10-Q 1 d277693d10q.htm 10-Q 10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended December 31, 2011

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Transition Period From                      to

Commission File Number: 001-34466

 

 

EDUCATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Pennsylvania   25-1119571

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor

Pittsburgh, PA, 15222

(412) 562-0900

(Address, including zip code and telephone number, of principal executive offices)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes   x     No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company     ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.):

Yes   ¨     No   x

As of February 6, there were 126,074,617 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

INDEX

 

         PAGE  

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

  

ITEM 1

  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS      2   

ITEM 2

  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS      26   

ITEM 3

  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK      37   

ITEM 4

  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES      37   

PART II — OTHER INFORMATION

  

ITEM 1

  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS      38   

ITEM 1A

  RISK FACTORS      38   

ITEM 2

  UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS      41   

ITEM 3

  DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES      41   

ITEM 4

  (REMOVED AND RESERVED)      41   

ITEM 5

  OTHER INFORMATION      41   

ITEM 6

  EXHIBITS INDEX      42   

SIGNATURES

       43   

 

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EDUCATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands)

 

     December 31,
2011
    June 30,
2011
    December 31,
2010
 
     (Unaudited)           (Unaudited)  

Assets

      

Current assets:

      

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 299,934      $ 403,224      $ 393,412   

Restricted cash

     79,323        47,513        18,388   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

     379,257        450,737        411,800   

Student receivables, net of allowances of $211,467, $187,102 and $164,971

     156,495        157,793        101,430   

Notes, advances and other receivables

     14,652        15,164        4,209   

Inventories

     9,430        9,594        11,643   

Deferred income taxes

     76,804        76,804        65,410   

Prepaid income taxes

     —          13,277        —     

Other current assets

     46,941        46,166        45,993   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     683,579        769,535        640,485   

Property and equipment, net (Note 4)

     668,436        697,377        692,293   

Other long-term assets (Note 6)

     45,717        46,613        100,278   

Intangible assets, net (Note 5)

     460,144        462,387        464,643   

Goodwill (Note 5)

     2,579,131        2,579,131        2,579,131   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 4,437,007      $ 4,555,043      $ 4,476,830   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity

      

Current liabilities:

      

Current portion of long-term debt (Note 8)

   $ 12,076      $ 12,076      $ 12,076   

Revolving credit facility

     —          79,000        —     

Accounts payable

     28,620        58,494        31,598   

Accrued liabilities (Note 7)

     130,512        135,126        175,574   

Accrued income taxes

     18,976        —          37,438   

Unearned tuition

     61,170        140,150        65,065   

Advance payments

     140,323        112,095        93,171   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     391,677        536,941        414,922   

Long-term debt, less current portion (Note 8)

     1,460,720        1,466,774        1,520,504   

Deferred income taxes

     217,065        222,684        179,174   

Deferred rent

     195,723        188,803        188,876   

Other long-term liabilities

     45,391        35,897        22,042   

Shareholders’ equity:

      

Common stock, at par

     1,434        1,431        1,431   

Additional paid-in capital

     1,770,645        1,761,848        1,755,269   

Treasury stock, at cost

     (296,409     (226,926     (65,487

Retained earnings

     669,862        579,781        471,999   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (19,101     (12,190     (11,900
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

     2,126,431        2,103,944        2,151,312   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   $ 4,437,007      $ 4,555,043      $ 4,476,830   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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EDUCATION MANAGEMENTCORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (Unaudited)

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 

     For the Three Months      For the Six Months  
     Ended December 31,      Ended December 31,  
     2011      2010      2011      2010  

Net revenues

   $ 737,188       $ 771,866       $ 1,419,283       $ 1,437,898   

Costs and expenses:

           

Educational services

     376,360         374,141         751,538         731,681   

General and administrative

     191,495         186,979         388,558         373,749   

Depreciation and amortization

     39,196         35,349         78,084         70,400   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

     607,051         596,469         1,218,180         1,175,830   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before interest, loss on extinguishment of debt and income taxes

     130,137         175,397         201,103         262,068   

Interest expense, net

     26,846         28,602         53,697         56,052   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     —           8,363         —           8,363   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     103,291         138,432         147,406         197,653   

Provision for income taxes

     40,164         53,154         57,325         75,927   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 63,127       $ 85,278       $ 90,081       $ 121,726   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earnings per share: (Note 2)

           

Basic

   $ 0.50       $ 0.61       $ 0.70       $ 0.86   

Diluted

   $ 0.49       $ 0.61       $ 0.70       $ 0.86   

Weighted average number of shares outstanding: (Note 2)

           

Basic

     127,193         139,598         127,833         141,021   

Diluted

     128,764         140,256         129,240         141,597   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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EDUCATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)

(In thousands)

 

     For the Six Months  
   Ended December 31,  
     2011     2010  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

    

Net income

   $ 90,081      $ 121,726   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash flows from operating activities:

    

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment

     74,246        66,406   

Amortization of intangible assets

     3,838        3,994   

Bad debt expense

     76,458        73,612   

Fair value adjustments to loans held for sale

     —          7,496   

Amortization of debt issuance costs

     2,632        3,833   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     —          8,363   

Share-based compensation

     6,530        5,399   

Non cash adjustments related to deferred rent

     (5,398     (1,237

Changes in assets and liabilities:

    

Restricted cash

     (31,810     (5,546

Receivables

     (74,675     5,397   

Reimbursements for tenant improvements

     10,705        14,138   

Inventory

     155        25   

Other assets

     (8,097     (10,478

Purchase of Education Finance Loan program loans

     —          (18,410

Accounts payable

     (26,522     (26,403

Accrued liabilities

     29,437        (4,046

Unearned tuition

     (78,980     (90,681

Advance payments

     28,404        20,782   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total adjustments

     6,923        52,644   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows provided by operating activities

     97,004        174,370   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

    

Expenditures for long-lived assets

     (36,125     (69,676

Reimbursements for tenant improvements

     (10,705     (14,138
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows used in investing activities

     (46,830     (83,814
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

    

Payments under revolving credit facility

     (79,000     —     

Issuance of common stock

     2,270        416   

Common stock repurchased for treasury

     (70,378     (59,598

Principal payments on long-term debt

     (6,054     (6,158

Debt issuance costs

     —          (5,411
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows used in financing activities

     (153,162     (70,751
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     (302     61   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

     (103,290     19,866   

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

     403,224        373,546   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

   $ 299,934      $ 393,412   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash paid during the period for:

    

Interest (including swap settlement)

   $ 60,433      $ 54,483   

Income taxes, net of refunds

     27,525        63,113   
     As of December 30,  
     2011     2010  

Noncash investing activities:

    

Capital expenditures in current liabilities

   $ 12,249      $ 16,259   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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EDUCATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(Dollars in thousands)

 

     Common
Stock at
Par Value (c)
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
     Treasury
Stock, at
Cost (c)
    Retained
Earnings
     Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss (b)
    Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 

Balance at June 30, 2010

   $ 1,429       $ 1,749,456       $ (2,207   $ 350,273       $ (22,256   $ 2,076,695   

Exercise of stock options including tax benefit

     2         1,322         —          —           —          1,324   

Share-based compensation

     —           11,070         —          —           —          11,070   

Common stock repurchased for
treasury

     —           —           (224,719     —           —          (224,719

Comprehensive income: (a)

               

Net income

     —           —           —          229,508         —          229,508   

Foreign currency translation

     —           —           —          —           1,165        1,165   

Reclassification into earnings on interest rate swaps, net of tax of $13,994

     —           —           —          —           23,802        23,802   

Periodic revaluation of interest rate swaps, net of tax of $8,771

     —           —           —          —           (14,901     (14,901
             

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unrealized gain on interest rate swaps, net of tax

     —           —           —          —           8,901        8,901   
               

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

     —           —           —          —           —          239,574   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

   $ 1,431       $ 1,761,848       $ (226,926   $ 579,781       $ (12,190   $ 2,103,944   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

               

Exercise of stock options including tax benefit

     3         2,267         —          —           —          2,270   

Share-based compensation

     —           6,530         —          —           —          6,530   

Common stock repurchased for treasury

     —           —           (69,483     —           —          (69,483

Comprehensive income:

               

Net income

     —           —           —          90,081         —          90,081   

Foreign currency translation

     —           —           —          —           (782     (782

Reclassification into earnings on interest rate swaps, net of tax of $2,793

     —           —           —          —           4,736        4,736   

Periodic revaluation of interest rate swaps, net of tax of $6,409

     —           —           —          —           (10,865     (10,865
             

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unrealized loss on interest rate swaps, net of tax

     —           —           —          —           (6,129     (6,129
               

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

     —           —           —          —           —          83,170   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 1,434       $ 1,770,645       $ (296,409   $ 669,862       $ (19,101   $ 2,126,431   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(a) During the six months ended December 31, 2010, other comprehensive income consisted of a $9.6 million unrealized gain on interest rate swaps, net of tax, and a $0.7 million foreign currency translation gain.

 

(b) The balance in accumulated other comprehensive loss at December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010 was comprised of $18.6 million, $12.5 million and $11.7 million of cumulative unrealized losses on interest rate swaps, net of tax, respectively and $(0.5) million, $0.3 million and $(0.2) million of a cumulative foreign currency translation gain/(loss), respectively.

 

(c) There were 600,000,000 authorized shares of par value $0.01 common stock at December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010. There were 137,880,176 outstanding shares of common stock, net of 5,179,872 shares in treasury, at December 31, 2010. Common stock and treasury stock balances and activity were as follows for the periods indicated.

