10-K 1 fy1410-k.htm 10-K FY14 10-K


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
 
 
ý
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended September 26, 2014
OR
o
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
(Commission File Number) 001-13836
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
TYCO INTERNATIONAL LTD.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
 
Switzerland
(Jurisdiction of Incorporation)
 
98-0390500
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)

Victor von Bruns-Strasse 21
CH-8212 Neuhausen am Rheinfall, Switzerland
(Address of registrant's principal executive office)

41-52-633-02-44
(Registrant's telephone number)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares, Par Value CHF 0.50
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act:  None
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III or this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K    o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Large accelerated filer ý
 
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
 (Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý
The aggregate market value of voting common shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of March 28, 2014 was approximately $19,024,092,777.
The number of common shares outstanding as of November 7, 2014 was 418,465,546.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant's proxy statement filed within 120 days of the close of the registrant's fiscal year in connection with the registrant's 2015 annual general meeting of shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.
See page 61 to 63 for the exhibit index.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
 
 
 
Page
Part I
 
 
Part II
 
 
Part III
 
 
Part IV
 
 




Part I
Item 1.    Business

General
Tyco International Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as "we," the "Company" or "Tyco") is a leading global provider of security products and services, fire detection and suppression products and services and life safety products. Our broad portfolio of products and services, sold under well-known brands such as Tyco, SimplexGrinnell, Sensormatic, Wormald, Ansul, Simplex, Scott and ADT (in jurisdictions outside of North America) serve security, fire detection and suppression and life safety needs across commercial, industrial, retail, institutional and governmental markets, as well as non-U.S. residential and small business markets. We hold market-leading positions in large, fragmented industries and we believe that we are well positioned to leverage our global footprint, deep industry experience, strong customer relationships and innovative technologies to expand our business in both developed and emerging markets. We operate and report financial and operating information in the following three operating segments:
North America Installation & Services ("NA Installation & Services") designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, institutional and governmental customers in North America.  
Rest of World ("ROW") Installation & Services ("ROW Installation & Services") designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers in the ROW regions.  
Global Products designs, manufactures and sells fire protection, security and life safety products, including intrusion security, anti-theft devices, breathing apparatus and access control and video management systems, for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers worldwide, including products installed and serviced by our NA and ROW Installation & Services segments.  
We also provide general corporate services to our segments and these costs are reported as Corporate and Other.
Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform with current period presentation. Specifically, the Company has reclassified the operations of its South Korean security business and several businesses in the ROW Installation & Services segment to income from discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and the assets and liabilities as held for sale within the Consolidated Balance Sheets as they satisfied the criteria to be presented as discontinued operations. See Note 3 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Net revenue by segment for 2014 is as follows ($ in millions):
 
Net
Revenue
 
Percent of
Total
Net
Revenue
 
Key Brands
NA Installation & Services
$
3,876

 
37
%
 
Tyco Fire & Security, Tyco Integrated Security, SimplexGrinnell, Sensormatic
ROW Installation & Services
3,920

 
38
%
 
Tyco Fire & Security, Wormald, Sensormatic, ADT
Global Products
2,544

 
25
%
 
Tyco, Simplex, Ansul, DSC, Scott, American Dynamics, Software House, Visonic, Chemguard, Exacq
 
$
10,340

 
100
%
 
 
Unless otherwise indicated, references in this Annual Report to 2014, 2013 and 2012 are to Tyco's fiscal years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012, respectively. The Company has a 52 or 53-week fiscal year that ends on the last Friday in September. Fiscal 2014, 2013, and 2012 were 52-week years.
For a detailed discussion of revenue, operating income and total assets by segment for fiscal years 2014, 2013 and 2012 see Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis and Note 17 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
History and Development
Tyco International Ltd.
Tyco International Ltd. is a Company organized under the laws of Switzerland. The Company was created as a result of the July 1997 acquisition of Tyco International Ltd., a Massachusetts corporation, by ADT Limited, a public company

