20-F 1 a06-19499_120f.htm ANNUAL AND TRANSITION REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUERS

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 20-F

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: 30 June 2006

Commission file number: 1-10691

DIAGEO plc

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

England

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organisation)

8 Henrietta Place, London, W1G 0NB, England

(Address of principal executive offices)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

American Depositary Shares

 

New York Stock Exchange

Ordinary shares of 28101¤108 pence each

 

New York Stock Exchange*

                  * Not for trading, but only in connection with the registration of American Depositary Shares representing such ordinary shares, pursuant to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the Annual Report: 3,050,980,245 ordinary shares of 28101¤108 pence each.

Indicate by check mark if each registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes x  No o

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if each registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Yes o  No x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes x  No o

Indicate by check mark whether each registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large Accelerated Filer x  Accelerated Filer o  Non-Accelerated Filer o

Indicate by check mark which financial statement item the Registrant has elected to follow.

Item 17 o  Item 18 x

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes o  No x

This document comprises the annual report on Form 20-F and the annual report to shareholders for the year ended 30 June 2006 of Diageo plc (the 2006 Form 20-F). Reference is made to the cross reference to Form 20-F table on pages 211 to 213 hereof (the Form 20-F Cross reference table). Only (i) the information in this document that is referenced in the Form 20-F Cross reference table, (ii) the cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements on pages 23 and 24  and (iii) the Exhibits, shall be deemed to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for any purpose, including incorporation by reference into the Registration Statements on Form F-3 (File Nos. 333-10410, 333-14100, 333-110804 and 333-132732) and Registration Statements on Form S-8 (File Nos. 333-08090, 333-08092, 333-08094, 333-08096, 333-08098, 333-08102, 333-08104, 333-08106, 333-09770, 333-11460 and 333-11462), and any other documents, including documents filed by Diageo plc pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, which purport to incorporate by reference the 2006 Form 20-F. Any information herein which is not referenced in the Form 20-F Cross reference table, or the Exhibits themselves, shall not be deemed to be so incorporated by reference.

 




Contents

1

 

Historical information

 

 

6

 

Business description

 

 

6

 

Overview

 

 

6

 

Strategy

 

 

7

 

Continuing operations – Premium drinks

 

 

18

 

Disposed businesses

 

 

19

 

Recent developments

 

 

19

 

Risk factors

 

 

23

 

Cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements

 

 

25

 

Operating and financial review

 

 

25

 

Introduction

 

 

27

 

Operating results – 2006 compared with 2005

 

 

43

 

Trend information

 

 

44

 

Liquidity and capital resources

 

 

49

 

Contractual obligations

 

 

49

 

Off-balance sheet arrangements

 

 

50

 

Risk management

 

 

51

 

Sensitivity analysis

 

 

53

 

Critical accounting policies

 

 

55

 

Differences between IFRS and US GAAP

 

 

57

 

New accounting standards

 

 

60

 

Directors and senior management

 

 

64

 

Directors’ remuneration report

 

 

81

 

Corporate governance report

 

 

93

 

Directors’ report

 

 

95

 

Consolidated financial statements

 

 

96

 

Report of independent registered public accounting firm

 

 

97

 

Consolidated income statement

 

 

98

 

Consolidated statement of recognised income and expense

 

 

99

 

Consolidated balance sheet

 

 

100

 

Consolidated cash flow statement

 

 

101

 

Accounting policies of the group

 

 

108

 

Notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

 

192

 

Principal group companies

 

 

193

 

Unaudited computation of ratio of earnings to fixed charges and preferred share dividends

 

 

195

 

Additional information for shareholders

 

 

195

 

Legal proceedings

 

 

195

 

Material contracts

 

 

196

 

Related party transactions

 

 

196

 

Share capital

 

 

198

 

Memorandum and articles of association

 

 

203

 

Exchange controls

 

 

203

 

Documents on display

 

 

203

 

Taxation

 

 

208

 

Signature

 

 

209

 

Exhibits

 

 

211

 

Cross reference to Form 20-F

 

 




 

214

 

Glossary of terms and US equivalents

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 12.1

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 12.2

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 13.1

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 13.2

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 15.1

 

 

 

This is the Annual Report on Form 20-F of Diageo plc for the year ended 30 June 2006.

This document contains forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainty. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements, including factors beyond Diageo's control. For more details, please refer to the cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements on pages 23 and 24.

The market data contained in this document is taken from independent industry sources in the markets in which Diageo operates.

This report includes names of Diageo’s products, which constitute trademarks or trade names which Diageo owns or which others own and license to Diageo for use. In this report, the term ‘company’ refers to Diageo plc and the terms ‘group’ and ‘Diageo’ refer to the company and its consolidated subsidiaries, except as the context otherwise requires. A glossary of terms used in this report is included at the end of the document.

Diageo’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as endorsed and adopted for use in the European Union (IFRS), which is the group’s primary reporting framework. Unless otherwise indicated, all financial information contained in this document has been prepared in accordance with IFRS. The principal differences between IFRS and US GAAP are set out in the consolidated financial statements.

Information presented

Percentage movements in this document are organic movements unless otherwise stated. These movements and operating margins are before exceptional items. Commentary, unless otherwise stated, refers to organic movements. Share, unless otherwise stated, refers to volume share. See the ‘Operating and financial review’ for an explanation of organic movement calculations. The financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2006 have been prepared in accordance with IFRS.




Historical information

The following table presents selected consolidated financial data for Diageo prepared under International Financial Reporting Standards as endorsed and adopted for use in the European Union (IFRS) for the years ended 30 June 2006 and 30 June 2005 and as at the respective year ends. Consolidated financial data has been prepared in accordance with IFRS for the first time for the year ended 30 June 2006, following the implementation of IFRS by the group, and the data for the year ended 30 June 2005 has been adjusted accordingly. In addition, the following table includes selected consolidated financial data for Diageo prepared under US GAAP for the five years ended 30 June 2006 and as at the respective year ends. The IFRS data for the two years ended 30 June 2006 and US GAAP data for the five years ended 30 June 2006 have been derived from Diageo’s audited consolidated financial statements.

 

Year ended 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Income statement data(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IFRS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

 

9,704

 

 

8,968

 

Operating profit before exceptional items(3)

 

 

2,044

 

 

1,932

 

Exceptional items charged to operating profit(3)

 

 

 

 

(201

)

Operating profit

 

 

2,044

 

 

1,731

 

Other exceptional items for continuing operations, excluding tax(3)

 

 

157

 

 

214

 

Profit for the year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing operations

 

 

1,965

 

 

1,326

 

Discontinued operations(2)

 

 

 

 

73

 

Total profit for the year

 

 

1,965

 

 

1,399

 

 

 

pence

 

pence

 

Per share data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividend per share(4)

 

 

31.10

 

 

29.55

 

Earnings per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing operations

 

 

67.2

 

 

42.8

 

Discontinued operations(2)

 

 

 

 

2.4

 

Basic earnings per share

 

 

67.2

 

 

45.2

 

Diluted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing operations

 

 

66.9

 

 

42.8

 

Discontinued operations(2)

 

 

 

 

2.4

 

Diluted earnings per share

 

 

66.9

 

 

45.2

 

 

 

million

 

million

 

Average shares

 

 

2,841

 

 

2,972

 

 

 

1




Historical information (continued)

 

 

Year ended 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Income statement data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US GAAP(5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

 

10,031

 

 

9,170

 

 

8,777

 

 

9,153

 

 

10,760

 

Operating income

 

 

1,942

 

 

1,768

 

 

1,928

 

 

955

 

 

3,630

 

Net income

 

 

1,427

 

 

1,470

 

 

1,700

 

 

434

 

 

2,554

 

 

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

Per share data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings per ordinary share before cumulative effect of accounting change

 

 

50.3

 

 

49.5

 

 

56.1

 

 

13.9

 

 

77.0

 

Cumulative effect of accounting change(5)

 

 

(0.1

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings per ordinary share

 

 

50.2

 

 

49.5

 

 

56.1

 

 

13.9

 

 

77.0

 

Diluted earnings per ordinary share before cumulative effect of accounting change

 

 

50.1

 

 

49.4

 

 

56.1

 

 

13.9

 

 

77.0

 

Cumulative effect of accounting change(5)

 

 

(0.1

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per ordinary share

 

 

50.0

 

 

49.4

 

 

56.1

 

 

13.9

 

 

77.0

 

Basic earnings per ADS

 

 

200.8

 

 

198.0

 

 

224.4

 

 

55.6

 

 

308.0

 

Diluted earnings per ADS

 

 

200.0

 

 

197.6

 

 

224.4

 

 

55.6

 

 

308.0

 

 

 

million

 

million

 

million

 

million

 

million

 

Average shares

 

 

2,841

 

 

2,972

 

 

3,030

 

 

3,113

 

 

3,316

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As at 30 June

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Balance sheet data(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IFRS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13,927

 

 

13,921

 

Net borrowings(6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,082

 

 

3,706

 

Equity attributable to the parent company’s equity shareholders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,502

 

 

4,459

 

Called up share capital(7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

883

 

 

883

 

 

 

As at 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Balance sheet data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US GAAP(5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

 

20,072

 

 

21,570

 

 

23,071

 

 

24,071

 

 

26,153

 

Long term obligations(6)

 

 

4,016

 

 

3,751

 

 

3,381

 

 

3,149

 

 

3,892

 

Shareholders’equity

 

 

9,508

 

 

9,853

 

 

10,287

 

 

9,344

 

 

11,316

 

 

 

2




Historical information (continued)

Notes to the selected consolidated financial data

1       IFRS accounting policies   The financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2006 are the group’s first financial statements published in accordance with IFRS. Extracts from the income statement and balance sheet as of and for the year ended 30 June 2005 presented here have been restated under IFRS as applied by the group from financial information previously reported in the group’s consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended 30 June 2005. The group has adopted the provisions of IAS 39 – Financial instruments recognition and measurement from 1 July 2005. As permitted under IFRS 1 – First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards, financial instruments in the year ended 30 June 2005 remain recorded in accordance with previous UK GAAP accounting policies, and the adjustment to IAS 39 is reflected in the consolidated balance sheet at 1 July 2005. The IFRS accounting policies applied by the group to the financial information in this document are presented in ‘Accounting policies of the group’ in the financial statements. In addition, there is an explanation of the primary impacts of IFRS on the group’s financial results and position as previously reported under UK GAAP in note 34 to the consolidated financial statements.

2       Discontinued operations   Discontinued operations in the year ended 30 June 2005 under IFRS are in respect of the quick service restaurants business (Burger King, sold 13 December 2002) and the packaged food business (Pillsbury, sold 31 October 2001). These were not discontinued operations under US GAAP.

3       Exceptional items   The group presents certain items separately as ‘exceptional’. These are items which, in management’s judgement, need to be disclosed by virtue of their size or incidence in order for the user to obtain a proper understanding of the financial information. Such items are included within the income statement caption to which they relate. Exceptional items, as presented by management, do not represent extraordinary items under US GAAP. An analysis of exceptional items for continuing operations under IFRS is as follows:

 

Year ended 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Exceptional items (charged)/credited to operating profit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Park Royal brewery accelerated depreciation

 

 

 

 

(29

)

Seagram integration costs

 

 

 

 

(30

)

Thalidomide Trust

 

 

 

 

(149

)

Disposal of property

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

(201

)

Other exceptional items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on disposal of General Mills shares

 

 

151

 

 

221

 

Gains/(losses) on disposal and termination of businesses

 

 

6

 

 

(7

)

 

 

 

157

 

 

214

 

Tax exceptional items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax credit in respect of exceptional items

 

 

2

 

 

78

 

Deferred tax exceptional item– agreement of brand carrying values

 

 

313

 

 

 

 

 

 

315

 

 

78

 

Total exceptional items

 

 

472

 

 

91

 

 

4       Dividends   The board expects that Diageo will pay an interim dividend in April and a final dividend in October of each year. Approximately 40% of the total dividend in respect of any financial year is

3




Historical information (continued)

expected to be paid as an interim dividend and approximately 60% as a final dividend. The payment of any future dividends, subject to shareholder approval, will depend upon Diageo’s earnings, financial condition and such other factors as the board deems relevant. Under IFRS, proposed dividends are not considered to be a liability until they are approved by the board for the interim dividend and by the shareholders at the annual general meeting for the final dividend. The information provided below for the final dividend for each period represents the dividend proposed by the directors but not approved by the shareholders and therefore is not reflected as a deduction from reserves at the balance sheet date.

