10-K 1 bth-12312013x10k.htm 10-K BTH-12.31.2013-10K

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K 
           (Mark One)
x    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the year ended December 31, 2013
or
o    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _______ to _______
Commission File number 1-13026
BLYTH, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
Delaware
36-2984916
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
One East Weaver Street
Greenwich, Connecticut
 
06831
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (203) 661-1926
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.02 per share
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes  o    No  x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o  No  x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes  x      No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files) Yes  x         No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer o 
Non-accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer x 
Smaller reporting company o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes  o     No  x 
The aggregate market value of the voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $127.7 million based on the closing price of the registrant’s Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2013 and based on the assumption, for purposes of this computation only, that all of the registrant’s directors and executive officers are affiliates.
As of February 28, 2014, there were 16,018,189 outstanding shares of Common Stock.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the 2014 Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 14, 2014 (Incorporated into Part III).





TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I
 
 
Item 1.
 
Item 1A.
 
Item 1B.
 
Item 2.
 
Item 3.
 
Item 4.
 
 
PART II
Item 5.
 
Item 6.
 
Item 7.
 
Item 7A.
 
Item 8.
 
Item 9.
 
Item 9A.
 
Item 9B.
 
 
PART III
Item 10.
 
Item 11.
 
Item 12.
 
Item 13.
 
Item 14.
 
 
PART IV
Item 15.
 


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CAUTIONARY NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This annual report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All of our statements in this annual report other than statements of historical fact are “forward-looking statements” for purposes of federal and state securities laws, including, by way of example, any projections of future earnings, revenue, capital expenditures, cash flow from operations or other financial items; any
statements regarding our, PartyLite's, ViSalus's or Silver Star Brands' (formerly known as the Miles Kimball Company) plans,
strategies or objectives for future operations, including those related to international expansion of PartyLite's or ViSalus's
operations; any statements concerning any proposed new products, developments or marketing campaigns; the outcome of contingencies such as legal proceedings; any statements regarding future domestic or global economic conditions or performance; any statements as to our belief; and any assumptions underlying any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts and often include words such as “may,” “will,” “estimate,” “intend,” “believe,” “expect” or “anticipate” and any other similar words.
Although we believe that the expectations reflected in our forward-looking statements are reasonable, our actual results could differ materially from those projected, estimated or assumed in any of our forward-looking statements. Our future financial condition and results of operations, as well as any forward-looking statements, are subject to change and to inherent risks and uncertainties, such as those disclosed or incorporated by reference in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Important factors that could cause our actual results, performance and achievements to differ materially from those indicated in
our forward-looking statements include, among others, the following:

• our ability to respond appropriately to changing consumer preferences and demand for our current and new products
or product enhancements;
• our dependence on sales by independent consultants and promoters and our ability to recruit, retain and motivate them;
• the loss of one or more leading consultants or promoters, for any reason, together with their respective sales
organizations;
• the attractiveness of PartyLite's and ViSalus's compensation plans to current and prospective independent consultants and promoters;
• our ability to retain our existing customers or attract new customers;
• our ability to influence or control our consultants and promoters;
• federal, state and foreign regulations applicable to our products (including advertising and labeling), promotional
programs and compensation plans;
• susceptibility to excess and obsolete inventory due to changing consumer preferences;
• adverse publicity directed at our products, ingredients, consultants, promoters, programs or business models, or those
of similar companies;
• product liability and health-related claims;
• competition;
• an economic downturn;
• our ability to grow our business in existing and new markets, including risks associated with international operations;
• legal actions by or against our independent consultants and promoters;
• our reliance on third-party manufacturers for the supply of products;
• our ability to manufacture candles at required quantity and quality levels;
• disruptions to transportation channels;
• shortages or increases in the cost of raw materials;
• our guarantee of ViSalus's obligation to redeem its preferred stock in December 2017;
• awards made pursuant to ViSalus's Omnibus Incentive Plan;
• our dependence on key employees;
certain taxes or assessments relating to the activities of our independent consultants and promoters for which we may
be held responsible;
• our reliance on third parties to plan many of our events;
• our ability to identify, consummate and integrate suitable acquisition candidates on favorable terms and conditions;
• the covenants in the indenture that governs our 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017 limit our operating and financial
flexibility, including, among other things, our ability to pay dividends and repurchase our common stock;

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• increased borrowing costs and reduced access to capital;
• our ability to protect our intellectual property;
• interruptions in our information-technology systems;
• our storage of user and employee data;
• information security or data breaches;
• our ability to successfully adapt to and integrate mobile devices;
• credit card and debit card fraud;
• changes in our effective tax rate;
• fluctuations in our periodic results of operations;
• increased mailing and shipping costs;
• increased risk and write-offs associated with the Silver Star Brands' credit program;
• speculative trading and volatility in our stock price;
• the failure of securities or industry analysts to publish research or reports about our business, or the publication of
negative reports about our business; and
• our compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

We operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment, where new risks emerge from time to time. It is not possible for us to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause our actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the future events and trends discussed in this annual report may not occur, and our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated, estimated or implied in any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Additional factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our forward-looking statements are set forth in this annual report, especially under the heading “Risk Factors,” “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and in our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related Notes.
You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. The events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements may not be achieved or occur. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Forward-looking statements in this annual report speak only as of the date of this report, and forward-looking statements in documents attached or to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that are incorporated by reference speak only as of the date of those documents. We do not undertake any obligation to update or release any revisions to any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.



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PART I

Item 1.   Business.
 
(a) General Development of Business

Blyth, Inc. (together with its subsidiaries, the “Company,” which may be referred to as “we,” “us” or “our”) is a multi-channel company primarily focused on the direct to consumer market. Our products include an extensive array of decorative and functional household products such as candles, accessories, seasonal decorations, household convenience items and personalized gifts, as well as meal replacement shakes, nutritional supplements, functional foods, energy drink mixes and health wellness related products. Our products can be found throughout North America, comprised of the United States and Canada, Mexico, Europe and Australia.

During the past five years we have acquired a new business and disposed of some of our businesses. In August 2008 we signed an agreement to acquire ViSalus, a network marketing company that sells weight management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes, through a series of investments. We have since increased our ownership in ViSalus to 80.9%. In February 2011 we assigned all the assets and liabilities of the Boca Java business through a court approved assignment for the benefit of its creditors. In May 2011, we sold substantially all of the net assets of our Midwest-CBK seasonal, home décor and home fragrance business. In October 2012, we sold our Sterno business, which completed our strategic transformation from a multi-channel marketing company to a direct to consumer marketing company focused on the direct selling and direct marketing channels of distribution. As a result of our strategic transformation, we report our financial results in three business segments: Candles & Home Décor (which currently is our PartyLite business); Health & Wellness (which currently is our ViSalus business); and Catalog & Internet (which currently is our Silver Star Brands business).

Additional Information

Additional information is available on our website, www.blyth.com. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments thereto filed or furnished pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 are available on our website free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable following submission to the SEC. Also available on our website are our corporate governance guidelines, code of conduct, and the charters for the audit committee, compensation committee, and nominating and corporate governance committee, each of which is available in print to any shareholder who makes a request to Blyth, Inc., One East Weaver Street, Greenwich, CT 06831, Attention: Secretary. The information posted to www.blyth.com is not incorporated herein by reference and is not a part of this report.

(b) Financial Information about Segments

We report our financial results in three business segments: Candles & Home Décor, Health & Wellness, and Catalog & Internet. These segments accounted for approximately 44%, 40% and 16% of consolidated net sales, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2013. Financial information relating to these business segments for the year ended December 31, 2013, the year ended December 31, 2012 and the eleven months ended December 31, 2011 appears in Note 21 to the Consolidated Financial Statements and is incorporated herein by reference.

(c) Narrative Description of Business

Candles & Home Décor Segment

We operate in the Candles & Home Décor segment through PartyLite. PartyLite sells premium candles, reed diffusers and other home fragrance products and related decorative accessories under the PartyLite® name in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Australia.

Independent Consultants

Within the United States and Canada, which PartyLite defines as its North American market, PartyLite® brand products are sold through independent consultants who are compensated on the basis of PartyLite product sales at parties organized by them and parties organized by consultants recruited by them. Approximately 17,000 active independent North American sales consultants were selling PartyLite products at December 31, 2013 compared to over 19,000 at December 31, 2012. PartyLite products are designed, packaged and priced in accordance with their premium quality, exclusivity and the distribution channel through which they are sold. Products may also be purchased on individual consultants’ websites and, in certain markets, on the corporate shopping website.

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At the end of December 31, 2013 and 2012, PartyLite products were sold in Europe by over 30,000 active independent sales consultants. These consultants were the exclusive distributors of PartyLite brand products internationally. PartyLite's international markets include: Australia, Austria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

Sourcing, Manufacturing and Logistics

PartyLite supports its independent sales consultants with inventory management and control, and satisfies delivery requirements through on-line order entry systems, which are available to independent sales consultants in the United States, Canada, Europe, and elsewhere.

PartyLite manufactures most of its candles using highly automated processes and technologies, as well as certain hand crafting and finishing, and sources nearly all of its home décor products, primarily from independent manufacturers in the Pacific Rim and Europe. PartyLite sources its food products from third party manufacturers in the United States based on its formulas. PartyLite has highly automated distribution facilities in the United States and Europe supporting its business.

Raw Materials

All of the raw materials used for our candles and home fragrance products have historically been available in adequate supply from multiple sources. Some of our ingredients are proprietary to the supplier and may not be easily re-sourced or replaced.
 
Health & Wellness Segment

We operate in the Health & Wellness segment through ViSalus, which offers a suite of branded weight management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes. ViSalus markets its products through the Body by Vi Challenge®, which we refer to as “The Challenge.” The Challenge is a platform that focuses on helping consumers achieve their health and fitness goals over a 90-day period and beyond. The Challenge is also the means by which ViSalus's independent sales promoters introduce ViSalus to prospective customers and promoters by encouraging them to join in The Challenge. Because most people focus their 90-day challenge on health and fitness milestones, promoters are able to promote the use of ViSalus products to assist the new customer in achieving their Challenge goals.

ViSalus markets The Challenge through its independent promoters using a network marketing model, which is a form of direct selling. ViSalus's promoters are independent contractors and earn commissions based on sales of ViSalus products. These sales include those made to customers whom ViSalus's promoters have referred, as well as sales in their sales organizations. After a customer is referred to ViSalus by one of its promoters, ViSalus can establish a direct servicing relationship with the customer, fulfilling orders and delivering products directly to him or her. ViSalus's promoters are not required to purchase any products for their personal use or for resale, although they are free to do so. If a promoter chooses to purchase ViSalus's products, they receive their product at the wholesale price.

In order for promoters to grow their business, it is essential that they grow their sales organization, which includes both their customer bases and the customer bases of the promoters in their sales organization. ViSalus trains its promoters to sell its products through their existing social networks and through hosting events. ViSalus refers to these events as “challenge parties.” ViSalus also trains its promoters to leverage social media and mobile technologies to engage current and prospective customers and promoters through the use of the Vi-Net® technology platform, including the Vi-Net Mobile application. Additionally, ViSalus supports its promoters in growing their business by continuing to develop great-tasting and effective products that they can use in an effort to increase sales throughout their existing sales organization as well as introduce to prospective customers and promoters.

Products

ViSalus has designed its product line with the goal of providing its customers with the benefits of weight management, nutritional well-being and increased energy. In 2005, ViSalus launched its line of nutritional supplements with the Vi-Pak®, a collection of four dietary supplements which include a patented anti-aging and energy formula, a multi-vitamin and mineral, omega fatty acids and an antioxidant. In 2007, ViSalus extended its product offerings by introducing ViSalus Neuro®, its first drink mix intended to help support healthy energy and maintain mental focus. In 2008, ViSalus entered the weight management category and introduced Vi-Shape®, a meal replacement shake designed with the goal of promoting weight loss through a flavor mix-in system and Vi-Slim® and Vi-Trim® for appetite control and metabolism support. In 2009, ViSalus revised its business model around the launch of The Challenge as the primary product marketing strategy, teaching customers to use

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ViSalus's products as part of a lifestyle change to support their weight loss, fitness and increased energy goals. ViSalus sells convenience packages of its products to customers and promoters for use in The Challenge, which we refer to as “Challenge Kits.” Challenge Kits may include products from some or all ViSalus's product categories.

Since 2009, ViSalus has grown its product portfolio to include ViSalus GO® and ViSalus PRO®, for pre- and post-workout energy benefits, the high protein, high fiber Nutra-Cookie™, and ViSalus Vi-Defy®, a superfruit antioxidant drink mix. In 2013, ViSalus introduced Vi Crunch™ Protein Super Cereal and Vi Crunch™ Fusions. Vi Crunch is a high protein, high fiber cereal that can be enhanced by adding crunchy Fusions which provide added flavor and unique health benefits.

Customers and promoters can participate in multiple Challenges which encourages them to use ViSalus's products on an ongoing basis and to sign up for the “auto ship” program so that they automatically receive ViSalus products on a monthly basis. Customers who sign up for auto ship also receive a discount on product purchases. In addition to the Challenge Kits, ViSalus also sells its products separately.

ViSalus also offers individuals the opportunity to benefit from the “3 for free” program, in which individuals who refer three customers who each purchase a Challenge Kit within a given month receive a free Challenge Kit in the following month. The receipt of a free Challenge Kit requires no purchase and is subject to a small processing and shipping fee. Individuals making use of the “3 for free” promotion can continue to receive a free Challenge Kit in each month that at least three of their referred customers purchase Challenge Kits.

ViSalus currently markets its products in five countries. Prior to 2013, ViSalus sold its products only in the United States and Canada. Beginning in 2013, ViSalus entered the European market when it began selling its products in the United Kingdom in April 2013 and in Germany and Austria in February 2014.

Independent Promoters

ViSalus had 35,000 qualified independent North American promoters at December 31, 2013 compared to 76,000 at December 31, 2012, and nearly 2,500 international promoters at the end of 2013, reflecting the entry into the United Kingdom in April 2013. ViSalus defines a “promoter” as a person eligible to receive a commission within the ViSalus promoter compensation plan on the measurement date. Based on the monthly volume of commissionable sales produced by a promoter and his or her sales organizations, the promoter qualifies for higher “ranks,” which provide the promoter with additional bonus and commission opportunities. ViSalus currently has six broad categories of promoter ranks: associate, director, regional director, national director, presidential director and ambassador (the rank of ambassador is further divided into several sublevels).
Customers

ViSalus makes sample products, support materials, training, special events and a compensation program available to its promoters. Each promoter is responsible for growing his or her own business and for conducting marketing activities to attract new customers and enroll other promoters. These activities may include hosting events such as challenge parties; purchasing and using promotional materials; utilizing and paying for direct mail and print material such as brochures, flyers, catalogs, business cards, posters and banners; purchasing inventory for use as samples or for sale; and recruiting, training and mentoring customers and other promoters on how to use our products and/or pursue the ViSalus business opportunity. ViSalus encourages the use of the Vi-Net® technology platform and other popular social media platforms as vehicles for promoters to share their personal and professional successes and promote ViSalus.

Some of ViSalus's promoters, together with their associated sales organizations, generate a large portion of ViSalus's net sales. For example, Nick Sarnicola, one of the founders of ViSalus and his associated sales organization, represented approximately 74% of ViSalus's net sales in 2013. This concentration is a result of the layered structure of ViSalus's independent promoter sales force, which results in all of ViSalus's net sales being attributed to one of two segments of its independent promoter sales force. ViSalus seeks to mitigate the potential risk posed by this sales concentration by developing direct relationships with its promoters at all levels of the organization in order to reduce the risk of losing multiple promoters at one time in the event that a particular promoter were to cease its relationship with ViSalus. Mr. Sarnicola also owns an equity interest in ViSalus which we believe may mitigate the risk that he would terminate his relationship with ViSalus. In addition, ViSalus's promoter enrollment form includes a restriction on solicitation of ViSalus promoters or employees with respect to competing network marketing programs for one year after a promoter’s relationship with ViSalus is ended, although these can be difficult, expensive and time consuming to enforce.

Sourcing, Manufacturing and Logistics

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All of ViSalus's products are manufactured and supplied by third-party manufacturers in the United States based on ViSalus formulas or, in the case of the components in the Vi-Pak® and Vimmunity® immune system support supplements, a licensed formula. ViSalus has entered into a long-term supply agreements with third-party manufacturers of many of its key products, including Vi-Shape®, Vi-Crunch™, ViSalus Neuro® and ViSalus Pro™. Ingredients for ViSalus's nutritional supplements are sourced from a variety of manufacturers. While some of the ingredients are unique and at times could be in short supply, we believe that ViSalus carries sufficient inventory of finished goods which, coupled with the level of raw materials maintained by its manufacturers, would enable ViSalus to avoid any material disruption to the business in the event of a shortage of raw materials.

Warranties

ViSalus offers a 30-day money-back guarantee on all of its products. Except for first-time purchasers, who do not have to return their products at all in order to receive a refund, purchasers must return products in re-saleable form within 30 days of purchase in order to receive a refund. Purchasers, including first-time purchasers, are still entitled to receive product credit if they return products after 30 days of purchase provided they are in re-saleable form. ViSalus's return rate was approximately 4.9% in 2013. In addition, in January 2013, ViSalus launched its new Body by Vi Challenge®, pursuant to which ViSalus offers a 90-day money-back results guarantee to participants who are not satisfied with their results after completing their Challenge and who have otherwise complied with the terms of The Challenge.

Catalog & Internet Segment

Silver Star Brands is a direct to consumer business that develops and markets an extensive array of decorative and functional household products, personalized cards, gifts, unique food products and health and wellness products. Silver Star Brands reaches consumers through its websites, catalogs and direct mail campaigns through its brands:

Miles Kimball® - offers unique and hard-to-find gadgets, personalized gifts, outdoor, gardening and household items, stationery, apparel and candy.

Walter Drake® - a leading direct marketer of value-priced kitchenware, household products, organizers, health care items, gardening and outdoor décor, personalized gifts, calendars and stationery.

As We Change® - focuses exclusively on the needs and preferences of women age 40+, providing a private and convenient place to turn for beauty, anti-aging, personal care, health and wellness, and slimming active wear items.

Easy Comforts® - offers health and personal care merchandise to the 50+ aging consumer, to support an independent lifestyle, including a wide array of mobility, daily living aids, personal safety and incontinence products.

Exposures® - sells photo albums, storage products, holiday décor and personalized gifts.

Sourcing, Manufacturing and Logistics

Silver Star Brands sources all of its products, primarily from independent manufacturers in the Pacific Rim, and has highly automated distribution facilities in the United States supporting its business.

Product Brand Names

The major brand names under which our Candles & Home Décor segment products are sold are PartyLite® and GloLite by PartyLite®. The key brand names under which our Health & Wellness Segment products are sold are ViSalus®, Vi™ and Body by Vi Challenge®. For the primary brand names under which our Catalog & Internet segment products are sold, see above under “Catalog & Internet Segment.”

Trade names, trademarks and service marks of other companies appearing in this annual report are the property of their respective holders.

Manufacturing, Sourcing and Distribution

In all of our business segments, management continuously works to increase value and lower costs through increased efficiency in worldwide production, sourcing, distribution and customer service practices, the application of new technologies and process

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control systems, and consolidation and rationalization of equipment and facilities. Net capital expenditures over the past five years have totaled $51.5 million and are targeted at technological advancements, significant maintenance and replacement projects at our manufacturing and distribution facilities and customer service capacity increases. We have also closed several facilities and written down the values of certain machinery and equipment in recent years in response to changing market conditions.

Customers

Our customers are individuals served by our independent sales consultants or promoters or who purchase products from our catalogs or websites. No single customer accounted for 10% or more of our net sales for the year ended December 31, 2013 or our accounts receivable balance as of December 31, 2013.

Competition

All of our business segments are highly competitive, both in terms of pricing and new product introductions. The worldwide markets for these products are highly fragmented, with numerous suppliers serving one or more of the distribution channels served by us. Some of our competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater financial, technical, product-development, marketing and sales resources, greater name recognition, larger established customer bases, and better-developed distribution channels than ours. Because there are relatively low barriers to entry in all of our business segments, it is relatively easy for new competitors to emerge to compete with all of our businesses. Some of our competitors focus on a single geographic or product market and attempt to gain or maintain market share solely on the basis of price.

Competition in the Candles & Home Decor segment includes companies selling candles manufactured at lower costs through direct selling and retail channels. Competition in the Health & Wellness segment includes companies selling competitive nutritional supplements and weight-loss management products (including shake mixes, high protein cereals and other functional foods) through direct selling and retail channels. The Catalog & Internet segment is also highly competitive, with longer and better established brands as well as new start-ups in the catalog, internet and brick-and-mortar retail markets.

In the Candles & Home Décor and the Health & Wellness segments we compete for consultants or promoters with other direct selling companies, both those that sell similar products and those that sell other types of products.

