10-K 1 ezpw_2012930-10k.htm FORM 10-K EZPW_2012.9.30-10K
 
 
 
 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
þ
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2012
or
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission File No. 000-19424
EZCORP, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
74-2540145
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
1901 Capital Parkway, Austin, Texas
 
78746 
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (512) 314-3400
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Class A Non-voting Common Stock, $.01 par value per share
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market
 
 
(NASDAQ Global Select Market)
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosures of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer þ
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company o
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No þ
The only class of voting securities of the registrant issued and outstanding is the Class B Voting Common Stock, par value $.01 per share, all of which is owned by an affiliate of the registrant. There is no trading market for the Class B Voting Common Stock. The aggregate market value of the Class A Non-voting Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $1,525 million, based on the closing price on the NASDAQ Stock Market on March 31, 2012.
As of October 31, 2012, 48,395,890 shares of the registrant’s Class A Non-voting Common Stock, par value $.01 per share and 2,970,171 shares of the registrant’s Class B Voting Common Stock, par value $.01 per share, were outstanding.
Documents incorporated by reference: None
 
 
 
 
 



EZCORP, INC.
YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2012
INDEX TO FORM 10-K
Item
Page
No.
No.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



PART I
This report contains forward-looking statements that are based on our current expectations. Actual results in future periods may differ materially from those expressed or implied by those forward-looking statements because of a number of risks and uncertainties. For a discussion of risk factors affecting our business and prospects, see “Part I — Item 1A — Risk Factors.” See also “Part II — Item 7 — Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Cautionary Statement Regarding Risks and Uncertainties That May Affect Future Results.”
Unless otherwise specified, references to the “company” or “we” refer to EZCORP, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. References to a “fiscal” year refer to our fiscal year ended September 30 of the specified year. For example, “fiscal 2012” refers to the fiscal year ended September 30, 2012.
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
General
EZCORP, Inc. is a Delaware corporation headquartered in Austin, Texas. We are a leading provider of instant cash solutions, employing approximately 7,200 team members and operating over 1,250 locations and branches across the United States, Mexico, Canada and the United Kingdom, with unconsolidated investments based in the United Kingdom and Australia.
We provide a variety of instant cash solutions, including collateralized, non-recourse loans, commonly known as pawn loans, and a variety of short-term consumer loans, including single-payment and multiple-payment unsecured loans and single-payment and multiple-payment auto title loans. In Texas, we provide fee-based credit services to consumers seeking loans. At our pawn and buy/sell stores, we sell merchandise, primarily collateral forfeited from pawn lending operations and second-hand merchandise purchased from customers. We also offer prepaid debit card services to help customers better manage their money and control their spending.
During the second quarter of fiscal 2012, we entered into the unsecured lending market in Mexico with the acquisition of a 60% interest in Prestaciones Finmart, S.A.de C.V., SOFOM, E.N.R. ("Crediamigo"), a leading payroll withholding lender headquartered in Mexico City. As of September 30, 2012, Crediamigo had approximately 100 payroll withholding master agreements with Mexican employers, primarily federal, state and local governments and agencies, and provided consumer loans to the agencies' employees. In addition, during the third quarter of fiscal 2012, we acquired 72% of Ariste Holding Limited and its affiliates ("Cash Genie"), which offers short-term consumer loans online in the United Kingdom. Subsequent to the end of fiscal 2012, we increased our ownership interest in Cash Genie to 95%.
At September 30, 2012, we operated a total of 1,262 locations, consisting of 470 U.S. pawn stores (operating primarily as EZPAWN or Value Pawn), seven U.S. buy/sell stores (operating as Cash Converters), 230 pawn stores in Mexico (operating as Empeño Fácil or Empeñe Su Oro), 442 U.S. financial services stores (operating primarily as EZMONEY), 33 financial services stores in Canada (operating as CASHMAX), 35 buy/sell and financial services stores in Canada (operating as Cash Converters) and 45 financial services branches in Mexico (operating as Crediamigo). We own approximately 30% of Albemarle & Bond Holdings, PLC, one of the United Kingdom's largest pawnbroking businesses with approximately 230 stores, and approximately 33% of Cash Converters International Limited, which is based in Australia and franchises and operates a worldwide network of approximately 700 locations that provide financial services and buy and sell second-hand goods. We also own the Cash Converters master franchise rights in Canada and are the franchisor of 10 stores there.
At our pawn stores, we offer pawn loans, which are non-recourse loans collateralized by tangible personal property, and sell merchandise to customers looking for good value. The merchandise we sell consists of second-hand collateral forfeited from our pawn lending activities or purchased from customers and new or refurbished merchandise from third party vendors. In our Cash Converters stores, we also buy and sell second-hand goods. At our financial services stores and at some of our pawn stores, we offer a variety of consumer loan products, including single-payment, unsecured loans with maturity dates typically ranging from 7 to 30 days; multiple-payment unsecured loans that may be repaid over extended periods of up to seven months; single-payment 30-day loans secured by automobile titles; multiple-payment auto title loans that carry terms of two to five months; and revolving lines of credit, both unsecured and secured by automobile titles. In Texas, our financial services stores and our pawn stores that also offer financial services do not offer loan products themselves, but rather offer credit services to help customers obtain loans from independent third-party lenders. We also offer prepaid debit cards in all of our U.S. stores.
Beginning with the second quarter of fiscal 2012, we redefined our reportable operating segments based on geography. Because our company is organized and managed along geographic lines, with product offerings and channels based on local custom and regulation, we concluded that segment reporting based on geography more closely aligns with our management organization and strategic direction.

3


For periods ending after January 1, 2012, we report segments as follows:
U.S. & Canada — All business activities in the United States and Canada
Latin America — All business activities in Mexico and other parts of Latin America
Other International — All business activities in the rest of the world (currently consisting of consumer loans online in the U.K. and our equity interests in the net income of Albemarle & Bond and Cash Converters International)
Concurrent with the change in reportable operating segments, we revised our prior period financial information to reflect comparable financial information for the new segment structure. For revenues, profitability, assets and other information attributable to each of our segments, see Note 18, “Operating Segment Information,” to our consolidated financial statements contained in “Part II — Item 8 — Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
The following table presents store data by segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2012
 
Company-owned Stores
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
 
Latin America
 
Other International
 
Consolidated
 
Franchises
Stores in operation:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of period
933

 
178

 

 
1,111

 
13

New openings
17

 
54

 

 
71

 

Acquired
51

 
45

 

 
96

 

Sold, combined or closed
(14
)
 
(2
)
 

 
(16
)
 
(3
)
End of period
987

 
275

 

 
1,262

 
10

The following components comprised our total revenues for each of the last three fiscal years:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Merchandise sales
33
%
 
33
%
 
33
%
Jewelry scrapping sales
21
%
 
24
%
 
24
%
Pawn service charges
24
%
 
23
%
 
22
%
Consumer loan (including credit service) fees
21
%
 
20
%
 
21
%
Other revenues
1
%
 
%
 
%
Total revenues
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
Pawn and Retail Activities
At our pawn stores, we make pawn loans, which are typically small, non-recourse loans collateralized by tangible personal property. At September 30, 2012, we had an aggregate pawn loan principal balance of $157.6 million, and the average pawn loan was approximately $125. We earn pawn service charge revenue on our pawn lending. In fiscal 2012, pawn service charges accounted for approximately 24% of our total revenues and 38% of our net revenues.
While allowable service charges vary by state and loan size, a majority of our U.S. pawn loans earn 20% per month. Our average U.S. pawn loan amount typically ranges between $130 and $145 but varies depending on the valuation of each item pawned. The total U.S. loan term ranges between 60 and 120 days, consisting of the primary term and grace period. In Mexico, pawn service charges range from 15% to 21% per month, including applicable taxes, with the majority of loans earning 21%. The total Mexico pawn loan term is 40 days, consisting of the primary term and grace period. Individual loans are made in Mexican pesos and vary depending on the valuation of each item pawned, but typically average $60 U.S. dollars. In fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, and on a consolidated basis, approximately 82%, 81% and 80%, respectively, of our pawn loans were redeemed in full or were renewed or extended.
Collateral for our pawn loans consists of tangible personal property, generally jewelry, consumer electronics, tools, sporting goods and musical instruments. Approximately 60% of our pawn loan collateral is jewelry, and the vast majority of that is gold jewelry. We do not evaluate the creditworthiness of a pawn customer, but rely on the estimated resale value of the collateral and the perceived probability of the loan’s redemption. The sources of information we use to determine the resale value of collateral include our computerized valuation software, gold values, Internet retail and auction sites, catalogs, newspaper advertisements

4


and previous sales of similar merchandise. We generally lend from 25% to 65% of the collateral’s estimated resale value depending on an evaluation of these factors, and up to 80% based on scrap value.
The collateral is held through the duration of the loan, which the customer may renew or extend by paying accrued pawn service charges (in the case of a renewal) or pawn service charges for the extension period (in the case of an extension). Through our lending guidelines, we maintain an annual redemption rate (the percentage of loans made that are repaid, renewed or extended) between 79% and 82%. If a customer does not repay, renew or extend a loan, the collateral is forfeited to us and becomes inventory available for sale. We do not record loan losses or charge-offs of pawn loans because the principal amount of an unpaid loan becomes the inventory carrying cost of the forfeited collateral. We provide an inventory valuation allowance to ensure that this forfeited collateral is valued at the lower of cost or market.
The table below shows the dollar amount of our pawn loan activity for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
(in millions)
Loans made
$
572.0

 
$
505.2

 
$
416.4

Loans repaid
(318.9
)
 
(273.5
)
 
(222.2
)
Loans forfeited
(245.6
)
 
(215.3
)
 
(177.8
)
Loans acquired in business acquisitions
6.8

 
8.6

 
2.7

Change due to foreign currency exchange fluctuations
(2.0
)
 
(0.9
)
 
0.4

Net increase in pawn loans outstanding at the end of the year
$
12.3

 
$
24.1

 
$
19.5

Loans renewed
$
221.6

 
$
173.4

 
$
124.8

Loans extended
$
1,234.2

 
$
979.6

 
$
805.3

The redemption rate of pawn loans and the gross profit realized on the sale of forfeited collateral are dependent on the loan value of customer merchandise. Jewelry can be appraised based on weight, gold content, style and value of gemstones. Other items pawned typically consist of consumer electronics, tools, sporting goods and musical instruments. These are evaluated based on recent sales experience and the selling price of similar new merchandise, adjusted for age, wear and obsolescence.
At the time a pawn loan is made, the customer is given a pawn ticket, which shows the name and address of the pawn store and the customer, the customer’s identification information, the date of the loan, a detailed description of the pledged goods, the amount financed, the pawn service charge, the maturity date of the loan, the total amount that must be paid to redeem the loan and the annual percentage rate.
In our pawn stores and buy/sell stores, we acquire inventory for retail sales through pawn loan forfeitures and through purchases of customers’ merchandise and purchases of new or refurbished merchandise from third party vendors. We believe our ability to offer quality second-hand goods and refurbished goods at prices significantly lower than original retail prices attracts value-conscious customers. The gross profit on sales of inventory depends primarily on our assessment of the loan or purchase value at the time the property is either accepted as loan collateral or purchased. Improper value assessment in the lending or purchasing process can result in lower margins or reduced marketability of the merchandise. During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, we realized gross margins on sales of 43%, 43% and 42%, respectively.
During the three most recent fiscal years, sources of inventory additions were:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Forfeited pawn loan collateral
72
%
 
68
%
 
69
%
Purchases from customers
26
%
 
30
%
 
30
%
Acquired in business acquisitions
2
%
 
2
%
 
1
%
Total
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
For fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, retail activities and jewelry scrapping (sales of precious metals and gemstones to refiners and gemstone wholesalers) accounted for approximately 55%, 57% and 56%, respectively, of our total revenues, or 35%, 37% and 36%, respectively, of net revenues, after deducting the cost of goods sold. As a significant portion of our inventory and sales involve gold jewelry, our results can be heavily influenced by the market price of gold.

5


Customers may purchase an extended return plan (called a “product protection plan”) that allows them to return or exchange certain general (non-jewelry) merchandise sold through our retail pawn operations within three to six months of purchase. We recognize the fees for this service as revenue ratably over the three to six month period.
We also offer a jewelry VIP package, which guarantees customers a minimum future pawn loan amount on the item sold, allows them full credit if they trade in the item to purchase a more expensive piece of jewelry, and provides minor repair service on the item sold. These fees are recognized on sale.
Customers may also purchase an item on layaway by paying a minimum layaway deposit of typically 10% to 20% of the item’s sale price. We hold the item for a 60 to 180-day period, during which the customer is required to pay the balance of the sales price. The initial deposit and subsequent payments are recorded as customer layaway deposits. Layaways are recorded as sales when paid in full. As of September 30, 2012, we held $7.2 million in customer layaway deposits. We record product protection, jewelry VIP and layaway fees as sales revenue, as they are incidental to sales of merchandise.
Our inventory is stated at the lower of cost or market. We record a valuation allowance for obsolete or slow-moving inventory based on the type and age of merchandise. We generally establish a higher allowance percentage on general merchandise, as it is more susceptible to obsolescence, and establish a lower allowance percentage on jewelry, as it retains much greater commodity value. The total allowance was 4.9% of gross inventory at September 30, 2012 compared to 9.5% at September 30, 2011. The lower valuation allowance is reflective of periodic analyses conducted to value the inventory based on aging, profitability, sell-through rates and shrink in each classification, including jewelry and general merchandise.
Financial Services
We also offer a variety of financial services to customers who have limited access to other sources of credit. Many customers find our financial services a more attractive alternative than borrowing from friends or family or incurring insufficient funds fees, overdraft protection fees, utility reconnect fees and other charges imposed when they have insufficient cash to meet their needs. By utilizing our financial services, customers can exercise greater control of their personal finances without damaging the relationships they have with their merchants, service providers and family members.
The specific financial services offered varies by location, but generally include some or all of the following:
Unsecured consumer loans — We offer a variety of unsecured consumer loans, including single-payment loans, multiple-payment loans, lines of credit and payroll withholding loans:
Single-payment loans — Single-payment loans are short-term loans (generally less than 30 days and averaging about 16 days) with due dates corresponding to the customer’s next payday. Principal amounts of single-payment unsecured loans can be up to $1,500, but average approximately $440. In the U.S. we typically charge a fee of 15% to 22% of the loan amount for a 7 to 23-day period. Online in the United Kingdom, we charge a fixed fee of 30% of the loan amount for up to 30 days.
Multiple-payment loans — Multiple-payment loans typically carry a term of four to seven months, with a series of equal installment payments due monthly, semi-monthly or on the customer’s paydays. Total interest and fees on these loans vary in accordance with state law and loan terms, but over the entire loan term, total approximately 45% to 130% of the original principal amount of the loan. Principal amounts range from $100 to $3,000, but average approximately $550.
Line of credit — Revolving lines of credit operate similarly to a typical credit card. Customers may borrow as needed, may fully repay borrowed amounts at any point and are billed at regular intervals with certain minimum principal and fee payment requirements due in each billing cycle. Billing cycle due dates range from two weeks to a month and generally correspond with the customer’s paydays. Customers may borrow up to their approved credit line, and may re-borrow any repaid amounts. We provide lines of credit ranging from $100 to $700 and typically charge an annual fee of $30 per account and a monthly fee approximating 52% of the amount borrowed.
Payroll withholding loans — At Crediamigo, we offer unsecured consumer loans to employees of various employers (typically, government agencies) with whom we have master payroll withholding lending agreements. Principal amounts of the loans average $1,200, with terms averaging 31 months. The loans typically have annual yields of approximately 27%.
Secured consumer loans — We offer three principal types of secured consumer loans:
Single-payment auto title loans — Single-payment auto title loans are 30-day loans secured by the titles to customers’ automobiles. Loan principal amounts range from $100 to $10,000, but average about $835. Loan