The table below sets out the amounts of interim, final and total cash dividends paid by the company on each ordinary share. The dividends are translated into US dollars per ADS (each ADS representing four ordinary shares) at the noon buying rate on each of the respective dividend payment dates.

 

Year ended 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

pence

 

Per ordinary share

Interim

 

11.95

 

11.35

 

10.6

 

9.9

 

9.3

 

 

    Final

 

19.15

 

18.20

 

17.0

 

15.7

 

14.5

 

 

    Total

 

31.10

 

29.55

 

27.6

 

25.6

 

23.8

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

Per ADS

Interim

 

0.88

 

0.81

 

0.77

 

0.61

 

0.54

 

 

    Final

 

1.42

 

1.30

 

1.24

 

1.06

 

0.90

 

 

    Total

 

2.30

 

2.11

 

2.01

 

1.67

 

1.44

 

 

Note: Subject to shareholder approval, the final dividend for the year ended 30 June 2006 will be paid on 23 October 2006 and payment to US ADR holders will be made on 27 October 2006. In the table above, an exchange rate of £1 = $1.85 has been assumed for this dividend, but the exact amount of the payment to US ADR holders will be determined by the rate of exchange on 23 October 2006.

5       US GAAP accounting changes   From 1 July 2005 Diageo adopted the provisions of SFAS No. 123(R) – Share-Based Payment for its US GAAP reporting. On adoption of SFAS 123(R), Diageo revalued unvested awards in its senior executive share option plan (SESOP) and recognised a cumulative effect of an accounting change of £2 million net of tax in its US GAAP financial information. Prior year information has not been restated. From 1 July 2004 Diageo adopted the provisions of FIN 46(R) – Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, which requires the group to consolidate the results, assets and liabilities of variable interest entities if the group is regarded as the primary beneficiary. Adoption of FIN 46(R) had no effect on US GAAP net income or shareholders’ equity.

6       Definitions   Net borrowings are defined as total borrowings (short term borrowings and long term borrowings plus finance lease obligations) less cash and cash equivalents, interest rate fair value hedging instruments, foreign currency swaps and forwards and other liquid resources. Long term obligations are defined as long term borrowings which fall due after more than one year.

7       Share capital   The called up share capital represents the par value of ordinary shares of 28101¤108 pence in issue. There were 3,051 million ordinary shares in issue and fully paid up at the balance sheet date (2005 – 3,050 million; 2004 – 3,057 million; 2003 – 3,100 million; 2002 – 3,215 million). Of these, 42 million (2005 – 43 million; 2004 – 43 million; 2003 – 45 million; 2002 – 39 million) are held in employee share trusts and 250 million are held as treasury shares (2005 – 86 million; 2004, 2003, 2002 – nil). These shares are deducted in arriving at equity attributable to the parent company’s equity shareholders. During the year ended 30 June 2006, the group repurchased 164 million ordinary shares for cancellation or to be held

4




Historical information (continued)

as treasury shares at a cost including fees and stamp duty of £1,407 million (2005 – 94 million ordinary shares, cost of £710 million; 2004 – 43 million ordinary shares, cost of £306 million; 2003 – 116 million ordinary shares, cost of £852 million; 2002 – 198 million ordinary shares, cost of £1,658 million). In addition the group repurchased 2 million ordinary shares to be held as treasury shares for hedging employee share scheme grants provided to employees during the year at a cost of £21 million.

8       Exchange rates   A substantial portion of the group’s assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses is denominated in currencies other than pound sterling, principally US dollars. For a discussion of the impact of exchange rate fluctuations on the company’s financial condition and results of operations, see ‘Operating and financial review – Risk management’.

The following table shows year end and average US dollar/pound sterling noon buying exchange rates, for the years indicated, expressed in US dollars per £1.

 

Year ended 30 June

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

Year end

 

1.85

 

1.79

 

1.81

 

1.65

 

1.52

 

Average rate(a)

 

1.78

 

1.86

 

1.75

 

1.59

 

1.45

 

 

The following table shows period end, high, low and average US dollar/pound sterling noon buying exchange rates by month, for the six month period to 30 August 2006, expressed in US dollars per £1.

 

2006

 

 

 

August

 

July

 

June

 

May

 

April

 

March

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

 

$

 

Month end

 

1.90

 

1.87

 

1.85

 

1.87

 

1.82

 

 

1.74

 

Month high

 

1.91

 

1.87

 

1.88

 

1.89

 

1.82

 

 

1.76

 

Month low

 

1.87

 

1.82

 

1.81

 

1.83

 

1.74

 

 

1.73

 

Average rate(b)

 

1.89

 

1.84

 

1.84

 

1.87

 

1.77

 

 

1.74

 

 

The average exchange rate for the period 1 to 20 September 2006 was £1 = $1.88 and the noon buying rate on 20 September 2006 was £1 = $1.89.


(a)           The average of the noon buying rates on the last business day of each month during the year ended 30 June

(b)          The average of the noon buying rates on each business day of the month

(c)           These rates have been provided for information only. They are not necessarily the rates that have been used in this document for currency translations or in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements. See note 2(i)(d) to the consolidated financial statements for the actual rates used.

5




Business description

Overview

Diageo is the world’s leading premium drinks business with a collection of international brands. Diageo was the fourteenth largest publicly quoted company in the United Kingdom in terms of market capitalisation on 20 September 2006, with a market capitalisation of approximately £26.1 billion.

Diageo was formed by the merger of Grand Metropolitan Public Limited Company (GrandMet) and Guinness PLC (the Guinness Group) that became effective on 17 December 1997. Diageo plc is incorporated as a public limited company in England and Wales. Diageo plc’s principal executive office is located at 8 Henrietta Place, London W1G 0NB and its telephone number is +44 (0) 20 7927 5200.

Diageo is a major participant in the branded beverage alcohol industry and operates on an international scale. It brings together world-class brands and a management team committed to the maximisation of shareholder value. The management team expects to invest in global brands, expand internationally and launch innovative new products and brands.

Diageo produces and distributes a leading collection of branded premium spirits, beer and wine. It produces and distributes a wide range of premium brands, including Smirnoff vodka, Johnnie Walker Scotch whiskies, Guinness stout, Baileys Original Irish Cream liqueur, Captain Morgan rum, J&B Scotch whisky and Tanqueray gin. In addition it also owns the distribution rights for the José Cuervo tequila brands in the United States and other countries.

Strategy

Diageo is the world’s leading premium drinks business and operates on an international scale. It is one of a small number of premium drinks companies that operate across beer, wine and spirits. Diageo is the leading premium spirits business in the world by volume, by net sales and by operating profit and manages nine of the world’s top 20 spirits brands as defined by Impact database. Diageo’s beer brands include the only global stout brand, Guinness, and together these beer brands account for approximately 20% of net sales while Diageo’s wine brands represent approximately 5% of Diageo’s net sales.

Diageo’s size provides for scale efficiencies in production, selling and marketing. This enables cost efficiencies and the dissemination of best practices in business operations across markets and brands allowing Diageo to serve its customers and consumers better.

Diageo’s business has a high return on invested capital and low capital intensity and therefore generates high levels of free cash flow.

All of the above factors enable Diageo to attract and retain talented individuals with the capabilities to contribute to the delivery of Diageo’s strategy, which is to focus on premium drinks to grow its business through organic sales and operating profit growth and the acquisition of premium drinks brands that add value for shareholders.

Diageo’s brands have broad consumer appeal across geographies and the company and its employees are proud of the responsible manner in which the brands are marketed and the role that moderate consumption of these brands plays in the lives of many people.

Diageo recognises, however, that excessive or irresponsible patterns of alcohol consumption may cause health or social problems for the individual or society as a whole. Diageo seeks to be at the forefront of industry efforts to promote responsible drinking and combat misuse and works with other stakeholders to combat alcohol misuse. Diageo’s approach is based on two principles: set world-class standards for

6




Business description (continued)

responsible marketing and innovation; and promote a shared understanding of what responsible drinking means in order to reduce alcohol-related harm.

Market participation   Diageo targets its geographical priorities in terms of the major regional economies in which it operates. These markets are managed in three regions: North America, Europe and International. International markets comprise Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East and India, China and other Asian markets, Australia and New Zealand, and the Global Duty Free business. North America accounts for the largest proportion of Diageo’s operating profit.

Product offering   Diageo manages its brands in terms of global priority brands, local priority brands and category brands. Acting as the main focus for the business, global priority brands are Diageo’s primary growth drivers across markets. Local priority brands have market-leading positions in the markets in which they are distributed. They drive growth on a significant scale but with a narrower geographic reach than the global priority brands. Category brands comprise the smaller scale brands in Diageo’s collection.

Business effectiveness   Over the long term, Diageo’s strategy will be continually focused on driving growth and increasing shareholder value.

Diageo has completed a number of acquisitions and disposals consistent with its strategy of focusing on its premium drinks business. Between the merger of Grand Met and the Guinness Group in December 1997 and 30 June 2006, the group has received approximately £10.5 billion from disposals (including £4.3 billion from the sale of Pillsbury, £1.9 billion from the sale of General Mills shares and £0.7 billion from the sale of Burger King) and spent approximately £4.9 billion on acquisitions (including £3.7 billion in relation to certain Seagram businesses).

Continuing operations – Premium drinks

Diageo is engaged in a broad range of activities within the beverage alcohol industry. Its operations include producing, distilling, brewing, bottling, packaging, distributing, developing and marketing a range of brands in approximately 180 markets around the world. Diageo markets a wide range of recognized beverage alcohol brands including a number of the world’s leading spirits and beer brands. The brand ranking information below, when comparing volume information with competitors, has been sourced from data published during 2006 by Impact. Market data information is taken from industry sources in the markets in which Diageo operates. Seventeen of the group’s owned brands were among the top 100 premium distilled spirits brands worldwide, as ranked by Impact, in calendar year 2005.

References to ready to drink products below include flavored malt beverages. Ready to drink products are sold throughout the world, but flavored malt beverages are currently only sold in the United States and certain markets supplied by the United States. References to Smirnoff ready to drink include Smirnoff Ice, Smirnoff Black Ice, Smirnoff Twisted V, Smirnoff Mule, Smirnoff Spin, Smirnoff Caipiroska, Smirnoff Signatures, Smirnoff Raw Teas, Smirnoff Storm and Smirnoff Caesar Classic. References to Smirnoff Black Ice include Smirnoff Ice Triple Black in the United States.

In the year ended 30 June 2006, Diageo sold 109 million equivalent units of spirits (including ready to drink), 22 million equivalent units of beer and 3 million equivalent units of wine. In the year ended 30 June 2006, ready to drink products contributed 7.5 million equivalent units of total volume, of which Smirnoff ready to drink variants accounted for 5 million equivalent units. Volume has been measured on an equivalent units basis to nine litre cases of spirits. An equivalent unit represents one nine litre case of spirits, which is approximately 272 servings. A serving comprises 33ml of spirits, 165ml of wine, or 330ml of ready to drink or beer. Therefore, to convert volume of products other than spirits to equivalent units, the

7




Business description (continued)

following guide has been used: beer in hectolitres divide by 0.9, wine in nine litre cases divide by five and ready to drink in nine litre cases divide by 10, with certain pre-mixed products that are classified as ready to drink divided by five.

The collection of premium drinks comprises brands owned by the company as a principal, and brands the company holds under agency agreements. The collection includes:

Global priority brands

Smirnoff vodka and Smirnoff ready to drink products

Johnnie Walker Scotch whiskies

Guinness stout

Baileys Original Irish Cream liqueur

Captain Morgan rum

J&B Scotch whisky

José Cuervo tequila (agency brand in North America and many other markets)

Tanqueray gin

Other spirits brands include:

 

Wine brands include:

 

Other beer brands include:

Crown Royal Canadian whisky

 

Beaulieu Vineyard wine

 

Harp Irish lager

Buchanan’s De Luxe whisky

 

Sterling Vineyards wine

 

Smithwick’s ale

Gordon’s gin and vodka

 

Chalone Vineyards wine

 

Malta non-alcoholic malt

Windsor Premier whisky

 

Blossom Hill wine

 

Red Stripe lager

Bell’s Extra Special whisky

 

Piat d’Or wine

 

 

Dimple/Pinch whisky

 

 

 

 

Seagram’s 7 Crown American whiskey

 

 

 

 

Old Parr whisky

 

 

 

 

Seagram’s VO Canadian whisky

 

 

 

 

Bundaberg rum

 

 

 

 

Ursus vodka

 

 

 

 

Bushmills Irish whiskey

 

 

 

 

 

Diageo’s agency agreements vary depending on the particular brand, but tend to be for a fixed number of years. Diageo’s principal agency brand is José Cuervo in North America and many other markets (with distribution rights extending to 2013). There can be no assurances that Diageo will be able to prevent termination of distribution rights or rights to manufacture under licence, or renegotiate distribution rights or rights to manufacture under licence on favourable terms when they expire.