Employees

As of December 31, 2013, we had approximately 1,700 full-time employees, of whom approximately 32% were based outside of the United States. Approximately 60% of our employees are non-salaried. We do not have any unionized employees in North America. We believe that relations with our employees are good. Since our formation in 1977, we have never experienced a work stoppage.

Seasonality

Our businesses are seasonal in nature and, as a result, the net sales and working capital requirements of our businesses fluctuate from quarter to quarter. Our Candles & Home Décor and Catalog & Internet businesses tend to achieve their strongest sales in the third and fourth quarters due to increased shipments to meet year-end holiday season demand for our products. The customers of our Health & Wellness business tend to place a lower number of orders in the summer months and toward the end of the year. Our Health & Wellness business may also experience a slight increase in sales during the first two quarters of the year due to the increased focus many people place on weight loss during the post-holiday and pre-summer periods. We expect the seasonality of our businesses to continue in the future, which may cause period-to-period fluctuations in certain of our operating results and limit our ability to predict our future results accurately.

Government Regulation

Our businesses and products are affected by extensive laws, regulations, administrative determinations, court decisions and similar constraints. Such laws, regulations and other constraints exist at the federal, state and local levels in the United States and at all levels of government in foreign jurisdictions. They include rules pertaining to: (1) formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution, marketing, promotion, importation, exportation, sale and storage of food and dietary supplement products; (2) product claims and advertising, including direct claims and advertising by all of our businesses and claims and advertising by consultants and promoters, for which our direct selling businesses may be held responsible; and (3) our network marketing programs.

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Product Claims and Composition

In the United States, the formulation, manufacturing, packaging, storing, labeling, promotion, advertising, distribution and sale of our products are regulated by various governmental agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA,”) the Federal Trade Commission (the “FTC,”) the Consumer Product Safety Commission (the “CPSC,”) the Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency. Our activities also are regulated by agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which our products are manufactured, distributed and sold.

Pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (the “FDCA,”) the FDA regulates the formulation, testing, safety, manufacture, packaging, labeling and distribution of conventional foods and dietary supplements (including vitamins, minerals and herbs) and the FTC has jurisdiction to regulate the advertising of these products. The FDCA was amended with respect to all foods (which include both conventional foods and dietary supplements) primarily in 1990 with the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (the “NLEA,”) and also in 2011 with the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (the “FSMA”). Under the NLEA, we must follow specific FDA regulations to include mandatory nutrition labeling on both our conventional food and dietary supplement products and we must abide by FDA regulations in order to make any claims that directly or by implication characterize the level of a nutrient in a conventional food or dietary supplement or the relationship between a substance in a conventional food or dietary supplement and a disease or health-related condition. The NLEA prohibits the use of claims that a conventional food or dietary supplement product can be used to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent a disease, without preauthorization from the FDA. If the FDA finds that the claims associated with our products are not in compliance with the NLEA framework, we may be subject to enforcement action.

Further, under the FSMA, conventional food and dietary supplement facilities are required to implement preventive controls and contamination mitigation strategies, and the FDA has enhanced inspection and enforcement authorities, including the power to order mandatory recalls, administratively detain products and suspend manufacturing facility registrations. The FDA has also adopted final regulations regarding current Good Manufacturing Practices ("cGMP"), governing the manufacturing, packing and holding of dietary ingredients and dietary supplements. The regulations include provisions related to the design and construction of physical plants, cleaning, proper manufacturing operations, quality control procedures, testing final product or incoming and in-process materials, handling consumer complaints and maintaining records. These regulations are consistent with longstanding cGMP requirements for conventional food products. If we or our suppliers were to be found not in compliance with the FDA's cGMP regulations, it could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial statements.

In the event of any possible contamination or other failure to comply with safety or reporting requirements of FSMA or the FDCA, our businesses could incur the significant costs of a recall or other administrative action and could also be subject to additional FDA enforcement.

The FDCA has been amended several times with respect to dietary supplements, in particular by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (“DSHEA”). DSHEA established a new framework governing the composition, safety, labeling and marketing of dietary supplements. Under DSHEA, dietary supplement ingredients, which we refer to as “dietary ingredients,” that were on the market prior to October 15, 1994 may be used in dietary supplements without notifying the FDA. “New” dietary ingredients (i.e., dietary ingredients that were not marketed in the United States before October 15, 1994) must be the subject of a new dietary ingredient notification submitted to the FDA unless the ingredient has been present in the food supply as an article used for food without being “chemically altered.” A new dietary ingredient notification must provide the FDA evidence of a history of use or other evidence of safety establishing that use of the dietary ingredient will reasonably be expected to be safe. A new dietary ingredient notification must be submitted to the FDA at least 75 days before the initial marketing of the new dietary ingredient. There is no certainty that the FDA will accept any particular evidence of safety for any new dietary ingredient, and the FDA's refusal to accept such evidence could prevent the marketing of such dietary ingredients. In December 2011, the FDA released a draft guidance document intended to assist industry in deciding when a new dietary ingredient notification is necessary and in preparing notifications for submission to the FDA. This draft guidance document is generally considered to expand the FDA's previous interpretation of the regulatory requirements surrounding new dietary ingredient notifications and related issues. If the draft guidance document is finalized similar to its current form, ViSalus may be required to submit substantially more new dietary ingredient notifications than it has previously submitted, which could result in additional costs.

DSHEA also outlines specific parameters for making certain claims for dietary supplements. For example, DSHEA permits certain “statements of nutritional support” to be included in the labeling for dietary supplements without FDA pre-market approval, provided that such statements are submitted to the FDA within 30 days of marketing and bear a label disclosure stating, “This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose,

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cure, treat or prevent any disease.” A company that uses a statement of nutritional support in labeling must possess scientific evidence substantiating that the statement is truthful and not misleading.

DSHEA also provides that certain “third-party literature,” such as a peer-reviewed scientific publication linking a particular dietary ingredient with health benefits, may be used in connection with the sale of a dietary supplement to consumers without the literature being subject to regulation as labeling. The literature must not be false or misleading, may not promote a particular manufacturer or brand of dietary supplement, must present a balanced view of the available scientific information on the subject matter, must be physically separate from the dietary supplements if displayed in an establishment, and should not have appended to it any information by sticker or any other method. If the FDA determined that our statements of nutritional support or third party literature fail to comply with DSHEA or related FDA implementing regulations prohibiting the use of claims that such products can diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent disease, we would be prevented from using the claims and subjected to regulatory action.

In addition, the Dietary Supplement and Nonprescription Drug Consumer Protection Act amended the FDCA to require adverse event reporting and recordkeeping for dietary supplements and non-prescription drugs marketed without an approved application. Under the law, an “adverse event” is any health-related event associated with the use of a dietary supplement that is adverse, and a “serious adverse event” is any adverse event that results in death, a life-threatening experience, inpatient hospitalization, a persistent or significant disability or incapacity, or a congenital anomaly or birth defect, or requires, based on reasonable medical judgment, a medical or surgical intervention to prevent one of these outcomes. Serious adverse event reports received through the address or phone number on the label of a dietary supplement, as well as all follow-up reports of new medical information received within one year after the initial report, must be submitted to the FDA no later than 15 business days after the report is received. The law also requires recordkeeping for reports of non-serious adverse events as well as serious adverse events for six years following the event, and these records are subject to FDA inspection.

The FDA has broad authority to enforce the provisions of the FDCA applicable to foods and dietary supplements, including the power to issue a public warning letter to a company, to publicize information about illegal products, to request a recall of illegal products from the market and to request the Department of Justice to initiate a seizure action, an injunction action or a criminal prosecution in the U.S. courts. Particular to our business, the FDA has focused its oversight and enforcement priorities on weight loss dietary supplements and caffeinated beverages in recent years, and we cannot guarantee that our products will not be subject to an FDA enforcement action in the future. Further, the regulation of foods and dietary supplements may increase or become more restrictive in the future.

The FTC, which regulates the advertising of all of our products, has brought enforcement actions against companies selling dietary supplements, weight loss products and caffeinated beverages for false and misleading advertising, often resulting in consent decrees and monetary payments. The FTC also reviews testimonials, expert endorsements and collection of personal identifiable information. We have not been a target of FTC enforcement action for the advertising of our products but we cannot be sure that the FTC, or comparable foreign agencies, will not question our advertising or other operations in the future.

In some countries we are, or regulators may assert that we are, responsible for our consultants' or promoters' conduct and may be requested or required to take steps to ensure that our consultants and promoters comply with local regulations regarding: (1) representations about our products; (2) income representations; (3) public media advertisements, which in foreign markets may require prior approval by regulators; and (4) sales of products in markets in which the products have not been approved, licensed or certified for sale. In some markets improper product claims by consultants or promoters could result in our products being reviewed by regulatory authorities and being classified or placed into another category as to which stricter regulations are applicable or we might be required to make labeling changes.

The CPSC is an independent federal regulatory agency created to protect consumers against unreasonable risk of serious injury or death from various consumer products, including candles. The CPSC enforces several statutes, including the Consumer Product Safety Act, Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, Federal Hazardous Substances Act and Flammable Fabrics Act. The CPSC also encourages compliance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) voluntary standards, including five ASTM standards for candles and candle accessories related to their labeling, packaging, emissions and safety. A company is required to notify the CPSC when the company receives information that reasonably supports the conclusion that a product fails to meet these voluntary standards or can otherwise create a substantial product hazard. If the CPSC determines that the product presents a substantial product hazard and that action is in the public interest, it may order public notice of the defect and any necessary corrective action, including civil and criminal penalties.
We have adapted our practices and rules to comply with CPSC standards and recommendations. However, failure to comply could have a material adverse effect on our business, including adverse publicity, civil and criminal penalties, and potential product liability claims.

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We cannot predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications or what effect additional regulations or administrative orders would have on our businesses. They could, however, require:

reformulation of some products not capable of being reformulated;
imposition of additional record keeping requirements;
expanded documentation of the properties of some products;
expanded or different labeling;
additional scientific substantiation regarding product ingredients, safety or usefulness; and/or
additional consultant or promoter compliance surveillance and enforcement action by us.
 
Any or all of these requirements could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

International Product Regulations
Products imported to Canada for resale are also subject to extensive Canadian regulations. Certain of ViSalus's products are currently imported to Canada as Natural Health Products (“NHPs”). The product safety, quality, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, storage, importation, advertising, distribution, and sale of NHPs are subject to regulation primarily under the federal Food and Drugs Act (Canada) (the “Canadian FDA,”) and associated regulations, including the Food and Drug Regulations and the Natural Health Products Regulations, and related Health Canada guidance documents and policies (collectively, the “Canadian regulations”). Health Canada approval for marketing authorizations and NHP licenses can take time. The approval time for NHPs can vary depending on the product and the application or submission.

ViSalus's Canadian-branded shakes, cookies and health flavor mix-ins imported for resale in Canada are regulated as foods and are subject to the Canadian FDA and Food and Drug Regulations that, among other things, regulate the labeling, nutrition facts and ingredients of such products.

ViSalus’s products are also subject to extensive country-specific regulations in the countries in which we operate, including in the United Kingdom (e.g., national regulations including the Local Trading Standards Offices), Germany (e.g., the German Unfair Competition Act, German Regulation on food supplements, and German Law on food and feed) and Austria (e.g., the Austrian Trade Law (1994), the Food Safety and Consumer Protection Law (2006), and the Food Code in Austria).
E-Commerce and Data Collection

Our involvement in e-commerce and collection of information regarding employees, independent consultants, promoters and consumers subject our businesses to a number of laws, regulations, administrative determinations, court decisions and similar constraints at the U.S. federal, state and local level and at all levels of government in foreign jurisdictions, governing companies that maintain information regarding their employees, consultants, promoters and consumers or their conduct of business on the Internet. These may involve user privacy, data protection, electronic contracts, consumer protection, taxation and online payment services. For example, the FTC regulates the appropriate collection and protection of personal identifiable information and has issued a number of enforcement actions against companies for using mobile applications or collecting information regarding consumers in a manner that the FTC considers to violate the Federal Trade Commission Act, as amended (the "FTC Act"). United States federal, state and foreign jurisdiction laws and regulations regarding data privacy and protection and e-commerce are constantly evolving and can be subject to significant change. In addition, the application and interpretation of these laws and regulations are often uncertain, particularly given the new and rapidly-evolving use of technology in the marketplace. The adoption of new laws and regulations or changes in the interpretations of existing laws and regulations may result in significant compliance costs or otherwise negatively impact our business.

Direct Selling and Network Marketing Programs

Our direct selling and network marketing programs are subject to federal and state regulations administered by the FTC and various state agencies as well as regulations in foreign markets administered by foreign agencies. These regulations generally seek to ensure that product sales are made to consumers and that advancement within an organization is based on sales of products rather than investments in the organization or other non-retail sales related criteria. For instance, in some markets, there are limits on the extent to which consultants or promoters may earn royalty overrides on sales generated by consultants or promoters that were not directly sponsored by them. While we believe we are in compliance with these regulations, we remain subject to the risk that in one or more markets our marketing systems could be found not to be in compliance with applicable regulations. Failure to comply with these regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business in a particular market or in general.


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The FTC could bring an enforcement action based on practices that are inconsistent with its Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising (“Guides”). We have adapted our practices and rules regarding the practices of our consultants and promoters to comply with the revised Guides. However, it is possible that our use, and that of our consultants or promoters, of testimonials in the advertising and promotion of our products, including but not limited to our weight management products and of our income opportunities, will be significantly impacted and therefore might negatively impact our sales.

In Canada, our network marketing system is regulated by both national and provincial laws. Under Canada’s Federal Competition Act, we must make sure that any representations relating to compensation to our consultants or promoters or made to prospective new consultants or promoters constitute fair, reasonable, and timely disclosure and that such representations meet other legal requirements of the Federal Competition Act. All Canadian provinces and territories, other than Ontario, have legislation requiring that we register or become licensed as a direct seller within that province to maintain the standards of the direct selling industry and to protect consumers. Some other Canadian provinces require that both we and our consultants or promoters be licensed as direct sellers.
In the United Kingdom, our network marketing system is subject to national regulations of the United Kingdom. Our compensation plan is designed to comply with the United Kingdom’s national requirements, the requirements of the Fair Trading Act of 1973, the Data Protection Act of 1998, the Trading Schemes Regulations of 1997, and other similar regulations. The U.K. Code of Advertising and Sales Promotion regulates our business and trade practices and the activities of our consultants or promoters, while the Trading Standards Office regulates any claims or representations relating to our operations. Our products are regulated by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.
In Germany, there is no specific legal regulation covering network marketing company practices. However, under certain circumstances network marketing systems may have to follow the German Unfair Competition Act. Our consultants’ or promoters' conduct is subject to the German statute that governs the conduct of a commercial agent. In addition, direct selling operations are governed by the Industrial Code, which requires direct sellers to hold itinerant trader’s cards. The German Regulation on food supplements and the German Law on food and feed govern vitamin and mineral substances and herbs and other substances, respectively.
In Austria, the Austrian Trade Law of 1994 (Novelle 2002) prohibits the offer of direct sale to an individual consumer of food supplement and cosmetic products. The provision, however, has generally not been enforced in recent years and sales made via the Internet or mail order or made to a non-consumer distributor do not fall under this prohibition. The Austrian Trade Law is predominantly administered through the National Ministry of Economy and Labor. ViSalus’s business operations within Austria are conducted from beyond the borders of Austria, which is the common practice in its industry. ViSalus’s promoters qualify as “traders” for purposes of Austrian state and municipal laws. Traders are regulated by the local chambers of commerce and must obtain licenses from the respective chambers of commerce. Regulation of food supplements and cosmetics is generally harmonized throughout the EU and must conform to EU standards. Austrian-specific food regulations include the Food Safety and Consumer Protection Law (2006), supporting ordinances to this law, the Food Supplement Law, and the Austrian Food Codex, which is primarily administered by the National Ministry of Health, Office for Health and Food Security, and the Local Health Authority.
Compliance Procedures

We have developed compliance functions to identify and investigate specific complaints against consultants and promoters and to remedy any violations of rules by them through appropriate sanctions, including warnings, suspensions and, when necessary, account closures. ViSalus's manuals, seminars and other training programs and materials, in particular, emphasize that promoters are prohibited from making therapeutic claims about our products.

To comply with regulations that apply to both us and our consultants and promoters, we research the applicable regulatory framework before entering new markets to identify all necessary licenses and approvals and applicable limitations on our operations in that market and devote substantial resources to obtaining those licenses and approvals and bringing our operations into compliance with applicable limitations. We research laws applicable to independent consultant and promoter operations and revise or alter our sales force manuals and other training materials and programs to provide our sales forces with guidelines for operating a business and marketing and distributing our products, as required by applicable regulations in each market.

Regulations in existing and new markets often are ambiguous and subject to considerable interpretive and enforcement discretion by the responsible regulators and new regulations regularly are being added and the interpretation of existing regulations is subject to change. Further, the content and impact of regulations to which we are subject may be influenced by public attention directed at us, our products or our network marketing and party plan programs or those of our competitors, so

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that extensive adverse publicity about us, our products or our network marketing and party plan programs, or those of our competitors, may result in increased regulatory scrutiny.

We seek to anticipate and respond to new and changing regulations and to make corresponding changes in our operations to the extent practicable. Although we devote considerable resources to maintaining our compliance with regulatory constraints in each market, we cannot be sure that we would be found to be in full compliance with applicable regulations in all of our markets at any given time or that the regulatory authorities in one or more markets will not assert, either retroactively or prospectively or both, that our operations are not in full compliance. These assertions or the effect of adverse regulations in one market could negatively affect us in other markets as well by causing increased regulatory scrutiny in those other markets or as a result of the negative publicity generated in those other markets. These assertions could have a material adverse effect on us in a particular market or in general. Furthermore, depending upon the severity of regulatory changes in a particular market and the changes in our operations that would be necessitated to maintain compliance, these changes could result in our experiencing a material reduction in sales in the market or determining to exit the market altogether, which might have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations either in the short or long term.

Most of our manufacturing and distribution operations are affected by federal, state, local and international environmental laws relating to the discharge of materials or otherwise to the protection of the environment. We have made and intend to continue to make expenditures necessary to comply with applicable environmental laws, and do not believe that such expenditures will have a material effect on our capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position.

(d) Financial Information about Geographic Areas

For information on net sales from external customers attributed to the United States and international geographies and on long-lived assets located in and outside the United States, see Note 21 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.








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Item 1A.    Risk Factors.

We encounter substantial risks in our business, any one of which may adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. The fact that some of these risk factors may be the same or similar to those that we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in prior reports means only that the risks are present in multiple periods. We believe that many of the risks that are described here are part of doing business in the industries in which we operate and will likely be present in all periods. The fact that certain risks are endemic to these industries does not lessen their significance. These risk factors should be read together with the other items in this report, including “Item 7 - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” We use the terms “we”, “us” or “our” to refer to Blyth, Inc. and its subsidiaries, unless suggested otherwise by the context.

The failure by our businesses to respond appropriately to changing consumer preferences and demand for new products or
product enhancements could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our ability to increase our sales and earnings depends on numerous factors, including market acceptance of our existing products and the successful introduction of new products. Sales of ViSalus's weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes, PartyLite's candles and accessories and Silver Star Brands' consumer products fluctuate according to changes in consumer preferences. If our businesses are unable to anticipate, identify or react to changing preferences, our sales may decline. ViSalus's weight-management products and PartyLite's candles represented a substantial portion of our sales in 2012 and 2013. If consumer demand for these products decreases significantly, or ViSalus ceases offering weight-management products without offering a suitable replacement, then our business, financial condition and results of operations would be harmed. In addition, if our businesses miscalculate consumer tastes and are no longer able to
offer products that appeal to their customers, their brand images may suffer and sales and earnings would decline.

ViSalus and PartyLite depend upon sales by their independent sales forces to drive their businesses, and their failure to
continue to recruit, retain and motivate promoters and consultants would harm their business and our financial condition
and results of operations.

ViSalus markets its products and The Challenge through its independent promoters using a network marketing model and
PartyLite markets its products through its independent consultants primarily using a party plan direct selling model. Both of
these marketing systems depend upon the successful recruitment, retention and motivation of a large number of promoters and
consultants to offset frequent turnover, which is a common characteristic found in the direct selling industry. Our promoters
and consultants may terminate their services at any time. Many of them market and sell our products on a part-time basis and
likely engage in other business activities, some of which may compete with us. If ViSalus and PartyLite were unable to grow
their promoter and consultant sales forces and reverse declines in their total number of promoters and consultants, our business
would be materially harmed. The rates of turnover of ViSalus's and PartyLite's promoters and consultants can be very high and
volatile from time to time, which may materially hinder their abilities to increase their total promoter and consultant counts.
Our ability to recruit, retain and motivate promoters and consultants depends on a number of factors, including, but not limited
to, our prominence among direct selling companies and the general labor market, the attractiveness of our products and
compensation and promotional programs, the number of people interested in direct selling, unemployment levels, economic
conditions and demographic and cultural changes in the workforce. ViSalus and PartyLite both rely primarily upon the efforts
of their promoters and consultants to attract, train and motivate new promoters and consultants, so our sales directly depend
upon their efforts. The failure by ViSalus or PartyLite to recruit, retain and motivate promoters and consultants and to reverse
declines in their total number of promoters and consultants could negatively impact sales of their products, which could harm
our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The loss by ViSalus or PartyLite of a leading promoter or consultant, together with his or her associated sales organization,
or the loss of a significant number of promoters or consultants for any reason, could harm our business, financial condition
and results of operations.