 

     Treasury      Outstanding  

Balance at June 30, 2010

     123,000         142,852,418   

Repurchased

     13,210,972         (13,210,972

Issued for stock-based compensation plans

     —           170,303   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

     13,333,972         129,811,749   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Repurchased

     3,472,433         (3,472,433

Issued for stock-based compensation plans

     —           215,232   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

     16,806,405         126,554,548   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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EDUCATION MANAGEMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Basis of presentation

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements of Education Management Corporation (“EDMC” and together with its subsidiaries, the “Company”) have been prepared by the Company’s management in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and applicable rules and regulations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles in the United States for annual financial statements. The unaudited consolidated financial statements included herein contain all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to present fairly the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and its statements of operations for the three and six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and of cash flows for the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010. The statements of operations for the three and six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for future periods. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011 (the “Annual Report on Form 10-K”) as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The accompanying consolidated balance sheet at June 30, 2011 has been derived from the consolidated audited balance sheet included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Nature of operations

The Company is among the largest providers of post-secondary education in North America, with approximately 151,200 enrolled students as of October 2011. The Company offers education through four different education systems (The Art Institutes, Argosy University, Brown Mackie Colleges and South University) and through online platforms at three of the four education systems. The Company offers academic programs to its students through campus-based and online instruction, or through a combination of both. The Company is committed to offering quality academic programs and strives to improve the learning experience for its students. The curriculum is designed with a strong emphasis on applied career-oriented content and is primarily taught by faculty members who possess practical and relevant professional experience in their respective fields.

Going Private Transaction

On June 1, 2006, EDMC was acquired by a consortium of private equity investment funds led by Providence Equity Partners, Goldman Sachs Capital Partners and Leeds Equity Partners (collectively, the “Sponsors”). The acquisition was accomplished through the merger of EM Acquisition Corporation into EDMC, with EDMC surviving the merger (the “Transaction”). The Sponsors, together with certain other investors, became the owners of EDMC.

The acquisition of EDMC was financed by equity invested in EM Acquisition Corporation by the Sponsors and other investors, cash on hand, borrowings by Education Management LLC (“EM LLC”) under a new senior secured credit facility and the issuance by EM LLC and Education Management Finance Corp. (a wholly-owned subsidiary of EM LLC) of senior notes due 2014 (the “Senior Notes”) and senior subordinated notes due 2016 (the “Senior Subordinated Notes”). See Note 8, “Short-Term and Long-Term Debt”.

 

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Initial Public Offering

In October 2009, EDMC completed an initial public offering of 23.0 million shares of its common stock, $0.01 par value, at a per share price of $18.00 (the “initial public offering”). Net proceeds to EDMC, after transaction costs, totaled approximately $387.3 million. The Sponsors did not sell any of their shares in connection with the initial public offering. Of the net proceeds from the initial public offering, $355.5 million was used to purchase $316.0 million of the $385 million Senior Subordinated Notes then outstanding in a tender offer and $29.6 million was used to pay a termination fee under a management agreement entered into with the Sponsors in connection with the Transaction.

Seasonality

The Company’s quarterly net revenues and income fluctuate primarily as a result of the pattern of student enrollments, and its first fiscal quarter is typically its lowest revenue recognition quarter of the fiscal year due to student vacations. However, the seasonality of the Company’s business has decreased over the last several years due to an increase in the percentage of students enrolling in online programs, which generally experience less seasonal fluctuations than campus-based programs.

Reclassifications

Certain reclassifications of December 31, 2010 and June 30, 2011 data have been made to conform to the December 31, 2011 presentation. These reclassifications did not materially change any of the previously reported amounts.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASU No. 2011-05, Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Presentation of Comprehensive Income. This ASU requires that the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income be presented in either a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. ASU 2011-05 is effective for the Company in the quarter ended September 30, 2012. ASU 2011-05 does not change the items reported in other comprehensive income or when a component of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. Therefore, the new standard will not impact the Company’s financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

2. EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed using the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. The Company uses the treasury stock method to compute diluted EPS, which assumes that restricted stock was converted into common stock and that outstanding stock options were exercised and the resulting proceeds used to acquire shares of common stock at its average market price during the reporting period.

 

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Basic and diluted EPS were calculated as follows (in thousands, except per share amounts):

 

     For the Three Months      For the Six Months  
     Ended December 31,      Ended December 31,  
     2011      2010      2011      2010  

Net income

   $ 63,127       $ 85,278       $ 90,081       $ 121,726   

 

Weighted average number of shares outstanding:

           

Basic

     127,193         139,598         127,833         141,021   

Effect of stock-based awards

     1,571         658         1,407         576   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted

     128,764         140,256         129,240         141,597   

 

Earnings per share:

           

Basic

   $ 0.50       $ 0.61       $ 0.70       $ 0.86   

Diluted

   $ 0.49       $ 0.61       $ 0.70       $ 0.86   

Time-based options to purchase 2.5 million and 4.0 million shares of common stock were outstanding for the three-month and six-month periods ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, but were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because the effect of applying the treasury stock method would have been antidilutive. As further described in Note 3, “Share-Based Compensation and Stock Repurchase Program,” the Company has determined its outstanding performance-based stock options are contingently issuable; therefore, they were not included in the diluted EPS calculation during any period presented.

3. SHARE-BASED COMPENSATION AND STOCK REPURCHASE PROGRAM

Omnibus Long-Term Incentive Plan and 2006 Stock Option Plan

The Company recognized $3.6 million and $3.2 million of share-based compensation expense during the quarters ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and $6.5 million and $5.4 million of share-based compensation expense during the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. None of the share-based compensation expense related to the Company’s performance-based stock options. Because the relevant performance conditions are not probable of being met at December 31, 2011, the Company continues to defer recognizing expense on outstanding performance-based stock options.

On November 3, 2011, the Company granted 2.3 million time-based stock options that vest over a four year period and have an exercise price of $20.93 per share. Using key assumptions of 45% for stock price volatility and 6.25 years for expected option term, the Company estimated a fair value of $9.49 per option using the Black-Scholes-Merton pricing model.

Employees exercised 0.2 million stock options during the quarter ended December 31, 2011. Prior to the current quarter, stock option exercises were not significant. Net of estimated forfeitures, the Company had $35.7 million of unrecognized compensation cost relating to time-based stock options and $29.4 million of unrecognized compensation cost related to performance-based stock options at December 31, 2011.

Long Term Incentive Compensation Plan

In fiscal 2007, EDMC adopted the Long-Term Incentive Compensation Plan (the “LTIC Plan”). The LTIC Plan consists of a bonus pool that is valued based on returns to Providence Equity Partners and Goldman Sachs Capital Partners (together, the “Principal Shareholders”) in connection with a change in

 

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control of EDMC. Out of a total of 1,000,000 units authorized, approximately 593,000 units were outstanding under the LTIC Plan at December 31, 2011. Each unit represents the right to receive a payment based on the value of the bonus pool. Because the contingent future events that would result in value to the unit-holders are less than probable, the Company has not recognized any compensation expense related to the LTIC Plan in any of the periods following the Transaction. The LTIC Plan is being accounted for as an equity-based plan because the units may be settled in stock or cash at the Company’s discretion, and it is the Company’s intent to settle any future payment out of the LTIC Plan by issuing common stock. The total amount of unrecognized compensation cost over the vesting periods of all units, net of estimated forfeitures, is approximately $2.3 million at December 31, 2011.

Stock Repurchase Program

In June 2010, EDMC’s Board of Directors (the “Board”) approved a stock repurchase program that permits EDMC to purchase shares of its common stock. On October 28, 2011, the Board extended the expiration of the period during which purchases could be made under the program from December 31, 2011 to June 30, 2012, and on December 15, 2011, the Board increased the size of the stock repurchase program from $325.0 million to $375.0 million and extended the expiration of the period during which purchases can be made under the program from June 30, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Under the terms of the stock repurchase program, EDMC may make repurchases in the open market, in privately negotiated transactions, through accelerated repurchase programs or in structured share repurchase programs. The program does not obligate EDMC to acquire any particular amount of common stock, and the program may be modified or suspended at any time at EDMC’s discretion. From the inception of the stock repurchase program through December 31, 2011, EDMC has repurchased 16.8 million shares of its common stock under the program at a total cost of $296.4 million.

4. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Property and equipment consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):

 

Asset Class    December 31,
2011
    June 30,
2011
    December 31,
2010
 

Land

   $ 17,648      $ 17,648      $ 17,630   

Buildings and improvements

     76,007        75,835        75,216   

Leasehold improvements

     534,767        515,254        463,440   

Furniture and equipment

     150,690        148,191        135,897   

Technology and other equipment

     289,163        274,015        250,425   

Software

     74,589        69,665        61,830   

Library books

     41,086        39,395        37,140   

Construction in progress

     18,129        21,023        49,830   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     1,202,079        1,161,026        1,091,408   

Accumulated depreciation

     (533,643     (463,649     (399,115
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

   $ 668,436      $ 697,377      $ 692,293   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment was $37.3 million and $33.4 million, respectively, for the quarters ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and $74.2 million and $66.4 million, respectively, for the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

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5. GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

Goodwill

As a result of the Transaction, the Company recorded approximately $2.6 billion of goodwill. Goodwill is recognized as an asset in the financial statements and is initially measured as the excess of the purchase price of the acquired company over the amounts assigned to net assets acquired. In connection with the Transaction, property, equipment, intangible assets other than goodwill and other assets and liabilities were recorded at fair value. The remaining value was assigned to goodwill and represents the intrinsic value of the Company beyond its tangible and identifiable intangible net assets. This is evidenced by the excess of the amount paid to acquire the Company over the values of these respective net assets.

The Company formally evaluates the carrying amount of goodwill for impairment on April 1 of each fiscal year. During interim periods, the Company reviews forecasts, its market capitalization, business plans, regulatory and legal matters and other activities necessary to identify events that may trigger more frequent impairment tests. During the quarters ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company identified no such triggering events, and as a result, no impairments were recorded.