6


amounts are established based on customers’ income levels, an inspection of the automobile and title and reference to market values of used automobiles. We earn a fee of 12.5% to 25% of auto title loan amounts.
Multi-payment auto title loans — In Texas, we assist customers in obtaining multiple-payment auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. Multiple-payment auto title loans carry a term of up to five months, with a series of equal installment payments due monthly, semi-monthly or on the customer’s paydays and with each installment payment we earn a fee of 11% to 35% of the initial loan amount.
Auto title line of credit —The terms and fee structure of auto title lines of credit are similar to those of unsecured lines of credit described above, except that they are secured by the titles to customers’ automobiles. We provide lines of credit ranging from $100 to $8,000 and typically charge an initial lien fee per account and a monthly fee approximating 25% of the amount borrowed.
Debit Cards — In many of our stores and online, customers may obtain general-purpose, branded reloadable debit cards. The cards are issued by a bank, and we receive a portion of the fees charged for activity on the cards.
In our Texas stores, we do not offer consumer loans themselves, but offer fee-based credit services to customers seeking loans. In these locations, we act as a credit services organization (or “CSO”) on behalf of customers in accordance with applicable state and local laws, and offer advice and assistance to customers in obtaining loans from unaffiliated lenders. Our services include arranging consumer loans with independent third-party lenders, assisting in the preparation of loan applications and loan documents and accepting loan payments for the lenders. We do not make, fund or participate in the consumer loans made by the lenders, but we assist customers in obtaining credit and enhance their creditworthiness by issuing letters of credit to guarantee customers’ payment obligations to the independent third-party lenders. For credit services in connection with arranging a single-payment loan (average loan amount of about $505), our fee is approximately 22% of the loan amount. For credit services in connection with arranging an unsecured multiple-payment loan (average loan amount of about $2,105), our fee is 11% of the initial loan amount with each semi-monthly or bi-weekly installment payment. Low dollar installment loan principal amounts range from $100 to $1,500, but average about $705. With each semi-monthly or bi-weekly installment payment, we earn a fee of 13% to 14% of the initial loan amount. For credit services in connection with arranging single-payment auto title loans (average loan amount of about $860), the fee is up to 30% of the loan amount. In fiscal 2012, we began assisting customers in obtaining longer-term multiple-payment auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. Multiple-payment auto title loans typically carry terms of two to five months with up to ten equal installments. Multiple-payment auto title loan principal amounts range from $150 to $10,000, but average about $1,000; and, with each installment payment, we earn a fee of 11% to 35% of the initial loan amount.
Single-payment consumer loans are considered defaulted if they are not repaid or renewed by the maturity date. Outstanding amounts on unsecured lines of credit are considered defaulted if customers do not timely make one required scheduled payment. Multiple-payment loans are considered defaulted if the customer has failed to make two consecutive installment payments. Although defaulted loans may be collected later, we charge the loan principal to bad debt upon default, leaving only active loans in the reported balance. Subsequent collections of principal are recorded as a reduction of bad debt at the time of collection. Accrued service charges related to defaulted loans are deducted from service charge revenue upon loan default, and increase service charge revenue upon subsequent collection. We provide for a valuation allowance on both the principal and service charges receivable based on recent default and collection experience. Our consumer loan balance represents the principal amount of all active (non-defaulted) loans, net of this valuation allowance.
If a credit service customer defaults on a loan, we pay the lender the principal and accrued interest due under the loan and an insufficient funds fee or late fee and charge those amounts to bad debt expense. We then attempt to collect those amounts from the customer. Subsequent recoveries are recorded as a reduction of bad debt at the time of collection. We also record as bad debt expense an accrual of expected losses for principal, interest and insufficient fund fees and late fees we expect to pay the lenders on default of the lenders’ current loans. This estimate is based on recent default and collection experience and the amount of loans the lenders have outstanding.

7


The table below shows the dollar amount of our consumer loan activity for the three most recent fiscal years. For purposes of this table, consumer loan balances include the principal portion of loans (net of valuation allowance) recorded on our balance sheet and the principal portion of active brokered loans outstanding from unaffiliated lenders, which is not included on our balance sheet.
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
(in millions)
Combined consumer loans:
 
 
 
 
 
Loans made
$
366.4

 
$
277.2

 
$
259.1

Loans repaid
(313.8
)
 
(241.2
)
 
(215.4
)
Loans forfeited, net of collections on bad debt
(42.4
)
 
(38.1
)
 
(35.2
)
Loans acquired in business acquisition
68.7

 

 

Change due to foreign currency exchange fluctuations
1.1



 

Net increase (decrease) in consumer loans outstanding at the end of the year
$
80.0

 
$
(2.1
)
 
$
8.5

 
 
 
 
 
 
Consumer loans made by unaffiliated lenders (credit services only):
 
 
 
 
 
Loans made
$
135.6

 
$
130.0

 
$
130.0

Loans repaid
(112.5
)
 
(109.8
)
 
(101.8
)
Loans forfeited, net of collections on bad debt
(24.6
)
 
(23.0
)
 
(23.6
)
Loans acquired in business acquisition

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in consumer loans outstanding at the end of the year
$
(1.5
)
 
$
(2.8
)
 
$
4.6

 
 
 
 
 
 
Consumer loans made by us:
 
 
 
 
 
Loans made
$
230.8

 
$
147.2

 
$
129.1

Loans repaid
(201.3
)
 
(131.4
)
 
(113.6
)
Loans forfeited, net of collections on bad debt
(17.8
)
 
(15.1
)
 
(11.6
)
Loans acquired in business acquisition
68.7

 

 

Change due to foreign currency exchange fluctuations
1.1

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in consumer loans outstanding at the end of the year
$
81.5

 
$
0.7

 
$
3.9

 
 
 
 
 
 
The profitability of unsecured consumer loans is highly dependent on our ability to manage the default rate and collect defaulted loan principal, interest and insufficient fund fees. In determining whether to lend or provide credit services, we perform a review of customer information, such as making a credit reporting agency inquiry, evaluating and verifying income sources and levels, verifying employment and verifying a telephone number where the customers may be contacted.
Auto title loans are secured by the titles to customers’ automobiles. Lending decisions and loan amounts are determined on the basis of customers’ income levels, an inspection of the automobile and title and reference to market values of used automobiles. Through charges to bad debt expense, we provide a bad debt allowance on the current and delinquent balances of auto title loans and auto title lines of credit, and increase the allowance as the loans age or in response to other potential indicators of loss. Auction proceeds from repossessed automobiles are recorded as an offset to bad debt.
At the time a consumer loan is made, a loan agreement and credit services agreement, when applicable, are given to the customer. It presents the name and address of the lender, the customer and the credit services company when applicable, the customer’s identification information, the date of the loan, the amount financed, the interest or service charges due on maturity, the maturity date of the loan, the total amount that must be paid and the annual percentage rate. At the time a line of credit is granted, customers receive a similar agreement specifying the terms of the credit line, fees and annual percentage rate and repayment terms.
Seasonality
Historically, pawn service charges are highest in our fourth fiscal quarter (July through September) due to a higher average loan balance during the summer lending season. Merchandise sales are highest in the first and second fiscal quarters (October

8


through March) due to the holiday season, jewelry sales surrounding Valentine’s Day and the impact of tax refunds in the United States. Jewelry scrapping sales are heavily influenced by the timing of decisions to scrap excess jewelry inventory. Jewelry scrapping sales generally are greatest during our fourth fiscal quarter (July through September). This results from relatively low jewelry merchandise sales in that quarter and the higher loan balance, leading to a higher dollar amount of loan forfeitures in the summer lending season providing more inventory available for sale.
Consumer loan fees are generally highest in our fourth and first fiscal quarters (July through December) due to a higher need for cash during the holiday season. Consumer loan bad debt, both in dollar terms and as a percentage of related fees, is highest in the fourth fiscal quarter and lowest in the second fiscal quarter due primarily to the impact of tax refunds in the U.S.
The payroll withholding lending business is less impacted by seasonality, with the exception of the summer months when new loan originations tend to moderate.
The net effect of these factors is that net revenues and net income typically are strongest in the fourth fiscal quarter and weakest in the third fiscal quarter.
Operations
A typical company pawn store employs approximately six full-time team members, consisting of a store manager, an assistant manager and four pawnbrokers. Each store manager is responsible for ensuring that the store is run in accordance with our policies, procedures and operating guidelines, and reports to an area manager. Area managers are responsible for the performance of all stores within their area and report to one of our regional directors. Managers and regional directors receive incentive compensation based on their performance in comparison to an operating budget. Our U.S. pawnbrokers are also eligible to receive incentive compensation based on the store’s performance and their individual productivity performance. The incentive compensation for our pawn employees typically ranges between 5% to 30% of their total compensation.
Financial services stores typically employ two to three team members per location, consisting of a store manager and one or two customer service representatives. Each store manager is responsible for ensuring that the store is run in accordance with our policies, procedures and operating guidelines, and reports to an area manager, who is responsible for the stores within a specific operating area and reports to a regional director. Managers and regional directors receive incentive compensation based on their performance in comparison to an operating budget.
In the majority of our financial services stores, store employees attempt to collect defaulted consumer loans in the first 30 days after default. After the initial 30 days, our centralized collection center assumes collection responsibility for these loans. The centralized collection center also collects defaulted consumer loans for all other locations from the date of default. After attempting to collect for approximately 90 days, we generally sell the remaining defaulted consumer loans to a third party or refer them to an outside collection agency for a contingency fee.
Our payroll withholding lending business in Mexico operates using a network of low-cost branch offices dedicated to making loans to employees of government agencies and other employers with whom Crediamigo has processing and withholding agreements in place. A centralized corporate office provides the lending approval function, processing of loans and repayments, collections, sales support and other administrative functions. Each branch location is headed by a sales manager and, depending upon size of the region, may have between eight and fifteen sales professionals reporting through the branch. Sales professionals are commission-based, with earnings tied to loans originated. All loan requests are approved or declined through the centralized credit process. Crediamigo also utilizes a network of brokers to augment the sales force.
We have an internally developed store level point of sale system that automates the recording of pawn, merchandise purchase and sale transactions. We also have a separate loan management computer system specifically designed to handle consumer loan transactions. We have redundant backup systems in the event of a system failure or natural disaster. Financial data from stores owned by our wholly-owned subsidiaries is processed at the corporate office each day and the preceding day’s data are available for management review via our internal network. For stores and operations owned by majority-owned subsidiaries, weekly financial data is provided to the corporate office. Our communications network provides information access between the stores and the corporate office.
Our internal audit staff monitors the perpetual inventory system, lending practices, regulatory compliance and compliance with our policies and procedures. Each location is typically audited several times annually, adjusted based on estimated risk.
As of September 30, 2012, we employed approximately 7,200 team members. We believe that our success is dependent upon our team members’ ability to provide prompt and courteous customer service and to execute our operating procedures and standards. We seek to hire people who will become long-term, career team members. To achieve our long-range personnel goals, we offer a structured career development program for all of our field team members. This program includes computer-

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based training, formal structured classroom training and supervised on-the-job training. All store team members, including managers, must meet certain competency criteria prior to hire or promotion and participate in on-going training classes and formal instructional programs. Our career development program develops and advances our employees and provides training for the efficient integration of experienced managers and team members from outside the company.
Trademarks and Trade Names
We operate our U.S. pawn stores principally under the names “EZPAWN” or “Value Pawn” and the Mexico pawn stores under the names “EMPEÑO FÁCIL” and “EMPEÑE SU ORO AL INSTANTE.” Our U.S. financial services stores operate under a variety of names, including “EZMONEY Payday Loans,” “EZ Loan Services,” “EZ Payday Advance” and “EZPAWN Payday Loans,” and our CSO stores operate under the name “EZMONEY Loan Services.” Our financial services and buy/sell stores in Canada operate under the names “CASHMAX” or “Cash Converters.” In Mexico, we offer payroll withholding loans under the name "Crediamigo." In the U.K. we offer consumer loans online under the name "Cash Genie." We have registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office the names EZPAWN, EZMONEY and EZCORP, among others. We hold a trademark in Mexico for the name “EMPEÑO FÁCIL” and are the master franchisee in Canada for the “Cash Converters” brand.
Growth and Expansion
We plan to expand the number of locations we operate through opening de novo locations and through acquisitions. We believe that in the near term the largest growth opportunities are with de novo stores in Mexico and the U.S., pawn store acquisitions in the U.S. and online lending, both in the U.S. and internationally. We continually evaluate and test new products and formats, which may result in expansion opportunities or strategic investments.
In fiscal 2012, we acquired 28 pawn stores in the San Antonio metropolitan area, Florida, Minnesota and Georgia; 8 buy/sell stores in Virginia, Pennsylvania and Canada; and 15 financial services stores in Hawaii and Texas. The aggregate consideration for these stores was approximately $76.9 million, net of cash acquired. During fiscal 2012, we also acquired a 60% interest in Crediamigo, a specialty consumer finance company headquartered in Mexico City, for total consideration of $60.1 million, net of cash acquired; and a 72% interest in Ariste Holding Limited and its affiliates, which provides online loans in the U.K under the name "Cash Genie," for total consideration of $32.4 million, net of cash acquired. The results of all acquired stores and businesses have been consolidated with our results since their acquisition. During fiscal 2012, we also opened 10 pawn and four financial services stores in the U.S., 52 pawn stores in Mexico, three buy/sell and financial services stores in Canada and two financial services stores in Mexico. These acquisitions were part of our continuing strategy to enhance and diversify our earnings.
In fiscal 2013, we plan to open 25 to 30 pawn stores in the U.S., 70 to 80 pawn stores in Mexico and 65 to 75 financial services stores in the U.S. (most of which will follow our store-within-a-store format).
The cost of opening new de novo stores varies based on the size, type and location of stores opened. During fiscal 2012, we opened 10 de novo U.S. pawn stores, each requiring an average property and equipment investment of approximately $380,000. The three de novo Canadian buy/sell and financial services stores required an average property and equipment investment of approximately $80,000, while the 52 de novo pawn stores in Mexico required an average property and equipment investment of approximately $120,000.
Our ability to add new stores is dependent on several variables, such as the availability of acceptable sites or acquisition candidates, the regulatory environment, local zoning ordinances, access to capital and the availability of qualified personnel.
Competition
We encounter significant competition in connection with all of our activities. These competitive conditions may adversely affect our revenues, profitability and ability to expand. In our lending businesses, we compete with other pawn stores, payday lenders, credit service organizations, banks, credit unions and other financial institutions, such as consumer finance companies. Other lenders may lend money on an unsecured basis, at interest rates that may be lower than our service charges, and on other terms that may be more favorable than ours or through other market channels, such as online, which some customers may prefer. We believe that the primary elements of competition are the quality of customer service and relationship management, convenience, store location, a customer friendly environment and the ability to loan competitive amounts at competitive rates. In addition, we believe the ability to compete effectively will be based increasingly on strong general management, regional focus, automated management information systems, access to capital, superior customer service and the ability to offer certain services online.
Our competitors for merchandise sales include numerous retail and wholesale stores, including jewelry stores, discount retail stores, consumer electronics stores, other pawn stores, other resale stores, electronic commerce retailers and auction sites.

