10-K 1 kohls_10kx2013.htm 10-K Kohls_10K_2013

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
ý
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended February 1, 2014
or
¨
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934          
 
For the Transition period from ____________ to ___________                    
          
Commission file number 1-11084
 
KOHL’S CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Wisconsin
 
39-1630919
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
 
N56 W17000 Ridgewood Drive, Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin
 
53051
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (262) 703-7000
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $.01 Par Value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
 
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes    X        No            .
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes                No    X    .
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes    X        No            .
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulations S-T (232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes    X        No            .
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    X   .
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filer    X    Accelerated filer            Non-accelerated filer            (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company            
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes                No    X    .
At August 2, 2013, the aggregate market value of the voting stock of the Registrant held by stockholders who were not affiliates of the Registrant was approximately $11.7 billion (based upon the closing price of Registrant’s Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange on such date). At March 12, 2014, the Registrant had outstanding an aggregate of 208,557,520 shares of its Common Stock.
Documents Incorporated by Reference:
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Registrant’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 15, 2014 are incorporated into Parts II and III.



KOHL’S CORPORATION
INDEX
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
 
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
 
 
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
 
 
Item 15.
 
 
 
F-1




PART I

Item 1. Business
Kohl’s Corporation (the “Company” or “Kohl’s”) was organized in 1988 and is a Wisconsin corporation. As of February 1, 2014, we operated 1,158 family-focused, value-oriented department stores and a website (www.Kohls.com) that sell moderately priced exclusive and national brand apparel, footwear, accessories, beauty and home products. Our stores generally carry a consistent merchandise assortment with some differences attributable to regional preferences. Our website includes merchandise which is available in our stores, as well as merchandise which is available only on-line.
Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday closest to January 31st each year. Unless otherwise stated, references to years in this report relate to fiscal years rather than to calendar years. The following fiscal periods are presented in this report.
Fiscal Year
Ended
 
Number of
Weeks
2013
February 1, 2014
 
52
2012
February 2, 2013
 
53
2011
January 28, 2012
 
52
For discussion of our financial results, see Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”
Merchandise
Our merchandise mix by line of business and brand type over the last three years are reflected in the table below:
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Line of Business
 
 
 
 
 
Women’s
31
%
 
31
%
 
31
%
Men’s
19
%
 
19
%
 
19
%
Home
18
%
 
18
%
 
19
%
Children’s
13
%
 
13
%
 
13
%
Accessories
10
%
 
10
%
 
10
%
Footwear
9
%
 
9
%
 
8
%
Total
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brand
 
 
 
 
 
Private and Exclusive
52
%
 
52
%
 
50
%
National
48
%
 
48
%
 
50
%
Total
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
Our private brands generally are at lower price-points than our other brands. Most of our private brands are well-known established brands such as Apt. 9, Croft & Barrow, Jumping Beans, SO and Sonoma Life + Style. Exclusive brands generally are at higher price-points and are developed and marketed through agreements with nationally-recognized brands. Examples of our exclusive brands include Food Network, Jennifer Lopez, Marc Anthony, Rock & Republic and Simply Vera Vera Wang.
We frequently launch new brands in order to maintain freshness in our inventory assortment and drive customer traffic to our stores and website. In 2013, we launched an assortment of over 20 new national beauty and fragrance brands in over 250 stores and on-line. In Spring 2014, we plan to combine the magic of Disney, one of the most recognizable brands in the world, with our highly successful Jumping Beans brand. We also plan to launch the next designer in our limited-time DesigNation series. In Fall 2014, we expect to begin selling IZOD menswear and Juicy Couture.
Omni-Channel Shopping Experience
Practical, easy shopping is about convenience. It's about providing customers the options which allow them to shop when they want and from where they want.
At Kohl’s, in-store convenience includes a neighborhood location close to home, convenient parking, easily-accessible entry, knowledgeable and friendly associates, wide aisles, a functional store layout, shopping carts/strollers and fast, centralized

3


checkouts. Though our stores have fewer departments than traditional, full-line department stores, the physical layout of the store and our focus on strong in-stock positions in style, color and size is aimed at providing a convenient shopping experience for an increasingly time-starved customer.
On-line convenience begins with an easy-to-navigate, on-line shopping experience for the growing percentage of our customers that prefer shopping on-line. Kohls.com was launched in 2001 and has experienced substantial growth, growing at an annual growth rate of approximately 20% in 2013 and over 40% in 2012 and 2011. On-line sales, including shipping revenues, were $1.7 billion and accounted for approximately 9% of our total sales in 2013. Our website currently carries significantly more product offerings than our stores, with a primary focus on extended sizes, product line extensions, and web-exclusive product lines.
We also are expanding our ability to meet the ever-changing needs of an increasingly technologically-savvy customer. Our in-store kiosks allow customers to order items from our stores and have them shipped to their homes with no shipping charges. All of our stores are equipped with Wi-Fi. We continue to improve our digital and mobile sales platforms. During 2013, we shipped selected on-line orders from approximately 200 of our stores and expect to have this capability in approximately 500 stores by the end of 2014. We are also building the infrastructure which will allow our customers to order on-line and pick up from our stores.
Stores
As of year-end 2013, we operated 1,158 stores. We have stores in all 48 of the continental United States and Alaska. Our stores are located in every large and intermediate sized market in the United States. During 2013, we opened 12 new stores. In 2014, we expect to increase our store count to 1,163. Substantially all of our recent store openings have been "small" stores with less than 64,000 square feet of retail space.
Low-Cost Operating Structure
An important aspect of our pricing strategy and overall profitability is a culture focused on maintaining a low-cost structure. Critical elements of this low-cost structure are our unique store format, lean staffing levels, sophisticated management information systems and operating efficiencies which are the result of centralized buying, advertising and distribution.
We remain focused on providing the solid infrastructure needed to ensure consistent, low-cost execution. We proactively invest in distribution capacity and regional management to facilitate growth in new and existing markets as well as on-line. Our central merchandising organization tailors merchandise assortments to reflect regional climates and preferences. Technological systems and improvements support our low-cost culture by enhancing productivity and providing the information needed to make key merchandising decisions.
Distribution
We receive substantially all of our store merchandise at our nine retail distribution centers. A small amount of our merchandise is delivered directly to the stores by vendors or their distributors. The retail distribution centers, which are strategically located throughout the United Sates, ship merchandise to each store by contract carrier several times a week. We also operate four fulfillment centers that service our E-Commerce business. Some of our E-Commerce sales are shipped directly to our customers by third-party vendors.
See Item 2, “Properties,” for additional information about our distribution centers.
Employees
As of February 1, 2014, we employed approximately 137,000 associates, including approximately 31,000 full-time and 106,000 part-time associates. The number of associates varies during the year, peaking during the back-to-school and holiday seasons. None of our associates are represented by a collective bargaining unit. We believe our relations with our associates are very good.
Competition
The retail industry is highly competitive. Management considers style, quality and price to be the most significant competitive factors in the industry. Merchandise mix, brands, service, customer experience and convenience are also key competitive factors. Our primary competitors are traditional department stores, upscale mass merchandisers, off-price retailers, specialty stores and on-line only retailers. Our specific competitors vary from market to market.

4


Merchandise Vendors
We purchase merchandise from numerous domestic and foreign suppliers. We have Terms of Engagement requirements which set forth the basic minimum requirements all business partners must meet in order to do business with us. Our Terms of Engagement include provisions regarding laws and regulations, employment practices, ethical standards, environmental and legal requirements, communication, monitoring/compliance, record keeping, subcontracting and corrective action. Our expectation is that all business partners will comply with these Terms of Engagement and quickly remediate any deficiencies, if noted, in order to maintain our business relationship.
Approximately 30% of the merchandise we sell is sourced through a third-party purchasing agent. None of our vendors individually accounted for more than 5% of our net purchases during 2013. We have no significant long-term purchase commitments or arrangements with any of our suppliers, and believe that we are not dependent on any one supplier. We believe we have good working relationships with our suppliers.
Seasonality
Our business, like that of most retailers, is subject to seasonal influences. The majority of our sales and income are typically realized during the second half of each fiscal year. The back-to-school season extends from August through September and represents approximately 15% of our annual sales. Approximately 30% of our annual sales occur during the holiday season in the months of November and December. Because of the seasonality of our business, results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be achieved for the fiscal year. Revenues and costs associated with the opening of new stores may also affect our quarterly results.

Trademarks and Service Marks
The name “Kohl’s” is a registered service mark of one of our wholly-owned subsidiaries. We consider this mark and the accompanying name recognition to be valuable to our business. This subsidiary has over 200 additional registered trademarks, trade names and service marks, most of which are used in our private label program.
Available Information
Our corporate website is www.KohlsCorporation.com. Through the “Investor Relations” portion of this website, we make available, free of charge, our proxy statements, Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, SEC Forms 3, 4 and 5 and any amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material has been filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).
The following have also been posted on our website, under the caption “Investor Relations-Corporate Governance”:
Committee charters of our Board of Directors’ Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Governance & Nominating Committee
Report to Shareholders on Social Responsibility
Corporate Governance Guidelines
Code of Ethics
Any amendment to or waiver from the provisions of the Code of Ethics that is applicable to our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer or other key finance associates will be disclosed on the “Corporate Governance” portion of the website.
Information contained on our website is not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Paper copies of any of the materials listed above will be provided without charge to any shareholder submitting a written request to our Investor Relations Department at N56 W17000 Ridgewood Drive, Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53051 or via e-mail to Investor.Relations@Kohls.com.

