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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



FORM 10-K

(Mark One)    

ý

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011

OR

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                                 to                                

Commission File Number 0-24206

Penn National Gaming, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Pennsylvania
(State or other jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  23-2234473
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

825 Berkshire Blvd., Suite 200
Wyomissing, Pennsylvania
(Address of principal executive offices)

 

19610
(Zip Code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (610) 373-2400
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class
 
Name of each
exchange on which registered
None   None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock, par value $.01 per share
Series B Preferred Stock, par value $.01 per share
(Title of Class)

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

Large accelerated filer ý   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

         Indicate by a check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý

         As of June 30, 2011 (the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter), the aggregate market value of the voting Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $2.7 billion. Such aggregate market value was computed by reference to the closing price of the Common Stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2011. For purposes of making this calculation only, the registrant has defined affiliates as including all directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of more than ten percent of the Common Stock of the Company.

         The number of shares of the registrant's Common Stock outstanding as of February 15, 2012 was 76,291,210.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

         Portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement for its 2012 annual meeting of shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.

   


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page  
PART I  

ITEM 1.

 

BUSINESS

 

 

1

 
ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS     14  
ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS     24  
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES     24  
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS     27  
ITEM 4.   MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES     29  

PART II

 

ITEM 5.

 

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

 

30

 
ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA     32  
ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS     34  
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK     60  
ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA     61  
ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE     109  
ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES     109  
ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION     111  

PART III

 

ITEM 10.

 

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

 

111

 
ITEM 11.   EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION     111  
ITEM 12.   SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS     111  
ITEM 13.   CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE     111  
ITEM 14.   PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES     111  

PART IV

 

ITEM 15.

 

EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

 

112

 

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IMPORTANT FACTORS REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

        This document includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These statements are included throughout the document, including the section entitled "Risk Factors," and relate to our business strategy, our prospects and our financial position. These statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "believes," "estimates," "expects," "intends," "may," "will," "should" or "anticipates" or the negative or other variation of these or similar words, or by discussions of future events, strategies or risks and uncertainties. Specifically, forward-looking statements may include, among others, statements concerning:

    our expectations of future results of operations or financial condition;

    our expectations for our properties;

    the timing, cost and expected impact of planned capital expenditures on our results of operations;

    the impact of our geographic diversification;

    our expectations with regard to further acquisitions and development opportunities, as well as the integration of any companies we have acquired or may acquire;

    the outcome and financial impact of the litigation in which we are or will be periodically involved;

    the actions of regulatory, legislative, executive or judicial decisions at the federal, state or local level with regard to our business and the impact of any such actions;

    our ability to maintain regulatory approvals for our existing businesses and to receive regulatory approvals for our new businesses; and

    our expectations for the continued availability and cost of capital.

        Although we believe that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, they are inherently subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions about our subsidiaries and us, and accordingly, our forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to the factors described below and in the information incorporated by reference herein. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements include, without limitation, risks related to the following:

    the passage of state, federal or local legislation (including referenda) that would expand, restrict, further tax, prevent or negatively impact operations in or adjacent to the jurisdictions in which we do or seek to do business (such as a smoking ban at any of our facilities);

    the effects of local and national economic, credit, capital market, housing, and energy conditions on the economy in general and on the gaming and lodging industries in particular;

    the activities of our competitors and the emergence of new competitors (traditional and internet based);

    increases in the effective rate of taxation at any of our properties or at the corporate level;

    our ability to identify attractive acquisition and development opportunities and to agree to terms with partners for such transactions;

    the costs and risks involved in the pursuit of such opportunities and our ability to complete the acquisition or development of, and achieve the expected returns from, such opportunities;

    our ability to secure state and local permits and approvals necessary for construction;

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    construction factors, including delays, unexpected remediation costs, local opposition and increased cost of labor and materials;

    our ability to receive, or delays in obtaining, the regulatory approvals required to own, develop and/or operate our facilities, or other delays or impediments to completing our planned acquisitions or projects, including favorable resolution of any related litigation;

    our dependence on key personnel;

    our expectations for the continued availability and cost of capital;

    the impact of weather;

    the maintenance of agreements with our horsemen, pari-mutuel clerks and other organized labor groups;

    the outcome of pending legal proceedings;

    changes in accounting standards;

    the impact of terrorism and other international hostilities; and

    other factors as discussed in our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

        All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements included in this document. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the forward-looking events discussed in this document may not occur.

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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

        We are a leading, diversified, multi-jurisdictional owner and manager of gaming and pari-mutuel properties. The Company was incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1982 as PNRC Corp. and adopted its current name in 1994, when the Company became a public company. In 1997, we began our transition from a pari-mutuel company to a diversified gaming company with the acquisition of the Charles Town property and the introduction of video lottery terminals in West Virginia. Since 1997, we have continued to expand our gaming operations through strategic acquisitions (including the acquisitions of Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis and Boomtown Biloxi, CRC Holdings, Inc., the Bullwhackers properties, Hollywood Casino Corporation, Argosy Gaming Company, Zia Park Casino, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club and The M Resorts LLC (the "M Resort") in June 2011), greenfield projects (such as at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway and Hollywood Casino Perryville), and property expansions (such as Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg). Most recently, we, along with our joint venture partner, opened Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway on February 3, 2012, and we anticipate opening our facilities in Columbus and Toledo, Ohio in 2012.

        As of December 31, 2011, we owned, managed, or had ownership interests in twenty-five facilities in the following eighteen jurisdictions: Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Ontario.

        We believe that our portfolio of assets provides us with a diversified cash flow from operations. We continue to expand our gaming operations through the implementation and execution of a disciplined capital expenditure program at our existing properties, the pursuit of strategic acquisitions and the development of new gaming properties, particularly in attractive regional markets. Current capital projects are ongoing at several of our new and existing properties, including our facilities under construction in Ohio.

        In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the terms "we," "us," "our," the "Company" and "Penn National" refer to Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.

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Properties

        The following table summarizes, by our reportable segments, certain features of our owned properties and our managed property that are currently in operations as of December 31, 2011:

 
  Location   Type of Facility   Approx.
Gaming
Square
Footage
  Gaming
Machines
  Table
Games(1)
  Hotel
Rooms
 

Midwest

                                 

Owned Properties:

                                 

Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg

  Lawrenceburg, IN   Dockside gaming     150,000     3,219     87     295  

Hollywood Casino Aurora

  Aurora, IL   Dockside gaming     53,000     1,172     21      

Hollywood Casino Joliet

  Joliet, IL   Dockside gaming     50,000     1,177     23     100  

Argosy Casino Alton

  Alton, IL   Dockside gaming     23,000     1,052     15      

Managed Property:

                                 

Casino Rama

  Orillia, Ontario   Land-based gaming     93,000     2,498     108     289  
                           

Subtotal

            369,000     9,118     254     684  

East/West

                                 

Owned Properties:

                                 

Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races

  Charles Town, WV   Land-based gaming/
Thoroughbred racing
    209,508     4,180     107     153  

Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course

  Grantville, PA   Land-based gaming/
Thoroughbred racing
    99,194     2,451     53      

M Resort

  Henderson, NV   Land-based gaming     92,000     1,561     52     390  

Hollywood Casino Perryville

  Perryville, MD   Land-based gaming     34,329     1,500          

Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway

  Bangor, ME   Land-based gaming/Harness racing     31,750     1,000         152  

Zia Park Casino

  Hobbs, NM   Land-based gaming/
Thoroughbred racing
    18,460     750          
                           

Subtotal

            485,241     11,442     212     695  

Southern Plains

                                 

Owned Properties:

                                 

Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis

  Bay St. Louis, MS   Land-based gaming     57,000     1,167     22     291  

Argosy Casino Riverside

  Riverside, MO   Dockside gaming     56,400     1,724     33     258  

Hollywood Casino Tunica(2)

  Tunica, MS   Dockside gaming     44,000     1,076     25     494  

Boomtown Biloxi

  Biloxi, MS   Dockside gaming     51,665     1,093     18      

Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge

  Baton Rouge, LA   Dockside gaming     28,000     1,120     23      

Argosy Casino Sioux City

  Sioux City, IA   Dockside gaming     20,500     719     16      
                           

Subtotal

            257,565     6,899     137     1,043  

Other

                                 

Owned Properties:

                                 

Bullwhackers

  Black Hawk, CO   Land-based gaming     10,425     290          

Raceway Park

  Toledo, OH   Standardbred racing                  

Beulah Park

  Grove City, OH   Thoroughbred racing                  

Rosecroft

  Oxon Hill, MD   Standardbred racing                  

Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club

  Longwood, FL   Greyhound racing                  

Freehold Raceway(3)

  Freehold, NJ   Standardbred racing                  

Sam Houston Race Park(4)

  Houston, TX   Thoroughbred racing                  

Valley Race Park(4)

  Harlingen, TX   Greyhound racing                  
                           

Subtotal

            10,425     290          
                           

Total

            1,122,231     27,749     603     2,422  
                           

(1)
Excludes poker tables.

(2)
Due to flooding in 2011 at Hollywood Casino Tunica, the gaming square footage has been temporarily reduced by 10,000 square feet compared to the prior year.

(3)
Pursuant to a joint venture with Greenwood Limited Jersey, Inc., a subsidiary of Greenwood Racing, Inc.

(4)
Pursuant to a joint venture with MAXXAM, Inc. ("MAXXAM").

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Midwest Owned Properties

Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg

        Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg is located on the Ohio River in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, approximately 15 miles west of Cincinnati. In late June 2009, we opened a new casino riverboat at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, replacing the vessel at Argosy Casino Lawrenceburg. The Hollywood-themed casino riverboat has 150,000 square feet of gaming space on two levels with 3,219 slot machines, 87 table games and 41 poker tables, a restaurant, a buffet, a bar, a nightclub, a casual dining room, two cafes and meeting space. Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg also includes a 295-room hotel.

        The City of Lawrenceburg is currently designing a hotel to be built by the City of Lawrenceburg near our Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg property. By contractual agreement reached with the City of Lawrenceburg, the project will ultimately be owned and operated by a subsidiary of the Company upon completion of construction. Currently slated to include 180 rooms and approximately 18,000 square feet of multipurpose space, the City of Lawrenceburg anticipates an opening date in the third quarter of 2013.

Hollywood Casino Aurora

        Hollywood Casino Aurora, part of the Chicagoland market, is located in Aurora, Illinois, the second largest city in Illinois, approximately 35 miles west of Chicago. This single-level dockside casino provides 53,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,172 slot machines, 21 gaming tables and 7 poker tables. The facility features an upscale lounge, a steakhouse with a private dining room, a VIP lounge for premium players, a casino bar with video poker, a buffet, and a deli. Hollywood Casino Aurora also has a surface parking lot, two parking garages with approximately 1,500 parking spaces, and a gift shop.

Hollywood Casino Joliet

        Hollywood Casino Joliet, part of the Chicagoland market, is located on the Des Plaines River in Joliet, Illinois, approximately 40 miles southwest of Chicago. This barge-based casino provides 50,000 square feet of gaming space on two levels with 1,177 slot machines, 23 table games and 3 poker tables. The land-based pavilion includes a steakhouse, a buffet, a deli, and a sports bar and entertainment lounge.

        The complex also includes a 100-room hotel, a 1,100 space parking garage, surface parking areas with approximately 1,500 spaces and an 80-space recreational vehicle park.

Argosy Casino Alton

        Argosy Casino Alton is located on the Mississippi River in Alton, Illinois, approximately 20 miles northeast of downtown St. Louis. Argosy Casino Alton is a three-deck gaming facility featuring 23,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,052 slot machines and 15 table games. Argosy Casino Alton includes an entertainment pavilion and features a 124-seat buffet, a restaurant, a deli and a 400-seat main showroom. The facility also includes surface parking areas with 1,341 spaces.

Midwest Managed Property

Casino Rama

        Through CHC Casinos Canada Limited ("CHC Casinos"), our indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary, we manage Casino Rama, a full service gaming and entertainment facility, on behalf of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation ("OLGC"), an agency of the Province of Ontario. Casino Rama is located on the lands of the Rama First Nation, approximately 90 miles north of Toronto. The property has approximately 93,000 square feet of gaming space with 2,498 gaming machines, 108 table games and 15 poker tables. In addition, the property includes a 5,000-seat entertainment facility, a 289-room hotel and 3,170 surface parking spaces.

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        The Development and Operating Agreement (the "Agreement"), which we refer to as the management service contract for Casino Rama, sets out the duties, rights and obligations of CHC Casinos and our indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary, CRC Holdings, Inc. The compensation under the Agreement is a base fee equal to 2.0% of gross revenues of the casino and an incentive fee equal to 5.0% of the casino's net operating profit.

        The Agreement terminated on August 1, 2011. In July 2011, we entered into a new interim agreement with the OLGC for the operation of the Casino Rama facility through March 31, 2012, which was subsequently extended in January 2012 for an additional six months through September 30, 2012. The OLGC is currently in the process of evaluating bids on a new five year term for the management of the Casino Rama facility, which includes a cap on management fees of $5 million per year. While we intend to participate in the bid process, there can be no assurance that the OLGC will select us to manage the property beyond September 30, 2012.

East/West Owned Properties

Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races

        Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races is located within approximately a one-hour drive of the Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. markets. Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races features 209,508 square feet of gaming space with 4,180 gaming machines and a 153-room hotel, as well as various dining options. In July 2010, we added table games and poker tables following voter approval of table games in the December 5, 2009 special election. As of December 31, 2011, the property had 107 table games and 30 poker tables. The complex also features live thoroughbred racing at a 3/4-mile all-weather lighted thoroughbred racetrack with a 3,000-seat grandstand, parking for 6,048 vehicles and simulcast wagering and dining. In addition, a high-end steakhouse was completed in the fourth quarter of 2010 and a sports bar and entertainment lounge was opened in July 2011.

Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course

        Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course is located in Grantville, Pennsylvania, which is 15 miles northeast of Harrisburg. Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, which opened on February 12, 2008, is a 365,000 square foot facility with 2,451 slot machines. In July 2010, we added table games and poker tables following legislation passed in January 2010 permitting the operation of table games by existing licensees. As of December 31, 2011, the property had 53 table games and 16 poker tables. The facility also includes an entertainment bar and lounge, a sports bar, a buffet, a high-end steakhouse and various casual dining options, as well as a simulcast facility and viewing area for live racing. The facility has ample parking, including a five-story self-parking garage, with capacity for approximately 2,200 cars and approximately 1,500 surface parking spaces for self and valet parking. The property includes a one-mile all-weather lighted thoroughbred racetrack and a 7/8-mile turf track. The property also includes approximately 400 acres that are available for future expansion or development.

M Resort

        On June 1, 2011, following the purchase of all of the outstanding debt of the M Resort and the receipt of requisite regulatory approvals, the Company acquired the business in exchange for the debt. Opened in March 2009, the M Resort, located approximately ten miles from the Las Vegas strip in Henderson, Nevada, is situated on over 90 acres on the southeast corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and St. Rose Parkway. The resort features over 92,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,561 slot machines, 52 table games, and 10 poker tables. M Resort also offers 390 guest rooms and suites, six restaurants and six destination bars, more than 60,000 square feet of meeting and conference space, a 4,700 space parking facility, a spa and fitness center and a 100,000 square foot events piazza. In January 2012, the M Resort expanded its convention space by about 25,000 square feet which will be used for both conventions and meetings, as well as concerts and other larger scale events.

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Hollywood Casino Perryville

        Hollywood Casino Perryville was opened to the public on September 27, 2010 and is located directly off Interstate 95 in Cecil County, Maryland just 35 miles northeast of Baltimore and 70 miles from Washington, D.C. Hollywood Casino Perryville is a Hollywood-themed facility which offers 34,329 square feet of gaming space with 1,500 slot machines. The facility also offers various food and beverage options, including a buffet and a grill, a gift shop and 1,600 parking spaces with valet and self-parking.

Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway

        Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway, which is located in Bangor, Maine, includes 31,750 square feet of gaming space with 1,000 slot machines. On November 8, 2011, voters in Penobscot County approved the addition of table games. The addition of 10 table games and 4 poker tables is anticipated to be in place by March 31, 2012. Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway's amenities include a 152-room hotel, with 5,119 square feet of meeting and pre-function space, two eateries, a buffet and a snack bar, a small entertainment stage, and a four-story parking garage with 1,500 spaces. Bangor Raceway, which is adjacent to the property, is located at historic Bass Park and includes a one-half mile standardbred racetrack and grandstand to seat 3,500 patrons.

Zia Park Casino

        Zia Park Casino is located in Hobbs, New Mexico and includes a casino as well as an adjoining racetrack. Zia Park Casino includes 18,460 square feet of gaming space with 750 slot machines and operates two restaurants. Year-round banquet services are available at the property and in the Turf Club, which also offers food and beverage services during the live racing season. The property has a one-mile quarter/thoroughbred racetrack, with live racing from September to December, and a year-round simulcast parlor.

Southern Plains Owned Properties

Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis

        Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis is located in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The casino features 57,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,167 slot machines, 22 table games, and 6 poker tables. The waterfront Hollywood Hotel features 291 rooms and a 10,000 square foot ballroom, including nine separate meeting rooms offering more than 14,000 square feet of meeting space. Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis offers live concerts and various entertainment on weekends in the ballroom. The property also features The Bridges golf course, an 18-hole championship golf course. Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis has various dining facilities including a steakhouse, a buffet, a casual dining room and a clubhouse lounge as well as an entertainment bar. Other amenities include a recreational vehicle park with 100 spaces and a gift shop.

Argosy Casino Riverside

        Argosy Casino Riverside is located on the Missouri River approximately five miles from downtown Kansas City in Riverside, Missouri. The casino primarily attracts customers who reside in the northern and western regions of the Kansas City metropolitan area. The casino features 56,400 square feet of gaming space with 1,724 slot machines and 33 table games.

        This Mediterranean-themed casino and hotel features a nine-story, 258-room hotel and spa, an entertainment facility featuring various food and beverage areas, including a buffet, a steakhouse, a deli, a coffee bar, a VIP lounge and a sports/entertainment lounge and 19,000 square feet of banquet/conference facilities. Argosy Casino Riverside also has parking for approximately 3,000 vehicles, including a 1,250 space parking garage.

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Hollywood Casino Tunica

        Hollywood Casino Tunica is located in Tunica, Mississippi. Tunica County is the closest resort gaming jurisdiction to, and is easily accessible from, the Memphis, Tennessee metropolitan area. The Tunica market has become a regional destination resort, attracting customers from surrounding markets such as Nashville, Tennessee, Atlanta, Georgia, St. Louis, Missouri, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Tulsa, Oklahoma. This single-level casino features 54,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,076 slot machines, 25 table games and 6 poker tables. On May 1, 2011, Hollywood Casino Tunica was forced to close as a result of flooding by the Mississippi River. The property reopened on May 25, 2011. Due to the flooding, 10,000 square feet of gaming space remains closed. A section of this area is expected to reopen in the first quarter of 2012 as a high limit area, with the remainder reopening by the end of 2012.

        Hollywood Casino Tunica's 494-room hotel and 123-space recreational vehicle park provide overnight accommodations for its patrons. Entertainment amenities include a steakhouse, a buffet, a grill, an entertainment lounge, a premium players' club, a themed bar facility, an indoor pool and showroom as well as banquet and meeting facilities. In addition, Hollywood Casino Tunica offers surface parking with 1,635 spaces.

Boomtown Biloxi

        Boomtown Biloxi is located in Biloxi, Mississippi. Boomtown Biloxi offers 51,665 square feet of gaming space with 1,093 slot machines, 18 table games and 5 poker tables. It features a buffet, a steakhouse and a 24-hour grill and bakery. Boomtown Biloxi also has 1,450 surface parking spaces.

Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge

        Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge is a dockside riverboat gaming facility operating in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge features a riverboat casino reminiscent of a nineteenth century Mississippi River paddlewheel steamboat. The riverboat features approximately 28,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,120 gaming machines and 23 table games.

        The facility also includes a two-story, 58,000 square foot dockside building featuring a variety of amenities, including a steakhouse, a 268-seat buffet, a deli, a premium players' lounge, a nightclub, a lobby bar, a public atrium, two meeting rooms, 1,490 parking spaces, and a gift shop.

        In December 2007, we agreed to acquire 3.8 acres of adjacent land and to pay for half of the construction costs for a railroad underpass with the seller of the land. Construction on the underpass started in June 2009 and was completed in March 2011. The underpass provides unimpeded access to the casino property and to property owned by the seller for future development.

Argosy Casino Sioux City

        Argosy Casino Sioux City is located on the Missouri River in downtown Sioux City, Iowa. The riverboat features 20,500 square feet of gaming space with 719 slot machines, 16 table games and 4 poker tables. The casino is complemented by adjacent barge facilities featuring dining facilities, meeting space, and 524 parking spaces.

        Each gaming license in Iowa is issued jointly to a gaming operator and a local charitable sponsor. The agreement between our gaming operator subsidiary in Iowa, Belle of Sioux City, L.P. (the "Belle") and its charitable sponsor, Missouri River Historical Development, Inc. ("MRHD"), may expire as early as July 2012. The Belle is in the process of negotiating with MRHD to transition its current barge-based facility to a new land-based facility and to enter into a new long-term agreement with MRHD. If a new agreement cannot be reached, MRHD has indicated that it may issue a request for proposals for alternative operators for a new land-based facility and has preemptively filed a lawsuit seeking to establish its right to do so. If MRHD were to issue such a request, the Belle may contest MRHD's right to do so, may participate in the process and/or may seek an alternative charitable

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sponsor. Accordingly, at this time, there can be no assurance that the Belle will be able to reach an agreement with MRHD or, absent such agreement, that it will be able to partner with an alternative charitable sponsor. In the event that both MRHD and the Belle find alternative partners, it is unclear whether the Iowa Gaming and Racing Commission would issue a gaming license to one or both such groups. Further, the Belle's ability to continue its operations may also be impacted by its ability to renew or extend its existing docking lease, which expires in January 2013, or to locate a suitable site to construct a land-based facility.

Other Owned Properties

Bullwhackers

        The Bullwhackers casino, which is located in Black Hawk, Colorado, includes 10,425 square feet of gaming space with 290 slot machines. The property also includes a 344-car surface parking area. We also own and operate a gas station/convenience store located approximately 7 miles east of the Bullwhackers casino on Highway 119.

Raceway Park

        Raceway Park is a 58,250 square foot facility with a 5/8-mile standardbred race track located in Toledo, Ohio. The facility also features simulcast wagering and has theatre-style seating capacity for 1,977 and surface parking for 3,000 vehicles.

Beulah Park

        Acquired on July 1, 2010, Beulah Park in Grove City, Ohio is located on approximately 210 acres just outside of Columbus, Ohio. Beulah Park is a thoroughbred racing facility that features live thoroughbred racing from October to May as well as simulcast wagering from a number of nationwide tracks. Beulah Park includes a grandstand, outdoor paddock, a clubhouse facility and numerous food and dining options.

Rosecroft

        On February 28, 2011, we completed our acquisition of Rosecroft Raceway in Oxon Hill, Maryland following the completion of a bankruptcy auction and approval of the purchase by a United States ("U.S.") Bankruptcy Court judge. Rosecroft Raceway, located approximately 13 miles south of Washington, D.C., is situated on approximately 125 acres just outside the Washington I-495 Beltway in Prince George's county. The Rosecroft facility features a 5/8-mile standardbred race track with a seven race paddock, a 53,000 square foot grandstand building, and a 96,000 square foot three story clubhouse building with dining facilities. In August 2011, Rosecroft Raceway re-opened for simulcasting and live standardbred racing resumed in late October 2011.

Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club

        Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club is a 1/4-mile greyhound facility located in Longwood, Florida. The facility has capacity for 6,500 patrons, with seating for 4,000 and surface parking for 2,500 vehicles. The facility conducts year-round greyhound racing and greyhound, thoroughbred, and harness racing simulcasts.

Freehold Raceway

        Through our joint venture in Pennwood Racing, Inc. ("Pennwood"), we own 50% of Freehold Raceway, located in Freehold, New Jersey. The property features a half-mile standardbred race track and a 150,000 square foot grandstand.

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Sam Houston Race Park and Valley Race Park

        On April 8, 2011, following final approval by the Texas Racing Commission, we completed our investment in a joint venture with MAXXAM that owns and operates the Sam Houston Race Park in Houston, Texas and the Valley Race Park in Harlingen, Texas, and holds a license for a planned racetrack in Laredo, Texas. Sam Houston Race Park, opened in April 1994, is located 15 miles northwest from downtown Houston along Beltway 8. Sam Houston Race Park hosts thoroughbred and quarter horse racing and offers daily simulcast operations, as well as hosts various special events, private parties and meetings, concerts and national touring festivals throughout the year. Valley Race Park, which was opened in 1990, is a 91,000 square foot dog racing and simulcasting facility located in Harlingen, Texas.

Off-track Wagering Facilities

        Our off-track wagering facilities ("OTWs") and racetracks provide areas for viewing import simulcast races of thoroughbred and standardbred horse racing, televised sporting events, placing pari-mutuel wagers and dining. We operate four OTWs in Pennsylvania, and through our joint venture in Pennwood, we own 50% of a leased OTW in Toms River, New Jersey.

Trademarks

        We own a number of trademarks registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ("U.S. PTO"), including but not limited to, "Telebet," "The World Series of Handicapping," and "Players' Choice." We also have a number of trademark applications pending with the U.S. PTO.

        BTN, Inc., our wholly-owned subsidiary, entered into a License Agreement with Boomtown, Inc., dated August 8, 2000 pursuant to which it uses "Boomtown" and other trademarks.

        As a result of our acquisitions of Hollywood Casino Corporation and Argosy, we own the service marks "Hollywood Casino" and "Argosy" which are registered with the U.S. PTO. We believe that our rights to the "Hollywood Casino" and "Argosy" service marks are well established and have competitive value to the Hollywood Casino and Argosy properties. We also acquired other trademarks used by the Hollywood Casino and Argosy facilities and their related services. These marks are either registered or are the subject of pending applications with the U.S. PTO.

Competition

        The gaming industry is characterized by a high degree of competition among a large number of participants, including riverboat casinos, dockside casinos, land-based casinos, video lottery and poker machines not located in casinos, Native American gaming, emerging varieties of Internet gaming and other forms of gaming in the U.S. In a broader sense, our gaming operations face competition from all manner of leisure and entertainment activities, including: shopping; high school, collegiate and professional athletic events; television and movies; concerts and travel. Legalized gaming is currently permitted in various forms throughout the U.S., in several Canadian provinces and on various lands taken into trust for the benefit of certain Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada. Other jurisdictions, including states adjacent to states in which we currently have facilities (such as in Ohio and Maryland), have legalized, and are likely to implement gaming in the near future. In addition, established gaming jurisdictions could award additional gaming licenses or permit the expansion or relocation of existing gaming operations. New, relocated or expanded operations by other persons will increase competition for our gaming operations and could have a material adverse impact on us. Finally, the imposition of smoking bans and/or higher gaming tax rates have a significant impact on our properties' ability to compete with facilities in nearby jurisdictions.