Diageo also brews and sells other companies’ beer brands under licence, including Budweiser and Carlsberg lagers in Ireland, Heineken lager in Jamaica and Tiger beer in Malaysia.

Global priority brands   Diageo has eight global priority brands that it markets worldwide. Diageo considers these brands to have the greatest current and future earnings potential. Each global priority brand is marketed consistently around the world, and therefore can achieve scale benefits. The group manages and invests in these brands on a global basis. In the year ended 30 June 2006, global priority brands contributed 59% of total volume and achieved sales of £5,593 million.

Figures for global priority brands include related ready to drink products, unless otherwise indicated.

8




Business description (continued)

Smirnoff is Diageo’s highest volume brand and achieved sales of 26.9 million equivalent units in the year ended 30 June 2006. Smirnoff is ranked, by volume, as the number one premium vodka and the number one premium spirit brand in the world.

Johnnie Walker Scotch whiskies comprise Johnnie Walker Red Label, Johnnie Walker Black Label and several other brand variants. During the year ended 30 June 2006, Johnnie Walker Red Label sold 8.5 million equivalent units and was ranked, by volume, as the number one premium Scotch whisky and the number five premium spirit brand in the world. Johnnie Walker Black Label sold 4.5 million equivalent units and the remaining variants sold 0.7 million equivalent units in the year ended 30 June 2006.

Guinness is the group’s only global priority beer brand, and for the year ended 30 June 2006 achieved volume of 11.1 million equivalent units.

Baileys ranked, by volume, the number one liqueur in the world, sold 7.0 million equivalent units in the year ended 30 June 2006.

Captain Morgan is ranked, by volume, as the number two premium rum brand in the world with sales of 7.2 million equivalent units in the year ended 30 June 2006.

Other global priority brands were also ranked, by volume, among the leading premium distilled spirits brands by Impact. These include: J&B Scotch whisky (comprising J&B Rare, J&B Select, J&B Reserve, J&B – 6°C and J&B Jet), ranked the number two premium Scotch whisky in the world; José Cuervo, ranked the number one premium tequila in the world; and Tanqueray, ranked the number four premium gin brand in the world. During the year ended 30 June 2006, J&B, José Cuervo and Tanqueray sold 5.9 million, 5.1 million and 2.0 million equivalent units, respectively.

Other brands   Diageo manages its other brands by category, analysing them between local priority brands and category brands.

Local priority brands represent the brands, apart from the global priority brands, that make the greatest contribution to operating profit in an individual country, rather than worldwide. Diageo has identified 30 local priority brands. Diageo manages and invests in these brands on a market by market basis and, unlike the global priority brands, may not have a consistent marketing strategy around the world for such brands. For the year ended 30 June 2006, local priority brands contributed volume of 23.1 million equivalent units, representing 17% of total volume, and sales of £1,975 million. Examples of local priority brands include Crown Royal Canadian whisky in North America, Windsor Premier whisky in South Korea, Seagram’s VO whisky and Seagram’s 7 Crown whiskey in North America, Cacique rum in Spain, Gordon’s gin in Great Britain, Bundaberg rum in Australia, Bell’s whisky in Great Britain, Smithwick’s ale in Ireland, Budweiser and Carlsberg lagers in Ireland and Sterling Vineyards wines in North America.

The remaining brands are grouped under category brands. Category brands include spirits, beer and wine brands and for the year ended 30 June 2006, these category brands contributed volume of 31.8 million equivalent units, representing 24% of total volume, and sales of £2,136 million. Of this, spirits achieved volume of 24.0 million equivalent units and contributed £1,373 million to Diageo’s sales in the year ended 30 June 2006. Examples of category spirits brands are Gordon’s gin (all markets except Great Britain and North America in which it is reported as a local priority brand), Gordon’s vodka, The Classic Malt whiskies and White Horse whisky.

In the year ended 30 June 2006, Diageo sold 5.4 million equivalent units of beers other than Guinness, achieving sales of £393 million. Other beer volume was attributable to mainly owned brands, such as Harp Irish lager (all markets except Ireland), Kilkenny Irish beer, and Smithwick’s ale (all markets except

9




Business description (continued)

Ireland), with a minority being attributable to beers brewed and/or sold under licence, such as Tiger beer in Malaysia and Heineken lager in Jamaica.

In addition, Diageo produces and markets a wide selection of wines. These include well known labels such as Beaulieu Vineyard, Sterling Vineyards and Chalone Vineyards in the United States, Blossom Hill in the United Kingdom, and Barton & Guestier and Piat d’Or in Europe. For the year ended 30 June 2006, other wine volume was 2.4 million equivalent units, contributing sales of £370 million.

Production   Diageo owns production facilities including maltings, distilleries, breweries, packaging plants, maturation warehouses, cooperages, vineyards and distribution warehouses. Production also occurs at plants owned and operated by third parties and joint ventures at a number of locations internationally.

Approximately 80% of total production (including third party production) is undertaken in five Diageo production areas, namely the United Kingdom, Baileys, Guinness, Santa Vittoria and North America centres. The majority of these production centres have several production facilities. The locations, principal activities, products, production capacity and production volume in 2006 of these principal production centres are set out in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Production

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Production

 

volume in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

capacity in

 

2006 in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

millions of

 

millions of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

equivalent

 

equivalent

 

Production centre

 

 

 

Location

 

Principal products

 

units

 

units

 

United Kingdom

 

United Kingdom

 

Scotch whisky, gin, vodka, rum, ready to drink

 

58

 

40

 

Baileys

 

Ireland

 

Irish cream liqueur, vodka

 

15

 

8

 

Guinness

 

Ireland

 

Beers, ready to drink

 

11

 

9

 

Santa Vittoria

 

Italy

 

Vodka, wine, rum, ready to drink

 

9

 

6

 

North America

 

United States, Canada

 

Vodka, gin, tequila, rum, Canadian whisky, American whiskey, flavored malt beverages, wine, ready to drink

 

65

 

38

 

 

Spirits are produced in distilleries located worldwide. The principal owned distilleries are 29 whisky distilleries in Scotland, a whisky distillery in Canada and gin distilleries in the United Kingdom and the United States. Diageo produces Smirnoff vodka internationally, Popov vodka and Gordon’s vodka in the United States and Baileys in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Rum is blended and bottled in the United States, Canada, Italy and the United Kingdom and is distilled, blended and bottled in Australia and Venezuela. All of Diageo’s maturing Scotch whisky is located in warehouses in Scotland. On 25 August 2005, Diageo acquired the Bushmills Irish whiskey distillery located in Northern Ireland.

Diageo’s principal wineries are in the United States, France and Argentina. Wines are sold both in their local markets and overseas.

Diageo produces a range of ready to drink products mainly in the United Kingdom, Italy, South Africa, Australia, the United States and Canada.

Diageo’s principal brewing facilities are at the St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin and in Kilkenny, Waterford and Dundalk in the Republic of Ireland, and in Nigeria, Kenya, Malaysia, Jamaica and

10




Business description (continued)

Cameroon. Ireland is the main export centre for the Guinness brand. In other countries, Guinness is brewed under licence arrangements.

In June 2005, Diageo closed its Park Royal brewery in London, England and transferred all Guinness Draught production to St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin in the Republic of Ireland, to optimise utilisation and reduce ongoing costs. The Runcorn facility performs the kegging of Guinness Draught, transported to the United Kingdom in bulk for the Great Britain market. Guinness Draught in cans and bottles, which uses an in-container system to replicate the taste of Guinness Draught, is packaged at Runcorn and Belfast in the United Kingdom.

Property, plant and equipment   Diageo owns or leases land and buildings throughout the world. The principal production facilities are described above. As at 30 June 2006, Diageo’s land and buildings were included in the group’s consolidated balance sheet under IFRS at a net book value of £709 million. Diageo’s largest individual facility, in terms of net book value of property, is St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin. Approximately 97% by value of the group’s properties were owned and approximately 3% are held under leases running for 50 years or longer. Diageo’s properties primarily are a variety of manufacturing, distilling, brewing, bottling and administration facilities spread across the group’s worldwide operations, as well as vineyards in the United States. Approximately 39% and 27% of the book value of Diageo’s land and buildings comprise properties located in the United Kingdom and the United States, respectively.

Raw materials   The group has a number of contracts for the forward purchasing of its raw material requirements in order to minimise the effect of raw material price fluctuations. Long term contracts are in place for the purchase of significant raw materials including glass, other packaging, tequila, neutral spirits, cream, rum and grapes. In addition, forward contracts are in place for the purchase of other raw materials including sugar and cereals to minimise the effects of short term price fluctuations.

Cream is the principal raw material used in the production of Irish cream liqueur and is sourced from Ireland. Grapes are used in the production of wine and are sourced from suppliers in the United States, France and Argentina. Other raw materials purchased in significant quantities for the production of spirits and beer are tequila, neutral spirits, molasses, rum, cereals, sugar and a number of flavours (such as juniper berries, agave, chocolate and herbs). These are sourced from suppliers around the world.

The majority of products are supplied to customers in glass bottles. Glass is purchased from suppliers located around the world, the principal supplier being the Owens Illinois group.

Diageo has a supply agreement with Casa Cuervo SA de CV, a Mexican company, for the supply of bulk tequila used to make the José Cuervo line of tequilas and tequila drinks in the United States. The supply agreement will expire in June 2013.

Diageo has a supply agreement with Destiléria Serrallés, Inc (Serrallés), a Puerto Rican corporation, for the supply of rum used to make the Captain Morgan line of rums and rum drinks in the United States. The supply agreement is for 10 years from 2002, with a three year notice requirement coming into effect once the original 10 year term has expired.

Marketing and distribution   Diageo is committed to investing in its brands. £1,127 million was spent worldwide on marketing brands in the year ended 30 June 2006. Marketing was focused on the eight global priority brands, which accounted for 68% of total marketing expenditure in the year ended 30 June 2006.

Diageo aims to maintain and improve its market position by enhancing the consumer appeal of its brands through consistent high investment in marketing support focused around the eight global priority brands. Diageo makes extensive use of magazine, newspaper, point of sale and poster and billboard

11




Business description (continued)

advertising, and uses radio, cinema and television advertising where appropriate and permitted by law. Diageo also runs consumer promotional programmes in the on trade (for example, licensed bars and restaurants).

Diageo markets and distributes its brands under a geographic organisation comprising North America, Europe and International.

Diageo North America comprises the United States and Canada.

Diageo Europe consists of the following regions and countries: Great Britain; Ireland; Northern Europe – the Nordics, Germany, France, Benelux, Austria, Switzerland and the Baltics; Southern and Eastern Europe – Greece, Turkey, Italy, Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Cyprus, Malta, Israel, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania; Iberia – Spain, Portugal and the Canary Islands; and Russia (comprising former Commonwealth of Independent States countries).

Diageo International consists of the following regions and countries: Latin America and the Caribbean; Africa; the Middle East and India; China and other Asian markets; Australia and New Zealand; and Global Duty Free.

In the year ended 30 June 2006, North America, Europe and International contributed 38%, 33% and 29%, respectively, of the group’s operating profit before exceptional items and corporate costs.

An analysis of sales and operating profit before exceptional items by market for the year ended 30 June 2006 is as follows:

 

 

 

Operating

 

 

 

 

 

profit/(loss)

 

 

 

 

 

before

 

 

 

 

 

exceptional

 

 

 

Sales

 

items

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

North America

 

 

2,968

 

 

829

 

Europe

 

 

3,834

 

 

737

 

International

 

 

2,826

 

 

644

 

Corporate and other

 

 

76

 

 

(166

)

Total

 

 

9,704

 

 

2,044

 

 

North America   North America is the largest market for Diageo in terms of operating profit before exceptional items, and the largest market for premium drinks in the world. Diageo markets its products through four operating units: US Spirits, Diageo-Guinness USA, Diageo Chateau & Estates Wine Company, and Diageo Canada.