Sales generated by a small number of promoters, together with their associated sales organizations, represent a majority of
ViSalus's net sales. In addition, there are a number of promoters whose generated sales, together with those of their sales
organizations, represent in excess of 10% of ViSalus's net sales. In particular, sales generated by one of ViSalus's founders and
promoters, Nick Sarnicola, together with his wife and their sales organizations and customers to whom they market represented
a substantial percentage of ViSalus's net sales in 2012 and 2013. The loss by ViSalus of one or more of its leading promoters,
together with their respective associated sales organizations, or the loss of a significant number of promoters or consultants by
ViSalus or PartyLite for any reason, could negatively impact sales of their products, impair their ability to recruit new promoters or consultants and harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Over the last year, the total

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number of ViSalus’s promoters has declined from 76,000 at December 31, 2012 to 37,000 at December 31, 2013, and over the same period, the number of PartyLite’s total consultants has declined from 54,000 to 52,000.

In general, ViSalus and PartyLite do not have non-competition arrangements with their promoters and consultants that would
prohibit them from promoting competing products if they terminate their relationship. Pursuant to agreements that all of
ViSalus's and PartyLite's top promoters and consultants must sign, the promoter or consultant is not permitted to solicit or
recruit ViSalus promoters or PartyLite's consultants to participate in any other direct selling company for a period of time
following the termination of their agreement. We cannot ensure that ViSalus's promoters or PartyLite's consultants will
abide by any non-solicitation obligations or that we will be able to enforce them. Some of ViSalus’s promoters and PartyLite’s consultants have not abided by these non-solicitation agreements following their departure and while we have, in some cases, taken legal action and other steps to seek to enforce these non-solicitation agreements, we have not always been able to do so. If ViSalus's promoters and PartyLite's consultants do not abide by these non-solicitation obligations or if we are unable to enforce them, our competitive position may be compromised, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

ViSalus's and PartyLite's compensation plans, or changes that are made to those plans, may be viewed negatively by some
of their promoters and consultants and could fail to achieve our desired objectives, which could have a negative impact on our business.

Direct selling and network marketing are highly competitive and sensitive to the introduction of new competitors, new products
and/or new compensation plans. Companies commonly attempt to attract new distributors by offering generous compensation
plans. From time to time, ViSalus and/or PartyLite modify components of their compensation plans in an effort to:

• keep them competitive and attractive to existing and potential promoters and consultants,
• cause or address a change in the behavior of their promoters and consultants,
• motivate promoters and consultants to grow our business,
• conform to legal and regulatory requirements, and
• address other business needs.

In light of the size and diversity of our promoter and consultant sales force and the complexity of our compensation plans, it is
difficult to predict how any changes to the plans will be viewed by ViSalus's promoters or PartyLite's consultants and whether
such changes will achieve their desired results. There can be no assurance that ViSalus's or PartyLite's compensation plans will
allow us to successfully attract or retain promoters or consultants, nor can we assure that any changes we make to our
compensation plans will achieve our desired results.

If we fail to retain our existing customers or attract new customers, our business, financial condition and results of
operations may be harmed.

ViSalus and PartyLite are customer-driven businesses, and the size of their customer bases and the amount that their customers
spend on their products are critical to their success. Increases in sales to customers are driven primarily by obtaining new
customers and retention of existing customers, rather than through increases in the average monthly expenditures of customers.
Many of ViSalus's customers sign up for an automatic monthly shipment of products. ViSalus must continually add new
customers to replace those who cancel their auto-shipments and to grow its business over time. Customers choose to
cancel their auto-shipments for a wide variety of reasons, many of which are not within ViSalus's control, including the conclusion of their 90-day Challenge, their desire to reduce discretionary spending, product dissatisfaction, their perception that competitive products provide a better value or benefit to them, or customer service issues are not addressed to their satisfaction.

Since we cannot exert the same level of influence or control over our promoters and consultants as we could if they were
our own employees, we may be unable to enforce compliance with our policies and procedures, which could result in claims
against us.

ViSalus's promoters and PartyLite's consultants are independent contractors and, accordingly, neither ViSalus nor PartyLite is
in a position to provide the same direction, motivation and oversight as it could if they were its employees. As a result, there
can be no assurance that ViSalus's promoters and PartyLite's consultants will participate in their marketing strategies or
plans, accept the introduction of new products or comply with policies and procedures. Extensive federal, state, local and foreign jurisdiction laws regulate our businesses, products and programs. While we have implemented policies and procedures that are designed to govern promoter and consultant conduct so that they comply with this regulatory regime, it can be difficult to enforce these policies and procedures because of the large number of promoters and consultants and their independent status.

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Violations by our promoters or consultants of applicable laws or of our policies and procedures could reflect negatively on our products and operations, harm our business reputation or lead to the imposition of penalties or claims.

Our product advertising and promotional programs are subject to a number of federal, state, local and foreign jurisdiction regulations. The failure of our product advertising and promotional programs to comply with current or newly adopted regulations could negatively impact our business in a particular market or in general.

The FTC exercises jurisdiction in the United States over product advertising in general and advertising of conventional foods
and dietary supplements in particular and has instituted numerous enforcement actions against companies for false and
misleading claims and for failure to have adequate substantiation for claims made in advertising. The FTC also regulates
promotional offers, including purported “savings” from the regular or suggested retail price of products. In the event that the
FTC pursues an enforcement action against any of our businesses, our businesses could be subject to consent decrees that could
limit their ability to make certain claims with respect to their products and require them to pay civil penalties. The National
Advertising Division, which we refer to as the “NAD,” of the Council of Better Business Bureaus serves as an industry sponsored self-regulatory system that permits competitors to resolve disputes over advertising claims. The system also
empowers the NAD to challenge claims that the NAD believes to be misleading, including product benefit claims and
purported sales or other discounts off of “regular” prices. The NAD has no independent enforcement authority. However, it
can refer cases to the FTC for further action. Failures by any of our businesses to comply with rules, consent decrees and
applicable regulations could occur from time to time, which could result in substantial monetary penalties.

There are also federal, state, provincial and foreign laws of general application, such as the FTC Act and state, provincial or
foreign unfair and deceptive trade practices laws that could potentially be invoked to challenge our advertising, compensation
practices or recruitment techniques. In particular, our recruiting efforts include promotional materials for recruits that describe
the potential opportunity available to them if they become promoters or consultants. These materials, as well as our other
recruiting efforts and those of promoters, are subject to scrutiny by the FTC and enforcement authorities with respect to
misleading statements, including misleading earnings claims made to convince potential new recruits to become promoters or
consultants. If claims or recruiting techniques used by ViSalus or PartyLite or by their promoters or consultants are deemed to
be misleading, it could result in violations of the FTC Act or comparable state, provincial or foreign statutes prohibiting unfair
or deceptive trade practices or result in reputational harm, any of which could materially harm our business, financial condition
and results of operations.

We are subject to the risk that, in one or more markets, our network marketing and party plan programs could be found not
to be in compliance with applicable law or regulations since regulatory requirements concerning direct selling programs do
not include “bright line” rules. The failure of our compensation programs to comply with current or newly adopted
regulations over “pyramid” or “chain sales” schemes would negatively impact our business in a particular market or in
general.

ViSalus's and PartyLite's promotional and compensation programs are subject to a number of federal and state regulations
administered by the FTC and various state agencies in the United States and the equivalent provincial and federal government agencies in Canada and in the other countries in which our businesses operate. We are subject to the risk that, in one or more
markets, our network marketing and party plan programs could be found not to be in compliance with applicable law or
regulations. Regulations applicable to direct selling organizations generally are directed at preventing fraudulent or deceptive
schemes, often referred to as “pyramid” or “chain sales” schemes, by ensuring that product sales ultimately are made to
consumers and that advancement within an organization is based on sales of the organization's products rather than investments
in the organization or other non-retail, non-product sales related criteria. The regulatory requirements concerning network
marketing and party plan programs do not include “bright line” rules, and therefore, even in jurisdictions where we believe that
our compensation programs are in compliance with applicable laws or regulations, we are subject to the risk that these laws or
regulations or the enforcement or interpretation of these laws and regulations by governmental agencies or courts can change.
The failure of our compensation programs to comply with current or newly adopted regulations could negatively impact our
business in a particular market or in general.

In general, a “pyramid scheme” is defined as an arrangement in which new participants are required to pay a fee to participate
in the organization and then receive compensation primarily for recruiting other persons to participate, either directly or
through sales of goods or services that are merely disguised payments for recruiting others. Such schemes are illegal because,
without legitimate sales of goods or services to support the organization's continued existence, new participants are exposed to
the loss of the fee paid to participate in the scheme. The application of these laws and regulations to a given set of business
practices is inherently fact-based and, therefore, is subject to interpretation by applicable enforcement authorities. Our
promoters and consultants are paid by commissions based on sales of our products to bona fide purchasers by those promoters or consultants and by their downline promoters or consultants. For this and other reasons we do not believe that we are in

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violation of any laws regulating pyramid schemes. However, even though we believe that our distribution practices are currently in compliance with, or exempt from, these laws and regulations, there is a risk that a governmental agency or court could disagree with our assessment or that these laws and regulations could change, which may require ViSalus or PartyLite to alter their distribution model or cease operations in certain jurisdictions or result in other costs or fines, any of which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our products are subject to challenge under California Proposition 65.

California's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, also known as Proposition 65, prohibits the discharge or
release of chemicals known to California to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity, without first giving clear and reasonable
warning. Among other things, the statute covers all consumer goods (including foods and consumer products) sold in
California. Proposition 65 allows private enforcement actions. Reports indicate that hundreds of such actions have been
commenced annually over the past few years against many companies in the consumer products and nutritional supplement
businesses (challenging, among other things, the lead content of certain ingredients and in certain consumer products) alleging
that their products are contaminated with heavy metals or other compounds that would trigger the warning requirements of the
act. While we take appropriate steps to ensure that our products are in compliance with the act, given the nature of this statute
and the extremely low tolerance limits it establishes, there is a risk that we or our manufacturers could be found liable for the
presence of minuscule amounts of a prohibited chemical in our products. We have, from time to time, been the subject of
Proposition 65 enforcement actions and may become the target of similar actions in the future. While the amounts we have paid to settle such actions have not had a material impact on our operations, there can be no assurance that any future
settlements would not be significant.

ViSalus's products are subject to regulation by the FDA and other federal and state authorities as foods, and in many
instances, the subset of foods referred to as “dietary supplements.” Any failure to comply with such regulations, or any
determinations by the FDA that any of ViSalus's products do not meet adequate safety standards or that its labeling or
marketing claims violate applicable requirements, could prevent ViSalus from marketing some of its products or subject it to
administrative, civil or criminal penalties.

ViSalus's products are subject to regulation by the FDA and other federal and state authorities as foods, and in many instances,
the subset of foods referred to as “dietary supplements.” The FDA regulates, among other things, the composition, safety,
labeling and marketing of conventional foods and dietary supplements (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other dietary
ingredients for human use). While ViSalus's products as they are currently marketed are not required to obtain pre-market
approval from the FDA, ViSalus must submit a new dietary ingredient notification to the FDA at least 75 days before the initial
marketing of any dietary supplement that contains a new dietary ingredient. The FDA may find unacceptable the evidence of
safety for any new dietary supplement ViSalus wishes to market, may determine that a particular dietary supplement or
ingredient that ViSalus currently markets presents an unacceptable health risk, or may determine that a particular claim or
statement of nutritional support that ViSalus uses to support the marketing of a food or dietary supplement conflicts with FDA
regulations regarding labeling claims. Any of these actions could prevent ViSalus from marketing particular products or
subject it to administrative, civil or criminal penalties. The FDA could also require ViSalus to remove or recall a particular product from the market based on safety issues or a failure to comply with applicable legal and regulatory requirements. Any future recall or removal would result in additional costs to ViSalus, including lost revenues from any additional products that it removes or recalls from the market, any of which could be material. Any product recalls or removals could also lead to liability, including consumer class action lawsuits, substantial costs and reduced growth prospects.

Additional or more stringent regulations of dietary supplements and other products have been considered from time to time.
These developments could require unanticipated company expenditures to address the reformulation of some products to meet
new standards, recalls or discontinuance of some products not able to be reformulated, additional record keeping requirements,
increased documentation of the properties of some products, additional or different labeling standards, additional scientific
substantiation, adverse event reporting or other new requirements. For example, in 2006, Congress enacted legislation to
impose adverse event reporting and record keeping requirements for dietary supplements, and in 2007, the FDA issued a final
rule on current Good Manufacturing Practices, creating new requirements for manufacturing, packaging and storing dietary
ingredients and dietary supplements. In the same year, the “Reportable Food Registry,” which we refer to as the “RFR,” was
established by the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, which requires food companies and other
“responsible parties” to file a report through the RFR electronic portal when there is a reasonable probability that the use of, or
exposure to, an article of food will cause serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals. In 2011, the FDA issued a draft guidance document expanding the FDA's previous interpretation of the regulatory requirements surrounding new dietary ingredient notifications and related issues, and Congress enacted new food safety legislation that has increased the FDA's authority over food facilities. ViSalus may not be able to comply with the new requirements or other future legislation, rules or guidance documents without incurring additional expenses, which could be significant.

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Although we intend that ViSalus's products be promoted in compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements, we
cannot ensure that aspects of ViSalus's operations will not be reviewed and challenged by regulatory authorities and if
challenged, that ViSalus would prevail. Furthermore, we cannot ensure that new laws or regulations, or industry standards
and guidelines, governing weight management, nutritional supplements, functional foods or energy drink mixes will not be enacted in the future, which could result in lost sales.

The FTC, state attorneys general, Canadian provincial and federal authorities, state consumer protection agencies in the United
States and similar authorities in foreign jurisdictions regulate fitness, weight loss and nutritional product-advertising claims and require that claims be supported by competent and reliable scientific evidence, where appropriate. The FTC and state attorneys general actively investigate and enforce claims made in weight management and nutritional supplement product advertisements, including for making claims that are too good to be true. ViSalus's marketing materials occasionally include consumer testimonials reporting or depicting specific results achieved by using the product or service generally. Published FTC guidelines state that such claims will be interpreted to mean that the endorser's experience is what others typically can expect to achieve. The FTC requires that advertisers possess adequate proof to back up that claim before making it, or clearly and conspicuously disclose the generally expected performance in the depicted circumstances. The FTC also requires that any material connections between an endorser must be clearly and conspicuously disclosed to consumers at the time of the endorsement.

Although we intend that ViSalus's products be promoted in compliance with these and all applicable regulatory requirements in
the markets in which it operates, and specifically intend to avoid making any express weight loss claims in marketing and other
promotional material provided to ViSalus's independent promoters, we cannot ensure that aspects of ViSalus's operations will
not be reviewed and challenged by regulatory authorities and if challenged, that ViSalus would prevail. Furthermore, we
cannot ensure that new laws or regulations, or industry standards and guidelines, governing weight management, nutritional
supplements, functional foods or energy drink mixes will not be enacted in the future in any of the markets in which ViSalus does business, resulting in lost sales.

These same laws, regulations, and government guidelines for enforcement and compliance apply to ViSalus's independent
promoters. While ViSalus trains promoters and attempts to monitor their marketing practices and materials, we cannot ensure that their promotional activities comply with the foregoing prohibitions on unfair and deceptive trade practices. If ViSalus's
promoters are found responsible for violating such restrictions, there can be no assurance that ViSalus could not be held
responsible for their conduct.

ViSalus and its promoters must comply with advertising and labeling laws. If ViSalus or its promoters fail to comply with these laws, then ViSalus and its promoters could be subjected to claims, financial penalties and relabeling requirements.

Although the physical labeling of ViSalus's products is not within the control of its promoters, ViSalus's promoters must
nevertheless advertise the products in compliance with the extensive regulations governing the promotion and labeling of
products intended for human consumption. ViSalus's products are sold principally as conventional foods and dietary
supplements and are subject to rigorous FDA and related legal regimens limiting the types of health-benefit claims that can be
made for their products. Claims that a product can diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent a disease, which we refer to as “therapeutic claims,” for example, are not permitted for these products. While ViSalus trains its promoters and attempts to monitor their marketing materials, we cannot ensure that all such materials comply with bans on therapeutic claims. If ViSalus or its promoters fail to comply with these restrictions, then ViSalus and its promoters could be subjected to claims, financial penalties and relabeling requirements. Similarly, the FTC prohibits promoters and endorsers from making any claims for products that are not substantiated with competent and reliable evidence. Although we expect that ViSalus's responsibility for the actions of its promoters in such an instance would be dependent on a determination that ViSalus either controlled or condoned a noncompliant advertising practice, there can be no assurance that ViSalus could not be held responsible for the actions of its promoters.

If we do not respond appropriately to changing consumer preferences, we could be vulnerable to increased exposure to
excess and obsolete inventory.

The ability of our businesses to respond to changing consumer preferences and demand for new products or product
enhancements and to manage their inventories properly is an important factor in their operations. The nature of their products
and the rapid changes in consumer preferences leave them vulnerable to an increased risk of inventory obsolescence. Excess or
obsolete inventories can result in lower gross margins due to the excessive discounts and markdowns that might be necessary to
reduce inventory levels. ViSalus’s products are meant for human consumption and have limited shelf lives. Our success depends in part on the ability of our businesses to anticipate and respond to these changes, and they may not respond in a

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timely or commercially appropriate manner to such changes. The ability of our businesses to meet future product demand will depend, among other things, upon their success in improving their ability to forecast product demand and fulfill customer orders promptly.

Adverse publicity directed at our products, ingredients, promoters, programs or network marketing business model, or those
of similar companies, could harm us.

Companies that market their products to consumers through a network of independent promoters can be the subject of negative
commentary. For example, starting in late 2012 and continuing in 2013, a hedge fund manager publicly raised allegations
regarding the legality of Herbalife's network marketing program and announced that his fund had taken a significant short
position regarding Herbalife's common shares, leading to intense public scrutiny of Herbalife's business and network marketing
and significant volatility in its stock price. We expect that negative publicity will, from time to time, continue to negatively
impact our business in particular markets and may adversely affect our stock price. This negative commentary can spread
inaccurate or incomplete information about the direct selling industry in general or our products, ingredients, promoters,
consultants or programs in particular. The number of our customers and promoters/consultants and our business, financial
condition and results of operations may be significantly affected by the public's perception of us and similar companies. This
perception is dependent upon opinions concerning:

• the safety, quality, effectiveness and taste of our products and ingredients;
• the safety, quality, effectiveness and taste of similar products and ingredients distributed by other companies;
• our independent sales forces;
• our promotional and compensation programs; and
• the direct selling business in general, including the operations of other direct selling companies.

Adverse publicity concerning any actual or purported failure by our direct selling businesses or their promoters or consultants
to comply with applicable laws and regulations regarding product claims and advertising, good manufacturing practices, the
regulation of our direct selling businesses, the licensing of our products for sale in our target markets or other aspects of our
business, whether or not resulting in enforcement actions or the imposition of penalties, could have an adverse effect on our
business and could negatively affect our direct selling businesses' ability to recruit, motivate and retain promoters and
consultants, which would negatively impact our ability to generate revenue.

In addition, adverse publicity concerning any actual or purported concerns about the quality of our products could have an
adverse effect on our business. We monitor our product quality and, from time to time, make changes to the ingredients,
packaging, fragrance, color and other matters to take into account changes in consumer preferences, opportunities to improve
the quality of our products and other matters. Our failure to maintain the quality of our products would reduce consumer
demand and negatively affect our ability to recruit, motivate and retain promoters and consultants, any of which would
negatively impact our sales and earnings.

ViSalus may be subject to health-related claims from its customers. Adverse publicity, whether or not accurate, could lead to
lawsuits or other legal challenges and could negatively impact ViSalus's and our reputation and the market demand for our
products.

Customers that suffer health problems may allege that ViSalus's products caused or contributed to the injury or ailment. From
time to time, customers may make such allegations on social media, which can be difficult to confront, challenge or refute. In
addition, the perception of the safety, quality, effectiveness and taste of our products and ingredients, as well as similar products
and ingredients distributed by other companies, could be significantly influenced by media attention (including on social
media), publicized scientific research or findings, widespread recalls or product liability claims or other publicity concerning
our products or ingredients or similar products and ingredients distributed by other companies. Adverse publicity, whether or
not accurate or resulting from the use or misuse of products, that associates consumption of our products or ingredients or any
similar products or ingredients with illness or other adverse effects, questions the benefits of ViSalus's products or similar
products, or claims that any such products are ineffective, inappropriately labeled or have inaccurate instructions as to their use
could lead to lawsuits or other legal challenges and could negatively impact ViSalus's and our reputation and the market
demand for our products.