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Competitive factors in our retail operations include the ability to provide the customer with a variety of merchandise at an exceptional value and convenience.
In offering general purpose, reloadable debit cards, our competitors include other specialty financial service providers, banks and credit unions, as well as specialists in offering debit cards. Competitive factors in our debit card operations include offering competitive, comprehensive services at competitive rates.
The pawn industry in the United States is large and highly fragmented. The industry consists of approximately 13,000 pawn stores owned primarily by independent operators who own one to three locations, and we consider the industry relatively mature. We are the second largest operator of pawn stores in the United States, with 470 locations at September 30, 2012. The three largest pawn store operators account for approximately ten percent of the total estimated pawn stores in the United States.
The pawn industry in Mexico is also fragmented, but less so than in the United States. The industry consists of approximately 5,000 pawn stores owned by independent operators and chains, including some not-for-profit organizations. The pawn industry, particularly full-line stores offering general merchandise and jewelry loans and resale, remains in more of an expansion stage in Mexico than in the United States. The market for gold-only pawn stores is mature.
The unsecured payroll lending industry in Mexico is less developed than other Latin American countries. Payroll lending in Mexico is generally marketed to public sector employees, who on average earn more and rotate less frequently than their private sector peers. Additionally, government entities tend to be more stable and on average have more employees than private companies. It is estimated that less than 15% of the market potential is being serviced. Crediamigo is the third largest vertically integrated payroll lender in Mexico with 45 branch offices located in 24 of the 32 states in the country.
The specialty financial services industry in the United States is mature and is larger and more concentrated than the pawn industry. The industry consists of a number of online lenders and approximately 20,000 locations that are either mono-line stores offering only short-term consumer loans or other businesses offering short-term consumer loans in addition to other products and services, such as check cashing stores, automobile title loan stores, pawn stores and stores offering reloadable debit cards. The ten largest short-term consumer loan companies, including us, operate approximately 45% of the total number of physical locations, and online competition has increased in recent years. Recently, several national and regional banks have begun offering cash advance products with similar characteristics and rate structures to our short-term consumer loans.
The specialty financial services industry in Canada remains in a growth stage. The industry consists of approximately 1,500 locations that are either mono-line stores offering only short-term consumer loans or other businesses offering short-term consumer loans in addition to other products and services, such as check cashing stores, pawn stores and stores offering reloadable debit cards or bank accounts. The Canadian short-term consumer loan industry is highly concentrated, with the three largest companies operating approximately 74% of the total number of locations.
The U.K. online lending market receives approximately 2 million applications per month, with 25% of that traffic coming from mobile phones. The online lending market is competitive, and website traffic is generated through mainstream and online media. There are over 100 online lenders within the U.K., with Cash Genie ranking in the top five.
Strategic Investments
Albemarle & Bond — At September 30, 2012, we held almost 30% of the outstanding shares of Albemarle & Bond Holdings PLC, a publicly-traded company headquartered in Reading, United Kingdom. At June 30, 2012, the latest date at which Albemarle & Bond has publicly reported results, Albemarle & Bond operated approximately 230 locations in the United Kingdom that offer pawn loans, payday loans, installment loans, check cashing and retail jewelry. For its fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, Albemarle & Bond's gross revenues increased 16% to £117.7 million ($186.5 million), its net income increased 2% to approximately £15.7 million ($24.8 million), and its diluted earnings per share increased 2% to £0.2819 ($0.4466). Albemarle & Bond's stock is traded on the Alternative Investment Market of the London Stock Exchange. We are its largest single shareholder and currently hold three of the nine seats on Albemarle & Bond’s board of directors. We account for our investment in Albemarle & Bond under the equity method. In fiscal 2012, our interest in Albemarle & Bond’s income was $7.5 million and we received dividends of $3.4 million. Based on the closing price and exchange rates on September 30, 2012, the market value of our investment in Albemarle & Bond was approximately $65.1 million compared to its book value of $51.8 million.
Cash Converters International — At September 30, 2012, we owned approximately 33% of the total ordinary shares of Cash Converters International Limited, a publicly-traded company headquartered in Perth, Australia. We acquired the shares between November 2009 and May 2010 for approximately $57.8 million. As its largest single shareholder and, pursuant to a shareholder agreement, we hold two of the five seats on Cash Converters’ board of directors. Cash Converters franchises and operates a worldwide network of approximately 700 specialty financial services and retail stores that provide pawn loans, short-term

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unsecured loans and other consumer finance products, and buy and sell second-hand goods. Cash Converters has significant store concentrations in Australia and the United Kingdom. In the short-term, we expect Cash Converters will continue buying back franchised locations and converting them into company operated stores as well as increasing its portfolio of short-term consumer loans in Australia and the U.K.
The Consumer Credit and Corporations Legislation Amendment (Enhancements) Bill 2011 was passed by the Australian Parliament in August 2012. This new law, which will go into effect on July 1, 2013, imposes certain limitations and restrictions on short-term consumer loans in Australia, including interest limitations and restrictions on extensions and refinancings. These limitations and restrictions, however, are more favorable to the industry than previous proposals, and the passage of these rules should stabilize the Australian regulatory environment related to short-term consumer loans for the foreseeable future.
For its fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, Cash Converters’ gross revenue improved 26% to AUS $234.4 million (U.S. $241.9 million), net income improved 6% to AUS $29.4 million (U.S. $30.4 million) and diluted earnings per share increased 6% to AUS $0.0763 (U.S. $0.0790). For the year, Cash Converters declared dividends of AUS $0.0350 (U.S. $0.0361) per share. We account for our investment in Cash Converters under the equity method. In fiscal 2012, our interest in Cash Converters’ income was $9.9 million and we recorded dividends of $4.4 million. Based on the closing price and exchange rates on September 30, 2012, the market value of our investment in Cash Converters was approximately $100.7 million compared to its book value of $74.3 million
Regulation
Our operations are subject to extensive regulation under various federal, state and local laws and regulations, and we believe that we conduct our business in material compliance with all of these rules. The following is a general description of significant regulations affecting our business. For a geographic breakdown of our operating locations, see “Part I — Item 2 — Properties.”
Pawn and Retail Regulations
Our pawn stores are regulated by the states in which they are located and, in some cases, by individual municipalities or other local authorities. The applicable statutes, ordinances and regulations vary from location to location and typically impose licensing requirements for pawn stores or individual pawn store employees. Licensing requirements typically relate to financial responsibility and character, and may establish restrictions on where pawn stores can operate. Additional rules regulate various aspects of the day-to-day pawn operations, including the service charges and interest rates that a pawn store may charge, the maximum amount of a pawn loan, the minimum or maximum term of a pawn loan, the content and format of the pawn ticket and the length of time after a loan default that a pawn store must hold a pawned item before it can be offered for sale. Failure to observe applicable regulations could result in a revocation or suspension of pawn licenses, the imposition of fines or requirements to refund service charges and fees, and other civil or criminal penalties. We must also comply with various federal requirements regarding the disclosure of interest, fees, total payments and annual percentage rate related to each pawn loan transaction. Additional federal regulations applicable to our pawn lending business are described in “Other Federal Regulations” below.
Most of our pawn stores, voluntarily or pursuant to applicable laws, provide periodic (generally daily) reports to local law enforcement agencies. These reports provide local law enforcement with information about the items received from customers (whether through pawn or purchase), including a detailed description of the goods involved and the name and address of the customer. If we accept as collateral or purchase merchandise from a customer and it is determined that our customer was not the rightful owner, the merchandise is subject to recovery by the rightful owner. Historically, we have not experienced a material number of claims of this nature.
Some of our pawn stores in the U.S. handle firearms and each of those stores maintains a federal firearms license as required by federal law. The federal Gun Control Act of 1968 and regulations issued by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms also require each pawn store dealing in firearms to maintain a permanent written record of all receipts and dispositions of firearms. In addition, we must comply with the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, which requires us to conduct a background check before releasing, selling or otherwise disposing of firearms.
Mexico regulates various aspects of the pawn industry at the federal, state and local level. Regulations issued by the federal consumer protection agency, Procuraduría Federal del Consumidor (PROFECO), govern the form of pawn loan contracts and consumer disclosures, but the regulations do not impose interest rate or service charge limitations on pawn loans. Pawn stores, like other businesses in Mexico, are also subject to a variety of regulations in such areas as tax compliance, customs, consumer protection and employment.
In Canada, and in Virginia and Pennsylvania in the U.S., we operate stores that buy and sell secondhand merchandise, as opposed to offering pawn loans. These stores are regulated by local municipalities or other local authorities. The applicable

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ordinances vary from location to location and include licensing for secondhand dealing or precious metal purchasing, law enforcement reporting requirements, and the imposition of holding periods before a purchased item can be offered for resale. Failure to observe these regulations could result in a revocation or suspension of licenses, the imposition of fines, and other civil or criminal penalties. Our Canadian buy/sell stores also offer short-term consumer loans.
Short-Term Consumer Loan Regulations
Each state in which we offer short-term consumer loan products has specific laws and regulations dealing with the conduct of this business. These laws and regulations vary in scope, but generally require licensing of locations, establish loan terms, provide for consumer protections and disclosures and permit periodic regulatory examinations. In the case of single-payment loans, most applicable laws and regulations limit the amount of fees that may be charged, establish maximum loan amounts and duration, and restrict the customer’s ability to renew or extend the loan. Some states require reporting of customers’ loan activities to a state-wide database, and prohibit the making of loans to customers who have loans outstanding with other lenders. Some municipalities in which we operate also impose various rules and regulations, primarily related to zoning and licensing requirements, but in some cases, related to loan terms (such as maximum loan amounts, maximum number of renewals or extensions and mandatory principal paydowns). Failure to observe applicable legal requirements could result in a loss of license, the imposition of fines or customer refunds, and other civil or criminal penalties.
We must also comply with various federal requirements (including the Truth in Lending Act and Regulation Z) regarding the disclosure of interest, fees, total payments and annual percentage rate related to each loan transaction. With respect to our debt collection activities, we comply with the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and similar state laws regulating debt collection practices. Additional federal regulations applicable to our short-term consumer loan business are described in “Other Federal Regulations” below.
In Texas, we do not make loans to customers, but rather offer fee-based credit services, including assistance in arranging loans with independent third-party lenders. As required by state law, we are registered as a Credit Services Organization (“CSO”) in order to provide such services and, pursuant to state laws effective January 1, 2012, are licensed as a Credit Access Business (“CAB”). The applicable CSO law requires us to provide each customer with an upfront disclosure statement describing, among other things, the services to be provided and the fees to be charged and, upon entering into a transaction, with a written contract fully describing the services provided. The law prohibits us from receiving compensation solely for referring a customer to a lender and also provides for other disclosure requirements, cancellation rights for customers and prohibitions on fraudulent or deceptive conduct. The law governing CABs requires us to provide conspicuous notices regarding fees and certain other disclosures and requires us to report certain information regarding customer transactions to the Office of the Consumer Credit Commissioner. Violations of these laws could subject us to criminal and civil liability. The independent lenders are not required to be licensed and are not regulated by any state agency so long as the interest rate charged on the loan does not exceed 10% per annum. The lenders are also permitted to charge late fees and insufficient funds fees. The lenders are subject to the federal regulations described below with regard to their lending activities. Certain cities in Texas, specifically, Austin, Dallas and San Antonio, have enacted municipal regulation of CAB products and the payday loans and auto title loans to which they provide access.
Legislators and regulators frequently scrutinize the legislative and regulatory environment for short-term lending, often proposing additional legislative and regulatory restrictions ranging from additional disclosure requirements to limits on rates and fees. In some cases, rate and fee limits would effectively prohibit certain short-term lending products, such as payday loans, because it would no longer be economically feasible for most lenders to offer such products.
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, enacted in July 2010, established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “CFPB”), which, with the appointment of a permanent director in January 2012, began exercising its supervisory and examination powers over companies that offer payday loans. The CFPB also may exercise regulatory authority over other products and services that we offer. Until such time as the CFPB examines our business or proposes rules and regulations that apply to our activities, it is not possible to accurately predict what affect the CFPB will have on our business.
There can be no assurance that legislative or regulatory efforts to eliminate or restrict the availability of certain short-term loan products, including payday loans and auto title loans, will not be successful, despite significant customer demand. To the extent such efforts are successful, our short-term consumer loan business could be adversely affected. See “Part I — Item 1A — Risk Factors.”

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Other Federal Regulations
All of our lending activities, both pawn loans and short-term consumer loans, are subject to other state and federal statutes and regulations, including the following:
We are subject to the federal Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and its underlying regulations, as well as various state laws and regulations relating to privacy and data security. Under these regulations, we are required to disclose to our customers our policies and practices relating to the protection of customers’ nonpublic personal information. These regulations also require us to ensure that our systems are designed to protect the confidentiality of customers’ nonpublic personal information, and many of these regulations dictate certain actions that we must take to notify customers if their personal information is disclosed in an unauthorized manner. In addition, the Federal Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act requires us to adopt written guidance and procedures for detecting, preventing and mitigating identity theft, and to adopt various policies and procedures (including employee training) that address the importance of protecting non-public personal information and aid in detecting and responding to suspicious activity or identify theft “red flags.”
The federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits discrimination against any credit applicant on the basis of any protected category such as race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status or age. If we deny an application for credit, we are required to provide the applicant with a Notice of Adverse Action, informing the applicant of the action taken regarding the credit application, a statement of the prohibition on discrimination, the name and address of both the creditor and the federal agency that monitors compliance, and the applicant’s right to learn the specific reasons for the denial.
Under the USA PATRIOT Act, we must maintain an anti-money laundering compliance program that includes the development of internal policies, procedures and controls; the designation of a compliance officer; an ongoing employee training program; and an independent audit function to test the program.
We are also subject to the Bank Secrecy Act and its underlying regulations, which require us to report and maintain records of certain high-dollar transactions. In addition, federal regulations require us to report certain suspicious transactions to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network of the Treasury Department (“FinCen”). Generally, a transaction is considered to be suspicious if we know, suspect or have reason to suspect that the transaction (a) involves funds derived from illegal activity or is intended to hide or disguise such funds, (b) is designed to evade the requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act or (c) appears to serve no legitimate business or lawful purpose. Certain of our subsidiaries are registered with FinCen as money services businesses by virtue of the check cashing or money transmission services they provide.
Federal law limits the annual percentage rate that may be charged on loans made to active duty military personnel and their immediate families at 36%. This 36% annual percentage rate cap applies to a variety of loan products, including signature loans, though it does not apply to pawn loans. We do not make signature loans to active duty military personnel or their immediate families because it is not economically feasible for us to do so at these rates.
Available Information
We maintain an Internet website at www.ezcorp.com. All of our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and Section 16 filings, are accessible, free of charge, through the Investor Relations section of our website as soon as reasonably practicable after electronic filing. The public may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Room 1580, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this report.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
There are many risks and uncertainties that may affect the operations, performance, development and results of our business. Many of these risks are beyond our control. The following is a description of the important risk factors that may affect our business. If any one or more of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations would likely suffer.
Changes in laws and regulations affecting our financial services and products could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial performance. Our financial products and services are subject to extensive regulation under various federal, state, local and international laws and regulations. There have been, and continue to