The US Spirits business, while managed as a single business unit, executes sales and marketing activities through 14 teams or clusters. National brand strategy and strategic accounts marketing are managed at the corporate North America level. The spirits clusters market the majority of Diageo’s portfolio of spirits (including Smirnoff vodka, Baileys Irish Cream liqueur, José Cuervo tequila, Johnnie Walker Scotch whisky, Captain Morgan rum, Tanqueray gin, J&B Scotch whisky, Crown Royal Canadian whisky, Seagram’s 7 Crown American whiskey, Seagram’s VO Canadian whisky and Buchanan’s Scotch whisky) across the United States. Diageo-Guinness USA distributes Diageo’s US beer portfolio (including Guinness stout, Harp Irish lager, Red Stripe lager and Smithwick’s ale) as well as the group’s flavored malt beverages (including Smirnoff Ice, Smirnoff Twisted V and Captain Morgan Parrot Bay). Diageo Chateau & Estate Wines owns and operates vineyards in California and Washington State (including

12




Business description (continued)

Beaulieu Vineyard, Sterling Vineyards, Chalone Vineyards and Hewitt Vineyards) and markets these and other wines across the United States. The Canada business unit distributes the group’s spirits, wine and beer portfolio across all Canadian territories.

Within the United States, there are generally two types of regulatory environments: open states and control states. In open states, spirits companies are allowed to sell spirits, wine and beer directly to independent distributors. In the open states, Diageo trades through a three tier distribution system, where the product is initially sold to distributors, who then sell it to on and off premise retailers. In most control states, Diageo markets its spirits products to state liquor control boards through the bailment warehousing system, and from there to state or agency liquor stores. There are variations – for example, certain states control distribution but not retail sales. Generally, wines are treated in the same way as spirits, although most states that are control states for spirits are open states for wines. Beer distribution follows open states regulation across the entire United States. In Canada, beer and spirits distribution laws are generally consistent and similar to those of control states in the United States. Diageo, however, has some licences to direct-deliver keg beer to licensed accounts, which account for approximately 33% of Diageo’s beer business in Canada.

Diageo has pursued a distribution strategy focused on consolidating the distribution of Diageo’s US spirits and wine brands into a single distributor in each state wherever possible. The strategy is designed to provide a consolidated distribution network limiting duplication of activities between Diageo and the distributor, increasing Diageo and distributor selling capabilities and employing a number of alternative approaches to optimise product distribution. Through this strategy, Diageo has consolidated its business in 39 states plus Washington DC, representing over 80% of Diageo’s US spirits and wine volume. Across the United States, Diageo’s distributors and brokers have over 2,100 dedicated sales people focused on selling Diageo’s spirits and wine brands. In the future, Diageo will focus on helping to build the capabilities and selling tools of the distributors’ dedicated sales forces and creating a more efficient and effective value chain.

The remaining states are franchise states that will be consolidated as opportunities arise.

Europe   Diageo Europe covers Great Britain, Ireland, Northern Europe, Southern and Eastern Europe, Iberia, and Russia.

In Great Britain Diageo markets its products via three business units: Diageo GB (spirits, beer and ready to drink), Percy Fox & Co (wines) and Justerini & Brooks Retail (private client wines). Products are distributed both via independent wholesalers and directly to the major grocers, convenience and specialist stores. In the on trade (eg, licensed major bars and restaurants), products are sold through the major brewers, multiple retail groups and smaller regional independent brewers and wholesalers. The customer base in Great Britain has seen consolidation in recent years in both the on trade and home consumption channels. In particular, Great Britain’s top four national multiple grocers together make up over 45% of home consumption total spirits volume.

Ireland comprises the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. In both territories, Diageo sells and distributes directly to both the on trade and the off trade (for example, retail shops and wholesalers) through a telesales operation, extensive sales calls to outlets and third party logistics providers. The Guinness, Smirnoff and Baileys brands are market leaders in their respective categories of long alcoholic drinks, vodka and liqueurs. Budweiser and Carlsberg lagers, also major products in the Diageo collection of brands in Ireland, are brewed and sold under licence in addition to the other local priority brands of Smithwick’s ale and Harp Irish lager.

13




Business description (continued)

Across the remainder of the Europe region, and including the majority of the markets within Northern Europe and Southern and Eastern Europe, Diageo distributes its spirits brands primarily through its own distribution companies. Exceptions to this are:

·       France, where Diageo sells its spirits and wine products through a joint arrangement with Moët Hennessy, and its beer products through Interbrew;

·       Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Cyprus, Malta, Croatia, former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Slovenia, where Diageo also sells and markets its brands via local distributors;

·       Russia, where Diageo’s products during the year ended 30 June 2006 were distributed via a local company, Roust. Diageo has announced the acquisition of the Smirnov brand in Russia through a company in which Diageo holds a 75% stake and a major Russian consortium, the Alfa Group, holds a 25% stake. This company will be the exclusive distributor of Diageo spirits and the Smirnov vodka brand in Russia.

·       in the Nordic countries, where Diageo has sales offices in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and representation through third party distributors in Finland and Iceland. In all Nordic markets except Denmark, off premise sales are controlled by state monopolies, with alcohol tax rates among the highest in the world, and border trade and duty free are important sources of purchase.

A specialist unit has been established for the distribution of Diageo’s beer brands in continental Europe in order to achieve synergies in the marketing and distribution of Guinness, Harp and Kilkenny brands within continental Europe. The distribution of these brands is managed by this specialist unit both in the on trade and off trade, with special focus on the markets in Germany, Italy, Russia and France, which are the largest continental European beer markets by size for Diageo.

International   Diageo International covers Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, India, China and other Asian markets, Australia and New Zealand, and Global Duty Free.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, distribution is achieved through a mixture of Diageo companies and third party distributors. In addition, Diageo owns a controlling interest in Desnoes & Geddes Limited, the Jamaican local brewer of Red Stripe lager.

Africa (excluding North Africa) is one of the longest established and largest markets for the Guinness brand, with the brewing of Guinness Foreign Extra Stout in a number of African countries, either through subsidiaries or under licence. Diageo has a three-way joint venture with Heineken and Namibia Breweries Limited in South Africa. Diageo has a wholly-owned subsidiary in Cameroon and also has majority-owned subsidiaries in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Réunion and the Seychelles. In Ghana, Diageo and Heineken amalgamated the businesses of Guinness Ghana Limited (Diageo) and Ghana Breweries Limited (Heineken) in 2005 to form Guinness Ghana Breweries Ltd to achieve a number of commercial and operational synergy benefits.

In the Middle East and India, distribution is achieved mainly through third party distributors. Lebanon is an exception, where a Diageo majority-owned joint venture distributes most of the Diageo brands sold there.

Elsewhere in Asia, Diageo works with a number of joint venture partners. In Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan, Diageo distributes its spirits and wine brands through joint venture arrangements with Moët Hennessy. Diageo has a distribution agreement with Citic/Sims for the distribution by that company of certain spirits brands in the People’s Republic of

14




Business description (continued)

China. In South Korea, Diageo’s own distribution company distributes the majority of Diageo’s brands. The remaining brands are distributed through third party distributors. In Japan, Guinness beer is distributed through an associated company of the group, a joint venture with Sapporo Breweries. There is also a direct relationship with Sapporo Breweries for distribution of Smirnoff Ice. Other spirits and wine brands, which are not distributed by the Moët Hennessy joint venture in Japan are handled by third parties. In Malaysia, Diageo’s own and third party beers are brewed and distributed by a listed business (Guinness Anchor Berhad) in which Diageo and its partner, Asia Pacific Breweries, have a majority share through a jointly controlled joint venture company. In Singapore Diageo’s beer brands are brewed and distributed by a business partner, APB Singapore. Generally, the remaining markets in Asia are served by third party distribution networks monitored by regional offices.

In Australia, Diageo has its own distribution company as well as a distribution arrangement with VOK beverages, and also has licensed brewing arrangements with Carlton-United Breweries. In New Zealand, Diageo operates through third party distributors and has licensed brewing arrangements with Lion Nathan.

Global Duty Free (GDF) is Diageo’s sales and marketing organisation which targets the international consumer in duty free and travel retail outlets such as airport shops, airlines and ferries around the world. The global nature of this channel and the organisation structure allows a co-ordinated approach to brand building initiatives and builds on consumer insights in this trade channel, where consumer behaviour tends to be different from domestic markets.

Seasonal impacts   The holiday season provides the peak period for sales. Approximately 30% of annual sales volume occurs in the last three months of each calendar year.

Employees   Releasing the potential of every employee is one of Diageo’s core strategic imperatives. The organisation and people strategy is focused on creating the conditions within which individuals feel both able and inspired to contribute directly to enhanced business performance, while also achieving personal growth.

Diageo’s ability to attract and retain the very best talent, from the most diverse global talent pools, is fundamental to achieving its ambitious performance targets and to meeting the expectations of its various stakeholders. Opportunities for employment, training and career progression are determined on the basis of each individual’s ability and performance track record, irrespective of their gender, ethnic origin, nationality, age, religion, sexual orientation or disability. Reward and recognition programmes that are provided for employees are regularly benchmarked to determine their competitive positioning but also to ensure that an individual’s contribution is appropriately and fairly recognised.

Employee policies are designed to support business performance goals and do so in a manner that takes account of external legislation and internal codes of conduct, as well as Diageo’s values as an organisation. In particular, Diageo is committed to the safety and wellbeing of employees at work and also promotes responsible drinking behaviour among its employees. Access to such policies is enabled via an intranet website, which allows employees to be kept fully informed of all relevant information.

Diageo strives to foster a sense of pride in employees working for Diageo. The senior leadership community is committed to delivering against a range of employee engagement goals. This includes, where appropriate, honouring its obligations to consult openly and regularly with employee representative forums and/or trade unions. Specifically, Diageo’s leaders seek to sustain an open and continuous dialogue with employees as a way to inform and engage them in the company’s strategy and business goals, but also to elicit their ideas and suggestions for improvement opportunities.

15




Business description (continued)

Diageo’s average number of employees during each of the three years ended 30 June 2006 was as follows:

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

Employees

 

Employees

 

Employees

 

Average number of employees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full time

 

 

21,972

 

 

22,333

 

 

22,548

 

Part time

 

 

647

 

 

633

 

 

1,172

 

 

 

 

22,619

 

 

22,966

 

 

23,720

 

 

Competition   Diageo competes on the basis of consumer loyalty, quality and price.

In spirits, Diageo’s major global competitors are Pernod Ricard, Bacardi and Brown-Forman, each of which has several brands that compete directly with Diageo brands. In addition, Diageo faces competition from local and regional companies in the countries in which it operates.

In beer, the Guinness brand competes in the overall beer market with its key competitors varying by market. These include Heineken in Ireland and both Heineken and SABMiller in several markets in Africa, Coors Brewing (Carling) in the United Kingdom and Carlsberg in Malaysia.

In wine, the market is fragmented with many producers and distributors.

Research and development   The overall nature of the group’s business does not demand substantial expenditure on research and development. However, the group has ongoing programmes for developing new drinks products. In the year ended 30 June 2006, the group’s research and development expenditure amounted to £18 million (2005 – £16 million). Research and development expenditure is generally written off in the year in which it is incurred.

Trademarks   Diageo produces and distributes branded goods and is therefore substantially dependent on the maintenance and protection of its trademarks. All brand names mentioned in this document are trademarks. The group also holds numerous licences and trade secrets, as well as having substantial trade knowledge related to its products. The group believes that its significant trademarks are registered and/or otherwise protected (insofar as legal protections are available) in all material respects in its most important markets.

Regulations and taxes   Diageo’s worldwide operations are subject to extensive regulatory requirements regarding production, product liability, distribution, importation, marketing, promotion, labelling, advertising, labour, pensions and environmental issues. In the United States, the beverage alcohol industry is subject to strict federal and state government regulations covering virtually every aspect of its operations, including production, marketing, promotion, sales, distribution, pricing, labelling, packaging and advertising.

Spirits, wine and beer are subject to national import and excise duties in many markets around the world. Most countries impose excise duties on beverage alcohol products, although the form of such taxation varies significantly from a simple application to units of alcohol by volume, to advanced systems based on imported or wholesale value of the product. Several countries impose additional import duty on distilled spirits, often discriminating between categories (such as Scotch whisky or bourbon) in the rate of such tariffs. Within the European Union, such products are subject to different rates of excise duty in each country, but within an overall European Union framework, there are minimum rates of excise duties that can be applied.

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Business description (continued)

Import and excise duties can have a significant impact on the final pricing of Diageo’s products to consumers. These duties have an impact on the competitive position versus other brands. The group devotes resources to encouraging the equitable taxation treatment of all beverage alcohol categories and to reducing government-imposed barriers to fair trading.