Item 1A. Risk Factors
Forward-Looking Statements
This Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” made within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “believes,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “may,” “intends,” “will,” “should,” “expects” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. In addition, statements covering our future sales or financial performance and our plans, performance and other objectives, expectations or intentions are forward-looking statements, such as statements regarding our liquidity, debt service requirements, planned capital expenditures, future store openings, adequacy of capital resources and reserves and statements contained in the "2014 Outlook" section of Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. There are a number of important factors that could

5


cause our results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements including, among others, those risk factors described below. Forward-looking statements relate to the date made, and we undertake no obligations to update them.
Our sales, gross margin and operating results could be negatively impacted by a number of factors including, but not limited to those described below. Many of these risk factors are outside of our control. If we are not successful in managing these risks, they could have a negative impact on our sales, gross margin and/or operating results.
Declines in general economic conditions, consumer spending levels and other conditions could lead to reduced consumer demand for our merchandise.
Consumer spending habits, including spending for the merchandise that we sell, are affected by, among other things, prevailing economic conditions, levels of employment, salaries and wage rates, prevailing interest rates, housing costs, energy costs, income tax rates and policies, consumer confidence and consumer perception of economic conditions. In addition, consumer purchasing patterns may be influenced by consumers' disposable income, credit availability and debt levels.
Recent economic conditions have caused disruptions and significant volatility in financial markets, increased rates of default and bankruptcy and declining consumer and business confidence, which has led to decreased levels of consumer spending, particularly on discretionary items. A continued or incremental slowdown in the U.S. economy and the uncertain economic outlook could continue to adversely affect consumer spending habits resulting in lower net sales and profits than expected on a quarterly or annual basis. As all of our stores are located in the United States, we are especially susceptible to deteriorations in the U.S. economy.
Consumer confidence is also affected by the domestic and international political situation. The outbreak or escalation of war, or the occurrence of terrorist acts or other hostilities in or affecting the United States, could lead to a decrease in spending by consumers.
Actions by our competitors.
The retail business is highly competitive. We compete for customers, associates, locations, merchandise, services and other important aspects of our business with many other local, regional and national retailers. Those competitors, some of which have a greater market presence than Kohl's, include traditional store-based retailers, internet and catalog businesses and other forms of retail commerce. Unanticipated changes in the pricing and other practices of those competitors may adversely affect our performance.
Our inability to offer merchandise our customers want and failure to successfully manage our inventory levels.
Our business is dependent on our ability to anticipate fluctuations in consumer demand for a wide variety of merchandise. Failure to accurately predict constantly changing consumer tastes, preferences, spending patterns and other lifestyle decisions could create inventory imbalances and adversely affect our performance and long-term relationships with our customers. Additionally, failure to accurately predict changing consumer tastes may result in excess inventory, which could result in additional markdowns and adversely affect our operating results.
We may be unable to source merchandise in a timely and cost-effective manner.
Approximately 30% of the merchandise we sell is sourced through a third-party purchasing agent. The remaining merchandise is sourced from a wide variety of domestic and international vendors. Our ability to find qualified vendors and access products in a timely and efficient manner is a significant challenge which is typically even more difficult with respect to goods sourced outside the United States. Political or financial instability, trade restrictions, tariffs, currency exchange rates, transport capacity and costs and other factors relating to foreign trade, and the ability to access suitable merchandise on acceptable terms are beyond our control and could adversely impact our performance.
If any of our significant vendors were to become subject to bankruptcy, receivership or similar proceedings, we may be unable to arrange for alternate or replacement contracts, transactions or business relationships on terms as favorable as current terms, which could adversely affect our sales and operating results.
Failure of our vendors to adhere to our Terms of Engagement and applicable laws.
A substantial portion of our merchandise is sourced by our vendors and by us from outside of the United States.  We require all suppliers to comply with our Terms of Engagement for Kohl's Business Partners and all applicable local and national laws, rules and regulations pertaining to all aspects of factory operations in the jurisdictions they conduct business. From time to time, suppliers may not be in compliance with these standards or applicable laws. Significant or continuing noncompliance with such standards and laws by one or more suppliers could have a negative impact on our reputation and our results of operations.

6


Increases in the price of merchandise, raw materials, fuel and labor or their reduced availability could increase our cost of goods.
We could again experience inflation in our merchandise, raw materials, fuel and labor costs as we did during 2011. The cost of cotton, which is a key raw material in many of our products, had the most dramatic increase in 2011. The price and availability of cotton may fluctuate substantially, depending on a variety of factors, including demand, acreage devoted to cotton crops and crop yields, weather, supply conditions, transportation costs, energy prices, work stoppages, government regulation and government policy, economic climates, market speculation and other unpredictable factors. Fluctuations in the price and availability of fuel, labor and raw materials, such as cotton, could again affect our cost of goods and an inability to mitigate these cost increases, unless sufficiently offset with our pricing actions, might cause a decrease in our profitability; while any related pricing actions might cause a decline in our sales volume. Additionally, any decrease in the availability of raw materials could impair our ability to meet our production or purchasing requirements in a timely manner. Both the increased cost and lower availability of merchandise, raw materials, fuel and labor may also have an adverse impact on our cash and working capital needs as well as those of our suppliers.
Ineffective marketing.
We believe that differentiating Kohl's in the marketplace is critical to our success. We design our marketing programs to increase awareness of our brands, which we expect will create and maintain customer loyalty, increase the number of customers that shop our stores and website and increase our sales. If our marketing programs are not successful, our sales and profitability could be adversely affected.
Damage to the reputation of the Kohl's brand or our private and exclusive brands.
We believe the Kohl's brand name and many of our private and exclusive brand names are powerful sales and marketing tools and we devote significant resources to promoting and protecting them. We develop and promote private and exclusive brands that have generated national recognition. In some cases, the brands or the marketing of such brands are tied to or affiliated with well-known individuals. Damage to the reputations (whether or not justified) of our brand names or any affiliated individuals, could arise from product failures, litigation or various forms of adverse publicity, especially in social media outlets, and may generate negative customer sentiment, potentially resulting in a reduction in sales, earnings, and shareholder value.
Product safety concerns.
If our merchandise offerings do not meet applicable safety standards or our customers' expectations regarding safety, we could experience lost sales, experience increased costs and/or be exposed to legal and reputational risk. Events that give rise to actual, potential or perceived product safety concerns could expose us to government enforcement action and/or private litigation. Reputational damage caused by real or perceived product safety concerns, could have a negative impact on our sales.
Disruptions in our information systems.
The efficient operation of our business is dependent on our information systems. In particular, we rely on our information systems to effectively manage sales, distribution, merchandise planning and allocation functions. We also generate sales though the operations of our Kohls.com website. The failure of our information systems to perform as designed could disrupt our business and harm sales and profitability.
Weather conditions could adversely affect consumer shopping patterns.
Because a significant portion of our business is apparel and subject to weather conditions in our markets, our operating results may be adversely affected by severe or unexpected weather conditions. Frequent or unusually heavy snow, ice or rain storms; natural disasters such as earthquakes, tornadoes, floods and hurricanes; or extended periods of unseasonable temperatures in our markets could adversely affect our performance by affecting consumer shopping patterns, diminishing demand for seasonal merchandise and/or causing physical damage to our properties.
Inability to successfully develop and maintain a relevant omni-channel experience for our customers.
Omni-channel retailing is rapidly evolving as our customers become increasingly technologically savvy. Computers, mobile phones, tablets and other similar devices are progressively becoming a more important aspect of the shopping experience. Additionally, the Internet and other new technologies facilitate competitive entry and comparison shopping. We strive to offer an omni-channel shopping experience for our customers and use social media as a way to interact with our customers and enhance their shopping experiences.
Our ability to compete with other retailers and to meet our customer expectations may suffer if we are unable to maintain or improve relevant customer-facing technology in a timely manner or if we or our third-party shipping and

7


delivery vendors are unable to effectively and efficiently fulfill and deliver orders, especially during the holiday season when sales volumes are especially high. Consequently, our results of operations could be adversely affected.
Our revenues, operating results and cash requirements are affected by the seasonal nature of our business.
Our business is subject to seasonal influences, with a major portion of sales and income historically realized during the second half of the fiscal year, which includes the back-to-school and holiday seasons. This seasonality causes our operating results and cash needs to vary considerably from quarter to quarter.
Growth in our E-Commerce business could adversely affect some of our operating metrics.
In recent years, we have experienced significant growth in our E-Commerce business. Some of this growth has resulted in lower sales in our stores. Though this has no impact on our consolidated sales, it has had a negative effect on our net income as a percentage of sales as our stores are currently more profitable than our E-Commerce business. This profitability variance is due to a variety of factors including, but not limited to, a higher mix of lower margin merchandise in our E-Commerce business, shipping costs, and investments to provide the infrastructure necessary to grow the E-Commerce business. Though we are aggressively working to improve the profitability of our E-Commerce business, there can be no assurances that our E-Commerce business will become as profitable as our stores.
Our inability to raise additional capital and maintain bank credit on favorable terms could adversely affect our business and financial condition.
We have historically relied on the public debt markets to raise capital to partially fund our operations and growth.  We have also historically maintained lines of credit with financial institutions.  Changes in the credit and capital markets, including market disruptions, limited liquidity and interest rate fluctuations, may increase the cost of financing or restrict our access to these potential sources of future liquidity.  Our continued access to these liquidity sources on favorable terms depends on multiple factors, including our operating performance and maintaining strong debt ratings. If our credit rating were lowered, our ability to access the debt markets and our cost of funds for new debt issuances could be adversely impacted. Additionally, if unfavorable capital market conditions exist if and when we were to seek additional financing, we may not be able to raise sufficient capital on favorable terms and on a timely basis (if at all).  If our access to capital were to become significantly constrained or costs of capital increased significantly due to lowered credit ratings, prevailing industry conditions, the volatility of the capital markets or other factors, then our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected.
Inefficient or ineffective allocation of capital could adversely affect our operating results and/or shareholder value.
Our goal is to invest capital to maximize our overall long-term returns. This includes spending on inventory, capital projects and expenses, managing debt levels, and periodically returning value to our shareholders through share repurchases and dividends. To a large degree, capital efficiency reflects how well we manage our other key risks. The actions taken to address other specific risks may affect how well we manage the more general risk of capital efficiency. If we do not properly allocate our capital to maximize returns, we may fail to produce optimal financial results and we may experience a reduction in shareholder value.
Changes in our credit card operations could adversely affect our sales and/or profitability.
Our credit card operations facilitate merchandise sales and generate additional revenue from fees related to extending credit. The proprietary Kohl's credit card accounts have been sold to an unrelated third-party, but we share in the net risk-adjusted revenue of the portfolio, which is defined as the sum of finance charges, late fees and other revenue less write-offs of uncollectible accounts. Changes in funding costs related to interest rate fluctuations will be shared similar to the revenue if interest rates exceed defined amounts. Though management currently believes that increases in funding costs will be largely offset by increases in finance charge revenue, increases in funding costs could adversely impact the profitability of this program.
Changes in credit card use, payment patterns and default rates may also result from a variety of economic, legal, social and other factors that we cannot control or predict with certainty. Changes that adversely impact our ability to extend credit and collect payments could negatively affect our results.
An inability to attract and retain quality employees could result in higher payroll costs and adversely affect our operating results.
Our performance is dependent on attracting and retaining a large number of quality associates. Many of those associates are in entry level or part-time positions with historically high rates of turnover. Our ability to meet our labor needs while controlling costs is subject to external factors such as unemployment levels, prevailing wage rates, minimum wage legislation and changing demographics. Changes that adversely impact our ability to attract and retain quality associates could adversely affect our performance.