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be, legislative and regulatory efforts to regulate, prohibit or severely restrict some of the types of short-term financial services and products we offer, particularly payday loans and auto title loans.
Adverse legislation could be enacted in any state or municipality in which we operate. If such legislation is enacted in any particular jurisdiction, we generally evaluate our business in the context of the new legislation and determine whether we can continue to operate in that jurisdiction with new or modified products or whether it is feasible to enhance our business with additional product offerings. In any case, if we are unable to continue to operate profitably under the new law, we may decide to close or consolidate stores, resulting in decreased revenues, earnings and assets.
For example, in 2011 and 2012, the Cities of Austin, Dallas and San Antonio, Texas adopted municipal ordinances imposing restrictions on certain financial services products we can offer in those cities. Specifically, the ordinances require municipal registrations, limit the amount we can loan and require principal paydowns on refinancing or with each installment payment. These limitations and restrictions make the products less attractive to our customers, thus lessening demand, and severely impair the financial viability of our financial services business in those cities.
In addition, any financial services business that we undertake directly in international jurisdictions, as well as the financial services businesses conducted by our strategic affiliates, are subject to a variety of regulation by international governmental authorities. Adverse legislation or regulations could be enacted in any of such international jurisdictions, with the result that the financial services business in that jurisdiction becomes less profitable or unprofitable. For example, the Consumer Credit and Corporations Legislation Amendment (Enhancements) Bill 2011 was passed by the Australian Parliament in August 2012. This new law, which will go into effect on July 1, 2013, imposes certain limitations and restrictions on short-term consumer loans in Australia, including interest limitations and restrictions on extensions and refinancings. See "Part I — Business — Strategic Investments."
Many of the legislative and regulatory efforts that are adverse to the short-term consumer loan industry are the result of the negative characterization of the industry by some consumer advocacy groups and some media reports that ignore the credit risk and high transaction costs of serving our customers. We can give no assurance that there will not be further negative characterizations of our industry or that legislative or regulatory efforts to eliminate or restrict the availability of certain short-term loan products, including payday loans and auto title loans, will not be successful despite significant customer demand for such products. Such efforts, if successful, could have a material adverse effect on our operations or financial performance.
A significant or sudden decrease in gold values or the volume of gold transactions may have a material impact on our earnings and financial position. Gold jewelry comprises a significant portion of the collateral security for our pawn loans and our inventory, and gold scrapping accounts for a significant portion of our revenues and gross profit. Pawn service charges, sales proceeds and our ability to liquidate excess jewelry inventory at an acceptable margin are dependent upon gold values and the volume of gold transactions. A decline in the availability of gold or our customers' willingness or ability to sell us gold or use gold as collateral for pawn loans could significantly impact our business. During fiscal 2012, we experienced a significant softening of gold prices and volumes, which had a significant negative impact on our profitability for the year. The impact on our financial position and results of operations of a continued decrease in gold values or volumes or a change in customer behavior cannot be reasonably estimated because the market and customer response to changes in gold values is not known; however, a significant decline in gold values or gold volumes could result in decreases in sales, sales margins and pawn service charge revenues.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has begun exercising its supervisory role over short-term, small-dollar lenders, which could result in a material adverse effect on our operations and financial performance.
As noted above under “Item 1 — Business — Regulation,” the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the "CFPB"), which has the power to, among other things, regulate companies that offer or supply payday loans and other products and services that we offer. In January 2012, with the appointment of a permanent director, the CFPB announced that it would exercise its regulatory authority over non-depository companies providing consumer financial services products and services.
Under its supervisory and examination powers, the CFPB has authority to inspect short-term lenders' books and records and lending practices, including marketing, underwriting, loan application and processing and collections. The CFPB has published its Short-Term, Small-Dollar Lending Examination Procedures, outlining the guidelines that CFPB examiners will use in examining short-term lenders. The CFPB has expressed its intention to use the examination process to assess companies' compliance with federal consumer financial services laws, obtain information on the activities and procedures of short term lenders and detect risks to consumers. Should the CFPB determine that a financial service provider is in violation of federal law, it has broad authority to initiate administrative

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actions or litigation, in which it may seek cease and desist orders for the provider's activities, rescission of loan contracts and administrative fines and penalties.
The CFPB also has rule-making authority over short-term lenders. While it does not have authority to regulate fees, it conceivably could adopt rules that could impair the viability or financial performance of products and services. It is not possible to accurately predict what affect the CFPB will have on our business. The CFPB, through its supervisory role or through its rule-making authority, could take actions that would have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial performance.
A significant portion of our business is concentrated in Texas. Over half of our financial services stores and almost half of our domestic pawn stores are located in Texas, and those stores account for a significant portion of our revenues and profitability. With the exception of recent activity by certain major cities (Dallas, Austin and San Antonio), which has negatively impacted our financial services business in those cities, the legislative, regulatory and general business environment in Texas has been relatively favorable for our business activities. We have been successful in growing and expanding our businesses in areas outside Texas for the past several years, and we expect that our business in other areas will continue to grow faster than our business in Texas. In the foreseeable future, however, a negative legislative or regulatory change in Texas could have a material adverse effect on our overall operations and financial performance. The next biennial session of the Texas legislature begins in January 2013 (and is subject to adjourn in May 2013). While it is not possible to predict with any certainty what legislation may be introduced or passed, it is anticipated that we will see legislation pertaining to the short-term consumer loan industry.
A significant change in foreign currency exchange rates could have a material adverse impact on our earnings and financial position. We have foreign operations in Mexico, Canada and the United Kingdom and equity investments in the United Kingdom and Australia. Our assets, investments in, earnings from and dividends from each of these must be translated to U.S. dollars from their respective functional currencies of the Mexican peso, Canadian dollar, British pound and the Australian dollar. A significant weakening of any of these foreign currencies could result in lower assets and earnings in U.S. dollars, resulting in a material adverse impact on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.
Prolonged periods of economic recession and unemployment could adversely affect our lending and retail businesses. All of our businesses, like other businesses, are subject to fluctuations based on varying economic conditions. Economic conditions and general consumer confidence affect the demand for our retail products and the ability and willingness of our customers to utilize our loan products and services. Our consumer loan products and services require the customer to have a verifiable recurring source of income. Consequently, we may experience reduced demand for our consumer loan products during prolonged periods of high unemployment. Weakened economic conditions may also result in an increase in loan defaults and loan losses. Even in the current economic environment, we have been able to efficiently manage our bad debt through our underwriting and collection efforts. There can be no assurance that we will be able to sustain our current bad debt rates or that we will not experience increasing difficulty in collecting defaulted loans.
A significant portion of our short-term consumer loan revenues and profitability is dependent upon the ability and willingness of unaffiliated lenders to make loans to our customers. In Texas, where over half of our financial services stores are located, we do not make consumer loans to customers, but assist customers in arranging loans with unaffiliated lenders. Our consumer loan business could be adversely affected if (a) we were to lose our current relationships with unaffiliated lenders and were unable to establish a relationship with another unaffiliated lender who was willing and able to make short-term loans to our Texas customers or (b) the unaffiliated lenders are unable to obtain capital or other sources of funding at appropriate rates.
Achievement of our growth objectives is dependent upon our ability to open and acquire new stores. Our expansion strategy includes opening de novo store locations and acquiring existing stores. The success our de novo store strategy is contingent upon numerous factors that cannot be predicted or controlled, such as the availability of acceptable locations with a desirable customer base, the negotiation of acceptable lease terms, the ability to obtain required government permits and licenses and the existence of a suitable competitive environment. In addition, our acquisition strategy is dependent upon the availability of attractive acquisition candidates. The achievement of our growth objectives is also subject to our ability to attract, train and retain qualified team members. Failure to achieve our expansion goals would adversely affect our prospects and future results of operations.
Changes in the business, regulatory or political climate in Mexico could adversely affect our operations in those countries, which could adversely affect our growth plans. Our growth plans include significant expansion in Mexico. Changes in the business, regulatory or political climate in Mexico, or significant fluctuations in currency

16


exchange rates, could affect our ability to expand or continue our operations there, which could have a material adverse impact on our prospects, results of operations and cash flows.
Fluctuations in our sales, pawn loan balances, sales margins, pawn redemption rates and loan default and collection rates could have a material adverse impact on our operating results. We regularly experience fluctuations in a variety of operating metrics. Changes in any of these metrics, as might be caused by changes in the economic environment, competitive pressures, changes in customers’ tastes and preferences or a significant decrease in gold prices could materially and adversely affect our profitability and ability to achieve our planned results of operations.
Changes in our liquidity and capital requirements or in banks’ abilities or willingness to lend to us could limit our ability to achieve our plans. We require continued access to capital. A significant reduction in cash flows from operations or the availability of credit could materially and adversely affect our ability to achieve our planned growth and operating results. We currently have a credit agreement with a syndicate of banks. If one of those lenders is unable to provide funding in accordance with its commitment, our available credit could be reduced by the amount of that lender’s commitment.
Changes in competition from various sources could have a material adverse impact on our ability to achieve our plans. We encounter significant competition from other pawn stores, cash advance companies, credit service organizations, online lenders, consumer finance companies and other forms of financial institutions and other retailers, many of which have significantly greater financial resources than we do. Significant increases in the number or size of competitors or other changes in competitive influences could adversely affect our operations through a decrease in the number or quality of loan products and services we are able to provide or our ability to liquidate forfeited collateral at acceptable margins.
One person beneficially owns all of our voting stock and controls the outcome of all matters requiring a vote of stockholders, which may influence the value of our publicly traded non-voting stock. Phillip E. Cohen is the beneficial owner of all of our Class B Voting Common Stock and controls the outcome of all issues requiring a vote of stockholders. All of our publicly traded stock is non-voting stock. Consequently, stockholders other than Mr. Cohen have no vote with respect to the election of directors or any other matter requiring a vote of stockholders. This lack of voting rights may adversely affect the market value of the publicly traded Class A Non-voting Common Stock.
We have regularly entered into, and may continue to enter into, advisory services agreements with Madison Park, LLC, a financial advisory firm wholly-owned by Mr. Cohen. See “Part III — Item 13 — Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence — Related Party Transactions — Agreement with Madison Park.”
Infrastructure failures and breaches in data security could harm our business. We depend on our information technology infrastructure to achieve our business objectives. If a problem, such as a computer virus, intentional disruption by a third party, natural disaster, telecommunications system failure or lost connectivity impairs our infrastructure, we may be unable to process transactions or otherwise carry on our business. An infrastructure disruption could damage our reputation and cause us to lose customers and revenue, result in the unintentional disclosure of company or customer information and require us to incur significant expense to eliminate these problems and address related data security concerns.
We are beginning to implement an online short-term consumer lending business, which will be subject to additional risks. We recently launched an online short-term consumer lending business. In addition to being subject to the various federal, state and local regulations that are applicable to short-term consumer lending generally, this business is subject to other regulations and risks. For example, we will be dependent on third parties, referred to as lead providers, to provide us with prospective new customers. Generally, lead providers operate separate websites to attract prospective customers and then sell those “leads” to online lenders. As a result, the success of our online consumer lending business will depend substantially on the willingness and ability of lead providers to send us customer leads at prices acceptable to us. The loss or a reduction in leads from lead providers, or the failure of our lead providers to maintain quality and consistency in their programs or services, could reduce our customer prospects and could have a material adverse effect on the success of this line of business. Furthermore, the lead providers’ failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, or any changes in laws or regulations applicable to lead providers, could have an adverse effect on our online consumer lending business. Federal legislation was recently introduced that, if enacted in its current form, would prohibit the use of lead providers or generators to secure consumer business. If such legislation were to be enacted, it would significantly impact the manner in which the online lending business is conducted, and could significantly negatively affect the success and profitability of our online lending business.

17


We may be subject to litigation proceedings that could harm our business. Currently and from time to time, we are defendants in various legal and regulatory actions. While we cannot determine the ultimate outcome of these actions, we believe their resolution will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties and unfavorable rulings could occur. An unfavorable ruling could include monetary damages or an injunction prohibiting us from conducting our business as we currently do. If we were to receive an unfavorable ruling in a matter, our business and results of operations could be materially harmed.
We invest in companies for strategic reasons and may not realize a return on our investments. We currently have significant investments in Albemarle & Bond Holdings PLC and Cash Converters International Limited, both of which are publicly-traded companies based outside the United States. We have made these investments, and may in the future make additional investments in these or other companies, to further our strategic objectives. The success of these strategic investments is dependent on a variety of factors, including the business performance of the companies in which we invest and the market’s assessment of that performance. If the business performance of any of these companies suffers, then the value of our investment may decline. If we determine that an other-than-temporary decline in the fair value exists for one of our equity investments, we will be required to write down that investment to its fair value and recognize the related write-down as an investment loss. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to dispose of some or all of an investment on favorable terms, should we decide to do so in the future. Any realized investment loss would adversely affect our results of operations.
We may incur property, casualty or other losses not covered by insurance. We maintain a program of insurance coverage for various types of property, casualty and other risks. The types and amounts of insurance that we obtain vary from time to time, depending on availability, cost and our decisions with respect to risk retention. The policies are subject to deductibles and exclusions that result in our retention of a level of risk on a self-insurance basis. Losses not covered by insurance could be substantial and may increase our expenses, which could harm our results of operations and financial condition.
Our acquisitions, investments and other transactions could disrupt our ongoing business and harm our results of operations. In pursuing our business strategy, we routinely conduct discussions, evaluate opportunities and enter into agreements regarding possible acquisitions, investments and other transactions. These transactions may involve significant challenges and risks, including risks that we may not realize the expected return on an acquisition or investment, that we may not be able to retain key personnel of an acquired business, or that we may experience difficulty in integrating acquired businesses into our business systems and processes. If we do enter into agreements with respect to acquisitions, investments or other transactions, we may fail to complete them due to inability to obtain required regulatory or other approvals or other factors. Furthermore, acquisitions, investments and other transactions require substantial management resources and have the potential to divert our attention from our existing business. These factors could harm our business and results of operations.
We could be subject to changes in tax rates, the adoption of new U.S. or international legislation or exposure to additional tax liabilities. We are subject to taxes in the U.S. and several foreign jurisdictions. Current economic and political conditions make tax rates in any of these jurisdictions subject to significant change. Our future effective tax rates could be affected by changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities or changes in tax laws or their interpretation.
Events beyond our control could result in business interruption or other adverse effects on our operations and growth. Our business or operations could be subject to interruption or damage due to inclement weather, natural disaster, power loss, acts of violence, terrorist attacks, war or similar event. Such events could impair our customers' access to our business, impact our ability to expand or continue our operations or otherwise have an adverse effect on our financial condition.
We face other risks discussed under Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk in Item 7A of this Form 10-K.
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

18


ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
Our typical pawn store is a freestanding building or part of a retail strip center with contiguous parking. Store interiors are designed to resemble small retail operations and attractively display merchandise by category. Distinctive exterior design and attractive in-store signage provide an appealing atmosphere to customers. The typical pawn store has approximately 1,800 square feet of retail space and approximately 3,200 square feet dedicated to collateral storage. Approximately 25% of our pawn stores in Mexico are gold jewelry-only pawn stores with no retail activities, which typically occupy 500 to 1,000 square feet. Financial services stores are designed to resemble a bank interior. The typical financial services store is approximately 1,000 to 1,500 square feet and is located in a retail strip center. Some of our financial services stores adjoin a pawn location and occupy approximately 300 to 500 square feet, with a different entrance, signage, décor and staffing. From the customers’ perspective, these are viewed as a separate business, but they are covered by the same lease agreement. We maintain property and general liability insurance for each of our stores. Our stores are open six or seven days a week.
We lease substantially all of our locations, and generally lease facilities for a term of three to ten years with one or more renewal options. Our existing leases expire on dates ranging between October 2012 and October 2027, with a small number of leases on month-to-month terms. All leases provide for specified periodic rental payments at market rates. Most leases require us to maintain the property and pay the cost of insurance and taxes. We believe the termination of any one of our leases would not have a material adverse effect on our operations. Our strategy generally is to lease rather than own space for our stores unless we find what we believe is a superior location at an attractive price.
Below is a summary of changes in the number of store locations during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Store count at beginning of fiscal year
1,111

 
1,006

 
910

New stores opened
71

 
82

 
111

Acquired stores
96

 
40

 
16

Stores closed or consolidated
(16
)
 
(17
)
 
(31
)
Store count at end of fiscal year
1,262

 
1,111

 
1,006

In 2012, we opened 52 Empeño Fácil pawn stores in Mexico, two financial services locations in Mexico, ten U.S. pawn stores, four financial services stores in the U.S and three buy/sell and financial services stores in Canada. During fiscal 2012, we also acquired 45 financial services stores in Mexico as part of the Crediamigo acquisition, 28 pawn stores, seven buy/sell stores and 15 financial services stores in the U.S., as well as one buy/sell store in Canada.
On an ongoing basis, we may close or consolidate under-performing store locations. In fiscal 2012, we closed or consolidated 13 financial services stores in the U.S., one pawn store in the U.S. and two financial services stores in Mexico. In fiscal 2011, we closed or consolidated 14 financial services stores in the U.S., one pawn store in the U.S., and two financial services stores in Canada.
Of our 442 U.S. financial services stores, 159 adjoin a pawn store, but they are covered by the same lease agreement. The lease agreements at approximately 94% of the remaining 283 free-standing U.S. financial services stores contain provisions that limit our exposure for additional rent at these stores to only a few months if laws were enacted that had a significant negative effect on our operations at these stores. If such laws were passed, the space currently utilized by stores adjoining pawn stores could be re-incorporated into the pawn operations. Following the passage of such laws in fiscal 2011, we closed or consolidated 11 financial services stores in Colorado and Wisconsin, resulting in a total rent exposure of approximately $0.2 million.