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organized under the laws of Bermuda, at which time ADT Limited changed its name to Tyco International Ltd. Effective March 17, 2009, the Company became a Swiss corporation under articles 620 et seq. of the Swiss Code of Obligations (the "Change of Domicile").
Effective September 28, 2012, the Company completed the spin-offs of The ADT Corporation ("ADT") and Pentair Ltd. (formerly known as Tyco Flow Control International Ltd. ("Tyco Flow Control")), formerly our North American residential security and flow control businesses, respectively, into separate, publicly traded companies in the form of a distribution to Tyco shareholders. Immediately following the spin-off, Pentair, Inc. was merged with a subsidiary of Tyco Flow Control in a tax-free, all-stock merger (the "Merger"), with Pentair Ltd. ("Pentair") succeeding Pentair Inc. as an independent publicly traded company. The distributions, the Merger and related transactions are collectively referred to herein as the "2012 Separation". As a result of the distribution, the operations of Tyco's former flow control and North American residential security businesses are now classified as discontinued operations in all periods presented.
Tyco's registered and principal office is located at Victor von Bruns-Strasse 21, CH-8212 Neuhausen am Rheinfall, Switzerland. Its management office in the United States is located at 9 Roszel Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.

On May 30, 2014, Tyco entered into a Merger Agreement ("Merger Agreement") with Tyco International plc, a newly-formed Irish public limited company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tyco ("Tyco Ireland"). Under the Merger Agreement, Tyco will merge with and into Tyco Ireland, with Tyco Ireland being the surviving company. This Merger will result in Tyco Ireland becoming Tyco's publicly-traded parent company and change the jurisdiction of organization of Tyco from Switzerland to Ireland. Tyco's shareholders are expected to receive one ordinary share of Tyco Ireland for each common share of Tyco held immediately prior to the Merger. Upon completion of the Merger, Tyco Ireland is expected to conduct, through its subsidiaries, the same businesses as conducted by Tyco before the Merger. The Merger is subject to certain conditions including shareholder approval, which was received at the special general meeting of shareholders held on September 9, 2014. The Merger is expected to become effective in November 2014.
Segments
Each of our three segments serves a highly diverse customer base and none is dependent upon a single customer or group of customers. For fiscal year 2014, no customer accounted for more than 10% of our revenues, and approximately 47% of our revenues were derived from customers outside of North America.
Our end-use customers, to whom we may sell directly or through wholesalers, distributors, commercial builders or contractors, can generally be grouped in the following categories:
Commercial customers, including residential and commercial property developers, financial institutions, food service businesses and commercial enterprises;
Industrial customers, including companies in the oil and gas, power generation, mining, petrochemical and other industries;
Retail customers, including international, regional and local consumer outlets;
Institutional customers, including a broad range of healthcare facilities, academic institutions, museums and foundations;
Governmental customers, including federal, state and local governments, defense installations, mass transportation networks, public utilities and other government-affiliated entities and applications; and
Residential and small business customers outside of North America, including owners of single-family homes and local providers of a wide range of goods and services.
As discussed under "Competition" below, the markets in which we compete are generally highly fragmented. We therefore compete with many other businesses in markets throughout the world, including other large global businesses, significant regional businesses and many smaller local businesses.
Installation & Services
NA Installation & Services and ROW Installation & Services (collectively, "Installation & Services") designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security and fire detection and suppression systems for retail, commercial, industrial, governmental and institutional customers around the world. Additionally, ROW Installation & Services designs, sells, installs, services and monitors security systems for residential and small business customers under the ADT brand name outside of North America.