Advertising, marketing and sales of alcohol are subject to various restrictions in markets around the world. These range from a complete prohibition of alcohol in certain countries and cultures, through the prohibition of the import of spirits, wine and beer, to restrictions on the advertising style, media and messages used. In a number of countries, television is a prohibited medium for spirits brands and in other countries, television advertising, while permitted, is carefully regulated.

Spirits, wine and beer are also regulated in distribution. In many countries, alcohol may only be sold through licensed outlets, both on and off premise, varying from government or state operated monopoly outlets (for example, Canada, Norway, and certain US states) to the common system of licensed on premise outlets (for example, licensed bars and restaurants) which prevails in much of the western world (for example, most US states and the European Union). In about one-third of the states in the United States, price changes must be filed or published 30 days to three months, depending on the state, before they become effective.

Labelling of beverage alcohol products is also regulated in many markets, varying from health warning labels to importer identification, alcohol strength and other consumer information. Specific warning statements related to the risks of drinking beverage alcohol products are required to be included on all beverage alcohol products sold in the United States. Following the end of the voluntary restrictions on television advertising of spirits in the United States, Diageo and other spirits companies have been advertising products on the air on local cable television stations. Expressions of political concern signify the uncertain future of beverage alcohol products advertising on network television in the United States. Further requirements for warning statements and any prohibitions on advertising and marketing could have an adverse impact on sales of the group.

Regulatory decisions and changes in the legal and regulatory environment could increase Diageo’s costs and liabilities or impact its business activities.

Business services   Diageo has committed to re-engineer its key business activities with customers, consumers, suppliers and the processes that summarise and report financial performance. In that regard, global processes have been designed, built and implemented across a number of markets and global supply.

A business service centre in Budapest, Hungary performs various process tasks for Australia, Austria, Benelux, Brazil, Canada, the Canaries, Eurobeer, Germany, Global Duty Free, Great Britain, Guinness supply, Ireland, Mexico, the Nordics, North America, Northern European Logistics and Switzerland. Certain central finance activities including group financial control and treasury activities are in the process of being transferred to Budapest over the next 12 months. Additional markets and supply entities are scheduled to transfer to Budapest during the next few years.

The costs of the business service centre and other corporate costs which cannot be directly allocated to the geographical operating units are reported separately as Corporate costs in the geographical analysis of business performance. Also included in Corporate are the revenues and costs related to rents receivable in respect of properties not used by Diageo in the manufacture, sale or distribution of premium drink products and the results of Gleneagles Hotel.

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Business description (continued)

Associates   Diageo’s principal associate is Moët Hennessy. It also owns shares in a number of other associates. In the year ended 30 June 2006, the share of profits of associates after tax was £131 million (2005 – £121 million), of which Moët Hennessy accounted for £122 million (2005 – £113 million).

Diageo owns 34% of Moët Hennessy, the principal spirits and wine business of LVMH Moët Hennessy-Louis Vuitton SA (LVMH). LVMH is based in France and is listed on the Paris Stock Exchange. Moët Hennessy is also based in France and is a producer and exporter of a number of brands in its main business areas of champagne and cognac. Its principal products include champagne brands, Moët & Chandon (including Dom Pérignon), Veuve Clicquot and Mercier, all of which are included in the top 10 champagne brands worldwide by volume, Hennessy, which is the top cognac brand worldwide by volume, and Glenmorangie, a malt whisky.

Since 1987, a number of joint distribution arrangements have been established with LVMH, principally covering distribution of Diageo’s premium brands of Scotch whisky and gin and Moët Hennessy’s premium champagne and cognac brands in the Asia Pacific region and France. Diageo and LVMH have each undertaken not to engage in any champagne or cognac activities competing with those of Moët Hennessy. The arrangements also contain certain provisions for the protection of Diageo as a minority shareholder in Moët Hennessy. The operations of Moët Hennessy in France are conducted through a partnership in which Diageo has a 34% interest and, as a partner, Diageo pays any tax due on its share of the results of the partnership to the tax authorities.

Acquisitions and disposals   Diageo has made a number of acquisitions and disposals of brands, distribution rights and equity interests in premium drinks businesses including the following:

In February 2005, Diageo acquired The Chalone Wine Group for $285 million (£153 million). The Chalone Wine Group is a North America based wine business with a range of premium brand wines and has been merged into Diageo’s North American wine business, Diageo Chateau & Estate Wines.

In February 2005, Diageo acquired Ursus Vodka Holding BV, the owner of the Ursus vodka and Ursus Roter brands. The principal market, by volume, for the Ursus vodka and Ursus Roter brands is Greece. Diageo’s total cash investment was 146 million (£99 million).

On 25 August 2005, Diageo completed the purchase of The “Old Bushmills” Distillery Company Limited, owner of Bushmills Irish whiskey, one of the world’s leading Irish whiskey brands, from Pernod Ricard SA for approximately 296 million (£209 million).

Diageo has announced the acquisition of the Smirnov brand in Russia through a company in which Diageo holds a 75% stake and a major Russian consortium, the Alfa Group, holds a 25% stake. This company will be the exclusive distributor of Diageo spirits and the Smirnov vodka brand in Russia.

Disposed businesses

General Mills   Diageo acquired an investment in the shares of General Mills on the disposal of Pillsbury to General Mills in October 2001. On 4 October 2004, Diageo sold 50 million shares of common stock in General Mills and transferred a further 4 million shares to the Diageo UK pension fund and Diageo ceased to be an affiliate of General Mills for US federal securities laws purposes at that time. In November 2005, Diageo sold its remaining 25 million shares of common stock of General Mills.

During the year ended 30 June 2006, the group recorded dividends receivable of £5 million from General Mills (2005 – £17 million).

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Business description (continued)

Recent developments

In the period 1 July 2006 to 20 September 2006 the company acquired 20.6 million shares as part of the company’s share buyback programmes to be held as treasury shares, 6.5 million shares purchased and subsequently cancelled and 1.5 million shares to be held as treasury shares for hedging share scheme grants provided to employees, for a total consideration of £267 million including expenses.

Risk factors

Diageo faces competition that may reduce its market share and margins   Diageo faces substantial competition from several international companies as well as local and regional companies in the countries in which it operates. Diageo competes with drinks companies across a wide range of consumer drinking occasions. Within a number of categories, consolidation or realignment is taking place. Consolidation is also taking place amongst Diageo’s customers in many countries. Increased competition and unanticipated actions by competitors or customers could lead to downward pressure on prices and/or a decline in Diageo’s market share in any of these categories, which would adversely affect Diageo’s results and hinder its growth potential.

Diageo may not be able to derive the expected benefits from its strategy to focus on premium drinks or its systems change and cost-saving programmes designed to enhance earnings   Diageo’s strategy is to focus on premium drinks to grow its business through organic sales and operating profit growth and the acquisition of premium drinks brands that add value for shareholders. There can be no assurance that Diageo’s strategic focus on premium drinks will result in better opportunities for growth and improved margins.

It is possible that the pursuit of this strategic focus on premium drinks could give rise to further acquisitions (including associated financing), disposals, joint ventures or partnerships. There can be no guarantee that any such acquisition, disposal, joint venture or partnership would deliver the benefits intended.

Similarly, there can be no assurance that the systems change and cost-savings programmes implemented by Diageo in order to improve efficiencies and deliver cost-savings will deliver the expected benefits.

Systems change programmes may not deliver the benefits intended and systems failures could lead to business disruption   Certain change programmes designed to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of end-to-end operating, administrative and financial systems and processes continue to be undertaken. This includes moving transaction processing from a number of markets to business service centres. There can be no certainty that these programmes will deliver the expected operational benefits. There is likely to be disruption caused to production processes and possibly to administrative and financial systems as further changes to such processes are effected. They could also lead to adverse customer or consumer reaction. Any failure of information systems could adversely impact on Diageo’s ability to operate. As with all large systems, Diageo’s information systems could be penetrated by outside parties intent on extracting information, corrupting information or disrupting business processes. Such unauthorised access could disrupt Diageo’s business and/or lead to loss of assets. The concentration of processes in business service centres also means that any disruption arising from system failure or physical plant issues could impact on a large portion of Diageo’s global business.

Regulatory decisions and changes in the legal and regulatory environment could increase Diageo’s costs and liabilities or limit its business activities   Diageo’s operations are subject to extensive regulatory requirements regarding production, product liability, distribution, importation, marketing, promotion,

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Business description (continued)

labelling, advertising, labour, pensions and environmental issues. Changes in laws, regulations or governmental policy could cause Diageo to incur material additional costs or liabilities that could adversely affect its business. In particular, governmental bodies in countries where Diageo operates may impose new labelling, product or production requirements, limitations on the advertising and/or promotion activities used to market beverage alcohol, restrictions on retail outlets or other restrictions on marketing, promotion and distribution. Regulatory authorities under whose laws Diageo operates may also have enforcement power that can subject the group to actions such as product recall, seizure of products or other sanctions, which could have an adverse effect on its sales or damage its reputation.

In addition, beverage alcohol products are the subject of national import and excise duties in most countries around the world. An increase in import or excise duties could have a significant adverse effect on Diageo’s sales revenue or margin, both through reducing overall consumption and by encouraging consumers to switch to lower-taxed categories of beverage alcohol.

Companies in the beverage alcohol industry are, from time to time, exposed to class action or other litigation relating to alcohol advertising, alcohol abuse problems or health consequences from the misuse of alcohol. If such litigation resulted in fines, damages or reputational damage to Diageo or its brands, Diageo’s business could be materially adversely affected.

A number of similar putative class actions are pending in state and federal courts in the United States against Diageo plc, Diageo North America Inc and other Diageo entities, along with a large group of other beverage alcohol manufacturers, brewers and importers. All have been brought by the same national counsel. In each action, the plaintiffs seek to pursue their claims on behalf of parents and guardians of people under the legal drinking age who illegally bought alcohol beverages during the period from 1982 to the present. Plaintiffs allege several causes of action, principally for negligence, unjust enrichment and violation of state consumer fraud statutes. Some complaints include additional claims based on conspiracy, nuisance and on other legal theories.

Diageo’s reported after tax income is calculated based on extensive tax and accounting requirements in each of its relevant jurisdictions of operation. Changes in tax law (including tax rates), accounting policies and accounting standards could materially reduce Diageo’s reported after tax income.

Demand for Diageo’s products may be adversely affected by changes in consumer preferences and tastes   Diageo’s collection of brands includes some of the world’s leading beverage alcohol brands as well as brands of local prominence. Maintaining Diageo’s competitive position depends on its continued ability to offer products that have a strong appeal to consumers. Consumer preferences may shift due to a variety of factors, including changes in demographic and social trends, public health regulations, changes in travel, vacation or leisure activity patterns, weather effects and a downturn in economic conditions, which may reduce consumers’ willingness to purchase premium branded products. In addition, concerns about health effects due to negative publicity regarding alcohol consumption, negative dietary effects, regulatory action or any litigation or customer complaints against companies in the industry may have an adverse effect on Diageo’s profitability.

The competitive position of Diageo’s brands could also be affected adversely by any failure to achieve consistent, reliable quality in the product or service levels to customers.

In addition, both the launch and ongoing success of new products is inherently uncertain especially as to their appeal to consumers. The failure to launch a new product successfully can give rise to inventory write offs and other costs and can affect consumer perception of an existing brand. Growth in Diageo’s business has been based on both the launch of new products and the growth of existing products. Product innovation remains a significant aspect of Diageo’s plans for growth. There can be no assurance as to

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Business description (continued)

Diageo’s continuing ability to develop and launch successful new products or variants of existing products or as to the profitable lifespan of newly or recently developed products.

Any significant changes in consumer preferences and failure to anticipate and react to such changes could result in reduced demand for Diageo’s products and erosion of its competitive and financial position.

If the social acceptability of Diageo’s products declines, Diageo’s sales volume could decrease and the business could be materially adversely affected   In recent years, there has been increased social and political attention directed to the beverage alcohol industry. Diageo believes that this attention is the result of public concern over problems related to alcohol abuse, including drink driving, underage drinking and health consequences from the misuse of alcohol. If, as a result, the general social acceptability of beverage alcohol were to decline significantly, sales of Diageo’s products could materially decrease.