We may incur material product liability claims, which could increase our costs and harm our business.

ViSalus markets products designed for human consumption. PartyLite and Silver Star Brands primarily market products for
consumer use, although some of their products are also intended for human consumption. As such, we may be subject to
product liability claims if the use of our products is alleged to have resulted in injury to consumers, whether from consumption

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or otherwise. We also may be subjected to product liability claims that relate to the use of candles and claims that our candles and accessories include inadequate instructions as to their uses or inadequate warnings concerning side effects. We cannot ensure that any of our products will never be associated with consumer injury. In addition, many of our products are manufactured by third-party manufacturers that also provide raw materials, which prevent us from having full control over the ingredients contained in many of our products.

As a marketer of weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes, ViSalus may be subjected to product-liability claims, including claims related to the use of these products in an inappropriate manner or by inappropriate consumer groups. Although we maintain third-party product liability insurance coverage, it is possible that claims against us may exceed the coverage limits of our insurance policies and cause us to record a self-insured loss. Even if any product liability loss is covered by an insurance policy, these policies typically have substantial retentions or deductibles for which we are responsible. Product liability claims in excess of applicable insurance coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition to the above, any product liability claim brought against any of our businesses, with or without merit, could result in
an increase of our product liability insurance rates. Insurance coverage varies in cost and can be difficult to obtain, and we
cannot guarantee that we will be able to obtain insurance coverage in the future on terms acceptable to us or at all. In addition,
such liability claims could cause our consumers to lose confidence in our products and stop purchasing our products, which
would harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

All of our businesses are subject to risks from increased competition, and our failure to maintain our competitive position
would harm us.

ViSalus's business of marketing and selling weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes, PartyLite's business of selling candles and accessories and Silver Star Brands' business of selling a wide variety of consumer products through catalogs and the Internet are highly competitive both in terms of pricing and new product introductions. The worldwide markets for these products are highly fragmented, with numerous suppliers serving one or more of the distribution channels served by us. In addition, we anticipate that we will be subject to increasing competition in the future from sellers that utilize electronic commerce. Some of these competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater financial, technical, product development, marketing and sales resources, greater name recognition, larger established customer bases, and better-developed distribution channels than our businesses. Our current or future competitors may be able to develop products that are comparable or superior to those that we offer, offer competitive products at more attractive prices, adapt more quickly than we do to new technologies, evolving industry trends and standards or consumer requirements, or devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products than our businesses. For example, ViSalus's Vi-Shape meal replacement product constitutes a significant portion of its sales, and if its competitors develop other weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods or energy drink mixes that become more popular than the ViSalus products, demand for ViSalus's products could decline. Competitors in ViSalus's target product market include Herbalife and retail establishments such as Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig, General Nutrition Centers and retail pharmacies. Competitors in PartyLite's target market include Yankee Candle and numerous retail establishments, including big-box retailers, that sell a wide variety of candles and accessories. Silver Star Brands competes with numerous general merchandise catalogs, online retailers and retail establishments. In addition, because the industries in which our businesses operate are not particularly capital intensive or otherwise subject to high barriers to entry, it is relatively easy for new competitors to emerge to compete with us for promoters, consultants and customers.

ViSalus and PartyLite are subject to significant competition for the recruitment of promoters and consultants from other direct
selling organizations, including those that market weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes, candles and home accessories, as well as other types of products. Our competitors for the recruitment of promoters and consultants include a large number of direct selling companies, examples of which include Amway, Avon, Herbalife, Natura, Nature's Sunshine, Nu Skin, Reliv, Shaklee, Tupperware and USANA. Furthermore, the fact that our promoters and consultants may easily enter and exit our programs contributes to the level of competition that we face. Our ability to remain competitive depends, in significant part, on our success in recruiting and retaining promoters and consultants through attractive compensation plans, the maintenance of attractive product portfolios and other incentives.

If our businesses are unable to compete effectively in their markets, if competition in their markets intensifies or if we are unable to recruit and retain promoters and consultants, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be harmed.

A downturn in the economy may affect consumer purchases of discretionary items such as our products.


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Recently, concerns over the global economy, including the recent financial crisis in Europe (including concerns that certain
European countries may default in payments due on their national debt) and the resulting economic uncertainty, as well as
concerns over unemployment in the United States and Europe, inflation, energy costs, geopolitical issues, and the availability
and cost of credit have contributed to increased volatility and diminished expectations for the United States and global
economies. A continued or protracted downturn in the economy could adversely impact consumer purchases of discretionary
items, including all of our products. Factors that could affect consumers' willingness to make such discretionary purchases
include general business conditions, levels of unemployment, political uncertainty, energy costs, interest rates and tax rates, the
availability of consumer credit and consumer confidence. A reduction in consumer spending could significantly reduce our
sales and leave us with unsold inventory.

Our results of operations are significantly affected by our success in increasing sales in our existing markets, as well as
opening new markets. As we continue to expand into international markets, our business becomes increasingly subject to
political, economic, legal and other risks. Changes in these markets could adversely affect our business.

PartyLite and ViSalus have a history of expanding into new international markets, although ViSalus has a very short history of
doing so commensurate with the short history of its business. We believe that our ability to achieve future growth is dependent
in part on our ability to continue our international expansion efforts. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able
to grow in our existing international markets, enter new international markets on a timely basis or that new markets will be
profitable. We must overcome significant regulatory and legal barriers before we can begin marketing in any international
market. Also, before marketing commences in a new country or market, it is difficult to assess the extent to which our products
and sales techniques will be accepted or successful in any given country. In addition to significant regulatory barriers, we may
also encounter problems conducting operations in new markets with different cultures, languages and legal systems from those
encountered elsewhere. We may be required to reformulate certain of our products before commencing sales in a given
country. Once we have entered a market, we must adhere to the regulatory and legal requirements of that market. No
assurance can be given that we will be able to successfully reformulate our products in any of our current or potential
international markets to meet local regulatory requirements or to attract local customers. There can be no assurance that we will be able to obtain and retain necessary permits and approvals in new markets, or that we will have sufficient capital to finance our expansion efforts in a timely manner.

In markets outside the United States, prior to commencing operations or marketing products, ViSalus may be required to obtain
approvals, licenses, or certifications from a country's regulatory agencies. Approvals, licensing or certifications may be
conditioned on reformulation of ViSalus's products for the market or may be unavailable with respect to certain products or
product ingredients. ViSalus must also comply with local product labeling and packaging regulations that vary among
countries.

In many market areas, other network marketing companies already have significant market penetration which may have the
effect of desensitizing the local population to a new opportunity from ViSalus or PartyLite, or to make it more difficult for us to
attract qualified promoters and consultants. Even if ViSalus and PartyLite are able to commence operations in new markets,
there may not be a sufficient population of individuals who are interested in direct selling in general or our business models in
particular. We believe our future success will depend in part on our ability to seamlessly integrate ViSalus's and PartyLite's
compensation plans across all markets where legally permissible. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to
utilize our compensation plans seamlessly in all existing or future markets.

We face diverse risks in our international business.

We depend on international sales for a substantial amount of our total revenue. For the year ended December 31, 2013, revenue from outside the United States represented 42% of our total revenue. We expect international sales to continue to represent a
substantial portion of our revenue for the foreseeable future and we plan to expand further into international markets. Due to our reliance on sales to customers outside the United States, we are subject to the risks of conducting business internationally, including:

• the acceptability of our products and sales models to international consumers;
• the interest in ViSalus's and PartyLite's business, products and compensation programs to prospective overseas
promoters and consultants;
• United States and foreign government trade restrictions, including those which may impose restrictions on imports to
or from the United States;
• foreign government taxes and regulations, including foreign taxes that we may not be able to offset against taxes
imposed upon us in the United States, and foreign tax and other laws limiting our ability to repatriate funds to the
United States;

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• the laws and policies of the United States, Canada, Australia and certain European countries affecting the importation of goods (including duties, quotas and taxes);
• foreign employment and labor laws, regulations and restrictions;
• difficulty in staffing and managing international operations and difficulty in maintaining quality control;
• adverse fluctuations in world currency exchange rates and interest rates, including risks related to any interest rate
swap or other hedging activities we undertake;
• political instability, natural disasters, health crises, war or events of terrorism;
• transportation costs and delays; and
• the strength of international economies.

Legal actions by ViSalus's or PartyLite's former promoters or consultants or third parties against us could harm our
business.

ViSalus and PartyLite monitor and review the compliance of their promoters and consultants with their respective policies and
procedures as well the laws and regulations applicable to their businesses. From time to time, some promoters and consultants
fail to adhere to these policies and procedures. In such cases, ViSalus or PartyLite may take disciplinary action against that
promoter or consultant based on the facts and circumstances of the particular case, which may include, for example, warnings
for minor violations to termination of the relationship for more serious violations. From time to time, we become involved in
litigation with a former promoter or consultant whose relationship has been terminated. We consider this type of litigation to be
routine and incidental to our business. While neither the existence nor the outcome of this type of litigation is typically
material to our business, we may become involved in litigation of this nature that results in a large cash award against us. Our
competitors have also been involved in this type of litigation and, in some cases, class actions, where the result has been a large
cash award against the competitor. These types of challenges, awards or settlements could provide incentives for similar
actions by former promoters or consultants against us in the future. Any such challenge involving us or others in our industry
could harm our business by resulting in fines or damages against us, creating adverse publicity about us or our industry, or
hurting our ability to attract and retain promoters, consultants and customers. We believe that compliance by promoters and
consultants with our policies and procedures is critical to the integrity of our business, and, therefore, we will continue to be
aggressive in enforcing them. As such, there can be no assurance that this type of litigation will not occur again in the future or
result in an award or settlement that has an adverse effect on our business.

Since our businesses rely on independent third parties to manufacture and supply many of their products, if these third
parties fail to reliably supply products at required levels of quantity and quality, then our business, financial condition and
results of operations would be harmed.

All of ViSalus's products are manufactured and supplied by third party manufacturers in the United States based on its formulas
(whether owned or licensed). PartyLite manufactures substantially all of its candles, but all of its accessories are manufactured
by third parties, primarily based overseas. All of Silver Star Brands' products are manufactured and supplied by third party
manufacturers, primarily based overseas. If any of the third party manufacturers were to become unable or unwilling to
continue to provide products in required volumes, at suitable quality levels, or if these suppliers fail to maintain compliance
with regulatory requirements imposed on the manufacturers of food and nutritional supplements, including the FDA's current
good manufacturing practices, we would be required to identify and obtain acceptable replacement manufacturing sources.
There is no assurance that we would be able to obtain alternative manufacturing sources on a timely basis. An extended
interruption in the supply of products would result in loss of sales, which could negatively impact our business, financial
condition and results of operations. In addition, any actual or perceived degradation of product quality as a result of reliance on
third party manufacturers may have an adverse effect on sales or result in increased product returns.

If PartyLite is unable to manufacture its candles at required levels of quantity and quality, then our business, financial
condition and results of operations could be harmed.

PartyLite manufactures substantially all of its candles. As a result, PartyLite depends upon the uninterrupted and efficient
operation of its manufacturing facilities. Those operations are subject to power failures, the breakdown, failure or substandard
performance of equipment, the improper installation, maintenance and operation of equipment, natural or other disasters, and
the need to comply with the requirements or directives of government agencies. If either of PartyLite's manufacturing facilities
were to experience a catastrophic loss, it would be expected to disrupt our operations and could result in personal injury or
property damage, damage relationships with PartyLite's consultants and customers or result in large expenses to repair or
replace the facilities, as well as result in other liabilities and adverse impacts. If PartyLite were to become unable to provide
products in required volumes and at suitable quality levels, we would be required to identify and obtain acceptable replacement
third party manufacturing sources. There is no assurance that we would be able to obtain alternative manufacturing sources on
a timely basis. An extended interruption in the supply of candles would result in loss of sales by PartyLite, which could

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negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any actual or perceived degradation
of product quality as a result of reliance on third party manufacturers instead of PartyLite for the manufacture of its candles
could have an adverse effect on sales or result in increased product returns.

PartyLite's manufacturing facilities are subject to a variety of environmental laws relating to the storage, discharge, handling,
emission, generation, manufacture, use and disposal of chemicals, solid and hazardous waste, and other toxic and hazardous
materials. PartyLite's manufacturing operations presently do not result in the generation of material amounts of hazardous or
toxic substances. Nevertheless, complying with new or more stringent laws or regulations, or more vigorous enforcement of
current or future policies of regulatory agencies, could require substantial expenditures by us that could have a material adverse
effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Environmental laws and regulations require us to maintain
and comply with a number of permits, authorizations and approvals and to maintain and update training programs and safety
data regarding materials used in our processes. Violations of those requirements could result in financial penalties and other
enforcement actions and could require us to halt one or more portions of our operations until a violation is cured. The
combined costs of curing incidents of non-compliance, resolving enforcement actions that might be initiated by government
authorities or of satisfying new legal requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or
results of operations.

Disruptions to transportation channels that we use to distribute our products may adversely affect us.

We may experience disruptions to the transportation channels used to distribute our products, including increased airport and
shipping port congestion, lack of transportation capacity, increased fuel expenses and a shortage of manpower. Disruptions in
our container shipments may result in increased costs, including the additional use of airfreight to meet demand. Although we
have not recently experienced significant shipping disruptions, we continue to watch for signs of upcoming congestion.
Congestion in ports can affect previously negotiated contracts with shipping companies, resulting in unexpected increases in
shipping costs.

Our profitability may be affected by shortages or increases in the cost of raw materials.

Certain raw materials could be in short supply due to price changes, capacity, availability, a change in production requirements,
weather or other factors, including supply disruptions due to production or transportation delays. Ingredients for ViSalus's
weight-management products, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes are sourced from a variety of third party suppliers. PartyLite sources petroleum based paraffin wax (which is used to manufacture candles) from several suppliers. While the price of crude oil is only one of several factors impacting the price of paraffin, it is possible that fluctuations in oil prices may have a material adverse effect on the cost of petroleum-based products used in the manufacture or transportation of PartyLite's products. In recent years, substantial cost increases for certain raw materials, such as paraffin and paper, negatively impacted our profitability. In addition, a number of governmental authorities in the United States and abroad have introduced or are contemplating enacting legal requirements, including emissions limitations, cap and trade systems and other measures to reduce production of greenhouse gases, in response to the potential impacts of climate change. These measures may have an indirect effect on us by affecting the prices of products made from fossil fuels, including paraffin. Given the wide range of potential future climate change regulations and their effects on these raw materials, the potential indirect impact to our operations is uncertain. In addition, climate change might contribute to severe weather in the locations where fossil fuel based raw materials are produced, such as increased hurricane activity in the Gulf of Mexico, which could disrupt the production, availability or pricing of these raw materials. Volatility in the prices of raw materials could increase our cost of sales and reduce our profitability. Moreover, we may not be able to implement price increases for products to cover any increased costs, and any price increases we implement may result in lower sales volumes. If our businesses are not successful in managing ingredient costs, if they are unable to increase their prices to cover increased costs or if such price increases reduce their sales volume, then such increases could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have guaranteed ViSalus's obligation to redeem its preferred stock in December 2017, and if we and ViSalus are unable
to redeem the preferred stock our ownership in ViSalus may decrease to less than 5%, which could significantly decrease
our sales, earnings or cash flows from operations.

In December 2012, in connection with our phased acquisition of ViSalus, ViSalus issued shares of its redeemable convertible
preferred stock to the minority owners of ViSalus. ViSalus has agreed to redeem all of the shares of preferred stock on
December 31, 2017, which can be extended with the consent of holders of a majority of the voting power of the preferred
stock, for $143.2 million, unless prior to such date ViSalus has made an initial public offering of its common stock with a
valuation above a certain threshold. We have guaranteed the performance by ViSalus of its redemption obligation. There can be no assurance that holders of a majority of the voting power of the preferred stock will choose to extend the redemption date beyond December 31, 2017.

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In the event that ViSalus does not redeem the preferred stock, each share of preferred stock will become convertible at the holder's sole discretion into 100 shares of common stock of ViSalus. There can be no assurance that any of the holders of the preferred stock will choose to convert the preferred stock into shares of common stock of ViSalus. If all of the preferred stock converted into 100 shares of common stock of ViSalus, our ownership interest in ViSalus would be reduced to approximately 4% of ViSalus, which could significantly decrease our sales, earnings or cash flow from operations.

In the event that we and ViSalus do not have the financial resources to redeem the preferred stock on the redemption date, in lieu of converting the preferred stock into shares of common stock of ViSalus, the holders thereof may seek to enforce the redemption obligations through legal proceedings or otherwise.
Awards made pursuant to ViSalus's Omnibus Incentive Plan could negatively impact our business, financial condition and
results of operations.

ViSalus has awarded restricted stock units and non-qualified stock options to its employees and others that vest over a number
of years and aggregate approximately 15% of the presently outstanding equity of ViSalus. As these awards vest and shares of
ViSalus stock (which we refer to collectively as “ViSalus Plan Shares”) are issued under them, our ownership interest in
ViSalus will be diluted. This dilution could reduce our earnings and cash flows, as well as the amount of cash we receive as
and when ViSalus declares dividends. The holders of the ViSalus Plan Shares may “put” some or all of their ViSalus Plan
Shares to ViSalus (i.e., require ViSalus to purchase them) unless doing so would violate, or be prohibited by, the terms of
Blyth's or ViSalus's lending arrangements or would, in the judgment of ViSalus's board of directors, materially adversely affect
ViSalus. Should the holders of the ViSalus Plan Shares exercise their put rights, such exercise could reduce our earnings and
cash flows as well as the amount of cash available for ViSalus to declare dividends. We and ViSalus will rely on an
independent third party appraiser to determine the value of the ViSalus stock at the time the “put” is exercised by the holders of
the ViSalus Plan Shares. The third party appraiser will determine that value based on several valuation methodologies of its
choosing, which may result in a value of the ViSalus stock that would exceed the price at which such stock would trade if
ViSalus were a separately traded public company.

Because of the put right, ViSalus's awards of restricted stock units and stock options may be accounted for as liability awards,
the fair value of which is measured at each reporting period. This means that ViSalus may be required to record additional
expenses (or expense reductions) in future periods for increases (or decreases) in the fair value of these awards. The fair value
of these awards is based on ViSalus's future operating performance and may change significantly if ViSalus's sales forecasts
and operating profits exceed or fall short of projections. Changes in the value of these awards could negatively impact our
results of operations and could cause our financial results to fluctuate from period to period. This may impair our ability to
predict financial results accurately, which could reduce the market price of our common stock.

If we lose the services of key employees, then our business, financial condition and results of operations would be harmed.

We depend on the continued services of Robert B. Goergen, our Chairman of the Board; Robert B. Goergen, Jr., our President and Chief Executive Officer and President PartyLite Worldwide; and Robert H. Barghaus, our Chief Financial Officer, as well as the continued services of Ryan Blair, the Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of ViSalus, and Blake Mallen, the Chief Marketing Officer and co-founder of ViSalus. In addition, ViSalus and PartyLite depend upon the continued services of the other members of their current senior management teams, including the relationships that they have developed with ViSalus's and PartyLite's senior independent promoters and consultants. The loss or departure of these key employees could negatively impact ViSalus's and PartyLite's relationship with their senior independent promoters and consultants and harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. If any of these key employees does not remain with us, our business could suffer. The loss of such key employees could negatively impact our ability to implement our business strategy. Our continued success will also be dependent upon our ability to retain existing, and attract additional, qualified personnel to meet our needs. Replacing key employees may be difficult and may require an extended period of time because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the necessary breadth of skills and experience.

We may be held responsible for certain taxes or assessments relating to the activities of our promoters and consultants.

Earnings of promoters and consultants are subject to taxation, and, in some instances, legislation or governmental regulations
impose obligations on ViSalus and PartyLite to collect or pay taxes, such as value-added taxes, and to maintain appropriate
records. In addition, we may be subject to the risk in some jurisdictions of new liabilities being imposed for social security and
similar taxes with respect to promoters or consultants. If local laws and regulations or the interpretation of local laws and
regulations change to require ViSalus or PartyLite to treat promoters or consultants as employees, or if promoters or consultants
are deemed by local regulatory authorities in one or more of the jurisdictions in which we operate to be our employees rather

25


than independent contractors or agents under existing laws and interpretations, we may be held responsible for social charges
and related taxes in those jurisdictions, plus related assessments and penalties.

ViSalus and PartyLite outsource some of their event planning to third parties, which exposes them to the risk that those
event planners will not produce events that meet ViSalus's and PartyLite's standards, as well as the standards of their
current and prospective promoters, consultants and customers.

