percent of
   
Beneficially
   
Percent of
 
Name
 
Age
   
Since
   
Owned
   
Class
   
Owned
   
Class
 
                                     
Class I Directors
                                   
Edward F. Bradley
  69     2008       20,000       0.18 %     -       0.00 %
Linda Tabas Stempel (1) (2) (3) (4)
  61     2003       688,030       6.19 %     -       0.00 %
Howard Wurzak (2)
  58     1987       948,457       8.53 %     76,366       3.78 %
Class II Director Nominees
                                           
William R. Hartman
  64     2011       5,000       0.04 %     -       0.00 %
Murray Stempel, III (2) (4)
  58     1997       742,603       6.68 %     -       0.00 %
Robert R. Tabas (1) (2) (5)
  57     1988       940,346       8.46 %     82,683       3.96 %
Class III Directors
                                           
F. Kevin Tylus
  58     2013       16,667       0.15 %     -       0.00 %
Michael J. Piracci
  67     2010       -       0.00 %     -       0.00 %
Edward B. Tepper
  74     1986       41,171       0.37 %     13       0.00 %
Other Directors (6)
                                           
Wayne R. Huey, Jr.
  68     2011       10,000       0.09 %     -          
Gerard M. Thomchick
  57     2011       -       0.00 %     -       0.00 %
                                             
Non-Director Executive Officer
                                           
Robert A. Kuehl (7)
  64     N/A       8,200       0.07 %     -       0.00 %
Michael S. Thompson (8)
  41     N/A       12,997       0.12 %     -       0.00 %
                                             
All directors and executive officers as a group (13 persons) and Daniel M. Tabas Trust (9)
      2,753,510       24.76 %     1,279,811       63.34 %
 
 
(1)
Linda Tabas Stempel, Robert R. Tabas and Nicholas Randazzo share voting and dispositive control over 1,120,779 shares of Class B common stock held in the Daniel M. Tabas Trust. These shares are not included in the share ownership reported in this table for Ms. Stempel or for Mr. Tabas (See footnote (1) on page 3).
 
(2)
Robert R. Tabas, Murray Stempel, III, Linda Tabas Stempel, Howard Wurzak and members of their immediate families and their affiliates, in the aggregate, own 2,634,047 shares of Class A common stock (23.69% of Class A) and 1,279,798 shares of Class B common stock (63.34% of Class B) or 30.93% of Class A assuming the full conversion of Class B common stock at a current conversion rate of 1.15 shares of Class A common stock for each share of Class B common stock.
 
(3)
Ms. Stempel disclaims beneficial interest in, and therefore the amount in the table above does not include, 249,650 Class A and 82,919 Class B shares held in the Linda Tabas Stempel Trust since she does not have voting or dispositive power over the shares.
 
(4)
Linda Tabas Stempel and Murray Stempel, III are married. Mr. Stempel's shares include 5,428 Class A shares related to shares that he has voting and dispositive power for a grandchild of Evelyn Tabas.
 
(5)
As a result of the Company missing the sixth quarterly dividend payment in November of 2010, the Treasury Department exercised its rights under the TARP Capital Purchase Program agreement and appointed two directors to the board of directors. Under the terms of the Series A Preferred Stock instrument issued to Treasury, these directors will serve as directors at a minimum until all accrued and unpaid dividends have been paid in full by the Company.
 
(6)
Mr. Kuehl served as the Corporation’s Chief Financial Officer from October 2008 until September 2012.  Mr. Kuehl is currently the Corporation’s Chief Administrative Officer.
 
(7)
Mr. Thompson became the Corporation’s Chief Financial Officer in September 2012.  Prior to September 2012, Mr. Thompson served as the Corporation’s Chief Accounting Officer.
 
(8)
The number of shares included in total for directors, officers and the Daniel Tabas Trust has been reduced by 679,961 shares to eliminate the same shares beneficially held by both Linda Tabas Stempel and her husband, Murray Stempel, III.

The information in the preceding table was furnished by the beneficial owners or their representatives and includes direct and indirect ownership.
 
For purposes of determining beneficial ownership of Class A common stock, we have assumed full conversion of Class B common stock to Class A common stock at the current conversion factor of 1.15 shares of Class A common stock for each share of Class B common stock.
 
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

The following table shows as of March 31, 2013, the amount of outstanding common stock beneficially owned by each shareholder (including any “group” as the term is used in Section 13(d)(3) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) known by the Corporation to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of such stock.  Each share of Class A common stock is entitled to one vote per share.  Each share of Class B common stock is entitled to ten votes per share and may be converted into shares of Class A common stock at the current rate of 1.15 shares of Class A common stock for each share of Class B common stock.  Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with applicable regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose.  For purposes of the table set forth below and the table subsequent to “Information about Nominees, Continuing Directors and Executive Officers,” beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which the individual has sole or shared voting power or investment power and any shares that the individual has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 31, 2013.  In addition, a person is deemed to beneficially own any stock for which he, directly or indirectly, through any contact, arrangement, understanding, relationship or otherwise has or shares voting or investment power.