Diageo’s operating results may be adversely affected by increased costs or shortages of raw materials or labour or disruption to production facilities or business service centres   The raw materials which Diageo uses for the production of its beverage products are largely commodities that are subject to price volatility caused by changes in global supply and demand, weather conditions, agricultural uncertainty or governmental controls. If commodity price changes result in unexpected increases in the cost of raw materials, glass bottles and other packaging materials or the transportation of such materials and Diageo’s beverage products, Diageo may not be able to increase its prices to offset these increased costs without suffering reduced volume, revenue and operating income. Diageo may be adversely affected by shortages of raw materials or packaging materials. Energy costs have increased recently, and energy costs could continue to rise, resulting in higher transportation, freight and other operating costs.

Diageo’s operating results could be adversely affected by labour or skill shortages or increased labour costs due to increased competition for employees, higher employee turnover or increased employee benefit costs. Diageo’s success is dependent on the capability of its employees. There is no guarantee that Diageo will continue to be able to recruit, retain and develop the capabilities that it requires to deliver its strategy, for example in relation to sales, marketing and innovation capability within markets or in its senior management. The loss of senior management or other key personnel or the inability to identify, attract and retain qualified personnel in the future could make it difficult to manage the business and could adversely affect operations and financial results.

Diageo would be affected if there were a catastrophic failure of its major production facilities or business service centres. See ‘Business description – Continuing operations – Premium drinks – Production’ for details of Diageo’s principal production areas. In addition, the maintenance and development of information systems may result in systems failures which may adversely affect business operations.

Diageo has a substantial inventory of aged product categories, principally Scotch whisky and Canadian whisky, which mature over periods of up to 30 years. As at 30 June 2006, the historical cost of Diageo’s maturing inventory amounted to £1,644 million. The maturing inventory is stored primarily in Scotland, and the loss through contamination, fire or other natural disaster of all or a portion of the inventory of any one of those aged product categories could result in a significant reduction in supply of those products, and consequently, Diageo would not be able to meet consumer demand for these products as it arises. There can be no assurance that insurance proceeds would cover the replacement value of Diageo’s maturing inventory or other assets, were such assets to be lost due to contamination, fire or natural disasters or destruction resulting from negligence or the acts of third parties. In addition, there is an inherent risk of forecasting error in determining the quantity of maturing inventory lay down in a given year for future

21




Business description (continued)

consumption. This could lead to an inability to supply future demand or lead to a future surplus of inventory and consequent write down in value of maturing inventories.

Diageo’s business may be adversely impacted by unfavourable economic conditions or political or other developments and risks in the countries in which it operates   Diageo’s business is dependent on general economic conditions in the United States, Great Britain and other important markets. A significant deterioration in these conditions, including a reduction in consumer spending levels, could have a material adverse effect on Diageo’s business and results of operations. In addition, Diageo may be adversely affected by political and economic developments in any of the countries where Diageo has distribution networks, production facilities or marketing companies. Diageo’s operations are also subject to a variety of other risks and uncertainties related to trading in numerous foreign countries, including political or economic upheaval and the imposition of any import, investment or currency restrictions, including tariffs and import quotas or any restrictions on the repatriation of earnings and capital. Current examples of such potential upheaval are the unrest in the Middle East, and the impact on tourism and travel of terrorist threats. These disruptions can affect Diageo’s ability to import or export products and to repatriate funds, as well as affecting the levels of consumer demand (for example in duty free outlets at airports or in on trade premises in affected regions) and therefore Diageo’s levels of sales or profitability.

Part of Diageo’s growth strategy includes expanding its business in certain countries where consumer spending in general, and spending on Diageo’s products in particular, has not historically been as great but where there are prospects for growth. There is no guarantee that this strategy will be successful and some of the markets represent a higher risk in terms of their changing regulatory environments and higher degree of uncertainty over levels of consumer spending.

Diageo may also be adversely affected by movements in the value of, and returns from, the investments held by its pension funds.

Diageo may be adversely affected by fluctuations in exchange rates. The results of operations of Diageo are accounted for in pounds sterling. Approximately 32% of sales in the year ended 30 June 2006 were in US dollars, approximately 23% were in sterling and approximately 20% were in euros. Movements in exchange rates used to translate foreign currencies into pounds sterling may have a significant impact on Diageo’s reported results of operations from year to year.

Diageo may also be adversely impacted by fluctuations in interest rates, mainly through an increased interest expense. To partly delay any adverse impact from interest rate movements, the profile of fixed rate to floating rate net borrowings is maintained according to a duration measure that is equivalent to an approximate 50% fixed and 50% floating amortising profile. See ‘Operating and financial review – Risk management’.

Diageo’s operations may be adversely affected by failure to renegotiate distribution and manufacturing agreements on favourable terms   Diageo’s business has a number of distribution agreements for brands owned by it or by other companies. These agreements vary depending on the particular brand, but tend to be for a fixed number of years. There can be no assurance that Diageo will be able to renegotiate distribution rights on favourable terms when they expire or that agreements will not be terminated. Failure to renew distribution agreements on favourable terms could have an adverse impact on Diageo’s revenues and operating income. In addition, Diageo’s sales may be adversely affected by any disputes with distributors of its products.

Diageo may not be able to protect its intellectual property rights   Given the importance of brand recognition to its business, Diageo has invested considerable effort in protecting its intellectual property

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Business description (continued)

rights, including trademark registration and domain names. Diageo’s patents cover some of its process technology, including some aspects of its bottle marking technology. Diageo also uses security measures and agreements to protect its confidential information. However, Diageo cannot be certain that the steps it has taken will be sufficient or that third parties will not infringe on or misappropriate its intellectual property rights. Moreover, some of the countries in which Diageo operates offer less intellectual property protection than Europe or North America. Given the attractiveness of Diageo’s brands to consumers, it is not uncommon for counterfeit products to be manufactured. Diageo cannot be certain that the steps it takes to prevent, detect and eliminate counterfeit products will be effective in preventing material loss of profits or erosion of brand equity resulting from lower quality or even dangerous counterfeit product reaching the market. If Diageo is unable to protect its intellectual property rights against infringement or misappropriation, this could materially harm its future financial results and ability to develop its business.

It may be difficult to effect service of US process and enforce US legal process against the directors of Diageo   Diageo is a public limited company incorporated under the laws of England and Wales. The majority of Diageo’s directors and officers, and some of the experts named in this document, reside outside of the United States, principally in the United Kingdom. A substantial portion of Diageo’s assets, and the assets of such persons, are located outside of the United States. Therefore, it may not be possible to effect service of process within the United States upon Diageo or these persons in order to enforce judgements of US courts against Diageo or these persons based on the civil liability provisions of the US federal securities laws. There is doubt as to the enforceability in England and Wales, in original actions or in actions for enforcement of judgements of US courts, of civil liabilities solely based on the US federal securities laws.

IFRS may introduce greater volatility into Diageo’s financial statements   These are the group’s first consolidated annual financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS. For all periods up to and including 30 June 2005, Diageo prepared its primary financial statements in accordance with UK generally accepted accounting principles (UK GAAP). It is likely that reporting under IFRS will introduce a greater degree of volatility in Diageo’s reported results. This may include, but is not limited to, the potential adverse impact of accounting for changes in taxation rates and their impact on deferred tax balances, and accounting for financial instruments that do not qualify for hedge accounting. There is no assurance that further volatility in Diageo’s financial statements due to IFRS will not have a significant adverse effect on financial results.

Cautionary statement concerning forward-looking statements

This document contains statements with respect to the financial condition, results of operations and business of Diageo and certain of the plans and objectives of Diageo with respect to these items. These forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the ‘Safe Harbor’ provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In particular, all statements that express forecasts, expectations and projections with respect to future matters, including trends in results of operations, margins, growth rates, overall market trends, the impact of interest or exchange rates, the availability of financing to Diageo, anticipated cost savings or synergies and the completion of Diageo’s strategic transactions, are forward-looking statements. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risk and uncertainty because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that will occur in the future. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements, including factors that are outside Diageo’s control.

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Business description (continued)

These factors include, but are not limited to:

·       increased competitive product and pricing pressures and unanticipated actions by competitors that could impact on Diageo’s market share, increase expenses and hinder growth potential;

·       the effects of business combinations, partnerships, acquisitions or disposals, existing or future, and the ability to realise expected synergies and/or costs savings;

·       Diageo’s ability to complete future acquisitions and disposals;

·       legal and regulatory developments, including changes in regulations regarding consumption of, or advertising for, beverage alcohol, changes in accounting standards, taxation requirements, such as the impact of excise tax increases with respect to the business, environmental laws and laws governing pensions;

·       developments in the alcohol advertising class actions and any similar proceedings or other litigation directed at the drinks and spirits industry;

·       developments in the Colombian litigation or any similar proceedings;

·       changes in consumer preferences and tastes, demographic trends or perceptions about health related issues;

·       changes in the cost of raw materials and labour costs;

·       changes in economic conditions in countries in which Diageo operates, including changes in levels of consumer spending;

·       levels of marketing, promotional and innovation expenditure by Diageo and its competitors;

·       renewal of distribution rights on favourable terms when they expire;

·       termination of existing distribution rights in respect of agency brands;

·       technological developments that may affect the distribution of products or impede Diageo’s ability to protect its intellectual property rights; and

·       changes in financial and equity markets, including significant interest rate and foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may affect Diageo’s access to or increase the cost of financing or which may affect Diageo’s financial results.

All oral and written forward-looking statements made on or after the date of this document and attributable to Diageo are expressly qualified in their entirety by the above factors and the ‘Risk factors’ above for the year ended 30 June 2006. Any forward-looking statements made by or on behalf of Diageo speak only as of the date they are made. Diageo does not undertake to update forward-looking statements to reflect any changes in Diageo’s expectations with regard thereto or any changes in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is based. The reader should, however, consult any additional disclosures that Diageo may make in documents it files with the SEC.

The information in this document does not constitute an offer to sell or an invitation to buy shares in Diageo plc or any other invitation or inducement to engage in investment activities.

This document includes information about Diageo’s debt rating. A security rating is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities and may be subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the assigning rating organisation. Each rating should be evaluated independently of any other rating.

Past performance cannot be relied upon as a guide to future performance.

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Operating and financial review

Introduction

Information presented   Diageo is the world’s leading premium drinks business and operates on an international scale selling all types of beverage alcohol. It is one of a small number of premium drinks companies that operate across beer, wine and spirits. Diageo’s brands have broad consumer appeal across geographies; as a result, the business is organised under the regions of North America, Europe and International and the business analysis is presented on this basis. The following discussion is based on Diageo’s results for the year ended 30 June 2006 compared with the year ended 30 June 2005.

The financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2006 have been prepared in accordance with IFRS. There are a number of accounting differences between IFRS and US GAAP. A reconciliation of net income from IFRS to US GAAP and an explanation of the differences between IFRS and US GAAP are set out in the US GAAP information in note 35 to the consolidated financial statements.

In the discussion of the performance of the business, net sales after deducting excise duties is presented in addition to sales, since sales reflects significant components of excise duties which are set by external regulators and over which Diageo has no control. Diageo incurs excise duties throughout the world. In some countries, excise duties are based on sales and are separately identified on the face of the invoice to the external customer. In others, it is effectively a production tax, which is incurred when the spirit is removed from bonded warehouses. In these countries it is part of the invoiced cost and is not separately identified on the sales invoice. Changes in the level of excise duties can significantly affect the level of reported sales and costs, without directly reflecting changes in volume, mix or profitability that are the variables which impact on the element of sales retained by the group.

Percentage movements presented below in ‘Operating results – 2006 compared with 2005 – analysis by brand and geographical region’ are organic movements unless otherwise stated. These movements and operating margins are before exceptional items. Commentary, unless otherwise stated, refers to organic movements. Share, unless otherwise stated, refers to volume share.

Presentation of information in relation to the business   In addition to describing the significant factors impacting on the income statement compared to the prior year for the year ended 30 June 2006, additional information is also presented on the operating performance and cash flows of the group.

There are several principal key performance indicators that the group’s management use to assess the performance of the group in addition to income statement measures of performance. These include volume, and the non-GAAP measures of the organic movements in volume, sales, net sales (after deducting excise duties) and operating profit before exceptional items and free cash flow. Non-GAAP measures are those not specifically used in the consolidated financial statements themselves. These key performance indicators are described below:

Volume   has been measured on an equivalent units basis to nine litre cases of spirits. An equivalent unit represents one nine litre case of spirits, which is approximately 272 servings. A serving comprises 33ml of spirits, 165ml of wine, or 330ml of ready to drink or beer. Therefore, to convert volume of products, other than spirits, to equivalent units, the following guide has been used: beer in hectolitres divide by 0.9, wine in nine litre cases divide by five, and ready to drink in nine litre cases divide by 10, with certain pre-mixed products that are classified as ready to drink divided by five.