19


The following table presents the number of pawn and financial services store locations by state or province as of September 30, 2012:
 
Pawn/Retail
Locations
 
Financial Services
Locations
 
Total
Locations
United States:
 
 
 
 
 
Texas
201

 
288

 
489

Florida
96

 

 
96

Colorado
38

 
26

 
64

Wisconsin
3

 
35

 
38

Oklahoma
21

 
6

 
27

Idaho

 
20

 
20

Utah
8

 
14

 
22

Alabama
7

 
9

 
16

Nevada
16

 

 
16

Indiana
16

 

 
16

Iowa
11

 

 
11

Kansas

 
13

 
13

Missouri

 
13

 
13

South Dakota

 
7

 
7

Tennessee
7

 

 
7

Illinois
21

 

 
21

Georgia
9

 

 
9

Hawaii

 
11

 
11

Louisiana
3

 

 
3

Minnesota
9

 

 
9

Mississippi
3

 

 
3

Pennsylvania
2

 

 
2

Virginia
5

 

 
5

Arkansas
1

 

 
1

Total United States Locations
477

 
442

 
919

Mexico:
 
 
 
 
 
Guanajuato
24

 

 
24

Veracruz
29

 
1

 
30

Jalisco
17

 
1

 
18

Puebla
19

 
1

 
20

Mexico
60

 
10

 
70

Chihuahua

 
2

 
2

Coahuila

 
2

 
2

Durango

 
1

 
1

Tamaulipas
12

 
3

 
15

Michoacán
10

 
3

 
13

Morelos

 
1

 
1

Nuevo León
6

 
1

 
7

Querétaro
6

 

 
6

Oaxaca
9

 
1

 
10

Aguascalientes
2

 
3

 
5

Guerrero
3

 
1

 
4

Tabasco
11

 
1

 
12

San Luis Potosí
4

 

 
4

Sinaloa

 
3

 
3

Sonora

 
1

 
1

Hidalgo
4

 

 
4

Tlaxcala
3

 
1

 
4

Quintana Roo

 
2

 
2

Baja California Sur
1

 

 
1

Baja California
2

 
1

 
3

Chiapas
4

 
2

 
6

Campeche
4

 
2

 
6

Zacatecas

 
1

 
1

Total Mexico Locations
230

 
45

 
275

Canada:
 
 
 
 
 
Ontario (1)

 
68

 
68

Total Canada Locations

 
68

 
68

Total Company
707

 
555

 
1,262

(1) The Canada locations exclude 10 stores that are franchised by the company to third parties.

20



In addition to our store locations, we lease corporate office space in Austin, Texas (68,900 square feet), Dallas, Texas (5,900 square feet), Querétaro, Mexico (6,700 square feet), Mexico City, Mexico (4,500 square feet) and Ontario, Canada (4,200 square feet). Crediamigo leases corporate office space in Mexico City, Mexico (10,800 square feet) and Cash Genie leases corporate office space in Ipswich, United Kingdom (4,700 square feet).
The following table presents store data by segment as of September 30, 2012:
 
Company-owned Stores
 
 
 
U.S. &
 
Latin
 
Other
 
 
 
 
 
Canada
 
America
 
International
 
Consolidated
 
Franchises
Pawn/retail stores
477

 
230

 

 
707

 

Financial services stores adjoining U.S. pawn stores
159

 

 

 
159

 

Financial services stores — free standing
351

 
45

 

 
396

 
10

Total stores in operation
987

 
275

 

 
1,262

 
10

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
Currently and from time to time, we are defendants in various legal and regulatory actions. While we cannot determine the ultimate outcome of these actions, we believe their resolution will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. However, we cannot give any assurance as to their ultimate outcome.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

21


PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market Information
Our Class A Non-voting Common Stock (“Class A Common Stock”) is traded on The NASDAQ Stock Market (NASDAQ Global Select Market) under the symbol “EZPW.” As of October 31, 2012, there were 97 stockholders of record of our Class A Common Stock. There is no trading market for our Class B Voting Common Stock (“Class B Common Stock”), which was held by one stockholder as of October 31, 2012.
The high and low per share sales price for our Class A Common Stock for the past two fiscal years, as reported by The NASDAQ Stock Market, were as follows:
 
High
 
Low
Fiscal 2012
 
 
 
Fourth quarter ended September 30, 2012
$
25.43

 
$
21.39

Third quarter ended June 30, 2012
33.38

 
21.91

Second quarter ended March 31, 2012
33.00

 
25.33

First quarter ended December 31, 2011
31.04

 
25.30

Fiscal 2011
 
 
 
Fourth quarter ended September 30, 2011
$
38.66

 
$
27.10

Third quarter ended June 30, 2011
35.98

 
27.78

Second quarter ended March 31, 2011
31.80

 
25.56

First quarter ended December 31, 2010
28.75

 
19.23

On September 28, 2012, the closing sales price of our Class A Common Stock, as reported by the NASDAQ Stock Market, was $22.93 per share.
We have not declared or paid any dividends during the past two fiscal years, and currently do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the immediate future. Under the terms of our credit agreement, which expires May 10, 2015, payment of dividends is restricted. Should we pay dividends in the future, our certificate of incorporation provides that cash dividends on common stock, when declared, must be declared and paid at the same per share amounts on both classes of stock. Any future determination to pay cash dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors.


22


Stock Performance Graph
The following table compares cumulative total stockholder returns for our Class A Common Stock for the last five fiscal years, with the cumulative total return on the NASDAQ Composite Index (ticker symbol: IXIC) and the NASDAQ Other Financial Index (ticker symbol: IXFN) over the same period. The graph shows the value, at the end of each of the last five fiscal years, of $100 invested in our Class A Common Stock or the indices on September 30, 2007. The graph depicts the change in the value of our Class A Common Stock relative to the indices at the end of each fiscal year and not for any interim period. Historical stock price performance is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.


23


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following selected financial information should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes:

 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in thousands, except per share and store figures)
Operating Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sales
$
543,729

 
$
494,562

 
$
411,865

 
$
329,923

 
$
234,679

Pawn service charges
235,642

 
201,135

 
163,695

 
130,169

 
94,244

Consumer loan fees
207,671

 
171,951

 
157,022

 
136,933

 
128,478

Other revenues
5,425

 
1,669

 
463

 
431

 
2

Total revenues
992,467

 
869,317

 
733,045

 
597,456

 
457,403

Cost of goods sold
326,862

 
295,620

 
251,122

 
203,589

 
139,402

Consumer loan bad debt
41,377

 
38,759

 
34,444

 
33,933

 
37,150

Net revenues
624,228

 
534,938

 
447,479

 
359,934

 
280,851

Store operating expenses
303,486

 
267,052

 
236,664

 
206,237

 
158,927

Administrative expenses
94,035

 
75,270

 
52,740

 
40,497

 
34,951

Depreciation and amortization
25,268

 
18,344

 
14,661

 
12,746

 
12,354

(Gain) loss on disposal of assets
(1
)
 
309

 
1,528

 
(1,024
)
 
939

Interest expense (income), net
(1,550
)
 
1,653

 
1,199

 
1,144

 
(57
)
Equity in net income of unconsolidated affiliates
(17,400
)
 
(16,237
)
 
(10,750
)
 
(5,016
)
 
(4,342
)
Other (income) expense
(1,210
)
 
(164
)
 
(93
)
 
38

 
8

Income before income taxes
221,600

 
188,711

 
151,530

 
105,312

 
78,071

Income tax expense
71,023

 
66,552

 
54,236

 
36,840

 
25,642

Net income
150,577

 
122,159

 
97,294

 
68,472

 
52,429

Net income attributable to redeemable noncontrolling interest
6,869

 

 

 

 

Net income attributable to EZCORP, Inc.
$
143,708

 
$
122,159

 
$
97,294

 
$
68,472

 
$
52,429

Earnings per common share, diluted
$
2.81

 
$
2.43

 
$
1.96

 
$
1.42

 
$
1.21

Cash dividends per common share
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

Weighted average common shares and share equivalents, diluted
51,133

 
50,369

 
49,576

 
48,076

 
43,327

Stores operating at end of period
1,262

 
1,111

 
1,006

 
910

 
809


 
September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
(in thousands)
Balance Sheet Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pawn loans
$
157,648

 
$
145,318

 
$
121,201

 
$
101,684

 
$
75,936

Consumer loans, net
96,149

 
14,611

 
13,920

 
10,020

 
7,125

Inventory, net
109,214

 
90,373

 
71,502

 
64,001

 
43,209

Working capital
373,557

 
291,968

 
232,713

 
228,796

 
159,918

Total assets
1,218,007

 
756,450

 
606,412

 
492,517

 
308,720

Long-term debt
198,836

 
17,500

 
25,000

 
35,000

 

Stockholders’ equity
834,828

 
664,248

 
519,428

 
415,685

 
273,050


24


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The discussion in this section contains forward-looking statements that are based on our current expectations. Actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements due to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors, including those identified in “Part I — Item 1A — Risk Factors.” See also “Cautionary Statement Regarding Risks and Uncertainties That May Affect Future Results” below.
The following table presents summary consolidated financial data for our fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010.
Summary Financial Data
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
 
 
(in thousands)
 
 
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
Merchandise sales
$
335,410

 
$
282,083

 
$
240,454

Jewelry scrapping sales
208,319

 
212,479

 
171,411

Pawn service charges
235,642

 
201,135

 
163,695

Consumer loan fees
207,671

 
171,951

 
157,022

Other revenues
5,425

 
1,669

 
463

Total revenues
992,467

 
869,317

 
733,045

Merchandise cost of goods sold
192,014

 
162,060

 
140,284

Jewelry scrapping cost of goods sold
134,848

 
133,560

 
110,838

Consumer loan bad debt
41,377

 
38,759

 
34,444

Net revenues
$
624,228

 
$
534,938

 
$
447,479

Net income attributable to EZCORP, Inc.
$
143,708

 
$
122,159

 
$
97,294

Previously, we reported segment information based primarily on product offerings. Beginning with the second quarter of fiscal 2012, we redefined our reportable operating segments based on geography as our company is organized and managed along geographic lines, with product offerings and channels based on local custom and regulation. For this reason, we concluded that segment reporting based on geography more closely aligns with our management organization and strategic direction. In connection with the new segment structure, we have changed the accountability for, and reporting of, certain items, including administrative expenses, depreciation and amortization, interest and our equity in the net income of unconsolidated affiliates. When practical, these items are allocated to segments. Interest is also allocated to operating segments when debt is incurred at the local country level and is nonrecourse to EZCORP, Inc. These items are now included in the segment’s measure of profit or loss (“segment contribution”). Expenses that cannot be allocated are included as corporate expenses.
In fiscal 2011, we reclassified fees from our Product Protection Plan and Jewelry VIP Program, as well as layaway fees, from “Other” revenue to “Sales,” as fees from these products are incidental to sales of merchandise. Prior year figures have been reclassified to conform to this presentation and margins have been recalculated accordingly.
Overview
We are a leading provider of instant cash solutions. We provide collateralized, non-recourse loans, commonly known as pawn loans, and a variety of short-term consumer loans, including single-payment and multiple-payment unsecured loans and single-payment and multiple-payment auto title loans. In Texas, we provide fee-based credit services to customers seeking loans. At our pawn and buy/sell stores, we also sell merchandise, primarily collateral forfeited from pawn lending operations and used merchandise purchased from customers. We offer prepaid debit card services to help customers better manage their money and control their spending.
During the second quarter of fiscal 2012, we entered into the unsecured lending market in Mexico with the acquisition of a 60% interest in Crediamigo. At September 30, 2012, Crediamigo had approximately 100 payroll withholding agreements with Mexican employers, primarily federal, state and local governments and agencies, and provides consumer loans to the agencies’ employees. In April 2012, we acquired a 72% interest in Cash Genie, which offers short-term consumer loans online in the United Kingdom. Subsequent to the end of fiscal 2012, we increased our ownership interest in Cash Genie to 95%.

25


At September 30, 2012, we operated a total of 1,262 locations, consisting of 470 U.S. pawn stores (operating as EZPAWN or Value Pawn), seven buy/sell stores in the U.S. (operating as Cash Converters), 230 pawn stores in Mexico (operating as Empeño Fácil or Empeñe Su Oro), 442 U.S. financial services stores (operating primarily as EZMONEY), 33 financial services stores in Canada (operating as CASHMAX), 35 buy/sell and financial services stores in Canada (operating as Cash Converters) and 45 Crediamigo locations in Mexico. In addition, we are the franchisor for 10 franchised Cash Converters stores in Canada. We also own almost 30% of Albemarle & Bond Holdings PLC, one of the U.K.’s largest pawnbroking businesses with approximately 230 stores, and almost 33% of Cash Converters International Limited, which franchises and operates a worldwide network of approximately 700 locations that buy and sell second-hand merchandise and offer financial services.
Our business consists of three reportable segments: The U.S. & Canada segment, which includes all business activities in the United States and Canada; the Latin America segment, which includes our Empeño Fácil Pawn operations and Crediamigo financial services operations in Mexico; and the Other International segment, which includes the Cash Genie online business in the U.K. and our equity interests in the net income of Albemarle & Bond and Cash Converters International.
The following tables present stores by segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2012
 
Company-owned Stores
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
 
Latin America
 
Other International
 
Consolidated
 
Franchises
Stores in operation:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of period
933
 
178
 

 
1,111
 
13

New openings
17
 
54
 

 
71
 

Acquired
51
 
45
 

 
96
 

Sold, combined or closed
(14)
 
(2)
 

 
(16)
 
(3)

End of period
987
 
275
 

 
1,262
 
10

 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2011
 
Company-owned Stores
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
 
Latin America
 
Other International
 
Consolidated
 
Franchises
Stores in operation:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of period
891
 
115

 

 
1,006
 

New openings
25
 
57

 

 
82
 
1

Acquired
34
 
6

 

 
40
 
13

Sold, combined or closed
(17)
 

 

 
(17)
 
(1)

End of period
933
 
178

 

 
1,111
 
13

 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2010
 
Company-owned Stores
 
 
 
U.S. & Canada
 
Latin America
 
Other International
 
Consolidated
 
Franchises
Stores in operation:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of period
848
 
62

 

 
910
 

New openings
58
 
53

 

 
111
 

Acquired
16
 

 

 
16
 

Sold, combined or closed
(31)
 

 

 
(31)
 

End of period
891
 
115

 