ViSalus and PartyLite hold periodic and annual events where they, among other things, provide training to their promoters and
consultants, introduce new products and changes to their compensation plans, recognize the achievements of their promoters,
consultants and customers, and otherwise introduce their business to prospective promoters, consultants and customers.
ViSalus and PartyLite currently outsource some of the planning for these events to third parties. Accordingly, ViSalus and
PartyLite have less control over their events than if they were planned and operated exclusively by their employees. If these
event planners do not produce ViSalus's annual Vitality, semi-annual National Success Training and other events and
PartyLite's annual events at the expected levels of quality, ViSalus and PartyLite may fail to meet the expectations of their
current and prospective promoters, consultants and customers.

There can be no assurances that we will identify suitable acquisition candidates, complete acquisitions on terms favorable to
us, successfully integrate acquired operations or that companies we acquire will perform as anticipated.

We seek to grow through strategic acquisitions in addition to internal growth. In the past several years, we increased our
ownership in ViSalus, but did not complete any other acquisitions. There can be no assurances that we will identify suitable
acquisition candidates, complete acquisitions on terms favorable to us or be able to finance acquisitions. We also may
encounter difficulties in integrating acquisitions with our operations, applying our internal controls processes to these
acquisitions or in managing strategic investments. Additionally, we may not realize the degree or timing of benefits we
anticipate when we first enter into a transaction. We will not be required to submit acquisitions for stockholder approval,
except in certain situations that have not applied to any of our acquisitions and that we do not expect to apply to any future
acquisitions. In addition, accounting requirements relating to business combinations, including the requirement to expense
certain acquisition costs as incurred, may cause us to incur greater earnings volatility and generally lower earnings during
periods in which we acquire new businesses. Furthermore, covenants in the indenture that govern our 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017 limit or restrict our and our subsidiaries' ability to engage in acquisitions.

The covenants in the indenture that governs our 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017 limits our operating and financial flexibility.

On May 10, 2013, we completed the private sale of $50.0 million aggregate principal amount of 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017.
The 6.00% Senior Notes were issued pursuant to an indenture that contains affirmative and negative covenants that, among
other things, limit or restrict our and our subsidiaries' ability to incur additional debt, grant negative pledges to other creditors,
prepay subordinated indebtedness and certain other indebtedness, pay dividends or make other distributions on capital stock,
redeem or repurchase preferred and capital stock, make loans, investments and other restricted payments, engage in
acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, sell assets, create liens on assets to secure debt, or effect a consolidation or
merger or to sell all, or substantially all, of our assets, in each case, subject to certain qualifications and exceptions set forth in
the indenture. The indenture limits the dividends that we pay on our common stock, repurchases of our outstanding common
stock, repurchases of ViSalus Plan Shares and other restricted payments to an amount not exceeding the sum of 50% of our net income on a cumulative basis from July 1, 2013 (the first day of the fiscal quarter beginning after we issued the 6.00% Senior Notes) until the last day of the fiscal quarter preceding any restricted payments (provided that if we shall have a cumulative net loss, then 100% of such loss), the net cash proceeds from issuances of common stock and other items, subject to conditions, qualifications and exceptions set forth in the indenture.

The turmoil in the financial markets in recent years could increase our cost of borrowing and impede access to or increase
the cost of financing our operations and investments and could result in additional impairments to our businesses.

United States and global credit and equity markets have undergone significant disruption in recent years, making it difficult for
many businesses to obtain financing on acceptable terms, if at all. In addition, in recent years equity markets have experienced
rapid and wide fluctuations in value. If these conditions continue or worsen, our cost of borrowing may increase and it may be
more difficult to obtain financing for our businesses. In addition, while our debt is not currently being rated, our future
borrowing costs could be affected by short and long-term debt ratings assigned by independent rating agencies if we choose to
raise capital with public debt. A decrease in these ratings by the agencies would likely increase our cost of future borrowings
and/or make it more difficult for us to obtain financing. In the event current market conditions continue we will more than
likely be subject to higher interest costs than we are currently incurring and may be required to provide security to guarantee
such borrowings. Alternatively, we may not be able to obtain unfunded borrowings in that amount, which may require us to

26


seek other forms of financing, such as term debt, at higher interest rates and with additional expenses. In addition, we may be
subject to future impairments of our assets, including accounts receivable, inventories, property, plant and equipment, goodwill
and other intangibles, if the valuation of these assets or businesses declines.

If our businesses fail to protect their intellectual property, then our ability to compete could be negatively affected.

All of our businesses attempt to protect their intellectual property rights, both in the United States and elsewhere, through a
combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws, as well as licensing agreements and third-party nondisclosure and assignment agreements. The failure by our businesses to obtain or maintain adequate protection of their intellectual property rights for any reason could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We cannot assure you that any of our patent applications will be approved. Even if granted, the patents could be challenged,
invalidated or circumvented by others and may not be of sufficient scope or strength to provide us with any meaningful
protection or commercial advantage. Further, we cannot assure you that competitors will not infringe on our patents or that we
will have adequate resources to enforce our patents. We cannot be certain that we will be the first creator of formulas or products covered by any patent application we may make or that we will be the first to file patent applications on such formulas or products. Because some patent applications are maintained in secrecy for a period of time, there is also a risk that we could
adopt a formula without knowledge of a pending patent application, which would infringe a third party patent once that patent
is issued.

We also rely on unpatented proprietary information related to some of our formulas and products. It is possible that others will
independently develop the same or similar technology or otherwise obtain access to these unpatented formulas or products. In
Canada, the medicinal ingredients in ViSalus's products must be disclosed by quantity. We also possess trade secret rights in
our promoter/consultant and customer lists and related contact information. To protect our trade secrets and other proprietary
information, we currently require most of our employees, consultants, advisors and collaborators to enter into confidentiality
agreements. We cannot ensure that these agreements will provide meaningful protection for any of our trade secrets, knowhow
or other proprietary information in the event of any unauthorized use, misappropriation or disclosure. If we are unable to
maintain the proprietary and/or secret nature of our formulas and products, we could be materially adversely affected. Further, loss of protection for our promoter, consultant and customer lists could harm our ability to recruit and retain promoters,
consultants or customers, which could harm our financial condition and results of operations.

The market for our products depends to a significant extent upon the goodwill associated with our trademarks and trade names.
We own most of the material trademarks and trade-name rights used in connection with the packaging, marketing and
distribution of our products in the markets where those products are sold. We rely on these trademarks, trade names, trade
dress and brand names to distinguish our products from the products of our competitors, and have registered or applied to
register many of these trademarks. We may not be successful in asserting trademark or trade-name protection against third
parties or otherwise successfully defending against a challenge to our trademarks or trade names. In addition, the laws of
other countries may not protect our intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. In the event that our trademarks or trade names are successfully challenged, we could be forced to rebrand our products, remove products from the market or pay a settlement, which could result in loss of brand recognition, and could require us to devote resources to advertising and marketing new brands and building goodwill in these new brands, trademarks and trade names. ViSalus has agreed not to use “ViSalus” as a trademark, name or product name outside of North America. Further, we cannot ensure that competitors will not infringe our trademarks, pass off themselves or their goods and services as being ours or associated with ours or otherwise depreciate the value of the goodwill associated with our trademarks and trade names or that we will have adequate resources to enforce our trademarks. Infringement of our trademarks or trade names, passing off by a competitor or depreciating the goodwill associated with our trademarks could impair the goodwill associated with our brands and harm our reputation, which could materially harm our financial condition and results of operations.

We face the risk of claims that we have infringed third parties' intellectual property rights. Any claims of intellectual property
infringement, even those without merit, could be expensive and time consuming to defend; cause us to cease making, licensing,
selling or using products that incorporate the challenged intellectual property; require us to redesign, reengineer, or rebrand our
products or packaging, if feasible; divert management's attention and resources; or require us to enter into royalty or licensing
agreements in order to obtain the right to use a third party's intellectual property. Any royalty or licensing agreements, if
required, may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.

We depend upon our information-technology systems, and if we experience interruptions in these systems, our business,
financial condition and results of operations could be negatively impacted.


27


Our businesses are increasingly dependent on information-technology systems to operate their websites, communicate with
their independent promoters and consultants, calculate compensation due to their promoters and consultants, process
transactions, manage inventory, purchase, sell and ship goods on a timely basis and maintain cost-efficient operations,
including information technology that they license from third parties. There is no guarantee that our businesses will continue to
have access to these third-party information-technology systems after the current license agreements expire, and if they do not
obtain licenses to use effective replacement information-technology systems, our business, financial condition and results of
operations could be adversely affected.

Previously, our businesses have experienced interruptions resulting from upgrades to certain of their information-technology
systems that temporarily reduced the effectiveness of their operations. Our information-technology systems depend on global
communication providers, telephone systems, hardware, software and other aspects of Internet infrastructure that have
experienced system failures in the past. Our systems are susceptible to outages due to fire, floods, power loss,
telecommunication failures and similar events. Despite the implementation of network security measures, our systems are
vulnerable to computer viruses, break-ins and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our systems. The
occurrence of these or other events could disrupt or damage our information-technology systems and inhibit internal operations,
the ability to provide service to our promoters, consultants and customers or their ability to access our information systems. If we are unable to effectively upgrade our systems and network infrastructure and take other steps to improve the efficiency of our systems, it could cause system interruptions or delays and adversely affect our operating results.

The Internet plays a major role in our interaction with customers and promoters and consultants. The disruptions described above may make our websites and online services, including but not limited to Vi-Net, unavailable or slow to respond and prevent us from efficiently fulfilling orders, which may reduce our net sales and the attractiveness of our products and services. Risks such as changes in required technology interfaces, website downtime and other technical failures, security breaches and consumer privacy regulations are key concerns related to the Internet. Our failure to respond successfully to these risks and uncertainties could reduce sales, increase costs and damage our relationships.

Management uses information systems to support decision-making and to monitor business performance. We may fail to
generate accurate financial and operational reports essential for making decisions at various levels of management. Failure to
adopt systematic procedures to maintain quality information-technology general controls could impact management's decision making and performance monitoring, which could disrupt our business. In addition, if we do not maintain adequate controls
such as reconciliations, segregation of duties and verification to prevent errors or incomplete information, our ability to operate
our business could be limited.

As a result of our online sales, we process, store and transmit large amounts of data, including personal information. If we fail to prevent or mitigate data loss, security breaches or the circumvention of our security measures, our systems could allow data loss or misappropriation of confidential, proprietary and/or personal information - including that of third parties such as promoters, consultants and customers collected in our online businesses - or could interrupt our operations, damage our computers or otherwise harm our reputation and business. Although we have developed systems and processes that are designed to protect this information and prevent data loss and security breaches, such measures cannot provide absolute security. In addition we rely on third party technology, systems and services in certain aspects of our business, including storage encryption and authentication technology to securely transmit confidential information. These third party systems also cannot provide absolute security.

Our storage of user and employee data subjects us to a number of federal, state and foreign laws and regulations governing the collection, storage, handling or sharing of personal data.

We collect, handle, store and disclose personal data collected from users of our websites and mobile applications, as well as our
employees, promoters and consultants, and potential and actual purchasers of our products. In this regard, we are subject to a
number of U.S. federal, state and foreign laws and regulations. The FTC, state attorneys general and foreign data protection and consumer protection authorities actively investigate and enforce compliance with laws and regulations governing fair information practices, as they are evolving in practice and being tested in courts. These laws, including the FTC Act, could be interpreted in ways that could harm our business, particularly if we are deemed to engage in unfair or deceptive trade practices with regard to our collection, storage, handling or sharing of personal data. Risks attendant upon our conduct of business on the Internet and data collection practices may involve user or employee privacy, data protection, electronic contracts, consumer protection, taxation and online payment services. The adoption of new laws and regulations or changes in the interpretations of existing laws and regulations regarding the storage, handling, collection and sharing of personal data may result in significant compliance costs or otherwise negatively impact our business. Our promoters and consultants also collect, store, handle and process personal data. A violation of law or fair information practices by a promoter or consultant could cause us financial or reputational harm.

28



User growth and engagement on mobile devices depend upon the effective operation of mobile operating systems, networks
and standards that we do not control.

ViSalus relies on its Vi-Net Mobile application suite, which allows promoters and customers to access their Vi- Net accounts
and place orders for customers on their smartphones. There is no guarantee that the Vi-Net Mobile application suite will
continue to be interoperable with popular mobile operating systems that ViSalus does not control, such as Android, Blackberry
and iOS, and any changes in such systems that degrade ViSalus's products' functionality or give preferential treatment to
competitive products could adversely affect Vi-Net Mobile application suite usage. Additionally, in order to deliver high quality
mobile products, it is important that ViSalus's products work well with a range of mobile technologies, systems,
networks and standards that ViSalus does not control. ViSalus may not be successful in developing relationships with key
participants in the mobile industry or in developing products that operate effectively with these technologies, systems, networks
or standards. If it is more difficult for ViSalus's users to access and use the Vi-Net Mobile application suite on their mobile
devices, or if ViSalus's users choose not to access or use the Vi-Net Mobile application suite on their mobile devices or use
mobile products that do not offer access to the Vi-Net Mobile application suite, ViSalus's customer and independent promoter
growth and retention could be harmed.

Our business is susceptible to fraud, including credit card and debit card fraud.

Our customers, promoters and consultants typically pay for their orders with debit or credit cards. We have been the victim of
credit card fraud, and our reputation, business and results of operations could be negatively impacted if we experience credit
card and debit card fraud. Failure to adequately detect and avoid fraudulent credit card and debit card transactions could cause
our businesses to lose their ability to accept credit cards or debit cards as forms of payment and/or result in charge-backs of the
fraudulently charged amounts and/or significantly decrease revenues. Furthermore, credit card and debit card fraud may lessen
customers', promoters' and consultants' willingness to purchase products. For this reason, such failure could have a material
adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in our effective tax rate may have an adverse effect on our financial results.

Our effective tax rate and the amount of our provision for income taxes may be adversely affected by a number of factors,
including:

• the jurisdictions in which profits are determined to be earned and taxed;
• adjustments to estimated taxes upon finalization of various tax returns;
• changes in available tax credits;
• changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities;
• the resolution of issues arising from uncertain positions and tax audits with various tax authorities;
• the non-deductibility of certain expenditures for tax purposes;
• changes in accounting standards or tax laws and regulations, or interpretations thereof; and
• penalties and/or interest expense that we may be required to recognize on liabilities associated with uncertain tax
positions.

A substantial amount of our deferred tax assets include foreign tax credits. We reduce deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of available evidence, some portion or all of the deferred tax assets are unlikely to be realized. Recording of valuation allowances includes estimates and therefore involves inherent uncertainty. We may also be required to record valuation allowances in the future, and our future results and financial condition may be adversely affected if we are required to do so. We may also be affected by future tax regulatory changes since the recordation of deferred tax assets and valuation allowances have been made based on the currently-effective tax regulations.

We do not collect sales or consumption taxes in some states.

U.S. Supreme Court decisions restrict the imposition of obligations to collect state and local sales taxes with respect to remote
sales. However, an increasing number of states have considered or adopted laws that attempt to impose obligations on out-of state retailers to collect taxes on their behalf. On May 6, 2013, the U.S. Senate passed legislation that could require Internet
retailers to collect sales taxes for state and local governments. The legislation would allow states to force online retailers with
more than $1.0 million in annual out-of-state sales to collect sales taxes from all customers and remit those taxes back to state
and local governments. The adoption of remote sales tax collection legislation would result in the imposition of sales taxes and
additional costs associated with complex sales tax collection, remittance and audit compliance requirements on us. A
successful assertion by one or more states or foreign countries requiring us to collect taxes where we do not do so could result

29


in substantial tax liabilities, including for past sales, as well as penalties and interest.

Since our periodic results of operations may fluctuate, we may fail to meet or exceed the expectations of investors or
securities analysts, which could cause our stock price to decline.

Our periodic results of operations have fluctuated in the past and are likely to fluctuate significantly in the future. Our periodic
results of operations may fluctuate as a result of many factors, including those listed below, many of which are outside of our
control:

• demand for and market acceptance of our products;
• our ability to recruit, retain and motivate promoters, consultants and customers;
• the timing and success of introductions of new products by us or our competitors;
• awards made pursuant to ViSalus's Omnibus Incentive Plan;
• the strength of the economy;
• changes in our pricing policies or those of our competitors;
• competition, including entry into the industry by new competitors and new offerings by existing competitors;
• the impact of seasonality on our business;
• the international expansion of our operations; and
• the timing of our events, including ViSalus's annual Vitality event and PartyLite's national conferences.

These factors, among others, make business forecasting difficult, may cause quarter to quarter fluctuations in our results of
operations and may impair our ability to predict financial results accurately, which could reduce the market price of our
common stock. Therefore, you should not rely on the results of any one quarter or year as an indication of future performance.
Furthermore, period to period comparisons of our results of operations may not be as meaningful for our company as they may
be for other public companies.

Our business units' profitability could be adversely affected by increased mailing, printing and shipping costs.

Postal rate increases and paper and printing costs affect the cost of our catalog and promotional mailings. Future additional
increases in postal rates or in paper or printing costs would reduce Silver Star Brands' profitability to the extent that it is unable
to pass those increases directly to customers or offset those increases by raising selling prices or by reducing the number and
size of certain catalog circulations. The sales volume and profitability of each of our business units could be affected by increased costs to ship our products.

The operation of Silver Star Brands' credit program, including higher than expected rates of customer defaults, could
adversely affect Silver Star Brands' sales and earnings and impact its cash flow from operations.

Silver Star Brands allows some of its customers to purchase products and pay for them with monthly payments over time,
which impacts Silver Star Brands' working capital requirements and cash flow from operations. Although customers are
selected and dollar limits on their purchases under the program are set using parameters that seek to ensure that most customers
will be able to make the monthly payments under the program, some customers default on their obligations under the program
and there is a risk that defaults may occur in larger than anticipated amounts. In addition the program may become subject to
regulatory regimes including, but not limited to, regulations that might be issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
The operation of the credit program and the application of such regulatory regimes or changes to them, if either occurs, may
affect Silver Star Brands' sales and/or financial performance.

Our stock price may be affected by speculative trading, including by those shorting our stock.

As of February 14, 2014, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) reported a short interest of approximately 82.3% of our
public float, which was the most heavily shorted stock as a percentage of public float on the NYSE. As of December 31, 2013,
we were the most heavily shorted stock as a percentage of public float in the S&P 1500. It is possible that the NYSE short
interest reporting system does not fully capture the total short interest and that it could be larger. Due to our limited public
float, we are vulnerable to investors taking a “short position” in our common stock, which is likely to have a depressing effect
on the price of our common stock and add increased volatility to our trading market. Short sellers expect to make a profit if our
common stock declines in value, and their actions and their public statements may cause volatility in our stock price. The
existence of such a significant short interest position may lead to continued volatility. The volatility of our stock may cause the
value of a stockholder's investment to decline rapidly.

Our stock price has been volatile, has a small public float and is subject to various market conditions.

30



The trading price of our common stock has been subject to wide fluctuations. Due to the large ownership of our common stock
by Robert B. Goergen and his affiliates, we have a relatively small public float compared to the number of our shares
outstanding. Accordingly, we cannot predict the extent to which investors' interest in our common stock will provide an active
and liquid trading market.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or publish negative reports about
our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock depends, to some extent, on the research and reports that securities or industry
analysts may publish about us. We are not currently followed by securities or industry analysts, and there can be no assurance
that any analysts will begin to follow us. In the event that securities or industry analysts begin to cover us, we will not have
any control over them or the reports that they may issue. If our financial performance fails to meet analyst estimates in the
future or one or more of the analysts who cover us at such time downgrade our shares or change their opinion of our shares, our
share price would likely decline. Since we are not currently followed by analysts, we do not have significant visibility in the
financial markets, which could cause our share price or trading volume to decline. If analysts begin to cover us and one or
more of such analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, our share price or trading
volume may decline. Our operating results in future quarters may be below the expectations of securities analysts and
investors. If that were to occur, the price of our common stock would likely decline, perhaps substantially.

If we fail to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the market may have reduced confidence in our
reported financial information.

We must continue to document, test, monitor and enhance our internal control over financial reporting in order to satisfy the
requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. We will continue to perform the documentation and
evaluations needed to comply with Section 404. If during this process our management identifies one or more material
weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we will be unable to assert that our internal controls are effective,
which may cause market participants to have reduced confidence in our reported financial condition.


31


Item 1B.  Unresolved Staff Comments.
 
None.

Item 2.  Properties.

The following table sets forth the location and approximate square footage of our major manufacturing, distribution, research and development, and office facilities for each of our business segments:

Location
Use
Business Segment
Approximate Square Feet
 
 
 
Owned
Leased
Arndell Park, Australia
Distribution
Candles & Home Décor
38,000
Batavia, IL
Manufacturing, Distribution and Research & Development
Candles & Home Décor
420,000
Cumbria, England
Manufacturing and related distribution
Candles & Home Décor
90,000
Los Angeles, CA
Office
Health & Wellness
15,000
Oshkosh, WI
Distribution
Catalog & Internet
386,000
Oshkosh, WI
Office
Catalog & Internet
99,625
Plymouth, MA
Office
Candles & Home Décor
100,000
Tilburg, Netherlands
Distribution
Candles & Home Décor
442,500
Troy, MI
Office
Health & Wellness
63,400

Our executive and administrative offices are generally located in leased space (except for certain offices located in owned space).