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        Our racing operations face significant competition for wagering dollars from other racetracks and OTWs, some of which also offer other forms of gaming, as well as other gaming venues such as casinos. Additionally, for a number of years, there has been a general decline in the number of people attending and wagering on live horse races at North American racetracks due to a number of factors, including increased competition from other wagering and entertainment alternatives and unwillingness of customers to travel a significant distance to racetracks. Our account wagering operations compete with other providers of such services throughout the country. We also may face competition in the future from new OTWs, new racetracks or new providers of account wagering. From time to time, states consider legislation to permit other forms of gaming. If additional gaming opportunities become available near our racing operations, such gaming opportunities could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Midwest.    In Ohio, voters passed a referendum in 2009 to allow four land-based casinos in four cities, one of which will be in downtown Cincinnati, which is the primary feeder market for our Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg property. The proposed $400 million casino in nearby Cincinnati, Ohio will be operated by Caesars Entertainment as part of a joint venture with Rock Gaming LLC and is anticipated to open in 2013. This new facility will have an adverse impact on Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg. However, the impact from this casino on our Midwest segment will be mitigated by the opening of our Ohio casinos, Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, both of which are expected to open in 2012. On January 25, 2012, MTR Gaming Group, Inc. ("MTR") announced it had received its license to install and operate up to 2,500 video lottery terminals at its Scioto Downs racetrack in Columbus, Ohio. The facility will offer a 300 seat buffet, a casual dining restaurant and a bar/lounge. MTR anticipates opening the new facility in the second quarter of 2012. In Illinois, a new approximately $445 million casino opened on July 18, 2011 in Des Plaines, Illinois. As a result, Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet face additional competition as the facilities are located in the suburban area northwest of Chicago, however the 3% surcharge that Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet paid to subsidize local racing horse interests is no longer incurred as the new facility is now open. In addition, in July 2009, the Governor of Illinois signed a bill providing for the legalization of up to five video lottery terminals to be installed in licensed bars, restaurants and truck stops, among other venues that permit on-site alcohol consumption. In July 2011, the Illinois Supreme Court, in a unanimous ruling, cleared the way for the 2009 Illinois Video Gaming Act to go forward. The Illinois Gaming Board is currently in the process of finalizing the regulatory framework and awarding licenses, however numerous cities and counties have opted out of participation. Additionally in Illinois, the legislature in May 2011 passed a gaming expansion bill to allow five new casinos in the state while bringing slot machines to the Illinois racetracks. However, this legislation was not sent formally to the Governor of Illinois for approval. Currently, legislators are working on new expansion gambling proposals. Finally, casino gaming is not currently permitted in Kentucky, although legislation has been introduced to allow gaming at racetracks and casinos subject to a referendum which will take place in 2012. The commencement of gaming in Kentucky and the expansion of gaming in Illinois would negatively impact certain of our existing Midwest properties.

        East/West.    In November 2008, the citizens of Maryland approved a referendum to allow up to 15,000 slot machines at five locations throughout the state. These locations included a facility in each of Cecil, Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore City and Worchester Counties. Applications for each of the gaming zones were submitted in February 2009. Hollywood Casino Perryville in Cecil County, which is our facility, opened to the public on September 27, 2010 and was the only Maryland facility operational in 2010. In January 2011, the Worchester County location opened at Ocean Downs Racetrack. In November 2010, zoning was approved by voters for a proposed casino complex offering 4,750 slot machines at the Arundel Mills mall in Anne Arundel, Maryland. The developer of the project is targeting an opening in the summer of 2012 of approximately 2,500 to 3,000 slot machines, with the full facility expected to be open by the end of 2012. Particularly as the Anne Arundel facility opens, Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and Hollywood Casino Perryville will face increased

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competition and their results will be negatively impacted. Additionally, the opening of a casino in Baltimore City, which now has a viable applicant, would negatively impact our operations at Charles Town and Perryville. In Pennsylvania, in April 2011, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board awarded a category 3 license to permit the operation of slot machines at an existing resort to Woodlands Fayette, LLC, operators of the Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Wharton Township, Fayette County. However, Mason-Dixon Resort LP, which applied for a category 3 license in Gettysburg, filed an appeal with the state Supreme Court seeking to reverse the Board's decision. This appeal is still pending. If the appeal is successful and a category 3 license was awarded to Mason-Dixon Resort LP, our operations at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course could be negatively impacted. In addition, in 2009, a category 3 license application was granted for a site in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The casino is currently under construction and could open as early as spring of 2012. We expect the opening of this casino to have a minor adverse effect on the financial results of Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course. Our East/West segment also contains our M Resort property which caters to the Las Vegas locals market. The strength of the Las Vegas locals market is partially linked to the health of the Las Vegas strip. Continued weakness in this market may continue to negatively impact the Las Vegas locals market, including our M Resort property.

        Southern Plains.    In Kansas, the legislature approved the expansion of casino gaming in its state, and in February 2010, Kansas Entertainment, LLC ("Kansas Entertainment"), a joint venture of affiliates of International Speedway Corporation ("International Speedway") and us, received the final approval under the Kansas Expanded Lottery Act, along with its gaming license from the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission, to proceed with the development of an approximately $411 million Hollywood-themed destination facility overlooking Turn 2 at Kansas Speedway, which is located approximately 17 miles from Argosy Casino Riverside. Kansas Entertainment began construction of the facility in the second quarter of 2010 and the facility opened on February 3, 2012. The opening of this casino will have an adverse effect on the financial results of Argosy Casino Riverside. In Louisiana, construction on an approximately $357 million riverboat casino and hotel has begun with a planned opening in the summer of 2012. The opening of this riverboat casino will have an adverse effect on the financial results of Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge. In the Mississippi Gulf Coast market, there are various proposals for casinos in development, as well as expansions at existing properties, that may take place in the next few years. Construction on an approximately $60 million casino project in Biloxi has begun with a planned opening in the spring of 2012. The opening of this casino will have an adverse effect on the financial results of Boomtown Biloxi.

U.S. and Foreign Revenues

        Our net revenues in the U.S. for 2011, 2010, and 2009 were approximately $2,727.1 million, $2,443.9 million, and $2,354.5 million, respectively. Our revenues from operations in Canada for 2011, 2010, and 2009 were approximately $15.2 million, $15.2 million, and $14.8 million, respectively.

Segments

        In 2011, we realigned our reporting structure in connection with the hiring of a senior vice president of regional operations. We now have three senior vice presidents of regional operations who oversee various properties based primarily on their geographic locations and whom report directly to our President and Chief Operating Officer. This event impacted how our Chief Executive Officer, who is the Company's Chief Operating Decision Maker ("CODM") as that term is defined in Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 280, "Segment Reporting" ("ASC 280"), measures and assesses our business performance and has caused us to conclude that we now have reportable segments. Therefore, we have aggregated our properties into three reportable segments: (i) Midwest, (ii) East/West, and (iii) Southern Plains, consistent with how our CODM reviews and assesses our financial performance.

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        The Midwest reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, Hollywood Casino Aurora, Hollywood Casino Joliet, and Argosy Casino Alton. It also includes our Casino Rama management service contract as well as the two Ohio properties that are currently under construction, Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, which are scheduled to open by the end of May 2012 and November 1, 2012, respectively.

        The East/West reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, Hollywood Casino Perryville, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway, Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Zia Park Casino, and M Resort.

        The Southern Plains reportable segment consists of the following properties: Argosy Casino Riverside, Argosy Casino Sioux City, Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge, Hollywood Casino Tunica, Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis, and Boomtown Biloxi. It also includes our 50% investment in Kansas Entertainment, which owns the Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway which opened in February 2012.

        The Other category consists of our standalone racing operations, namely Beulah Park, Raceway Park, Rosecroft Raceway, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club, and our joint venture interests in Sam Houston Race Park and Valley Race Park, Freehold Raceway, and Maryland Jockey Club (which was sold in July 2011). If we are successful in obtaining gaming operations at these locations, they would be assigned to one of our regional executives and reported in their respective reportable segment. The Other category also includes our corporate overhead operations which does not meet the definition of an operating segment under ASC 280 and our Bullwhackers property.

Management

Name
  Age   Position
Peter M. Carlino     65   Chief Executive Officer
Timothy J. Wilmott     53   President and Chief Operating Officer
William J. Clifford     54   Senior Vice President-Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Thomas P. Burke     55   Senior Vice President-Regional Operations
John V. Finamore     53   Senior Vice President-Regional Operations
Robert S. Ippolito     60   Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer
Jordan B. Savitch     46   Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Jay A. Snowden     35   Senior Vice President-Regional Operations
Steven T. Snyder     51   Senior Vice President-Corporate Development

        Peter M. Carlino.    Mr. Carlino has served as our Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer since April 1994. Since 1976, Mr. Carlino has been President of Carlino Capital Management Corp. (formerly known as Carlino Financial Corporation), a holding company that owns and operates various Carlino family businesses, in which capacity he has been continuously active in strategic planning and monitoring the operations.

        Timothy J. Wilmott.    Mr. Wilmott joined us in February 2008 as President and Chief Operating Officer. Mr. Wilmott most recently served as Chief Operating Officer of Harrah's Entertainment, a position he held for approximately four years. In this position, he oversaw the operations of all of Harrah's revenue-generating businesses, including 48 casinos, 38,000 hotel rooms and 300 restaurants. All Harrah's Division Presidents, Senior Vice Presidents of Brand Operations, Marketing and Information Technology personnel reported to Mr. Wilmott in his capacity as Chief Operating Officer. Prior to his appointment to the position of Chief Operating Officer, Mr. Wilmott served from 1997 to 2002 as Division President of Harrah's Eastern Division with responsibility for the operations of eight Harrah's properties.

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        William J. Clifford.    Mr. Clifford joined us in August 2001 and was appointed to his current position as Senior Vice President-Finance and Chief Financial Officer in October 2001. From March 1997 to July 2001, Mr. Clifford served as the Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President of Finance with Sun International Resorts, Inc., Paradise Island, Bahamas. From November 1993 to February 1997, Mr. Clifford was Financial, Hotel and Operations Controller for Treasure Island Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. From May 1989 to November 1993, Mr. Clifford was Controller for Golden Nugget Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas. Prior to May 1989, Mr. Clifford held the positions of Controller for the Dunes Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Property Operations Analyst with Aladdin Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, Casino Administrator with Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, Senior Internal Auditor with Del Webb, Las Vegas, and Agent, Audit Division, of the Nevada Gaming Control Board, Las Vegas and Reno.

        Thomas P. Burke.    Mr. Burke joined us in November 2002 and was appointed to his current position of Senior Vice President-Regional Operations effective October 2008. In this position, Mr. Burke is responsible for overseeing all facets of our facilities located in our Southern Plains segment. Previously, Mr. Burke served as Vice President and General Manager of our Argosy Casino Riverside from June 2006 until October 2008 and as President and General Manager of our Bullwhackers properties from November 2002 until June 2006. Prior to joining us, Mr. Burke held senior management positions at Ameristar Casinos, Station Casinos, Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort and Trump Castle Hotel/Casino, American Gaming and Entertainment and the Majestic Star Casino.

        John V. Finamore.    Mr. Finamore joined us in November 2002 as Senior Vice President-Regional Operations. In this position, Mr. Finamore is responsible for overseeing all facets of our facilities located in our Midwest segment. Prior to joining us, Mr. Finamore served as President of Missouri Operations for Ameristar Casinos, Inc. from December of 2000 until February of 2002 and President of Midwest Operations for Station Casinos, Inc. from July 1998 until November 2000. Mr. Finamore has over 28 years of gaming industry and hotel management experience.

        Robert S. Ippolito.    In July 2001, we appointed Mr. Ippolito to the position of Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer. Mr. Ippolito has served as our Secretary and Treasurer since April 1994 and as our Chief Financial Officer from April 1994 until July 2001. Mr. Ippolito brings more than 24 years of gaming and racing experience to the management team both as a manager at a major accounting firm and as an officer of companies in the racing business.

        Jordan B. Savitch.    Mr. Savitch joined us in September 2002 as Senior Vice President and General Counsel. From June 1999 to April 2002, Mr. Savitch served as a director and senior executive at iMedium, Inc., a venture-backed software company offering innovative software solutions for increasing sales effectiveness. From 1995 to 1999, Mr. Savitch served as senior corporate counsel at Safeguard Scientifics, Inc., a NYSE-listed company specializing in identifying, developing and operating emerging technology companies. Mr. Savitch also spent four years in private practice as an associate at Willkie Farr & Gallagher, LLP in New York, New York.

        Jay A. Snowden.    Mr. Snowden joined us in October 2011 as Senior Vice President-Regional Operations. In this position, Mr. Snowden is responsible for overseeing all facets of our facilities located in our East/West segment. Prior to joining us, Mr. Snowden was the Senior Vice President and GM of Caesar's and Harrah's in Atlantic City, and prior to that, he held various senior leadership positions in St. Louis, San Diego and Las Vegas.

        Steven T. Snyder.    Mr. Snyder joined us in May 1998, and from 1998 through 2001 served as Vice President of Corporate Development. In June 2003, he accepted the position of Senior Vice President of Corporate Development and is responsible for identifying and conducting internal and industry analysis of potential acquisitions, partnerships and other opportunities. Prior to joining us, Mr. Snyder was a partner with Hamilton Partners, Ltd., as well as Managing Director of Municipal and Corporate Investment Banking for Meridian Capital Markets. Mr. Snyder began his career in finance at Butcher & Singer, where he served as First Vice President of Public Finance.

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Governmental Regulations

        The gaming and racing industries are highly regulated and we must maintain our licenses and pay gaming taxes to continue our operations. Each of our facilities is subject to extensive regulation under the laws, rules and regulations of the jurisdiction where it is located. These laws, rules and regulations generally concern the responsibility, financial stability and character of the owners, managers, and persons with financial interests in the gaming operations. Violations of laws or regulations in one jurisdiction could result in disciplinary action in other jurisdictions. A more detailed description of the regulations to which we are subject is contained in Exhibit 99.1 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which is incorporated herein by reference.

        Our businesses are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations in addition to gaming regulations. These laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, restrictions and conditions concerning alcoholic beverages, environmental matters, employees, currency transactions, taxation, zoning and building codes, and marketing and advertising. Such laws and regulations could change or could be interpreted differently in the future, or new laws and regulations could be enacted. Material changes, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could adversely affect our operating results.

Employees and Labor Relations

        As of December 31, 2011, we had 16,740 full- and part-time employees.

        We are required to have agreements with the horsemen at each of our racetracks to conduct its live racing and simulcasting activities, with the exception of our tracks in Ohio and New Mexico. In addition, in order to operate gaming machines and table games in West Virginia, we must maintain agreements with each of the Charles Town Horsemen, pari-mutuel clerks and breeders.

        At Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, we have an agreement with the Charles Town Horsemen expiring on December 31, 2012, and an agreement with the breeders that expires on June 30, 2012. The pari-mutuel clerks at Charles Town are represented under a collective bargaining agreement with the West Virginia Union of Mutuel Clerks, which expired on December 31, 2010 and has been informally extended on a month-to-month basis while negotiations are in process.

        Our agreement with the Pennsylvania Thoroughbred Horsemen at Penn National Race Course expired on September 30, 2011 has been extended through February 29, 2012 pending continuing negotiations. We have a collective bargaining agreement with Local 137 of the Sports Arena Employees at Penn National Race Course with respect to pari-mutuel clerks, admissions and Telebet personnel which expired on December 31, 2011 and will likely be extended pending negotiations. We also have an agreement in place with Local 137 of the Sports Arena Employees with respect to pari-mutuel clerks and admission personnel at our OTWs, which expires on August 31, 2013.

        Our agreement with the Maine Harness Horsemen Association at Bangor Raceway expired on December 31, 2011. We anticipate having a new agreement in place prior to the commencement of live racing which will occur in May 2012.

        Our agreement with the Ohio Harness Horsemen Association at Raceway Park expires on November 30, 2012. In connection with the acquisition of Beulah Park, we have assumed the agreement with the Ohio Horsemen's Protective and Benevolent Association, which expires on November 30, 2012. Rosecroft Raceway entered into agreements with the Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association and Maryland Standardbred Breeder's Association as of July 5, 2011. Both of these agreements expire on December 31, 2022.

        Across certain of our properties, the Seafarers Entertainment and Allied Trade Union represents approximately 1,860 of our employees under agreements that expire at various times between June

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2012 and November 2020. At Hollywood Casino Joliet, the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union ("UNITE/HERE") Local 1 represents approximately 280 employees under a collective bargaining agreement which expires on March 31, 2015. In addition, at some of our properties, the Seafarer International Union of North America, Atlantic, Gulf, Lakes and Inland Waters District/NMU, AFL-CIO, the Security Police and Fire Professionals of America, the International Brotherhood of Electronic Workers, the UNITE/HERE Local 10, the Local No. 27 United Food and Commercial Workers, and the United Industrial, Service, Transportation, Professional and Government Workers of North America represent certain of our employees under collective bargaining agreements that expire at various times between May 2012 and February 2020. None of these particular unions represent more than 50 of our employees.

Available Information

        For more information about us, visit our website at www.pngaming.com. The contents of our website are not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our electronic filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (including all annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, and current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to these reports), including the exhibits, are available free of charge through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file them with or furnish them to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Our Business

         A substantial portion of our revenues is derived from our Charles Town, West Virginia and Lawrenceburg, Indiana facilities, which will face increased competitive pressures in the near term.

        For the year ended December 31, 2011, approximately 37.4% of our net revenues were collectively derived from our Charles Town and Lawrenceburg operations. Our ability to meet our operating and debt service requirements is substantially dependent upon the continued success of these facilities. The operations at these facilities and any of our other facilities could be adversely affected by numerous factors, including:

    risks related to local and regional economic and competitive conditions, such as a decline in the number of visitors to a facility, a downturn in the overall economy in the market, a decrease in consumer spending on gaming activities in the market or an increase in competition within and outside the state in which each property is located (for example, the potential effect on Charles Town due to the development of a casino complex at the Arundel Mills mall in Anne Arundel, Maryland, the potential opening of a casino in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as ongoing and potentially new competition in Pennsylvania and Maryland, and the potential impact on Lawrenceburg of a proposed $400 million casino in nearby Cincinnati, Ohio that will be operated by Caesars Entertainment as part of a joint venture with Rock Gaming LLC with an announced opening in 2013);

    changes in local and state governmental laws and regulations (including changes in laws and regulations affecting gaming operations and taxes) applicable to a facility;

    impeded access to a facility due to weather, road construction or closures of primary access routes; and

    the occurrence of floods and other natural disasters.

        If any of these events occur, our operating revenues and cash flow could decline significantly.

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         We may face disruption in integrating and managing facilities we may develop or acquire in the future.

        We expect to continue pursuing expansion opportunities, and we regularly evaluate opportunities for acquisition and development of new properties, which evaluations may include discussions and the review of confidential information after the execution of nondisclosure agreements with potential acquisition candidates, some of which may be potentially significant in relation to our size.

        We could face significant challenges in managing and integrating our expanded or combined operations and any other properties we may develop or acquire, particularly in new competitive markets. The integration of properties we may develop or acquire will require the dedication of management resources that may temporarily divert attention from our day-to-day business. The process of integrating properties that we may acquire also could interrupt the activities of those businesses, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the development of new properties may involve construction, local opposition, regulatory, legal and competitive risks as well as the risks attendant to partnership deals on these development opportunities. In particular, in projects where we team up with a joint venture partner, if we cannot reach agreement with such partners, or our relationships otherwise deteriorate, we could face significant increased costs and delays. Local opposition can delay or increase the anticipated cost of a project. Finally, given the competitive nature of these types of limited license opportunities, litigation is possible.

        Management of new properties, especially in new geographic areas, may require that we increase our management resources. We cannot assure you that we will be able to manage the combined operations effectively or realize any of the anticipated benefits of our acquisitions. We also cannot assure you that if acquisitions are completed, that the acquired businesses will generate returns consistent with our expectations.

        Our ability to achieve our objectives in connection with any acquisition we may consummate may be highly dependent on, among other things, our ability to retain the senior level property management teams of such acquisition candidates. If, for any reason, we are unable to retain these management teams following such acquisitions or if we fail to attract new capable executives, our operations after consummation of such acquisitions could be materially adversely affected.

        The occurrence of some or all of the above described events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         We may face risks related to our ability to receive regulatory approvals required to complete, or other delays or impediments to completing certain of our acquisitions.

        Our growth is fueled, in part, by the acquisition of existing gaming, racing, and development properties. In addition to standard closing conditions, our acquisitions are often conditioned on the receipt of regulatory approvals and other hurdles that create uncertainty and could increase costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         We face risks related to the development and expansion of our properties.

        We expect to use a portion of our cash on hand, cash flow from operations and available borrowings under our revolving credit facility for significant capital expenditures at certain of our properties. Any proposed enhancement may require us to significantly increase the size of our existing work force at those properties. We cannot be certain that management will be able to hire and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees to operate and manage these facilities at their optimal levels. The failure to employ the necessary work force could adversely affect our operations and ultimately

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harm profitability. In addition, these enhancements could involve construction risks including cost over-runs and delays, market deterioration and timely receipt of required licenses, permits or authorizations. Our failure to complete any new development or expansion project as planned, on schedule, within budget or in a manner that generates anticipated profits, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         We face a number of challenges prior to opening new or upgraded gaming facilities.

        No assurance can be given that, when we endeavor to open new or upgraded gaming facilities, the expected timetables for opening such facilities will be met in light of the uncertainties inherent in the development of the regulatory framework, construction, the licensing process, legislative action and litigation.

         We face significant competition from other gaming operations.

        The gaming industry is characterized by a high degree of competition among a large number of participants, including riverboat casinos, dockside casinos, land-based casinos, video lottery and poker machines not located in casinos, Native American gaming, and other forms of gaming in the U.S. Furthermore, competition from internet lotteries and other internet wagering gaming services, which allow their customers to wager on a wide variety of sporting events and play Las Vegas-style casino games from home, could divert customers from our properties and thus adversely affect our business. Such internet wagering services are often illegal under federal law but operate from overseas locations, and are nevertheless sometimes accessible to domestic gamblers. Currently, there are proposals that would legalize internet poker and other varieties of internet gaming in a number of states and at the federal level.

        In a broader sense, our gaming operations face competition from all manner of leisure and entertainment activities, including: shopping; high school, collegiate and professional athletic events; television and movies; concerts and travel. Legalized gaming is currently permitted in various forms throughout the U.S., in several Canadian provinces and on various lands taken into trust for the benefit of certain Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada. Other jurisdictions, including states adjacent to states in which we currently have facilities (such as in Ohio and Maryland), have legalized, and are likely to fully implement, gaming in the near future. In addition, established gaming jurisdictions could award additional gaming licenses or permit the expansion or relocation of existing gaming operations. New, relocated or expanded operations by other persons could increase competition for our gaming operations and could have a material adverse impact on us.

        Gaming competition is intense in most of the markets where we operate. There could be further competition in our markets as a result of the upgrading or expansion of facilities by existing market participants, the entrance of new gaming participants into a market or legislative changes. As competing properties and new markets are opened our operating results may be negatively impacted. For example, a proposed $400 million casino scheduled to open in 2013 in Cincinnati, Ohio will compete in the same market as our Lawrenceburg property, increased competition to our Charles Town property is anticipated from the opening of a significant casino complex at the Arundel Mills mall in Anne Arundel, Maryland , the potential opening of a casino in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as ongoing and potentially new competition in Pennsylvania and Maryland, an approximately $357 million riverboat casino and hotel in Baton Rouge, Louisiana is scheduled to open in the summer of 2012 that may have a potential impact on our Baton Rouge property, and an approximately $445 million casino that opened in July 2011 in Des Plaines, Illinois has negatively impacted our Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet properties. In addition, some of our direct competitors in certain markets may have superior facilities and/or operating conditions.

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        We expect each existing or future market in which we participate to be highly competitive. The competitive position of each of our casino properties is discussed in detail in the subsection entitled "Competition" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

         We may face reductions in discretionary consumer spending as a result of an economic downturn.

        Our net revenues are highly dependent upon the volume and spending levels of customers at our properties and as such our business has been adversely impacted by economic downturns. Decreases in discretionary consumer spending brought about by weakened general economic conditions such as, but not limited to, high unemployment levels, low levels of consumer confidence, weakness in the housing market and increased stock market volatility may negatively impact our revenues and operating cash flow.

         We are or may become involved in legal proceedings that, if adversely adjudicated or settled, could impact our financial condition.

        From time to time, we are defendants in various lawsuits relating to matters incidental to our business. The nature of our business subjects us to the risk of lawsuits filed by customers, past and present employees, competitors, business partners and others in the ordinary course of business. As with all litigation, no assurance can be provided as to the outcome of these matters and, in general, litigation can be expensive and time consuming. We may not be successful in these lawsuits, which could result in settlements or damages that could significantly impact our business, financial condition and results of operations (see, for example, the lawsuits described in Item 3 below).

         We face extensive regulation from gaming and other regulatory authorities.

        Licensing requirements.    As owners and managers of gaming and pari-mutuel wagering facilities, we are subject to extensive state, local and, in Canada, provincial regulation. State, local and provincial authorities require us and our subsidiaries to demonstrate suitability to obtain and retain various licenses and require that we have registrations, permits and approvals to conduct gaming operations. These regulatory authorities have broad discretion, and may, for any reason set forth in the applicable legislation, rules and regulations, limit, condition, suspend, fail to renew or revoke a license or registration to conduct gaming operations or prevent us from owning the securities of any of our gaming subsidiaries or prevent another person from owning an equity interest in us. Like all gaming operators in the jurisdictions in which we operate, we must periodically apply to renew our gaming licenses or registrations and have the suitability of certain of our directors, officers and employees approved. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such renewals or approvals. Regulatory authorities have input into our operations, for instance, hours of operation, location or relocation of a facility, and numbers and types of machines. Regulators may also levy substantial fines against or seize our assets or the assets of our subsidiaries or the people involved in violating gaming laws or regulations. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        We have demonstrated suitability to obtain and have obtained all governmental licenses, registrations, permits and approvals necessary for us to operate our existing gaming and pari-mutuel facilities. We cannot assure you that we will be able to retain them or demonstrate suitability to obtain any new licenses, registrations, permits or approvals. In addition, the loss of a license in one jurisdiction could trigger the loss of a license or affect our eligibility for a license in another jurisdiction. As we expand our gaming operations in our existing jurisdictions or to new areas, we may have to meet additional suitability requirements and obtain additional licenses, registrations, permits and approvals from gaming authorities in these jurisdictions. The approval process can be time-consuming and costly and we cannot be sure that we will be successful.

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        Gaming authorities in the U.S. generally can require that any beneficial owner of our securities file an application for a finding of suitability. If a gaming authority requires a record or beneficial owner of our securities to file a suitability application, the owner must generally apply for a finding of suitability within 30 days or at an earlier time prescribed by the gaming authority. The gaming authority has the power to investigate such an owner's suitability and the owner must pay all costs of the investigation. If the owner is found unsuitable, then the owner may be required by law to dispose of our securities.

        Potential changes in legislation and regulation of our operations.    Regulations governing the conduct of gaming activities and the obligations of gaming companies in any jurisdiction in which we have or in the future may have gaming operations are subject to change and could impose additional operating, financial or other burdens on the way we conduct our business.