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):

 

     December 31, 2011     June 30, 2011     December 31, 2010  
     Gross            Gross            Gross         
     Carrying      Accumulated     Carrying      Accumulated     Carrying      Accumulated  
     Amount      Amortization     Amount      Amortization     Amount      Amortization  

Tradename-Art Institute

   $ 330,000       $ —        $ 330,000       $ —        $ 330,000       $ —     

Licensing, accreditation and Title IV program participation

     112,179         —          112,179         —          112,179         —     

Curriculum and programs

     36,791         (26,120     35,221         (23,664     33,391         (20,974

Student contracts, applications and relationships

     39,511         (35,715     39,511         (35,159     39,511         (34,604

Favorable leases and other

     19,425         (15,927     19,451         (15,152     19,435         (14,295
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total intangible assets

   $ 537,906       $ (77,762   $ 536,362       $ (73,975   $ 534,516       $ (69,873
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Tradenames are often considered to have useful lives similar to that of the overall business, which generally means such assets are assigned an indefinite life for accounting purposes. State licenses and accreditations of the Company’s schools, as well as their eligibility for Title IV program participation, are periodically renewed in cycles ranging from every year to up to every ten years depending upon government and accreditation regulations. Because the Company considers these renewal processes to be a routine aspect of the overall business, these assets are generally assigned indefinite lives.

Amortization of intangible assets was $1.9 million and $2.0 million, respectively, for the quarters ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and $3.8 million and $4.0 million, respectively, for the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

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Total estimated amortization on the Company’s existing intangible assets at December 31, 2011 for each of the years ending June 30, 2012 through 2016 and thereafter is as follows (in thousands):

 

     Amortization  

Fiscal years

   Expense  

2012 (remainder)

   $ 4,536   

2013

     6,220   

2014

     4,452   

2015

     2,219   

2016

     380   

Thereafter

     158   

6. OTHER LONG-TERM ASSETS

Other long-term assets consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

     December 31,
2011
     June 30,
2011
     December 31,
2010
 

EFL program loans

   $ —         $ —         $ 53,789   

Student receivables, net of allowance

     12,851         11,425         7,354   

Deferred financing fees

     12,879         15,511         18,751   

Deferred compensation

     11,041         10,819         10,142   

Other

     8,946         8,858         10,242   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total other long-term assets

   $ 45,717       $ 46,613       $ 100,278   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Student receivables, net of allowance, relates to payments due from students by a date that is more than twelve months after the balance sheet date. The Company extends credit to students through payment plans for up to 36 months beyond graduation. This extension of credit helps fund the difference between total tuition and fees and the amount covered by government sponsored aid, including amounts awarded under Title IV programs, private loans and cash payments by students.

In August 2008, the Company introduced the Education Finance Loan (“EFL”) program, under which the Company purchased loans that were originated by a private lender. The EFL program enabled students who had exhausted all available government-sponsored or other aid and had been denied a private loan to borrow funds to finance a portion of their tuition and other educational expenses. In April 2011, the Company sold its wholly-owned subsidiary that held the EFL program loans to an unrelated third party for net proceeds of $42.8 million. The Company has no future obligations to purchase additional loans from the private lender under the EFL program.

 

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7. ACCRUED LIABILITIES

Accrued liabilities consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):

 

     December 31,
2011
     June 30,
2011
     December 31,
2010
 

Payroll and related taxes

   $ 37,286       $ 30,637       $ 35,592   

Advertising

     28,795         28,279         36,804   

Interest

     3,004         12,340         12,859   

Benefits

     12,848         11,440         12,749   

Capital expenditures

     5,996         4,801         11,869   

Interest rate swap liability

     —           —           18,592   

Other

     42,583         47,629         47,109   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total accrued liabilities

   $ 130,512       $ 135,126       $ 175,574   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

8. SHORT-TERM AND LONG-TERM DEBT

Senior Secured Credit Facility and Letter of Credit Facility

EM LLC has in place a senior secured credit facility that it obtained in connection with the Transaction and that currently consists of a $1.1 billion term loan and a $442.5 million revolving credit facility, of which a maximum of $425.0 million is available for the issuance of letters of credit.

On December 7, 2010, EM LLC entered into an agreement to amend and extend its senior secured credit facility, as a result of which lenders providing $328.3 million of the $442.5 million in total commitments under the revolving credit facility extended their commitments from June 1, 2012 to June 1, 2015. The LIBOR based interest rate payable to lenders that agreed to extend the maturity of their revolving commitments increased by a margin of 2.5%, from LIBOR plus 1.5% to LIBOR plus 4.0%. The prime based interest rate payable to lenders that agreed to extend the maturity of their revolving commitments increased by a margin of 2.5%, from the prime rate plus a margin of 0.5% to the prime rate plus a margin of 3.0%. Lenders with revolving commitments totaling $114.2 million elected not to extend those commitments, which mature on the original maturity date of June 1, 2012 and bear interest at the lower rate. In addition, holders of an aggregate of $758.7 million of then-outstanding amounts on the term loan agreed to extend the maturity date of their respective portions of the term loan from June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2016. The interest rate payable on these borrowings increased by a margin of 2.25%, from LIBOR + 1.75% to LIBOR + 4.0%. Holders of an aggregate of $352.4 million of then-outstanding amounts on the term loan elected not to extend the maturity date, and that portion of the term loan matures on June 1, 2013, the original maturity date, and bears interest at the lower rate.

The amendment of the term loan was accounted for as an extinguishment of the original term loan, which resulted in a loss on extinguishment of debt of $8.4 million. This loss included $5.1 million of previously deferred financing fees that were being amortized through the original maturity date and $3.3 million paid to lenders in connection with the amendment.

At December 31, 2011, the Company had outstanding letters of credit for $363.7 million, the largest of which is issued to the U.S. Department of Education. The U.S. Department of Education requires the Company to maintain a letter of credit due to the Company’s failure to satisfy certain regulatory financial ratios after giving effect to the Transaction. The amount of this letter of credit was $361.5 million at December 31, 2011, which equals 15% of the total financial aid under Title IV programs received by students attending the Company’s institutions during fiscal 2010. The outstanding letters of credit reduced the amount available under the revolving credit facility to $78.8 million at December 31, 2011. Total borrowing capacity available, including for the issuance of letters of credit, under the Company’s existing revolving credit facility will decrease on June 1, 2012 to $328.3 million.

On November 30, 2011, the Company entered into a cash secured letter of credit agreement pursuant to which the lender agreed to issue letters of credit to the U.S. Department of Education in an aggregate face amount at any time outstanding of up to $150.0 million. The Company’s obligations with respect to such letters of credit are secured by a lien in favor of the lender on certain of the Company’s cash deposits. The agreement matures on November 30, 2013, or earlier if the Company terminates its existing revolving credit facility.

 

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Short-Term Debt

As noted above, the Company had outstanding letters of credit for $363.7 million at December 31, 2011. The Company had no borrowings outstanding under the revolving credit facility at December 31, 2011 and 2010. At June 30, 2011, the Company borrowed $79.0 million on the revolving credit facility in order to satisfy year-end regulatory financial ratios, which the Company repaid on July 1, 2011 from available cash on hand.

At June 30, 2011, the interest rate on amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility due in 2012 was 3.75%, which equaled the prime rate plus a margin of 0.50%, and the interest rate on amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility that are due in 2015 was 6.25%, which equaled the prime rate plus a margin of 3.00%. The applicable margin for borrowings under the revolving credit facility may change based on certain leverage ratios and the Company’s credit ratings. EM LLC is also obligated to pay a per annum commitment fee on undrawn amounts under the revolving credit facility, which is currently 0.375% and varies based on certain leverage ratios. The revolving credit facility is secured by certain of EM LLC’s assets and is subject to EM LLC’s satisfaction of certain covenants and financial ratios, which are described in Part I, Item 2 – “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Covenant Compliance.”

Long-Term Debt

The Company’s long-term debt consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):

 

     December 31,
2011
    June 30,
2011
    December 31,
2010
 

Senior secured term loan facility, due 2013

   $ 348,621      $ 350,503      $ 352,386   

Senior secured term loan facility, due 2016

     748,581        752,624        756,666   

Senior notes due 2014 at 8.75%

     375,000        375,000        375,000   

Senior subordinated notes due 2016 at 10.25%

     —          —          47,680   

Other

     594        723        848   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long-term debt

     1,472,796        1,478,850        1,532,580   

Current portion

     (12,076     (12,076     (12,076
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long term debt, less current portion

   $ 1,460,720      $ 1,466,774      $ 1,520,504   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The interest rate on the senior secured term loan facility due in 2013, which equals three-month LIBOR plus a margin of 1.75%, was 2.38%, 2.00% and 2.06% at December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. The interest rate on the senior secured term loan facility due in 2016, which equals three-month LIBOR plus a margin spread of 4.00%, was 4.63%, 4.25% and 4.31% at December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively.

9. DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS

EM LLC has historically utilized interest rate swap agreements, which are contractual agreements to exchange payments based on underlying interest rates, to manage the floating interest rate risk on its long-term debt. Two such interest rate swaps, each with a notional amount of $375.0 million, expired on July 1, 2011.

 

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In April 2011, EM LLC entered into three new interest rate swap agreements, which became effective on July 1, 2011, for an aggregate notional amount of $950.0 million. The first swap agreement is for a notional amount of $325.0 million and effectively fixes future interest payments at a rate of 2.935% until the scheduled maturity of the underlying borrowings on June 1, 2013. The other two swap agreements, one of which was entered into with an affiliate of one of the Sponsors, are for notional amounts of $312.5 million each and effectively fix future interest payments at a rate of 6.26% through June 1, 2015.

The fair values of the interest rate swap liabilities were $29.6 million, $19.8 million and $18.6 million at December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. The December 31, 2011 and June 30, 2011 fair values were recorded in other long-term liabilities, and the December 31, 2010 fair values were recorded in accrued liabilities on the Company’s accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Additionally, at December 31, 2011, there was a cumulative unrealized loss of $18.6 million, net of tax, related to these interest rate swaps included in accumulated other comprehensive loss on the Company’s accompanying consolidated balance sheet. This loss would be immediately recognized in the consolidated statement of operations if these instruments fail to meet certain cash flow hedge requirements.

The change in interest rate swaps, net of tax, recorded in other comprehensive loss was as follows (in thousands):

 

     For the Three Months
Ended December 31,
    For the Six Months
Ended December 31,
 
     2011     2010     2011     2010  

Reclassification into earnings

   $ 2,276      $ 6,032      $ 4,736      $ 11,778   

Periodic revaluation

     (480     (355     (10,865     (2,131
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unrealized gain/(loss) on interest rate swaps, net of tax

   $ 1,796      $ 5,677      $ (6,129   $ 9,647   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Over the next twelve months, the Company estimates approximately $7.8 million will be reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss to the consolidated statement of operations based on current interest rates and underlying debt obligations at December 31, 2011.