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings.

We, certain of our officers, FVA Ventures, Inc. (“FVA”), ViSalus Holdings, LLC, ViSalus and one of its Founders were named as defendants in a putative class action filed in federal district court in Connecticut on behalf of purchasers of our common stock during the period March to November 2012. On June 3, 2013, we and the other defendants moved to dismiss the then-operative amended complaint. In lieu of responding to the motion to dismiss, on June 24, 2013 plaintiff filed a second amended complaint, which is currently operative and names as defendants us, certain of our officers, ViSalus Holdings, LLC, ViSalus, and a ViSalus co-founder/promoter. The second amended complaint, which seeks unspecified damages and asserts violations of Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder, alleges certain misstatements and omissions by certain defendants, including concerning ViSalus's operations and prospects, and further alleges that certain defendants engaged in a fraudulent or deceptive “scheme.” On August 2, 2013, we and the other defendants filed a memorandum of law in support of our motion to dismiss the second amended complaint. On September 12, 2013, plaintiff filed a memorandum of law opposing defendants’ motion to dismiss its second amended complaint, and on October 3, 2013 we and the other defendants filed a reply memorandum in support of our motion to dismiss the second amended complaint. Oral argument on the motion was held on March 6, 2014. We believe that we have meritorious defenses to the claims asserted against us and we intend to defend ourselves vigorously.

We are also involved in litigation arising in the ordinary course of business, which, in our opinion, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.
 

32


PART II
 
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Our Common Stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol BTH. The following table provides the closing price range for the Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange:

 
High
 
Low
Year Ended December 31, 2013
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
17.36

 
$
13.45

Second Quarter
19.68

 
13.34

Third Quarter
15.23

 
8.70

Fourth Quarter
15.50

 
10.50

 
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31, 2012
 
 
 
First Quarter
$
39.91

 
$
28.21

Second Quarter
44.60

 
34.43

Third Quarter
45.57

 
24.80

       Fourth Quarter
26.96

 
14.73


Many of our shares are held in “street name” by brokers and other institutions on behalf of stockholders, and we had approximately 4,300 beneficial holders of Common Stock as of February 28, 2014.

During the year ended December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, the Board of Directors declared cash dividends as follows:

Regular Dividend
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
Second Quarter
$
0.10

 
$
0.08

Fourth Quarter
$
0.10

 
$
0.10


Our ability to pay cash dividends in the future depends upon, among other things, the restrictions and limitations imposed thereon by the indenture governing our 6.00% Senior Notes, our ability to operate profitably and to generate significant cash flows from operations in excess of investment and financing requirements that may increase in the future to, for example, fund acquisitions, meet contractual obligations to acquire the remaining portion of ViSalus that we do not own or retire debt.

The following table sets forth, for the equity compensation plan categories listed below, information as of December 31, 2013:

Equity Compensation Plan Information
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plan Category
(a)
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights1
 
(b)
Weighted-average
exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights1
 
(c) Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
2,500

 
$
63.37

 
1,707,674

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 

 

Total
2,500

 
$
63.37

 
1,707,674

1 The information in this column excludes 158,630 restricted stock units outstanding as of December 31, 2013.


33


The following table sets forth certain information concerning repurchases of our common stock during the quarter ended December 31, 2013.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities (1)
Period
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
 
Price Paid
per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
October 1, 2013 - October 31, 2013

 
$

 

 
1,005,578

November 1, 2013 -November 30, 2013

 

 

 
1,005,578

December 1, 2013 -December 31, 2013

 

 

 
1,005,578

Total

 
$

 

 
1,005,578

(1) On September 10, 1998, our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program pursuant to which we were originally authorized to repurchase up to 500,000 shares of common stock in open market transactions. From June 1999 to June 2006 the Board of Directors increased the authorization under this repurchase program five times (on June 8, 1999 to increase the authorization by 500,000 shares to 1.0 million shares; on March 30, 2000 to increase the authorization by 500,000 shares to 1.5 million shares; on December 14, 2000 to increase the authorization by 500,000 shares to 2.0 million shares; on April 4, 2002 to increase the authorization by 1.0 million shares to 3.0 million shares; and on June 7, 2006 to increase the authorization by 3.0 million shares to 6.0 million shares). On December 13, 2007, the Board of Directors authorized a new repurchase program, for 3.0 million shares, which became effective after we exhausted the authorized amount under the old repurchase program. As of December 31, 2013, we have purchased a total of 7,994,422 shares of common stock under the old and new repurchase programs. The new repurchase program does not have an expiration date. We intend to make further purchases under our repurchase program from time to time. The indenture that governs our 6.00% Senior Notes limits and restricts our ability to repurchase our common stock. The amounts set forth in this paragraph have been adjusted to give effect to the 1-for-4 reverse stock split implemented in January 2009 and the 2-for-1 stock split implemented in June 2012.

34


Performance Graph

The performance graph set forth below reflects the yearly change in the cumulative total stockholder return (price appreciation and reinvestment of dividends) on our common stock compared to the Standard and Poor’s (“S&P”) 500 Index and the S&P SmallCap 600 Index. The graph assumes the investment of $100 in common stock and the reinvestment of all dividends paid on such common stock into additional shares of common stock and such indexes. We believe that it is appropriate to compare us to companies comprising the S&P SmallCap 600 Index, the index we are currently tracked in by S&P.

35


Item 6. Selected Financial Data

Set forth below are selected summary consolidated financial and operating data which have been derived from our audited financial statements.  The information presented below should be read in conjunction with our “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, appearing elsewhere in this Report. The per share amounts and number of shares outstanding have been retroactively adjusted to give effect to the 2-for-1 stock split implemented June 15, 2012.

In December 2011, we changed our fiscal year-end from January 31 to December 31. In addition, we have eliminated the lag differences in the reporting year-ends of certain of our subsidiaries to align them with our other subsidiaries fiscal year end.
 
Years ended December 31,
 
Eleven Months ended December 31,
 
Years ended January 31,
(In thousands, except per share and percent data)
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2011
 
2011
 
2010
Statement of Earnings Data:
 
 
 
 
(Unaudited)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
(2)
Net sales
$
885,450

 
$
1,179,514

 
$
879,090

 
$
827,612

 
$
738,947

 
$
791,737

Gross profit
572,591

 
787,520

 
566,246

 
535,786

 
465,306

 
481,766

  Operating profit (1)
19,651

 
84,566

 
32,237

 
32,122

 
49,539

 
35,027

  Earnings from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interest (3)
14,630

 
81,142

 
25,654

 
27,518

 
42,144

 
27,468

Earnings from continuing operations
3,436

 
49,507

 
19,135

 
20,158

 
27,487

 
19,981

Net earnings attributable to Blyth, Inc.
2,433

 
44,002

 
13,750

 
16,226

 
26,591

 
17,004

Net earnings (loss) attributable to Blyth, Inc. common stockholders
(3,038
)
 
10,046

 
13,750

 
16,226

 
26,591

 
17,004

Per share data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted net earnings (loss) attributable per share of Blyth, Inc. common stock
$
(0.19
)
 
$
0.58

 
$
0.83

 
$
0.98

 
$
1.56

 
$
0.95

Cash dividends declared, per share
0.20

 
0.18

 
0.85

 
0.85

 
0.60

 
0.60

Diluted weighted average number of common shares outstanding
16,196

 
17,247

 
16,656

 
16,656

 
17,017

 
17,868

Operating Data:
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Gross profit margin
64.7
%
 
66.8
%
 
64.4
%
 
64.7
%
 
63.0
%
 
60.8
%
Operating profit margin
2.2
%
 
7.2
%
 
3.7
%
 
3.9
%
 
6.7
%
 
4.4
%
Net capital expenditures
$
12,358

 
$
19,393

 
$
7,196

 
$
6,318

 
$
8,192

 
$
5,195

Depreciation and amortization
12,987

 
11,239

 
11,207

 
10,172

 
11,234

 
13,529

Balance Sheet Data:
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Total assets
$
366,777

 
$
434,923

 
$
515,294

 
$
515,294

 
$
508,835

 
$
526,357

Total debt
56,278

 
78,190

 
99,883

 
99,883

 
110,845

 
110,796

Total stockholders' equity
$
45,622

 
$
58,536

 
$
153,798

 
$
153,798

 
$
252,868

 
$
254,830


(1) Calendar year 2012 and 2011 and fiscal 2011 and 2010 earnings include restructuring charges recorded in the Candles & Home Décor segment of $3.2 million, $3.0 million, $0.8 million and $0.1 million, respectively.
(2) In 2012, we sold our Sterno business and in 2011 we sold substantially all of the net assets of Midwest-CBK and disposed of the assets and liabilities of the Boca Java business as more fully detailed in Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.  The results of operations for these businesses have been reclassified to discontinued operations for all periods presented.
(3) In 2013, we paid make-whole interest expense of $1.2 million for the early retirement of our 5.50% Senior Notes recorded in Interest Expense. In addition, in 2012, we recorded a $1.9 million impairment on a promissory note in addition to other adjustments of $0.3 million, for a net write-down of $1.6 million recorded in Foreign exchange and other.

36


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The financial and business analysis below provides information that we believe is relevant to an assessment and understanding of our consolidated financial condition, changes in financial condition and results of operations. This financial and business analysis should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements set forth in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

Overview

Our products include an extensive array of decorative and functional household products such as candles, accessories, seasonal decorations, household convenience items and personalized gifts, as well as meal replacement shakes, nutritional supplements, functional foods, energy drink mixes and health wellness related products. Our products can be found throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Australia. Our financial results are reported in three segments: the Candles & Home Décor segment (PartyLite), the Health & Wellness segment (ViSalus) and the Catalog & Internet segment (Silver Star Brands, formerly known as the Miles Kimball Company).

Our current focus is driving sales growth and profitability of our brands so we may leverage more fully our infrastructure, as well as supporting new infrastructure requirements of some of our businesses. New product development continues to be critical to all three segments of our business. In the Candles & Home Décor and Health & Wellness segments, monthly sales and productivity incentives are designed to attract, retain and increase the earnings opportunity of independent sales consultants and promoters. In the Catalog & Internet segment, product, merchandising and circulation strategy are designed to drive strong sales growth in smaller brands and expand the sales and customer base of our flagship brands.

In 2012 we divested our Sterno business, and in 2011 we sold substantially all of the net assets of Midwest-CBK as more fully detailed in Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements. The results of operations for these businesses have been presented as discontinued operations for all periods presented.

Segments

Within the Candles & Home Décor segment, we design, manufacture or source, market and distribute an extensive line of products including scented candles, candle-related accessories and other fragranced products under the PartyLite® brand. Products in this segment are sold through networks of independent sales consultants. PartyLite brand products are sold in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe and Australia.

Within the Health & Wellness segment, we operate ViSalus, which is focused on selling meal replacement shakes, nutritional supplements, functional foods and energy drink mixes. Products in this segment are sold through networks of independent sales promoters. ViSalus brand products are sold in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany and Austria.
 
Within the Catalog & Internet segment, we design, source and market a broad range of household convenience items, health and wellness products, holiday cards, personalized gifts, kitchen accessories, premium photo albums and frames.  These products are sold directly to consumers under the Miles Kimball®, Walter Drake® , Easy Comforts®, As We Change® and Exposures® brands.  These products are sold in North America.

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the percentage relationship to net sales and the percentage increase or decrease of certain items included in our Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Loss):


37


 
Percentage of Net Sales
 
Percentage Increase (Decrease) from Prior Period
 
Years ended
 
Eleven months ended
 
 
12/31/2013
 
12/31/2012
 
12/31/2011
 
12/31/2011
 
Year ended 12/31/13 compared to year ended 12/31/12
 
Year ended 12/31/12 compared to year ended 12/31/11
 
 
 
(1)
 
(unaudited) (1)
 
(1)
 
 
 
 
Net sales
100.0

 
100.0

 
100.0

 
100.0

 
(24.9
)
 
34.2
Cost of goods sold
35.3

 
33.2

 
35.6

 
35.3

 
(20.2
)
 
25.3
Gross profit
64.7

 
66.8

 
64.4

 
64.7

 
(27.3
)
 
39.1
Selling
43.8

 
43.8

 
43.6

 
43.7

 
(24.9
)
 
34.6
Administrative
18.6

 
15.8

 
17.1

 
17.2

 
(11.6
)
 
24.0
Operating profit
2.2

 
7.2

 
3.7

 
3.9

 
(76.8
)
 
162.3
Earnings from continuing operations
0.3

 
3.1

 
2.3

 
2.6

 
(93.3
)
 
82.0
(1)  In 2012, we sold our Sterno business and in 2011 we sold substantially all of the net assets of Midwest-CBK and disposed of the assets and liabilities of the Boca Java business as more fully detailed in Note 4 to the Consolidated financial statements.  The results of operations for these businesses have been reclassified to discontinued operations for all periods presented.

For the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the year ended December 31, 2012

Net Sales
 
Net sales decreased 25%, or approximately $294.0 million, to $885.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $1,179.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 due to a decrease in the Health & Wellness segment and to a much lesser extent a decrease in the Candles & Home Décor segment. Net sales in our Catalog & Internet segment increased 3% over the prior year.

Net Sales – Candles & Home Décor Segment

Net sales for PartyLite decreased $26.5 million, or 6%, to $390.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $417.3 million in the prior year. This decline was mainly due to a 17% decline in North American sales due to a decline in active independent sales consultants to approximately 17,000 this year from approximately 19,000 last year, as well as fewer shows, which results in fewer opportunities to promote our products and recruit new consultants.

In PartyLite’s European markets sales declined 6% in local currency or 2% in U.S. dollars mainly due to lower sales within the larger, more mature markets partly offset by higher sales in Austria and Finland. In addition, PartyLite Australia sales increased 27% in local currency or 17% in U.S. dollars mainly due to growing consultant counts. PartyLite's European independent consultant count was over 30,000 at December 31, 2013 and at December 31, 2012.

Net sales in the Candles & Home Décor segment accounted for approximately 44% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to 35% in the prior year.

Net Sales – Health & Wellness Segment

Net sales for ViSalus decreased $272.3 million, or 44%, to $351.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $623.5 million in 2012. This decrease was attributed to a decline in North American promoters to approximately 35,000 at December 31, 2013 from approximately 76,000 at December 31, 2012. International promoters totaled nearly 2,500 at December 31, 2013 reflecting ViSalus's entry into the United Kingdom in April 2013. Net sales in the Health & Wellness segment represented approximately 40% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to 53% in the prior year.

Net Sales – Catalog & Internet Segment


38


Net sales for Silver Star Brands increased $4.8 million, or 3%, to $143.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $138.7 million in the prior year. This increase was primarily due to the improved performance of our health, wellness and beauty products as well as higher sales associated with the credit program. These increases were partly offset by lower general merchandise sales. Net sales in the Catalog & Internet segment accounted for approximately 16% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to 12% in the prior year.

Gross Profit and Operating Expenses

Blyth’s consolidated gross profit decreased $214.9 million, or 27%, to $572.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $787.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This decrease was principally due to the impact of lower sales. In addition, gross margin declined to 64.7% for the year ended December 31, 2013 from 66.8% for the prior year, principally due to a reduction at ViSalus partly offset by improvements at PartyLite and Silver Star Bands.
 
Blyth’s consolidated selling expenses decreased $128.4 million, or approximately 25%, to $388.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $516.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This decrease was primarily due to lower commission expenses at ViSalus and PartyLite associated with their sales declines. Selling expenses as a percentage of net sales remained constant at 43.8% when compared to the prior year.

Blyth’s consolidated administrative and other expenses decreased $21.5 million, or 12%, to $165.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $186.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This decline was principally due to charges at ViSalus in 2012, including equity incentive charges of $11.3 million and ViSalus's withdrawn stock offering fees of $4.7 million, as well as prior year charges at PartyLite associated with the realignment of the North American distribution center of $1.6 million. In addition, corporate expenses declined from the prior year due to cost saving initiatives as well as the elimination of executive and employee bonuses. Partly offsetting these declines was an increase at ViSalus related to its International expansion in Europe. Administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales increased to 18.6% for the year ended December 31, 2013 from 15.8% for the prior year principally due to lower sales.

Blyth’s consolidated operating profit decreased $64.9 million to $19.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $84.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.  This decrease was principally due to lower sales and operating profit at ViSalus offset by increases in operating profits at PartyLite and Silver Star Brands. In addition prior year's operating profit includes equity incentive charges of $11.3 million, fees of $4.7 million in connection with ViSalus's withdrawn stock offering, PartyLite's restructuring charges of $3.2 million associated with the realignment of the North American distribution center and Silver Star Brands' intangible impairment charge of $0.8 million.

Operating Profit – Candles & Home Décor Segment
 
Operating profit for PartyLite increased to $21.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $20.4 million for the prior year. Prior year profit includes restructuring charges of $3.2 million associated with the realignment of the North American distribution center. Corporate expenses charged to PartyLite were $5.9 million this year and $7.5 million last year.

Operating Profit (Loss) - Health & Wellness Segment

Operating loss for ViSalus was $1.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to a profit of $69.2 million for the prior year. This decrease was primarily due to ViSalus's sales decline in North America and, to a lesser extent, additional expenses to support their international expansion in Europe. ViSalus's prior year operating profit includes equity incentive charges of $11.3 million and fees of $4.7 million in connection with ViSalus's withdrawn stock offering. Corporate expenses charged to ViSalus were $8.9 million this year and $11.8 million last year.

 
Operating Loss – Catalog & Internet Segment

Operating loss for Silver Star Brands decreased to $0.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $5.0 million for the prior year. This improvement was principally due to the impact of increased sales. In addition, last year's loss includes an intangible impairment charge of $0.8 million. Corporate expense charged to Silver Star Brands were $2.0 million this year and $2.6 million last year.
 
Other Expense (Income)


39


Interest expense decreased $0.1 million to $6.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $6.1 million in the prior year. This decline was due to lower average outstanding debt this year versus last year offset by a make-whole interest charge of $1.2 million incurred in 2013 associated with the early retirement of the 5.50% senior notes settled in July 2013.
 
Interest income decreased $1.1 million to $0.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $1.7 million in the prior year, mainly due to lower invested average cash balances as well as prior year's interest income of $0.7 million received on a promissory note.

Foreign exchange and other income was $0.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $0.9 million in the prior year. This decline was due to this year's losses on the sale of investments of $0.3 million compared to last year's gain on the sale of investments of $1.0 million. Last year's foreign currency exchange rate gains were partly offset by a $1.9 million impairment on a promissory note in addition to other adjustments of $0.3 million, for a net write-down of $1.6 million recorded in Foreign exchange and other.

Income tax expense decreased $20.4 million to $11.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $31.6 million in the prior year.  This decrease was due primarily to a decrease in the pretax income. The effective tax rate was 76.5% in 2013 compared to 39.0% for 2012. The increase in the effective tax rate was due primarily to valuation allowances on certain foreign net operating losses, as well as the tax impact of a dividend received from ViSalus, a non-consolidated domestic subsidiary for tax purposes.

The net earnings from discontinued operations for the year ended December 31, 2012 was $7.7 million. The net earnings for the year ended December 31, 2012 include $5.5 million related to the gain on sale of Sterno as well as net operating earnings of $2.2 million from the business during the period January 1, 2012 through its disposition date in October 2012.

The net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests decreased $12.2 million to $1.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $13.2 million in the prior year. This decrease was mainly attributed to lower earnings associated with ViSalus.

Net earnings attributable to Blyth, Inc. decreased $41.6 million to $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from $44.0 million in the prior year.  This decrease was primarily attributable to ViSalus's decreased operating performance partly offset by improved operating results at Silver Star Brands.

Net earnings (loss) attributable to Blyth, Inc. common stockholders decreased $13.0 million to a loss of $3.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 from income of $10.0 million in the prior year. This decrease was primarily due to ViSalus's decreased operating performance in addition to a charge for accretion to redemption value for ViSalus redeemable preferred stock of $5.5 million. Included in prior year's earnings attributable to Blyth, Inc. was a $34.0 million charge for exchange of redeemable preferred stock in excess of fair value.

For the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the year ended December 31, 2011

Net Sales
 
Net sales increased $300.4 million, or approximately 34%, to $1,179.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $879.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 due to increases within the Health & Wellness segment.

Net Sales – Candles & Home Décor Segment

Net sales in the Candles & Home Décor segment decreased $78.4 million, or 16%, to $417.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $495.7 million in the comparable prior year. This decrease was mainly due to the decline in PartyLite’s European markets of 16% in U.S. dollars or 10% in local currency, principally due to lower sales in Germany, France and the United Kingdom. PartyLite’s active independent European sales consultant base decreased from approximately 34,000 at December 31, 2011 to approximately 30,000 at December 31, 2012. PartyLite Europe represented approximately 62% of PartyLite’s worldwide net sales for the year ended December 31, 2012 and the comparable prior year.