        Moreover, legislation to prohibit, limit, or add burdens to our business may be introduced in the future in states where gaming has been legalized. In addition, from time to time, legislators and special interest groups have proposed legislation that would expand, restrict or prevent gaming operations or which may otherwise adversely impact our operations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Any expansion of gaming or restriction on or prohibition of our gaming operations or enactment of other adverse regulatory changes could have a material adverse effect on our operating results. For example, in October 2005, the Illinois House of Representatives voted to approve proposed legislation that would eliminate riverboat gambling. If the Illinois Senate had passed that bill, our business would have been materially impacted. In addition, legislation banning smoking appears to be gaining momentum in a number of jurisdictions where we operate or seek to do business (including passage in Illinois, Colorado and Pennsylvania in 2008). If these bans continue to be enacted, our business could be adversely affected.

        Taxation and fees.    We believe that the prospect of significant revenue is one of the primary reasons that jurisdictions permit legalized gaming. As a result, gaming companies are typically subject to significant revenue based taxes and fees in addition to normal federal, state, local and provincial income taxes, and such taxes and fees are subject to increase at any time. We pay substantial taxes and fees with respect to our operations. From time to time, federal, state, local and provincial legislators and officials have proposed changes in tax laws, or in the administration of such laws, affecting the gaming industry. In addition, worsening economic conditions could intensify the efforts of state and local governments to raise revenues through increases in gaming taxes. It is not possible to determine with certainty the likelihood of changes in tax laws or in the administration of such laws. Such changes, if adopted, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The large number of state and local governments with significant current or projected budget deficits makes it more likely that those governments that currently permit gaming will seek to fund such deficits with new or increased gaming taxes, and worsening economic conditions could intensify those efforts. Any material increase, or the adoption of additional taxes or fees, could have a material adverse effect on our future financial results.

        Compliance with other laws.    We are also subject to a variety of other rules and regulations, including zoning, environmental, construction and land-use laws and regulations governing the serving of alcoholic beverages. If we are not in compliance with these laws, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         We depend on our key personnel.

        We are highly dependent on the services of Peter M. Carlino, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Timothy J. Wilmott, our President and Chief Operating Officer, William J. Clifford, our Senior Vice President-Finance and Chief Financial Officer, and other members of our senior management team. Our ability to retain key personnel is affected by the competitiveness of our compensation packages and the other terms and conditions of employment, our continued ability to compete

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effectively against other gaming companies and our growth prospects. The loss of the services of any of these individuals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure may result in additional expenses and compliance risks.

        Changing laws and regulations relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission regulations, generally accepted accounting principles, and NASDAQ Global Select Market rules, are creating uncertainty for companies. These changing laws and regulations are subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity, recent issuance and/or lack of guidance. As a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. In addition, further regulation of financial institutions and public companies is possible. This could result in continuing uncertainty and higher costs regarding compliance matters. Due to our commitment to maintain high standards of compliance with laws and public disclosure, our efforts to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards have resulted in and are likely to continue to result in increased general and administrative expense. In addition, we are subject to different parties' interpretation of our compliance with these new and changing laws and regulations. A failure to comply with any of these laws or regulations could have a materially adverse effect on us. For instance, if our gaming authorities, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, our independent auditors or our shareholders and potential shareholders conclude that our compliance with the regulations is unsatisfactory, this may result in a negative public perception of us, subject us to increased regulatory scrutiny, monetary penalties or otherwise adversely affect us.

         Inclement weather and other casualty events could seriously disrupt our business and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

        The operations of our facilities are subject to disruptions or reduced patronage as a result of severe weather conditions, natural disasters and other casualty events. Because many of our gaming operations are located on or adjacent to bodies of water, these facilities are subject to risks in addition to those associated with land-based casinos, including loss of service due to casualty, forces of nature, mechanical failure, extended or extraordinary maintenance, flood, hurricane or other severe weather conditions. For example, in late August 2005, we closed Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, Boomtown Biloxi in Biloxi, Mississippi and Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in anticipation of Hurricane Katrina. Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge subsequently reopened on August 30, 2005. However, due to the extensive damage sustained, operations at Boomtown Biloxi and Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis did not resume until June 29, 2006 and August 31, 2006, respectively. Many of our casinos operate in areas which are subject to periodic flooding that has caused us to experience decreased attendance and increased operating expenses. Any flood or other severe weather condition could lead to the loss of use of a casino facility for an extended period. For instance, Hollywood Casino Tunica was closed from May 1, 2011 to May 25, 2011 due to flooding. In terms of casualty events, on March 20, 2009, our Hollywood Casino Joliet was closed following a fire that started in the land-based pavilion at the facility. On June 25, 2009, the casino barge reopened with temporary land-based facilities, and we began construction of a new land-based pavilion, which opened in late December 2010.

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         The extent to which we can recover under our insurance policies for damages sustained at our properties in the event of future hurricanes and casualty events could adversely affect our business.

        We maintain significant property insurance, including business interruption coverage, for these and other properties. However, there can be no assurances that we will be fully or promptly compensated for losses at any of our facilities in the event of future hurricanes or casualty events.

         Our operations in certain jurisdictions depend on management agreements and/or leases with third parties and local governments.

        Our operations in several jurisdictions depend on land leases and/or management and development agreements with third parties and local governments. If we are unable to renew these leases and agreements on satisfactory terms as they expire, our business may be disrupted and, in the event of disruptions in multiple jurisdictions, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. For example, in Iowa, each gaming license is issued jointly to a gaming operator and a local charitable sponsor. Our gaming operator subsidiary in Iowa, Belle of Sioux City, L.P. (the "Belle"), is party to an agreement with its local sponsor, Missouri River Historical Development, Inc. ("MRHD") that may expire as soon as July 2012. The Belle is currently negotiating with MRHD to enter into a new long-term agreement in connection with which it has offered to construct a new land-based facility to replace its current barge-based facility. If the Belle does not reach a new agreement with MRHD, it will need to partner with another sponsor. At this time, no assurance can be given that the Belle will be able to reach a new agreement with MRHD or, if such agreement is not reached, that it will be able to partner with another sponsor. In addition, the Belle also has a docking lease with the City of Sioux City, scheduled to expire in January 2013, which permits it to dock its gaming vessel at its current location. Its failure to renew this lease on acceptable terms could disrupt its operations and adversely affect our operating results. Similarly, in the Province of Ontario, through CHC Casinos, our indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary, we manage Casino Rama, a full service gaming and entertainment facility, on behalf of the OLGC, an agency of the Province of Ontario. On October 5, 2010, the OLGC issued a request for proposals inviting gaming operators to bid on a new five year term for the management of the Casino Rama facility subject to a cap on management fees of $5 million per year. Our current management agreement for Casino Rama, which initially expired in July 2011, has been twice extended to provide additional time for the bid process. Our current extension expires on September 30, 2012. No assurance can be given that we will be given additional extensions or that we may ultimately be selected as the new operator.

         We are subject to environmental laws and potential exposure to environmental liabilities.

        We are subject to various federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations that govern our operations, including emissions and discharges into the environment, and the handling and disposal of hazardous and nonhazardous substances and wastes. Failure to comply with such laws and regulations could result in costs for corrective action, penalties or the imposition of other liabilities or restrictions. From time to time, we have incurred and are incurring costs and obligations for correcting environmental noncompliance matters. To date, none of these matters have had a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations; however, there can be no assurance that such matters will not have such an effect in the future. In addition, as we acquire properties, we may not know the full level of exposure that we may have undertaken despite appropriate due diligence.

        We also are subject to laws and regulations that impose liability and clean-up responsibility for releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Under certain of these laws and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of property may be liable for the costs of remediating contaminated soil or groundwater on or from its property, without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or caused, the contamination, as well as incur liability to third parties impacted by such contamination. The presence of contamination, or failure to remediate it properly, may adversely

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affect our ability to use, sell or rent property. The Bullwhackers property is located within the geographic footprint of the Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site, a large area of historic mining activity which is the subject of state and federal clean-up actions. Although we have not been named a potentially responsible party for this Superfund Site, it is possible that as a result of our ownership and operation of this property (on which mining may have occurred in the past), we may incur costs related to this matter in the future. Furthermore, we are aware that there is or may have been soil or groundwater contamination at certain of our properties (such as Colorado and Ohio) resulting from current or former operations. These matters are in various stages of investigation, and we are not able at this time to estimate the costs that will be required to resolve them. Additionally, certain of the gaming chips used at many gaming properties, including some of ours, have been found to contain some level of lead. Analysis by third parties has indicated the normal handling of the chips does not create a health hazard. We are in the process of evaluating our disposal alternatives. To date, none of these matters or other matters arising under environmental laws has had a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations; however, there can be no assurance that such matters will not have such an effect in the future.

         The concentration and evolution of the slot machine manufacturing industry could impose additional costs on us.

        A majority of our revenues are attributable to slot machines operated by us at our gaming facilities. It is important, for competitive reasons, that we offer the most popular and up to date slot machine games with the latest technology to our customers.

        A substantial majority of the slot machines sold in the U.S. in recent years were manufactured by a few select companies. In recent years, the prices of new slot machines have escalated faster than the rate of inflation. Furthermore, in recent years, slot machine manufacturers have frequently refused to sell slot machines featuring the most popular games, instead requiring participation lease arrangements in order to acquire the machines. Participation slot machine leasing arrangements typically require the payment of a fixed daily rental. Such agreements may also include a percentage payment of coin-in or net win. Generally, a participation lease is substantially more expensive over the long term than the cost to purchase a new machine.

        For competitive reasons, we may be forced to purchase new slot machines or enter into participation lease arrangements that are more expensive than our current costs associated with the continued operation of our existing slot machines. If the newer slot machines do not result in sufficient incremental revenues to offset the increased investment and participation lease costs, it could hurt our profitability.

         We depend on agreements with our horsemen and pari-mutuel clerks.

        The Federal Interstate Horseracing Act of 1978, as amended, the West Virginia Racing Act and the Pennsylvania Racing Act require that, in order to simulcast races, we have written agreements with the horse owners and trainers at our West Virginia and Pennsylvania race tracks. In addition, in order to operate gaming machines and table games in West Virginia, we are required to enter into written agreements regarding the proceeds of the gaming machines with a representative of a majority of the horse owners and trainers, a representative of a majority of the pari-mutuel clerks and a representative of a majority of the horse breeders.

        Effective October 1, 2004, we signed an agreement with the Pennsylvania Thoroughbred Horsemen at Penn National Race Course that expired on September 30, 2011, but has been extended through February 29, 2012 pending continuing negotiations. We have a collective bargaining agreement with Local 137 of the Sports Arena Employees at Penn National Race Course with respect to pari-mutuel clerks, admissions and Telebet personnel which expired on December 31, 2011 and will likely be extended pending negotiations. We also have an agreement in place with Local 137 of the Sports Arena Employees with respect to pari-mutuel clerks and admission personnel at our OTWs, which expires on

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August 31, 2013. At Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, we have an agreement with the Charles Town Horsemen expiring on December 31, 2012, and an agreement with the breeders that expires on June 30, 2012. The pari-mutuel clerks at Charles Town are represented under a collective bargaining agreement with the West Virginia Union of Mutuel Clerks, which expired on December 31, 2010 and has been informally extended on a month-to-month basis while negotiations are in process. Our agreement with the Maine Harness Horsemen Association at Bangor Raceway expired on December 31, 2011. We anticipate having a new agreement in place prior to the commencement of live racing which will occur in May 2012. Our agreement with the Ohio Harness Horsemen Association at Raceway Park expires on November 30, 2012. In connection with the acquisition of Beulah Park, we have assumed the agreement with the Ohio Horsemen's Protective and Benevolent Association which expires on November 30, 2012. Rosecroft Raceway entered into agreements with the Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association and Maryland Standardbred Breeder's Association as of July 5, 2011. Both of these agreements expire on December 31, 2022.

        If we fail to maintain operative agreements with the horsemen at a track, we will not be permitted to conduct live racing and export and import simulcasting at that track and OTWs and, in West Virginia, we will not be permitted to operate our gaming machines and table games unless the state intervenes or changes the statute. In addition, our simulcasting agreements are subject to the horsemen's approval. If we fail to renew or modify existing agreements on satisfactory terms, this failure could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

         Work stoppages, organizing drives and other labor problems could negatively impact our future profits.

        Some of our employees are currently represented by labor unions. A lengthy strike or other work stoppages at any of our casino properties or construction projects could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Given the large number of employees, labor unions are making a concerted effort to recruit more employees in the gaming industry. In addition, organized labor may benefit from new legislation or legal interpretations by the current presidential administration. Particularly, in light of current support for changes to federal and state labor laws, we cannot provide any assurance that we will not experience additional and more successful union organization activity in the future.

Risks Related to Our Capital Structure

         Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health and prevent us from fulfilling our obligations under our debt.

        Although we have lower debt leverage ratios than our domestic gaming competitors, we continue to have a significant amount of indebtedness. Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences to our financial health. For example, it could:

    increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

    require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to debt service, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes;

    limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate;

    limit, along with the financial and other restrictive covenants in our indebtedness, among other things, our ability to borrow additional funds; and

    result in an event of default if we fail to satisfy our obligations under our debt or fail to comply with the financial and other restrictive covenants contained in our debt instruments, which event of default could result in all of our debt becoming immediately due and payable and could permit certain of our lenders to foreclose on our assets securing such debt.

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        Any of the above listed factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, we may incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future, including to fund acquisitions. The terms of our existing indebtedness do not, and any future debt may not, fully prohibit us from doing so. If new debt is added to our current debt levels, the related risks that we now face could intensify.

         Volatility and disruption of the capital and credit markets and adverse changes in the global economy may negatively impact our revenues and our ability to access favorable financing terms.

        While we intend to finance expansion and renovation projects with existing cash, cash flow from operations and borrowing under our senior secured credit facility, we may require additional financing to support our continued growth. However, depending on then current economic conditions, our access to capital may not be available on terms acceptable to us or at all. Further, if adverse regional and national economic conditions persist or worsen, we could experience decreased revenues from our operations attributable to decreases in consumer spending levels and could fail to satisfy the financial and other restrictive covenants to which we are subject under our existing indebtedness. Finally, our borrowing costs under our senior secured credit facility are tied to LIBOR. We currently have no hedges in place to mitigate the impact of higher LIBOR rates and as such significant increases in LIBOR could have a negative impact on our results of operations.

         The availability and cost of financing could have an adverse effect on business.

        We intend to finance some of our current and future expansion and renovation projects primarily with cash flow from operations, borrowings under our current senior secured credit facility and equity or debt financings. Depending on the state of the credit markets, if we are unable to finance our current or future expansion projects, we could have to adopt one or more alternatives, such as reducing or delaying planned expansion, development and renovation projects as well as capital expenditures, selling assets, restructuring debt, obtaining additional equity financing or joint venture partners, or modifying our senior secured credit facility. Depending on credit market conditions, these sources of funds may not be sufficient to finance our expansion, and other financing may not be available on acceptable terms, in a timely manner or at all. In addition, our existing indebtedness contains certain restrictions on our ability to incur additional indebtedness. If we are unable to secure additional financing, we could be forced to limit or suspend expansion, acquisitions, development and renovation projects, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        We have a revolving credit facility with a borrowing capacity of $700.0 million that expires in July 2016 via a bank group that is comprised of various large financial institutions with the top four institutions providing over 53% of the facility. If a large percentage of our lenders were to file for bankruptcy or otherwise default on their obligations to us, we could experience decreased levels of liquidity which could have a detrimental impact on our operations, including being able to fund our current project pipeline. There is no certainty that our lenders will continue to remain solvent or fund their respective obligations under our senior secured credit facility.

         Our indebtedness imposes restrictive covenants on us.

        Our senior secured credit facility requires us, among other obligations, to maintain specified financial ratios and to satisfy certain financial tests, including fixed charge coverage, interest coverage, senior leverage and total leverage ratios. In addition, our senior secured credit facility and $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes restrict, among other things, our ability to incur additional indebtedness, incur guarantee obligations, amend debt instruments, pay dividends, create liens on assets, make investments, engage in mergers or consolidations, and otherwise restrict corporate activities. A failure to comply with these restrictions could lead to an event of default thereunder which could result in an acceleration of such indebtedness.

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         To service our indebtedness, we will require a significant amount of cash, which depends on many factors beyond our control.

        Based on our current level of operations, we believe our cash flow from operations, available cash and available borrowings under our senior secured credit facility will be adequate to meet our future liquidity needs for the next year. We cannot assure you, however, that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations, or that future borrowings will be available to us under our senior secured credit facility in amounts sufficient to enable us to fund our liquidity needs, including with respect to our indebtedness. In addition, if we consummate significant acquisitions and/or other expansion opportunities in the future, our cash requirements may increase significantly. As we are required to satisfy amortization requirements under our senior secured credit facility or as other debt matures, we may also need to raise funds to refinance all or a portion of our debt. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of our debt, including our senior secured credit facility, on attractive terms, commercially reasonable terms or at all. Our future operating performance and our ability to service or refinance the notes, extend or refinance our debt, including our senior secured credit facility, will be subject to future economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control.

         The price of our Common Stock may fluctuate significantly.

        Our stock price may fluctuate in response to a number of events and factors, such as variations in operating results, actions by various regulatory agencies and legislatures, litigation, operating competition, market perceptions, progress with respect to potential acquisitions, changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts, the actions of rating agencies, the operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors may deem comparable to us, and news reports relating to trends in our markets or general economic conditions.

ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        None.

ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES

        The following describes our principal real estate properties by segment:

Midwest

        Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg.    We own the Hollywood casino riverboat. We own and lease 52 acres in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, a portion of which serves as the dockside embarkation for the gaming vessel, and includes an entertainment pavilion, a 295-room hotel, two parking garages and an adjacent surface lot. In addition, we own a 52-acre parcel on Route 50 which we use for remote parking.

        The City of Lawrenceburg is currently designing a hotel to be built by the City of Lawrenceburg near our Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg property. By contractual agreement reached with the City of Lawrenceburg, the project will ultimately be owned and operated by a subsidiary of the Company upon completion of construction. Currently slated to include 180 rooms and approximately 18,000 square feet of multipurpose space, the City of Lawrenceburg anticipates an opening date in the third quarter of 2013.

        Hollywood Casino Aurora.    We own a dockside barge structure and land-based pavilion in Aurora, Illinois. We own the land, which is approximately 17,000 square feet, on which the pavilion is located and a pedestrian walkway bridge. The property also includes a parking lot under an operating lease agreement and two parking garages under capital lease agreements.

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        Hollywood Casino Joliet.    We own approximately 276 acres in Joliet, Illinois, which includes a barge-based casino, a 100-room hotel, and a 1,100 space parking garage.

        Argosy Casino Alton.    The Alton Belle II is a riverboat casino, which we own. We lease a 2.5-acre parcel in Alton, Illinois, a portion of which serves as the dockside boarding for the Alton Belle II. The dockside facility includes an entertainment pavilion and office space. In addition, we lease a warehouse facility and own an office building.

        Casino Rama.    We do not own any of the land located at or near the casino or Casino Rama's facilities and equipment. The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation has a long-term ground lease with an affiliate of the Rama First Nation, for the land on which Casino Rama is situated. Under the Agreement, CHC Casinos Canada Limited and CRC Holdings, Inc. have been granted full access to Casino Rama during the term of the Agreement to perform the management services under the Agreement. The Casino Rama facilities are located on approximately 57 acres.

        Hollywood Casino Columbus.    We currently own approximately 123 acres of land in Columbus, Ohio, where we have begun construction of Hollywood Casino Columbus.

        Hollywood Casino Toledo.    We own a 44-acre site in Toledo, Ohio, where we have begun construction of Hollywood Casino Toledo.

East/West

        Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races.    We own 315 acres on various parcels in Charles Town and Ranson, West Virginia of which 155 acres comprise Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races. The facility includes a 153-room hotel and a 3/4-mile all-weather lighted thoroughbred racetrack, a training track, two parking garages, an employee parking lot, an enclosed grandstand/clubhouse and housing facilities for over 1,300 horses.

        Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course.    We own approximately 625 acres in Grantville, Pennsylvania, where Penn National Race Course is located on 225 acres. Currently, the property includes a 365,000 square foot facility, complimented by a one-mile all-weather lighted thoroughbred racetrack and a 7/8-mile turf track, and a parking garage. The property also includes approximately 400 acres surrounding the Penn National Race Course that are available for future expansion or development.

        M Resort.    We own the M Resort, which is situated on over 90 acres on the southeast corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and St. Rose Parkway, in Henderson, Nevada. The M Resort property includes a 390-room hotel, 4,700 space parking, and other land-based facilities.

        Hollywood Casino Perryville.    We own approximately 36 acres of land in Perryville, Maryland, where we opened Hollywood Casino Perryville to the public on September 27, 2010.

        Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway.    We lease the land on which the Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway facility is located in Bangor, Maine, which consists of just over 9 acres, and includes a 152-room hotel and four-story parking. In addition, we lease approximately 26 acres located at historic Bass Park, which is adjacent to the facility, which includes a one-half mile track and a grandstand with over 12,000 square feet and seating for 3,500 patrons.

        Zia Park Casino.    Our casino adjoins the racetrack and is located on an approximately 320-acre site that we own in Hobbs, New Mexico. The property includes a one-mile quarter/thoroughbred racetrack.

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Southern Plains

        Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis.    We own approximately 614 acres in the city of Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, including a 17-acre marina. The property includes a land-based casino, an 18-hole golf course, a 291-room hotel, and other land-based facilities, all of which we own.

        Argosy Casino Riverside.    We own approximately 41 acres in Riverside, Missouri, which includes a barge-based casino, a 258-room luxury hotel, an entertainment/banquet facility and a parking garage.

        Hollywood Casino Tunica.    We lease approximately 70 acres of land in Tunica, Mississippi. The property includes a single-level casino, a 494-room hotel, and other land-based facilities, which we own.

        Boomtown Biloxi.    We lease approximately 13 acres, most of which is utilized for the gaming location, under a lease that expires in 2093. We also lease approximately 5 acres of submerged tidelands at the casino site from the State of Mississippi. We own the barge on which the casino is located and all of the land-based facilities.

        Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge.    Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge is a four-story riverboat casino, which we own. We own a 17.4-acre site on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the East Baton Rouge Downtown Development District. The property site serves as the dockside embarkation for Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge and features a two-story building. We also own 5.5 acres of land that are used primarily for offices, warehousing, and parking. In December 2007, we agreed to acquire 3.8 acres of adjacent land and to pay for half of the construction costs for a railroad underpass with the seller of the land. Construction on the underpass started in June 2009 and was completed in March 2011. The underpass provides unimpeded access to the casino property and to property owned by the seller for future development.

        Argosy Casino Sioux City.    We have a lease in Sioux City, Iowa, for the landing rights, which includes the dockside embarkation for the Argosy IV, a riverboat casino. We own the Argosy IV as well as adjacent barge facilities.

Other

        Bullwhackers.    Our Bullwhackers casino is located on a 3.5-acre site, which we own. On August 30, 2006, we purchased a gas station/convenience store located approximately 7 miles east of the Bullwhackers casino on Highway 119 on a 7.6-acre site.

        Raceway Park.    We own approximately 92 acres in Toledo, Ohio, where Raceway Park is located. The property includes a 5/8-mile standardbred race track, including a clubhouse and a grandstand.

        Beulah Park.    We own approximately 210 acres in Grove City, Ohio, just outside of Columbus, Ohio. The property includes a thoroughbred racing facility, a grandstand, outdoor paddock and a clubhouse building.

        Rosecroft.    Rosecroft Raceway is situated on approximately 125 acres, which we own. The Rosecroft facility features a 5/8-mile standardbred race track with a seven race paddock, a 53,000 square foot grandstand building, and a 96,000 square foot three story clubhouse building with dining facilities.

        Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club.    We own approximately 26 acres in Longwood, Florida where Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club is located. The property includes a 1/4-mile racing surface, a clubhouse dining facility and a main grandstand building. Kennel facilities for up to 1,300 greyhounds are located at a leased location approximately 1/2 mile from the racetrack enclosure.

        Freehold Raceway.    Through our joint venture in Pennwood, we own a 51-acre site in Freehold, New Jersey, where Freehold Raceway is located. The property features a half-mile standardbred race

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track and a grandstand. In addition, through our joint venture in Pennwood, we own a 10-acre site in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, which is currently undeveloped.

        Sam Houston Race Park and Valley Race Park.    Through our joint venture with MAXXAM, we own 323 acres at Sam Houston Race Park and 80 acres at Valley Race Park. Sam Houston Race Park includes a one-mile dirt track and a 7/8-mile turf track as well as a 226,000 square foot grandstand and pavilion centre. Valley Race Park includes a 91,000 square foot dog racing and simulcasting facility.

        Off-track Wagering Facilities.    The following is a list of our four OTWs, which are leased, and their locations:

Location
  Approx. Size
(Square Ft.)
  Owned/Leased   Date Opened  

Reading, PA

    22,500   Leased     May 1992  

Chambersburg, PA

   
12,500
 

Leased

   

April 1994

 

York, PA

   
25,000
 

Leased

   

March 1995

 

Lancaster, PA

   
24,000
 

Leased

   

July 1996

 

        In addition, through our joint venture in Pennwood, we own 50% of a leased OTW in Toms River, New Jersey, that has 28,160 square feet.

        Corporate.    We lease 45,917 square feet of executive office and warehouse space for buildings in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania from affiliates of Peter M. Carlino, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. We believe the lease terms for the executive office and warehouse to be no less favorable than such lease terms that could have been obtained from unaffiliated third parties.

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        We are subject to various legal and administrative proceedings relating to personal injuries, employment matters, commercial transactions and other matters arising in the normal course of business. We do not believe that the final outcome of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations. In addition, we maintain what we believe is adequate insurance coverage to further mitigate the risks of such proceedings. However, such proceedings can be costly, time consuming and unpredictable and, therefore, no assurance can be given that the final outcome of such proceedings may not materially impact our consolidated financial condition or results of operations. Further, no assurance can be given that the amount or scope of existing insurance coverage will be sufficient to cover losses arising from such matters.

        The following proceedings could result in costs, settlements, damages, or rulings that materially impact our consolidated financial condition or operating results. In each instance, we believe that we have meritorious defenses, claims and/or counter-claims, and intends to vigorously defend ourselves or pursue our claim.

        The Illinois Legislature passed into law House Bill 1918, effective May 26, 2006, which singled out four of the nine Illinois casinos, including the Company's Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora, for a 3% surcharge to subsidize local horse racing interests. On May 30, 2006, Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora joined with the two other riverboats affected by the law, Harrah's Joliet and the Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin (collectively, the "Four Casinos"), and filed suit in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial District in Will County, Illinois (the "Court"), asking the Court to declare the law unconstitutional. Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora began paying the 3% surcharge into a protest fund which accrued interest during the pendency of the lawsuit. In two orders dated March 29, 2007 and April 20, 2007, the Court declared the law unconstitutional under the Uniformity Clause of the Illinois Constitution and enjoined the collection of this surcharge. The State of Illinois requested, and was granted, a stay of this ruling. As a result,

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Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora continued paying the 3% surcharge into the protest fund until May 25, 2008, when the 3% surcharge expired. The State of Illinois appealed the ruling to the Illinois Supreme Court. On June 5, 2008, the Illinois Supreme Court reversed the trial court's ruling and issued a decision upholding the constitutionality of the 3% surcharge. On January 21, 2009, the Four Casinos filed a petition for certiorari, requesting the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case. Seven amicus curiae briefs supporting the plaintiffs' request were also filed. On June 8, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court decided not to hear the case. On June 10, 2009, the Four Casinos filed a petition with the Court to open the judgment based on new evidence that came to light during the investigation of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich that the 2006 law was procured by corruption. On August 17, 2009, the Court dismissed the Four Casinos' petition to reopen the case, and the Four Casinos decided not to pursue an appeal of the dismissal.