The Company used “level two” inputs to value its interest rate swaps. These inputs are defined as other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable. The application of level two inputs includes obtaining quotes from counterparties, which are based on LIBOR forward curves, and assessing non-performance risk based upon published market data.

10. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The following table presents the carrying amounts and fair values of financial instruments (in thousands):

 

     December 31, 2011      June 30, 2011      December 31, 2010  
     Carrying
Value
     Fair Value      Carrying
Value
     Fair Value      Carrying
Value
     Fair Value  

Variable rate debt

   $ 1,097,202       $ 1,015,077       $ 1,103,127       $ 1,085,768       $ 1,109,052       $ 1,087,947   

Fixed rate debt

     375,594         381,219         375,723         383,223         423,528         434,246   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total long-term debt

   $ 1,472,796       $ 1,396,296       $ 1,478,850       $ 1,468,991       $ 1,532,580       $ 1,522,193   

The fair values of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, the revolving credit facility, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate carrying values due to the short-term nature of these instruments. Derivative financial instruments are carried at fair value, which is based on the framework discussed in Note 9, “Derivative Instruments.” The fair values of the Company’s debt were determined based on each instrument’s trading value at the dates presented.

 

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11. INCOME TAXES

The Company uses the asset and liability method to account for income taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities result from (i) temporary differences in the recognition of income and expense for financial and federal income tax reporting requirements, and (ii) differences between the recorded value of assets acquired in business combinations accounted for as purchases for financial reporting purposes and their corresponding tax bases. The Company regularly evaluates deferred income tax assets for recoverability and records a valuation allowance if it is more-likely-than-not that some portion of the deferred income tax asset will not be realized.

The Company’s effective tax rate was 38.9% and 38.4%, respectively, for the quarters and six month periods ended December 31, 2011 and 2010. The effective rates differed from the combined federal and state statutory rates primarily due to valuation allowances, expenses that are non-deductible for tax purposes, and accounting for uncertain tax positions. There have been no material adjustments to liabilities relating to uncertain tax positions since the last annual disclosure for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011.

12. CONTINGENCIES

Securities Class Action

On August 11, 2010, a securities class action complaint captioned Gaer v. Education Management Corp., et. al was filed against the Company, certain of its executive officers and directors, and certain underwriters of the Company’s initial public offering. The complaint alleges violations of Sections 11, 12(a)(2) and 15 of the Securities Act of 1933 and Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934 due to allegedly false and misleading statements in connection with the Company’s initial public offering and the Company’s subsequent press releases and filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. On November 10, 2010, the District Court granted the Oklahoma Police Pension and Retirement System’s motion to serve as lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. On January 10, 2011, the lead plaintiff and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority filed an Amended Class Action Complaint with the Court alleging similar violations of Section 11, 12(a)(2) and 15 of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 10(b) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act of 1934 and adding one additional individual defendant and other underwriters from the Company’s initial public offering. On September 29, 2011, the District Court granted the Company’s motion to dismiss the case with prejudice. The plaintiffs have appealed the District Court’s dismissal of the lawsuit to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals.

Incentive Compensation Matters

On May 3, 2011, a qui tam action captioned United States of America, and the States of California, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Tennessee, and the District of Columbia, each ex rel., Lynntoya Washington and Michael T. Mahoney v. Education Management Corporation, et. al (“Washington”) filed under the federal False Claims Act in April 2007 was unsealed due to the U.S. Department of Justice’s decision to intervene in the case. Five of the states listed on the case caption and the District of Columbia have joined the case based on qui tam actions filed under their respective False Claims Acts. The State of Kentucky, which does not have a False Claims Act, filed a motion to intervene in the case under its consumer protection laws which was denied by the Court. The case, which is pending in the Western District of Pennsylvania, relates to whether the defendants’ compensation plans for admission representatives violated the Higher Education Act, as amended (“HEA”), and U.S. Department of Education regulations prohibiting an institution participating in Title IV programs from providing any commission, bonus or other incentive payment based directly or indirectly on success in securing enrollments to any person or entity engaged in any student recruitment or admissions activity during the period of July 1, 2003 through June 30, 2011. The complaint was initially filed by a former admissions representative at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online Division and a former director of training at Online Higher Education and

 

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asserts the relators are entitled to recover treble the amount of actual damages allegedly sustained by the federal government as a result of the alleged activity, plus civil monetary penalties. The complaint does not specify the amount of damages sought but claims that the Company and/or students attending the Company’s schools received over $11 billion in funds from participation in Title IV programs during the period of alleged wrongdoing. On October 5, 2011, the Company filed a motion to dismiss the case with prejudice for failure to state a claim upon which relief can be granted. The Company believes the claims to be without merit and intends to vigorously defend itself.

OIG Subpoena

On March 22, 2011, the Company received a subpoena from the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Education requesting documents related to satisfactory academic progress standards and state licensing of online programs offered by South University and The Art Institute of Pittsburgh for the time period beginning January 1, 2006 through the date of the subpoena. The Company intends to cooperate with the subpoena and investigation. However, the Company cannot predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigation at this time.

Buirkle APA Program Accreditation Lawsuit

In August 2009, a petition was filed in the District Court for Dallas County, Texas in the case of Capalbo et al. v. Argosy Education Group, Inc. University, Education Management LLC, Education Management Corporation and Marilyn Powell-Kissinger by 15 former students in the Clinical Psychology program offered by the Dallas campus of Argosy University. In September 2009, the defendants removed the case to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas division. The case was remanded back to state court in November 2009 by agreement after the plaintiffs amended their pleadings to specify their allegations and agreed to dismiss Ms. Powell-Kissinger as a defendant. The plaintiffs filed an amended petition in state court in January 2010 under the name of Buirkle et al. v. Argosy Education Group, Inc., Education Management LLC and Education Management Corporation and included three new plaintiffs. The petition alleges that, prior to the plaintiffs’ enrollment and/or while the plaintiffs were enrolled in the program, the defendants violated the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Act and made material misrepresentations regarding the importance of accreditation of the program by the Commission on Accreditation, American Psychological Association, the status of the application of the Dallas campus for such accreditation, the availability of loan repayment options for the plaintiffs, and the quantity and quality of the plaintiffs’ career options. Plaintiffs seek unspecified monetary compensatory and punitive damages. In March 2010, claims filed by three of the plaintiffs who signed arbitration agreements with Argosy University were compelled to binding arbitration. The remaining lawsuits in the case were stayed pending the resolution of the three arbitrations.

In May 2010, those three plaintiffs and a fourth former student in the Clinical Psychology program offered by the Dallas campus of Argosy University filed a demand for arbitration. The first of four separate arbitrations is currently scheduled to be heard in 2012. Also in May 2010, three additional former students in the Clinical Psychology program offered by the Dallas campus of Argosy University filed a new action in the District Court for Dallas County, Texas in the case of Adibian et al. v. Argosy Education Group, Inc., Education Management LLC, and Education Management Corporation alleging the same claims made in the previous lawsuits. The defendants filed a motion to stay the new action pending the resolution of the arbitration proceedings. Prior to the hearing on the motion, plaintiffs filed a notice of non-suit without prejudice. The court signed the order of non-suit in August 2010, and the case was closed. In September 2010, the plaintiffs filed two amendments to the petition filed in the previously-stayed Buirkle lawsuit, adding four new plaintiffs to the lawsuit, including the plaintiffs from the non-suited Adibian lawsuit.

The Company believes the claims in the lawsuits and the arbitrations to be without merit and intends to vigorously defend itself.

State Attorney General Investigations

In August 2011, the Company received a subpoena from the Attorney General of the State of New York requesting documents and detailed information for the time period of January 1, 2000 through the present. The Art Institute of New York City is the Company’s only school located in New York though the subpoena also addresses fully online students who reside in the State. The subpoena is primarily related to the Company’s compensation of admissions representatives and recruiting activities. The relators in the

 

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Washington qui tam case filed the complaint under the State of New York’s False Claims Act though the state has not announced an intention to intervene in the matter. The Company intends to cooperate with the investigation. However, the Company cannot predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigation at this time.

In December 2010, the Company received a subpoena from the Office of Consumer Protection of the Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Kentucky requesting documents and detailed information for the time period of January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2010. The Company has three Brown Mackie College locations in Kentucky. The Kentucky Attorney General has announced an investigation of the business practices of for-profit post-secondary schools and that subpoenas had been issued to six proprietary colleges that do business in Kentucky in connection with the investigation. The Company intends to continue to cooperate with the investigation. However, the Company cannot predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigation at this time.

In October 2010, Argosy University received a subpoena from the Florida Attorney General’s office seeking a wide range of documents related to the Company’s institutions, including the nine institutions located in Florida, from January 2, 2006 to the present. The Florida Attorney General has announced that it is investigating potential misrepresentations in recruitment, financial aid and other areas. The Company is cooperating with the investigation, but has also filed a suit to quash or limit the subpoena and to protect information sought that constitutes proprietary or trade secret information. The Company cannot predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigation at this time.

In June 2007, The New England Institute of Art (“NEIA”) received a civil investigative demand letter from the Massachusetts State Attorney General requesting information in connection with the Attorney General’s review of alleged submissions of false claims by NEIA to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and alleged unfair and deceptive student lending and marketing practices engaged in by the school. In February 2008, the Attorney General informed NEIA that it does not plan to further pursue its investigation of deceptive marketing practices. In June and August of 2011, the Company provided the Attorney General with additional information related to the false claims investigation. NEIA intends to fully cooperate with the Attorney General in connection with its continuing investigation.

City of San Francisco

In December 2011, the Company received a letter from the City Attorney of the City of San Francisco, California requesting information related to student recruitment and indebtedness, including recruiting practices and job placement reporting, among other issues, by The Art Institute of San Francisco and the seven other Art Institutes located in California. The Company intends to cooperate with the investigation. However, the Company cannot predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of the investigation at this time.