Organic movements   in volume, sales, net sales after deducting excise duties and operating profit before exceptional items are measures not specifically used in the consolidated financial statements themselves. The performance of the group is discussed using these measures.

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Operating and financial review (continued)

In the discussion of the performance of the business, certain information is presented using pounds sterling amounts on a constant currency basis. This strips out the effect of exchange rate movements and enables an understanding of the underlying performance of the market that is most closely influenced by the actions of that market’s management. The risk from exchange rate movements is managed centrally and is not a factor over which local managers have any control.

Acquisitions and disposals also impact the reported performance and therefore the reported movement in any period in which they arise. Management adjusts for the impact of such transactions in assessing the performance of the underlying business.

The underlying performance on a constant currency basis and excluding the impact of acquisitions and disposals is referred to as ‘organic’ performance, and further information on the calculation of organic measures as used in the discussion of the business is included in the organic movements calculation and in the notes to that calculation.

Diageo’s strategic planning and budgeting process is based on organic movement in volume, sales, net sales after deducting excise duties and operating profit before exceptional items, and these measures closely reflect the way in which operating targets are defined and performance is monitored by the group’s management.

These measures are chosen for planning, budgeting, reporting and incentive purposes since they represent those measures which local managers are most directly able to influence and they enable consideration of the underlying business performance without the distortion caused by fluctuating exchange rates, acquisitions and disposals.

The group’s management believe these measures provide valuable additional information for users of the financial statements in understanding the group’s performance since they provide information on those elements of performance which local managers are most directly able to influence and they focus on that element of the core brand portfolio which is common to both periods. They should be viewed as complementary to, and not replacements for, the comparable GAAP measures: sales, net sales after deducting excise duties and reported movements in individual income statement captions.

Free cash flow   comprises the net cash flow from operating activities as well as the net purchase and disposal of investments and property, plant and equipment that form part of net cash from investing activities. The group’s management believes the measure assists users of the financial statements in understanding the group’s cash generating performance as it comprises items which arise from the running of the ongoing business. Free cash flow may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies.

The remaining components of net cash flow from investing activities that do not form part of free cash flow, as defined by the group’s management, relate to the purchase and disposal of subsidiaries, associates and businesses. The group’s management regards the purchase and disposal of property, plant and equipment as ultimately non-discretionary since ongoing investment in plant and machinery is required to support the day-to-day operations, whereas acquisitions and disposals of businesses are discretionary. However, free cash flow does not necessarily reflect all amounts which the group either has a constructive or legal obligation to incur. Where appropriate, separate discussion is given for the impacts of acquisitions and disposals of businesses, equity dividends paid and the purchase of own shares – each of which arises from decisions that are independent from the running of the ongoing underlying business.

26




Operating and financial review (continued)

The free cash flow measure is also used by management for their own planning, budgeting, reporting and incentive purposes since it provides information on those elements of performance which local managers are most directly able to influence.

Operating results – 2006 compared with 2005

 

Year ended 30 June 2006

 

Year ended 30 June 2005

 

 

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

exceptional

 

Exceptional

 

 

 

exceptional

 

Exceptional

 

 

 

Summary consolidated income statement

 

 

 

items

 

items

 

Total

 

items

 

items

 

Total

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

Sales

 

 

9,704

 

 

 

 

9,704

 

 

8,968

 

 

 

 

8,968

 

Excise duties

 

 

(2,444

)

 

 

 

(2,444

)

 

(2,291

)

 

 

 

(2,291

)

Net sales

 

 

7,260

 

 

 

 

7,260

 

 

6,677

 

 

 

 

6,677

 

Operating costs

 

 

(5,216

)

 

 

 

(5,216

)

 

(4,745

)

 

(201

)

 

(4,946

)

Operating profit

 

 

2,044

 

 

 

 

2,044

 

 

1,932

 

 

(201

)

 

1,731

 

Disposal of investments and businesses

 

 

 

 

 

157

 

 

157

 

 

 

 

 

214

 

 

214

 

Net finance charges

 

 

(186

)

 

 

 

(186

)

 

(141

)

 

 

 

(141

)

Associates’profits

 

 

131

 

 

 

 

131

 

 

121

 

 

 

 

121

 

Profit before taxation

 

 

1,989

 

 

157

 

 

2,146

 

 

1,912

 

 

13

 

 

1,925

 

Taxation

 

 

(496

)

 

315

 

 

(181

)

 

(677

)

 

78

 

 

(599

)

Profit from continuing operations

 

 

1,493

 

 

472

 

 

1,965

 

 

1,235

 

 

91

 

 

1,326

 

Profit after tax from disposal of businesses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

 

 

73

 

Profit for the year

 

 

1,493

 

 

472

 

 

1,965

 

 

1,235

 

 

164

 

 

1,399

 

Attributable to:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity shareholders

 

 

1,436

 

 

472

 

 

1,908

 

 

1,180

 

 

164

 

 

1,344

 

Minority interests

 

 

57

 

 

 

 

57

 

 

55

 

 

 

 

55

 

 

 

 

1,493

 

 

472

 

 

1,965

 

 

1,235

 

 

164

 

 

1,399

 

 

Adoption of IFRS   The financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2006 have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as endorsed and adopted for use in the European Union (IFRS). The results for the comparative year ended 30 June 2005 are also presented in accordance with IFRS. Further information on the conversion to IFRS is set out in ‘Accounting policies of the group – Basis of preparation’ and in note 34 to the consolidated financial statements.

Sales and net sales after deducting excise duties   On a reported basis, sales increased by £736 million (8%) from £8,968 million in the year ended 30 June 2005 to £9,704 million in the year ended 30 June 2006. On a reported basis, net sales, after deducting excise duties, increased by £583 million (9%) from £6,677 million in the year ended 30 June 2005 to £7,260 million in the year ended 30 June 2006. Acquisitions and disposals contributed a net increase to reported sales and net sales, after deducting excise duties, of £46 million and £27 million respectively in the year and foreign exchange rate movements also beneficially impacted reported sales by £186 million and reported net sales, after deducting excise duties, by £140 million, principally arising from strengthening of the US dollar.

Operating costs   On a reported basis operating costs before exceptional items increased by £471 million, principally due to an increase in cost of goods sold of £318 million and an increase in marketing costs of 11% from £1,013 million to £1,127 million. Overall, the impact of exchange rate movements increased total operating costs before exceptional items by £165 million. There were no exceptional operating costs in the year (2005 – £201 million). In the prior year, exceptional operating costs comprised £149 million in respect

27




Operating and financial review (continued)

of contributions to be made to the Thalidomide Trust, £29 million of accelerated depreciation and £30 million of Seagram integration costs, less £7 million in respect of the disposal of property, plant and equipment. On a reported basis, operating costs increased by £270 million (5%) from £4,946 million in the year ended 30 June 2005 to £5,216 million in the year ended 30 June 2006.

Post employment plans   Post employment costs for the year ended 30 June 2006 of £87 million (2005 – £80 million) comprised amounts charged to operating profit of £106 million (2005 – £89 million) and finance income of £19 million (2005 – £9 million). At 30 June 2006, Diageo’s deficit before taxation for all post employment plans was £801 million (2005 – £1,294 million).

Operating profit   Operating profit before exceptional items for the year increased by £112 million to £2,044 million from £1,932 million in the prior year. Exchange rate movements reduced operating profit before exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2006 by £25 million. There were no exceptional operating charges in the year ended 30 June 2006, compared to costs in respect of the year ended 30 June 2005 of £201 million.

Non-operating exceptional items   Non-operating exceptional items before taxation were a gain of £157 million in the year ended 30 June 2006 compared with a gain of £214 million in the year ended 30 June 2005. The gain in the year to 30 June 2006 represents a gain of £151 million on sale of the group’s remaining 25 million shares of common stock of General Mills and a gain on sale of other businesses of £6 million. In the year ended 30 June 2005, non-operating exceptional items included a gain of £221 million on the disposal of 54 million shares of common stock of General Mills and a net charge of £7 million in respect of the disposal of other businesses.

Net finance charges   Net finance charges increased by £45 million from £141 million in the year ended 30 June 2005 to £186 million in the year ended 30 June 2006.

The net interest charge increased by £43 million from £150 million in the prior year to £193 million in the year ended 30 June 2006; £23 million of this increase resulted from higher debt and higher interest rates year on year, £13 million resulted from the loss of interest income on the Burger King subordinated debt repaid in July 2005 and £10 million from the termination of certain financing arrangements. In addition, the interest charge increased by £6 million as a result of exchange rate movements. Partly offsetting these increases, net interest also includes an interest credit of £9 million related to derivative instruments arising on the application of IAS 39Financial instruments: recognition and measurement.

Other net finance income of £7 million (2005 – income of £9 million) included income in respect of the group’s post employment plans of £19 million (2005 – income of £9 million) which year on year improvement principally results from lower interest costs in the pension plans from the unwinding of discounted liabilities. In addition, other net finance charges include a charge of £15 million (2005 – £7 million) in respect of the unwinding of discounted liabilities, a £2 million charge (2005 – charge of £8 million) in respect of foreign exchange translation differences on inter company funding arrangements that do not meet the accounting criteria for recognition in equity, and investment income of £5 million (2005 – £17 million) in respect of dividends on General Mills shares.

Associates   The group’s share of profits of associates after interest and tax was £131 million for the year compared to £121 million last year. Diageo’s 34% equity interest in Moët Hennessy contributed £122 million to share of profits of associates after interest and tax (2005 – £113 million).

Profit before taxation   After exceptional items, profit before taxation increased by £221 million from £1,925 million to £2,146 million in the year ended 30 June 2006.

28




Operating and financial review (continued)

Taxation   The effective tax rate before exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2006 is 24.9% compared with 35.4% for the year ended 30 June 2005. The higher effective tax rate in the year ended 30 June 2005 mainly resulted from the reduction in the carrying value of deferred tax assets following a change in tax rate in the relevant territory.

The effective tax rate for continuing operations for the year ended 30 June 2006 after exceptional items is 8.4% compared with 31.1% for the year ended 30 June 2005. The effective tax rate in the current year has been reduced following the agreement of certain brand values with fiscal authorities that resulted in recognising an increase in the group’s deferred tax assets of £313 million. This amount has been accounted for as exceptional income. The profit arising on the sale of General Mills shares in the year and the comparative year is not subject to tax.

Profit after tax from disposal of businesses   Profit after tax from the disposal of businesses in the prior year of £73 million is in respect of the release of provisions established on the disposal of Burger King and Pillsbury.

Exchange rates   Diageo does not hedge the translation of its foreign currency results into sterling. Transactional exchange rate risk is hedged for those currencies in which there is an active market. The group seeks to hedge between 80% and 100% of forecast transactional exchange rate risk, for up to a maximum of 21 months forward, using forward currency exchange contracts. The gain or loss on the hedge is recognised in equity to the extent the hedge is effective and subsequently recognised in the income statement at the same time as the underlying hedged transaction affects the income statement.

Dividend   The directors recommend a final dividend of 19.15 pence per share, an increase of 5% on last year’s final dividend. The full dividend would therefore be 31.1 pence per share, an increase of 5% from the year ended 30 June 2005. Subject to approval by shareholders, the final dividend will be paid on 23 October 2006 to shareholders on the register on 15 September 2006. Payment to ADR holders will be made on 27 October 2006. A dividend reinvestment plan is available in respect of the final dividend and the plan notice date is 2 October 2006.

Operating results – 2006 compared with 2005 – analysis by brand and geographical region

In order to assist the reader of the financial statements, the following comparison of 2006 with 2005 includes tables which present the exchange, acquisitions and disposals and organic components of the year-on-year movement for each of sales, net sales (after deducting excise duties) and operating profit before exceptional items.

Organic movements in the tables below are calculated as follows:

The organic movement percentage is the amount in the column headed ‘Organic movement’ expressed as a percentage of the aggregate of the columns headed 2005 Reported, Transfers, Exchange and the amounts in respect of disposals (see note 4 to the tables below) included in the column headed Acquisitions and disposals. The inclusion of the column headed Exchange in the organic movement calculation reflects the adjustment to exclude the effect of exchange rate movements by recalculating the prior period results as if they had been generated at the current period’s exchange rates. Organic movement percentages are calculated as the organic movement amount in £ million, expressed as the percentage of the prior period results at current year exchange rates and after adjusting for disposals. The basis of calculation means that the results used to measure organic movement for a given period will be adjusted when used to measure organic movement in the subsequent period.