        On December 15, 2008, former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich signed Public Act No. 95-1008 requiring the Four Casinos to continue paying the 3% surcharge to subsidize Illinois horse racing interests. On January 8, 2009, the Four Casinos filed suit in the Court, asking it to declare the law unconstitutional. The 3% surcharge being paid pursuant to Public Act No. 95-1008 was paid into a protest fund where it accrued interest. The defendants filed a motion to dismiss, which was granted on August 17, 2009. The Four Casinos appealed the dismissal and filed motions to keep the payments in the protest fund while the appeal is being litigated. The motion to keep the monies in the protest fund was denied and the funds were released to the racetracks. On January 27, 2011, the Illinois appellate court affirmed the trial court's dismissal of this case. Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora asked the Illinois Supreme Court to hear an appeal of this dismissal and this request was denied. The monies paid into the protest fund have been transferred by the State of Illinois to the racetracks. The payment of the 3% surcharge under the 2008 statute ended on July 14, 2011 with the opening of the new casino in Des Plaines, Illinois.

        On June 12, 2009, the Four Casinos filed a lawsuit in Illinois Federal Court naming former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, his campaign fund, racetrack owner John Johnston, and his two racetracks as defendants alleging a civil conspiracy in violation of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, 18 U.S.C. §1962(c),(d) ("RICO"), based on an illegal scheme to secure the enactment of the 3% surcharge legislation in exchange for the payment of money by Johnston and entities controlled by him. The Four Casinos sought to impose a constructive trust over all funds paid under the surcharge, and therefore all of the Illinois racetracks were named as parties to the lawsuit. The defendants in the RICO case filed motions to dismiss. On December 7, 2009, the district court denied the motions to dismiss the RICO count, but it granted the motion to dismiss the constructive trust count, stating that it did not have jurisdiction in this case to impose the constructive trust. The Four Casinos appealed this dismissal to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, which affirmed the dismissal in an en banc opinion. The Illinois racetracks are now free to use the monies that they received from the 3% surcharge. Since the passing of House Bill 1918 into law, Hollywood Casino Joliet and Hollywood Casino Aurora have recognized approximately $55.2 million in expense as a result of the 3% surcharge, including $5.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2011. The 3% surcharge is included in gaming expense within the consolidated statements of operations.

        On July 16, 2008, the Company was served with a purported class action lawsuit brought by plaintiffs seeking to represent a class of shareholders who purchased shares of the Company's Common Stock between March 20, 2008 and July 2, 2008. The lawsuit alleges that the Company's disclosure practices relative to the proposed transaction with Fortress Investment Group LLC and Centerbridge Partners, L.P. and the eventual termination of that transaction were misleading and deficient in violation of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The complaint, which seeks class certification and unspecified damages, was filed in federal court in Maryland. The complaint was amended, among other things, to add three new named plaintiffs and to name Peter M. Carlino, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and William J. Clifford, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, as

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additional defendants. The Company filed a motion to dismiss the complaint in November 2008, and the court granted the motion and dismissed the complaint with prejudice. The plaintiffs filed a motion for reconsideration, which was denied on October 21, 2009. The plaintiffs subsequently appealed the dismissal to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and an oral argument was heard on October 26, 2010. On March 14, 2011, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the decision of the lower court. The plaintiffs have requested the U.S. Supreme Court to consider an appeal of the decision. In October 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the application for an appeal.

        On September 11, 2008, the Board of County Commissioners of Cherokee County, Kansas (the "County") filed suit against Kansas Penn Gaming, LLC ("KPG," a wholly-owned subsidiary of Penn created to pursue a development project in Cherokee County, Kansas) and the Company in the District Court of Shawnee County, Kansas. The petition alleges that KPG breached its pre-development agreement with the County when KPG withdrew its application to manage a lottery gaming facility in Cherokee County and currently seeks in excess of $50 million in damages. In connection with their petition, the County obtained an ex-parte order attaching the $25 million privilege fee paid to the Kansas Lottery Commission in conjunction with the gaming application for the Cherokee County zone. The defendants have filed motions to dissolve and reduce the attachment. Those motions were denied. Following discovery, both parties have filed dispositive motions.

        On September 23, 2008, KPG filed an action against HV Properties of Kansas, LLC ("HV") in the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas seeking a declaratory judgment from the U.S. District Court finding that KPG has no further obligations to HV under a Real Estate Sale Contract (the "Contract") that KPG and HV entered into on September 6, 2007, and that KPG properly terminated this Contract under the terms of the Repurchase Agreement entered into between the parties effective September 28, 2007. HV filed a counterclaim claiming KPG breached the Contract, and seeks $37.5 million in damages. On October 7, 2008, HV filed suit against the Company claiming the Company is liable to HV for KPG's alleged breach based on a Guaranty Agreement signed by the Company. Both cases were consolidated. Following extensive discovery and briefings, on July 23, 2010, the court granted KPG's motion for summary judgment and dismissed HV's claim. KPG filed a motion requesting reimbursement of the attorneys' fees and costs incurred in litigating this case pursuant to the terms of the Contract and was awarded approximately $0.9 million. HV has appealed both rulings of the district court. In December 2011, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the district courts' rulings.

        On March 11, 2011, CD Gaming Ventures, LLC ("CD Gaming"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company and developer of the Columbus casino, filed suit in U.S. District Court against the City of Columbus (the "City"), Columbus officials, Franklin County and County officials. The lawsuit alleged that the City, Franklin County and various city and county officials violated the Company's rights under the U.S. and Ohio Constitutions, principally by removing preexisting sewer and water service in an effort to force annexation of the constitutionally-authorized casino site into the City. CD Gaming asked the court for an injunction preventing the City and the county from denying water and sewer service to the casino site and also sought monetary damages. On May 24, 2011, the City and CD Gaming announced they had reached a contingent agreement, subject to final documentation, that would result in the annexation of the casino site into the City in exchange for water and sewer service and other considerations. The agreement was conditioned, among other things, on the sale of real estate previously purchased by the Company in downtown Columbus for $11 million and an acceptable settlement agreement with certain affiliates of the Columbus Dispatch. A sale agreement for the real estate in downtown Columbus closed on August 23, 2011 and a release and settlement agreement has been finalized with certain affiliates of the Columbus Dispatch.

ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

        None.

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PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Range of Market Price

        Our Common Stock is quoted on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol "PENN." The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low sales prices per share of our Common Stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market.

 
  High   Low  

2011

             

First Quarter

  $ 38.17   $ 33.42  

Second Quarter

    40.75     36.36  

Third Quarter

    44.29     33.05  

Fourth Quarter

    41.49     31.68  

2010

             

First Quarter

  $ 30.22   $ 22.45  

Second Quarter

    31.95     23.05  

Third Quarter

    30.86     22.35  

Fourth Quarter

    37.32     29.44  

        The closing sale price per share of our Common Stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on February 15, 2012, was $41.85. As of February 15, 2012, there were approximately 583 holders of record of our Common Stock.

Dividend Policy

        Since our initial public offering of Common Stock in May 1994, we have not paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock. We intend to retain all of our earnings to finance the development of our business, and thus, do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our Common Stock for the foreseeable future. Payment of any cash dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, our future earnings, operations and capital requirements, our general financial condition and general business conditions. In addition, our senior secured credit facility and $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes restrict, among other things, our ability to pay dividends. In addition, future financing arrangements may prohibit the payment of dividends under certain conditions.

Stock Repurchase

        On June 9, 2011, the Board of Directors authorized the extension of the repurchase program previously authorized by the Board of Directors on June 9, 2010 which provided for the purchase of up to $300 million of our Common Stock. The current authorization extends the repurchase program until the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in 2012, unless otherwise extended or shortened by the Board of Directors. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we repurchased 2,981,406 shares of our Common Stock in open market transactions for approximately $105.2 million at an average price of $35.29 per share. During the year ended December 31, 2010, we repurchased 1,526,400 shares of our Common Stock in open market transactions for approximately $35.9 million at an average price of $23.49 per share. We did not repurchase any shares of our Common Stock in 2009.

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        The table below summarizes the Company's repurchases of Common Stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2011:

 
  Total Number of
Shares Purchased
  Average
Price Paid
per Share
  Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced
Program(1)
  Maximum Dollar
Value of Shares
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Program
 

October 1, 2011 - October 31, 2011

      $       $ 238,329,608  

November 1, 2011 - November 30, 2011

    1,190,935     34.69     1,190,935     197,013,437  

December 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    1,034,954     35.61     1,034,954     160,159,344  

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ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

        The following selected consolidated financial and operating data for the five-year period ended December 31, 2011 is derived from our consolidated financial statements that have been audited by Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm. The selected consolidated financial and operating data should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and the other financial information included herein.

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010(1)   2009(2)   2008(3)   2007  
 
  (in thousands, except per share data)
 

Income statement data:(4)

                               

Net revenues

  $ 2,742,257   $ 2,459,111   $ 2,369,275   $ 2,423,053   $ 2,436,793  

Total operating expenses

    2,242,676     2,305,885     2,563,873     2,509,494     1,938,984  
                       

Income (loss) from operations

    499,581     153,226     (194,598 )   (86,441 )   497,809  

Total other (expenses) income

    (110,349 )   (148,708 )   (133,283 )   38,856     (205,569 )
                       

Income (loss) from operations before income taxes

    389,232     4,518     (327,881 )   (47,585 )   292,240  

Taxes on income

    146,881     66,178     (60,468 )   105,738     132,187  
                       

Net income (loss) including noncontrolling interests

    242,351     (61,660 )   (267,413 )   (153,323 )   160,053  

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

        (2,193 )   (2,465 )        
                       

Net income (loss) attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries

  $ 242,351   $ (59,467 ) $ (264,948 ) $ (153,323 ) $ 160,053  
                       

Per share data:

                               

Basic earnings (loss) per common share

  $ 2.52   $ (0.76 ) $ (3.39 ) $ (1.81 ) $ 1.87  

Diluted earnings (loss) per common share

  $ 2.26   $ (0.76 ) $ (3.39 ) $ (1.81 ) $ 1.81  

Weighted shares outstanding—Basic(5)

    77,991     78,079     78,122     84,536     85,578  

Weighted shares outstanding—Diluted(5)

    107,051     78,079     78,122     84,536     88,384  

Other data:

                               

Net cash provided by operating activities

  $ 567,365   $ 493,178   $ 338,246   $ 420,463   $ 431,219  

Net cash used in investing activities

    (338,802 )   (736,758 )   (262,659 )   (391,498 )   (611,617 )

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

    (236,508 )   (223,153 )   (108,747 )   542,941     186,255  

Depreciation and amortization

    211,476     212,387     194,436     173,545     147,915  

Interest expense

    99,564     130,215     134,984     169,827     198,059  

Capital expenditures

    293,081     362,955     289,551     344,894     361,155  

Balance sheet data:

                               

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 238,440   $ 246,385   $ 713,118   $ 746,278   $ 174,372  

Total assets

    4,606,346     4,462,879     4,712,616     5,189,676     4,967,032  

Total debt

    2,043,165     2,171,123     2,334,777     2,430,180     2,974,922  

Shareholders' equity

    1,971,631     1,777,766     1,852,076     2,057,273     1,120,962  

(1)
As a result of decreased earning projections resulting from an anticipated increase in competition from the scheduled opening of a $445 million casino in the second half of 2011 in Des Plaines, Illinois, as well as continued challenging market conditions in the Chicagoland regional market, we recorded a pre-tax goodwill impairment charge of $188.8 million ($173.0 million, net of taxes) related to our Aurora and Joliet properties during the year ended December 31, 2010. As a result of the May 2010 statewide election, whereby the voters determined that our casino in Columbus will be located at the site of the former Delphi Automotive plant along Columbus's West Side, we reclassified the land that

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    we had previously purchased in the Arena District site that had been originally approved for our casino as held for sale and recorded a pre-tax impairment charge of $31.3 million ($20.1 million, net of taxes). Additionally, during the year ended December 31, 2010, we wrote-off the trademark intangible asset associated with the Argosy acquisition for $4.4 million ($2.8 million, net of taxes) due to management's strategy to transition Argosy properties to the Hollywood Casino brand. We also recorded a pre-tax charge of $0.2 million during the year-ended December 31, 2010 related to the replaced Lawrenceburg vessel. See Note 3 below.

(2)
As a result of the anticipated impact of gaming expansion in Ohio, we recorded a pre-tax impairment charge of $520.5 million ($368.8 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2009, as we determined that a portion of the value of our goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets associated with the original purchase of Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg was impaired. In addition, in conjunction with the opening of the new casino riverboat at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, we recorded a pre-tax impairment charge for the replaced Lawrenceburg vessel of $11.9 million ($7.1 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2009.

(3)
As a result of a decline in our share price, an overall reduction in industry valuations, and property operating performance in the then-current economic environment, we recorded a pre-tax impairment charge of $481.3 million ($392.6 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2008, as we determined that a portion of the value of our goodwill, indefinite-life intangible assets and long-lived assets was impaired. The December 31, 2008 impairment charge by property was as follows: Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, $214.1 million pre-tax ($189.3 million, net of taxes); Hollywood Casino Aurora, $43.7 million pre-tax and net of taxes; Hollywood Casino Joliet, $94.4 million pre-tax ($60.4 million, net of taxes); Argosy Casino Alton, $14.1 million pre-tax and net of taxes; Bullwhackers, $14.2 million pre-tax ($9.1 million, net of taxes); Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway, $82.7 million pre-tax ($64.0 million, net of taxes); and Corporate overhead, $18.1 million pre-tax ($12.0 million, net of taxes).

(4)
For purposes of comparability, certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

(5)
Since we reported a loss from operations for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, we were required to use basic weighted-average common shares outstanding, rather than diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding, when calculating diluted loss per share for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008.

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Our Operations

        We are a leading, diversified, multi-jurisdictional owner and manager of gaming and pari-mutuel properties. As of December 31, 2011, we owned, managed, or had ownership interests in twenty-five facilities in the following eighteen jurisdictions: Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Ontario. We believe that our portfolio of assets provides us with diversified cash flow from operations.

        We have made significant acquisitions in the past, and expect to continue to pursue additional acquisition and development opportunities in the future. In 1997, we began our transition from a pari-mutuel company to a diversified gaming company with the acquisition of the Charles Town property and the introduction of video lottery terminals in West Virginia. Since 1997, we have continued to expand our gaming operations through strategic acquisitions (including the acquisitions of Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis and Boomtown Biloxi, CRC Holdings, Inc., the Bullwhackers properties, Hollywood Casino Corporation, Argosy Gaming Company, Zia Park Casino, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club and the M Resort in June 2011), greenfield projects (such as at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway and Hollywood Casino Perryville), and property expansions (such as Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg). Most recently, we, along with our joint venture partner, opened Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway on February 3, 2012, and we anticipate opening our facilities in Columbus and Toledo, Ohio in 2012.

        The vast majority of our revenue is gaming revenue, derived primarily from gaming on slot machines and, to a lesser extent, table games, which is highly dependent upon the volume and spending levels of customers at our properties. Other revenues are derived from our management service fee from Casino Rama, our hotel, dining, retail, admissions, program sales, concessions and certain other ancillary activities, and our racing operations. Our racing revenue includes our share of pari-mutuel wagering on live races after payment of amounts returned as winning wagers, our share of wagering from import and export simulcasting, and our share of wagering from our OTWs.

        Key performance indicators related to gaming revenue are slot handle and table game drop (volume indicators) and "win" or "hold" percentage. Our typical property slot win percentage is in the range of 6% to 10% of slot handle, and our typical table game win percentage is in the range of 12% to 25% of table game drop.

        Our properties generate significant operating cash flow, since most of our revenue is cash-based from slot machines and pari-mutuel wagering. Our business is capital intensive, and we rely on cash flow from our properties to generate operating cash to repay debt, fund capital maintenance expenditures, fund new capital projects at existing properties and provide excess cash for future development and acquisitions.

        We continue to expand our gaming operations through the implementation and execution of a disciplined capital expenditure program at our existing properties, the pursuit of strategic acquisitions and the development of new gaming properties, particularly in attractive regional markets. Current capital projects are ongoing at several of our new and existing properties, including our facilities under construction in Ohio. Additional information regarding our capital projects is discussed in detail in the section entitled "Liquidity and Capital Resources—Capital Expenditures" below.

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Segment Information

        During 2011, we realigned our reporting structure in connection with the hiring of a senior vice president of regional operations. We now have three senior vice presidents of regional operations who oversee various properties based primarily on their geographic locations and whom report directly to our President and Chief Operating Officer. This event impacted how our Chief Executive Officer, who is the Company's CODM as that term is defined in ASC 280, measures and assesses our business performance and has caused us to conclude that we now have reportable segments. Therefore, we have aggregated our properties into three reportable segments: (i) Midwest, (ii) East/West, and (iii) Southern Plains, consistent with how our CODM reviews and assesses our financial performance.

        The Midwest reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, Hollywood Casino Aurora, Hollywood Casino Joliet, and Argosy Casino Alton. It also includes our Casino Rama management service contract as well as the two Ohio properties that are currently under construction, Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, which are scheduled to open by the end of May 2012 and November 1, 2012, respectively.

        The East/West reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, Hollywood Casino Perryville, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway, Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Zia Park Casino, and M Resort.

        The Southern Plains reportable segment consists of the following properties: Argosy Casino Riverside, Argosy Casino Sioux City, Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge, Hollywood Casino Tunica, Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis, and Boomtown Biloxi. It also includes our 50% investment in Kansas Entertainment, which owns the Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway which opened in February 2012.

        The Other category consists of our standalone racing operations, namely Beulah Park, Raceway Park, Rosecroft Raceway, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club, and our joint venture interests in Sam Houston Race Park and Valley Race Park, Freehold Raceway, and Maryland Jockey Club (which was sold in July 2011). If we are successful in obtaining gaming operations at these locations, they would be assigned to one of our regional executives and reported in their respective reportable segment. The Other category also includes our corporate overhead operations which does not meet the definition of an operating segment under ASC 280 and our Bullwhackers property.

Executive Summary

        Economic conditions continue to impact the overall domestic gaming industry as well as operating results. We believe that the current economic conditions, including, but not limited to, high unemployment levels, low levels of consumer confidence, weakness in the housing and consumer credit markets and increased stock market volatility, have resulted in reduced levels of discretionary consumer spending compared to historical levels. In order to mitigate the impact of these conditions, we have increasingly focused on cost management, such as monitoring staff levels and establishing effective marketing programs, to continue to generate strong cash flow.

        Even though the current economic environment has been challenging, we believe our strengths include our relatively low leverage ratios compared to the regional casino companies that we directly compete with and the ability of our operations to generate positive cash flow. These two factors have allowed us to develop what we believe to be attractive future growth opportunities in new regional gaming markets. We have also made investments in joint ventures and certain racetrack operations that we believe may allow us to capitalize on additional gaming opportunities in certain states if legislation or referenda are passed that permit and/or expand gaming in these jurisdictions.

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Financial Highlights:

        The major factors affecting our results for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2010, were:

    Net revenues and income from operations increased by $293.5 million and $82.2 million, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the corresponding period in the prior year, for our East/West segment, primarily due to the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011, the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010, and the introduction of table games in July 2010 at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course.

    Income from operations at our Midwest segment was impacted by a pre-tax insurance gain of $18.5 million at Hollywood Casino Joliet during the year ended December 31, 2011, compared to a pre-tax insurance gain of $7.5 million during the corresponding period in the prior year, and included goodwill and other impairment losses of $220.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2010.

    Excluding the recently opened Hollywood Casino Perryville and the recently acquired M Resort, management's continued focus on cost management contributed to improved operating margins at 14 of our 15 gaming facilities.

    Our Other category included a gain of $20.2 million on the sale of our interest in the Maryland Jockey Club in July 2011 for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to a loss from our interest in the Maryland Jockey Club for the year ended December 31, 2010, which included our share of a goodwill impairment write-down recorded by the Maryland Jockey Club during the fourth quarter of 2010 for $14.4 million. Our Other category for the year ended December 31, 2011 also included a loss on the early extinguishment of debt for $17.8 million related to debt issuance costs write-offs and the call premium on the $250 million senior subordinated notes, as well as a $5.9 million charge for our share of a goodwill impairment write-down at our New Jersey joint venture.

    Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and its subsidiaries increased by $301.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2010, primarily due to the variances explained above and a decrease in interest expense as well as an increase in income taxes.

Recent Developments:

        The following are recent developments that have had or are likely to have an impact on us:

    In July 2011, we entered into a new $2.15 billion senior secured credit facility which is comprised of a $700 million revolving credit facility that will mature in July 2016, a $700 million variable rate Term Loan A due in July 2016 and a $750 million variable rate Term Loan B due in July 2018. We utilized the proceeds of the two term loan borrowings and cash on hand to retire our previous senior secured credit facility obligation of $1,518.1 million (which had significant principal repayments due at the end of 2011 and 2012) and pay transaction costs and accrued interest and fees on the retired debt. As a result of this refinancing, we incurred a $10.2 million loss on the early extinguishment of debt during the year ended December 31, 2011. Additionally, in July 2011, we announced our intention to redeem all of our $250 million senior subordinated notes. The redemption price was $1,022.50 per $1,000 principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest, which was paid in August 2011. We funded the redemption of our $250 million senior subordinated notes from our new revolving credit facility and available cash. We recorded a $7.6 million loss on early extinguishment of debt during the year ended

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      December 31, 2011 related to debt issuance costs write-offs and the call premium on the $250 million senior subordinated notes.

    Following the purchase of all of the outstanding debt of the M Resort for $230.5 million and the receipt of requisite regulatory approvals, we acquired the business in exchange for the debt on June 1, 2011. We purchased all of the outstanding bank and subordinated debt of the M Resort in October 2010 at which time we also secured the right to acquire the business of the M Resort in exchange for the property's outstanding debt obligations.

    The Hollywood Casino Columbus project, a $400 million Hollywood-themed casino in Columbus, Ohio, inclusive of $50 million in licensing fees, is under construction, with a planned casino opening of up to 3,000 slot machines, 70 table games and 30 poker tables, structured and surface parking, as well as food and beverage outlets and an entertainment lounge. We expect that Hollywood Casino Columbus will open on November 1, 2012. Construction is also underway for Hollywood Casino Toledo, a $320 million Hollywood-themed casino in Toledo, Ohio, inclusive of $50 million in licensing fees, with a planned casino opening of 2,000 slot machines, 60 table games and 20 poker tables, structured and surface parking, as well as food and beverage outlets and an entertainment lounge. Hollywood Casino Toledo is anticipated to open by the end of May 2012.

    In June 2011, we reached an agreement in principle with the State of Ohio that will provide greater clarity regarding our total state tax burden and future competition, and establishes the framework, including licensing fees, tax structure and minimal capital expenditures, for the placement of video lottery terminals at the state's seven racetracks. The State of Ohio has approved the placement of video lottery terminals at the state's seven racetracks and while we await the regulatory structure to be put in place, we are actively seeking the potential relocation of our existing racetracks at Raceway Park and Beulah Park to Youngstown and Dayton, respectively. On October 21, 2011, The Ohio Roundtable filed a complaint in the Court of Common Pleas in Franklin County, Ohio against a number of defendants, including the Governor, the Ohio Lottery Commission and the Ohio Casino Control Commission. The complaint alleges a variety of substantive and procedural defects relative to the approval and implementation of video lottery terminals as well as several counts dealing with the taxation of standalone casinos.

    On July 18, 2011, the tenth licensed casino in Illinois opened in the city of Des Plaines. This facility is a new source of competition for Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet and has had a negative impact on these properties' financial results. However, the 3% surcharge Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet paid to subsidize local horse racing interests is no longer required with the opening of the Des Plaines facility.

    In February 2010, Kansas Entertainment received the final approval under the Kansas Expanded Lottery Act, along with its gaming license from the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission, to proceed with the development of an approximately $411 million Hollywood-themed destination facility overlooking Turn 2 at Kansas Speedway. Kansas Entertainment began construction of the facility in the second quarter of 2010 and the facility opened on February 3, 2012. The approximately $411 million facility, inclusive of licensing fees, features a 95,000 square foot casino with approximately 2,000 slot machines, 52 table games and 12 poker tables, a 1,253 space parking structure, as well as a variety of dining and entertainment amenities. We, along with our partner in Kansas Entertainment, International Speedway, shared equally in the cost of developing and constructing the facility. We estimate that our share of the project will be approximately $155 million.

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    Each gaming license in Iowa is issued jointly to a gaming operator and a local charitable sponsor. The agreement between our gaming operator subsidiary in Iowa, Belle of Sioux City, L.P. (the "Belle") and its charitable sponsor, Missouri River Historical Development, Inc. ("MRHD"), may expire as early as July 2012. The Belle is in the process of negotiating with MRHD to transition its current barge-based facility to a new land-based facility and to enter into a new long-term agreement with MRHD. If a new agreement cannot be reached, MRHD has indicated that it may issue a request for proposals for alternative operators for a new land-based facility and has preemptively filed a lawsuit seeking to establish its right to do so. If MRHD were to issue such a request, the Belle may contest MRHD's right to do so, may participate in the process and/or may seek an alternative charitable sponsor. Accordingly, at this time, there can be no assurance that the Belle will be able to reach an agreement with MRHD or, absent such agreement, that it will be able to partner with an alternative charitable sponsor. In the event that both MRHD and the Belle find alternative partners, it is unclear whether the Iowa Gaming and Racing Commission would issue a gaming license to one or both such groups. Further, the Belle's ability to continue its operations may also be impacted by its ability to renew or extend its existing docking lease, which expires in January 2013, or to locate a suitable site to construct a land-based facility.

    We closed the transaction to enter into a joint venture that owns and operates the Sam Houston Race Park in Houston, Texas and the Valley Race Park in Harlingen, Texas, and holds a license for a planned racetrack in Laredo, Texas on April 8, 2011, following final approval by the Texas Racing Commission and the satisfaction of certain closing conditions. We intend to work collaboratively with MAXXAM, our joint venture partner, to strengthen and enhance the existing racetrack operations as well as pursue other opportunities, including the potential for gaming operations at the pari-mutuel facilities, to maximize the overall value of the business.