8


Regulatory and litigation developments could adversely affect our business operations and financial performance.
Various aspects of our operations are subject to federal, state or local laws, rules and regulations, any of which may change from time to time. The costs and other effects of new or changed legal requirements cannot be determined with certainty. For example, new legislation or regulations may result in increased costs directly for our compliance or indirectly to the extent such requirements increase prices of goods and services, reduce the availability of raw materials or further restrict our ability to extend credit to our customers.
We continually monitor the state and federal legal/regulatory environment for developments that may impact us. Failure to detect changes and comply with such laws and regulations may result in an erosion of our reputation, disruption of business and/or loss of employee morale. Additionally, we are regularly involved in various litigation matters that arise out of the conduct of our business. Litigation or regulatory developments could adversely affect our business operations and financial performance.
Unauthorized disclosure of sensitive or confidential customer information could severely damage our reputation, expose us to risks of litigation and liability, disrupt our operations and harm our business.
As part of our normal course of business, we collect, process and retain sensitive and confidential customer, employee and company information. The protection of this data is extremely important to us, our employees and our customers. Despite the considerable security measures we have in place, our facilities and systems, and those of our third-party service providers, may be vulnerable to security breaches, acts of vandalism, computer viruses, misplaced or lost data, programming and/or human errors, or other similar events. Any security breach involving the misappropriation, loss or other unauthorized disclosure of confidential information, whether by us or our vendors, could disrupt our operations, damage our reputation and customers' willingness to shop in our stores or on our website, violate applicable laws, regulations, orders and agreements, and subject us to additional costs and liabilities which could be material.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Not applicable

Item 2. Properties
Stores
As of February 1, 2014, we operated 1,158 stores in 49 states. Our typical, or “prototype,” store has approximately 88,000 gross square feet of retail space and serves trade areas of 150,000 to 200,000 people. Most “small” stores are 55,000 to 68,000 gross square feet and serve trade areas of 100,000 to 150,000 people.
Our typical lease has an initial term of 20-25 years and four to eight renewal options for consecutive five-year extension terms. Substantially all of our leases provide for a minimum annual rent that is fixed or adjusts to set levels during the lease term, including renewals. Approximately one-fourth of the leases provide for additional rent based on a percentage of sales over designated levels.

9


The following tables summarize key information about our stores.
 
Number of Stores
 
Selling  Square
Footage
2013
 
 
2012
 
Net
Change
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(In Thousands)
Mid-Atlantic Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Delaware
5

 

 
5

 
399

 
Maryland
23

 

 
23

 
1,634

 
Pennsylvania
48

 
2

 
50

 
3,556

 
Virginia
30

 

 
30

 
2,175

 
West Virginia
7

 

 
7

 
500

 
Total Mid-Atlantic
113

 
2

 
115

 
8,264

 
Midwest Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Illinois
65

 
1

 
66

 
4,930

 
Indiana
38

 
1

 
39

 
2,794

 
Iowa
16

 
2

 
18

 
1,131

 
Michigan
45

 

 
45

 
3,336

 
Minnesota
26

 

 
26

 
1,976

 
Nebraska
7

 

 
7

 
479

 
North Dakota
3

 
1

 
4

 
263

 
Ohio
58

 

 
58

 
4,250

 
South Dakota
3

 

 
3

 
244

 
Wisconsin
40

 

 
40

 
2,894

 
Total Midwest
301

 
5

 
306

 
22,297

 
Northeast Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Connecticut
21

 

 
21

 
1,474

 
Maine
5

 

 
5

 
388

 
Massachusetts
24

 
1

 
25

 
1,907

 
New Hampshire
10

 
1

 
11

 
761

 
New Jersey
38

 

 
38

 
2,901

 
New York
51

 

 
51

 
3,844

 
Rhode Island
3

 

 
3

 
227

 
Vermont
1

 

 
1

 
77

 
Total Northeast
153

 
2

 
155

 
11,579

 
South Central Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arkansas
8

 

 
8

 
572

 
Kansas
12

 

 
12

 
810

 
Louisiana
6

 

 
6

 
421

 
Missouri
26

 

 
26

 
1,859

 
Oklahoma
10

 

 
10

 
720

 
Texas
84

 
1

 
85

 
6,140

 
Total South Central
146

 
1

 
147

 
10,522

 

10


 
Number of Stores
 
Selling  Square
Footage
2013
 
 
2012
 
Net
Change
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(In Thousands)
Southeast Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alabama
13

 
1

 
14

 
904

 
Florida
53

 

 
53

 
3,874

 
Georgia
35

 

 
35

 
2,554

 
Kentucky
16

 

 
16

 
1,127

 
Mississippi
5

 

 
5

 
378

 
North Carolina
31

 

 
31

 
2,195

 
South Carolina
15

 

 
15

 
1,033

 
Tennessee
20

 

 
20

 
1,398

 
Total Southeast
188

 
1

 
189

 
13,463

 
West Region:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alaska
1

 

 
1

 
73

 
Arizona
26

 

 
26

 
1,953

 
California
128

 

 
128

 
9,206

 
Colorado
24

 

 
24

 
1,835

 
Idaho
5

 

 
5

 
328

 
Montana
2

 

 
2

 
117

 
Nevada
12

 

 
12

 
851

 
New Mexico
5

 

 
5

 
326

 
Oregon
10

 
1

 
11

 
695

 
Utah
12

 

 
12

 
874

 
Washington
18

 

 
18

 
1,190

 
Wyoming
2

 

 
2

 
98

 
Total West
245

 
1

 
246

 
17,546

 
Total Kohl’s
1,146

 
12

 
1,158

 
83,671

 
 
 
Number of Stores
by Store Type
 
 
Number of Stores
by Ownership
 
2012
 
Net
Additions
 
2013
 
 
2012
 
Net
Additions
 
2013
Prototype
992

 
1

 
993

 
Owned
407

 
4

 
411

Small
154

 
11

 
165

 
Leased*
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,146

 
12

 
1,158

 
Operating lease
312

 
4

 
316

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On-balance sheet
427

 
4

 
431

 
Number of Stores
 by Location
 
Total leased
739

 
8

 
747

 
 
 
1,146

 
12

 
1,158

 
2012
 
Net
Additions
 
2013
 
* Includes locations where we lease the land and/or building
Strip centers
771

 
6

 
777

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Community & regional malls
85

 

 
85

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Freestanding
290

 
6

 
296

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,146

 
12

 
1,158

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 


11


Distribution Centers
The following table summarizes key information about each of our distribution centers.
Location
Year
Opened
 
Square
Footage
 
States Serviced
 
Approximate
Store
Capacity
Retail:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Findlay, Ohio
1994
 
780,000

 
Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia
 
185
Winchester, Virginia
1997
 
420,000

 
Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia
 
135
Blue Springs, Missouri
1999
 
540,000

 
Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wyoming
 
110
Corsicana, Texas
2001
 
540,000

 
Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas
 
115
Mamakating, New York
2002
 
605,000

 
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont
 
145
San Bernardino, California
2002
 
575,000

 
Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, Utah
 
110
Macon, Georgia
2005
 
560,000

 
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee
 
150
Patterson, California
2006
 
360,000

 
Alaska, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington
 
110
Ottawa, Illinois
2008
 
328,000

 
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin
 
155
E-Commerce:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Monroe, Ohio
2001
 
1,200,000

 
 
 
 
San Bernardino, California
2010
 
970,000

 
 
 
 
Edgewood, Maryland
2011
 
1,450,000

 
 
 
 
DeSoto, Texas
2012
 
1,200,000

 
 
 
 
We own all of the distribution centers except Corsicana, Texas, which is leased.

Corporate Facilities
We own our corporate headquarters in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin. We also own or lease additional buildings and office space which are used by various corporate departments, including our credit operations.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings
We are not currently a party to any material legal proceedings, but are subject to certain legal proceedings and claims from time to time that arise out of the conduct of our business.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable


12


PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
(a) Market information
Our Common Stock has been traded on the New York Stock Exchange since May 19, 1992, under the symbol “KSS.” The prices in the table set forth below indicate the high and low sales prices of our Common Stock per the New York Stock Exchange Composite Price History and our quarterly cash dividends per common share for each quarter in 2013 and 2012.
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
High
 
Low
 
Dividend
 
High
 
Low
 
Dividend
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fourth Quarter
$58.47
 
$49.97
 
$0.35
 
$55.11
 
$41.81
 
$0.32
Third Quarter
57.04

 
49.84

 
0.35

 
53.77

 
49.72

 
0.32

Second Quarter
54.16

 
47.00

 
0.35

 
51.25

 
43.13

 
0.32

First Quarter
49.32

 
45.21

 
0.35

 
52.19

 
45.56

 
0.32

We have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act Section 302 certifications. In 2013, Kevin Mansell, our Chief Executive Officer, submitted a certification with the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) in accordance with Section 303A.12 of the NYSE Listed Company Manual stating that, as of the date of the certification, he was not aware that we had violated any of the NYSE’s corporate governance listing standards.
On February 26, 2014, our Board of Directors approved a dividend of $0.39 per share which will be paid on March 26, 2014 to shareholders of record as of March 12, 2014. In 2013, we paid aggregate cash dividends of $302 million.
(b) Holders
As of March 12, 2014, there were approximately 4,400 record holders of our Common Stock.
(c) Securities Authorized For Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
See the information provided in the “Equity Compensation Plan Information” section of the Proxy Statement for our May 15, 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which information is incorporated herein by reference.


13


(d) Performance Graph
The graph below compares our cumulative five-year shareholder return to that of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and a Peer Group Index that is consistent with the retail peer group used in the Compensation Discussion & Analysis section of our Proxy Statement for our May 15, 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. The Peer Group Index was calculated by Capital IQ, a Standard & Poor’s business and includes Bed, Bath & Beyond Inc.; The Gap, Inc.; J.C Penney Company, Inc.; Limited Brands, Inc.; Macy’s, Inc.; Nordstrom, Inc.; Ross Stores, Inc.; Sears Holding Corporation; Target Corporation; and The TJX Companies, Inc. The Peer Group Index is weighted by the market capitalization of each component company at the beginning of each period. The graph assumes an investment of $100 on January 31, 2009 and reinvestment of dividends. The calculations exclude trading commissions and taxes.
 