Other Matters

The Company is a defendant in certain other legal proceedings arising out of the conduct of its business. In the opinion of management, based upon an investigation of these claims and discussion with legal counsel, the ultimate outcome of such other legal proceedings, individually and in the aggregate, is not expected to have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

13. GUARANTOR SUBSIDIARIES FINANCIAL INFORMATION

On June 1, 2006, in connection with the Transaction, EM LLC and Education Management Finance Corp. (a wholly owned subsidiary of EM LLC) issued the Senior Notes. The Senior Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by all of EM LLC’s existing direct and indirect domestic restricted subsidiaries, other than any subsidiary that directly owns or operates a school, or has been formed for such purposes, and

 

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subsidiaries that have no material assets (collectively, the “Guarantor Subsidiaries”). None of EM LLC’s other direct or indirect subsidiaries guarantee the Senior Notes (collectively, the “Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries”). Additionally, EDMC has guaranteed the indebtedness of Education Management Finance Corp. and EM LLC under the Senior Notes.

The following tables present the condensed consolidated financial position of EM LLC, the Guarantor Subsidiaries, the Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries and EDMC as of December 31, 2011, June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010. The results of operations for the three and six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 and of condensed cash flows for the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 are also presented for EM LLC, the Guarantor Subsidiaries, the Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries and EDMC.

 

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CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

December 31, 2011 (In thousands)

 

            Guarantor    

Non-

Guarantor

          EM LLC                 EDMC  
   EM LLC      Subsidiaries     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated     EDMC     Eliminations     Consolidated  

Assets

                 

Current:

                 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 234,008       $ 223      $ 12,928      $ —        $ 247,159      $ 52,775      $ —        $ 299,934   

Restricted cash

     56,169         —          23,154        —          79,323        —          —          79,323   

Student and other receivables, net

     3,908         132        167,107        —          171,147        —          —          171,147   

Inventories

     —           109        9,321        —          9,430        —          —          9,430   

Other current assets

     31,047         541        92,157        —          123,745        —          —          123,745   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     325,132         1,005        304,667        —          630,804        52,775        —          683,579   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

     65,775         8,214        594,447        —          668,436        —          —          668,436   

Intercompany balances

     805,780         (31,832     (898,039     —          (124,091     124,091        —          —     

Other long-term assets

     48,332         —          (2,614     —          45,718        (1     —          45,717   

Investment in subsidiaries

     2,321,140         —          —          (2,321,140     —          1,949,439        (1,949,439     —     

Intangible assets, net

     2,067         45        458,032        —          460,144        —          —          460,144   

Goodwill

     7,328         —          2,571,803        —          2,579,131        —          —          2,579,131   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 3,575,554       $ (22,568   $ 3,028,296      $ (2,321,140   $ 4,260,142      $ 2,126,304      $ (1,949,439   $ 4,437,007   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

                 

Current:

                 

Current portion of long-term debt

   $ 11,850       $ —        $ 226      $ —        $ 12,076      $ —        $ —        $ 12,076   

Other current liabilities

     100,056         1,963        277,585        —          379,604        (3     —          379,601   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     111,906         1,963        277,811        —          391,680        (3     —          391,677   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt, less current portion

     1,460,352         —          368        —          1,460,720        —          —          1,460,720   

Other long-term liabilities

     52,611         411        188,092        —          241,114        —          —          241,114   

Deferred income taxes

     1,246         265        215,678        —          217,189        (124     —          217,065   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,626,115         2,639        681,949        —          2,310,703        (127     —          2,310,576   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)

     1,949,439         (25,207     2,346,347        (2,321,140     1,949,439        2,126,431        (1,949,439     2,126,431   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

   $ 3,575,554       $ (22,568   $ 3,028,296      $ (2,321,140   $ 4,260,142      $ 2,126,304      $ (1,949,439   $ 4,437,007   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

June 30, 2011 (In thousands)

 

          Guarantor    

Non-

Guarantor

          EM LLC                 EDMC  
    EM LLC     Subsidiaries     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated     EDMC     Eliminations     Consolidated  

Assets

               

Current:

               

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ (16,816   $ 270      $ 369,637      $ —        $ 353,091      $ 50,133      $ —        $ 403,224   

Restricted cash

    30,685        —          16,828        —          47,513        —          —          47,513   

Student and other receivables, net

    3,758        78        169,121        —          172,957        —          —          172,957   

Inventories

    (296     172        9,718        —          9,594        —          —          9,594   

Other current assets

    25,229        586        110,432        —          136,247        —          —          136,247   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

    42,560        1,106        675,736        —          719,402        50,133        —          769,535   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

    71,417        7,552        618,408        —          697,377        —          —          697,377   

Intangible assets, net

    2,300        51        460,036        —          462,387        —          —          462,387   

Goodwill

    7,328        —          2,571,803        —          2,579,131        —          —          2,579,131   

Intercompany balances

    1,206,483        (29,516     (1,364,493     —          (187,526     187,526        —          —     

Other long-term assets

    30,229        —          16,384        —          46,613        —          —          46,613   

Investment in subsidiaries

    2,189,422        —          —          (2,189,422     —          1,866,158        (1,866,158     —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

  $ 3,549,739      $ (20,807   $ 2,977,874      $ (2,189,422   $ 4,317,384      $ 2,103,817      $ (1,866,158   $ 4,555,043   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

               

Current:

               

Current portion of long-term debt

  $ 90,850      $ —        $ (78,774   $ —        $ 12,076      $ —        $ —        $ 12,076   

Other current liabilities

    94,837        3,517        426,514        —          524,868        (3     —          524,865   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

    185,687        3,517        347,740        —          536,944        (3     —          536,941   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt, less current portion

    1,466,277        —          497        —          1,466,774        —          —          1,466,774   

Other long-term liabilities

    42,841        433        181,426        —          224,700        —          —          224,700   

Deferred income taxes

    (11,224     265        233,767        —          222,808        (124     —          222,684   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

    1,683,581        4,215        763,430        —          2,451,226        (127     —          2,451,099   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)

    1,866,158        (25,022     2,214,444        (2,189,422     1,866,158        2,103,944        (1,866,158     2,103,944   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

  $ 3,549,739      $ (20,807   $ 2,977,874      $ (2,189,422   $ 4,317,384      $ 2,103,817      $ (1,866,158   $ 4,555,043   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

December 31, 2010 (In thousands)

 

     EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     Eliminations     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Assets

                

Current:

                

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 311,400      $ 9,334      $ 23,884      $ —        $ 344,618      $ 48,794      $ —        $ 393,412   

Restricted cash

     438        —          17,950        —          18,388        —          —          18,388   

Student and other receivables, net

     (172     72        105,734        —          105,634        5        —          105,639   

Inventories

     (355     105        11,893        —          11,643        —          —          11,643   

Other current assets

     27,874        533        82,996        —          111,403        —          —          111,403   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     339,185        10,044        242,457        —          591,686        48,799        —          640,485   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

     71,328        7,205        613,760        —          692,293        —          —          692,293   

Intangible assets, net

     2,551        57        462,035        —          464,643        —          —          464,643   

Goodwill

     7,328        —          2,571,803        —          2,579,131        —          —          2,579,131   

Intercompany balances

     973,077        (102,869     (1,213,810     —          (343,602     343,602        —          —     

Other long-term assets

     33,800        53,789        12,691        —          100,280        (2     —          100,278   

Investment in subsidiaries

     2,043,812        —          —          (2,043,812     —          1,758,651        (1,758,651     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 3,471,081      $ (31,774   $ 2,688,936      $ (2,043,812   $ 4,084,431      $ 2,151,050      $ (1,758,651   $ 4,476,830   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

                

Current:

                

Current portion of long-term debt

   $ 11,850      $ —        $ 226      $ —        $ 12,076      $ —        $ —        $ 12,076   

Other current liabilities

     147,905        1,953        252,990        —          402,848        (2     —          402,846   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     159,755        1,953        253,216        —          414,924        (2     —          414,922   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt, less current portion

     1,519,882        —          622        —          1,520,504        —          —          1,520,504   

Other long-term liabilities

     44,916        2,563        163,439        —          210,918        —          —          210,918   

Deferred income taxes

     (12,123     (18,642     210,199        —          179,434        (260     —          179,174   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,712,430        (14,126     627,476        —          2,325,780        (262     —          2,325,518   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)

     1,758,651        (17,648     2,061,460        (2,043,812     1,758,651        2,151,312        (1,758,651     2,151,312   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

   $ 3,471,081      $ (31,774   $ 2,688,936      $ (2,043,812   $ 4,084,431      $ 2,151,050      $ (1,758,651   $ 4,476,830   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

For the Three Months Ended December 31, 2011 (In thousands)

 

    EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     Eliminations     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net revenues

  $ —        $ 1,672      $ 735,516      $ —        $ 737,188      $ —        $ —        $ 737,188   

Costs and expenses:

               

Educational services

    22,456        2,335        351,569        —          376,360        —          —          376,360   

General and administrative

    (20,855     (157     212,450        —          191,438        57        —          191,495   

Depreciation and amortization

    6,522        119        32,555        —          39,196        —          —          39,196   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

    8,123        2,297        596,574        —          606,994        57        —          607,051   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before interest and income taxes

    (8,123     (625     138,942        —          130,194        (57     —          130,137   

Interest (income) expense, net

    26,221        —          627        —          26,848        (2     —          26,846   

Equity in earnings of subsidiaries

    (84,177     —          —          84,177        —          (63,182     63,182        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    49,833        (625     138,315        (84,177     103,346        63,127        (63,182     103,291   

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

    (13,349     (243     53,756        —          40,164        —          —          40,164   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ 63,182      $ (382   $ 84,559      $ (84,177   $ 63,182      $ 63,127      $ (63,182   $ 63,127   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

For the Three Months Ended December 31, 2010 (In thousands)

 

    EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     Eliminations     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net revenues

  $ —        $ 545      $ 771,321      $ —        $ 771,866      $ —        $ —        $ 771,866   

Costs and expenses:

               

Educational services

    19,301        10,227        344,613        —          374,141        —          —          374,141   