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Security Services
Our Installation & Services segments design, sell, install and service security systems to detect intrusion, control access and react to movement, fire, smoke, flooding, environmental conditions, industrial processes and other hazards. These electronic security systems include detection devices that are usually connected to a monitoring center that receives and records alarm signals where security monitoring specialists verify alarm conditions and initiate a range of response scenarios. For most systems, control panels identify the nature of the alarm and the areas where a sensor was triggered. Our other security solutions include access control systems for sensitive areas such as government facilities and banks; video surveillance systems designed to deter theft and fraud and help protect employees and customers; and asset protection and security management systems designed to monitor and protect physical assets as well as proprietary electronic data. Our offerings also include anti-theft systems utilizing acousto-magnetic and radio frequency identification tags and labels in the retail industry as well as store performance solutions to enhance retailer performance. Many of the world's leading retailers use our Sensormatic anti-theft systems to help protect against shoplifting and employee theft. Many of the products that we install for our Installation & Services security customers are designed and manufactured by our Global Products segment. Additionally, our deep experience in designing, integrating, deploying and maintaining large-scale security systems—including, for example, centrally managed security systems that span large commercial and institutional campuses—allows us to install and/or service products manufactured by third parties.
Purchasers of our intrusion systems typically contract for ongoing security system monitoring and maintenance at the time of initial equipment installation. These contracts are generally for a term of one to three years. Systems installed at customers' premises may be owned by us or by our customers. Monitoring center personnel may respond to alarms by relaying appropriate information to local fire or police departments, notifying the customer or taking other appropriate action. In certain markets, we directly provide the alarm response services with highly trained and professionally equipped employees. In some instances, alarm systems are connected directly to local fire or police departments.
In addition, our ROW Installation & Services segment is a leading provider of monitored residential and small business security systems. In addition to traditional burglar alarm and fire detection systems, installation and monitoring services, ROW Installation & Services provides patrol and response services in select geographies, including South Africa. Our ROW Installation & Services segment continues to expand its offering of value-added residential services worldwide, such as an interactive services platform. The interactive services platform allows for remote management of the home security system, as well as lifestyle applications, which currently include remote video, lighting control, and energy management.
Our customers are often prompted to purchase security systems by their insurance carriers, which may offer lower insurance premium rates if a security system is installed or require that a system be installed as a condition of coverage.
Fire Protection Services
Our Installation & Services segments design, sell, install and service fire detection and fire suppression systems in both new and existing facilities. Commercial construction as well as legislation mandating the installation and service of fire detection and suppression systems are significant drivers of demand for our products. Our Installation & Services segments offer a wide range of fire detection and suppression systems, including those designed and manufactured by our Global Products segment and those designed by third parties. These detection systems include fire alarm control panels, advanced fire alarm monitoring systems, smoke and flame detection systems, heat and carbon monoxide detectors and voice evacuation systems. Our Installation & Services segments also offer a wide range of standard water-based sprinkler and chemical suppression systems and custom designed special hazard suppression systems, which incorporate specialized extinguishing agents such as foams, dry chemicals and gases in addition to spill control products designed to absorb, neutralize and solidify spills of hazardous materials. These systems are often especially suited to fire suppression in industrial and commercial applications, including oil and gas, power generation, mining, petrochemical, manufacturing, transportation, data processing, telecommunications, commercial food preparation and marine applications. Our Installation & Services segments continue to focus on system maintenance and inspection, which have become increasingly important parts of our business.
Customers
Our Installation & Services customers range from Fortune 500 companies with diverse worldwide operations who look to us to provide integrated, global solutions for their fire and security needs, to single location commercial customers and individual homeowners. Our Installation & Services customer relationships generally are in the market for new construction or retrofit projects, which represented 47% of Installation & Services fiscal 2014 net revenue, and the market for aftermarket products and services, which accounted for the remaining 53% of Installation & Services fiscal 2014 net revenue. New construction projects are inherently long-lead in nature and we strive to become involved in the planning process for these projects as early as possible. We believe that by actively participating in the preliminary design stages of a new construction project and by offering our design services that combine our global expertise and knowledge of local codes and standards, we