PartyLite’s U.S. sales decreased 19% from the prior year due to a decline in active independent sales consultants from approximately 19,000 at December 31, 2011 to approximately 15,000 at December 31, 2012, as well as fewer shows, resulting in less opportunity to promote our products and recruit new consultants.


40


Net sales in the Candles & Home Décor segment accounted for approximately 35% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to 57% in the comparable prior year.

Net Sales – Health & Wellness Segment

Net sales in the Health & Wellness segment increased $393.0 million, or 171%, to $623.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $230.5 million in the comparable prior year. This increase was attributed to ViSalus’s growth as a result of an increase in promoters to approximately 76,000 at December 31, 2012 from approximately 59,000 at December 31, 2011, as well as increased demand for its products. Net sales in the Health & Wellness segment represented approximately 53% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to 26% in the comparable prior year.

Net Sales – Catalog & Internet Segment

Net sales in the Catalog & Internet segment decreased $14.2 million, or 9%, to $138.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $152.9 million in the comparable prior year. This decrease was due to soft demand for general merchandise products as well as a planned reduction in circulation for general merchandise catalogs, partly offset by an increase in sales and circulation for health and wellness products. Net sales in the Catalog & Internet segment accounted for approximately 12% of total Blyth net sales for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to 17% in the comparable prior year.

Gross Profit and Operating Expenses

Blyth’s consolidated gross profit increased $221.3 million, or 39%, to $787.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $566.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase was principally due to an increase in ViSalus's gross profit due to higher sales volume partly offset by a decline for PartyLite due to lower sales and restructuring charges associated with the realignment of the PartyLite North American distribution center of $1.6 million and lower gross profits at Silver Star Brands due to lower sales. The gross profit margin increased to 66.8% for the year ended December 31, 2012 from 64.4% for the year ended December 31, 2011 principally due to higher sales volume in ViSalus, which carries a higher gross margin than our other businesses.
 
Blyth’s consolidated selling expense increased $132.8 million, or approximately 35%, to $516.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $383.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.  This increase was primarily due to higher commission expense at ViSalus associated with higher sales, partially offset by a decline at PartyLite principally due to lower sales.  Selling expense as a percentage of net sales increased to 43.8% for the year ended December 31, 2012 from 43.6% for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Blyth’s consolidated administrative expenses increased $36.1 million, or 24%, to $186.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $150.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase was principally due to additional employee expenses at ViSalus of $23.3 million, credit card fees of $6.1 million associated with ViSalus's sales growth, fees incurred by ViSalus for their withdrawn stock offering of $4.7 million and PartyLite restructuring charges associated with the realignment of the North American distribution center of $1.6 million. This was partly offset by lower equity incentive charges of $11.3 million incurred this year versus $27.1 million last year and by lower headcount at PartyLite. Administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales decreased to 15.8% for the year ended December 31, 2012 from 17.1% for the comparable prior year.

Blyth’s consolidated operating profit increased $52.4 million to $84.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $32.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.  This increase was mainly due to the aforementioned sales increase at ViSalus and lower equity incentive charges, partially offset by costs incurred by ViSalus for their withdrawn stock offering of $4.7 million and lower sales and operating profit within PartyLite.

Operating Profit – Candles & Home Décor Segment
 
Operating profit in the Candles & Home Décor segment decreased to $20.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $30.3 million for the comparable prior year principally due to lower sales. Earnings include restructuring charges of $3.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 and $3.0 million for the comparable prior year. Corporate expenses and other allocated costs to the Candles & Home Décor Selling segment were $7.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 and $11.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Operating Profit - Health & Wellness Segment


41


Operating profit in the Health & Wellness segment increased to $69.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $2.6 million for the comparable prior year. This improvement was primarily due to ViSalus's significantly higher sales partially offset by costs incurred by ViSalus for their withdrawn stock offering fees of $4.7 million and reduced equity incentive charges of $11.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 and $27.1 million for the comparable prior year. Corporate expenses and other allocated costs to the Health & Wellness segment were $11.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 and $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.
 
Operating Loss – Catalog & Internet Segment

Operating loss in the Catalog & Internet segment increased to $5.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $0.6 million for the comparable prior year. This increased loss was primarily due to lower sales and an impairment charge of $0.8 million. Partly offsetting this loss were lower overhead costs resulting from cost management programs. Corporate expense and other allocated costs to the Catalog & Internet segment were $2.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 and $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.
 
Other Expense (Income)

Interest expense decreased $0.4 million to $6.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $6.5 million in the comparable prior year. This decline was due to lower average outstanding debt this year versus last year, primarily related to repurchases of our Senior Notes.
 
Interest income increased $0.3 million to $1.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $1.4 million in the comparable prior year, mainly due to interest income received of $0.7 million on a promissory note and higher interest rates on invested cash balances.

Foreign exchange and other income was $0.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to a loss of $1.5 million in the comparable prior year. This increase was mainly due to this year's foreign currency exchange rate gains partly offset by a $1.9 million impairment on a promissory note in addition to other adjustments of $0.3 million, for a net write-down of $1.6 million recorded in Foreign exchange and other compared to a prior year loss on impairment of an auction rate security investment of $1.3 million.

Income tax expense increased $25.1 million to $31.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $6.5 million in the comparable prior year.  The increase in income tax expense was due primarily to an increase in the pretax income in the United States and a valuation allowance recorded against various foreign losses, as well as a $2.3 million benefit recorded in the prior year as a result of the closure of income tax audits and a $2.3 million beneficial tax impact of the release of a valuation allowance previously recorded against a federal net operating loss carryforward also recorded in the prior year. The effective tax rate was 39.0% in 2012 compared to 25.4% for 2011. The increase in the effective tax rate was due primarily to no tax benefit being realized on certain foreign net operating losses as well as the tax impact of a dividend received from a non-consolidated domestic subsidiary. The decrease in the effective rate for 2011 was primarily due to a $2.3 million tax benefit recorded in the current year as a result of a favorable closure of audits previously accrued for and a tax benefit of $2.3 million recorded as the result of a valuation allowance release related to a federal net operating loss carryforward.

The net earnings from discontinued operations increased $13.9 million to $7.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from a loss of $6.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The net earnings for the year ended December 31, 2012 include $5.5 million related to the gain on sale of Sterno as well as net operating earnings of $2.2 million from the business during the period January 1, 2012 through its disposition date. The net loss for the year ended December 31, 2011 includes $2.5 million related to the loss on sale of Midwest-CBK.

The net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests increased $14.0 million to $13.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from a loss of $0.8 million in the comparable prior year. This increase was due to higher earnings associated with ViSalus partly offset by a decrease in the ownership of the noncontrolling stockholders.

Net earnings increased $30.2 million to $44.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $13.8 million in the comparable prior year.  The increase was primarily attributable to ViSalus's improved operating performance and gain on sale of Sterno, partly offset by lower operating results from PartyLite and Silver Star Brands.

Seasonality


42


Our businesses are seasonal in nature and, as a result, the net sales and working capital requirements of our businesses fluctuate from quarter to quarter. Our Candles & Home Décor and Catalog & Internet businesses tend to achieve their strongest sales in the third and fourth quarters due to increased shipments to meet year-end holiday season demand for our products. The customers of our Health & Wellness business tend to place a lower number of orders in the summer months and toward the end of the year. Our Health & Wellness business may also experience a slight increase in sales during the first two quarters of the year due to the increased focus many people place on weight loss during the post-holiday and pre-summer period.We expect the seasonality of our businesses to continue in the future, which may cause period-to-period fluctuations in certain of our operating results and limit our ability to predict our future results accurately.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash and cash equivalents decreased $14.3 million to $114.8 million at December 31, 2013 from $129.1 million at December 31, 2012. This decrease in cash was primarily attributed to the early retirement in July 2013 of our 5.50% Senior Notes due November 1, 2013, the January 2013 payment to ViSalus's equity incentive plan participants, purchases of investments, capital expenditures and purchases of treasury stock. These payments were partly offset by new borrowings on long term debt, proceeds from sale of investments and the collection of a note receivable as well as positive cash flow from operations. Cash held in foreign locations was approximately $58 million and $68 million as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

We typically generate positive cash flow from operations due to favorable gross margins and the variable nature of selling expenses, which constitute a significant percentage of operating expenses. We generated $32.4 million in cash from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to $54.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Cash from continuing operations reflects a decline mainly due to ViSalus's decreased operating profits partly offset by lower working capital requirements mainly in inventories.  Included in earnings for the year ended December 31, 2013 were non-cash charges for depreciation and amortization of $13.0 million and stock-based compensation of $1.7 million.
 
Net cash provided by investing activities was $19.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $9.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Cash provided by investing activities included the collection of a note receivable of $10.0 million and net proceeds from the sales and purchases of investments of $23.6 million offset by capital expenditures of $12.4 million. Cash provided by investing activities in the prior year reflects proceeds from the sale of Sterno of $23.5 million and net proceeds from the sales and purchases of investments of $6.2 million partly offset by capital expenditures of $19.4 million.

Net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $67.5 million compared to $133.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This year's activity includes repayments on long-term debt of $72.4 million mainly due to the early retirement of our 5.50% Senior Notes, treasury stock repurchases of $10.0 million and payments to ViSalus's equity incentive plan participants of $25.3 million partly offset by borrowing on long term debt of $50.0 million. Last year's cash used in financing activities primarily reflected the additional purchase of ViSalus interest of $89.2 million, repayments on long term debt of $21.7 million and treasury stock repurchases of $13.4 million.

We will continue to monitor carefully our cash position, and will only make additional repurchases of treasury shares or pay dividends when we have sufficient cash surpluses available and are permitted to do so under the terms of the indenture governing our 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017. The indenture limits the dividends that we pay on our common stock, repurchases of our outstanding common stock, repurchases of ViSalus plan shares and other restricted payments to an amount not exceeding the sum of 50% of our net income on a cumulative basis from July 1, 2013 (the first day of the fiscal quarter beginning after we issued the 6.00% Senior Notes) until the last day of the fiscal quarter preceding any such restricted payments (provided that if we shall have a cumulative net loss, then 100% of such loss), the net cash proceeds from issuances of common stock and other items, subject to conditions, qualifications and exceptions set forth in the indenture. The indenture also restricts us from incurring additional debt if we do not meet a liquidity ratio. In October 2013, the indenture specifically permitted us to pay a cash dividend of $0.10 per share on our common stock. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we paid $3.2 million in dividends, compared to $3.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.

A significant portion of our business is outside of the United States. A significant downturn in our business in our international markets would adversely impact our ability to generate operating cash flows. Operating cash flows would also be negatively impacted if we experienced difficulties in the recruitment, retention and our ability to maintain the productivity of our independent consultants and promoters. PartyLite has had several continuous years of decline in the United States and Canada. ViSalus had over 37,000 promoters at December 31, 2013, which represented a decline from over 52,000 promoters at September 30, 2013 and from over 76,000 at December 31, 2012. ViSalus has experienced a decline in its number of promoters since the summer of 2012. Management's key areas of focus have included stabilizing and increasing the consultant and promoter base within PartyLite and ViSalus through training and promotional incentives. While we are making efforts to

43


stabilize and increase the number of active independent sales consultants and promoters within PartyLite and ViSalus and expand our ViSalus business internationally, it may be difficult to do so. If PartyLite's consultant count and ViSalus's promoters continue to decline it will have a negative impact on our liquidity and financial results.

In December 2012, we purchased an additional 8.2% of ViSalus which increased our ownership to 80.9% for a payment of $60.5 million to the ViSalus founders and its other noncontrolling members. In addition, the ViSalus founders and other members of ViSalus exchanged their remaining membership interests for a total of 8,955,730 shares of Series A and Series B Redeemable Preferred Stock of ViSalus Inc. (“Preferred Stock”), which will become redeemable on December 31, 2017 for a total redemption price of $143.2 million. The Preferred Stock is redeemable for cash on December 31, 2017 at a price per share equal to $15.99 unless prior thereto ViSalus shall have effected a “Qualified IPO” or the holders, at their option, elect to convert their Preferred Stock into common shares.
 
On October 20, 2003, we issued $100.0 million of 5.50% Senior Notes due on November 1, 2013. On July 10, 2013 these notes were settled for a total of $73.7 million which included make-whole interest expense of $1.2 million. We recorded this loss on extinguishment of this debt associated with the early retirement of this obligation as interest expense in our third quarter.

On May 10, 2013, we issued $50.0 million principal amount of 6.00% Senior Notes due June 30, 2017. The notes bear interest
payable semi-annually in arrears on May 15 and November 15. Proceeds from this issuance, together with available funds, were
used in July 2013 to retire the outstanding $71.8 million of 5.50% Senior Notes due November 1, 2013 on July 10, 2013. The
indenture governing the 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017 contains affirmative and negative covenants that, among other things,
limit or restrict our and our subsidiaries' ability to incur additional debt, grant negative pledges to other creditors, prepay subordinated indebtedness and certain other indebtedness, pay dividends or make other distributions on capital stock, redeem or repurchase preferred and capital stock, make loans, investments and other restricted payments, engage in acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, sell assets, create liens on assets to secure debt, or effect a consolidation or merger or to sell all, or substantially all, of our assets, in each case, subject to certain qualifications and exceptions set forth in the indenture.

A portion of our cash and cash equivalents is held by our international subsidiaries in foreign banks and, as such, may be subject to foreign taxes, unfavorable exchange rate fluctuations and other factors, including foreign working capital requirements, limiting our ability to repatriate funds to the United States.

In addition, if economic conditions decline, we may be subject to future impairments of our assets, including accounts receivable, inventories, property, plant and equipment, investments, deferred tax assets, goodwill and other intangibles, if the valuations of these assets or businesses decline.

As of December 31, 2013, we had $2.4 million available under an uncommitted facility issued by a bank, to be used for letters of credit through January 31, 2015.  As of December 31, 2013, no amount was outstanding under this facility.

As of December 31, 2013, we had $1.1 million in standby letters of credit outstanding that are fully collateralized through a certificate of deposit funded by us.

As of December 31, 2013 and 2012, Silver Star Brands had approximately $5.5 million and $6.2 million, respectively, of long-term debt outstanding under a real estate mortgage note payable which matures June 1, 2020.  Under the terms of the note, payments of principal and interest are required monthly at a fixed interest rate of 7.89%.


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The following table summarizes the maturity dates of our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2013:
 
Payments Due by Period
Contractual Obligations (In thousands)
Total
 
Less than 1 year
 
1 - 3 Years
 
4 - 5 Years
 
More than 5 Years
  Long-Term Debt(1)
$
55,529

 
$
678

 
$
1,527

 
$
51,787

 
$
1,537

  Capital Leases(2)
689

 
253

 
244

 
192

 

  Interest(3)
12,141

 
3,444

 
6,692

 
1,907

 
98

  Purchase Obligations(4)
45,901

 
42,158

 
2,387

 
1,356

 

Operating Leases
28,618

 
9,088

 
11,356

 
5,434

 
2,740

  Redeemable Preferred Stock(5)
143,200

 

 

 
143,200

 

  Unrecognized Tax Benefits(6)
4,035

 

 

 

 

Total Contractual Obligations
$
290,113

 
$
55,621

 
$
22,206

 
$
203,876

 
$
4,375

(1) Long-term debt includes 6.00% Senior Notes due 2017 and a mortgage note payable maturing June 1, 2020 (See Note 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).
(2) Amounts represent future lease payments, excluding interest, due on eleven capital leases, which end between 2014 and 2019 (See Note 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).
(3) Interest expense on long-term debt is comprised of $10.5 million relating to Senior Notes, $1.6 million in mortgage interest, and approximately $85,000 of interest relating to future capital lease obligations.
(4) Purchase obligations consist primarily of open purchase orders for inventory.
(5) Redeemable preferred stock due December 31, 2017 at $15.99 per share for a total redemption price of $143.2 million (See Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).
(6) There are no unrecognized tax benefits expected to be realized within the next 12 months and $4.0 million for which we are not able to reasonably estimate the timing of the potential future payments (See Note 15 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).
 
On December 13, 2007, our Board of Directors authorized a new stock repurchase program for 3,000,000 shares in addition to 6,000,000 shares authorized under the previous plan. The new stock repurchase program became effective after we exhausted the authorized amount under the old repurchase program.  We repurchased approximately 595,000 shares during the year ended December 31, 2013. As of December 31, 2013, the cumulative total shares purchased under the new and old program was 7,994,422, at a total cost of approximately $275.0 million. The acquired shares are held as common stock in treasury at cost.

During the year ended December 31, 2013 we paid $3.2 million in dividends compared to $3.0 million in 2012. On March 12, 2014 the Board of Directors authorized and declared a cash dividend of $0.05 per share for a total dividend payment of $0.8 million. The dividend is payable to shareholders of record as of April 1, 2014 and will be paid on April 15, 2014.

We do not maintain any off-balance sheet arrangements, transactions, obligations or other relationships with unconsolidated entities that would be expected to a have a material current or future effect upon our financial statements. We utilize foreign exchange forward contracts for operational purposes.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.  The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.  On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, sales adjustments, inventories, income taxes, restructuring and impairments, contingencies and litigation.  We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.  Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

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Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements includes a summary of the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. The following are our critical accounting policies and methods.

Revenue Recognition

Revenues consist of sales to customers, net of returns and allowances.  We recognize revenue upon delivery, when both title and risk of loss are transferred to the customer. We present revenues net of any taxes collected from customers and remitted to government authorities. We also record revenue on financing fees from past due balances from financing receivables within our Catalog and Internet segment.

Generally, our sales are based on fixed prices from published price lists.  We record estimated reductions to revenue for customer promotions, volume incentives and other promotions.  Should market conditions decline, we may increase customer incentives with respect to future sales.  We also record reductions to revenue based primarily on historical experience, for estimated customer returns and chargebacks that may arise as a result of shipping errors, product damage in transit or for other reasons that can only become known subsequent to recognizing the revenue.  If the amount of actual customer returns and chargebacks were to increase significantly from the estimated amount, revisions to the estimated allowance would be required.  In some instances, we receive payment in advance of product delivery.  Such advance payments occur primarily in our direct selling and direct marketing channels and are recorded as deferred revenue in Accrued expenses in the Consolidated Balance Sheets.  Upon delivery of product for which advance payment has been made, the related deferred revenue is reversed and recorded as revenue.

We establish an allowance for doubtful accounts for customer receivables.  The allowance is determined based on our evaluation of specific customers’ ability to pay, aging of receivables, historical experience and the current economic environment. We believe we are adequately reserved for expected credit losses and will continue to take actions to reduce our exposure to credit losses. While we believe we have appropriately considered known or expected outcomes, our customers’ ability to pay their obligations, including those to us, could be adversely affected by declining retail sales resulting from such factors as contraction in the economy or a general decline in consumer spending.

The sales price for our products sold is fixed prior to the time of shipment to the customer.  Customers do not have the right to return product, except for rights to return that we believe are typical of our industry for such reasons as damaged goods, shipping errors or similar occurrences.

Financing Receivables

During 2012, Silver Star Brands entered into an agreement with a financial services company, to offer financing services, including originating, collecting, and servicing customer receivables related to the purchase of Silver Star Brands products through a private credit financing program. New financing originations, which represent the amounts of financing provided by the service provider to customers, were approximately $17.3 million and $3.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. As of December 31, 2013 and 2012, our net financing receivables balances were $5.6 million and $1.7 million, respectively. This balance is recorded in accounts receivable in the Consolidated Balance Sheets and includes income from financing fees which represents income from interest earned on outstanding balances and late fees.

We maintain an allowance to cover expected financing receivable credit losses and evaluate credit loss expectations based on our total portfolio. The allowance for credit losses is determined based on various factors, including historical and anticipated experience, past due receivables, receivable type, and customer risk profile. Accounts become past due and accrue interest 30 days after the first initial billing cycle when a payment due date is missed or only a partial payment is received. As of December 31, 2013 and 2012, the allowance for credit losses was $3.0 million and $0.7 million, respectively. Provisions for the allowance of credit losses are recorded to selling expenses within the Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Loss). We continue to monitor broader economic indicators and their potential impact on future loss performance. We have an extensive process to manage our exposure to customer credit risk, including active management of credit lines and our collection activities. Based on our assessment of the customer financing receivables, we believe that we are adequately reserved. Write-offs recorded to date related to 2013 and 2012 sales were 9.4% and 20.5% of 2013 and 2012 sales, respectively. Our policy is to write-off financing receivables greater than 180 days past due with no collection activity and no receivable is placed on non-accrual status until it is written off. All write-offs are submitted to a third party collection agency.

See Note 5 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in “Part II — Item 8 — Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” for additional information about our financing receivables and the associated allowance.