General and administrative

    (29,708     (929     217,559        —          186,922        57        —          186,979   

Depreciation and amortization

    5,988        85        29,276        —          35,349        —          —          35,349   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

    (4,419     9,383        591,448        —          596,412        57        —          596,469   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before interest, loss on
extinguishment of debt and income taxes

    4,419        (8,838     179,873        —          175,454        (57     —          175,397   

Interest (income) expense net

    28,942        (963     637        —          28,616        (14     —          28,602   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

    8,363        —          —          —          8,363        —          —          8,363   

Equity in earnings of subsidiaries

    (105,587     —          —          105,587        —          (85,321     85,321        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    72,701        (7,875     179,236        (105,587     138,475        85,278        (85,321     138,432   

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

    (12,620     (3,023     68,797        —          53,154        —          —          53,154   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

    85,321        (4,852     110,439        (105,587     85,321        85,278        (85,321     85,278   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

For the Six Months Ended December 31, 2011 (In thousands)

 

    EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     Eliminations     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net revenues

  $ —        $ 4,676      $ 1,414,607      $ —        $ 1,419,283      $ —        $ —        $ 1,419,283   

Costs and expenses:

               

Educational services

    42,577        5,284        703,677        —          751,538        —          —          751,538   

General and administrative

    (40,069     (526     429,039        —          388,444        114        —          388,558   

Depreciation and amortization

    12,964        221        64,899        —          78,084        —          —          78,084   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

    15,472        4,979        1,197,615        —          1,218,066        114        —          1,218,180   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before interest and income taxes

    (15,472     (303     216,992        —          201,217        (114     —          201,103   

Interest (income) expense, net

    52,447        —          1,253        —          53,700        (3     —          53,697   

Equity in earnings of subsidiaries

    (131,718     —          —          131,718        —          (90,192     90,192        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    63,799        (303     215,739        (131,718     147,517        90,081        (90,192     147,406   

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

    (26,393     (118     83,836        —          57,325        —          —          57,325   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ 90,192      $ (185   $ 131,903      $ (131,718   $ 90,192      $ 90,081      $ (90,192   $ 90,081   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

For the Six Months Ended December 31, 2010 (In thousands)

 

     EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     Eliminations     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net revenues

  $ —        $ 1,696      $ 1,436,202      $ —        $ 1,437,898      $ —        $ —        $ 1,437,898   

Costs and expenses:

               

Educational services

    35,107        12,283        684,291        —          731,681        —          —          731,681   

General and administrative

    (49,646     (1,031     424,312        —          373,635        114        —          373,749   

Depreciation and amortization

    11,648        166        58,586        —          70,400        —          —          70,400   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

    (2,891     11,418        1,167,189        —          1,175,716        114        —          1,175,830   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before interest, loss on
extinguishment of debt and income taxes

    2,891        (9,722     269,013        —          262,182        (114     —          262,068   

Interest (income) expense, net

    56,903        (2,072     1,249        —          56,080        (28     —          56,052   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

    8,363        —          —          —          8,363        —          —          8,363   

Equity in earnings of subsidiaries

    (160,236     —          —          160,236        —          (121,812     121,812        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

    97,861        (7,650     267,764        (160,236     197,739        121,726        (121,812     197,653   

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

    (23,951     (2,937     102,815        —          75,927        —          —          75,927   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

  $ 121,812      $ (4,713   $ 164,949      $ (160,236   $ 121,812      $ 121,726      $ (121,812   $ 121,726   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

For the Six Months Ended December 31, 2011 (In thousands)

 

     EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net cash flows provided by (used in) operations

   $ 21,841      $ (1,486   $ 74,007      $ 94,362      $ 2,642      $ 97,004   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

            

Expenditures for long-lived assets

     (3,555     (444     (32,126     (36,125     —          (36,125

Other investing activities

     —          —          (10,705     (10,705     —          (10,705
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows used in investing activities

     (3,555     (444     (42,831     (46,830     —          (46,830
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

            

Net repayments of debt and other

     (163,925     —          78,871        (85,054     —          (85,054

Common stock repurchased and stock option exercises

     —          —          —          —          (68,108     (68,108

Intercompany transactions

     396,463        1,883        (466,454     (68,108     68,108        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows provided by (used in) financing activities

     232,538        1,883        (387,583     (153,162     —          (153,162
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     —          —          (302     (302     —          (302
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     250,824        (47     (356,709     (105,932     2,642        (103,290

Beginning cash and cash equivalents

     (16,816     270        369,637        353,091        50,133        403,224   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending cash and cash equivalents

   $ 234,008      $ 223      $ 12,928      $ 247,159      $ 52,775      $ 299,934   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

For the Six Months Ended December 31, 2010 (In thousands)

 

     EM LLC     Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
    EM LLC
Consolidated
    EDMC     EDMC
Consolidated
 

Net cash flows provided by (used in) operations

   $ 5,376      $ (12,395   $ 180,902      $ 173,883      $ 487      $ 174,370   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

            

Expenditures for long-lived assets

     (7,179     (725     (61,772     (69,676     —          (69,676

Other investing activities

     —          —          (14,138     (14,138     —          (14,138
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows used in investing activities

     (7,179     (725     (75,910     (83,814     —          (83,814
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

            

Net repayments of debt and other

     (11,336     —          (233     (11,569     —          (11,569

Common stock repurchased and stock option exercises

     —          —          —          —          (59,182     (59,182

Intercompany transactions

     313,017        22,140        (394,339     (59,182     59,182        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash flows provided by (used in) financing activities

     301,681        22,140        (394,572     (70,751     —          (70,751
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash

     —          —          61        61        —          61   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     299,878        9,020        (289,519     19,379        487        19,866   

Beginning cash and cash equivalents

     11,522        314        313,403        325,239        48,307        373,546   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending cash and cash equivalents

   $ 311,400      $ 9,334      $ 23,884      $ 344,618      $ 48,794      $ 393,412   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the percentage relationship of certain statements of operations items to net revenues.

Amounts expressed as a percentage of net revenues

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

     For the Three Months
Ended December 31,
    For the Six Months
Ended December 31,
 
     2011     2010     2011     2010  

Net revenues

     100.0     100.0     100.0     100.0

Costs and expenses:

        

Educational services

     51.1     48.5     52.9     50.9

General and administrative

     25.9     24.2     27.4     26.0

Depreciation and amortization

     5.4     4.6     5.6     4.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

     82.4     77.3     85.9     81.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before interest, loss on extinguishment of debt and income taxes

     17.6     22.7     14.1     18.2

Interest expense, net

     3.6     3.7     3.8     3.9

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     0.0     1.1     0.0     0.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     14.0     17.9     10.3     13.7

Provision for income taxes

     5.4     6.9     4.0     5.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     8.6     11.0     6.3     8.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Three months ended December 31, 2011 (current quarter) compared to the three months ended December 31, 2010 (prior year quarter)

All basis point changes are presented as a percentage of net revenues in each period of comparison.

Net revenues

Our quarterly net revenues and income fluctuate primarily as a result of the pattern of student enrollments, and our first fiscal quarter is typically the lowest revenue recognition quarter of our fiscal year due to student vacations. However, the seasonality of our business has decreased over the last several years due to an increase in the percentage of students enrolling in our online programs, which generally experience less seasonal fluctuations than campus-based programs.

The largest component of our net revenues is tuition collected from our students, which is presented in our statements of operations after deducting refunds, scholarships and other adjustments. In addition to tuition, net revenues also include course-related fees, student housing fees, bookstore sales, restaurant sales in connection with culinary programs, workshop fees, and sales of related study materials. We recognize revenue on a pro rata basis over the term of instruction or occupancy or when cash is received in the case of certain point-of-sale revenues. The amount of tuition revenue received from students varies based on the average tuition charge per credit hour, average credit hours taken per student, type of program, specific curriculum and average student population. Bookstore and housing revenues are largely a function of the average student population.

 

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The two main drivers of our net revenues are average student population and tuition rates. Factors affecting our average student population include the number of continuing students attending our schools at the beginning of a period and the number of new students entering our schools during such period. We believe that the size of our student population at our campuses is influenced by a number of factors. These include, among other factors, the number of individuals seeking post-secondary education, the attractiveness of our program offerings, the quality of the student experience, the persistence of our students, the length of the education programs and our overall educational reputation. We seek to grow our average student population by offering additional programs at existing schools and by establishing new school locations, whether through new facility start-up or acquisition.

Historically, we have been able to pass along the rising cost of providing quality education through increases in tuition. Our ability to raise tuition in the future may be limited by the gainful employment regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Education in June 2011, because potential increases in student borrowing to pay higher tuition costs could negatively impact the financial ratios by which the Department will measure compliance with the new regulations. Total tuition and fees can exceed the amounts of financial aid available for students under all available government-sponsored aid, including Title IV programs. We have increased the number of funding options available to students over the last several years due to significant decreases in the availability of private loans for students to cover this financing gap. For example, we have extended the repayment period for some of the financing we make available to students to include periods of up to 36 months beyond graduation, which may result in higher bad debt expense as a percentage of our net revenues in future periods.

Net revenues for the three months ended December 31, 2011 was $737.2 million, a decrease of 4.5% from the prior year quarter. The decrease in net revenues from the prior year quarter was primarily driven by a 4.5% decrease in October 2011 student enrollment as compared to October 2010 student enrollment.

Educational services expense

Educational services expense, the largest component of our operating expenses, consists primarily of costs related to the development, delivery and administration of our education programs. Major cost components are faculty compensation, salaries of administrative and student services staff, costs of educational materials, facility occupancy costs, information systems costs and bad debt expense.

Educational services expense increased by $2.2 million, or 0.6%, to $376.4 million in the current quarter. As a percentage of net revenues, educational services expense increased by 258 basis points compared to the quarter ended December 31, 2010. This increase was due primarily to decreases in average class size due to lower student enrollment in the current quarter compared to the prior year quarter and the resulting loss of operating leverage.