 
1,006
 


26


Pawn and Retail Activities
We earn pawn service charge revenues on our pawn lending. While allowable service charges vary by state and loan size, a majority of our U.S. pawn loans earn 20% per month. Our average U.S. pawn loan amount typically ranges between $130 and $145, but varies depending on the valuation of each item pawned. The total U.S. loan term ranges between 60 and 120 days, consisting of the primary term and grace period. In Mexico, pawn service charges range from 15% to 21% per month, including applicable taxes, with the majority of loans earning 21%. The total Mexico pawn loan term is 40 days, consisting of the primary term and grace period. Individual loans are made in Mexican pesos and vary depending on the valuation of each item pawned, but typically average $60 U.S. dollars.
In our pawn stores, buy/sell stores in Pennsylvania and Virginia and certain financial services stores in Canada, we acquire inventory for retail sales through pawn loan forfeitures, purchases of customers’ second hand merchandise or purchases of new or refurbished merchandise from third party vendors. The gross profit on sales of inventory depends primarily on our assessment of the loan or purchase value at the time the property is either accepted as loan collateral or purchased. Margins achieved on sale of inventory are a function of the assessment of value at the time the pawn loan was originated or, in the case of purchased merchandise, the purchase price.
We record a valuation allowance for obsolete or slow-moving inventory based on the type and age of merchandise. We generally establish a higher allowance percentage on general merchandise, as it is more susceptible to obsolescence, and establish a lower allowance percentage on jewelry, as it generally has greater inherent commodity value. At September 30, 2012, our total allowance was 4.9% of gross inventory, compared to 9.5% at September 30, 2011. Changes in the valuation allowance are charged to merchandise cost of goods sold.
Consumer Loan Activities
At September 30, 2012, 288 of our U.S. financial services stores and 25 of our U.S. pawn stores in Texas offered credit services to customers seeking consumer loans from unaffiliated lenders. We do not participate in any of the loans made by the lenders, but earn a fee for helping customers obtain credit and for enhancing customers’ creditworthiness by providing letters of credit to the unaffiliated lenders. Customers may obtain different types of consumer loans from the unaffiliated lenders. In all stores offering consumer loan credit services, customers can obtain single-payment unsecured consumer loans, with principal amounts up to $1,500 but averaging about $505. Terms of these loans are generally less than 30 days, averaging about 16 days, with due dates corresponding with the customer’s next payday. We typically earn a fee of 22% of the loan amount for our credit services offered in connection with single-payment loans. In the financial services stores offering credit services, customers can obtain longer-term unsecured multiple-payment loans from the unaffiliated lenders. All multiple-payment loans typically carry terms of about five months with ten equal installment payments, including principal amortization, due on customers’ paydays. Traditional multi-payment loan principal amounts range from $1,525 to $3,000, but average about $2,105, and with each semi-monthly or bi-weekly installment payment, we earn a fee of 11% of the initial loan amount. Low dollar multiple-payment loan principal amounts range from $100 to $1,500, but average about $705. With each semi-monthly or bi-weekly installment payment, we earn a fee of 13% to 14% of the initial loan amount. At September 30, 2012, single-payment loans comprised 93% of the balance of consumer loans brokered through our credit services, and multiple-payment loans comprised the remaining 7%.
Outside of Texas, we earn loan fee revenue on our consumer loans. In 20 U.S. pawn stores, 80 U.S. financial services stores and 67 Canadian financial services stores, we offer single-payment unsecured consumer loans. The average single-payment loan amount is approximately $440 and the term is generally less than 30 days, averaging about 16 days. We typically charge a fee of 15% to 22% of the loan amount. In 115 of our U.S. financial services stores and three U.S. pawn stores, we offer multiple-payment unsecured consumer loans. These loans carry a term of four to seven months, with a series of equal installment payments, including principal amortization, due monthly, semi-monthly or on the customer’s paydays. Total interest and fees on these loans vary in accordance with state law and loan terms, but over the entire loan term, total approximately 45% to 130% of the original principal amount of the loan. Multiple-payment loan principal amounts range from $100 to $3,000, but average approximately $550.
At September 30, 2012, 398 of our U.S. financial services stores and 44 of our U.S. pawn stores offered auto title loans or, in Texas, credit services to assist customers in obtaining auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. Auto title loans are 30-day loans secured by the titles to customers’ automobiles. Loan principal amounts range from $100 to $10,000, but average about $835. We earn a fee of 12.5% to 30% of auto title loan amounts. In fiscal 2012, in Texas, we began assisting customers in obtaining multiple-payment auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. These loans typically carry terms of two to five months with up to ten equal installments. Principal amounts range from $150 to $10,000, but average about $1,000; and, with each installment payment, we earn a fee of 11% to 35% of the initial loan amount.

27


In Mexico, Crediamigo offers multiple-payment consumer loans with typical annual yields of approximately 27% and collects interest and principal through payroll deductions. The average loan is approximately $1,200 with a term of 31 months.
In the U.K., Cash Genie offers unsecured single payment loans with a fixed fee of 30% of the loan amount. Loans are due within 30 days and can be renewed. Principal loan amounts range from $78 to $1,560 but average $300.
Acquisitions
In fiscal 2012, we acquired 28 pawn stores in the San Antonio metropolitan area, Florida, Minnesota and Georgia; 8 buy/sell stores in Virginia, Pennsylvania and Canada; and 15 financial services stores in Hawaii and Texas. The aggregate consideration for these stores was approximately $76.9 million, net of cash acquired. During fiscal 2012, we also acquired a 60% interest in Crediamigo, a specialty consumer finance company headquartered in Mexico City, for total consideration of $60.1 million, net of cash acquired; and a 72% interest in Ariste Holding Limited and its affiliates, which provides online loans in the U.K under the name "Cash Genie," for total consideration of $32.4 million, comprised of 0.2 million shares of EZCORP stock valued at $6.4 million and $26.0 million of cash, net of cash acquired. The results of all acquired stores and businesses have been consolidated with our results since their acquisition.
In the year ended September 30, 2011, we acquired 40 pawn stores in the Chicago metropolitan area, Georgia, Central and South Florida, Iowa, Wisconsin, Utah and the Mexican states of Hidalgo and Tlaxcala for approximately $66.2 million in cash and the issuance of approximately 0.2 million shares of EZCORP stock valued at $7.3 million. In April 2011 we also acquired the trademark and licensing rights of Cash Converters in Canada, including rights to receive fees from 13 stores operated by franchisees in Canada. The results of all acquired stores have been consolidated with our results since their acquisition.
International Growth
With continued execution of the our geographic and product diversification strategy, nearly 18% of our consolidated segment contribution in fiscal 2012 was attributable to areas outside the United States, up from 8% during fiscal 2011. Total revenue in the Latin America and Other International segments combined more than doubled from fiscal 2011 to fiscal 2012, with combined segment contribution increasing 160%. These year-over year increases are the result of continued strength in our Empeño Fácil business in Mexico, the acquisition of controlling interests in Crediamigo and Cash Genie and our strategic investments in the United Kingdom and Australia.
Other
Included in the results for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011 is a pre-tax administrative expense charge of $10.9 million related to the October 2010 retirement of our former Chief Executive Officer, including $3.4 million attributable to a cash payment and $7.5 million attributable to the vesting of restricted stock. The prior year income tax expense reflects a $3.8 million tax benefit related to this charge.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those related to revenue recognition, inventory, loan loss allowances, long-lived and intangible assets, income taxes, contingencies and litigation. We base our estimates on historical experience, observable trends and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. We use this information to make judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from the estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following critical accounting policies and estimates could have a significant impact on our results of operations. You should refer to Note 1, “Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” to our consolidated financial statements included in “Part II — Item 8 — Financial Statements and Supplemental Data” for a more complete review of other accounting policies and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

28


Consolidation
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of EZCORP, Inc. and our controlled subsidiaries. All significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. We own 60% of the outstanding equity interests in Prestaciones Finmart, S.A. de C.V., SOFOM, E.N.R. ("Crediamigo") and 72% of Ariste Holding Limited and its affiliates ("Cash Genie") and, therefore, include their results in our consolidated financial statements. We account for our investments in Albemarle & Bond Holdings, PLC and Cash Converters International Limited using the equity method.
Pawn Loan and Sales Revenue Recognition
We record pawn service charges using the interest method for all pawn loans we believe to be collectible. We base our estimate of collectible loans on several factors, including recent redemption rates, historical trends in redemption rates and the amount of loans due in the following two months. Unexpected variations in any of these factors could change our estimate of collectible loans, affecting our earnings and financial condition. If a pawn loan is not repaid, we value the forfeited collateral (inventory) at the lower of cost (pawn loan principal) or market value of the property. We record sales revenue and the related cost when this inventory is sold or when we receive the final payment on a layaway sale. Sales tax collected upon the sale of inventory is excluded from the amount recognized as sales and instead recorded as a liability in “Accounts payable and other accrued expenses” on our balance sheets until remitted to the appropriate governmental authorities.
Consumer Loans
We provide a variety of short-term consumer loans, including single-payment and multiple-payment unsecured loans and single-payment and multiple-payment auto title loans. In Texas, we provide fee-based credit services to customers seeking loans. In Mexico, Crediamigo enters into agreements with employers that permit it to market consumer loans to employees. Payments are withheld by the employers through payroll deductions and remitted to Crediamigo.
Revenue Recognition
Unsecured Consumer Loan Credit Service Fees — We earn credit service fees when we assist customers in obtaining unsecured loans from unaffiliated lenders. We initially defer recognition of the fees we expect to collect, net of direct expenses, and recognize that deferred net amount over the life of the related loans. We reserve the percentage of credit service fees we expect not to collect. Accrued fees related to defaulted loans reduce credit service fee revenue upon loan default, and increase credit service fee revenue upon collection. Consumer loan credit service fee revenue is included in “Consumer loan fees” on our statements of operations.
Unsecured Consumer Loan Revenue — We accrue fees in accordance with state and provincial laws on the percentage of unsecured loans we have made that we believe to be collectible. Accrued fees related to defaulted loans reduce fee revenue upon loan default and increase fee revenue upon collection. Unsecured loan revenue is included in “Consumer loan fees” on our statements of operations.
Long-term Unsecured Consumer Loan Revenue — Crediamigo customers obtain installment loans with a series of payments due over as much as a four year period. We recognize consumer loan fees related to loans we originate based on the percentage of consumer loans made that we believe to be collectible. We recognize interest revenue ratably over the life of the related loans. We reserve the percentage of interest we expect not to collect. Accrued fees related to defaulted loans reduce consumer loan revenue upon loan default and increase consumer loan fee revenue upon collection.
Auto Title Loan Credit Service Fee Revenue — We earn auto title credit service fees when we assist customers in obtaining auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. We recognize the fee revenue ratably over the life of the loan, and reserve the percentage of fees we expect not to collect. Auto title loan credit service fee revenue is included in “Consumer loan fees” on our statements of operations.
Auto Title Loan Revenue — We accrue fees in accordance with state laws on the percentage of auto title loans we have made that we believe to be collectible. We recognize the fee revenue ratably over the life of the loan. Auto title loan revenue is included in “Consumer loan fees” on our statements of operations.
Bad Debt and Allowance For Losses
Unsecured Consumer Loan Credit Service Bad Debt — We issue letters of credit to enhance the creditworthiness of our customers seeking unsecured loans from unaffiliated lenders. The letters of credit assure the lenders that if borrowers default on the loans, we will pay the lenders, upon demand, the principal and accrued interest owed to the lenders by the borrowers plus any insufficient funds fees. Although amounts paid under letters of credit may be collected later, we charge those amounts to consumer loan bad debt upon default. We record recoveries under the letters of credit as a reduction of

29


bad debt at the time of collection. After attempting collection of bad debts internally, we occasionally sell them to an unaffiliated company as another method of recovery and record the proceeds from such sales as a reduction of bad debt at the time of the sale.
The majority of our credit service customers obtain short-term unsecured loans with a single maturity date. These short-term loans, with terms averaging about 16 days, are considered defaulted if they have not been repaid or renewed by the maturity date. Other credit service customers obtain multiple-payment loans with a series of payments due over as much as a seven-month period. If one payment of a multiple-payment loan is delinquent, that one payment is considered defaulted. If more than one payment is delinquent at any time, the entire loan is considered defaulted.
Allowance for Losses on Unsecured Consumer Loan Credit Services — We provide an allowance for losses we expect to incur under letters of credit for brokered unsecured loans that have not yet matured. The allowance is based on recent loan default experience adjusted for seasonal variations. It includes all amounts we expect to pay to the unaffiliated lenders upon loan default, including loan principal, accrued interest, insufficient funds fees and late fees, net of the amounts we expect to collect from borrowers (collectively, “Expected LOC Losses”). Changes in the allowance are charged to consumer loan bad debt. We include the balance of Expected LOC Losses in “Accounts payable and other accrued expenses” on our balance sheets. Based on the expected loss and collection percentages, we also provide an allowance for the unsecured loan credit service fees we expect not to collect, and charge changes in this allowance to consumer loan fee revenue.
Unsecured Consumer Loan Bad Debt — We consider a single-payment loan defaulted if it has not been repaid or renewed by the maturity date. If one payment of a multiple-payment loan is delinquent, that one payment is considered defaulted. If more than one payment is delinquent at any time, the entire loan is considered defaulted. Although defaulted loans may be collected later, we charge the loan principal to consumer loan bad debt upon default, leaving only active loans in the reported balance. We record collections of principal as a reduction of consumer loan bad debt when collected. After attempting collection of bad debts internally, we occasionally sell them to an unaffiliated company as another method of recovery and record the proceeds from such sales as a reduction of bad debt at the time of sale.
Unsecured Consumer Loan Allowance for Losses — We provide an allowance for losses on unsecured loans that have not yet matured and related fees receivable, based on recent loan default experience adjusted for seasonal variations. We charge any changes in the principal valuation allowance to consumer loan bad debt. We record changes in the fee receivable valuation allowance to consumer loan fee revenue.
Long-Term Unsecured Consumer Loan Bad Debt — Consumer loans made by Crediamigo are considered in current status as long as the customer is employed and Crediamigo receives payments via payroll withholdings. Loans made to customers no longer employed are considered current if payments are made by the due date. If one payment of a loan is delinquent, that one payment is considered defaulted. If two or more payments are delinquent at any time, the entire loan is considered defaulted. Although defaulted loans may be collected later, Crediamigo charges the loan principal to consumer loan bad debt upon default, leaving only active loans in the reported balance. Collections of principal are recorded as a reduction of consumer loan bad debt when collected.
Long-Term Unsecured Consumer Loan Allowance for Losses — Crediamigo provides an allowance for losses on consumer loans that have not yet matured and related fees receivable based on recent loan default experience. Changes in the principal valuation allowance are charged to consumer loan bad debt and changes in the interest receivable valuation allowance are charged to consumer loan fee revenue.
Auto Title Loan Credit Services Bad Debt and Allowance for Losses — We issue letters of credit to enhance the creditworthiness of our customers seeking auto title loans from unaffiliated lenders. The letters of credit assure the lenders that if borrowers default on the loans, we will pay the lenders, upon demand, all amounts owed to the lenders by the borrowers plus any late fees. Through a charge to auto title loan bad debt, we provide an allowance for losses we expect to incur under letters of credit for brokered auto title loans, and record actual charge-offs against this allowance. The allowance includes all amounts we expect to pay to the unaffiliated lenders upon loan default, including principal, accrued interest and late fees, net of the amounts we expect to collect from borrowers or through the sale of repossessed vehicles. We include the allowance for expected losses in “Accounts payable and other accrued expenses” on our balance sheets.
Auto Title Loan Bad Debt and Allowance for Losses — Based on historical collection experience, the age of past-due loans and amounts we expect to receive through the sale of repossessed vehicles, we provide an allowance for losses on auto title loans and related fees receivable. We charge any increases in the principal valuation allowance to consumer loan bad debt and charge uncollectable loans against this allowance. We record changes in the fee receivable valuation allowance to consumer loan fee revenue.