Company / Index
Jan 31,
2009
 
Jan 30,
2010
 
Jan 29,
2011
 
Jan 28,
2012
 
Feb 2,
2013
 
Feb 1,
2014
Kohl’s Corporation
$100.00
 
$137.21
 
$139.47
 
$129.78
 
$131.42
 
$148.60
S&P 500 Index
100.00

 
133.14

 
161.44

 
170.04

 
199.98

 
240.58

Peer Group Index
100.00

 
183.36

 
217.01

 
257.88

 
311.11

 
343.50

(e) Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds from Registered Securities
We did not sell any equity securities during 2013 which were not registered under the Securities Act.
(f) Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
Since first authorizing our share repurchase program in 2007, our Board of Directors has increased the authorization in 2011 and again in November 2012. Purchases under the repurchase program may be made in the open market, through block trades and other negotiated transactions. We expect to execute the share repurchase program primarily in open market transactions, subject to market conditions and to complete the program in early fiscal 2016. There is no fixed termination date for the repurchase program, and the program may be suspended, discontinued or accelerated at any time.

14


The following table contains information for shares repurchased and shares acquired from employees in lieu of amounts required to satisfy minimum tax withholding requirements upon the vesting of the employees’ restricted stock during the three fiscal months ended February 1, 2014:
Period
Total
Number
of Shares
Purchased
During
Period
 
Average
Price
Paid Per
Share
 
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of
Publicly
Announced
Plans or
Programs
 
Approximate Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet Be  Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Dollars In Millions)
November 3 – November 30, 2013
550,943

 
$
54.94

 
549,082

 
$
2,542

December 1, 2013 – January 4, 2014
1,909,447

 
55.12

 
1,908,334

 
2,437

January 5 – February 1, 2014
2,184,134

 
52.40

 
2,179,209

 
2,322

Total
4,644,524

 
$
53.82

 
4,636,625

 
$
2,322



15


Item 6. Selected Consolidated Financial Data
The selected consolidated financial data presented below should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this document. The Statement of Income and Balance Sheet Data have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements.
 
2013
 
2012(a)
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
(Dollars in Millions, Except Per Share and Per Square Foot Data)
Statement of Income Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
$
19,031

 
$
19,279

 
$
18,804

 
$
18,391

 
$
17,178

Cost of merchandise sold
12,087

 
12,289

 
11,625

 
11,359

 
10,680

Gross margin
6,944

 
6,990

 
7,179

 
7,032

 
6,498

Selling, general and administrative expenses
4,313

 
4,267

 
4,243

 
4,190

 
3,951

Depreciation and amortization
889

 
833

 
778

 
750

 
688

Operating income
1,742

 
1,890

 
2,158

 
2,092

 
1,859

Interest expense, net
338

 
329

 
299

 
304

 
301

Income before income taxes
1,404

 
1,561

 
1,859

 
1,788

 
1,558

Provision for income taxes
515

 
575

 
692

 
668

 
585

Net income
$
889

 
$
986

 
$
1,167

 
$
1,120

 
$
973

Net income per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
4.08

 
$
4.19

 
$
4.33

 
$
3.69

 
$
3.19

Diluted
$
4.05

 
$
4.17

 
$
4.30

 
$
3.66

 
$
3.17

Dividends per share
$
1.40

 
$
1.28

 
$
1.00

 

 

Operating Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales growth
(1.3
)%
 
2.5
%
 
2.2
%
 
7.1
%
 
4.8
%
Comparable sales growth (b)
(1.2
)%
 
0.3
%
 
0.5
%
 
4.4
%
 
0.4
%
Net sales per selling square foot (c)
$
207

 
$
213

 
$
220

 
$
222

 
$
217

As a percent of sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross margin
36.5
 %
 
36.3
%
 
38.2
%
 
38.2
%
 
37.8
%
Operating income
9.2
 %
 
9.8
%
 
11.5
%
 
11.4
%
 
10.8
%
Net income
4.7
 %
 
5.1
%
 
6.2
%
 
6.1
%
 
5.7
%
Total square feet of selling space (in thousands)
83,671

 
83,098

 
82,226

 
80,139

 
78,396

Number of stores open (end of period)
1,158

 
1,146

 
1,127

 
1,089

 
1,058

Return on average shareholders’ equity (d)
14.8
 %
 
15.8
%
 
16.4
%
 
14.1
%
 
13.8
%
Balance Sheet Data (end of period):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Working capital
$
2,556

 
$
2,184

 
$
2,222

 
$
2,888

 
$
3,054

Property and equipment, net
8,745

 
8,872

 
8,905

 
8,692

 
8,506

Total assets
14,378

 
13,905

 
14,148

 
14,891

 
14,502

Long-term debt
2,792

 
2,492

 
2,141

 
1,894

 
1,894

Capital lease and financing obligations
2,069

 
2,061

 
2,103

 
2,104

 
2,046

Shareholders’ equity
5,978

 
6,048

 
6,508

 
7,850

 
7,595

 
(a)
Fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year. During the 53rd week, total sales were $169 million; selling, general and administrative expenses were approximately $30 million; interest was approximately $2 million; net income was approximately $15 million and diluted earnings per share was approximately $0.06.
(b)
Comparable sales growth is based on sales for stores (including relocated or remodeled stores) which were open throughout both the full current and prior year periods and E-Commerce. Fiscal 2013 comparable sales growth compares the 52 weeks ended February 1, 2014 to the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013. Fiscal 2012 comparable sales growth compares the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013 to the 52 weeks ended January 28, 2012.
(c)
Net sales per selling square foot is based on stores open for the full current period, excluding E-Commerce. 2012 excludes the impact of the 53rd week.
(d)
Average shareholders’ equity is based on a 5-quarter average for 2013, 2012, 2011, and 2010, and the two most recent year-end balances for 2009.

16


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Executive Summary
As of February 1, 2014, we operated 1,158 family-focused, value-oriented department stores and a website (www.Kohls.com) that sell moderately priced exclusive and national brand apparel, footwear, accessories, beauty and home products. Our stores generally carry a consistent merchandise assortment with some differences attributable to regional preferences. Our website includes merchandise which is available in our stores, as well as merchandise which is available only on-line.
The following table summarizes our recent financial results:
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars and Shares in Millions)
Net sales
$
19,031

 
$
19,279

 
$
18,804

Change in:
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
(1.3
)%
 
2.5
%
 
2.2
%
Comparable sales
(1.2
)%
 
0.3
%
 
0.5
%
Gross margin as a percent of net sales
36.5
 %
 
36.3
%
 
38.2
%
Selling, general and administrative expenses
$
4,313

 
$
4,267

 
$
4,243

Net income
$
889

 
$
986

 
$
1,167

Net income per diluted share
$
4.05

 
$
4.17

 
$
4.30

Shares repurchased
15

 
26

 
46

Treasury stock purchases
$
799

 
$
1,259

 
$
2,331

Cash flow from operations
$
1,884

 
$
1,265

 
$
2,139

For additional details about our financial results, see Results of Operations and Liquidity and Capital Resources.

Our main business objective is to profitably increase sales. In order to increase sales, we believe that we need to continue to increase transactions per store, which is our primary sales driver. We have a number of initiatives which we believe will increase transactions per store.

We continue to improve the quality of our merchandise and to offer items at great values. We are pleased with the progress we have made in these areas, but believe that we have additional opportunities to improve.
We continue to focus on creating excitement for our customers to increase customer traffic to our stores and website.

In fiscal 2014, we expect to launch several new brands, including Juicy Couture, IZOD, and a Jumping Beans collection featuring Disney characters. The Juicy Couture assortment will include women's and girl's apparel, footwear, accessories, bedding, and home accessories. The IZOD assortment will be one of the largest men's launches in our history and will feature men's sportswear and dress apparel, including golf separates, woven sport shirts, sweaters, knit shirts, shorts, suit separates, dress shirts, and dress pants. The Jumping Beans collection will combine Disney, one of the most recognizable brands in the world, and our own highly-successful Jumping Beans brand. We will also launch the next DesigNation designer, our limited-time special collection.

Approximately 280 of our stores had renovated beauty departments at the end of fiscal 2013. We expect to renovate the beauty department in approximately another 200 stores in 2014. We are testing three different beauty renovations - new fixtures with expanded and/or relocated floor space, new fixtures with no change to department size or location, and existing fixtures with acrylic retrofits. Initial test results are showing a significant increase in beauty sales in the renovated stores.
We are designing a rewards system to increase customer loyalty, especially for customers who do not have a Kohl's-branded credit card. The program allows enrolled customers to earn various rewards or discounts based upon the volume of their purchases. The loyalty program is currently available in approximately 30% of our stores. Initial results have been very positive and we expect this loyalty program to be available in all stores by the end of fiscal 2014.

17


We are also making significant investments to create an exciting omni-channel shopping experience for our customers. Whether they are shopping in one of our stores, from their phones or from their laptops, we are creating a consistent experience to ensure that they can connect with us wherever and however they wish.
We remain committed to meeting the changing shopping needs of our customer, to strengthening our omni-channel experience and to investing in our future in a strategic and profitable manner.

2014 Outlook
Our current expectations for fiscal 2014 compared to 2013 including estimated impacts of these initiatives are as follows:
 
 
Total sales
Increase 0.5 - 2.5%
Comparable sales
Increase 0 - 2%
Gross margin as a percent of sales
Increase 10 - 30 bps
SG&A
Increase 1.5 - 2.5%
Earnings per diluted share
$4.05 - $4.45

Our earnings per diluted share expectation assumes share repurchases of $1 billion at an average price of $50 per share.

Results of Operations
53rd Week.

Fiscal 2012 was a 53-week year. During the 53rd week, total sales were $169 million; selling, general and administrative expenses were approximately $30 million; interest was approximately $2 million; net income was approximately $15 million and diluted earnings per share was approximately $0.06. Our comparable sales in both 2013 and 2012 exclude the impact of the 53rd week.

Net Sales.