Bad debt expense increased 80 basis points to $41.3 million in the current quarter compared to $37.1 million for the prior year quarter. The increase in bad debt expense as a percentage of net revenues was primarily due to higher delinquency rates, larger receivable balances related to continued credit extension to our students and an increase in the proportion of our receivables from out-of-school students, which are reserved for at a higher rate than receivables from in-school students. The extension of our credit terms to students may continue to result in higher bad debt expense as a percentage of net revenues in future periods if students continue to utilize this funding source. Salaries and benefits expense, including costs related to the outsourcing of facilities management at one of our education systems, increased 233 basis points as a percentage of net revenues compared to the prior year quarter. In addition, non-capital investments in technology and other infrastructure intended to further enhance the student experience also contributed to the increase in educational services expense. Finally, rent expense associated with schools increased 15 basis points as a percentage of net revenues compared to the prior year quarter, although actual costs decreased from $46.2 million in the prior year quarter to $45.2 million in the current quarter.

These increases were partially offset by a decrease due to recording a non-cash fair value adjustment on our Education Finance Loan portfolio in the prior year quarter of $7.5 million, or 97 basis points. The remaining net increase of 27 basis points in educational services expense in the current quarter was the result of a net increase in other costs, none of which were individually significant.

 

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Table of Contents

General and administrative expense

General and administrative expense consists primarily of marketing and student admissions expenses and certain central staff departmental costs such as executive management, finance and accounting, legal, and other departments that do not provide direct services to students attending our schools.

General and administrative expense was $191.5 million for the current quarter, an increase of 2.4% from $187.0 million in the prior year quarter. As a percentage of net revenues, general and administrative expense increased 175 basis points compared to the quarter ended December 31, 2010. Marketing and admissions costs were 22.0% of net revenues in the current quarter compared to 20.7% of net revenues in the prior year quarter, an increase of 123 basis points. These costs increased in the current quarter primarily due to a decline in the percentage of prospective students who ultimately enrolled in one of our schools. Salaries and benefits expense related to other personnel also increased by 80 basis points due primarily to increased staffing to support certain centralization initiatives and a decrease in operating leverage due to lower student enrollment quarter to quarter.

Partially offsetting the above increases was a 26 basis point decrease in legal and consulting costs, as well a two basis point decrease in other costs, none of which were individually significant.

Depreciation and amortization expense

Depreciation and amortization of long-lived assets was $39.2 million in the current quarter, an increase of 10.9% from the prior year quarter. As a percentage of net revenues, depreciation and amortization expense increased by 74 basis points compared to the prior year quarter, due primarily to the effect of amortization of assets placed into service in the latter half of fiscal 2011 coupled with lower net revenues compared to the prior year quarter.

Interest expense, net

Net interest expense was $26.8 million in the current quarter, a decrease of $1.8 million from the prior year quarter. The decrease in net interest expense is primarily related to the early retirement of the Senior Subordinated Notes in June 2011 and lower weighted average interest rates on our senior secured term loan, including fixed rates from our interest rate swaps, partially offset by higher letter of credit fees following the amendment to our senior secured credit facility in December 2010.

Loss on extinguishment of debt

On December 7, 2010, we finalized an agreement to amend and extend our senior secured credit facility. The amendment was accounted for as an extinguishment of the original term loan. As a result, we recorded a loss on extinguishment of debt of $8.4 million in the prior year. This loss included $5.1 million of previously deferred financing fees that were being amortized through the original maturity date and $3.3 million in fees paid to lending institutions to complete the debt amendment.

Provision for income taxes

Our effective tax rate was 38.9% for the quarter ended December 31, 2011 and 38.4% for the quarter ended December 31, 2010. The effective rates differed from the combined federal and state statutory rates primarily due to valuation allowances, expenses that are non-deductible for tax purposes, and accounting for uncertain tax positions.

Six months ended December 31, 2011 (current period) compared to the six months ended December 31, 2010 (prior year period)

All basis point changes are presented as a percentage of net revenues in each period of comparison.

 

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Table of Contents

Net revenues

Net revenues for the six months ended December 31, 2011 decreased 1.3% to $1,419.3 million, compared to $1,437.9 million in the same period a year ago. The decrease in net revenues from the prior year period was primarily driven by a 3.2% decrease in average student enrollment, partially offset by an average tuition increase of 2.6% in the current year period.

Educational services expense

Educational services expense increased by $19.9 million, or 2.7%, to $751.5 million in the current period. As a percentage of net revenues, educational services expense increased by 207 basis points compared to the six month period ended December 31, 2010. This increase was due primarily to decreases in average class size due to lower student enrollment in the current period compared to the prior year period and the resulting loss of operating leverage.

Bad debt expense increased 27 basis points to $76.5 million in the current period compared to $73.6 million for the prior year period. The increase in bad debt expense as a percentage of net revenues was primarily due to higher delinquency rates, larger receivable balances related to continued credit extension to our students and an increase in the proportion of our receivables from out-of-school students, which are reserved for at a higher rate than receivables from in-school students. The extension of our credit terms to students may continue to result in higher bad debt expense as a percentage of net revenues in future periods if students continue to utilize this funding source. Salaries and benefits expense, including costs related to the outsourcing of facilities management at one of our education systems, increased 212 basis points as a percentage of net revenues compared to the prior year period. In addition, non-capital investments in technology and other infrastructure intended to further enhance the student experience also contributed to the increase in educational services expense. Finally, rent expense associated with schools increased seven basis points as a percentage of net revenues compared to the prior year period, although actual costs decreased from $90.9 million in the prior year period to $90.7 million in the current period.

These increases were partially offset by a decrease due to recording a non-cash fair value adjustment on our Education Finance Loan portfolio in the prior year period of $7.5 million, or 52 basis points. The remaining net increase of 13 basis points consists of other costs, none of which are individually significant.

General and administrative expense

General and administrative expense was $388.6 million for the current period, an increase of 4.0% from $373.7 million in the prior year period. As a percentage of net revenues, general and administrative expense increased 138 basis points compared to the six months ended December 31, 2010. As a result of efficiency and centralization efforts, we incurred a $5.2 million charge related to employee severance at several of our education systems during the current period, which accounted for an increase of 36 basis points in general and administrative expense.

After adjusting for the above item, general and administrative expense increased 102 basis points as compared to the prior year period. Marketing and admissions costs were 23.1% of net revenues in the current period compared to 22.1% of net revenues in the prior year period, an increase of 101 basis points. These costs increased in the current period due to declines in conversion and start rates. Salaries and benefits expense related to other personnel also increased by 61 basis points due primarily to increased staffing to support certain centralization initiatives and a decrease in operating leverage due to lower student enrollment in the current period compared to the prior year period.

Partially offsetting the above increases was a 47 basis point decrease in legal and consulting costs, as well as a 13 basis point decrease in other costs, none of which were individually significant.

 

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Table of Contents

Depreciation and amortization expense

Depreciation and amortization of long-lived assets was $78.1 million in the current period, an increase of 10.9% from the prior year period. As a percentage of net revenues, depreciation and amortization expense increased by 61 basis points compared to the prior year period. The increase in depreciation and amortization as a percentage of net revenues is primarily due to the effect of amortization of assets placed into service in the latter half of fiscal 2011 and lower net revenues period over period.

Interest expense, net

Net interest expense was $53.7 million in the current period, a decrease of $2.4 million from the prior year period. The decrease in net interest expense is primarily related to the early retirement of the Senior Subordinated Notes in June 2011 and lower weighted average interest rates on our senior secured term loan, including fixed rates from our interest rate swaps, partially offset by higher letter of credit fees following the amendment to our senior secured credit facility in December 2010.

Loss on extinguishment of debt

On December 7, 2010, we finalized an agreement to amend and extend our senior secured credit facility. The amendment was accounted for as an extinguishment of the original term loan. As a result, we recorded a loss on extinguishment of debt of $8.4 million in the prior year. This loss included $5.1 million of previously deferred financing fees that were being amortized through the original maturity date and $3.3 million in fees paid to lending institutions to complete the debt amendment.

Provision for income taxes

Our effective tax rate was 38.9% for the six months ended December 31, 2011 and 38.4% for the six months ended December 31, 2010. The effective rates differed from the combined federal and state statutory rates primarily due to valuation allowances, expenses that are non-deductible for tax purposes, and accounting for uncertain tax positions.

Liquidity and Funds of Capital Resources

We finance our operating activities primarily from cash generated from operations, and our primary source of cash is tuition collected from our students. Most of the students at our U.S. schools rely, at least in part, on financial assistance programs to pay for their education, the most significant of which are federal student aid programs under Title IV of the HEA. We believe that cash flow from operations, supplemented from time to time with borrowings under our revolving credit facility, will provide adequate funds for ongoing operations, planned capital expenditures and debt service during the next twelve months. 

Operating cash flows

Cash provided by operating activities for the six month period ended December 31, 2011 was $97.0 million compared to $174.4 million in the prior year period. The decrease in cash provided by operating activities was primarily the result of reduced operating performance as compared to the prior year period coupled with the timing of receipts associated with the conversion to a non-term based academic structure for certain of our students and the related growth in restricted cash.

Our student receivables balance reaches a peak immediately after the billing of tuition and fees at the beginning of each academic period. We collect the majority of these receivables at or near the start of each academic period when we receive federal financial aid proceeds and cash payments from continuing students. Because the academic terms of all of our programs do not coincide with our quarterly reporting periods, we may have quarterly fluctuations in cash receipts, reported net cash flow from operations, net accounts receivable, unearned tuition and advance payment balances. For the six month period ended December 31, 2011, there were no significant changes to the start dates of academic terms in session as compared to the prior year period. However, there was a decrease in cash flow from operations due to the increase in the number of students who were enrolled under a non-term academic structure. See “Conversion to Non-Term Academic Structure” described later in Liquidity and Funds of Capital Resources.

The extent to which we extend credit to our students has increased over the last several years due to decreases in the availability of private loans for students. We extend credit to students to help fund the difference between our total tuition and fees and the amount covered by government sponsored aid, including amounts awarded under Title IV programs, private loans obtained by students, and cash payments by students. During fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2012, we extended the repayment period for some of the financing we make available to students to include periods of up to 36 months beyond graduation, which may result in higher bad debt expense as a percentage of our net revenues in future periods if students continue to utilize this funding source. Because the extended payment plans are not federal student loans, these plans will not directly affect our published student loan default rates. However, these extended credit terms may have an indirect negative impact on default rates because our students effectively may have more total debt upon graduation.