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can increase our value to customers relative to many smaller local and regional competitors. With respect to fire detection and suppression installations, we prefer to become involved at the time an architectural or engineering design firm is selected. With respect to security system design and installation, we generally become involved in the later stages of a construction project or as tenants take occupancy.
Our relationships with customers in the aftermarket may include any combination of alarm monitoring, fire and security maintenance and or testing and inspection services. We also provide aftermarket services to many customers whose fire and security systems were manufactured or installed by third parties.
Global Products
Our Global Products segment designs, manufactures and sells fire protection, security and life safety products, including intrusion security, anti-theft devices, breathing apparatus, and access control and video management systems.
Fire Protection Products
Fire Protection Products designs, manufactures, distributes and sells fire alarm and fire detection systems, automatic fire sprinkler systems and special hazard suppression systems, including many of the fire protection products that our Installation & Services segments install and service. Fire Protection Products also manufactures and sells grooved products for the rapid joining of piping in both the fire and non-fire markets. Fire Protection Products are marketed under various leading trade names, including Simplex, Wormald, Ansul and Tyco and include fire alarm control panels, advanced fire alarm monitoring systems, smoke, heat and carbon monoxide detectors and voice evacuation systems. Fire Protection Products also offers a wide range of water-based sprinkler systems and custom designed special hazard suppression systems, which incorporate specialized extinguishing agents such as foams, dry chemicals and gases. These systems are often especially suited to fire suppression in industrial and commercial applications, including oil and gas, power generation, mining, petrochemical, manufacturing, transportation, data processing, telecommunications, commercial food preparation and marine applications.
Fire Protection Products' systems often are purchased by facility owners through construction engineers and electrical contractors, as well as mechanical or general contractors. In recent years, retrofitting of existing buildings has increased as a result of legislation mandating the installation of fire detection and fire suppression systems, especially in hotels, restaurants, healthcare facilities and educational establishments. The 2009 edition of the International Residential Code, developed by the International Code Council, a non-profit association that develops model codes that are the predominant building and fire safety regulations followed by state and local jurisdictions in the United States, adopted a proposal advanced by firefighters and other life-safety advocates that requires sprinkler systems in new one and two-family homes and townhouses as of January 2011. This national code is not binding on state and local jurisdictions and must be adopted locally before it becomes mandatory for new homes being built in these areas. The timing and extent of adoption, if at all, will vary by jurisdiction. However, we believe that this development may offer opportunities to expand our residential fire suppression business in the United States.
Security Products
Security Products designs and manufactures a wide array of electronic security products, including integrated video surveillance and access control systems to enable businesses to manage their security and enhance business performance. Our global access control solutions include integrated security management systems for enterprise applications, access control solutions applications, alarm management panels, door controllers, readers, keypads and cards. Our global video system solutions include digital video management systems, matrix switchers and controllers, digital multiplexers, programmable cameras, monitors and liquid crystal interactive displays. Our security products for homes and businesses range from basic burglar alarms to comprehensive interactive security systems including alarm control panels, keypads, sensors and central station receiving equipment used in security monitoring centers. Our offerings also include anti-theft systems utilizing acousto magnetic and radio frequency identification tags and labels in the retail industry. Our security products are marketed under various leading trade names, including Software House, DSC, American Dynamics, Sensormatic, Visonic and Exacq. Many of the world's leading retailers use our Sensormatic anti-theft systems to help protect against shoplifting and employee theft. Security Products manufactures many of the security products that our Installation & Services business installs and services.
Life Safety Products
Life Safety Products manufactures life safety products, including self-contained breathing apparatus designed for firefighter, industrial and military use, supplied air respirators, air-purifying respirators, thermal imaging cameras, gas detection equipment, gas masks and personal protection equipment. The Life Safety Products business operates under various leading trade names, including Scott Safety and Protector. Our breathing apparatus are used by the military forces of several countries and many U.S. firefighters rely on the Scott Air-Pak brand of self-contained breathing apparatus.