    Hollywood Casino Joliet, which was undergoing a $55 million renovation, was closed following a fire that started in the land-based pavilion at the facility on March 20, 2009. All customers and employees were successfully evacuated, and the fire was contained on the land-side of the property before it could spread to the adjacent casino barge. On June 25, 2009, the casino barge was reopened with temporary land-based facilities, and we began construction of a new land-based pavilion. In December 2010, the first phase of the new permanent land-based pavilion was opened to the public and in January 2011 the final phase, including a sports bar, was completed. At the time of the fire, we carried a builders' risk insurance policy for the on-going renovations with a policy limit of $57 million, inclusive of $14 million for delay in completion and $43 million for property damage. The builders' risk insurance policy included a $50,000 property damage deductible and a 30-day delay in completion deductible for the peril of fire. In addition, we carried comprehensive business interruption and property damage insurance for the operational components of Hollywood Casino Joliet with an overall limit of $228 million. The operational insurance policy included a $2.5 million property damage deductible and a 48-hour business interruption deductible for the peril of fire. We received $81.2 million in insurance proceeds related to the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet, with $18.6 million received during the year ended December 31, 2011. As the insurance recovery amount exceeded the net book value of assets believed to be damaged, destroyed or abandoned and other costs incurred as a result of the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet in 2010, we recorded a pre-tax gain of $18.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2011. During the second quarter of 2011, the insurance claim for the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet was settled and no further proceeds will be received.

    On May 1, 2011, Hollywood Casino Tunica was forced to close as a result of flooding by the Mississippi River. Due to the flooding, access to the property was temporarily cut-off and the property sustained minor damage. The property reopened on May 25, 2011. At the time of the flood, we carried property insurance coverage with a flood limit of $300 million for both

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      property damage and business interruption applicable to this event. This coverage included a $5 million property damage and two day business interruption deductible for the peril of flood. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we recorded a $5.2 million pre-tax loss for the insurance deductibles for property damage and business interruption. The $1.1 million insurance receivable within the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2011 was limited to the net book value of assets believed to be damaged and other costs incurred as a result of the flood at Hollywood Casino Tunica that are expected to be recovered via an insurance claim that we expect to finalize in 2012. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we received $7.0 million in insurance proceeds related to the flood at Hollywood Casino Tunica.

    In July 2011, we entered into a new interim agreement with the OLGC for the operation of the Casino Rama facility through March 31, 2012, which was subsequently extended in January 2012 for an additional six months through September 30, 2012. The OLGC is currently in the process of evaluating bids on a new five year operating contract for the facility (with bids required to include operating fees that do not exceed $5 million per year).

Critical Accounting Estimates

        We make certain judgments and use certain estimates and assumptions when applying accounting principles in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. The nature of the estimates and assumptions are material due to the levels of subjectivity and judgment necessary to account for highly uncertain factors or the susceptibility of such factors to change. We have identified the accounting for long-lived assets, goodwill and other intangible assets, income taxes and litigation, claims and assessments as critical accounting estimates, as they are the most important to our financial statement presentation and require difficult, subjective and complex judgments.

        We believe the current assumptions and other considerations used to estimate amounts reflected in our consolidated financial statements are appropriate. However, if actual experience differs from the assumptions and other considerations used in estimating amounts reflected in our consolidated financial statements, the resulting changes could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and, in certain situations, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

        The development and selection of the critical accounting estimates, and the related disclosures, have been reviewed with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.

Long-lived assets

        At December 31, 2011, we had a net property and equipment balance of $2,277.2 million within our consolidated balance sheet, representing 49.4% of total assets. We depreciate property and equipment on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. The estimated useful lives are determined based on the nature of the assets as well as our current operating strategy. We review the carrying value of our property and equipment for possible impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable based on undiscounted estimated future cash flows expected to result from its use and eventual disposition. The factors considered by us in performing this assessment include current operating results, trends and prospects, as well as the effect of obsolescence, demand, competition and other economic factors. In estimating expected future cash flows for determining whether an asset is impaired, assets are grouped at the individual property level. In assessing the recoverability of the carrying value of property and equipment, we must make assumptions regarding future cash flows and other factors. If these estimates or the related assumptions change in the future, we may be required to record an impairment loss for these assets. Such an impairment loss would be recognized as a non-cash component of operating income.

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Goodwill and other intangible assets

        At December 31, 2011, we had $1,180.4 million in goodwill and $421.6 million in other intangible assets within our consolidated balance sheet, representing 25.6% and 9.2% of total assets, respectively, resulting from our acquisition of other businesses and payment for gaming licenses and racing permits. Two issues arise with respect to these assets that require significant management estimates and judgment: (i) the valuation in connection with the initial purchase price allocation; and (ii) the ongoing evaluation for impairment.

        In connection with our acquisitions, valuations are completed to determine the allocation of the purchase prices. The factors considered in the valuations include data gathered as a result of our due diligence in connection with the acquisitions, projections for future operations, and data obtained from third- party valuation specialists as deemed appropriate. Goodwill is tested annually, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist, for impairment by comparing the fair value of the reporting units to their carrying amount. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value in step 1 of the impairment test, then step 2 of the impairment test is performed to determine the implied value of goodwill for that reporting unit. If the implied value of goodwill is less than the goodwill allocated for that reporting unit, an impairment loss is recognized.

        In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") ASC 350, "Intangibles-Goodwill and Other," the Company considers its gaming licenses, racing permits and the majority of its trademark intangible assets as indefinite-life intangible assets that do not require amortization based on our future expectations to operate our gaming facilities indefinitely as well as our historical experience in renewing these intangible assets at minimal cost with various state gaming and racing commissions. Rather, these intangible assets are tested annually, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist, for impairment by comparing the fair value of the recorded assets to their carrying amount. If the carrying amounts of the indefinite-life intangible assets exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized.

        The evaluation of goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets requires the use of estimates about future operating results of each reporting unit to determine their estimated fair value. We use a market approach model, which includes the use of forecasted adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, charges for stock compensation, depreciation and amortization, gain or loss on disposal of assets, and certain other income and expenses, and inclusive of loss from unconsolidated affiliates) and adjusted EBITDA multiples, as we believe that adjusted EBITDA is a widely-used measure of performance in the gaming industry and as we use adjusted EBITDA as the primary measurement of the operating performance of our properties (including the evaluation of operating personnel). In addition, we believe that an adjusted EBITDA multiple is the principal basis for the valuation of gaming companies. Changes in the estimated adjusted EBITDA multiples or forecasted operations can materially affect these estimates.

        Forecasted adjusted EBITDA levels (based on our annual operating plan as determined in the fourth quarter) can be significantly impacted by the local economy in which our reporting units operate. For example, increases in unemployment rates can result in decreased customer visitations and/or lower customer spend per visit. In addition, the impact of new legislation which approves gaming in nearby jurisdictions or further expands gaming in jurisdictions where our reporting units currently operate can result in opportunities for us to expand its operations. However, it also has the impact of increasing competition for our established properties which generally will have a negative effect on those locations' profitability once competitors become established as a certain level of cannibalization occurs absent an overall increase in customer visitations. Lastly, increases in gaming taxes approved by state regulatory bodies can negatively impact forecasted adjusted EBITDA.

        The adjusted EBITDA multiple utilized by us in our goodwill impairment valuation methodology is determined based on our current enterprise value, increased for a control premium. The control

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premium assumption is based on acquisitions of precedent transactions of comparable businesses. In evaluating the estimates derived by the market based approach, management assesses the relevance and reliability of the multiples by considering factors unique to its reporting units, including recent operating results, business plans, economic projections, anticipated future cash flows, and other market data. These considerations can lead the Company to modify its individual reporting units adjusted EBITDA multiple. EBITDA multiples can be significantly impacted by various factors, such as a company's present and future cost of capital, the future growth opportunities for the industry as well as for the company itself, general market sentiment, investors' perceptions of senior management's effectiveness at deploying capital and managing overall operations, as well as pending or recently completed merger transactions.

        Assumptions and estimates about future adjusted EBITDA levels and multiples by individual reporting units are complex and subjective. They are sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions and can be affected by a variety of factors, including external factors, such as industry and economic trends, and internal factors, such as changes in our business strategy, which may reallocate capital and resources to different or new opportunities which management believes will enhance our overall value but may be to the detriment of an individual reporting unit.

        As of the Company's most recent impairment analysis test performed on October 1, 2011, we applied an estimated adjusted EBITDA multiple ranging between 5.4 and 8.9 to the individual reporting unit's forecasted adjusted EBITDA.

        For 2011, one reporting unit had a fair value in excess of its carrying value by 2%. All of our other reporting units with significant amounts of goodwill and other indefinite-life intangible assets had fair values that were significantly in excess of their carrying value. However, we do not believe that the margin by which our reporting units' fair value exceeds their carrying value is the only predictor of the likelihood of future impairment charges or the potential magnitude of such charges. This is because the revenue and earning streams in our industry can vary significantly based on various circumstances, which in many cases are outside of the Company's control, and as such are extremely difficult to predict and quantify. We have disclosed several of these circumstances in the "Risk Factors" section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. For instance, changes in legislation that approves gaming in nearby jurisdictions (which was the primarily reason for our impairment charges recorded in 2010 and 2009), further expands gaming in jurisdictions where we currently operate, new state legislation that requires the implementation of smoking bans at our casinos or any other events outside of our control that make the customer experience less desirable can result in sudden, dramatic and in some cases permanent declines in customer visitations. As such, we believe at this time all of our reporting units are at risk of goodwill impairment charges in future periods regardless of the margin by which the current fair value of our reporting unit exceeds its carrying value and that such margin cannot and should not be relied upon to predict which properties are most at risk for future impairment charges.

        During the year ended December 31, 2010, we recorded a pre-tax goodwill impairment charge of $144.6 million and $44.2 million for Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet, respectively, due to decreased earning projections at our properties in the Chicagoland regional market resulting from an anticipated increase in competition from the scheduled opening of a $445 million casino in the second half of 2011 in Des Plaines, Illinois, as well as continued challenging market conditions in the Chicagoland regional market. During the year ended December 31, 2009, we recorded pre-tax impairment charges of $520.5 million at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg due to the anticipated impact of gaming expansion in Ohio.

        Once an impairment of goodwill or other indefinite-life intangible assets has been recorded, it cannot be reversed. Because our goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets are not amortized, there may be volatility in reported income because impairment losses, if any, are likely to occur irregularly and in varying amounts. Intangible assets that have a definite-life are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives or related service contract. We review the carrying value of our

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intangible assets that have a definite-life for possible impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable. If the carrying amount of the intangible assets that have a definite-life exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized.

        The Company's remaining goodwill and other intangible assets by reporting unit at December 31, 2011 is shown below (in thousands):

Reporting Unit
  Remaining Goodwill and
other intangible assets
at December 31, 2011
 

Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg

  $ 362,491  

Hollywood Casino Joliet

    210,158  

Hollywood Casino Aurora

    207,207  

Argosy Casino Riverside

    159,296  

Zia Park Casino

    145,777  

Argosy Casino Alton

    135,511  

Argosy Casino Sioux City

    92,795  

Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge

    75,521  

Others

    213,196  
       

Total

  $ 1,601,952  
       

Income taxes

        At December 31, 2011, we had a net deferred tax liability balance of $135.3 million within our consolidated balance sheet. We account for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, "Income Taxes" ("ASC 740"). Under ASC 740, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities and are measured at the prevailing enacted tax rates that will be in effect when these differences are settled or realized. ASC 740 also requires that deferred tax assets be reduced by a valuation allowance if it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

        The realizability of the deferred tax assets is evaluated quarterly by assessing the valuation allowance and by adjusting the amount of the allowance, if necessary. The factors used to assess the likelihood of realization are the forecast of future taxable income and available tax planning strategies that could be implemented to realize the net deferred tax assets. We have used tax-planning strategies to realize or renew net deferred tax assets in order to avoid the potential loss of future tax benefits.

        ASC 740 also creates a single model to address uncertainty in tax positions, and clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise's financial statements by prescribing the minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in an enterprise's financial statements. It also provides guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. At December 31, 2011, we had a liability for unrecognized tax benefits of $33.9 million, which is included in noncurrent tax liabilities within our consolidated balance sheet. We operate within multiple taxing jurisdictions and are subject to audit in each jurisdiction. These audits can involve complex issues that may require an extended period of time to resolve. In our opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all periods.

Litigation, claims and assessments

        We utilize estimates for litigation, claims and assessments. These estimates are based on our knowledge and experience regarding current and past events, as well as assumptions about future events. If our assessment of such a matter should change, we may have to change the estimate, which may have an adverse effect on our results of operations. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

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Results of Operations

        The following are the most important factors and trends that contribute to our operating performance:

    The fact that most of our properties operate in mature competitive markets. As a result, we expect a majority of our future growth to come from prudent acquisitions of gaming properties, jurisdictional expansions (such as the September 2010 opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville in Maryland, the February 2012 opening of a casino through a joint venture in Kansas, and the anticipated 2012 openings in Ohio), expansions of gaming in existing jurisdictions (such as the introduction of table games in July 2010 at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course) and expansions/improvements of existing properties.

    The actions of government bodies can affect our operations in a variety of ways. For instance, the continued pressure on governments to balance their budgets could intensify the efforts of state and local governments to raise revenues through increases in gaming taxes. In addition, government bodies may restrict, prevent or negatively impact operations in the jurisdictions in which we do business (such as the implementation of smoking bans).

    The fact that a number of states are currently considering or implementing legislation to legalize or expand gaming. Such legislation presents both potential opportunities to establish new properties (for instance, in Kansas where we opened a casino through a joint venture in February 2012, in Ohio where we have plans to open two casinos, one in Toledo by the end of May 2012 and the other in Columbus on November 1, 2012, and in Maryland where we opened Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010, the first casino in the state) and increased competitive threats to business at our existing properties (such as the introduction of commercial casinos in Kansas, Maryland, Ohio, and potentially Kentucky, an additional casino in Illinois which opened on July 18, 2011, gaming expansion in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the introduction of tavern licenses in several states).

    The continued demand for, and our emphasis on, slot wagering entertainment at our properties.

    The successful execution of the development and construction activities currently underway at a number of our facilities, as well as the risks associated with the costs, regulatory approval and the timing for these activities.

    The risks related to economic conditions and the effect of such conditions on consumer spending for leisure and gaming activities, which may negatively impact our operating results and our ability to access financing.

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        The results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are summarized below:

Year Ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Revenues:

                   

Gaming

  $ 2,468,630   $ 2,242,515   $ 2,158,028  

Food, beverage and other

    400,258     334,808     339,235  

Management service fee

    15,185     15,190     14,787  
               

Revenues

    2,884,073     2,592,513     2,512,050  

Less promotional allowances

    (141,816 )   (133,402 )   (142,775 )
               

Net revenues

    2,742,257     2,459,111     2,369,275  
               

Operating expenses:

                   

Gaming

    1,298,938     1,198,097     1,161,510  

Food, beverage and other

    321,801     266,800     266,351  

General and administrative

    423,718     411,415     403,136  

Depreciation and amortization

    211,476     212,387     194,436  

Impairment losses

        224,709     532,377  

Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges

    (13,257 )   (7,523 )   6,063  
               

Total operating expenses

    2,242,676     2,305,885     2,563,873  
               

Income (loss) from operations

  $ 499,581   $ 153,226   $ (194,598 )
               

        Certain information regarding our results of operations by segment for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 is summarized below:

 
  Net Revenues   Income (loss) from Operations  
Year Ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009   2011   2010   2009  
 
  (in thousands)
 

East/West

  $ 1,290,732   $ 997,262   $ 896,941   $ 263,423   $ 181,175   $ 137,418  

Midwest

    826,436     825,847     806,866     211,356     (39,514 )   (346,260 )

Southern Plains

    590,709     602,257     632,543     137,580     125,318     136,164  

Other

    34,380     33,745     32,925     (112,778 )   (113,753 )   (121,920 )
                           

Total

  $ 2,742,257   $ 2,459,111   $ 2,369,275   $ 499,581   $ 153,226   $ (194,598 )
                           

Revenues

        Revenues for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows (in thousands):

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Gaming

  $ 2,468,630   $ 2,242,515   $ 226,115     10.1 %

Food, beverage and other

    400,258     334,808     65,450     19.5 %

Management service fee

    15,185     15,190     (5 )   (0.0 )%
                     

Revenues

    2,884,073     2,592,513     291,560     11.2 %

Less promotional allowances

    (141,816 )   (133,402 )   (8,414 )   (6.3 )%
                     

Net revenues

  $ 2,742,257   $ 2,459,111   $ 283,146     11.5 %
                     

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Year ended December 31,
  2010   2009   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Gaming

  $ 2,242,515   $ 2,158,028   $ 84,487     3.9 %

Food, beverage and other

    334,808     339,235     (4,427 )   (1.3 )%

Management service fee

    15,190     14,787     403     2.7 %
                     

Revenues

    2,592,513     2,512,050     80,463     3.2 %

Less promotional allowances

    (133,402 )   (142,775 )   9,373     6.6 %
                     

Net revenues

  $ 2,459,111   $ 2,369,275   $ 89,836     3.8 %
                     

        In our business, revenue is driven by discretionary consumer spending, which has been impacted by weakened general economic conditions such as, but not limited to, high unemployment levels, low levels of consumer confidence, weakness in the housing market and increased stock market volatility.

        We have no certain mechanism for determining why consumers choose to spend more or less money at our properties from period to period and as such cannot quantify a dollar amount for each factor that impacts our customers' spending behaviors. However, based on our experience, we can generally offer some insight into the factors that we believe were likely to account for such changes. In instances where we believe one factor may have had a significantly greater impact than the other factors, we have noted that as well. However, in all instances, such insights are based only on our reasonable judgment and professional experience, and no assurance can be given as to the accuracy of our judgments.

Gaming revenue

2011 Compared with 2010

        Gaming revenue increased by $226.1 million, or 10.1%, to $2,468.6 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Gaming revenue for our East/West segment increased by $247.0 million in 2011, primarily due to the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010 and the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011. In addition, gaming revenue also increased for our East/West segment due to the introduction of table games in July 2010 at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town and Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course partially offset by a reduction in slot machine revenue due to lower levels of electronic table game revenues and general economic conditions.

        Gaming revenue for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $10.7 million in 2011, primarily due to closure of Hollywood Casino Tunica from May 1, 2011 to May 25, 2011 due to flooding.

        Gaming revenue for Other decreased by $6.4 million in 2011, primarily due to decreased gaming revenue at Bullwhackers due to the continued impact of recent competition.

        Gaming revenue for our Midwest segment decreased by $3.8 million in 2011, primarily due to lower gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino Aurora primarily due to increased competition with the opening of the tenth licensed casino in Illinois on July 18, 2011.

2010 Compared with 2009

        Gaming revenue increased by $84.5 million, or 3.9%, to $2,242.5 million in 2010, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Gaming revenue for our East/West segment increased by $100.8 million in 2010, primarily due to increased gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to the introduction of table games in July 2010 partially offset by lower attendance and spending levels in the first half of 2010 compared to the corresponding period in the prior year due to then-current economic

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conditions and inclement weather in early 2010, increased gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course primarily due to introduction of table games in July 2010 and the continued growth from a new gaming market, and the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010.

        Gaming revenue for our Midwest segment increased by $15.3 million in 2010, primarily due to increased gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino Joliet as this property was closed from March 20, 2009 until June 25, 2009 due to a fire. Our Midwest segment also experienced increased gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg primarily due to the continued impact of the opening of its new casino riverboat in late June 2009, which enabled this property to gain an increased share of its local gaming market. These were partially offset by decreased gaming revenue at Hollywood Casino Aurora primarily due to then-current economic conditions. In addition, the decline at Hollywood Casino Aurora was also impacted by increased patronage in the second quarter of 2009 as a result of the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet.

        Gaming revenue for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $29.4 million in 2010, primarily due to then-current economic conditions at the majority of our properties within this segment.

Food, beverage and other revenue

2011 Compared with 2010

        Food, beverage and other revenue increased by $65.5 million, or 19.5%, to $400.3 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Food, beverage and other revenue for our East/West segment increased by $66.2 million in 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011, and increased food, beverage and other revenue at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to additional attendance levels as a result of the introduction of table games in July 2010.

        Food, beverage and other revenue for Other increased by $6.2 million in 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of Beulah Park in July 2010.

        Food, beverage and other revenue for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $10.7 million in 2011, primarily due to closure of Hollywood Casino Tunica from May 1, 2011 to May 25, 2011 due to flooding and, to a lesser extent, management's efforts to decrease promotional spending levels to improve margins and profitability.

2010 Compared with 2009

        Food, beverage and other revenue decreased by $4.4 million, or 1.3%, to $334.8 million in 2010, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Food, beverage and other revenue for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $9.4 million in 2010, primarily due to decreased food, beverage and other revenue at Hollywood Casino Tunica primarily due to then-current economic conditions and to a lesser extent a decrease in promotional offers.

        Food, beverage and other revenue for Other increased by $2.9 million in 2010, primarily due to the acquisition of Beulah Park in July 2010.

Promotional allowances

2011 Compared with 2010

        Promotional allowances increased by $8.4 million, or 6.3%, to $141.8 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

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        Promotional allowances for our East/West segment increased by $19.8 million in 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011, and an increase in promotional allowances at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to the introduction of table games in July 2010.

        Promotional allowances for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $9.8 million in 2011, primarily due to closure of Hollywood Casino Tunica from May 1, 2011 to May 25, 2011 due to flooding and, to a lesser extent, efforts by management to rationalize our promotional spending levels to improve operating margins.

2010 Compared with 2009

        Promotional allowances decreased by $9.4 million, or 6.6%, to $133.4 million in 2010, primarily due to efforts by management to rationalize our promotional spending levels.

Operating Expenses

        Operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows (in thousands):

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Gaming

  $ 1,298,938   $ 1,198,097   $ 100,841     8.4 %

Food, beverage and other

    321,801     266,800     55,001     20.6 %

General and administrative

    423,718     411,415     12,303     3.0 %

Depreciation and amortization

    211,476     212,387     (911 )   (0.4 )%

Impairment losses

        224,709     (224,709 )   (100.0 )%

Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges

    (13,257 )   (7,523 )   (5,734 )   (76.2 )%
                     

Total operating expenses

  $ 2,242,676   $ 2,305,885   $ (63,209 )   (2.7 )%
                     

 

Year ended December 31,
  2010   2009   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Gaming

  $ 1,198,097   $ 1,161,510   $ 36,587     3.1 %

Food, beverage and other

    266,800     266,351     449     0.2 %

General and administrative

    411,415     403,136     8,279     2.1 %

Depreciation and amortization

    212,387     194,436     17,951     9.2 %

Impairment losses

    224,709     532,377     (307,668 )   (57.8 )%

Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges

    (7,523 )   6,063     (13,586 )   (224.1 )%
                     

Total operating expenses

  $ 2,305,885   $ 2,563,873   $ (257,988 )   (10.1 )%
                     

Gaming expense

2011 Compared with 2010

        Gaming expense increased by $100.8 million, or 8.4%, to $1,298.9 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Gaming expense for our East/West segment increased by $126.5 million in 2011, primarily due to the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010, the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011, and an increase in gaming expense at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races which was primarily due to increased payroll expense and gaming taxes resulting from higher table game revenue due to the introduction of table games in July 2010.

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        Gaming expense for our Midwest segment decreased by $13.1 million in 2011, primarily due to a decline in gaming taxes at Hollywood Casino Aurora resulting from lower taxable gaming revenue mentioned above and the expiration of the 3% surcharge in July 2011 for both our Hollywood Casino Aurora and Hollywood Casino Joliet properties. Gaming expense for our Midwest segment also decreased due to lower marketing costs and payroll expense primarily due to increased cost management efforts.

        Gaming expense for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $7.9 million in 2011, primarily due to closure of Hollywood Casino Tunica from May 1, 2011 to May 25, 2011 due to flooding.

        Gaming expense for Other decreased by $4.7 million in 2011, primarily due to our fourth quarter 2010 restructuring efforts at Bullwhackers to reduce costs to improve the property's profitability.

2010 Compared with 2009

        Gaming expense increased by $36.6 million, or 3.1%, to $1,198.1 million in 2010, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        Gaming expense for our East/West segment increased by $46.8 million in 2010, primarily due to the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010, higher gaming expense at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to an increase in gaming taxes and payroll and benefit costs from the introduction of table games in July 2010, which were partially offset by a decrease in gaming taxes resulting from lower slot revenue. Our East/West segment also experienced higher gaming taxes and payroll and benefit costs at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course from the introduction of table games in July 2010, which was partially offset by a decrease in regulatory fees and marketing costs.

        Gaming expense for our Midwest segment increased by $6.3 million in 2010, primarily due to Hollywood Casino Joliet being closed from March 20, 2009 until June 25, 2009 due to a fire, and increased gaming expense at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg primarily due to higher gaming taxes from increased gaming revenues as well as higher marketing expenses during the first half of the year compared to the corresponding period in the prior year, which were partially offset by decreased payroll costs. The increases at these two properties were partially offset by decreased gaming expense at Hollywood Casino Aurora primarily due to a reduction in gaming taxes resulting from lower gaming revenue as well as lower payroll and benefit costs, which were partially offset by increased marketing expenses.

        Gaming expense for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $16.2 million in 2010, primarily due to a reduction in gaming taxes resulting from lower gaming revenue, as well as decreased marketing expenses, participation fees, and payroll and benefit costs at the majority of our properties within this segment.

Food, beverage and other expense

2011 Compared to 2010

        Food, beverage and other expense increased by $55.0 million, or 20.6%, to $321.8 million in 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011.

2010 Compared to 2009

        No significant variances were noted during this time period.

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General and administrative expense

        General and administrative expenses include expenses such as compliance, facility maintenance, utilities, property and liability insurance, surveillance and security, and certain housekeeping services, as well as all expenses for administrative departments such as accounting, purchasing, human resources, legal and internal audit. General and administrative expenses also include lobbying expenses.

2011 Compared with 2010

        General and administrative expenses increased by $12.3 million, or 3.0%, to $423.7 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        General and administrative expenses for our East/West segment increased by $26.9 million in 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011, increased general and administrative expenses at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to increased staffing needs to meet higher customer demand, and the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010.

        General and administrative expenses for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $11.8 million in 2011, primarily due to increased cost management efforts to mitigate lower levels of gaming revenue.

        General and administrative expenses for our Midwest segment decreased by $8.5 million in 2011, primarily due to a decrease in general and administrative expenses at Hollywood Casino Aurora primarily due to a police services contract termination charge of $6.6 million in the second quarter of 2010.

        General and administrative expenses for Other increased by $5.7 million in 2011, primarily due to increased corporate payroll and benefit costs to support the Company's growing operations.

2010 Compared with 2009

        General and administrative expense increased by $8.3 million, or 2.1%, to $411.4 million in 2010, primarily due to the variances explained below.

        General and administrative expenses for our Midwest segment increased by $12.7 million in 2010, primarily due to the police services contract termination at Hollywood Casino Aurora in the second quarter of 2010 for $6.6 million, and Hollywood Casino Joliet being closed from March 20, 2009 until June 25, 2009 due to a fire.

        General and administrative expenses for our East/West segment increased by $10.9 million in 2010, primarily due to higher general and administrative expense at Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races primarily due to higher bonus expense in 2010 due to improved financial performance at this property compared to the prior year as well as increased utilities and relocation expense primarily due to the introduction of table games in July 2010, and the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010.