30


Inventory and Cost of Goods Sold
If a pawn loan is not redeemed, we record the forfeited collateral at cost (the principal amount of the pawn loan). We do not record loan loss allowances or charge-offs on the principal portion of pawn loans, as they are fully collateralized.
In order to state inventory at the lower of cost (specific identification) or market value, we record an allowance for excess, obsolete or slow moving inventory based on the type and age of merchandise. We include in cost of goods sold the historical cost of inventory sold, inventory shrinkage and any change in the allowance for inventory shrinkage and valuation. We also include the cost of operating our central jewelry processing unit, as it relates directly to sales of precious metals to refiners.
Intangible Assets
Goodwill and other intangible assets having indefinite lives are not subject to amortization. In fiscal 2012 we early adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board "FASB" issued Accounting Standards Update "ASU" 2012-02 Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment and ASU 2011-08 Testing Goodwill for Impairment, which allows for a level of qualitative review for potential impairment of an indefinite lived asset. We review qualitative indicators annually on July 1st, or more frequently if necessary, to identify potential areas of risk for impairment. If there is an indicator that the fair market value of the segment has potentially dropped below the carrying value, then a full valuation of the segment is performed, using analyses of cash flows and other market valuation methods.  We amortize intangible assets with definite lives over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method.
Valuation of Tangible Long-Lived Assets
We assess the impairment of tangible long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the net recorded amount may not be recoverable. The following factors could trigger an impairment review: significant underperformance relative to historical or projected future cash flows, significant changes in the manner of use of the assets or the strategy for the overall business and significant negative industry trends or legislative changes prohibiting us from offering our loan products. When we determine that the net recorded amount of tangible long-lived assets may not be recoverable, we measure impairment based on the excess of the assets’ net recorded amount over the estimated fair value.
Acquisitions
We adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 805-10-65 (Business Combinations — Revised) on October 1, 2009, and have applied it prospectively to all business acquisitions completed since that date. In accordance with FASB ASC 805-10-65, we allocate the total acquisition price to the fair value of assets and liabilities acquired and immediately expense transaction costs that would have been included in the purchase price allocation under previous accounting standards.
Foreign Currency Translation
Our equity investments in Albemarle & Bond and Cash Converters International are translated from British pounds and Australian dollars, respectively, into U.S. dollars at the exchange rates as of the investees’ balance sheet date of June 30. The related interest in the investees’ net income is translated at the average exchange rates for each six-month period reported by the investees. The functional currency of Empeño Fácil, our wholly-owned subsidiary, and Crediamigo, our 60% owned subsidiary, is the Mexican peso. The functional currency of our wholly-owned foreign subsidiary in Canada is the Canadian dollar, and the functional currency of Cash Genie, our 95% owned subsidiary, is the British Pound. Our foreign subsidiaries' balance sheet accounts are translated from their respective functional currencies into U.S. dollars at the exchange rate at the end of each quarter, and their earnings are translated into U.S. dollars at the average exchange rate each quarter. We present resulting translation adjustments as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Foreign currency transaction gains and losses have not been significant, and are reported as “Other” (income) or expense in our statements of operations.
Income Taxes
We account for income taxes using the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying value of assets and liabilities and their tax basis and for operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which the related temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized when the rate change is enacted.
Management believes that it is more likely than not that forecasted income, including income that may be generated as a result of certain tax planning strategies, together with future reversals of existing taxable temporary differences, will be sufficient to fully recover the deferred tax assets. In the event that we determine all or part of the net deferred tax assets are not realizable in

31


the future, we will make an adjustment to the valuation allowance that would be charged to earnings in the period such determination is made.
Stock Compensation
We account for stock compensation in accordance with the fair value recognition provisions of FASB ASC 718-10-25 (Compensation — Stock Compensation). The fair value of restricted shares is measured as the closing market price of our stock on the date of grant, which is amortized over the vesting period for each grant. When we grant options, our policy is to estimate the grant-date fair value of options using the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model and amortize that fair value to compensation expense on a ratable basis over the options’ vesting periods.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
See Note 1, “Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” in “Part II — Item 8 — Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” for a discussion of recent accounting pronouncements.
Results of Operations
Fiscal 2012 Compared to Fiscal 2011
The following discussion compares our results of operations for the year ended September 30, 2012 to the year ended September 30, 2011. It should be read with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes.
In fiscal 2012, consolidated total revenues increased 14%, or $123.2 million, to $992.5 million, compared to the prior year. Same store total revenues decreased $13.2 million, or 2%, and new and acquired stores contributed $136.4 million. Excluding the one-time $10.9 million charge related to the retirement of our former Chief Executive Officer and the related tax benefit, net income before taxes increased 11% to $221.6 million from $199.7 million in the prior year. Net income attributable to EZCORP, Inc. increased $21.5 million, or 18%, after a $6.9 million of net income attributable to noncontrolling interest.


32


U.S. & Canada
The following table presents selected financial data for the U.S. & Canada segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
(dollars in thousands)
Merchandise sales
$
293,461

 
$
256,846

Jewelry scrapping sales
192,587

 
196,482

Pawn service charges
210,645

 
184,234

Loan fees
170,886

 
171,951

Other revenue
3,769

 
1,547

Total revenues
871,348

 
811,060

Merchandise cost of goods sold
169,285

 
147,388

Jewelry scrapping cost of goods sold
122,955

 
121,355

Consumer loan bad debt
37,405

 
38,759

Net revenues
541,703

 
503,558

 
 
 
 
Store operations
272,446

 
246,416

Administrative
25,893

 
19,444

Depreciation
13,930

 
11,211

Amortization
526

 
456

(Gain)/loss on sale or disposal of assets
(235
)
 
296

Interest, net
(3
)
 
30

Other income
(647
)
 
(3
)
Segment contribution
$
229,793

 
$
225,708

Other data:
 
 
 
Gross margin on merchandise sales
42.3
%
 
42.6
%
Gross margin on jewelry scrapping sales
36.2
%
 
38.2
%
Gross margin on total sales
39.9
%
 
40.7
%
Average pawn loan balance per pawn store at period end
$
295

 
$
311

Average yield on pawn loan portfolio (a)
160
%
 
158
%
Pawn loan redemption rate
82
%
 
81
%
Consumer loan bad debt as a percentage of consumer loan fees
22
%
 
23
%
(a)
Average yield on pawn loan portfolio is calculated as pawn service charge revenues for the period divided by the average pawn loan balance during the period.
The U.S. & Canada segment total revenues increased $60.3 million, or 7%, from the prior year to $871.3 million. Same store total revenues decreased $17.3 million, or 2.1%, and new and acquired stores net of closed stores contributed $77.6 million. The overall increase in total revenues consisted of a $32.7 million increase in merchandise and jewelry scrapping sales, a $26.4 million increase in pawn service charges and a $1.2 million increase in loan fees and other revenues. In fiscal 2012, we acquired 28 U.S. pawn stores, seven U.S. buy/sell stores, 15 financial services stores in the U.S. and one buy/sell store in Canada for an aggregate of $78.2 million. As part of these acquisitions, we began operations in the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia, Hawaii and Minnesota, bringing the total number of states in which we operate at September 30, 2012 to 24.
Fiscal 2012 pawn service charge revenue increased 14%, or $26.4 million, from the prior year to $210.6 million. Same store pawn service charges increased $12.2 million, or 7%, with new and acquired stores net of closed stores contributing $14.2 million. The same store improvement was due to a higher average same store pawn loan balance coupled with higher yield. The yield improved primarily due to a slightly higher loan redemption rate as we continued to focus on loan values and better qualifying customers to determine those that prefer to sell their merchandise rather than use it as collateral for a loan.

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Fiscal 2012 merchandise sales gross profit increased $14.7 million, or 13%, from the prior year to $124.2 million. This was due to a $37.3 million, or 14%, increase in sales from new and acquired stores net of closed stores, partially offset by a $0.7 million decrease in same store sales and a 0.3 percentage point decrease in gross margins. The decrease in gross margins was due to a shift in sales mix from jewelry to general merchandise. General merchandise sales were up 27%, while jewelry sales were down 10%.
Gross profit on jewelry scrapping sales decreased $5.5 million, or 7%, from the prior year to $69.6 million. Jewelry scrapping revenues decreased $3.9 million, or 2%, due to a 16% increase in proceeds realized per gram of gold jewelry scrapped, offset by a 19% decrease in gold volume. Same store jewelry scrapping sales decreased $26.3 million, or 13%, and new and acquired stores contributed $22.4 million. Jewelry scrapping sales include the sale of approximately $10.8 million of loose diamonds removed from scrap jewelry in fiscal 2012 and $8.1 million in the prior year. As a result of the higher average cost per gram of jewelry scrapped, scrap cost of goods increased $1.6 million, or 1%.
Total segment expenses increased to $311.9 million (36% of revenues) in fiscal 2012 from $277.9 million (34% of net revenues) in the prior year. Store operations expense increased 11%, or $26.0 million, due to operating costs resulting from new and acquired stores. Administrative expenses increased 33%, or $6.4 million, from the prior year to $25.9 million, mainly due to increased labor, benefits and additional investments made in infrastructure to support our growth. Depreciation and amortization increased 24%, or $2.8 million, from the prior year to $14.5 million, mainly due to assets placed in service at new and acquired stores.
In fiscal 2012, U.S. & Canada delivered segment contribution of $229.8 million, a $4.1 million increase compared to prior year. For fiscal 2012, the U.S. & Canada segment's contribution represents 82% of consolidated segment contribution compared to 92% in the prior year. While the U.S. & Canada segment has experienced some challenges related to jewelry merchandise sales and gold scrap sales, other elements of the business have continued to show strength, offsetting to a large extent, the challenges in the gold and jewelry market.


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Latin America
The following table presents selected financial data for the Latin America segment after translation to U.S. dollars from its functional currency of the Mexican peso:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
(dollars in thousands)
Merchandise sales
$
41,949

 
$
25,237

Jewelry scrapping sales
15,732

 
15,997

Pawn service charges
24,997

 
16,901

Consumer loan fees
26,901

 

Other revenues
1,348

 
122

Total revenues
110,927

 
58,257

Merchandise cost of goods sold
22,729

 
14,672

Jewelry scrapping cost of goods sold
11,893

 
12,205

Consumer loan bad debt
309

 

Net revenues
75,996

 
31,380

 
 
 
 
Store operations
28,919

 
20,636

Administrative
14,281

 
4,447

Depreciation
3,725

 
2,446

Amortization
1,388

 
399

Loss on sale or disposal of assets
12

 
13

Interest, net
(4,507
)
 
4

Other expense (income)
(4
)
 
7

Segment contribution
$
32,182

 
$
3,428

Other data:
 
 
 
Gross margin on merchandise sales
45.8
%
 
41.9
%
Gross margin on jewelry scrapping sales
24.4
%
 
23.7
%
Gross margin on total sales
40.0
%
 
34.8
%
Average pawn loan balance per pawn store at period end
$
73

 
$
61

Average yield on pawn loan portfolio (a)
195
%
 
187
%
Pawn loan redemption rate
76
%
 
74
%
Consumer loan bad debt as a percentage of consumer loan fees
1
%
 
N/A

(a)
Average yield on pawn loan portfolio is calculated as pawn service charge revenues for the period divided by the average pawn loan balance during the period.
The average exchange rate used to translate Latin America's results from Mexican pesos to U.S. dollars was 13.3 to 1, pesos to the dollar, 9% higher than the prior year's rate of 12.1 to 1. Total revenues increased 90% in U.S. dollars and 109% in local currency. Total operating expenses increased 57% in U.S. dollars and 102% in local currency. In fiscal 2012, we opened 52 de novo pawn stores, and on January 30, 2012, we acquired a 60% interest in Crediamigo, a specialty consumer finance company headquartered in Mexico City with 45 loan servicing locations throughout the county. Crediamigo is included in our current year results for eight months of the twelve-month period.
The Latin America segment's total revenues increased $52.7 million, or 90%, in fiscal 2012 to $110.9 million. Same store total revenues increased $4.1 million, or 7%, and new and acquired stores contributed $48.6 million. The overall increase in total revenues was mostly due to the $26.9 million in Crediamigo consumer loan fees, $16.5 million increase in merchandise and jewelry scrapping sales, a $8.1 million increase in pawn service charges and a $1.2 million increase in other revenues.


35


The Latin America segment's pawn service charge revenues increased $8.1 million, or 48%, in fiscal 2012 to $25.0 million. Same store pawn service charges increased $2.5 million, or 15%, and new and acquired stores contributed $5.6 million. The total increase was due to a 42% increase in the average outstanding pawn loan balance during the period coupled with an 8 percentage point increase in the pawn yield. The yield increased primarily due to a 2 percentage point increase in the loan redemption rate as we continued to focus on loan values.
Merchandise gross profit increased $8.7 million, or 82%, from the prior year to $19.2 million. The increase was due to a $5.6 million, or 22%, same store sales increase and a $11.1 million increase in sales from new and acquired stores coupled with a 4.0 percentage point increase in gross margins to 46%.
Gross profit on jewelry scrapping sales stayed relatively flat at $3.8 million. Jewelry scrapping revenues decreased slightly as the 11% increase in proceeds realized per gram of gold jewelry scrapped was offset by the 15% decrease in gold volume processed. Same store jewelry scrapping sales decreased $4.0 million, or 25%, and new and acquired stores contributed $3.7 million. Scrap cost of goods increased $0.3 million, or 3%, due to the 10% increase in cost per gram.
Total segment expenses increased to $43.8 million (39% of revenues) in fiscal 2012 from $28.0 million (48% of revenues) in the prior year. The dollar increase was due to a 40%, or $8.3 million, increase in store operations expenses due to higher operating costs resulting from the addition of 52 Empeño Fácil stores since the prior period. Segment administrative expenses increased $9.8 million from the prior year to $14.3 million, mainly due to Crediamigo administrative expenses and other acquisition costs. Depreciation and amortization increased $2.3 million from the prior year to $5.1 million, mainly due to depreciation of assets placed in service at new stores and amortization of acquisition related intangible assets.
Within the segment, purchase accounting pre-tax income impact during the year totaled $9.3 million, of which $5.6 million was attributable to EZCORP, Inc. with the majority of the adjustment coming from the accelerated amortization of debt premium associated with the refinanced debt at Crediamigo. The weighted average rate on Crediamigo's third party debt was 11% at September 30, 2012 compared to 19% at the time of acquisition.
In fiscal 2012, the $44.6 million greater net revenues were partially offset by the $15.8 million higher operations expense, resulting in a $28.8 million increase in contribution for the Latin America segment. Contribution margin increased 23.1 percentage points to 29%. For fiscal 2012, Latin America's segment contribution represents 12% of consolidated segment contribution compared to 1% a year ago, this 11 percentage point increase makes Latin America our fastest growing segment.