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Customers
Global Products sells products through our Installation & Service segments and indirect distribution channels around the world. Some of Global Products' channel business partners act as dealers selling to smaller fire and security contractors that install fire detection and suppression, security and theft protection systems, whereas others act as integrators that install the products themselves. Builders, contractors and developers are customers for our sprinkler products. End customers for our breathing apparatus and related products include fire departments, municipal and state governments and military forces as well as major companies in the industrial sector.
Competition
The markets that we serve are generally highly competitive and fragmented with a small number of large, global firms and thousands of smaller regional and local companies. Competition is based on price, specialized product capacity, breadth of product line, training, support and delivery, with the relative importance of these factors varying depending on the project complexity, product line, the local market and other factors. Rather than compete primarily on price, we emphasize the quality of our products and services, the reputation of our brands and our knowledge of customers' fire and security needs. Among large industrial, commercial, governmental and institutional customers, we believe that our comprehensive global coverage and product and service offerings provide a competitive advantage. We also believe that our systems integration capabilities, which allow us to offer global solutions to customers that fully integrate our security and/or fire offerings into existing information technology networks, business operations and management tools, and process automation and control systems, set us apart from all but a small number of other large, global competitors.
Competitive dynamics in the fire and security industry generally result in more direct competition and lower margins for installation projects compared to aftermarket products and services. We generally face the greatest competitive pricing pressure for the installation of products that have become more commoditized over time, including standard commercial sprinkler systems and closed-circuit television systems.
Backlog
See Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for information relating to our backlog.
Intellectual Property
Patents, trademarks, copyrights and other proprietary rights are important to our business. We also rely upon trade secrets, manufacturing know-how, continuing technological innovations and licensing opportunities to maintain and improve our competitive position. We review third-party proprietary rights, including trademarks, patents and patent applications, in an effort to develop an effective intellectual property strategy, avoid infringement of third-party proprietary rights, identify licensing opportunities and misappropriation of our proprietary rights, and monitor the intellectual property claims of others.
We own a portfolio of patents that principally relates to: electronic security products and systems for intrusion detection, access control, electronic identification tags & video surveillance; fire protection products and systems, including fire detection and fire suppression with chemical, gas, foam and water agents; personal protective products and systems for fire and other hazards. We also own a portfolio of trademarks and are a licensee of various patents and trademarks. Patents for individual products extend for varying periods according to the date of patent filing or grant and the legal term of patents in the various countries where patent protection is obtained. Trademark rights may potentially extend for longer periods of time and are dependent upon national laws and use of the marks.
While we consider our patents to be valuable assets that help prevent or delay the commoditization of our products and thus extend their life cycles, we do not believe that our overall operations are dependent upon any single patent or group of related patents. We share the ADT® trademark with ADT and operate under a brand governance agreement between the two companies.