Comparable sales include sales for stores (including relocated or remodeled stores) which were open during both the current and prior year periods. We also include E-Commerce sales in our comparable sales. Omni-channel sales are recorded as store or E-Commerce sales based on the fulfillment channel. For example, customer purchases from our in-store kiosks are generally recognized as E-Commerce sales as the orders are shipped from our E-Commerce fulfillment centers and on-line orders which are shipped from our stores are recognized as store sales. Merchandise returns reduce sales at the location of the return. As a result, store sales are reduced by merchandise purchased on-line, but returned to a store.

The following table summarizes net sales:
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Net sales (In Millions)
$
19,031

 
$
19,279

 
$
18,804

Sales growth:
 
 
 
 
 
Total
(1.3
)%
 
2.5
%
 
2.2
%
Comparable stores (a)
(1.2
)%
 
0.3
%
 
0.5
%
Net sales per selling square foot (b)
$
207

 
$
213

 
$
220


(a)Includes sales for stores (including relocated or remodeled stores) which were open throughout both the full current and prior year periods and E-Commerce. 2013 compares the 52 weeks ended February 1, 2014 to the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013. 2012 compares the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013 to the 52 weeks ended January 28, 2012.
(b)Net sales per selling square foot is based on stores open for the full current period, excluding E-Commerce. 2012 excludes the impact of the 53rd week.


18


The following table summarizes the changes in net sales:
 
2013
 
2012
 
$
 
%
 
$
 
%
Comparable sales:
(Dollars in Millions)
Stores
$
(517
)
 
(3.0
)%
 
(354
)
 
(2.0
)%
E-Commerce
284

 
20.4
 %
 
411

 
41.8
 %
Total (a)
(233
)
 
(1.2
)%
 
57

 
0.3
 %
New stores and other revenues
154

 

 
249

 

Net change before 53rd week
(79
)
 
(0.4
)%
 
306

 
1.6
 %
Net sales in 53rd week
(169
)
 

 
169

 

Increase (decrease) in net sales
$
(248
)
 
(1.3
)%
 
$
475

 
2.5
 %

(a)2013 compares the 52 weeks ended February 1, 2014 to the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013. 2012 compares the 52 weeks ended January 26, 2013 to the 52 weeks ended January 28, 2012.
Drivers of the changes in comparable sales were as follows:
 
2013
 
2012
Selling price per unit
(0.4
)%
 
1.8
%
Units per transaction
1.5

 

Average transaction value
1.1

 
1.8

Number of transactions
(2.3
)
 
(1.5
)
Comparable sales
(1.2
)%
 
0.3
%

The decrease in selling price per unit was primarily due to slightly deeper discounts and clearance merchandise which represented a slightly higher percentage of our total sales than in the prior year periods. Units per transaction increased as customers purchased more items in response to the lower prices. Increases in the number of E-Commerce transactions were more than offset by decreases in our stores. Transactions in 2013 were also negatively impacted by an unseasonably cold spring and winter which reduced customer visits throughout the year.

From a regional perspective, the West, which reported sales consistent with 2012, was the strongest region in 2013. All other regions reported low to mid single-digit sales decreases. E-Commerce revenue, which includes shipping and other revenues and the 53rd week in 2012, increased $286 million to $1.7 billion for 2013. The increase is primarily due to increased transactions and units per transaction.

We have renewed our emphasis on national brands in 2013 in an effort to drive customer traffic and maximize sales growth. In the last 6 months of 2013, national brands had improved sales results and represented a growing percentage of our sales. This focus will continue into 2014, as we continue to rebalance our mix between private and exclusive brands and national brands to drive sales growth.
By line of business, all categories reported low single-digit sales decreases in 2013. Children's, Men's and Home outperformed the Company average and Women's was consistent with the Company average. Toys was the strongest category in Children's. Outerwear and active were the strongest categories in both the Men's and the Women's businesses. Electrics and luggage reported the highest sales increases in the Home business. Comparable sales in the Accessories and Footwear categories were below the Company average. Bath and beauty reported the strongest increase in the Accessories business as a result of our beauty remodel program. In Footwear, athletic shoes reported the highest sales increase.
Net sales per selling square foot (which is based on stores open for the full current period and excludes E-Commerce and the 53rd week in 2012), decreased $6 to $207 in 2013. The decrease is primarily due to a 3% decrease in sales at our comparable stores.
Net sales for 2012 increased 2.5% over 2011 and comparable sales increased 0.3%. From a line of business perspective, Children's and Men's reported the strongest comparable sales in 2012. Footwear outperformed the Company average for the year, with a low single-digit increase. Comparable sales in the Accessories, Women's and Home businesses declined slightly for the year. All regions reported modest comparable sales decreases. E-Commerce revenue, which includes shipping and other revenues and the 53rd week, increased $432 million to $1.4 billion in 2012.

19



Gross margin.
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Gross margin
$
6,944

 
$
6,990

 
$
7,179

As a percent of net sales
36.5
%
 
36.3
%
 
38.2
%

Gross margin includes the total cost of products sold, including product development costs, net of vendor payments other than reimbursement of specific, incremental and identifiable costs; inventory shrink; markdowns; freight expenses associated with moving merchandise from our vendors to our distribution centers; shipping and handling expenses of E-Commerce sales; and terms cash discount. Our gross margin may not be comparable with that of other retailers because we include distribution center costs in selling, general and administrative expenses while other retailers may include these expenses in cost of merchandise sold.

Gross margin as a percentage of sales increased approximately 20 basis points over 2012. The increase includes a 45 basis point increase in our merchandise sales margin. This increase was primarily due to modest decreases in apparel costs in 2013. Partially offsetting this increase were higher shipping losses in our on-line business. The losses were due to higher costs to ship merchandise during the fourth quarter holiday season and to growth in our on-line business.

Gross margin as a percent of net sales decreased approximately 190 basis points from 2012 to 2011 due to reductions in selling price to drive customer traffic and higher apparel costs, especially in the first six months of 2012, which were only partially offset by higher selling prices early in the year.
Selling, general and administrative expenses.
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Selling, general, and administrative expenses
$
4,313

 
$
4,267

 
$
4,243

As a percent of net sales
22.7
%
 
22.1
%
 
22.6
%
Selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A”) include compensation and benefit costs (including stores, headquarters, buying and merchandising and distribution centers); occupancy and operating costs of our retail, distribution and corporate facilities; freight expenses associated with moving merchandise from our distribution centers to our retail stores and among distribution and retail facilities; advertising expenses, offset by vendor payments for reimbursement of specific, incremental and identifiable costs; net revenues from our Kohl’s credit card operations; and other administrative revenues and expenses. We do not include depreciation and amortization in SG&A. The classification of these expenses varies across the retail industry.

The following table summarizes the changes in SG&A by expense type:
 
2013
 
2012
 
(Dollars In Millions)
Distribution costs
$
27

 
$
42

Corporate expenses
32

 
(10
)
Store expenses
27

 
(11
)
Marketing costs, excluding credit card operations
9

 
14

Net revenues from credit card operations
(19
)
 
(41
)
SG&A in 53rd week
(30
)
 
30

Total increase
$
46

 
$
24

    
Many of our expenses, including store payroll and distribution costs, are variable in nature. These costs generally increase as sales increase and decrease as sales decrease. We measure both the change in these variable expenses and the expense as a percent of sales. If the expense as a percent of sales decreased from the prior year, the expense “leveraged” and indicates that the expense was well-managed or effectively generated additional sales. If the expense as a percent of sales increased over the prior year, the expense "deleveraged" and indicates that sales growth was less than expense growth. SG&A as a percent of sales increased, or "deleveraged," by approximately 60 basis points in 2013.

20



Distribution costs increased in 2013 due to higher distribution and fulfillment costs related to our growing on-line business, particularly in the fourth quarter.

IT spending, which is included in corporate expenses, increased over 2012 due to growth and infrastructure investments related to our omni-channel strategy.

The increases in store expenses are the result of higher store payroll, higher rent-related expenses due to new stores, increases in real estate taxes, and higher controllable expenses including repairs and maintenance.

Marketing costs were higher in 2013 as we increased our spending in digital and broadcast and added additional markets to our loyalty program pilot.

The increases in net revenues from credit card operations are the result of higher finance charge revenues and late fees due to growth in the portfolio. Partially offsetting these increases were higher bad debt expenses and operational costs. The increased operating costs were primarily due to growth in the portfolio.

SG&A for 2012 increased $24 million, or 1% over 2011. As a percentage of sales, SG&A decreased, or "leveraged", by approximately 40 basis points in 2012. The increase in SG&A is due primarily to higher distribution costs, increased marketing, investments in technology and infrastructure related to our E-Commerce business and the extra week in the 2012 retail calendar. These increases were partially offset by lower incentive costs.

Other Expenses.
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars In Millions)
Depreciation and amortization
$
889

 
$
833

 
$
778

Interest expense, net
338

 
329

 
299

Provision for income taxes
515

 
575

 
692

Effective tax rate
36.7
%
 
36.8
%
 
37.2
%
The increase in depreciation and amortization in 2013 was primarily due to our E-Commerce fulfillment centers and IT amortization. The increase in depreciation and amortization in 2012 was primarily due to recent computer and hardware additions which have a short amortization period as well as the addition of new stores, remodels and the opening of our fourth E-Commerce fullfillment center in DeSoto, Texas.
Net interest expense, including $2 million in the 53rd week of 2012, increased $9 million, or 3%, in 2013 and increased $30 million in 2012. The increases in interest expense are primarily due to the increases in our outstanding long-term debt.
The decreases in the effective tax rate for 2013 and 2012 were primarily due to favorable settlements of state tax audits in the first six months of both years.
Inflation
Although we expect that our operations will be influenced by general economic conditions, including rising food, fuel and energy prices, we do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our results of operations. However, there can be no assurance that our business will not be affected by such factors in the future. We experienced 10-15% increases in apparel costs in 2011. We saw modest increases in apparel costs in the first six months of 2012 and modest decreases in the last six months of 2012 and in 2013. In 2014, we expect to see modest increases in apparel costs.

Liquidity and Capital Resources
Our primary ongoing cash requirements are for capital expenditures for new stores, remodels and IT spending and for seasonal and new store inventory purchases. Share repurchases and dividend payments to shareholders are currently other significant usages of cash. These payments are discretionary and can be discontinued at any time should we require cash for other uses. Our primary source of funds is cash flow provided by operations. Short-term trade credit, in the form of extended payment terms for inventory purchases, often represents a significant source of financing for merchandise inventories. We also have a line of credit available under our revolving credit facility which could be used to meet cash needs. Our working capital and inventory levels typically build throughout the fall, peaking during the November and December holiday selling season.