 

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We accrued $5.4 million as of December 31, 2011 for uncertain tax positions, excluding interest and the indirect benefits associated with state income taxes. We may be required to pay the amounts accrued in future periods if we are ultimately unsuccessful in defending these uncertain tax positions. However, we cannot reasonably predict at this time the future period in which these payments may occur, if at all.

In November 2011, we entered into a cash secured letter of credit agreement pursuant to which the lender agreed to issue letters of credit to the U.S. Department of Education in an aggregate face amount at any time outstanding of up to $150.0 million. Our obligations with respect to such letters of credit are secured by a lien in favor of the lender on certain of our cash deposits. The agreement with the lender matures on November 30, 2013, or earlier if we terminate our existing revolving credit facility. Once we utilize this new facility, we will transfer funds to restricted cash, which we anticipate will result in an operating cash outflow in the period in which the transfer occurs.

FFEL/Direct Loan Programs and Private Student Loans

Approximately 90.3% and 3.2% of our net revenues were indirectly derived from Title IV programs under the HEA and private loan programs, respectively, in fiscal 2011 compared to 88.5% and 4.5% from Title IV programs and private loan programs, respectively, in fiscal 2010. In fiscal 2011, cash receipts from Title IV programs included $664.6 million of stipends, or financing received by students in excess of tuition and fees they paid to our schools. For purposes of the 90/10 Rule, which tests receipts from Title IV programs on a cash basis and excludes certain receipts such as military aid, the percentage of revenues derived by our institutions from Title IV programs during fiscal 2011 ranged from approximately 88% to 57%, with a weighted average of approximately 78%.

The reliance on private loans by students attending our schools has decreased substantially during the last three fiscal years due to the increased availability of federal aid and adverse market conditions for consumer student loans. However, this trend was partially offset in fiscal 2009, 2010 and 2011 by our involvement in the EFL program we introduced in August 2008. Because we terminated the program as of June 30, 2011, we increased the extension of credit to our students for periods of up to 36 months beyond graduation.

While we are taking steps to address the private loan needs of our students, the consumer lending market could worsen. The inability of our students to finance their education could cause our student population to decrease, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Conversion to Non-Term Academic Structure

Beginning in January 2011 and continuing into fiscal 2012, we transitioned the fully online programs offered by South University and Argosy University from a term-based academic structure, under which all students begin programs and are eligible to receive financial aid at periodic start dates pursuant to a calendar-based term system, to a non-term academic structure, under which each student may begin a program and be eligible to receive financial aid as they successfully progress throughout the year. For students attending fully online programs, we believe a non-term academic structure provides greater ease and flexibility by providing for rolling and flexible start dates. The non-term academic structure also assists in ensuring that students do not over borrow in the early years of a program, which otherwise could cause our students to exceed aggregate loan limits prior to graduation. The move to a non-term academic structure reduces the amount of stipends (i.e., loans used for living and other expenses) a student is eligible to receive.

Under a non-term academic structure, Direct Loans and Pell grants are typically provided in two equal disbursements each academic year. The first disbursement is usually received during the first course of a payment period. The student’s second disbursement cannot be received until the student has successfully completed the courses that were previously funded. These factors, together with the timing of when students begin their programs, affect our operating cash flow. In a quarterly term-based Title IV program environment, disbursements are generally based on three academic terms per academic year, and institutions operating on this basis are generally allowed to draw most of a student’s financial aid at the start of a term as long as the student is enrolled at least as a half-time student. The majority of the cash received in a term-based environment is recorded as unrestricted cash and unearned tuition. However, in a non-term environment, Title IV draws are generally based on when a student takes a class, which results in higher restricted cash and advance payment balances than in a term-based environment. In addition, the transition to a non-term academic structure may result in a reduction in cash flow from operations due to more cash being restricted compared to prior periods. At December 31, 2011, we had $52.1 million in restricted cash related to non-term disbursements.

Investing cash flows

Capital expenditures were $36.1 million, or 2.5% of net revenues, for the six month period ended December 31, 2011 compared to $69.7 million, or 4.8% of net revenues, for the prior year period. We expect capital expenditures in fiscal 2012 to be between 4.0% and 4.5% of net revenues, compared to 4.8% of net revenues in fiscal 2011.

 

 

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Reimbursements for tenant improvements represent cash received from lessors based on the terms of lease agreements to be used for leasehold improvements and reduce capital expenditures. We lease most of our facilities under operating lease agreements. We anticipate that future commitments on existing leases will be satisfied from cash provided from operating activities. We also expect to extend the terms of leases that will expire in the near future or enter into similar long-term commitments for comparable space.

Financing cash flows

As a result of the Transaction, we are highly leveraged and our debt service requirements are significant. At December 31, 2011, we had $1,472.8 million in aggregate indebtedness outstanding, the largest of which is a senior secured credit facility that we obtained in connection with the Transaction. The senior secured credit facility currently consists of a $1.1 billion term loan and a $442.5 million revolving credit facility, of which a maximum of $425.0 million is available for the issuance of letters of credit. Total borrowing capacity under the revolving credit facility will decrease to $328.3 million on June 1, 2012.

At December 31, 2011, an aggregate of $363.7 million in letters of credit were outstanding under the revolving credit facility, the largest of which is issued to the U.S. Department of Education, which requires us to maintain a letter of credit due to our failure to satisfy certain regulatory financial ratios after giving effect to the Transaction. The amount of the letter of credit was $361.5 million at December 31, 2011, which equals 15% of the total Title IV aid received by students attending our institutions during fiscal 2010. The outstanding letters of credit reduced the amount available under the revolving credit facility to $78.8 million at December 31, 2011.

We borrowed $79.0 million on the revolving credit facility at June 30, 2011 in order to satisfy year-end regulatory financial ratios, which was repaid on July 1, 2011 from cash on hand at fiscal year-end. We did not borrow against the revolving credit facility at any other point during fiscal 2011.

In June 2010, we adopted a stock repurchase program which currently permits the repurchase of up to $375.0 million of our common stock through December 31, 2012. Pursuant to this program, we repurchased 16.8 million shares of our common stock at a total cost of $296.4 million through December 31, 2011 and have repurchased a total of 17.2 million shares of our common stock for $306.4 million through January 31, 2012. Continued stock repurchases during fiscal 2012 through the repurchase program will contribute to a decrease in our weighted average diluted shares compared to prior years. See Note 3, “Share-Based Compensation and Stock Repurchase Program,” to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

At December 31, 2011, total indebtedness outstanding under the Senior Notes issued by EM LLC, which EDMC has guaranteed, was $375.0 million. We do not expect the guarantee will adversely affect our liquidity within the next twelve months or restrict our ability to declare dividends or incur additional indebtedness in the future.

We may from time to time use cash on hand to retire or purchase our outstanding debt through open market transactions, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. Such repurchases, if any, will depend on prevailing market conditions, our liquidity requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors. The amounts involved may be material. See Note 8, “Short-Term and Long-Term Debt,” to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

 

 

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Regulatory Environment and Gainful Employment

In November 2009, the U.S. Department of Education convened two negotiated rulemaking teams primarily related to Title IV program integrity issues. The resulting program integrity rules promulgated in October 2010 and June 2011 address numerous topics. See Part I, Item 1 “Business — Student Financial Assistance — Program Integrity Regulations” of our June 30, 2011 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In October 2011, the U.S. Department of Education requested nominations for individual negotiators for two negotiation teams to address teacher preparation and student loan issues. These negotiations began in January 2012 and are scheduled to conclude in April 2012.

The U.S. Department of Education and its Office of Inspector General may conduct program reviews or audits, respectively, of our institutions’ participation in Title IV programs. During fiscal 2011, the U.S. Department of Education performed program reviews of five of our institutions, of which one is fully resolved. We have provided an initial response to two of the remaining four program reviews and have not received the initial reports with respect to the other two remaining reviews. Based on the respective program review verbal exit interviews, we do not anticipate that the results of any of these reviews will have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

An additional program review was performed at one of our institutions during the first six months of fiscal 2012. We received the initial report on February 8, 2012 and we are currently reviewing the report.

Contingencies

See Note 12, “Contingencies” in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

New Accounting Standards Not Yet Adopted

See Note 1, “Basis of Presentation” in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

EBITDA, a measure used by management to measure operating performance, is defined as net income plus interest expense, net, provision for income taxes and depreciation and amortization. EBITDA is not a recognized term under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and does not purport to be an alternative to net income as a measure of operating performance or to cash flows from operating activities as a measure of liquidity. Additionally, EBITDA is not intended to be a measure of free cash flows available for management’s discretionary use, as it does not consider certain cash requirements such as interest payments, tax payments and debt service requirements. Our obligations to make interest payments and our other debt service obligations have increased substantially as a result of the indebtedness incurred to finance the Transaction and to pay related expenses in June 2006. Management believes EBITDA is helpful in highlighting trends because EBITDA excludes the results of decisions that are outside the control of operating management and can differ significantly from company to company depending on long-term strategic decisions regarding capital structure, the tax jurisdictions in which companies operate and capital investments. Management compensates for the limitations of using non-GAAP financial measures by using them to supplement GAAP results to provide a more complete understanding of the factors and trends affecting the business than GAAP results alone. Because not all companies use identical calculations, these presentations of EBITDA may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of other companies. EBITDA is calculated as follows (in millions):

 

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     For the Three Months
Ended December 31,
     For the Six Months
Ended December 31,
 
     2011      2010      2011      2010  

Net income

   $ 63.1       $ 85.3       $ 90.1       $ 121.7   

Interest expense, net

     26.8         28.6         53.7         56.1   

Loss on the extinguishment of debt (1)

     0.0         8.4         0.0         8.4   

Provision for income taxes

     40.2         53.1         57.3         75.9   

Depreciation and amortization

     39.2         35.3         78.1         70.4