Unless otherwise indicated in a footnote, shares reported in this table are owned directly by the reporting person.  The percent of class assumes all options exercisable within 60 days of March 31, 2013, have been exercised and, therefore, on a pro forma basis, 11,119,551 shares of Class A common stock would be outstanding, net of treasury stock.
 
   
Class A Shares
   
Class B Shares
 
Name and Address of
 
Beneficially
   
Percent of
   
Beneficially
   
Percent of
 
Beneficial Owner
 
Owned
   
Class
   
Owned
   
Class
 
                         
Daniel M. Tabas, Trust (1)
   
-
     
0.00
%
   
1,120,779
     
55.47
%
915 Montgomery Avenue
                               
Narberth, PA 19072
                               
                                 
Evelyn R. Tabas (2) (3)
    573,835       5.16
%
    164,991       8.17
%
543 Mulberry Lane
                               
Narberth, PA 19072
                               
                                 
Lee Evan Tabas (4)
    1,370,679       12.33
%
    149,662       7.41
%
355 W. Lancaster Avenue
                               
Haverford, PA 19041
                               
                                 
Carol Tabas (5)
   
641,601
     
5.78
%
   
-
     
0.00
%
39 Rosemont Lane
                               
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
                               
                                 
Susan Tabas Tepper (6)
   
604,995
     
5.44
%
   
-
     
0.00
%
717 Eagle Farm Road
                               
Villanova, PA 19085
                               
                                 
 
(1)
The trustees for the Daniel M. Tabas Trust are, Robert R. Tabas, Linda Tabas Stempel and Nicholas Randazzo, who as a group have voting rights and dispositive control of these shares.
(2)
The shares beneficially owned by Evelyn R. Tabas consist of: (a) 22,367 shares of Class A common stock owned and voted solely by Evelyn R. Tabas and 6,489 options currently exercisable to purchase shares of Class A common stock, (b) 249,650 Class A and 82,919 Class B shares in the Linda Tabas Stempel Trust, and (c) 219,074 Class A and 82,041 Class B shares in the Carol Tabas Stofman Trust.

(3)
Evelyn R. Tabas has sole power to vote and dispose of 76,255 shares of Class A common stock and 31 shares of Class B common stock from numerous custodial accounts and a trust for the Tabas grandchildren.
(4)
Based on a Schedule 13D filing on November 26, 2008, the shares beneficially owned by Lee Evan Tabas consist of: (a) 604,995 Class A shares acquired pursuant to the 2008 Irrevocable Agreement of Trust for the Family of Lee E. Tabas from Evelyn R. Tabas of which he has sole voting power and dispositive power subject to the terms of the trust agreement; (b) 5,177 Class A and 58,887 Class B shares held by his wife, Nancy Freeman Tabas in her name over which she holds voting and dispositive power; (c) 282,461 Class A shares held by Lee Evan Tabas and Nancy Freeman Tabas as joint tenants in common; and (d) 193,482 Class A and 5,918 Class B shares owned collectively by the Samuel Bradford Tabas Trust, the Elizabeth Rebecca Tabas Trust, the Theodore Herschel Tabas Trust and the Melissa Tamara Tabas Trust. Samuel, Elizabeth, Theodore, and Melissa are the adult children of Lee and Nancy Tabas. Lee and Nancy Tabas share voting and dispositive power over the shares they hold jointly and for the shares held in the trusts in the names of their adult children. Lee Tabas disclaims beneficial interest in, and therefore the table does not include, 284,564 Class A and 84,857 Class B shares held in the Lee Evan Tabas Trust since he does not have voting or dispositive power over the shares.

(5)
The shares beneficially owned by Carol Tabas consist of 604,995 Class A shares acquired pursuant to the 2008 Irrevocable Agreement of Trust for Carol Tabas from Evelyn R. Tabas of which she has sole voting and dispositive power subject to the terms of the trust agreement and 36,606 Class A shares in the Lily Ashley Stofman Trust of which she has sole voting power.
(6)
The shares beneficially owned by Susan Tabas Tepper consist of 604,995 Class A shares acquired pursuant to the 2008 Irrevocable Agreement of Trust for Susan Tabas Tepper from Evelyn R. Tabas of which she has sole voting and dispositive power subject to the terms of the trust agreement. Ms. Tepper disclaims beneficial interest in, and therefore the amount in the table does not include, 265,277 Class A shares and 82,647 Class B shares held in the Susan Tabas Tepper Trust since she does not have voting or dispositive power over the shares.
 