        General and administrative expenses for Other decreased by $14.3 million in 2010, primarily due to decreased corporate overhead expense primarily due to decreased lobbying expenses and decreased equity-based compensation, which were partially offset by higher payroll costs. Additionally, Other included lease termination charges and severance costs of $3.0 million at Bullwhackers for the year ended December 31, 2010.

Depreciation and amortization expense

2011 Compared to 2010

        Depreciation and amortization expense decreased by $0.9 million, or 0.4%, to $211.5 million in 2011, primarily due to the variances explained below.

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        Depreciation and amortization expense for our Southern Plains segment decreased by $6.0 million in 2011, primarily due to decreased depreciation and amortization expense at Boomtown Biloxi and Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis primarily related to replacement assets that were purchased after Hurricane Katrina now being fully depreciated in the third quarter of 2011, as well as decreased depreciation and amortization expense at Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge.

        Depreciation and amortization expense for our Midwest segment decreased by $1.6 million in 2011, primarily due to customer relationship intangible assets being fully amortized at the end of the third quarter in 2010 at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg.

        Depreciation and amortization expense for our East/West segment increased by $6.5 million in 2011, primarily due to the opening of Hollywood Casino Perryville on September 27, 2010 and the acquisition of the M Resort on June 1, 2011.

2010 Compared to 2009

        Depreciation and amortization expense increased by $18.0 million, or 9.2%, to $212.4 million in 2010, primarily due to the opening of the new casino riverboat in late June 2009 at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, and an increase in expense at Hollywood Casino Joliet as the property was closed from March 20, 2009 until June 25, 2009 due to a fire.

Impairment losses

2011

        There were no impairment losses during the year ended December 31, 2011.

2010

        As a result of decreased earning projections resulting from an anticipated increase in competition from the scheduled opening of a casino in the second half of 2011 in Des Plaines, Illinois, as well as continued challenging market conditions in the Chicagoland regional market, we recorded a pre-tax goodwill impairment charge in our Midwest segment of $144.6 million ($144.6 million, net of taxes) at Hollywood Casino Aurora and $44.2 million ($28.4 million, net of taxes) at Hollywood Casino Joliet during the year ended December 31, 2010. Additionally, during the year ended December 31, 2010, we wrote-off the trademark intangible asset associated with the Argosy acquisition for $4.4 million ($2.8 million, net of taxes) due to management's strategy to transition Argosy properties to the Hollywood Casino brand.

        We also recorded a pre-tax impairment charge in our Midwest segment of $31.3 million ($20.1 million, net of taxes) associated with land that we had purchased in the Arena District for our Columbus, Ohio casino. Due to a May 2010 statewide election, the voters determined that our casino in Columbus will be located at the site of the former Delphi Automotive plant along Columbus's West Side and as such we reclassified our land in the Arena District as held for sale.

2009

        As a result of the anticipated impact of gaming expansion in Ohio, we recorded a pre-tax impairment charge in our Midwest segment of $520.5 million ($368.8 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2009, as we determined that a portion of the value of our goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets associated with the original purchase of Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg was impaired. In addition, in conjunction with the opening of the new casino riverboat at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, we recorded a pre-tax impairment charge in our Midwest segment for the replaced Lawrenceburg vessel of $11.9 million ($7.1 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2009.

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Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges

        Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges were $13.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2011 primarily related to a pre-tax insurance gain of $18.5 million in our Midwest segment for the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet for the year ended December 31, 2011, which was partially offset by a pre-tax insurance loss in our Southern Plains segment of $5.2 million for the flood at Hollywood Casino Tunica for the year ended December 31, 2011.

        In 2010, the insurance recovery amount exceeded the net book value of assets believed to be damaged, destroyed or abandoned and other costs incurred as a result of the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet, and as such, we recorded a pre-tax gain of $7.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2010.

        During the year ended December 31, 2009, we recorded a $6.1 million pre-tax loss in our Midwest segment as a result of the Hollywood Casino Joliet fire for the insurance deductibles for property damage, business interruption and employee lost wages, as well as a write-off of construction fees related to the renovation that are not recoverable under our insurance policies and certain consulting fees.

Other income (expenses)

        Other income (expenses) for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows (in thousands):

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Interest expense

  $ (99,564 ) $ (130,215 ) $ 30,651     23.5 %

Interest income

    423     1,579     (1,156 )   (73.2 )%

Gain (loss) from unconsolidated affiliates

    7,364     (25,974 )   33,338     128.4 %

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (17,838 )   (519 )   (17,319 )   (3337.0 )%

Other

    (734 )   6,421     (7,155 )   (111.4 )%
                   

Total other expenses

  $ (110,349 ) $ (148,708 ) $ 38,359     25.8 %
                   

 

Year ended December 31,
  2010   2009   Variance   Percentage
Variance
 

Interest expense

  $ (130,215 ) $ (134,984 ) $ 4,769     3.5 %

Interest income

    1,579     6,522     (4,943 )   (75.8 )%

Loss from unconsolidated affiliates

    (25,974 )   (1,121 )   (24,853 )   (2217.0 )%

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (519 )   (4,793 )   4,274     89.2 %

Other

    6,421     1,093     5,328     487.5 %
                   

Total other expenses

  $ (148,708 ) $ (133,283 ) $ (15,425 )   (11.6 )%
                   

Interest expense

        Interest expense decreased by $30.7 million, or 23.5%, to $99.6 million in 2011, primarily due to a $24.5 million decline in swap interest expense due to the expiration of certain receive-variable pay-fixed interest rate hedges which increased interest expense in the prior year due to the effective interest rate of the swaps being in excess of market rates due to the low interest rate environment. Additionally, in July 2011, we entered into a new senior secured credit facility and retired our $250 million 63/4% senior subordinated notes which lowered our overall funding costs compared to the prior year.

        Interest expense decreased by $4.8 million, or 3.5%, to $130.2 million in 2010, primarily due to lower outstanding balances and lower interest rates on our senior secured credit facility, the

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redemption of our $200 million 67/8% senior subordinated notes in late 2009, and decreased interest expense resulting from our interest rate swaps, all of which were partially offset by the issuance of the $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes in August 2009 and lower capitalized interest during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Interest income

        Interest income decreased by $1.2 million, or 73.2%, to $0.4 million in 2011, primarily due to the issuer of our remaining corporate debt security going into default and ceasing to make interest payments in mid 2010. See Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements for further details.

        Interest income decreased by $4.9 million, or 75.8%, to $1.6 million in 2010, primarily due to lower interest on our corporate debt securities due to the sale of a security in the second quarter of 2009 and the issuer of the remaining security ceasing to make interest payments in mid 2010, and lower interest earned on cash on hand during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Gain (loss) from unconsolidated affiliates

        We recorded a gain from unconsolidated affiliates of $7.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, primarily due to a gain of $20.2 million on the sale of our interest in the Maryland Jockey Club in July 2011, which was partially offset by a charge of $5.9 million for our share of a goodwill impairment write-down recorded at our New Jersey joint venture during the fourth quarter of 2011, and our share of Kansas Entertainment net losses for the year ended December 31, 2011 prior to the opening of the casino in February 2012.

        Loss from unconsolidated affiliates increased by $24.9 million, or 2217.0%, to $26.0 million in 2010, primarily due to our share of losses in the Maryland Jockey Club, which included a $14.4 million charge for our share of a goodwill impairment write-down recorded by the Maryland Jockey Club during the fourth quarter of 2010 as a result of a negative outcome related to a zoning referendum.

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

        During the year ended December 31, 2011, we recorded a $17.8 million loss on the early extinguishment of debt related to debt issuance costs write-offs for the 2011 refinancing of our senior secured credit facility and the call premium on the $250 million 63/4% senior subordinated notes.

        During the year ended December 31, 2009, we wrote-off $4.8 million of debt issuance costs, as a result of the repayment of all outstanding borrowings under the Term Loan A Facility of the previous senior secured credit facility and the redemption of our $200 million 67/8% senior subordinated notes due 2011.

Other

        Other decreased by $7.2 million, or 111.4%, to ($0.7) million in 2011, primarily due to the reversal of previously accrued reserves associated with the Capitol House litigation that ended in the third quarter of 2010 for $9.6 million.

        Other increased by $5.3 million, or 487.5%, to $6.4 million in 2010, primarily due to the reversal of previously accrued reserves associated with the Capitol House litigation for $9.6 million and foreign currency translation gains that were recorded during the year ended December 31, 2010, both of which were partially offset by a gain of $6.6 million related to the partial sale of corporate debt securities in the second quarter of 2009.

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Taxes

        Our effective tax rate (income taxes as a percentage of income from operations before income taxes) decreased to 37.7% for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to 1,464.8% for the year ended December 31, 2010. Our 2010 effective rate was impacted by the non-deductible portion of our goodwill impairment charges recorded for the year ended December 31, 2010. Our 2011 rate was impacted by the reversal of previously recorded unrecognized tax benefit reserves for years that either the statue of limitations has lapsed in 2011 or that have been favorably settled, coupled with favorable state income tax benefits received from the impact of certain subsidiary restructurings completed in 2011.

        Our effective tax rate increased to 1,464.8% for the year ended December 31, 2010, as compared to a tax benefit of 18.4% for the year ended December 31, 2009, primarily as a result of the non-deductible portion of our goodwill impairment charges.

        Our effective income tax rate can vary from period to period depending on, among other factors, the geographic and business mix of our earnings and the level of our tax credits. Certain of these and other factors, including our history and projections of pre-tax earnings, are taken into account in assessing our ability to realize our net deferred tax assets.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

        Historically, our primary sources of liquidity and capital resources have been cash flow from operations, borrowings from banks and proceeds from the issuance of debt and equity securities.

        Net cash provided by operating activities was $567.4 million, $493.2 million and $338.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The increase in net cash provided by operating activities of $74.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the corresponding period in the prior year is comprised primarily of an increase in cash receipts from customers of $281.3 million and a decrease in interest payments of $23.1 million, which were partially offset by an increase in cash paid to suppliers and vendors of $189.9 million, in income tax payments of $18.6 million and cash paid to employees of $51.6 million. The increase in cash receipts collected from our customers for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the previously discussed property openings, expansions and acquisitions in our East/West segment. Additionally, the increase in higher cash payments for operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the prior year was primarily due to increased expenses from the recent events at our East/West segment as well as less insurance proceeds received in 2011 for the fire at Hollywood Casino Joliet, which were partially offset by expense management initiatives at the majority of our properties within our operating segments to help mitigate the impact of the difficult operating environment.

        Net cash used in investing activities totaled $338.8 million, $736.8 million and $262.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2011 included expenditures for property and equipment totaling $293.1 million and investment in joint ventures, net of proceeds received from the sale of our interest in the Maryland Jockey Club, of $100.4 million, both of which were partially offset by a decrease in cash in escrow of $29.0 million, proceeds from the sale of property and equipment totaling $13.0 million, cash acquired, net of acquisitions of businesses and gaming licenses, of $8.9 million, and insurance proceeds related to damaged property and equipment for the Tunica flood of $3.8 million. The decrease in net cash used in investing activities of $398.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the prior year was primarily due to decreased expenditures for property and equipment as a result of decreased expenditures for Hollywood Casino Perryville which opened in September 2010, for Hollywood Casino Joliet as the permanent land-based pavilion opened in December 2010, and for Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg due to certain 2010 improvements, all of

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which were partially offset by increased expenditures at our two facilities under construction in Ohio. Also contributing to the variance was the purchase of outstanding loans of the M Resort for $230.5 million in 2010, cash proceeds received for the sales of our interest in the Maryland Jockey Club and land in Columbus's Arena District in 2011, and the acquisition of Beulah Park in 2010.

        Net cash used in financing activities totaled $236.5 million, $223.2 million and $108.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2011 was impacted by the issuance of our new $2.15 billion senior secured credit facility and the redemption of our $250 million 63/4% senior subordinated notes. We utilized the proceeds of this issuance along with cash on hand to retire our previous senior secured credit facility and $250 million 63/4% senior subordinated notes. See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for further details. The increase in net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the corresponding period in the prior year was also primarily due to increased repurchases of common stock for $69.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the corresponding period in the prior year, offset by the repurchase of preferred stock and noncontrolling interest for $11.2 million and $25.0 million, respectively, during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Capital Expenditures

        Capital expenditures are accounted for as either capital project or capital maintenance (replacement) expenditures. Capital project expenditures are for fixed asset additions that expand an existing facility or create a new facility. Capital maintenance expenditures are expenditures to replace existing fixed assets with a useful life greater than one year that are obsolete, worn out or no longer cost effective to repair.

        The following table summarizes our capital project expenditures by segment for the year ended December 31, 2011:

 
  Actual(1)  
 
  (in millions)
 

Midwest (2)

  $ 187.4  

East/West

    22.2  

Southern Plains

    2.1  

Other

    4.4  
       

Total

  $ 216.1  
       

(1)
Excludes licensing fees and is net of reimbursements.

(2)
Capital expenditures for our Midwest segment include $131.0 million and $43.7 million for the construction of Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, respectively.

        In November 2009, the "Ohio Jobs and Growth Plan," a casino ballot proposal calling for an amendment to Ohio's Constitution to authorize casinos in the state's four largest cities, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus and Toledo, was approved. Construction is underway for Hollywood Casino Toledo, a $320 million Hollywood-themed casino in Toledo, Ohio, inclusive of $50 million in licensing fees, with a planned casino opening of 2,000 slot machines, 60 table games and 20 poker tables, structured and surface parking, as well as food and beverage outlets and an entertainment lounge. The Hollywood Casino Columbus project, a $400 million Hollywood-themed casino in Columbus, Ohio, inclusive of $50 million in licensing fees, is under construction, with a planned casino opening of up to 3,000 slot machines, 70 table games and 30 poker tables, structured and surface parking, as well as food and beverage outlets and an entertainment lounge. We expect the opening of Hollywood Casino Toledo by the end of May 2012 and Hollywood Casino Columbus on November 1, 2012.

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        During the year ended December 31, 2011, we spent approximately $77.0 million for capital maintenance expenditures, with $18.7 million at our Midwest segment, $29.5 million at our East/West segment, $23.4 million at our Southern Plains segment, and $5.4 million for Other. The majority of the capital maintenance expenditures were for slot machines and slot machine equipment.

        Cash generated from operations and cash available under the revolver portion of our senior secured credit facility have funded our capital project and capital maintenance expenditures in 2011.

        The following table summarizes our expected capital project expenditures for the year ending December 31, 2012, as well as the projects in their entirety (including licensing fees), by segment:

 
  Total for 2012   Project Total  
 
  (in millions)
 

Midwest(1)

  $ 449.8   $ 722.9  

East/West

    1.5     2.7  

Southern Plains

    0.5     0.5  

Other

    0.6     1.8  
           

Total

  $ 452.4   $ 727.9  
           

(1)
Expected capital expenditures for our Midwest segment include $163.7 million and $284.9 million for the construction of Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, respectively.

        The table above excludes our share of the anticipated commitments related to our joint venture with International Speedway to develop a casino at Kansas Speedway since these amounts will be recorded within investments in and advances to unconsolidated affiliates on our consolidated balance sheet.

Debt

    Senior Secured Credit Facility

        On July 14, 2011, we entered into a new $2.15 billion senior secured credit facility, which is comprised of a $700 million revolving credit facility that will mature in July 2016, a $700 million variable rate Term Loan A due in July 2016 and a $750 million variable rate Term Loan B due in July 2018. The interest rates payable on the facilities are based on the leverage ratios of the Company as defined in the debt agreements, however, based on current borrowing levels, we will pay LIBOR plus 150 basis points on the revolver and Term Loan A and LIBOR plus 275 basis points on Term Loan B (subject to a 1% LIBOR floor). We utilized the proceeds of the two term loan borrowings and cash on hand to retire our previous senior secured credit facility obligation of $1,518.1 million (which had significant principal repayments due at the end of 2011 and 2012) and pay transaction costs and accrued interest and fees on the retired debt. As a result of this refinancing, we incurred debt extinguishment charges of $10.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2011.

        Our senior secured credit facility had a gross outstanding balance of $1,715.8 million at December 31, 2011, consisting of $287.0 million drawn under the revolving credit facility, a $682.5 million Term Loan A facility, and a $746.3 million Term Loan B facility. Additionally, at December 31, 2011, we were contingently obligated under letters of credit issued pursuant to the $2.15 billion senior secured credit facility with face amounts aggregating $24.9 million, resulting in $388.1 million of available borrowing capacity as of December 31, 2011 under the revolving credit facility.

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    63/4% Senior Subordinated Notes

        In July 2011, we announced our intention to redeem all of our $250 million 63/4% senior subordinated notes. The redemption price was $1,022.50 per $1,000 principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest, which was paid in August 2011. We funded the redemption of our $250 million senior subordinated notes from our new revolving credit facility and available cash. We recorded a $7.6 million loss on early extinguishment of debt during the year ended December 31, 2011 related to debt issuance costs write-offs and the call premium on the $250 million senior subordinated notes.

    83/4% Senior Subordinated Notes

        In August 2009, we completed an offering of $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes that mature on August 15, 2019. Interest on the $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes is payable on February 15 and August 15 of each year. The $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes are general unsecured obligations and are not guaranteed by our subsidiaries and were issued in a private placement pursuant to an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. At any time prior to August 15, 2014, we may redeem all or part of the 83/4% senior subordinated notes at par plus the present value (discounted at the treasury rate plus 50 basis points) of scheduled interest payments through August 15, 2014, along with accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. On or after August 15, 2014, we may redeem all or part of the 83/4% senior subordinated notes at a redemption price of 104.375% which gradually reduces to par by 2017.

    Other Long-Term Obligations

        In April 2010, we entered into a termination contract with the city of Aurora, Illinois, whereby we will pay $7 million in lieu of perpetual annual payments (of approximately $1 million) to have off duty Aurora police officials provide security at Hollywood Casino Aurora each day. Payments of $1.5 million were made on June 1, 2010 and September 1, 2010 and a payment of $2.0 million was made on June 1, 2011. A final payment of $2.0 million is due on June 1, 2012. This liability was discounted using an estimate of our incremental borrowing rate over the term of the obligation. The accretion of this discount is recorded in interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

    Covenants

        Our senior secured credit facility and $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes require us, among other obligations, to maintain specified financial ratios and to satisfy certain financial tests, including fixed charge coverage, interest coverage, senior leverage and total leverage ratios. In addition, our senior secured credit facility and $325 million 83/4% senior subordinated notes restrict, among other things, our ability to incur additional indebtedness, incur guarantee obligations, amend debt instruments, pay dividends, create liens on assets, make investments, engage in mergers or consolidations, and otherwise restrict corporate activities.

        At December 31, 2011, we were in compliance with all required financial covenants.

    Outlook

        Based on our current level of operations and anticipated earnings growth, we believe that cash generated from operations and cash on hand, together with amounts available under our senior secured credit facility, will be adequate to meet our anticipated debt service requirements, capital expenditures and working capital needs for the foreseeable future. However, we cannot be certain that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations, that our anticipated earnings growth will be realized, or that future borrowings will be available under our senior secured credit facility or otherwise will be available to enable us to service our indebtedness, including the senior secured credit facility and the senior subordinated notes, to retire or redeem the senior subordinated notes when required or to make

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anticipated capital expenditures. In addition, we expect a majority of our future growth to come from acquisitions of gaming properties at reasonable valuations, greenfield projects, jurisdictional expansions and property expansion in under-penetrated markets. If we consummate significant acquisitions in the future or undertake any significant property expansions, our cash requirements may increase significantly and we may need to make additional borrowings or complete equity or debt financings to meet these requirements. Our future operating performance and our ability to service or refinance our debt will be subject to future economic conditions and to financial, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. See "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Capital Structure" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of the risk related to our capital structure.

        We have historically maintained a capital structure comprising a mix of equity and debt financing. We vary our leverage to pursue opportunities in the marketplace and in an effort to maximize our enterprise value for our shareholders. We expect to meet our debt obligations as they come due through internally generated funds from operations and/or refinancing them through the debt or equity markets prior to their maturity.

Commitments and Contingencies

    Contractual Cash Obligations

        At December 31, 2011, there was approximately $388.1 million available for borrowing under our revolving credit facility. The following table presents our contractual cash obligations at December 31, 2011:

 
  Payments Due By Period  
 
  Total   2012   2013-2014   2015-2016   2017 and After  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Senior secured credit facility

                               

Principal

  $ 1,715,750   $ 42,500   $ 120,000   $ 844,500   $ 708,750  

Interest

    278,009     45,449     95,797     86,255     50,508  

83/4% senior subordinated notes

                               

Principal

    325,000                 325,000  

Interest

    227,500     28,437     56,875     56,875     85,313  

Purchase obligations

    38,238     32,684     4,471     896     187  

Capital expenditure commitments(1)

    205,015     205,015              

Anticipated additional advances to unconsolidated affiliates(2)

    52,577     52,577              

Capital leases

    2,215     110     188     219     1,698  

Operating leases

    51,370     6,451     8,899     4,343     31,677  

Other liabilities reflected in the Company's consolidated balance sheets(3)

    15,951     15,951              
                       

Total

  $ 2,911,625   $ 429,174   $ 286,230   $ 993,088   $ 1,203,133  
                       

(1)
The Company anticipates spending approximately $268.3 million (including licensing fees) for future construction projects over the next year that have not been contractually committed to at year-end. These amounts are primarily related to the opening of Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus that are scheduled to open in 2012.

(2)
In February 2010, Kansas Entertainment received the final approval under the Kansas Expanded Lottery Act, along with its gaming license from the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission, to proceed with the development of a an approximately $411 million Hollywood-themed destination

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    facility overlooking Turn 2 at Kansas Speedway. Kansas Entertainment began construction of the facility in the second half of 2010 and opened the facility on February 3, 2012. The approximately $411 million facility, inclusive of licensing fees, features a 82,000 square foot casino with approximately 2,000 slot machines, 52 table games and 12 poker tables, a 1,253 space parking structure, as well as a variety of dining and entertainment amenities. We and International Speedway shared equally in the cost of developing and constructing the facility. We estimate that our share of the project will be approximately $155 million, of which approximately $102.4 million has been incurred to date.

(3)
Primarily represents liabilities associated with reward programs that can be redeemed for cash, free play or services. Does not include any liability for unrecognized tax benefits, as the Company cannot make a reasonably reliable estimate of the period of cash settlement with the respective taxing authority.

        The table above does not include the redemption of the Company's Preferred Stock which is required to be redeemed on June 30, 2015 for either cash or common shares at the Company's election. See Note 14 to the consolidated financial statements for further details.

    Other Commercial Commitments

        The following table presents our material commercial commitments as of December 31, 2011 for the following future periods:

 
  Total Amounts Committed   2012   2013-2014   2015-2016   2017 and After  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Letters of Credit(1)

  $ 24,893   $ 24,893   $   $   $  
                       

Total

  $ 24,893   $ 24,893   $   $   $  
                       

(1)
The available balance under the revolving credit portion of our senior secured credit facility is reduced by outstanding letters of credit.

New Accounting Pronouncements

        In December 2011, the FASB issued amendments to enhance disclosures about offsetting and related arrangements. This information will enable the users of the financial statements to evaluate the effect or potential effect of netting arrangements on an entity's financial position, including the effect or potential effect of rights of setoff associated with certain financial and derivative instruments. These amendments are effective for annual reporting periods, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. The disclosures required by these amendments should be provided retrospectively for all comparative periods presented. Management does not believe that these amendments will have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

        In September 2011, the FASB issued amendments to simplify how entities test goodwill for impairment. Under the updated guidance, an entity now has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. If the assessment of qualitative factors leads to a determination that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. However, if an entity concludes otherwise, then the entity is required to perform the first step of the two-step impairment test by calculating the fair value of the reporting unit and comparing it against its carrying amount. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, then the entity is required to perform the second step of the goodwill impairment

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test to measure the amount of impairment loss, if any. Under the new guidance, an entity can elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit in any period and proceed directly to performing the first step of the two-step goodwill impairment. The amendments are effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted, however the Company did not early adopt this amendment.

        In June 2011, the FASB issued amendments to guidance regarding the presentation of comprehensive income. The amendments eliminate the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. The amendments require that comprehensive income be presented in either a single continuous statement or in two separate but consecutive statements. In a single continuous statement, the entity would present the components of net income and total net income, the components of other comprehensive income and a total of other comprehensive income, along with the total of comprehensive income in that statement. In the two-statement approach, the entity would present components of net income and total net income in the statement of net income and a statement of other comprehensive income would immediately follow the statement of net income and include the components of other comprehensive income and a total for other comprehensive income, along with a total for comprehensive income. The amendments also require the entity to present on the face of the financial statements any reclassification adjustments for items that are reclassified from other comprehensive income to net income in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of other comprehensive income are presented. The amendments do not change the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income, when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassed to net income or the option to present components of other comprehensive income either net of related tax effects or before related tax effects. The amendments, excluding the specific requirement to present on the face of the financial statements any reclassification adjustments for items that are reclassified from other comprehensive income to net income in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of other comprehensive income are presented which was deferred by the FASB in December 2011, are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011 and are to be applied retrospectively. The Company adopted the guidance, except for the deferred requirement to present reclassification adjustments in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of other comprehensive income are presented, as of January 1, 2012. The Company plans to present comprehensive income in two separate but consecutive statements.

        In May 2011, the FASB issued amendments to existing fair value measurement guidance in order to achieve common requirements for measuring fair value and disclosures in accordance with GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. The guidance clarifies how a principal market is determined, addresses the fair value measurement of instruments with offsetting market or counterparty credit risks, addresses the concept of valuation premise and highest and best use, extends the prohibition on blockage factors to all three levels of the fair value hierarchy and requires additional disclosures. The amendments are to be applied prospectively and are effective during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company adopted the guidance as of January 1, 2012, which did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

        In April 2010, the FASB issued guidance on accruing for jackpot liabilities. The guidance clarifies that an entity should not accrue jackpot liabilities (or portions thereof) before a jackpot is won if the entity can legally avoid paying that jackpot (for example, by removing the gaming machine from the casino floor). Jackpots should be accrued and charged to revenue when an entity has the obligation to pay the jackpot. This guidance applies to both base jackpots and the incremental portion of progressive jackpots. However, the guidance only affected the accounting for base jackpots, as the guidance uses the same principle that is applied by the Company to the incremental portion of progressive jackpots. The guidance was effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on

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or after December 15, 2010. This guidance was applied by recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to opening retained earnings in the period of adoption. The Company adopted the guidance as of January 1, 2011, and as such, recorded a cumulative-effect adjustment, which increased retained earnings by $2.9 million.

ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

        The table below provides information at December 31, 2011 about our financial instruments that are sensitive to changes in interest rates. For debt obligations, the table presents notional amounts maturing during the year and the related weighted-average interest rates by maturity dates. Notional amounts are used to calculate the contractual payments to be exchanged by maturity date and the weighted-average interest rates are based on implied forward LIBOR rates at December 31, 2011.