29




Operating and financial review (continued)

Where a business, brand, brand distribution right or agency agreement was disposed of, or terminated, in the current period, the group, in organic movement calculations, adjusts the results for the comparable prior period to exclude the amount the group earned in that period that it could not have earned in the current period (ie the period between the date in the prior period, equivalent to the date of the disposal in the current period, and the end of the prior period). As a result, the organic movement numbers reflect only comparable performance. Similarly, if a business was disposed of part way through the equivalent prior period then its contribution would be completely excluded from that prior period’s performance in the organic movement calculation, since the group recognised no contribution from that business in the current period. In the calculation of operating profit before exceptional items the overheads included in disposals were only those directly attributable to the businesses disposed, and do not result from subjective judgements of management. For acquisitions, a similar adjustment is made in the organic movement calculations. For acquisitions subsequent to the end of the equivalent prior period, the post acquisition results in the current period are excluded from the organic movement calculations. For acquisitions in the prior period, post acquisition results are included in full in the prior period but are only included from the anniversary of the acquisition date in the current period.

The organic movement calculations for volume, sales, net sales (after deducting excise duties) and operating profit before exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2006 were as follows:

 

2005
units

 

Acquisitions
units

 

Organic
movement
units

 

20006

units

 

Organic
movement

 

Volume

 

 

 

million

 

million

 

Million

 

million

 

%

 

North America

 

46.5

 

 

0.2

 

 

2.1

 

48.8

 

 

5

 

Europe

 

40.8

 

 

0.3

 

 

0.3

 

41.4

 

 

1

 

International

 

38.1

 

 

0.3

 

 

5.2

 

43.6

 

 

14

 

Total

 

125.4

 

 

0.8

 

 

7.6

 

133.8

 

 

6

 

 

30




Operating and financial review (continued)

 

 

2005

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisitions

 

Organic

 

2006

 

Organic

 

 

 

Reported

 

Transfers

 

Exchange

 

and disposals

 

movement

 

Reported

 

movement

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

%

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North America

 

 

2,622

 

 

3

 

 

129

 

 

41

 

 

173

 

 

2,968

 

 

6

 

Europe

 

 

3,860

 

 

(23

)

 

1

 

 

(7

)

 

3

 

 

3,834

 

 

 

International

 

 

2,424

 

 

5

 

 

56

 

 

12

 

 

329

 

 

2,826

 

 

13

 

Corporate and other

 

 

62

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1

)

 

76

 

 

(2

)

Total

 

 

8,968

 

 

 

 

186

 

 

46

 

 

504

 

 

9,704

 

 

6

 

Net sales after deducting excise duties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North America

 

 

2,194

 

 

3

 

 

110

 

 

34

 

 

169

 

 

2,510

 

 

7

 

Europe

 

 

2,499

 

 

(23

)

 

(1

)

 

(16

)

 

(4

)

 

2,455

 

 

 

International

 

 

1,922

 

 

5

 

 

31

 

 

9

 

 

252

 

 

2,219

 

 

13

 

Corporate and other

 

 

62

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1

)

 

76

 

 

(2

)

Total net sales

 

 

6,677

 

 

 

 

140

 

 

27

 

 

416

 

 

7,260

 

 

6

 

Excise duties

 

 

2,291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,444

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

 

8,968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9,704

 

 

 

 

Operating profit before exceptional items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North America

 

 

779

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

1

 

 

47

 

 

829

 

 

6

 

Europe

 

 

702

 

 

(3

)

 

(5

)

 

4

 

 

39

 

 

737

 

 

6

 

International

 

 

615

 

 

(3

)

 

(23

)

 

1

 

 

54

 

 

644

 

 

9

 

Corporate and other

 

 

(164

)

 

6

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

(9

)

 

(166

)

 

(6

)

Total

 

 

1,932

 

 

 

 

(25

)

 

6

 

 

131

 

 

2,044

 

 

7

 


Notes

(1)          Results for 2005 have been restated for the impacts of implementing IFRS.

(2)          Transfers represent the movement between operating units of certain activities, the most significant of which were the reallocation of the Guinness Storehouse visitor centre in Dublin from Europe into the Corporate business segment and the transfer of the costs in respect of a global information technology project from Corporate into Europe and International.

(3)          The exchange adjustments for sales, net sales after deducting excise duties, and operating profit before exceptional items are principally in respect of the US dollar.

(4)          The only acquisition in the year ended 30 June 2006 was the acquisition of The “Old Bushmills” Distillery Company Limited. Other acquisitions impacting on the calculation of organic growth in the year were in respect of the acquisition of The Chalone Wine Group (North America), Ursus Vodka Holdings B.V. (Europe) and Ghana Breweries Limited (International). Disposals affecting the year were principally the disposal of United Beverages Limited (Europe) and contributed sales, net sales after deducting excise duties, and operating profit before exceptional items of £35 million, £35 million and £nil, respectively, in the year ended 30 June 2005.

31




Operating and financial review (continued)

 

 

 

 

2006

 

 

 

2005

 

 

 

 

 

Operating

 

 

 

Operating

 

Analysis by business

 

 

 

Net sales(a)

 

profit/(loss)(b)

 

Net sales(a)

 

profit/(loss)(b)

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

North America

 

 

2,510

 

 

829

 

 

2,194

 

 

779

 

Europe

 

 

2,455

 

 

737

 

 

2,499

 

 

702

 

International

 

 

2,219

 

 

644

 

 

1,922

 

 

615

 

Corporate and other

 

 

76

 

 

(166

)

 

62

 

 

(164

)

Total

 

 

7,260

 

 

2,044

 

 

6,677

 

 

1,932

 


(a)           after deducting excise duties

(b)          before exceptional items

North America

Summary:

·       Top line growth across the business – spirits 8%, wine 7%, beer 11% and ready to drink 3%

·       Increased spend on proven marketing campaigns

·       Well executed on and off trade sales programmes

·       Growth of the premium beer brands supported by effective advertising and targeted product placement

·       In wine, Chalone is another growth driver – performing ahead of expectations

 

 

 

 

 

Reported

 

Organic

 

Key measures

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

movement

 

movement

 

 

 

£ million

 

£ million

 

%

 

%

 

Volume

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

5

 

Net sales after deducting excise duties

 

 

2,510

 

 

2,194

 

 

14

 

 

7

 

Marketing

 

 

384

 

 

341

 

 

13

 

 

6

 

Operating profit before exceptional items

 

 

829

 

 

779

 

 

6

 

 

6

 

 

Reported performance   Net sales, after deducting excise duties, were £2,510 million in the year ended 30 June 2006, up by £316 million from £2,194 million in the prior year. Operating profit before exceptional items increased by £50 million to £829 million in the year ended 30 June 2006.

 

32




Operating and financial review (continued)

Organic performance   The weighted average exchange rate used to translate US dollar sales and profits moved from £1 = $1.86 in the year ended 30 June 2005 to £1 = $1.78 in the year ended 30 June 2006. The strengthening of the US dollar resulted in a £110 million increase in net sales, after deducting excise duties. Acquisitions added £34 million of net sales, after deducting excise duties, and there was an organic increase in net sales, after deducting excise duties, of £169 million. Transfers between business segments increased prior year net sales, after deducting excise duties, by £3 million. Operating profit before exceptional items increased by £2 million as a result of foreign exchange impacts. Acquisitions increased operating profit before exceptional items by £1 million and organic growth of £47 million was achieved.

 

Reported

 

Organic

 

Reported

 

Organic

 

 

 

volume

 

volume

 

net sales*

 

net sales*

 

Organic brand performance

 

 

 

movement

 

movement

 

movement

 

movement

 

 

 

%

 

%

 

%

 

%

 

Global priority brands

 

 

7

 

 

7

 

 

14

 

 

8

 

Local priority brands

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

10

 

 

5

 

Category brands

 

 

2

 

 

(1

)

 

24

 

 

7

 

Total

 

 

5

 

 

5

 

 

14

 

 

7

 

 

Key brands

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smirnoff vodka

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

16

 

 

11

 

Smirnoff ready to drink

 

 

 

 

(3

)

 

1

 

 

(5

)

Johnnie Walker

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

10

 

 

5

 

Captain Morgan (excluding ready to drink)

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

19

 

 

14

 

Baileys

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

13

 

 

7

 

José Cuervo (excluding ready to drink)

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

16

 

 

11

 

Crown Royal

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

14

 

 

8

 

Tanqueray

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

13

 

 

7

 

Guinness

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

15

 

 

9

 

Beaulieu Vineyard

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

1

 

Sterling Wines

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

15

 

 

10

 


*       after deducting excise duties

Diageo continued to outperform the market in an industry where the increase in the US legal drinking age population and the trend towards more premium products across all beverage alcohol categories are helping to drive growth.

The global priority brands again led the growth with volume up 7% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, up 8%.

The spirits brands, excluding ready to drink, delivered 8% growth in net sales, after deducting excise duties, reflecting strong performances from Smirnoff, Captain Morgan and José Cuervo.

Smirnoff benefited from targeted profile raising activity. In the off trade, volume was driven by concentrated activity on high visibility feature and display initiatives across Smirnoff vodka, as well as innovation in flavours. These activities and the focus on proven growth drivers, such as quality account management, delivered strong growth for Smirnoff vodka with volume up 9% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, up 11%.

Johnnie Walker continued to outperform the scotch category with volume up 1% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, up 5%. Both Johnnie Walker Red Label and Johnnie Walker Black Label grew

33




Operating and financial review (continued)

share. Higher marketing and public relations investment behind the successful Mentor programme and increased relationship marketing underpinned these strong results.

Captain Morgan had a good year. Excluding ready to drink, volume was up 9% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, were up 14%, benefiting from increased media spending, particularly in television to drive awareness and trial, strong display executions and the launch of Tattoo.

Baileys continued its turnaround from last year with volume and net sales, after deducting excise duties, both up 7%.

The José Cuervo Tradicional and Reserva variants delivered double-digit growth benefiting from the trend towards premium tequila. Product innovation also made a strong contribution to growth as the super premium range was further extended with the introduction of Black Medallion in February. A range of flavours was also introduced during the year. Excluding ready to drink, José Cuervo volume increased 9% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, rose 11%.

A strong second half performance from Crown Royal resulted in full year volume up 6% and net sales, after deducting excise duties, up 8% as the investment behind NASCAR was increased. The second half also saw the launch of an ultra premium offering, Crown Royal Extra Rare.

The ‘Tony Sinclair – Ready to Tanqueray’ campaign has reinvigorated the Tanqueray brand with volume up 5%. Price increases, taken over the year in certain markets, have led to an increase in net sales, after deducting excise duties, of 7%.

In line with the trend towards premium beers, Guinness continued to show strong performance with volume up 7%. A price increase across all variants in October 2005 meant that net sales, after deducting excise duties, grew 9%.

In wine, Beaulieu Vineyard volume was flat, but net sales, after deducting excise duties, increased 1%. Sterling Wines volume was up 3% with net sales, after deducting excise duties, up 10% as price increases were taken across a variety of labels. The Chalone wine brands are delivering ahead of expectations, as a result of a strong contribution from innovation with the introduction of new varietals.

Total ready to drink volume was up 2% led by the continued growth of José Cuervo’s pre-mixed margarita offerings and the launch of the Captain Morgan’s Parrot Bay ready to drink product. The introduction of new Smirnoff Twisted V flavours, strong growth of Smirnoff Ice in Canada and the regional launch of Smirnoff Raw Tea partially offset declines in the Smirnoff Ice brand in the US.

In category brands, volume decreased by 1% but net sales, after deducting excise duties, were up 7%. This reflected the decision to shift operational focus toward the more profitable reserve brands such as Cîroc and Don Julio and away from the high volume standard brands such as Popov and Gordon’s vodka.

Marketing spend for the year was up 6% and excluding ready to drink, up 9%. This reflects an accelerated investment in spirits, offset by a reduction in spend on ready to drink.

Europe

Summary:

·       Net sales, after deducting excise duties, were unchanged year on year as growth in core spirits offset tough market conditions in beer and ready to drink

·       Spirits demonstrated healthy volume growth at 3%

·       Innovation is increasing brand visibility with new and existing customers

34




Operating and financial review (continued)

·       Marketing spend was reduced by 4% and prioritised against specific opportunities such as Johnnie Walker throughout Europe and J&B in France