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Research and Development
We are engaged in research and development in an effort to introduce new products, to enhance the effectiveness, ease of use, safety and reliability of our existing products and to expand the applications for which the uses of our products are appropriate. For example, in order to position ourselves to participate in and lead the development of residential interactive platforms, enterprise-wide integrated access control platforms and transition IP video platforms, we have made significant investments in our security products portfolio. In addition, we continually evaluate developing technologies in areas that we believe will enhance our business for possible investment. Our research and development expense was $193 million in 2014, $172 million in 2013 and $145 million in 2012 related to new product development.
Raw and Other Purchased Materials
We are a large buyer of metals and other commodities, including fuel for our vehicle fleet. We purchase materials from a large number of independent sources around the world and have experienced no shortages that have had a material adverse effect on our businesses. We enter into long-term supply contracts, using fixed or variable pricing to manage our exposure to potential supply disruptions. Significant changes in certain raw material, including steel, brass and certain flurochemicals used in our fire suppression agents, may have an adverse impact on costs and operating margins.
Governmental Regulation and Supervision
Our operations are subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations, both within and outside the United States, in areas such as: consumer protection, government contracts, international trade, environmental protection, labor and employment, tax, licensing and others. For example, most U.S. states and non-U.S. jurisdictions in which we operate have licensing laws directed specifically toward the alarm and fire suppression industries. Our security businesses currently rely extensively upon the use of wireline and wireless telephone service to communicate signals. Wireline and wireless telephone companies in the United States are regulated by the federal and state governments. In addition, government regulation of fire safety codes can impact our fire businesses. These and other laws and regulations impact the manner in which we conduct our business, and changes in legislation or government policies can affect our worldwide operations, both favorably and unfavorably. For a more detailed description of the various laws and regulations that affect our business, see Item 1A. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Legal, Regulatory and Compliance Matters.
Environmental Matters
We are involved in various stages of investigation and cleanup related to environmental remediation matters at a number of sites. The ultimate cost of site cleanup is difficult to predict given the uncertainties regarding the extent of the required cleanup, the interpretation of applicable laws and regulations and alternative cleanup methods. As of September 26, 2014, we concluded that it was probable that we would incur remedial costs in the range of approximately $38 million to $79 million. As of September 26, 2014, Tyco concluded that the best estimate within this range is approximately $42 million, of which $23 million is included in Accrued and other current liabilities and Accounts payable and $19 million is included in Other liabilities in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet.
The majority of the liabilities described above relate to ongoing remediation efforts at a facility in the Company's Global Products segment located in Marinette, Wisconsin, which the Company acquired in 1990 in connection with its acquisition of, among other things, the Ansul product line. Prior to Tyco's acquisition, Ansul manufactured arsenic-based agricultural herbicides at the Marinette facility, which resulted in significant arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater on the Marinette site and in parts of the adjoining Menominee River. Ansul has been engaged in ongoing remediation efforts at the Marinette site since 1990, and in February 2009 entered into an Administrative Consent Order (the "Consent Order") with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address the presence of arsenic at the Marinette site. Under this agreement, Ansul's principal obligations are to contain the arsenic contamination on the site, pump and treat on-site groundwater, dredge, treat and properly dispose of contaminated sediments in the adjoining river areas, and monitor contamination levels on an ongoing basis. Activities completed under the Consent Order since 2009 include the installation of a subsurface barrier wall around the facility to contain contaminated groundwater, the installation of a groundwater extraction and treatment system and the dredging and offsite disposal of treated river sediment. As of September 26, 2014, the Company concluded that its remaining remediation and monitoring costs related to the Marinette facility were in the range of approximately $27 million to $54 million. The Company's best estimate within that range is approximately $30 million, of which $18 million is included in Accrued and other current liabilities and $12 million is included in Other liabilities in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet. During the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013, and September 28, 2012, the Company recorded charges of nil, $100 million, and $17 million, respectively, in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations. Although the Company has recorded its best estimate of the costs that it will incur to remediate and monitor the arsenic contamination at the Marinette facility, it is possible that technological, regulatory or enforcement developments, the results of environmental studies or other factors could change the Company's expectations with respect to future charges and