 
PART IV

Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
 
 
(a)(1)
The following financial statements are included by reference in Part II, Item 8 hereof:
 
 
 
 
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Condition
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Income
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
     
 
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
 
(a)(2)
List of Financial Schedules
 
 
 
 
 
Financial Statement Schedules are omitted because the required information is either not applicable, not required or is shown in the respective financial statements or in the notes thereto.
 
 
 
 
(a)(3)
Exhibits
 
 
 
 
 
The exhibits listed on the Exhibit Index of this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been previously filed, are filed herewith, or are incorporated herein by reference to other filings.
 
See the Index to Exhibits for a list of exhibits filed as part of this Annual Report.
 
 
SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
 
ROYAL BANCSHARES OF PENNSYLVANIA, INC.
   
 
By: /s/ Michael S. Thompson
 
Michael S. Thompson
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
(Principal Financial Officer
 
and Principal Accounting Officer)
 
May 20, 2013
 
 
Exhibit Index

 
 
 
3.1
Articles of Incorporation of the Company.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008.)
 
 
3.2
Bylaws of the Company.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008.)
 
 
4.1
Junior Subordinated Debt Security Due 2034 issued by Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. to JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Institutional Trustee, dated October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K (included as Exhibit A to Exhibit 10.1) filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
4.2
Junior Subordinated Debt Security Due 2034 issued by Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. to JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Institutional Trustee, dated October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K (included as Exhibit A to Exhibit 10.2) filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
4.3
Indenture by and between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Trustee, dated October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
4.4
Indenture by and between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Trustee, dated October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
4.5
Guarantee Agreement by and between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Guarantee Trustee, dated October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
4.6
Guarantee Agreement by and between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Guarantee Trustee, October 27, 2004.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on November 1, 2004.)
 
 
10.1
Stock Option and Appreciation Right Plan. As amended on March 15, 2005 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement N0. 333-135226, on Form S-8 filed with the Commission on June 22, 2006.)*
 
 
10.2
Stock Option and Appreciation Right Plan. As amended on May 16, 2005 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement N0. 333-129894, on Form S-8 filed with the Commission on November 22, 2005.)*


 
10.3
Outside Directors’ Stock Option Plan. (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement No. 333-25855, on Form S-8 filed with the Commission on April 5, 1997.)*
 
 
10.4
Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. 2007 Long-Term Incentive Plan.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit A to the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement dated April 6, 2007.)*
 
 
10.5
Letter Agreement, including Securities Purchase Agreement - Standard Terms, dated December 19, 2008, between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and the United States Department of the Treasury.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on February 26, 2009.)
 
 
10.6
Side Letter Agreement, dated February 20, 2009, between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and the United States Department of the Treasury.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on February 26, 2009.)
 
 
10.7
Form of Letter Agreement, dated December 19, 2008, between Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc. and certain of its executive officers relating to executive compensation limitations under the United States Treasury Department’s Capital Purchase Program.* (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 filed on March 30, 2009.)
 
 
10.8
Employment Agreement, dated June 1, 2008, between the Company, Royal Bank America and Robert A. Kuehl.*  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 to the Company’s Amendment No. 2 on Form 10-K/A filed on November 13, 2009.)
 
 
10.9
Royal Bank America Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan.* (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 13, 2009.)
 
 
10.10
SERP Participation Agreement, as amended — Robert Tabas.* (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 13, 2009.)
 
 
10.11
SERP Participation Agreement, as amended — James J. McSwiggan.* (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 13, 2009.)
 
 
10.12
SERP Participation Agreement, as amended — Murray Stempel.* (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.8 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 13, 2009.)
 
 
10.13
Form of Written Agreement between the Company and the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia dated as of March 17, 2010.  (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on March 18, 2010.)
 
 
 
10.14
Consulting Agreement, dated as of July 12, 2012, among James J. McSwiggan, Royal Bancshares of Pennsylvania, Inc., and Royal Bank America. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on June 20, 2012.)
 
 
11.
Statement re: Computation of Earnings Per Share.  (Included at Item 8, hereof, Note 18, “Earnings Per Common Share”.)**
 
 
12.
Statement re: Computation of Ratios. (Included at Item 8 here of, Note 15, “Regulatory Capital Requirements.”)**
 
 
21.
Subsidiaries of Registrant.**
 
 
23.
Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.**
 
 
Rule 13a-14(a)/15-d-14(a) Certification of Principal Executive Officer
 
 
Rule 13a-14(a)/15-d-14(a) Certification of Principal Financial Officer.
 
 
Section 1350 Certification of Principal Executive Officer.**
 
 
Section 1350 Certification of Principal Financial Officer.**
 
 
99.1