21


As of February 1, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents of $971 million. We generated $1.1 billion of free cash flow in 2013. (See the Free Cash Flow discussion later in this Liquidity and Capital Resources section for additional discussion of this non-GAAP financial measure.)
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(In Millions)
Net cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
$
1,884

 
$
1,265

 
$
2,139

Investing activities
(623
)
 
(660
)
 
(802
)
Financing activities
(827
)
 
(1,273
)
 
(2,409
)

Operating activities.

Cash provided by operations increased $619 million, or 49%, in 2013 to $1.9 billion. The increase was primarily due to reduced inventory growth and to lower bonus and other payroll-related liability payments in 2013.

Inventory units per store, excluding E-commerce, as of year-end 2013 were 4% lower than year-end 2012. At cost, inventory per store, excluding E-Commerce, was approximately 1% higher than year-end 2012. The increase in cost per store is primarily due to our renewed focus on national brands which generally have a higher cost than our private and exclusive brands.
Accounts payable as a percent of inventory was 35.2% at February 1, 2014, compared to 34.9% at year-end 2012. The increase reflects lower markdowns and extended payment terms; partially offset by slower inventory turn.
Cash provided by operations decreased $874 million from $2.1 billion in 2011 to $1.3 billion in 2012. The decrease was primarily due to lower earnings, a decrease in deferred taxes related to depreciation and higher inventory levels.

Investing activities.
Net cash used in investing activities decreased $37 million to $623 million in 2013. The decrease reflects a $142 million decrease in capital expenditures which was substantially offset by a $108 million decrease in auction rate securities sales.
Capital expenditures totaled $643 million for 2013, a $142 million decrease from 2012. The decrease reflects multiple changes in our capital expenditures including fewer remodels and new stores and lower spending on E-Commerce fulfillment centers, partially offset by higher IT spending.
The following table summarizes expected and actual capital expenditures by major category:
 
2014
Estimate
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Computer hardware and software
39
%
 
45
%
 
33
%
 
18
%
Fixtures and store improvements
30

 
25

 
18

 
7

Remodels/relocations
13

 
10

 
14

 
26

New stores
6

 
9

 
18

 
27

Other
12

 
9

 
3

 
7

Distribution centers

 
2

 
14

 
15

Total
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
We expect total capital expenditures of approximately $725 million in fiscal 2014. The expected increase over 2013 reflects higher spending for corporate expansion and IT, partially offset by fewer new store openings. The actual amount of our future capital expenditures will depend on the number and timing of new stores and remodels, distribution centers and E-Commerce fulfillment centers opened and remodeled; the mix of owned, leased or acquired stores; and IT spending. We do not anticipate that our capital expenditures will be limited by any restrictive covenants in our financing agreements.
Net cash used in investing activities decreased $142 million to $660 million in 2012. The decrease reflects lower capital expenditures primarily due to fewer remodels and new stores, partially offset by higher technology spending.

22


Financing activities.
Our financing activities used cash of $827 million in 2013 and $1.3 billion in 2012. The decrease is primarily due to lower share repurchases.
We repurchased 15 million shares of our common stock for $799 million in 2013 and 26 million shares for $1.3 billion in 2012. Share repurchases are discretionary in nature. The timing and amount of repurchases is based upon available cash balances, our stock price and other factors. The shares were purchased as part of our share repurchase program. We have $2.3 billion of authorized share repurchases remaining from the $3.5 billion program approved by our Board of Directors in November 2012. We expect to execute the share repurchase program primarily in open market transactions, subject to market conditions, and to complete the program in early fiscal 2016.
In September 2013, we issued $300 million of 4.75% notes with semi-annual interest payments beginning in December 2013. In September 2012, we issued $350 million of 3.25% notes with semi-annual interest payments beginning in February 2013.
We have various facilities upon which we may draw funds, including a 5-year, $1 billion senior unsecured revolving credit facility. In June 2013, we amended the revolving line of credit that we finalized in June 2011. The amendment extended the remaining term from June 2016 to June 2018 and changed the debt ratio covenant. There were no draws on these facilities during 2013 or 2012.
Our credit ratings have been unchanged since September 2007 when we issued $1 billion in debt. As of February 1, 2014, our ratings were as follows:
 
Moody’s
 
Standard & Poor’s
  
Fitch
Long-term debt
Baa1
  
BBB+
 
BBB+
We may from time to time seek to retire or purchase our outstanding debt through open market cash purchases, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. Such repurchases, if any, will depend on prevailing market conditions, our liquidity requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors. The amounts involved could be material.
During 2013, we paid cash dividends of $302 million as detailed in the following table:
 
First Quarter
  
Second Quarter
  
Third Quarter
  
Fourth Quarter
Declaration date
February 27
  
May 15
  
August 13
  
November 13
Record date
March 13
  
June 12
  
September 11
  
December 11
Payment date
March 27
  
June 26
  
September 25
  
December 24
Amount per common share
$0.35
  
$0.35
  
$0.35
  
$0.35
On February 26, 2014 our Board of Directors approved a dividend of $0.39 per common share which will be paid on March 26, 2014 to shareholders of record as of March 12, 2014.
Our financing activities used cash of $1.3 billion in 2012 and $2.4 billion in 2011. The decrease is primarily due to lower treasury stock purchases.

23


Key financial ratios.
The following ratios provide certain measures of our liquidity, return on investments, and capital structure.
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Liquidity Ratios:
(Dollars in Millions)
Working capital
$
2,556

 
$
2,184

 
$
2,222

Current ratio
1.93

 
1.86

 
1.85

Free Cash Flow (a)
$
1,127

 
$
381

 
$
1,135

Return on Investment Ratios:
 
 
 
 
 
Ratio of earnings to fixed charges
3.7

 
4.1

 
4.8

Return on Assets
6.2
%
 
6.9
%
 
8.1
%
Return on Gross Investment (a)
15.5
%
 
16.8
%
 
18.8
%
Capital Structure Ratios:
 
 
 
 
 
Debt/capitalization
44.8
%

42.9
%

39.5
%
Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR (a)
2.42


2.23


1.99

(a) Non-GAAP financial measure
Liquidity ratios.

Working capital increased $372 million and our current ratio increased 7 basis points over year-end 2012. The increases were primarily due to higher cash balances. The 2012 working capital and current ratio were generally consistent with 2011.
  
We generated $1.1 billion of free cash flow in 2013; an increase of $746 million over 2012. As discussed above, the increase is primarily the result of higher cash provided by operating activities, and lower capital expenditures in fiscal 2013. Free cash flow is a non-GAAP financial measure which we define as net cash provided by operating activities and proceeds from financing obligations (which generally represent landlord reimbursements of construction costs) less acquisition of property & equipment and capital lease & financing obligation payments. Free cash flow should be evaluated in addition to, and not considered a substitute for, other financial measures such as net income and cash flow provided by operating activities. We believe that free cash flow represents our ability to generate additional cash flow from our business operations. See the key financial ratio calculations section below.
Return on investment ratios.

Lower earnings resulted in decreases in all three of our return on investment ratios - ratio of earnings to fixed charges, return on assets and return on gross investment ("ROI"). See Exhibit 12.1 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the calculation of our ratio of earnings to fixed charges and the key financial ratio calculations below for the return on assets calculation.

We believe that ROI is a useful financial measure in evaluating our operating performance. When analyzed in conjunction with our net earnings and total assets and compared with return on assets, it provides investors with a useful tool to evaluate our ongoing operations and our management of assets from period to period. ROI is a non-GAAP financial measure which we define as earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and rent (“EBITDAR”) divided by average gross investment. Our ROI calculation may not be comparable to similarly-titled measures reported by other companies. ROI should be evaluated in addition to, and not considered a substitute for, other financial measures such as return on assets. See the key financial ratio calculations section below.
Capital structure ratios.

Our debt agreements contain various covenants including limitations on additional indebtedness and a maximum permitted debt ratio. As of February 1, 2014, we were in compliance with all debt covenants and expect to remain in compliance during fiscal 2014. See the key financial ratio calculations section below for our debt covenant calculation.

Our debt/capitalization ratio was 44.8% at year-end 2013, 42.9% at year-end 2012 and 39.5% at year-end 2011. The increases are primarily due to higher debt levels and lower capitalization as a result of share repurchases.


24


Our Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR ratio was 2.42 for 2013, 2.23 for 2012 and 1.99 for 2011. The increases are primarily due to higher debt levels. Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR is a non-GAAP financial measure which we define as our adjusted outstanding debt balance divided by EBITDAR. We believe that our debt levels are best analyzed using this measure. Our current goals are to maintain an Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR ratio of approximately 2.25, to manage debt levels to maintain a BBB+ investment-grade credit rating and to operate with an efficient capital structure for our size, growth plans and industry. We exceeded our target goal in 2013 to take advantage of a favorable, low interest rate debt environment.  We expect to manage our business and debt levels to get our overall ratio back to our target goal over the next several years. Our Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR calculation may not be comparable to similarly-titled measures reported by other companies. Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR should be evaluated in addition to, and not considered a substitute for, other financial measures such as debt/capitalization. See the key financial ratio calculations section below for our Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR calculation.