 
  2012   2013   2014   2015   2016   Thereafter   Total   Fair Value
12/31/11
 
 
  (in thousands)
 

Long-term debt:

                                                 

Fixed rate

  $   $   $   $   $   $ 325,000   $ 325,000   $ 353,438  

Average interest rate

                                  8.75 %            

Other Long Term Obligations

  $ 1,949   $   $   $   $   $   $ 1,949   $ 1,949  

Average interest rate

    6.20 %                                          

Variable rate

  $ 42,500   $ 51,250   $ 68,750   $ 77,500   $ 767,000   $ 708,750   $ 1,715,750   $ 1,716,720  

Average interest rate(1)

    2.63 %   2.81 %   3.00 %   3.21 %   3.33 %   4.73 %            

(1)
Estimated rate, reflective of forward LIBOR plus the spread over LIBOR applicable to variable-rate borrowing.

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ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Board of Directors
Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries

        We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

        We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

        In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries at December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

        We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries' internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 24, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

   

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
February 24, 2012

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Penn National Gaming, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 
  December 31,  
 
  2011   2010  

Assets

             

Current assets

             

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 238,440   $ 246,385  

Receivables, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $4,115 and $3,332 at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively

    55,455     44,463  

Insurance receivable

    1,072      

Prepaid expenses

    39,801     72,393  

Deferred income taxes

    32,306     25,206  

Other current assets

    48,715     77,506  
           

Total current assets

    415,789     465,953  
           

Property and equipment, net

   
2,277,200
   
1,965,774
 

Other assets

             

Investment in and advances to unconsolidated affiliates

    174,116     64,120  

Goodwill

    1,180,359     1,185,756  

Other intangible assets

    421,593     415,152  

Debt issuance costs, net of accumulated amortization of $4,860 and $45,234 at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively

    33,310     27,742  

Loan receivable

        230,500  

Other assets

    103,979     107,882  
           

Total other assets

    1,913,357     2,031,152  
           

Total assets

  $ 4,606,346   $ 4,462,879  
           

Liabilities

             

Current liabilities

             

Current maturities of long-term debt

  $ 44,559   $ 357,927  

Accounts payable

    39,582     17,312  

Accrued expenses

    113,699     101,447  

Accrued interest

    17,947     36,597  

Accrued salaries and wages

    85,285     73,432  

Gaming, pari-mutuel, property, and other taxes

    49,559     46,449  

Income taxes

    5,696      

Insurance financing

    16,363     11,602  

Other current liabilities

    53,650     46,763  
           

Total current liabilities

    426,340     691,529  
           

Long-term liabilities

             

Long-term debt, net of current maturities

    1,998,606     1,813,196  

Deferred income taxes

    167,576     134,572  

Noncurrent tax liabilities

    33,872     36,846  

Other noncurrent liabilities

    8,321     8,970  
           

Total long-term liabilities

    2,208,375     1,993,584  
           

Shareholders' equity

             

Preferred stock ($.01 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 12,275 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2011 and 2010)

         

Common stock ($.01 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized, 76,213,126 and 78,414,022 shares issued at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively)

    756     779  

Additional paid-in capital

    1,385,355     1,446,932  

Retained earnings

    583,202     337,940  

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

    2,318     (7,885 )
           

Total shareholders' equity

    1,971,631     1,777,766  
           

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity

  $ 4,606,346   $ 4,462,879  
           

   

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

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Penn National Gaming, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Operations
(in thousands, except per share data)

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  

Revenues

                   

Gaming

  $ 2,468,630   $ 2,242,515   $ 2,158,028  

Food, beverage and other

    400,258     334,808     339,235  

Management service fee

    15,185     15,190     14,787  
               

Revenues

    2,884,073     2,592,513     2,512,050  

Less promotional allowances

    (141,816 )   (133,402 )   (142,775 )
               

Net revenues

    2,742,257     2,459,111     2,369,275  
               

Operating expenses

                   

Gaming

    1,298,938     1,198,097     1,161,510  

Food, beverage and other

    321,801     266,800     266,351  

General and administrative

    423,718     411,415     403,136  

Depreciation and amortization

    211,476     212,387     194,436  

Impairment losses

        224,709     532,377  

Insurance recoveries, net of deductible charges

    (13,257 )   (7,523 )   6,063  
               

Total operating expenses

    2,242,676     2,305,885     2,563,873  
               

Income (loss) from operations

    499,581     153,226     (194,598 )
               

Other income (expenses)

                   

Interest expense

    (99,564 )   (130,215 )   (134,984 )

Interest income

    423     1,579     6,522  

Gain (loss) from unconsolidated affiliates

    7,364     (25,974 )   (1,121 )

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (17,838 )   (519 )   (4,793 )

Other

    (734 )   6,421     1,093  
               

Total other expenses

    (110,349 )   (148,708 )   (133,283 )
               

Income (loss) from operations before income taxes

    389,232     4,518     (327,881 )

Taxes on income

    146,881     66,178     (60,468 )
               

Net income (loss) including noncontrolling interests

    242,351     (61,660 )   (267,413 )

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

        (2,193 )   (2,465 )
               

Net income (loss) attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries

  $ 242,351   $ (59,467 ) $ (264,948 )
               

Earnings (loss) per common share attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries:

                   

Basic earnings (loss) per common share

  $ 2.52   $ (0.76 ) $ (3.39 )

Diluted earnings (loss) per common share

  $ 2.26   $ (0.76 ) $ (3.39 )

   

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

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Penn National Gaming, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders' Equity
(in thousands, except share data)

 
  Penn National Gaming, Inc. shareholders    
   
   
 
 
  Preferred Stock   Common Stock    
   
   
   
   
   
 
 
  Additional
Paid-In
Capital
  Retained
Earnings
  Accumulated Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
  Noncontrolling
Interests
  Total
Shareholders'
Equity
  Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
 
  Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount  

Balance, December 31, 2008

    12,500   $     78,148,488   $ 782   $ 1,442,829   $ 662,355   $ (48,693 ) $   $ 2,057,273        

Stock option activity, including tax benefit of $2,388

            491,078     4     35,173                 35,177   $  

Restricted stock activity

            332,690         2,474                 2,474      

Change in fair value of interest rate swap contracts, net of income taxes of $8,150

                            14,586         14,586     14,586  

Change in fair value of corporate debt securities

                            6,843         6,843     6,843  

Foreign currency translation adjustment

                            1,236         1,236     1,236  

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

                                1,900     1,900      

Net loss

                        (264,948 )       (2,465 )   (267,413 )   (267,413 )
                                           

Balance, December 31, 2009

    12,500         78,972,256     786     1,480,476     397,407     (26,028 )   (565 )   1,852,076     (244,748 )
                                                             

Repurchase of preferred stock

    (225 )               (11,200 )               (11,200 )    

Repurchase of noncontrolling interest

                    (27,758 )           2,758     (25,000 )    

Stock option activity, including tax benefit of $3,311

            823,056     8     35,875                 35,883      

Share repurchases

            (1,526,400 )   (15 )   (35,843 )               (35,858 )    

Restricted stock activity

            145,110         5,382                 5,382      

Change in fair value of interest rate swap contracts, net of income taxes of $9,427

                            16,410         16,410     16,410  

Change in fair value of corporate debt securities

                            1,165         1,165     1,165  

Foreign currency translation adjustment

                            568         568     568  

Net loss

                        (59,467 )       (2,193 )   (61,660 )   (61,660 )
                                           

Balance, December 31, 2010

    12,275         78,414,022     779     1,446,932     337,940     (7,885 )       1,777,766     (43,517 )
                                                             

Stock option activity, including tax benefit of $2,557

            695,915     7     39,352                 39,359      

Share repurchases

            (2,981,406 )   (30 )   (105,176 )               (105,206 )    

Restricted stock activity, net

            84,595         4,247                 4,247      

Change in fair value of interest rate swap contracts, net of income taxes of $5,238

                            9,374         9,374     9,374  

Change in fair value of corporate debt securities

                            1,116         1,116     1,116  

Foreign currency translation adjustment

                            (287 )       (287 )   (287 )

Cumulative-effect of adoption of amendments to ASC 924 regarding jackpot liabilities, net of income taxes of $1,068

                        2,911             2,911      

Net income

                        242,351             242,351     242,351  
                                           

Balance, December 31, 2011

    12,275   $     76,213,126   $ 756   $ 1,385,355   $ 583,202   $ 2,318   $   $ 1,971,631   $ 252,554  
                                           

   

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

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Penn National Gaming, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in thousands)

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  

Operating activities

                   

Net income (loss) including noncontrolling interests

  $ 242,351   $ (61,660 ) $ (267,413 )

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) including noncontrolling interests to net cash provided by operating activities:

                   

Depreciation and amortization

    211,476     212,387     194,436  

Amortization of items charged to interest expense and interest income

    9,601     12,581     10,733  

Loss on sale of fixed assets

    340     3,104     332  

(Gain) loss from unconsolidated affiliates

    (7,364 )   25,974     1,121  

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    12,212     519     4,793  

Hollywood Casino Joliet fire

            5,186  

Loss on police services contract termination at Hollywood Casino Aurora

        6,624      

Gain on accelerated payment of other long-term obligations

            (1,305 )

Gain on litigation settlement

        (9,619 )    

Gain on sale of corporate debt securities

            (6,598 )

Impairment loss on corporate debt securities

        265      

Deferred income taxes

    21,560     (2,204 )   (146,408 )

Charge for stock-based compensation

    24,330     25,954     28,360  

Impairment losses

        224,709     532,377  

(Increase) decrease, net of businesses acquired

                   

Accounts receivable

    (6,064 )   (1,338 )   (16,091 )

Insurance receivable

    (1,073 )   28,673      

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

    (4,648 )   3,585     (13,160 )

Other assets

    (2,556 )   10,160     (8,138 )

Increase (decrease), net of businesses acquired

                   

Accounts payable

    397     477     (5,292 )

Accrued expenses

    8,382     505     4,837  

Accrued interest

    (4,038 )   648     4,332  

Accrued salaries and wages

    8,961     7,824     10,228  

Gaming, pari-mutuel, property and other taxes

    2,047     7,506     (5,560 )

Income taxes

    49,285          

Other current and noncurrent liabilities

    2,849     6,827     11,401  

Other noncurrent tax liabilities

    (683 )   (10,323 )   75  
               

Net cash provided by operating activities

    567,365     493,178     338,246  
               

Investing activities

                   

Expenditures for property and equipment, net of reimbursements

    (293,081 )   (362,955 )   (289,551 )

Proceeds from sale of property and equipment

    12,966     1,627     2,628  

Proceeds from sale of corporate debt securities

            50,602  

Insurance proceeds related to damaged property and equipment

    3,862     4,821     20,593  

Purchase of outstanding loans of M Resorts LLC

        (230,500 )    

Investment in joint ventures, net of proceeds received

    (100,398 )   (63,632 )   (12,895 )

Decrease (increase) in cash in escrow

    28,975     (30,224 )   (25,036 )

Cash acquired, net of acquisitions of businesses and licenses

    8,874     (55,895 )   (9,000 )
               

Net cash used in investing activities

    (338,802 )   (736,758 )   (262,659 )
               

Financing activities

                   

Proceeds from exercise of options

    16,719     11,488     5,431  

Repurchase of common stock

    (105,206 )   (35,858 )    

Repurchase of preferred stock

        (11,200 )    

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt, net of issuance costs

    1,773,232     212,732     762,068  

Principal payments on long-term debt

    (1,928,571 )   (383,476 )   (879,193 )

Proceeds from insurance financing

    17,406     18,271     15,454  

Payments on insurance financing

    (12,645 )   (13,421 )   (16,795 )

(Repurchase of)/contributions from noncontrolling interest

        (25,000 )   1,900  

Tax benefit from stock options exercised

    2,557     3,311     2,388  
               

Net cash used in financing activities

    (236,508 )   (223,153 )   (108,747 )
               

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

    (7,945 )   (466,733 )   (33,160 )

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

    246,385     713,118     746,278  
               

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

  $ 238,440   $ 246,385   $ 713,118  
               

Supplemental disclosure

                   

Interest expense paid

  $ 98,756   $ 121,821   $ 124,992  

Income taxes paid

  $ 90,702   $ 72,091   $ 109,200  

        Non-cash transaction:    On June 1, 2011, following the purchase of all of the outstanding debt of The M Resorts LLC in October 2010 and the receipt of requisite regulatory approvals, the Company acquired the business in exchange for the debt. This non-cash transaction at the acquisition date, resulted in the removal of the Company's loan receivable and increased property and equipment, net, total current assets, total other assets and total current liabilities by $203.7 million, $13.7 million, $2.4 million and $17.3 million, respectively.

   

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

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Penn National Gaming, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

1.     Business and Basis of Presentation

        Penn National Gaming, Inc. ("Penn") and subsidiaries (collectively, the "Company") is a diversified, multi-jurisdictional owner and manager of gaming and pari-mutuel properties. Penn is the successor to several businesses that have operated as Penn National Race Course since 1972. Penn was incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1982 as PNRC Corp. and adopted its current name in 1994, when the Company became a public company. In 1997, the Company began its transition from a pari-mutuel company to a diversified gaming company with the acquisition of the Charles Town property and the introduction of video lottery terminals in West Virginia. Since 1997, the Company has continued to expand its gaming operations through strategic acquisitions (including the acquisitions of Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis and Boomtown Biloxi, CRC Holdings, Inc., the Bullwhackers properties, Hollywood Casino Corporation, Argosy Gaming Company, Zia Park Casino, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club and The M Resorts LLC (the "M Resort") in June 2011), greenfield projects (such as at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway and Hollywood Casino Perryville), and property expansions (such as Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races and Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg). Most recently, the Company, along with its joint venture partner, opened Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway on February 3, 2012, and the Company anticipates opening facilities in Columbus and Toledo, Ohio in 2012.

        As of December 31, 2011, the Company owned, managed, or had ownership interests in twenty-five facilities in the following eighteen jurisdictions: Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Ontario.

        The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses for the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

        For purposes of comparability, certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

2.     Principles of Consolidation

        The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Penn and its subsidiaries, including wholly-owned subsidiaries and subsidiaries that had a noncontrolling interest. Investment in and advances to unconsolidated affiliates are accounted for under the equity method. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

3.     Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Cash and Cash Equivalents

        The Company considers all cash balances and highly-liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash and cash equivalents.

Concentration of Credit Risk

        Financial instruments that subject the Company to credit risk consist of cash equivalents, corporate securities, interest rate swap contracts and accounts receivable.

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        The Company's policy is to limit the amount of credit exposure to any one financial institution, and place investments with financial institutions evaluated as being creditworthy, or in short-term money market and tax-free bond funds which are exposed to minimal interest rate and credit risk. The Company has bank deposits and overnight repurchase agreements that exceed federally-insured limits.

        Concentration of credit risk, with respect to casino receivables, is limited through the Company's credit evaluation process. The Company issues markers to approved casino customers only following credit checks and investigations of creditworthiness. Marker balances issued to approved casino customers were $7.6 million at December 31, 2011, compared to $4.8 million at December 31, 2010.

        The Company's receivables of $55.5 million and $44.5 million at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, primarily consist of $10.9 million and $8.1 million, respectively, due from the West Virginia Lottery for gaming revenue settlements and capital reinvestment projects at the Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, $11.2 million and $11.1 million, respectively, for reimbursement of expenses paid on behalf of Casino Rama, $3.6 million and $4.1 million, respectively, for racing settlements due from simulcasting at Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, and markers issued to customers mentioned above.

        Accounts are written off when management determines that an account is uncollectible. Recoveries of accounts previously written off are recorded when received. An allowance for doubtful accounts is determined to reduce the Company's receivables to their carrying value, which approximates fair value. The allowance is estimated based on historical collection experience, specific review of individual customer accounts, and current economic and business conditions. Historically, the Company has not incurred any significant credit-related losses.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

        The following methods and assumptions are used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments for which it is practicable to estimate:

    Cash and Cash Equivalents

        The fair value of the Company's cash and cash equivalents approximates the carrying value of the Company's cash and cash equivalents, due to the short maturity of the cash equivalents.

    Investment in Corporate Debt Securities

        The fair value of the investment in corporate debt securities is estimated based on a third party broker quote. The investment in corporate debt securities is measured at fair value on a recurring basis.

    Loan Receivable

        On June 1, 2011, following the purchase of all of the outstanding debt of the M Resort for $230.5 million and the receipt of requisite regulatory approvals, the Company acquired the business in exchange for the debt. The Company purchased all of the outstanding bank and subordinated debt of the M Resort in October 2010 at which time the Company also secured the right to acquire the business of the M Resort in exchange for the property's outstanding debt obligations. At December 31, 2010, the $230.5 million loan was recorded as a loan receivable within total other assets on the consolidated balance sheet. See Note 6 for further information.

    Long-term Debt

        The fair value of the Company's Term Loan B component of the senior secured credit facility and senior subordinated notes is estimated based on quoted prices in active markets. The fair value of the

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remainder of the Company's senior secured credit facility approximates its carrying value as it is variable rate debt. The fair value of the Company's other long-term obligations approximates its carrying value.

    Interest Rate Swap Contracts

        The fair value of the Company's interest rate swap contracts was measured at the present value of all expected future cash flows based on the LIBOR-based swap yield curve as of the date of the valuation, subject to a credit adjustment to the LIBOR-based yield curve's implied discount rates. The credit adjustment reflected the Company's best estimate as to the Company's credit quality at December 31, 2010. The interest rate swap contracts were measured at fair value on a recurring basis. There were no outstanding interest rate swap contracts as of December 31, 2011.

        The estimated fair values of the Company's financial instruments are as follows (in thousands):

 
  2011   2010  
December 31,
  Carrying
Amount
  Fair
Value
  Carrying
Amount
  Fair
Value
 

Financial assets:

                         

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 238,440   $ 238,440   $ 246,385   $ 246,385  

Investment in corporate debt securities

    6,790     6,790     5,828     5,828  

Loan receivable

            230,500     230,500  

Financial liabilities:

                         

Long-term debt

                         

Senior secured credit facility

    1,714,001     1,716,720     1,589,125     1,589,125  

Senior subordinated notes

    325,000     353,438     575,000     612,875  

Other long-term obligations

    1,949     1,949     3,782     3,782  

Interest rate swap contracts

            16,746     16,746  

        See Note 21 for further information regarding the Company's assessment of the inputs used to measure the fair value for the investment in corporate debt securities and interest rate swap contracts.

Property and Equipment

        Property and equipment are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation. Maintenance and repairs that neither add materially to the value of the asset nor appreciably prolong its useful life are charged to expense as incurred. Gains or losses on the disposal of property and equipment are included in the determination of income.

        Depreciation of property and equipment is recorded using the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives:

Land improvements

  5 to 15 years

Building and improvements

  10 to 40 years

Furniture, fixtures, and equipment

  3 to 7 years

        Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the estimated useful life of the improvement or the related lease term.

        The estimated useful lives are determined based on the nature of the assets as well as the Company's current operating strategy.

        The Company reviews the carrying value of its property and equipment for possible impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable based on undiscounted estimated future cash flows expected to result from its use and

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eventual disposition. The factors considered by the Company in performing this assessment include current operating results, trends and prospects, as well as the effect of obsolescence, demand, competition and other economic factors. In estimating expected future cash flows for determining whether an asset is impaired, assets are grouped at the individual property level. In assessing the recoverability of the carrying value of property and equipment, the Company must make assumptions regarding future cash flows and other factors. If these estimates or the related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record an impairment loss for these assets. Such an impairment loss would be recognized as a non-cash component of operating income.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

        At December 31, 2011, the Company had $1,180.4 million in goodwill and $421.6 million in other intangible assets within its consolidated balance sheet, representing 25.6% and 9.2% of total assets, respectively, resulting from the Company's acquisition of other businesses and payment for gaming licenses and racing permits. Two issues arise with respect to these assets that require significant management estimates and judgment: (i) the valuation in connection with the initial purchase price allocation; and (ii) the ongoing evaluation for impairment.

        In connection with the Company's acquisitions, valuations are completed to determine the allocation of the purchase prices. The factors considered in the valuations include data gathered as a result of the Company's due diligence in connection with the acquisitions, projections for future operations, and data obtained from third-party valuation specialists as deemed appropriate. Goodwill is tested annually, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist, for impairment by comparing the fair value of the reporting units to their carrying amount. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value in step 1 of the impairment test, then step 2 of the impairment test is performed to determine the implied value of goodwill for that reporting unit. If the implied value of goodwill is less than the goodwill allocated for that reporting unit, an impairment loss is recognized.

        In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 350, "Intangibles-Goodwill and Other," the Company considers its gaming licenses, racing permits and the majority of its trademark intangible assets as indefinite-life intangible assets that do not require amortization based on the Company's future expectations to operate its gaming facilities indefinitely as well as its historical experience in renewing these intangible assets at minimal cost with various state gaming and racing commissions. Rather, these intangible assets are tested annually, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist, for impairment by comparing the fair value of the recorded assets to their carrying amount. If the carrying amounts of the indefinite-life intangible assets exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized.

        The evaluation of goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets requires the use of estimates about future operating results of each reporting unit to determine their estimated fair value. The Company uses a market approach model, which includes the use of forecasted adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, charges for stock compensation, depreciation and amortization, gain or loss on disposal of assets, and certain other income and expenses, and inclusive of loss from unconsolidated affiliates) and adjusted EBITDA multiples, as the Company believes that adjusted EBITDA is a widely-used measure of performance in the gaming industry and as the Company uses adjusted EBITDA as the primary measurement of the operating performance of its properties (including the evaluation of operating personnel). In addition, the Company believes that an adjusted EBITDA multiple is the principal basis for the valuation of gaming companies. Changes in the estimated adjusted EBITDA multiples or forecasted operations can materially affect these estimates.

        Forecasted adjusted EBITDA levels (based on the Company's annual operating plan as determined in the fourth quarter) can be significantly impacted by the local economy in which the Company's reporting units operate. For example, increases in unemployment rates can result in decreased customer

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visitations and/or lower customer spend per visit. In addition, the impact of new legislation which approves gaming in nearby jurisdictions or further expands gaming in jurisdictions where the Company's reporting units currently operate can result in opportunities for the Company to expand its operations. However, it also has the impact of increasing competition for the Company's established properties which generally will have a negative effect on those locations' profitability once competitors become established as a certain level of cannibalization occurs absent an overall increase in customer visitations. Lastly, increases in gaming taxes approved by state regulatory bodies can negatively impact forecasted adjusted EBITDA.

        The adjusted EBITDA multiple utilized by the Company in its goodwill impairment valuation methodology is determined based on the Company's current enterprise value, increased for a control premium. The control premium assumption is based on acquisitions of precedent transactions of comparable businesses. In evaluating the estimates derived by the market based approach, management assesses the relevance and reliability of the multiples by considering factors unique to its reporting units, including recent operating results, business plans, economic projections, anticipated future cash flows, and other market data. These considerations can lead the Company to modify its individual reporting units adjusted EBITDA multiple. EBITDA multiples can be significantly impacted by various factors, such as a company's present and future cost of capital, the future growth opportunities for the industry as well as for the company itself, general market sentiment, investors' perceptions of senior management's effectiveness at deploying capital and managing overall operations, as well as pending or recently completed merger transactions.

        Assumptions and estimates about future adjusted EBITDA levels and multiples by individual reporting units are complex and subjective. They are sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions and can be affected by a variety of factors, including external factors, such as industry and economic trends, and internal factors, such as changes in the Company's business strategy, which may reallocate capital and resources to different or new opportunities which management believes will enhance the Company's overall value but may be to the detriment of an individual reporting unit.

        Once an impairment of goodwill or other indefinite-life intangible assets has been recorded, it cannot be reversed. Because the Company's goodwill and indefinite-life intangible assets are not amortized, there may be volatility in reported income because impairment losses, if any, are likely to occur irregularly and in varying amounts. Intangible assets that have a definite-life are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives or related service contract. The Company reviews the carrying value of its intangible assets that have a definite-life for possible impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable. If the carrying amount of the intangible assets that have a definite-life exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized.

Debt Issuance Costs

        Debt issuance costs that are incurred by the Company in connection with the issuance of debt are deferred and amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the contractual term of the underlying indebtedness.

Comprehensive Income

        The Company accounts for comprehensive income in accordance with ASC 220, "Comprehensive Income," which established standards for the reporting and presentation of comprehensive income in the consolidated financial statements. The Company presents comprehensive income in its consolidated statements of changes in shareholders' equity.

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Income Taxes

        The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, "Income Taxes" ("ASC 740"). Under ASC 740, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities and are measured at the prevailing enacted tax rates that will be in effect when these differences are settled or realized. ASC 740 also requires that deferred tax assets be reduced by a valuation allowance if it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

        The realizability of the deferred tax assets is evaluated quarterly by assessing the valuation allowance and by adjusting the amount of the allowance, if necessary. The factors used to assess the likelihood of realization are the forecast of future taxable income and available tax planning strategies that could be implemented to realize the net deferred tax assets. The Company has used tax-planning strategies to realize or renew net deferred tax assets in order to avoid the potential loss of future tax benefits.

        ASC 740 also creates a single model to address uncertainty in tax positions, and clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise's financial statements by prescribing the minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in an enterprise's financial statements. It also provides guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. The liability for unrecognized tax benefits is included in noncurrent tax liabilities within the consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2011 and 2010.

Accounting for Derivatives and Hedging Activities

        The Company uses fixed and variable-rate debt to finance its operations. Both funding sources have associated risks and opportunities, such as interest rate exposure, and the Company's risk management policy permits the use of derivatives to manage this exposure. The Company does not hold or issue derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes. Thus, uses of derivatives are strictly limited to hedging and risk management purposes in connection with managing interest rate exposure. Acceptable derivatives for this purpose include interest rate swap contracts, futures, options, caps, and similar instruments.

        When using derivatives, the Company has historically desired to obtain hedge accounting, which is conditional upon satisfying specific documentation and performance criteria. In particular, the underlying hedged item must expose the Company to risks associated with market fluctuations and the instrument used as the hedging derivative must generate offsetting effects in prescribed magnitudes. If these criteria are not met, a change in the market value of the financial instrument and all associated settlements would be recognized as gains or losses in the period of change.

        Under cash flow hedge accounting, effective derivative results are initially recorded in other comprehensive income ("OCI") and later reclassified to earnings, coinciding with the income recognition relating to the variable interest payments being hedged (i.e., when the interest expense on the variable-rate liability is recorded in earnings). Any hedge ineffectiveness (which represents the amount by which hedge results exceed the variability in the cash flows of the forecasted transaction due to the risk being hedged) is recorded in current period earnings. Under cash flow hedge accounting, derivatives are included in the consolidated balance sheets as assets or liabilities at fair value.

        Previously, the Company had a number of interest rate swap contracts in place. These contracts served to mitigate income volatility for a portion of the Company's variable-rate funding. In effect, these interest rate swap contracts synthetically converted the portion of variable-rate debt being hedged to the equivalent of fixed-rate funding. Under the terms of the swap contracts, the Company received cash flows from the swap contract counterparties to offset the benchmark interest rate component of

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variable interest payments on the hedged financings, in exchange for paying cash flows based on the swap contracts' fixed rates. These two respective obligations were net-settled periodically. The fair value of the Company's interest rate swap contracts was measured at the present value of all expected future cash flows based on the LIBOR-based swap yield curve as of the date of the valuation, subject to a credit adjustment to the LIBOR-based yield curve's implied discount rates. The credit adjustment reflected the Company's best estimate as to the Company's credit quality. The interest rate swap contract liabilities were included in accrued interest within the consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2010. There were no outstanding interest rate swap contracts as of December 31, 2011.