36


Other International
The following table presents selected financial data for the Other International segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
(dollars in thousands)
Consumer loan fees
$
9,884

 
$

Other revenues
308

 

Total revenues
10,192

 

Consumer loan bad debt
3,663

 

Net revenues
6,529

 

 
 
 
 
Store operations
2,121

 

Administrative
4,597

 
795

Depreciation
177

 

Amortization
46

 

Loss on sale or disposal of assets
223

 

Interest, net
(1
)
 

Equity in net income of unconsolidated affiliates
(17,400
)
 
(16,237
)
Other income
(559
)
 
(168
)
Segment contribution
$
17,325

 
$
15,610

Other data:
 
 
 
Consumer loan bad debt as a percent of consumer loan fees
37
%
 
N/A

In the first quarter of fiscal 2012, we began offering consumer loans online in the U.K. On April 14, 2012, we acquired a 72% interest in Cash Genie, an online lending business in the U.K. and consolidated it with our existing U.K. operations. In fiscal 2012, consumer loan fees were $9.9 million, with bad debt as a percentage of fees at 37%.
Our equity in the net income of unconsolidated affiliates increased $1.2 million, or 7%, from the prior year to $17.4 million. The increase is due to strong performance by Cash Converters International and a slight increase by Albermarle & Bond.
In fiscal 2012, the $6.5 million net revenues, the $1.2 million increase in our equity in the net income of unconsolidated affiliates and $0.4 million increase in other income were mostly offset by a $6.4 million increase in other operations expense, resulting in a $1.7 million increase in contribution for the Other International segment. Operations expenses include $6.1 million of Cash Genie expenses. For fiscal 2012, segment contribution from the Other International segment stayed relatively constant at 6% of consolidated segment contribution.

37


Other Items
The following table reconciles our consolidated store operating income discussed above to net income, including items that affect our consolidated financial results but are not allocated among segments:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2012
 
2011
 
(dollars in thousands)
Segment contribution
$
279,300

 
$
244,746

Corporate expenses:
 
 
 
Administrative expenses
49,264

 
50,584

Depreciation
5,457

 
3,832

Amortization
19

 

Gain on sale or disposal of assets
(1
)
 

Interest, net
2,961

 
1,619

Consolidated income before taxes
221,600

 
188,711

Income tax expense
71,023

 
66,552

Net income
150,577

 
122,159

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest
6,869

 

Net income attributable to EZCORP, Inc.
$
143,708

 
$
122,159

Corporate expenses increased $1.7 million, or 3%, to $57.7 million as a result of a $1.7 million increase in depreciation expense and a $1.3 million increase in interest expense, partially offset by a $1.3 million decrease in administrative expense. The decrease in administrative expense is primarily due to a pre-tax charge of $10.9 million related to the retirement of our former Chief Executive officer in fiscal 2011. This charge included a $3.4 million attributable to a cash payment and $7.5 million attributable to the accelerated vesting of restricted stock. Excluding this charge, administrative expenses increased $9.6 million, or 24%, which was primarily associated with supporting accelerated growth of the de novo and international operations. In fiscal 2012, interest expense increased 83% due to greater utilization of our revolver and depreciation expense increased 42% due to assets placed in service as we continue to invest in the infrastructure to support our growth.
Consolidated income before taxes increased $32.9 million, or 17%, to $221.6 million mostly due to a $4.1 million, $28.8 million and $1.7 million increase in contribution from the U.S. & Canada, Latin America and Other International segments, respectfully, offset by a $1.7 million increase in corporate expenses.
In fiscal 2012, income tax expense increased $4.5 million, or 7%, to $71.0 million. The fiscal 2012 effective tax rate is 32%, compared to 35% in the prior year. The decrease is primarily due to a larger portion of income being derived from countries outside the United States, as well as the recognition of state net operation losses.
In fiscal 2012, net income attributable to EZCORP, Inc. increased $21.5 million, or 18%, to $143.7 million, after $6.9 million of net income attributable to the noncontrolling interests.

38


Fiscal 2011 Compared to Fiscal 2010
The following discussion compares our results of operations for the year ended September 30, 2011 to the year ended September 30, 2010. It should be read with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes.
In fiscal 2011, consolidated total revenues increased 19%, or $136.3 million, to $869.3 million, compared to fiscal 2010. Same store total revenues increased $70.4 million, or 10%, and new and acquired stores contributed $65.9 million. Net income increased 26%, or $24.9 million. Excluding the one-time $10.9 million charge related to the retirement of our former Chief Executive Officer and the related tax benefit in the first quarter of fiscal 2011, net income increased 33% to $129.3 million from $97.3 million in fiscal 2010.
U.S. & Canada
The following table presents selected financial data for the U.S. & Canada segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
(dollars in thousands)
Merchandise sales
$
256,846

 
$
226,424

Jewelry scrapping sales
196,482

 
164,022

Pawn service charges
184,234

 
154,505

Consumer loan fees
171,951

 
157,022

Other revenues
1,547

 
463

Total revenues
811,060

 
702,436

Merchandise cost of goods sold
147,388

 
131,825

Jewelry scrapping cost of goods sold
121,355

 
104,701

Consumer loan bad debt
38,759

 
34,444

Net revenues
503,558

 
431,466

 
 
 
 
Store operations
246,416

 
225,006

Administrative
19,444

 
16,550

Depreciation
11,211

 
9,442

Amortization
456

 
275

Loss on sale or disposal of assets
296

 
1,546

Interest, net
30

 

Other expenses(income)
(3
)
 
3

Segment contribution
$
225,708

 
$
178,644

Other data:
 
 
 
Gross margin on merchandise sales
42.6
%
 
41.8
%
Gross margin on jewelry scrapping sales
38.2
%
 
36.2
%
Gross margin on total sales
40.7
%
 
39.4
%
Average pawn loan balance per pawn store at period end
$
311

 
$
292

Average yield on pawn loan portfolio (a)
158
%
 
156
%
Pawn loan redemption rate
81
%
 
81
%
Consumer loan bad debt as a percentage of consumer loan fees
23
%
 
22
%
(a)
Average yield on pawn loan portfolio is calculated as annualized pawn service charge revenue for the period divided by the average pawn loan balance during the period.
The U.S. & Canada segment total revenues increased $108.6 million, or 15%, from fiscal 2010 to $811.1 million in fiscal 2011. Same store total revenues increased $59.9 million, or 9%, and new and acquired stores net of closed stores contributed $48.7 million. The overall increase in total revenues consisted of a $62.9 million increase in merchandise and jewelry scrapping sales, a $29.7 million increase in pawn service charges and a $16.0 million increase in loan fees and other revenues. In fiscal 2011,

39


we acquired 34 U.S. pawn stores for an aggregate of $68.3 million. As part of these acquisitions, we began operations in three new states: Iowa, Utah and Wisconsin. We also opened 10 new de novo pawn stores in the U.S. and 15 new de novo buy/sell and financial services stores in Canada.
In fiscal 2011, pawn service charge revenue increased 19%, or $29.7 million, from the prior year to $184.2 million. Same store pawn service charges increased $18.4 million, or 12%, with new and acquired stores, net of closed stores, contributing $11.3 million. The same store improvement was due to a higher average same store pawn loan balance coupled with higher yield. The yield improved primarily due to a slightly higher loan redemption rate as we continued to focus on loan values and better qualifying customers to determine those that prefer to sell their merchandise rather than use it as collateral for a loan.
In fiscal 2011, merchandise sales gross profit increased $14.9 million, or 16%, from the prior year to $109.4 million. This was due to a $13.0 million, or 6%, increase in same store sales, a $17.4 million increase in sales from new and acquired stores net of closed stores and a 0.8 percentage point improvement in gross margins.
In fiscal 2011, gross profit on jewelry scrapping sales increased $15.8 million, or 27%, from the prior year to $75.1 million. Jewelry scrapping revenues increased $32.5 million, or 20%, due to a 28% increase in proceeds realized per gram of gold jewelry scrapped, partially offset by a 9% decrease in gold volume. Same store jewelry scrapping sales increased $15.9 million, or 10%, and new and acquired stores net of closed stores contributed $16.6 million. Jewelry scrapping sales include the sale of approximately $8.1 million of loose diamonds removed from scrap jewelry in fiscal 2011 and $3.2 million in fiscal 2010. As a result of the higher average cost per gram of jewelry scrapped, scrap cost of goods increased $16.7 million, or 16%.
In fiscal 2011, consumer loan fees increased $14.9 million, or 10%, from the prior year to $172.0 million. Net fees increased 9%, reflecting a significant improvement in bad debt performance. Consumer loan bad debt as a percentage of fees stayed relatively constant at 23% in fiscal 2011 compared to 22% in the prior year.
Total segment expenses increased to $277.9 million (34% of revenues) in fiscal 2011 from $252.8 million (36% of revenues) in fiscal 2010. Store operations expense increased $21.4 million, or 10%, due to higher operating costs resulting from new and acquired stores. Administrative expenses increased 17%, or $2.9 million, to $19.4 million mainly due to increased labor, benefits and additional investments made in infrastructure to support our growth. Depreciation and amortization increased 20%, or $2.0 million, from fiscal 2011 to $11.7 million, mainly due to assets placed in service at new and acquired stores. Loss on sale or disposal of assets decreased $1.3 million, or 81%, as fiscal 2010 included a $1.5 million loss on the closure or consolidation of several financial services stores in the states of Colorado and Wisconsin.
In fiscal 2011, the U.S. & Canada's segment contribution increased $47.1 million, or 26%, to $225.7 million. Contribution margin increased 2.4 percentage points to 27.8%. In fiscal 2011, the U.S & Canada's segment contribution comprised 92% of consolidated segment contribution compared to 94% in fiscal 2010.


40


Latin America
The following table presents selected financial data for the Latin America segment after translation to U.S. dollars from its functional currency of the Mexican peso:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
(dollars in thousands)
Merchandise sales
$
25,237

 
$
14,030

Jewelry scrapping sales
15,997

 
7,389

Pawn service charges
16,901

 
9,190

Other revenues
122

 

Total revenues
58,257

 
30,609

Merchandise cost of goods sold
14,672

 
8,459

Jewelry scrapping cost of goods sold
12,205

 
6,137

Net revenues
31,380

 
16,013

 
 
 
 
Store operations
20,636

 
11,658

Administrative
4,447

 
2,763

Depreciation
2,446

 
1,453

Amortization
399

 
356

(Gain)/loss on sale or disposal of assets
13

 
(2
)
Interest, net
4

 
2

Other expenses/(income)
7

 
(3
)
Segment contribution
$
3,428

 
$
(214
)
Other data:
 
 
 
Gross margin on merchandise sales
41.9
%
 
39.7
%
Gross margin on jewelry scrapping sales
23.7
%
 
16.9
%
Gross margin on total sales
34.8
%
 
31.9
%
Average pawn loan balance per pawn store at period end
$
61

 
$
63

Average yield on pawn loan portfolio (a)
187
%
 
182
%
Pawn loan redemption rate
74
%
 
75
%
(a)
Average yield on pawn loan portfolio is calculated as pawn service charge revenue for the period divided by the average pawn loan balance during the period.
The average exchange rate used to translate Latin America's current year results from Mexican pesos to U.S. dollars was 12.1 pesos to the dollar, 6% stronger than in the prior year. Total revenues increased 90% in U.S. dollars and 80% in local currency. Operating expenses increased 72% in U.S. dollars and 63% in local currency. We expect new stores will be a drag on earnings until they become profitable in their second year of operation. Approximately 32% of the stores open at September 30, 2011 had been open less than one year. We opened 57 new stores in fiscal 2011, 14 of which are Empeñe Su Oro jewelry-only pawn stores. These jewelry-only stores are smaller and require less staff than our full-line pawn stores, but also carry smaller average loan balances per store.
The Latin America segment total revenues increased $27.6 million, or 90%, in fiscal 2011 to $58.3 million. Same store total revenues increased $10.5 million, or 34%, and new and acquired stores contributed $17.1 million. The overall increase in total revenues comprised a $19.8 million increase in merchandise and jewelry scrapping sales, a $7.7 million increase in pawn service charges and a $0.1 million increase in other revenues.
Latin America's pawn service charge revenues increased $7.7 million, or 84%, in fiscal 2011 to $16.9 million. Same store pawn service charges increased approximately $3.4 million, or 37%, and new and acquired stores contributed $4.3 million. The same store increase was due to an improvement in the average pawn loan yield coupled with an increase in average loan balance during the period. The yield increased primarily due to an increase in pawn service charge rates in certain geographic areas compared to the prior year, partially offset by a lower loan redemption rate.

41


Merchandise gross profit increased $5.0 million, or 90%, from fiscal 2010 to $10.6 million. This was due to a $4.2 million, or 30%, same store sales increase and $7.0 million in sales from new and acquired stores in addition to a 2.2 percentage point increase in gross margins to 41.9%.
Gross profit on jewelry scrapping sales increased $2.5 million, or 203%, from fiscal 2010 to $3.8 million. Jewelry scrapping revenues increased $8.6 million, or 116%, due to 107% increase in gold volume and a 5% increase in proceeds realized per gram of gold jewelry scrapped. Same store jewelry scrapping sales increased $2.9 million, or 40%, and new and acquired stores contributed $5.7 million. The significant volume increase and the margin increase are due primarily to the continued maturation of our Empeñe Su Oro jewelry-only stores. As a result of the greater volume, scrap cost of goods increased $6.1 million.
Total segment expenses increased to $28.0 million (48% of revenues) in fiscal 2011 from $16.2 million (53% of revenues) in fiscal 2010. The dollar increase was due to a 77%, or $9.0 million, increase in store operations expenses and a $1.7 million dollar increase in administrative expenses due to higher operating costs resulting from the addition of 63 new stores. During fiscal 2011 depreciation and amortization increased $1.0 million from fiscal 2010 to $2.8 million, mainly due to depreciation of assets place in service at new stores.
In fiscal 2011, the $15.4 million greater net revenues were partially offset by the $11.8 million higher operations expense, resulting in a $3.6 million increase in contribution for the Latin America segment. Contribution margin increased 7 percentage points to 6%. In fiscal 2011, Latin America's segment contribution was 1% of consolidated segment contribution compared to a small loss in fiscal 2010.
Other International
The following table presents selected financial data for the Other International segment:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
(dollars in thousands)
Administrative expense
$
795

 
$
69

Equity in net income of unconsolidated affiliates
(16,237
)
 
(10,750
)
Other income
(168
)
 
(93
)
Segment Contribution
$
15,610

 
$
10,774

Administrative expenses increased $0.7 million in fiscal 2011, mainly due to transactions costs related to our additional investment in Cash Converters, which was subsequently canceled.
Our equity in the net income of Albemarle & Bond increased $0.5 million, or 7%, in fiscal 2011 to $7.3 million as a result of Albemarle & Bond's higher earnings and a slightly stronger British pound in relation to the U.S. dollar. On November 6, 2009, we acquired 108,218,000 newly issued shares, or approximately 30% of the capital stock of Cash Converters International Limited, a publicly traded company headquartered in Perth, Australia for approximately AUS $54.1 million (approximately U.S. $49.6 million). We acquired 16,200,000 additional shares on May 20, 2010 at a cost of AUS $9.7 million (approximately U.S. $8.2 million), which increased our ownership level to approximately 33%. In fiscal 2011, our equity in the net income of Cash Converters was $8.9 million compared to $3.9 million in fiscal 2010. As we account for our earnings from Cash Converters on a 3-month lag, fiscal 2010 included our pro rata share of their results of operations for the 237-day period from our November 6, 2009 initial investment date to the June 30, 2010 end of Cash Converters' period.
In fiscal 2011, the Other International segment contribution increased $4.8 million, or 45%, to $15.6 million. The $5.5 million, or 51%, increase in our equity in the net income of unconsolidated affiliates was partially offset by a $0.7 million increase in administrative and other expenses in the fiscal 2011 compared to fiscal 2010. Segment contribution from the Other International segment remained constant at 6%.

42


Other Items
The following table reconciles our consolidated store operating income discussed above to net income, including items that affect our consolidated financial results but are not allocated among segments:
 
Fiscal Year Ended September 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
(dollars in thousands)
Segment contribution
$
244,746

 
$
189,204

Corporate expenses:
 
 
 
Administrative expenses
50,584

 
33,358

Depreciation
3,832

 
3,135

Gain on sale or disposal of assets

 
(16
)
Interest, net
1,619

 
1,197

Consolidated income before income taxes
188,711

 
151,530

Income tax expense
66,552