Key financial ratio calculations.
The following table reconciles net cash provided by operating activities (a GAAP measure) to free cash flow (a non-GAAP measure).
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
1,884

 
$
1,265

 
$
2,139

Acquisition of property & equipment
(643
)
 
(785
)
 
(927
)
Capital lease & financing obligation payments
(115
)
 
(111
)
 
(91
)
Proceeds from financing obligations
1

 
12

 
14

Free cash flow
$
1,127


$
381


$
1,135

The following table includes our ROI and return on assets (the most comparable GAAP measure) calculations:
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Net income
$
889

 
$
986

 
$
1,167

Net interest
338

 
329

 
299

Provision for income taxes
515

 
575

 
692

Depreciation and amortization
889

 
833

 
778

Rent expense
270


265


265

EBITDAR
$
2,901


$
2,988


$
3,201

Average: (a)
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
14,335

 
$
14,266

 
$
14,434

Cash equivalents and long-term investments (b)
(321
)
 
(677
)
 
(1,421
)
Deferred tax and other assets
(149
)
 
(126
)
 
(124
)
Accumulated depreciation and amortization
5,457

 
4,943

 
4,473

Accounts payable
(1,556
)
 
(1,622
)
 
(1,439
)
Accrued liabilities
(1,082
)
 
(1,079
)
 
(1,068
)
Other long-term liabilities
(538
)
 
(478
)
 
(458
)
Capitalized rent (c)
2,625

 
2,573

 
2,598

Gross Investment (“AGI”)
$
18,771

 
$
17,800

 
$
16,995

Return on Assets (“ROA”) (d)
6.2
%

6.9
%

8.1
%
Return on Gross Investment (“ROI”) (e)
15.5
%
 
16.8
%
 
18.8
%
(a)    Represents average of 5 most recent quarter end balances
(b)    Represents excess cash not required for operations
(c)    Represents 10 times store rent and 5 times equipment/other rent
(d)    Net income divided by average total assets
(e)    EBITDAR divided by Gross Investment

25


The following table includes our debt ratio calculation, as defined by our debt agreements as of February 1, 2014:
 
 
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Included Indebtedness
 
Total debt
$
4,869

Permitted exclusions
(8
)
 
 
Subtotal
4,861

Rent x 8
2,160

 
 
Included Indebtedness
$
7,021

 
 
Adjusted Debt Compliance EBITDAR
 
Net income
$
889

Rent expense
270

Depreciation and amortization
889

Net interest
338

Provision for income taxes
515

EBITDAR
2,901

Stock based compensation
55

Other non-cash revenues and expenses
24

Adjusted Debt Compliance EBITDAR
$
2,980

 
 
Debt Ratio (a)
2.36

Maximum permitted Debt Ratio
3.75

(a) Included Indebtedness divided by Adjusted Debt Compliance EBITDAR

The following table includes our Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR and debt/capitalization (a comparable GAAP measure) calculations:
 
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
(Dollars in Millions)
Total Debt
$
4,861

 
$
4,553

 
$
4,244

Adjusted Rent (a)
2,160

 
2,120

 
2,117

Adjusted Debt
$
7,021

 
$
6,673

 
$
6,361

Total Equity
$
5,978

 
$
6,048

 
$
6,508

EBITDAR (b)
$
2,901

 
$
2,988

 
$
3,201

Debt/capitalization (c)
44.8
%
 
42.9
%
 
39.5
%
Adjusted Debt to EBITDAR (d)
2.42

 
2.23

 
1.99

(a)    Represents 8 times annual rent
(b)    See details in ROI calculation above
(c)    Total debt divided by total debt and shareholders' equity
(d)    Adjusted debt divided by EBITDAR


26


Contractual Obligations
Our contractual obligations as of February 1, 2014 were as follows:
 
Maturing in:
 
Total
 
2014
 
2015
and
2016
 
2017
and
2018
 
2019
and
after
 
(Dollars In Millions)
Recorded contractual obligations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term debt
$
2,800

 
$

 
$

 
$
650

 
$
2,150

Capital lease and financing obligations
1,611

 
127

 
200

 
194

 
1,090

 
4,411

 
127

 
200

 
844

 
3,240

Unrecorded contractual obligations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest payments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term debt
1,765

 
149

 
297

 
263

 
1,056

Capital lease and financing obligations
2,844

 
187

 
350

 
317

 
1,990

Operating leases (a)
5,973

 
245

 
482

 
474

 
4,772

Royalties
330

 
90

 
142

 
83

 
15

Purchase obligations (b)
4,032

 
4,032

 

 

 

Other (c)
432

 
150

 
114

 
74

 
94

 
15,376

 
4,853

 
1,385

 
1,211

 
7,927

Total
$
19,787

 
$
4,980

 
$
1,585

 
$
2,055

 
$
11,167

 
(a)
Our leases typically require that we pay real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance costs in addition to the minimum rental payments included in the table above. Such costs vary from period to period and totaled $175 million for 2013, $165 million for 2012 and $161 million for 2011. The lease term includes cancelable option periods where failure to exercise such options would result in economic penalty.
(b)
Our purchase obligations consist mainly of purchase orders for merchandise. Amounts committed under open purchase orders for merchandise are cancelable without penalty prior to a date that precedes the vendors’ scheduled shipment date.
(c)
Our other commitments include legally binding minimum lease and interest payments for stores opening in 2014 or later, as well as payments associated with technology and marketing agreements.
We have not included $146 million of long-term liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits and the related interest and penalties in the contractual obligations table because we are not able to reasonably estimate the timing of cash settlements. It is reasonably possible that such tax positions may change within the next 12 months, primarily as a result of ongoing audits. While it is possible that one or more of these audits may be resolved in the next year, it is not anticipated that payment of any such amounts in future periods will materially affect liquidity and cash flows.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We have not provided any financial guarantees as of year-end 2013.
We have not created, and are not party to, any special-purpose or off-balance sheet entities for the purpose of raising capital, incurring debt or operating our business. We do not have any arrangements or relationships with entities that are not consolidated into the financial statements that are reasonably likely to materially affect our financial condition, liquidity, results of operations or capital resources.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts. A discussion of the more significant estimates follows. Management has discussed the development, selection and disclosure of these estimates and assumptions with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.

27


Retail Inventory Method and Inventory Valuation
We value our inventory at the lower of cost or market with cost determined on the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis using the retail inventory method (“RIM”). Under RIM, the valuation of inventories at cost and the resulting gross margins are calculated by applying a cost-to-retail ratio to the retail value of the inventories. Inherent in the retail inventory method are certain management estimates that may affect the ending inventory valuation as well as gross margin.
The use of RIM will generally result in inventories being valued at the lower of cost or market as permanent markdowns are taken as a reduction of the retail value of inventories. Management estimates the need for an additional markdown reserve based on a review of historical clearance markdowns, current business trends, expected vendor funding and discontinued merchandise categories.
We also record a reserve for estimated inventory shrink between the last physical inventory count and the balance sheet date. Shrink is the difference between the recorded amount of inventory and the physical inventory. Shrink may occur due to theft, loss, inaccurate records for the receipt of inventory or deterioration of goods, among other things. We generally perform an annual physical inventory count at the majority of our stores, distribution centers and E-Commerce fulfillment centers. The shrink reserve is based on sales and actual shrink results from previous inventories.
We did not make any material changes in the methodologies used to value our inventory or to estimate the markdown and shrink reserves during 2013, 2012 or 2011. We believe that we have sufficient current and historical knowledge to record reasonable estimates for our inventory reserves. Though historical reserves have approximated actual markdowns and shrink adjustments, it is possible that future results could differ from current recorded reserves.
Because we routinely record permanent markdowns for potentially obsolete merchandise, we do not believe that a markdown reserve was required as of February 1, 2014. Changes in the assumptions used to estimate our markdown reserve requirement would not have had a material impact on our financial statements. A 10 basis point change in estimated inventory shrink would also have had an immaterial impact on our financial statements.
Vendor Allowances
We receive allowances from many of our merchandise vendors. These allowances often are reimbursements for markdowns that we have taken in order to sell the merchandise and/or to support the gross margins earned in connection with the sales of merchandise. The allowances generally relate to sold inventory or permanent markdowns and, accordingly, are reflected as reductions to cost of merchandise sold. Allowances related to merchandise that has not yet been sold are recorded in inventory.
We also receive vendor allowances which represent reimbursements of costs (primarily advertising) that we have incurred to promote the vendors’ merchandise. These allowances are generally netted against advertising or the other related costs as the costs are incurred. Advertising allowances in excess of costs incurred are recorded as a reduction of merchandise costs.
Most of our vendor allowance agreements are supported by signed contracts which are binding, but informal in nature. The terms of these arrangements vary significantly from vendor to vendor and are influenced by, among other things, the type of merchandise to be supported. Vendor allowances will fluctuate based on the amount of promotional and clearance markdowns necessary to liquidate the inventory as well as advertising and other reimbursed costs.
Insurance Reserve Estimates
We use a combination of insurance and self-insurance for a number of risks.
We retain the initial risk of $500,000 per occurrence in workers’ compensation claims and $250,000 per occurrence in general liability claims. We record reserves for workers’ compensation and general liability claims which include the total amounts that we expect to pay for a fully developed loss and related expenses, such as fees paid to attorneys, experts and investigators. The fully developed loss includes amounts for both reported claims and incurred, but not reported losses.
We use a third-party actuary to estimate the liabilities associated with these risks. The actuary considers historical claims experience, demographic and severity factors and actuarial assumptions to estimate the liabilities associated with these risks. As of February 1, 2014, estimated liabilities for workers’ compensation and general liability claims were approximately $34 million.
A change in claims frequency and severity of claims from historical experience as well as changes in state statutes and the mix of states in which we operate could result in a change to the required reserve levels. Changes in actuarial assumptions