        Effective July 1, 2011, the Company de-designated its interest rate swap contracts that historically qualified for cash flow hedge accounting. This was due to the new $2.15 billion senior secured credit facility that the Company entered into in July 2011. As a result, the loss in OCI related to these swaps of $4.7 million was amortized to interest expense over the swaps remaining lives. The total notional value of these swaps was $440 million, with $200 million expiring in October 2011 and the remainder maturing in December 2011. Subsequent to the de-designation date of July 1, 2011, the Company had accounted for changes in the fair value of these derivatives in earnings as a component of interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

        In addition, the Company had certain other derivative instruments that were not designated to qualify for hedge accounting, which expired in May 2011. The periodic change in the mark-to-market of these derivative instruments had been recorded in current period earnings in interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

        Credit risk relating to derivative counterparties is mitigated by using multiple, highly rated counterparties, and the credit quality of each is monitored on an ongoing basis.

        See Note 11 for additional information related to the Company's derivatives.

Revenue Recognition and Promotional Allowances

        Gaming revenue is the aggregate net difference between gaming wins and losses, with liabilities recognized for funds deposited by customers before gaming play occurs, for chips and "ticket-in, ticket-out" coupons in the customers' possession, and for accruals related to the anticipated payout of progressive jackpots. Progressive slot machines, which contain base jackpots that increase at a progressive rate based on the number of coins played, are charged to revenue as the amount of the jackpots increase.

        Food, beverage and other revenue, including racing revenue, is recognized as services are performed. Racing revenue includes the Company's share of pari-mutuel wagering on live races after payment of amounts returned as winning wagers, its share of wagering from import and export simulcasting, and its share of wagering from its off-track wagering facilities ("OTWs").

        Revenue from the management service contract for Casino Rama is based upon contracted terms and is recognized when services are performed.

        Revenues are recognized net of certain sales incentives in accordance with ASC 605-50, "Revenue Recognition—Customer Payments and Incentives." The Company records certain sales incentives and points earned in point-loyalty programs as a reduction of revenue.

        The retail value of accommodations, food and beverage, and other services furnished to guests without charge is included in gross revenues and then deducted as promotional allowances. The estimated cost of providing such promotional allowances is primarily included in food, beverage and

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other expense. The amounts included in promotional allowances for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows:

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Rooms

  $ 24,646   $ 23,980   $ 23,316  

Food and beverage

    106,687     99,024     108,473  

Other

    10,483     10,398     10,986  
               

Total promotional allowances

  $ 141,816   $ 133,402   $ 142,775  
               

        The estimated cost of providing such complimentary services for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows:

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Rooms

  $ 9,149   $ 9,188   $ 9,406  

Food and beverage

    76,357     75,180     77,444  

Other

    6,430     6,544     6,590  
               

Total cost of complimentary services

  $ 91,936   $ 90,912   $ 93,440  
               

Gaming and Racing Taxes

        The Company is subject to gaming and pari-mutuel taxes based on gross gaming revenue and pari-mutuel revenue in the jurisdictions in which it operates. The Company primarily recognizes gaming and pari-mutuel tax expense based on the statutorily required percentage of revenue that is required to be paid to state and local jurisdictions in the states wagering occurs. In certain states in which the Company operates, gaming taxes are based on graduated rates. The Company records gaming tax expense at the Company's estimated effective gaming tax rate for the year, considering estimated taxable gaming revenue and the applicable rates. Such estimates are adjusted each interim period. If gaming tax rates change during the year, such changes are applied prospectively in the determination of gaming tax expense in future interim periods. Finally, the Company recognizes purse expense based on the statutorily required percentage of revenue that is required to be paid out in the form of purses to the winning owners of horseraces run at the Company's racetracks in the period in which wagering occurs. For the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, these expenses, which are recorded primarily within gaming expense in the consolidated statements of operations, was $1.06 billion, $975.7 million, and $947.1 million, respectively.

Earnings Per Share

        The Company calculates earnings per share ("EPS") in accordance with ASC 260, "Earnings Per Share" ("ASC 260"). Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income applicable to common stock, excluding net income attributable to noncontrolling interests, by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS reflects the additional dilution for all potentially-dilutive securities such as stock options and unvested restricted shares.

        At December 31, 2011, the Company had outstanding 12,275 shares of Series B Redeemable Preferred Stock (the "Preferred Stock"), which the Company determined qualified as a participating security as defined in ASC 260. Under ASC 260, a security is considered a participating security if the security may participate in undistributed earnings with common stock, whether that participation is conditioned upon the occurrence of a specified event or not. In accordance with ASC 260, a company is required to use the two-class method when computing EPS when a company has a security that qualifies as a "participating security." The two-class method is an earnings allocation formula that

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determines EPS for each class of common stock and participating security according to dividends declared (or accumulated) and participation rights in undistributed earnings. A participating security is included in the computation of basic EPS using the two-class method. Under the two-class method, basic EPS for the Company's Common Stock is computed by dividing net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries applicable to common stock by the weighted-average common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS for the Company's Common Stock is computed using the more dilutive of the two-class method or the if-converted method.

        The following table sets forth the allocation of net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2011 under the two-class method:

Year ended December, 31
  2011  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries

  $ 242,351  

Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries applicable to preferred stock

    46,101  

Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries applicable to common stock

  $ 196,250  
       

        The following table reconciles the weighted-average common shares outstanding used in the calculation of basic EPS to the weighted-average common shares outstanding used in the calculation of diluted EPS for the year ended December 31, 2011:

Year ended December 31,
  2011  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Determination of shares:

       

Weighted-average common shares outstanding

    77,991  

Assumed conversion of dilutive employee stock-based awards

    1,782  

Assumed conversion of preferred stock

    27,278  
       

Diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding

    107,051  
       

        Reflecting the issuance of the Preferred Stock and the repurchase of 225 shares of Preferred Stock during the year ended December 31, 2010, the Company is required to adjust its diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding for the purpose of calculating diluted EPS as follows: 1) when the price of the Company's Common Stock is less than $45, the diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding is increased by 27,277,778 shares (regardless of how much the stock price is below $45); 2) when the price of the Company's Common Stock is between $45 and $67, the diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding is increased by an amount which can be calculated by dividing $1.23 billion (face value) by the current price per share of the Company's Common Stock, which will result in an increase in the diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding of between 18,320,896 shares and 27,277,778 shares; and 3) when the price of the Company's Common Stock is above $67, the diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding is increased by 18,320,896 shares (regardless of how much the stock price exceeds $67).

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        The following table presents the calculation of basic and diluted EPS for the Company's Common Stock:

Year ended December 31,
  2011  
 
  (in thousands, except
per share data)

 

Calculation of basic EPS attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries:

       

Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries applicable to common stock

  $ 196,250  

Weighted-average common shares outstanding

    77,991  

Basic EPS

  $ 2.52  

Calculation of diluted EPS attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries:

       

Net income attributable to the shareholders of Penn National Gaming, Inc. and subsidiaries

  $ 242,351  

Diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding

    107,051  

Diluted EPS

  $ 2.26  

        Since the Company reported a net loss for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, it was required by ASC 260 to use basic weighted-average common shares outstanding, rather than diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding, when calculating diluted EPS. In addition, since the Company reported a loss from operations for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, the Preferred Stock was not deemed to be a participating security for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, pursuant to ASC 260. The basic weighted-average common shares outstanding for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 were 78,078,602 and 78,121,571, respectively.

        Options to purchase 3,004,402 shares were outstanding during the year ended December 31, 2011 but were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because they were antidilutive. Options to purchase 10,834,444 and 9,966,125 shares were outstanding during the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, but were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because they were antidilutive since the Company reported a loss from operations for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009.

Stock-Based Compensation

        The Company accounts for stock compensation under ASC 718, "Compensation—Stock Compensation," which requires the Company to expense the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. This expense is recognized ratably over the requisite service period following the date of grant.

        The fair value for stock options was estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which requires management to make certain assumptions. The risk-free interest rate was based on the United States ("U.S.") Treasury spot rate with a term equal to the expected life assumed at the date of grant. Expected volatility was estimated based on the historical volatility of the Company's stock price over a period of 5.82 years, in order to match the expected life of the options at the grant date. There is no expected dividend yield since the Company has not paid any cash dividends on its Common Stock since its initial public offering in May 1994 and since the Company intends to retain all of its earnings to finance the development of its business for the foreseeable future. The weighted-average expected life was based on the contractual term of the stock option and expected employee exercise dates, which was based on the historical and expected exercise behavior of the Company's employees. Forfeitures are estimated at the date of grant based on historical experience.

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        The following are the weighted-average assumptions used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model at December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009:

Year ended December 31,
  2011   2010   2009  

Risk-free interest rate

    1.04 %   2.27 %   2.80 %

Expected volatility

    47.60 %   48.02 %   49.68 %

Dividend yield

             

Weighted-average expected life (years)

    5.82     5.73     5.32  

Forfeiture rate

    5.00 %   5.00 %   5.00 %

Segment Information

        During 2011, the Company realigned its reporting structure in connection with the hiring of an additional senior vice president of regional operations. The Company now has three senior vice presidents of regional operations who oversee various properties based primarily on their geographic locations and whom report directly to the Company's President and Chief Operating Officer. This event impacted how the Company's Chief Executive Officer, who is the Company's Chief Operating Decision Maker ("CODM") as that term is defined in ASC 280, "Segment Reporting" ("ASC 280"), measures and assesses the Company's business performance and has caused the Company to conclude that it now has reportable segments. Therefore, the Company has aggregated its properties into three reportable segments: (i) Midwest, (ii) East/West, and (iii) Southern Plains consistent with how the Company's CODM reviews and assesses the Company's financial performance.

        The Midwest reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg, Hollywood Casino Aurora, Hollywood Casino Joliet, and Argosy Casino Alton. It also includes the Company's Casino Rama management service contract as well as the two Ohio properties that are currently under construction, Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus, which are scheduled to open by the end of May 2012 and November 1, 2012, respectively.

        The East/West reportable segment consists of the following properties: Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races, Hollywood Casino Perryville, Hollywood Slots Hotel and Raceway, Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course, Zia Park Casino, and M Resort.

        The Southern Plains reportable segment consists of the following properties: Argosy Casino Riverside, Argosy Casino Sioux City, Hollywood Casino Baton Rouge, Hollywood Casino Tunica, Hollywood Casino Bay St. Louis, and Boomtown Biloxi. It also includes the Company's 50% investment in Kansas Entertainment, LLC ("Kansas Entertainment"), which owns the Hollywood Casino at Kansas Speedway which opened in February 2012.

        The Other category consists of the Company's standalone racing operations, namely Beulah Park, Raceway Park, Rosecroft Raceway, Sanford-Orlando Kennel Club, and the Company's joint venture interests in Sam Houston Race Park and Valley Race Park, Freehold Raceway, and Maryland Jockey Club (which was sold in July 2011). If the Company is successful in obtaining gaming operations at these locations, they would be assigned to one of the Company's regional executives and reported in their respective reportable segment. The Other category also includes the Company's corporate overhead operations which does not meet the definition of an operating segment under ASC 280 and our Bullwhackers property.

        See Note 17 for further information with respect to the Company's segments.

Statements of Cash Flows

        The Company has presented the consolidated statements of cash flows using the indirect method, which involves the reconciliation of net income (loss) including noncontrolling interests to net cash flow from operating activities.

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Acquisitions

        The Company accounts for its acquisitions in accordance with ASC 805, "Business Combinations." The results of operations of acquisitions are included in the consolidated financial statements from their respective dates of acquisition.

Certain Risks and Uncertainties

        The Company faces intense gaming competition in most of the markets where its properties operate. Various states are currently considering or implementing legislation to legalize or expand gaming. Such legislation presents potential opportunities for the Company to establish new properties; however, this also presents potential competitive threats to the Company's existing properties. For example, the Company's two largest properties in terms of net revenues will face new sources of significant competition in the near term. Namely, a casino scheduled to open in 2013 in Cincinnati, Ohio will compete in the same market as Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg and increased competition to Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races is anticipated in 2012 from the opening of a significant casino complex at the Arundel Mills mall in Anne Arundel, Maryland. Although these openings will have a significant impact on the Company's operations, they are anticipated to be mitigated by the Company's planned openings of Hollywood Casino Toledo and Hollywood Casino Columbus in Ohio. However, no assurance can be given that these casinos in Toledo and Columbus will open as scheduled or be as successful as anticipated.

        The Company's operations are dependent on its continued licensing by state gaming commissions. The loss of a license, in any jurisdiction in which the Company operates, could have a material adverse effect on future results of operations.

        The Company is dependent on each gaming property's local market for a significant number of its patrons and revenues. If economic conditions in these areas deteriorate or additional gaming licenses are awarded in these markets, the Company's results of operations could be adversely affected.

        The Company is dependent on the economy of the U.S. in general, and any deterioration in the national economic, energy, credit and capital markets could have a material adverse effect on future results of operations.

        The Company is dependent upon a stable gaming and admission tax structure in the locations that it operates in. Any change in the tax structure could have a material adverse affect on future results of operations.

4.     New Accounting Pronouncements

        In December 2011, the FASB issued amendments to enhance disclosures about offsetting and related arrangements. This information will enable the users of the financial statements to evaluate the effect or potential effect of netting arrangements on an entity's financial position, including the effect or potential effect of rights of setoff associated with certain financial and derivative instruments. These amendments are effective for annual reporting periods, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. The disclosures required by these amendments should be provided retrospectively for all comparative periods presented. Management does not believe that these amendments will have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

        In September 2011, the FASB issued amendments to simplify how entities test goodwill for impairment. Under the updated guidance, an entity now has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. If the assessment of qualitative factors leads to a determination that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then performing

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the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. However, if an entity concludes otherwise, then the entity is required to perform the first step of the two-step impairment test by calculating the fair value of the reporting unit and comparing it against its carrying amount. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, then the entity is required to perform the second step of the goodwill impairment test to measure the amount of impairment loss, if any. Under the new guidance, an entity can elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit in any period and proceed directly to performing the first step of the two-step goodwill impairment. The amendments are effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted, however the Company did not early adopt this amendment.

        In June 2011, the FASB issued amendments to guidance regarding the presentation of comprehensive income. The amendments eliminate the option to present components of OCI as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. The amendments require that comprehensive income be presented in either a single continuous statement or in two separate but consecutive statements. In a single continuous statement, the entity would present the components of net income and total net income, the components of OCI and a total of OCI, along with the total of comprehensive income in that statement. In the two-statement approach, the entity would present components of net income and total net income in the statement of net income and a statement of OCI would immediately follow the statement of net income and include the components of OCI and a total for OCI, along with a total for comprehensive income. The amendments also require the entity to present on the face of the financial statements any reclassification adjustments for items that are reclassified from OCI to net income in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of OCI are presented. The amendments do not change the items that must be reported in OCI, when an item of OCI must be reclassed to net income or the option to present components of OCI either net of related tax effects or before related tax effects. The amendments, excluding the specific requirement to present on the face of the financial statements any reclassification adjustments for items that are reclassified from OCI to net income in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of OCI are presented which was deferred by the FASB in December 2011, are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011 and are to be applied retrospectively. The Company adopted the guidance, except for the deferred requirement to present reclassification adjustments in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of OCI are presented, as of January 1, 2012. The Company plans to present comprehensive income in two separate but consecutive statements.

        In May 2011, the FASB issued amendments to existing fair value measurement guidance in order to achieve common requirements for measuring fair value and disclosures in accordance with GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. The guidance clarifies how a principal market is determined, addresses the fair value measurement of instruments with offsetting market or counterparty credit risks, addresses the concept of valuation premise and highest and best use, extends the prohibition on blockage factors to all three levels of the fair value hierarchy and requires additional disclosures. The amendments are to be applied prospectively and are effective during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company adopted the guidance as of January 1, 2012, which did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

        In April 2010, the FASB issued guidance on accruing for jackpot liabilities. The guidance clarifies that an entity should not accrue jackpot liabilities (or portions thereof) before a jackpot is won if the entity can legally avoid paying that jackpot (for example, by removing the gaming machine from the casino floor). Jackpots should be accrued and charged to revenue when an entity has the obligation to pay the jackpot. This guidance applies to both base jackpots and the incremental portion of progressive jackpots. However, the guidance only affected the accounting for base jackpots, as the guidance uses the same principle that is applied by the Company to the incremental portion of progressive jackpots. The guidance was effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on

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or after December 15, 2010. This guidance was applied by recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to opening retained earnings in the period of adoption. The Company adopted the guidance as of January 1, 2011, and as such, recorded a cumulative-effect adjustment, which increased retained earnings by $2.9 million.

5.     Acquisitions and Other Recent Business Ventures

Sale of Maryland Jockey Club Interest

        In July 2011, the Company sold its joint venture interest in the Maryland Jockey Club. See Note 7 for further discussion.

M Resort Transaction

        On June 1, 2011, following the purchase of all of the outstanding debt of the M Resort for $230.5 million and the receipt of requisite regulatory approvals, the Company acquired the business in exchange for the debt. See Note 6 for further discussion.

Texas Joint Venture Interest

        On April 8, 2011, the Company established a joint venture that owns and operates racetracks in Texas. See Note 7 for further discussion.

Rosecroft Acquisition

        On February 28, 2011, the Company completed its acquisition of Rosecroft Raceway in Oxon Hill, Maryland following the completion of a bankruptcy auction and approval of the purchase by a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge. Rosecroft Raceway, located approximately 13 miles south of Washington, D.C., is situated on approximately 125 acres just outside the Washington I-495 Beltway in Prince George's county. The Rosecroft facility features a 5/8-mile standardbred race track with a seven race paddock, a 53,000 square foot grandstand building, and a 96,000 square foot three story clubhouse building with dining facilities. In August 2011, Rosecroft Raceway re-opened for simulcasting and live standardbred racing resumed in late October 2011.

Beulah Park Acquisition

        On July 1, 2010, the Company completed its acquisition of Beulah Park in Grove City, Ohio from Heartland Jockey Club Ltd. Located on approximately 210 acres just outside of Columbus, Ohio, Beulah Park is a thoroughbred racing facility that features live thoroughbred racing from October to May as well as simulcast wagering from a number of nationwide tracks. Beulah Park includes a grandstand, outdoor paddock, a clubhouse facility and numerous food and dining options. The results of Beulah Park have been included in the Company's consolidated financial statements since the July 1, 2010 acquisition date.

6.     Loan Receivable

        The Company purchased all of the outstanding bank and subordinated debt of the M Resort in October 2010 for $230.5 million at which time the Company also secured the right to acquire the business of the M Resort in exchange for the property's outstanding debt obligations. At December 31, 2010, the $230.5 million loan was recorded as a loan receivable within total other assets on the consolidated balance sheet. On June 1, 2011, following the requisite regulatory approvals, the Company acquired the business in exchange for the debt. This non-cash transaction resulted in the removal of the Company's loan receivable and the purchase price allocation resulted in an increase to property and equipment, net, total current assets, total other assets, and total current liabilities, of $203.7 million,

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$13.7 million, $2.4 million, and $17.3 million, respectively based on their estimated fair values at June 1, 2011.

7.     Investment In and Advances to Unconsolidated Affiliates

        As of December 31, 2011, investment in and advances to unconsolidated affiliates primarily included the Company's 50% interest in Freehold Raceway, its 50% investment in Kansas Entertainment, which is a joint venture with International Speedway Corporation ("International Speedway"), and its 50% joint venture with MAXXAM, Inc. ("MAXXAM") that owns and operates racetracks in Texas. These investments are more fully described below.

Texas Joint Venture

        On April 8, 2011, following final approval by the Texas Racing Commission, the Company completed its investment in a joint venture with MAXXAM that owns and operates the Sam Houston Race Park in Houston, Texas and the Valley Race Park in Harlingen, Texas, and holds a license for a planned racetrack in Laredo, Texas. Under the terms of the joint venture, the Company secured a 50% interest in the joint venture, which has sole ownership of the above facilities including interests in 323 acres at Sam Houston Race Park, 80 acres at Valley Race Park, and an option to purchase 135 acres for the planned racetrack in Laredo, Texas.

        Sam Houston Race Park, opened in April 1994, is located 15 miles northwest from downtown Houston along Beltway 8. Sam Houston Race Park hosts thoroughbred and quarter horse racing and offers daily simulcast operations, as well as hosts various special events, private parties and meetings, concerts and national touring festivals throughout the year. Valley Race Park, which was opened in 1990 and acquired by Sam Houston Race Park in 2000, is a 91,000 square foot dog racing and simulcasting facility located in Harlingen, Texas.

        The Company intends to work collaboratively with MAXXAM to strengthen and enhance the existing racetrack operations as well as pursue other opportunities, including the potential for gaming operations at the pari-mutuel facilities, to maximize the overall value of the business. As part of the agreement for the joint venture, the Company agreed to fund, upon the legalization of gaming, a loan to the joint venture for up to $375 million to cover development costs that cannot be financed through third party debt. This loan commitment is in place through December 31, 2015, however it may be extended to December 31, 2016 in order to obtain gaming referendum approval in the event gaming legislation approval has occurred prior to December 31, 2015. If the joint venture elects to utilize the loan, the rates to be paid will be LIBOR plus 800 to 900 basis points for a senior financing and an additional 500 to 600 basis points for a subordinated financing.

        The Company determined that the Texas joint venture did not qualify as a variable interest entity ("VIE") at December 31, 2011. Using the guidance for entities that are not VIEs, the Company determined that it did not have a controlling financial interest in the joint venture at, and for the year ended December 31, 2011, primarily as it did not have the ability to direct the activities of the joint venture that most significantly impacted the joint venture's economic performance without the input of MAXXAM. Therefore, the Company did not consolidate its investment in the joint venture at, and for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Kansas Entertainment

        In December 2009, Kansas Entertainment was selected by the Kansas Lottery Gaming Facility Review Board to develop and operate a facility in the North East Gaming Zone in Wyandotte County, Kansas, and in February 2010, Kansas Entertainment received the final approval under the Kansas Expanded Lottery Act, along with its gaming license from the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission,

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to proceed with the development of an approximately $411 million Hollywood-themed destination facility overlooking Turn 2 at Kansas Speedway.

        Kansas Entertainment recently completed the construction of its planned $411 million facility, inclusive of licensing fees, which features a 95,000 square foot casino with approximately 2,000 slot machines, 52 table games and 12 poker tables, a 1,253 space parking structure, as well as a variety of dining and entertainment facilities. The Company and International Speedway shared equally in the cost of developing and constructing the facility. The Company estimates that its share of the project will be approximately $155 million. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, the Company funded $70.9 million, $30.6 million and $12.9 million, respectively, for capital expenditures and other operating expenses.

        The Company determined that Kansas Entertainment qualified as a VIE at December 31, 2011 and 2010. The Company did not consolidate its investment in Kansas Entertainment at, and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, as the Company determined that it did not qualify as the primary beneficiary of Kansas Entertainment at, and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, primarily as it did not have the ability to direct the activities of Kansas Entertainment that most significantly impacted Kansas Entertainment's economic performance without the input of International Speedway. In addition, the Company determined that International Speedway had substantive participating rights in Kansas Entertainment at, and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

Sale of Maryland Jockey Club Interest

        In July 2011, the Company sold its joint venture interest in Maryland RE & R LLC, a joint venture with MI Developments, Inc. that owned and operated the Maryland Jockey Club. This transaction resulted in a gain of $20.2 million which was included in gain (loss) from unconsolidated affiliates within the consolidated statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2011.

        For the year ended December 31, 2010, the Company's share of losses in the Maryland Jockey Club included a $14.4 million charge for the Company's share of a goodwill impairment write-down recorded by the Maryland Jockey Club during the fourth quarter of 2010 as a result of the negative outcome related to the zoning referendum in which voters approved a proposed casino complex at the Arundel Mills mall in Anne Arundel, Maryland.

New Jersey Joint Venture

        During the fourth quarter of 2011, the Company recorded a $5.9 million charge to reflect its share of a goodwill impairment recorded at its joint venture. This charge reduced the Company's investment balance to $11.2 million at December 31, 2011. The Company believes this amount is realizable based on its share of the underlying fair value of the business which was utilized in the joint venture's goodwill impairment analysis.

        The Company determined that the New Jersey joint venture did not qualify as a VIE at December 31, 2011 and 2010. Using the guidance for entities that are not VIEs, the Company determined that it did not have a controlling financial interest in the joint venture at, and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, primarily as it did not have the ability to direct the activities of the joint venture that most significantly impacted the joint venture's economic performance without the input of Greenwood Limited Jersey, Inc. Therefore, the Company did not consolidate its investment in the joint venture at, and for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

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8.     Property and Equipment

        Property and equipment, net, consists of the following:

December 31,
  2011   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Land and improvements

  $ 362,402   $ 298,482  

Building and improvements

    1,715,144     1,534,117  

Furniture, fixtures, and equipment

    1,021,362     938,443  

Leasehold improvements

    16,910     17,089  

Construction in progress

    256,459     106,963  
           

Total property and equipment

    3,372,277     2,895,094  

Less accumulated depreciation

    (1,095,077 )   (929,320 )
           

Property and equipment, net

  $ 2,277,200   $ 1,965,774  
           

        During the year ended December 31, 2011, total property and equipment increased by $477.2 million primarily due to the M Resort transaction that closed on June 1, 2011, as well as expenditures for the facilities under construction in Ohio.

        Depreciation expense, for property and equipment, totaled $209.3 million, $206.6 million, and $187.8 million in 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Interest capitalized in connection with major construction projects was $5.6 million, $5.5 million, and $7.0 million in 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

        On May 4, 2010, in a statewide election in Ohio, the voters determined that the Company's casino in Columbus will be located at the site of the former Delphi Automotive plant along Columbus's West Side. As a result of the election, the Company initiated the process to sell the parcel of land that it purchased in Columbus's Arena District, the original site approved by voters, and reclassified the land as held for sale. The Company obtained an appraisal to determine the estimated fair market value of the land and recorded a pre-tax impairment charge of $31.3 million ($20.1 million, net of taxes) during the year ended December 31, 2010, which was comprised of the difference between the land's estimated fair market value less costs to sell and its carrying value. This land was sold in August 2011, which did not have a significant impact on the Company's consolidated statement of operations.

        During the year ended December 31, 2009, the Company recorded a pre-tax impairment charge for the replaced Lawrenceburg vessel of $11.9 million ($7.1 million, net of taxes) in conjunction with the opening of the new casino riverboat at Hollywood Casino Lawrenceburg. During the year-ended December 31, 2010, the Company recorded a $0.2 million charge on this replaced vessel.

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9.     Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

        A reconciliation of goodwill and accumulated goodwill impairment losses is as follows (in thousands):

Balance at January 1, 2010:

       

Goodwill

  $ 2,024,963