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Inventory valuation

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market.  Cost is determined by the first-in, first-out method.  We write down our inventory for estimated obsolete, excess and unmarketable inventory by an amount equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the estimated market value based upon assumptions about future demand, market conditions, customer programs and sales forecasts.  If market acceptance of our existing products or the successful introduction of new products should significantly decrease, additional inventory write-downs could be required.  Potential additional inventory write-downs could result from unanticipated additional quantities of obsolete finished goods and raw materials, and/or from lower disposition values offered by the parties who normally purchase surplus inventories.

Restructuring and impairment charges on long-lived assets

In response to changing market conditions and competition, our management regularly updates our business model and market strategies, including the evaluation of facilities, personnel and products. Future adverse changes in economic and market conditions could result in additional organizational changes and possibly additional restructuring and impairment charges. Historically, we have reviewed long-lived assets, including property, plant and equipment and other intangibles with definite lives for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicated that the carrying amount of such an asset might not be recoverable.  Management determines whether there has been an impairment on long-lived assets held for use in the business by comparing anticipated undiscounted future cash flow from the use and eventual disposition of the asset or asset group to the carrying value of the asset.  For assets whose aggregate undiscounted cash flows are less than its carrying value, the assets are considered potentially impaired and actual impairments, if any, would be determined to the extent the assets carrying value exceeds its aggregate fair value. Long-lived assets that meet the definition of held for sale are valued at the lower of carrying amount or net realizable value. Assets or asset groups are determined at the lowest level possible for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities.

Goodwill

We had approximately $2.3 million of goodwill as of December 31, 2013 and 2012.  Goodwill is subject to an assessment for impairment using a two-step fair value-based test, which is performed at least annually or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate that goodwill might be impaired.

The following circumstances could impact our cash flow and cause further impairments to reported goodwill:
unexpected increase in competition resulting in lower prices or lower volumes,
entry of new products into the marketplace from competitors,
lack of acceptance of our new products into the marketplace,
loss of a key employee or customer,
significantly higher raw material costs,
economic downturn, and
other micro/macroeconomic factors.

The December 31, 2013 impairment assessment of the remaining $2.3 million of the goodwill within the Candles & Home Décor Segment unit indicates that it is fully recoverable.

If actual revenue growth, profit margins, costs and capital spending should differ significantly from the assumptions included in our business outlook used in the cash flow models, the reporting unit’s fair value could fall significantly below expectations and additional impairment charges could be required to write down goodwill to its fair value and, if necessary, other long lived-assets could be subject to a similar fair value test and possible impairment. Long-lived assets represent primarily fixed assets and other long-term assets excluding goodwill and other intangibles.

Trade Names and Trademarks
 
Our trade name and trademark intangible assets relate to our acquisitions of Miles Kimball and Walter Drake (reported in the Catalog & Internet segment) and our acquisition of ViSalus beginning in October 2008 (reported in the Health & Wellness segment). We had approximately $8.6 million in trade names and trademarks as of December 31, 2013 and 2012.

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On an annual basis we perform our assessment of impairment for indefinite-lived intangible assets, or upon the occurrence of a triggering event.  We use the relief from royalty method to estimate the fair value for indefinite-lived intangible assets. The underlying concept of the relief from royalty method is that the inherent economic value of intangibles is directly related to the timing of future cash flows associated with the intangible asset. Similar to the income approach or discounted cash flow methodology used to determine the fair value of goodwill, the fair value of indefinite-lived intangible assets is equal to the present value of after-tax cash flows associated with the intangible asset based on an applicable royalty rate. The royalty rate is determined by using existing market comparables for royalty agreements using an intellectual property data base. The arms-length agreements generally support a rate that is a percentage of direct sales. This approach is based on the premise that the free cash flow is a more valid criterion for measuring value than “book” or accounting profits.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, the Exposures brand under the Silver Star Brands business, within the Catalog & Internet segment, experienced substantial declines in revenues when compared to its forecasts and prior years. The Company believes this shortfall in revenue was primarily attributable to decreased consumer spending, due to changes in the business environment and adverse economic conditions. As a result of the impairment analysis performed, the indefinite-lived trade name was determined to be partially impaired, as the fair value of this brand was less than its carrying value. Accordingly, the Company recorded a non-cash pre-tax impairment charge of $0.8 million to Administrative and other expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Loss) resulting in a carrying value of $0.6 million.

As of December 31, 2013, we performed our annual impairment analysis on the trade names and trademarks of the Catalog & Internet and ViSalus assets. The three primary assumptions used in the relief from royalty method are the discount rate, the perpetuity growth rate and the royalty rate. This discount rate is used to value the expected net cash flows to be derived from the royalty to its net present value. The discount rate uses a rate of return to account for the time value of money and an investment risk factor. The perpetuity growth rate estimates the businesses' sustainable long-term growth rate. The royalty rate is based upon past royalty performance as well as the expected royalty growth rate using both macro and microeconomic factors surrounding the business. A change in the discount rate is often used by management to risk adjust the discounted cash flow analysis if there is a higher degree of risk that the estimated cash flows from the indefinite-lived intangible asset may not be fully achieved. These risks are often based upon the business units’ past performance, competition, position in the marketplace, acceptance of new products in the marketplace and other macro and microeconomic factors surrounding the business. If, however, actual cash flows should fall significantly below expectations, this could result in an impairment of our indefinite-lived intangible assets.

If the discount rate had increased by 0.5% and royalty rate had decreased by 0.25%, the estimated fair value of the trade names and trademarks within the Catalog & Internet segment would have decreased by $2.0 million to $5.5 million. This decrease would have required us to take an impairment charge of $1.0 million to write-down our indefinite lived intangibles to its estimated fair value. Conversely, if the discount rate had decreased by 0.5% and the royalty rate had increased by 0.25%, the estimated fair value of the trade names and trademarks within the Catalog and Internet segment would have increased by $2.2 million, resulting in no impairment charge. There would have been no impact in the recorded value of the ViSalus trade names and trademarks within the Health & Wellness segment, if the same changes in discount and royalty rate assumptions had occurred as the value would have exceeded its recorded value by $13.6 million and $22.2 million, respectively.
 
Equity Incentive Compensation Expense

Our ViSalus subsidiary has recorded equity incentive compensation expense related to certain equity rights of unit holders that allow the settlement of these awards through a future cash payment. As a result, these awards are classified as a liability and are subject to fair value measurement in accordance with ASC section 718 on “Stock Compensation”. The Company recorded an expense of $11.3 million and $27.1 million in Administrative and other expense, respectively for the year ended December 31, 2012 and the eleven months ended December 31, 2011. In January 2013, the Company made a final payment of $25.3 million to certain equity rights and unit holders associated with the Company's acquisition of ViSalus.

On May 14, 2013, the Board of Directors of ViSalus, Inc. adopted the ViSalus, Inc. 2012 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “ViSalus Plan”), which allows the Board of Directors of ViSalus to grant nonqualified stock options, incentive stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units, dividend equivalents and performance compensation awards to employees and others of ViSalus and its affiliates. The objectives of the ViSalus Plan are to attract, retain and provide incentives to employees and others to promote the long-term success of the business. See Note 17 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Accounting for income taxes


48


As part of the process of preparing our Consolidated Financial Statements, we are required to estimate our actual current tax exposure (state, federal and foreign), together with assessing permanent and temporary differences resulting from differing bases and treatment of items for tax and accounting purposes, such as the carrying value of intangibles, deductibility of expenses, depreciation of property and equipment, and valuation of inventories. Temporary differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our Consolidated Balance Sheets. We must then assess the likelihood that our deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income. Actual results could differ from this assessment if sufficient taxable income is not generated in future periods. To the extent we determine the need to establish a valuation allowance or change the allowance in a period, we would include this as an expense within the tax provision in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Loss). Management periodically estimates our probable tax obligations using historical experience in tax jurisdictions and informed judgments. There are inherent uncertainties related to the interpretation of tax regulations in the jurisdictions in which we transact business. The judgments and estimates made at a point in time may change based on the outcome of tax audits, as well as changes to or further interpretations of regulations. If such changes take place, there is a risk that the tax rate may increase or decrease in any period. Amounts accrued for the tax uncertainties, primarily recorded in long-term liabilities, total $4.0 million and $2.7 million at December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Accruals relate to tax issues for U.S. federal, domestic state, and taxation of foreign earnings.

Blyth's historical policy has been to consider its unremitted foreign earnings as not indefinitely invested except for amounts deemed required for working capital and expansion needs and as such provide deferred income tax expense on these undistributed earnings. The Company periodically reassesses whether the non-US subsidiaries will invest their undistributed earnings indefinitely.

As of December 31, 2013, we determined that $215.0 million of cumulative undistributed foreign earnings were not reinvested indefinitely by our non-U.S. subsidiaries. For the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, we repatriated $38 million and $50 million respectively. As a result, $0.2 million of a reduction to deferred taxes was recorded in the current year as an increase to our Net earnings on those unremitted earnings.
 
Due to the various jurisdictions in which the Company files tax returns and the uncertainty regarding the timing of the settlement of tax audits, it is possible that there could be other significant changes in the amount of unrecognized tax benefits in the year ended December 31, 2013 but the amount cannot be estimated.



49


Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Market Risk

We have operations outside of the United States and sell our products worldwide.  Our activities expose us to a variety of market risks, including the effects of changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and commodity prices. These financial exposures are actively monitored and, where considered appropriate, managed by us. We enter into contracts, with the intention of limiting these risks, with only those counterparties that we deem to be creditworthy, and also in order to mitigate our non-performance risk. International sales represented 42% of total sales for the year ended December 31, 2013.

Investment Risk

We are subject to investment risks on our investments due to market volatility.  As of December 31, 2013, we held $8.0 million of short-term bond mutual funds, which have been adjusted to fair value based on current market data.
 
Foreign Currency Risk
 
We use foreign exchange forward contracts to hedge the impact of foreign currency fluctuations on foreign denominated inventory purchases, net assets of our foreign operations, intercompany payables and certain foreign denominated loans. We do not hold or issue derivative financial instruments for trading purposes.

We have hedged the net assets of certain of our foreign operations through foreign currency forward contracts. The realized and unrealized gains/losses on these hedges are recorded within AOCI until the investment is sold or disposed of. The cumulative net after-tax gain related to net investment hedges in AOCI as of December 31, 2013 and 2012 was $2.3 million and $3.9 million, respectively.

We have designated our foreign currency forward contracts related to certain foreign denominated loans and intercompany payables as fair value hedges.  The gains or losses on the fair value hedges are recognized into earnings and generally offset the transaction gains or losses in the foreign denominated loans that they are intended to hedge.

We have designated forward exchange contracts on forecasted intercompany inventory purchases and future purchase commitments as cash flow hedges and as long as the hedge remains effective and the underlying transaction remains probable, the effective portion of the changes in the fair value of these contracts will be recorded in AOCI until earnings are affected by the variability of the cash flows being hedged. Upon settlement of each commitment, the underlying forward contract is closed and the corresponding gain or loss is transferred from AOCI and is included in the measurement of the cost of the acquired asset upon sale.  If a hedging instrument is sold or terminated prior to maturity, gains and losses are deferred in AOCI until the hedged item is settled.  However, if the hedged item is probable of not occurring, the resultant gain or loss on the terminated hedge is recognized into earnings immediately.  The net after-tax unrealized loss included in AOCI at December 31, 2013 for cash flow hedges is $0.1 million and is expected to be transferred into earnings within the next twelve months upon settlement of the underlying commitment. The net after-tax loss included in AOCI at December 31, 2012 for cash flow hedges was $0.1 million.
  
For consolidated financial statement presentation, net cash flows from such hedges are classified in the categories of the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows with the items being hedged.

The following table provides information about our foreign exchange forward contracts accounted for as cash flow hedges as of December 31, 2013:
(In thousands, except average contract rate)
US Dollar Notional Amount
 
Average Contract Rate
 
Unrealized Loss
Euro
$
7,000

 
$
1.35

 
$
(170
)
 
The foreign exchange contracts outstanding have maturity dates through November 2014.
 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Blyth, Inc. and subsidiaries

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Blyth, Inc. and subsidiaries (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, the related consolidated statements of earnings (loss), comprehensive income, stockholders' equity, and cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the eleven month period ended December 31, 2011. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed at Item 15(a)(2). These financial statements and schedules are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company at December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 and the eleven month period December 31, 2011, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (1992 framework) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated March 14, 2014 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.


/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
    
Stamford, Connecticut
March 14, 2014


51


                                                 BLYTH, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
                                             Consolidated Balance Sheets
 
 
 
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
ASSETS
 
 

Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
114,847

 
$
129,056

Short-term investments
7,985

 
32,073

Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful receivables $3,932 and $1,274, respectively
12,704

 
9,187

Inventories
75,795

 
90,952

Prepaid assets
18,630

 
18,309

Deferred income taxes
2,198

 
14,305

Other current assets
7,649

 
27,722

Total current assets
239,808

 
321,604

Property, plant and equipment, at cost:
 

 
 

Land and buildings
89,575

 
87,583

Leasehold improvements
12,600

 
9,916

Machinery and equipment
79,479

 
76,028

Office furniture, data processing equipment and software
67,837

 
57,593

Construction in progress
1,848

 
7,070

 
251,339

 
238,190

Less accumulated depreciation
155,911

 
145,082

 
95,428

 
93,108

Other assets:
 

 
 

Investments
2,246

 
2,141

Goodwill
2,298

 
2,298

Other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $15,186 and $14,573, respectively
8,808

 
9,393

Deferred income taxes
10,425

 

Other assets
7,764

 
6,379

Total other assets
31,541

 
20,211

Total assets
$
366,777

 
$
434,923

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
 

 
 

Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Current maturities of long-term debt
$
952

 
$
72,532

Accounts payable
33,197

 
32,519

Accrued expenses
58,917

 
95,284

Income taxes payable
779

 
959

Deferred income taxes
585

 

Other current liabilities
9,603

 
8,132

Total current liabilities
104,033

 
209,426

Deferred income taxes

 
1,951

Long-term debt, less current maturities
55,326

 
5,658

Other liabilities
14,787

 
12,537

Commitments and contingencies

 

ViSalus redeemable preferred stock
146,603

 
146,547

Stockholders' equity:
 

 
 

Preferred stock - authorized 10,000,000 shares of $0.01 par value; no shares issued

 

Common stock - authorized 50,000,000 shares of $0.02 par value; issued 26,574,031 shares and 26,505,210 shares, respectively
532

 
530

Additional contributed capital
168,732

 
167,080

Retained earnings
312,036

 
318,299

Accumulated other comprehensive income
16,362

 
14,401

Treasury stock, at cost, 10,557,342 shares and 9,944,239 shares, respectively
(452,040
)
 
(441,774
)
Total stockholders' equity
45,622

 
58,536

Noncontrolling interest
406

 
268

Total equity
46,028

 
58,804

Total liabilities and equity
$
366,777

 
$
434,923


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 

52


BLYTH, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Consolidated Statements of Earnings (Loss)
 
For the year ended
 
For the year ended
 
For the eleven months ended
(In thousands, except per share data)
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
 
 
 

 

Net sales
$
885,450

 
$
1,179,514

 
$
827,612

Cost of goods sold
312,859

 
391,994

 
291,826

Gross profit
572,591

 
787,520

 
535,786

Selling
387,960

 
516,419

 
361,314

Administrative and other expense
164,980

 
186,535

 
142,350

Total operating expense
552,940

 
702,954

 
503,664

Operating profit
19,651

 
84,566

 
32,122

Other expense (income):
 

 
 

 
 

Interest expense
6,042

 
6,057

 
5,705

Interest income
(635
)
 
(1,724
)
 
(1,301
)
Foreign exchange and other, net
(386
)
 
(909
)
 
200

Total other expense
5,021

 
3,424

 
4,604

Earnings from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interest
14,630

 
81,142

 
27,518

Income tax expense
11,194

 
31,635

 
7,360

Earnings from continuing operations
3,436

 
49,507

 
20,158

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income tax expense of $1,474 and benefit of $1,140, respectively

 
2,197

 
(2,445
)
Earnings (loss) on sale of discontinued operations, net of income tax expense of $3,065 and benefit of $1,324, respectively

 
5,540

 
(2,458
)
Net earnings
3,436

 
57,244

 
15,255

Less: Net earnings (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
1,003

 
13,242

 
(971
)
Net earnings attributable to Blyth, Inc.
2,433

 
44,002

 
16,226

Less: Exchange of redeemable preferred stock in excess of fair value

 
(33,956
)
 

Less: Accretion to redemption value for ViSalus redeemable preferred stock
(5,471
)
 

 

Net earnings (loss) attributable to Blyth, Inc. common stockholders
$
(3,038
)
 
$
10,046

 
$
16,226

Basic earnings per share: (a)
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings (loss) from continuing operations
$
(0.19
)
 
$
0.13

 
$
1.28

Net earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
0.45

 
(0.30
)
Net earnings (loss) attributable per share of Blyth, Inc. common stock
$
(0.19
)
 
$
0.58

 
$
0.98

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
16,196

 
17,180

 
16,546

Diluted earnings per share: (a)
 

 
 

 
 

Net earnings (loss) from continuing operations
$
(0.19
)
 
$
0.13

 
$
1.27

Net earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
0.45

 
(0.29
)
Net earnings (loss) attributable per share of Blyth, Inc. common stock
$
(0.19
)
 
$
0.58

 
$
0.98

Weighted average number of shares outstanding
16,196

 
17,247

 
16,656

Cash dividend declared per share
$
0.20

 
$
0.18

 
$
0.85

(a) Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share are determined on the Net earnings attributable to Blyth, Inc. less the Exchange of redeemable preferred stock in excess of fair value and Accretion to the redemption value for the ViSalus redeemable preferred stock after allocating attributable losses and dividends paid to ViSalus preferred stockholders in excess of fair value.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

53



BLYTH, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
 
For the year ended
 
For the year ended
 
For the eleven
months ended
(In thousands)
December 31, 2013
 
December 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
 Net earnings
$
3,436

 
$
57,244

 
$
15,255

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
1,914

 
3,451

 
(7,868
)
Net unrealized gain (loss) on certain investments
(169
)
 
202

 
707

Net unrealized gain (loss) on cash flow hedging instruments
(154
)
 
(490
)
 
504

Less: Reclassification adjustments for (gain) loss included in net income
370

 
(624
)
 
(583
)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
1,961

 
2,539

 
(7,240
)
Total comprehensive income, net of tax
5,397

 
59,783

 
8,015

Less: comprehensive (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
(1,003
)
 
(13,242
)
 
971

Comprehensive income attributable to Blyth, Inc.
$
4,394

 
$
46,541

 
$
8,986


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.


54


BLYTH, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity
 
 
 
Blyth, Inc.'s Stockholders
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(In thousands)
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Contributed
Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Total
Equity
 
Redeemable
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Redeemable Preferred Stock
Balance, January 31, 2011
$
512

 
$
146,356

 
$
511,108

 
$
19,102

 
$
(424,210
)
 
$
(2,103
)
 
$
250,765

 
$

 
$

Net earnings (loss) for the year
 

 
 

 
16,226

 
 

 
 

 
257

 
16,483

 
(1,228
)
 
 
Distribution to noncontrolling interest
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(167
)
 
(167
)
 
 

 
 
Reclass of Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest to Noncontrolling Interest
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
2,181

 
2,181

 
(2,181
)
 
 
Other comprehensive loss
 

 
 

 
 

 
(7,240
)
 
 

 
 

 
(7,240
)
 
 

 
 
Common stock issued in connection with long-term incentive plan
2

 
(2
)
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 

 
 

 
 
Stock-based compensation
 

 
1,436

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
1,436

 
 

 
 
Purchase of additional ViSalus interest
 
 
 
 
(2,160
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(2,160
)
 
 
 
 
Accretion of redeemable noncontrolling interest
 
 
 
 
(90,782
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(90,782
)
 
90,782

 
 
Dividends declared ($0.85 per share)
 

 
 

 
(14,043
)
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(14,043
)
 
 

 
 
Treasury stock purchases (1)
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(2,507
)
 
 

 
(2,507
)
 
 

 
 
Balance, December 31, 2011
$
514

 
$
147,790

 
$
420,349

 
$
11,862

 
$
(426,717
)
 
$
168

 
$
153,966

 
$
87,373

 
$

Net earnings for the year
 

 
 

 
44,002

 
 

 
 

 
281

 
44,283

 
12,890

 
71

Distribution to noncontrolling interest
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(181
)
 
(181
)
 
(5,998
)
 
 
Other comprehensive income
 

 
 

 
 

 
2,539

 
 

 
 

 
2,539

 
 

 
 
Stock-based compensation
2

 
4,676

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
4,678

 
 

 
 
Purchase of additional ViSalus interest
14

 
14,614

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
14,628

 
(96,661
)
 
 
Reversal of accretion of redeemable noncontrolling interest, net
 

 
 

 
(2,396
)
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(2,396
)
 
2,396

 
 
Issuance of redeemable preferred stock, net (2)
 
 
 
 
(140,644
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(140,644
)
 
 
 
146,476

Dividends declared ($0.18 per share)
 

 
 

 
(3,012
)
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
(3,012
)