28


could also have an impact on estimated reserves. Historically, our actuarial estimates have not been materially different from actual results.
We are fully self-insured for employee-related health care benefits, a portion of which is paid by our associates. We use a third-party actuary to estimate the liability for incurred, but not reported, health care claims. This estimate uses historical claims information as well as estimated health care trends. As of February 1, 2014, we had recorded approximately $13 million for medical, pharmacy and dental claims which were incurred in 2013 and expected to be paid in 2014. Historically, our actuarial estimates have not been materially different from actual results.
Impairment of Assets
As of February 1, 2014, our investment in buildings and improvements, before accumulated depreciation, was $10 billion. We review these buildings and improvements for impairment when an event or changes in circumstances, such as decisions to close a store or significant operating losses, indicate the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable.
For operating stores, a potential impairment has occurred if the fair value of a specific store is less than the net carrying amount of the assets. If required, we would record an impairment loss equal to the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value.
Identifying impaired assets and quantifying the related impairment loss, if any, requires significant estimates by management. The most significant of these estimates is the cash flow expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset. When determining the stream of projected future cash flows associated with an individual store, management estimates future store performance including sales growth rates, gross margin and controllable expenses, such as store payroll and occupancy expense. Projected cash flows must be estimated for future periods throughout the remaining life of the property, which may be as many as 40 years in the future. The accuracy of these estimates will be impacted by a number of factors including general economic conditions, changes in competitive landscape and our ability to effectively manage the operations of the store.
We have not historically experienced any significant impairment of long-lived assets. Additionally, impairment of an individual building and related improvements, net of accumulated depreciation, would not generally be material to our financial results.
Income Taxes
We regularly evaluate the likelihood of realizing the benefit for income tax positions we have taken in various federal and state filings by considering all relevant facts, circumstances and information available to us. If we believe it is more likely than not that our position will be sustained, we recognize a benefit at the largest amount which we believe is cumulatively greater than 50% likely to be realized. Our unrecognized tax benefit, excluding accrued interest and penalties, was $125 million as of February 1, 2014 and $108 million as of February 2, 2013.
Unrecognized tax benefits require significant management judgment regarding applicable statutes and their related interpretation, the status of various income tax audits and our particular facts and circumstances. Also, as audits are completed or statutes of limitations lapse, it may be necessary to record adjustments to our taxes payable, deferred tax assets, tax reserves or income tax expense. Although we believe we have adequately reserved for our uncertain tax positions, no assurance can be given that the final tax outcome of these matters will not be different.
Operating Leases
As of February 1, 2014, 747 of our 1,158 retail stores were subject to either a ground or building lease. Accounting for leased properties requires compliance with technical accounting rules and significant judgment by management. Application of these accounting rules and assumptions made by management will determine whether we are considered the owner for accounting purposes or whether the lease is accounted for as a capital or operating lease in accordance with ASC 840, “Leases.”
If we are considered the owner for accounting purposes or the lease is considered a capital lease, we record the property and a related financing or capital lease obligation on our balance sheet. The asset is then depreciated over its expected lease term. Rent payments for these properties are recognized as interest expense and a reduction of the financing or capital lease obligation.
If the lease is considered an operating lease, it is not recorded on our balance sheet and rent expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the expected lease term.

29


The most significant estimates used by management in accounting for property leases and the impact of these estimates are as follows:
Expected lease term—Our expected lease term includes both contractual lease periods and cancelable option periods where failure to exercise such options would result in an economic penalty. The expected lease term is used in determining whether the lease is accounted for as an operating lease or a capital lease. A lease is considered a capital lease if the lease term exceeds 75% of the leased asset’s useful life. The expected lease term is also used in determining the depreciable life of the asset or the straight-line rent recognition period. Increasing the expected lease term will increase the probability that a lease will be considered a capital lease and will generally result in higher rent expense for an operating lease and higher interest and depreciation expenses for a leased property recorded on our balance sheet.
Incremental borrowing rate—We estimate our incremental borrowing rate using treasury rates for debt with maturities comparable to the expected lease term and our credit spread. The incremental borrowing rate is primarily used in determining whether the lease is accounted for as an operating lease or a capital lease. A lease is considered a capital lease if the net present value of the lease payments is greater than 90% of the fair market value of the property. Increasing the incremental borrowing rate decreases the net present value of the lease payments and reduces the probability that a lease will be considered a capital lease. For leases which are recorded on our balance sheet with a related capital lease or financing obligation, the incremental borrowing rate is also used in allocating our rental payments between interest expense and a reduction of the outstanding obligation.
Fair market value of leased asset—The fair market value of leased retail property is generally estimated based on comparable market data as provided by third-party appraisers or consideration received from the landlord. Fair market value is used in determining whether the lease is accounted for as an operating lease or a capital lease. A lease is considered a capital lease if the net present value of the lease payments is greater than 90% of the fair market value of the property. Increasing the fair market value reduces the probability that a lease will be considered a capital lease. Fair market value is also used in determining the amount of property and related financing obligation to be recognized on our balance sheet for certain leased properties which are considered owned for accounting purposes.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
All of our long-term debt at year-end 2013 is at fixed interest rates and, therefore, is not affected by changes in interest rates. When our long-term debt instruments mature, we may refinance them at then existing market interest rates, which may be more or less than interest rates on the maturing debt.
Cash equivalents and long-term investments earn interest at variable rates and are affected by changes in interest rates. During 2013, average investments were $750 million and average yield was 0.25%. If interest rates on the average 2013 variable rate cash equivalents and long-term investments increased by 100 basis points, our annual interest income would also increase by approximately $7.5 million assuming comparable investment levels.
We share in the net risk-adjusted revenue of the Kohl’s credit card portfolio as defined by the sum of finance charges, late fees and other revenue less write-offs of uncollectible accounts. We also share the costs of funding the outstanding receivables if interest rates were to exceed defined rates. As a result, our share of profits from the credit card portfolio may be negatively impacted by increases in interest rates. The reduced profitability, if any, will be impacted by various factors, including our ability to pass higher funding costs on to the credit card holders and the outstanding receivable balance, and cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.
 
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
The financial statements are included in this report beginning on page F-3.

Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures
None


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Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (the “Evaluation”) at a reasonable assurance level as of the last day of the period covered by this Report.
Based upon the Evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at the reasonable assurance level. Disclosure controls and procedures are defined by Rules 13a-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act") as controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the SEC's rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.
It should be noted that the design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving our stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.
(b) Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance to our management and Board of Directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of our published financial statements.
All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.
Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financing reporting as of February 1, 2014. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (1992 Framework). Based on this assessment, our management has concluded that as of February 1, 2014, our internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.
Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and, as part of its audit, has issued an attestation report, included herein, on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
(c) Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
During the last fiscal quarter, there were no changes in our internal controls that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect such controls, including any corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies and material weaknesses.


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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of Kohl's Corporation

We have audited Kohl's Corporation's internal control over financial reporting as of February 1, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (1992 Framework) (the COSO criteria). Kohl's Corporation's management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management's Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, Kohl's Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of February 1, 2014, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of the Company as of February 1, 2014 and February 2, 2013, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, changes in shareholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended February 1, 2014 of Kohl's Corporation and our report dated March 21, 2014 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.


/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
March 21, 2014

Item 9B. Other Information
None


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PART III

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
For information with respect to our Directors, the Board of Directors’ Audit Committee and our written code of ethics, see the applicable portions of the “Questions and Answers About our Board of Directors and Corporate Governance Matters” and “Item One: Election of Directors” sections of the Proxy Statement for our May 15, 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (“our 2014 Proxy”), which information is incorporated herein by reference. For information with respect to Section 16 reports, see the information provided in the “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” section of our 2014 Proxy, which information is incorporated herein by reference.
Our executive officers as of February 1, 2014 were as follows:
Name
Age
 
Position
Kevin Mansell
61
 
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President
Don Brennan
53
 
Chief Merchandising Officer
Michelle Gass
45
 
Chief Customer Officer
Kenneth Bonning
56
 
Senior Executive Vice President
Peggy Eskenasi
58
 
Senior Executive Vice President
Wesley S. McDonald
51
 
Senior Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
Richard D. Schepp
53
 
Senior Executive Vice President
Mr. Mansell is responsible for Kohl’s strategic direction, long-term growth and profitability. He has served as Chairman since September 2009, Chief Executive Officer since August 2008 and President and Director since February 1999. Mr. Mansell began his retail career in 1975.
Mr. Brennan was promoted to Chief Merchandising Officer in December 2010 and is responsible for all merchandising divisions, product development, merchandise planning and allocation. Previously, he had served as Senior Executive Vice President since September 2007. Mr. Brennan began his retail career in 1982.
Ms. Gass joined Kohl's in June 2013 as Chief Customer Officer and is responsible for our overall customer engagement strategy, including our digital, marketing, public relations, and social responsibility efforts, as well as our E-Commerce business. Previously, she had served as President, Starbucks Europe, Middle East and Africa. Ms. Gass began her retail career in 1991.
Mr. Bonning was promoted to Senior Executive Vice President in May 2011 and is responsible for logistics, store planning and construction and information systems. Previously, he had served as Executive Vice President, Logistics, Facilities and Store Planning from October 2006 to May 2011. Mr. Bonning began his retail career in 1985.
Ms. Eskenasi was promoted to Senior Executive Vice President in December 2010 and oversees all product development. Previously, she had served as Executive Vice President—Product Development since October 2004. Ms. Eskenasi began her retail career in 1977.

Mr. McDonald was promoted to Senior Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer in December 2010 and is responsible for financial planning and analysis, investor relations, financial reporting, accounting operations, tax, treasury, credit and capital investment. Previously, he had served as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer since August 2003. Mr. McDonald began his retail career in 1988.
Mr. Schepp was promoted to Senior Executive Vice President in May 2011 and is responsible for legal affairs, real estate, human resources, and internal audit. Mr. Schepp assumed responsibility for our Human Resource department in April 2012. He previously served as Executive Vice President—General Counsel, Secretary from August 2001 to May 2011. Mr. Schepp began his retail career in 1992.

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Members of our Board of Directors as of February 1, 2014 were as follows:
 
 
 
Kevin Mansell
Chairman, President and Chief Executive
Officer,
Kohl’s Corporation
  
Frank V. Sica (b)* (c)
Managing Partner,
Tailwind Capital
 
 
 
Peter Boneparth (b) (c)
Senior Advisor,
Irving Place Capital Partners
 
Peter M. Sommerhauser
Shareholder,
Godfrey & Kahn, S.C. Law Firm
 
 
 
Steven A. Burd (b) (c)
Former Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President,
Safeway Inc.
 
Stephanie A. Streeter(a) (c)*
Chief Executive Officer and Director
Libbey, Inc.
 
 
 
Dale E. Jones (b) (c)
President,
Diversified Search
 
Nina G. Vaca(a)(c)
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer,
Pinnacle Technical Resources, Inc.
 
 
 
John E. Schlifske(a) (c)
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer,
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company
 
Stephen E. Watson(a)* (c)
Former President, Chief Executive Officer of Gander Mountain, L.L.C.
 
Former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Department Store Division of Dayton-Hudson Corporation

(a)Audit Committee member
(b)Compensation Committee member
(c)Governance & Nominating Committee member
* Denotes Chair

Item 11. Executive Compensation
See the information provided in the applicable portions of the “Questions and Answers About our Board of Directors and Corporate Governance Matters” and “Item One: Election of Directors” sections of our 2014 Proxy, including the Compensation Discussion & Analysis, which information is incorporated herein by reference.


Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
See the information provided in the “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners, Directors and Management” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information” sections of our 2014 Proxy, which information is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
See the information provided in the “Independence Determinations & Related Party Transactions” section of our 2014 Proxy, which information is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
See the information provided in the “Fees Paid to Ernst & Young” section of our 20