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cash outlays, and such changes could be material to the Company's future results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
Employees
As of September 26, 2014, we employed approximately 57,000 people worldwide, of which approximately 20,000 were employed in the United States and approximately 37,000 were outside the United States. Approximately 8,000 employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements or works councils and we believe that our relations with the labor unions are generally good.
Available Information
Tyco is required to file annual, quarterly and special reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. Investors may read and copy any document that Tyco files, including this Annual Report on Form 10-K, at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Room 1580, Washington, DC 20549. Investors may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an Internet site at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, from which investors can electronically access Tyco's SEC filings.
Our Internet website is www.tyco.com. We make available free of charge on or through our website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, reports filed pursuant to Section 16 and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such materials to the SEC. In addition, we have posted the charters for our Audit Committee, Compensation and Human Resources Committee, and Nominating and Governance Committee, as well as our Board Governance Principles and Guide to Ethical Conduct, on our website under the headings "About—Board of Directors" and "About—Corporate Social Responsibility." The annual report to shareholders, charters and principles are not incorporated in this report by reference. We will also provide a copy of these documents free of charge to shareholders upon request.
Item 1A.    Risk Factors
        You should carefully consider the risks described below before investing in our publicly traded securities. The risks described below are not the only ones facing us. Our business is also subject to the risks that affect many other companies, such as technological obsolescence, labor relations, geopolitical events, climate change and international operations.
Risks Relating to Our Businesses
General economic and cyclical industry conditions may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Our operating results have been and may in the future be adversely affected by general economic conditions and the cyclical pattern of certain markets that we serve. For example, demand for our services and products is significantly affected by the level of commercial and residential construction, industrial capital expenditures for facility expansions and maintenance and the amount of discretionary business and consumer spending, each of which historically has displayed significant cyclicality. Even if demand for our products is not negatively affected, the liquidity and financial position of our customers could impact their ability to pay in full and/or on a timely basis.
Much of the demand for installation of security products and fire detection and suppression solutions is driven by commercial and residential construction and industrial facility expansion and maintenance projects. Commercial and residential construction projects are heavily dependent on general economic conditions, localized demand for commercial and residential real estate and availability of credit. In recent years, many commercial and residential real estate markets have experienced significant fluctuations in supply and demand, and this volatility may continue indefinitely. In addition, most commercial and residential real estate developers rely heavily on project financing from banks and other institutional lenders in order to initiate and complete projects. Declines in real estate values in many parts of the world have led to significant reductions in the availability of project financing, even in markets where demand may otherwise be sufficient to support new construction. These factors have in turn hampered demand for new fire detection and suppression and security installations.
Levels of industrial capital expenditures for facility expansions and maintenance turn on general economic conditions, economic conditions within specific industries we serve, expectations of future market behavior and available financing. Additionally, volatility in commodity prices can negatively affect the level of these activities and can result in postponement of capital spending decisions or the delay or cancellation of existing orders.

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The businesses of many of our industrial customers, particularly oil and gas companies, chemical and petrochemical companies, mining and general industrial companies, are to varying degrees cyclical and have experienced periodic downturns. During such economic downturns, customers in these industries historically have tended to delay major capital projects, including greenfield construction, expensive maintenance projects and upgrades. Additionally, demand for our products and services may be affected by volatility in energy and commodity prices and fluctuating demand forecasts, as our customers may be more conservative in their capital planning, which may reduce demand for our products and services. Although our industrial customers tend to be less dependent on project financing than real estate developers, disruptions in financial markets and banking systems, could make credit and capital markets difficult for our customers to access, and could raise the cost of new debt for our customers to prohibitive levels. Any difficulty in accessing these markets and the increased associated costs can have a negative effect on investment in large capital projects, including necessary maintenance and upgrades, even during periods of favorable end-market conditions.
Many of our customers outside of the industrial and commercial sectors, including governmental and institutional customers, have experienced budgetary constraints as sources of revenue, including tax receipts, general obligation and construction bonds, endowments and donations, have been negatively impacted by adverse economic conditions. These budgetary constraints have in the past and may in the future reduce demand for our products and services among governmental and institutional customers.
Reduced demand for our products and services could result in the delay or cancellation of existing orders or lead to excess capacity, which unfavorably impacts our absorption of fixed costs. This reduced demand may also erode average selling prices in the industries we serve. Any of these results could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We face competition in each of our businesses, which results in pressure on our profit margins and limits our ability to maintain or increase the market share of our products and services. If we cannot successfully compete in an increasingly global market-place, our operating results may be adversely affected.
We operate in competitive domestic and international markets and compete with many highly competitive manufacturers and service providers, both domestically and on a global basis. Our manufacturing businesses face competition from lower cost manufacturers in Asia and elsewhere and our service businesses face competition from alternative service providers around the world. Currently, key components of our competitive position are our ability to bring to market industry-leading products and services, to adapt to changing competitive environments and to manage expenses successfully. These factors require continuous management focus on maintaining our competitive position through technological innovation, cost reduction, productivity improvement and a regular appraisal of our asset portfolio. If we are unable to maintain our position as a market leader, or to achieve appropriate levels of scalability or cost-effectiveness, or if we are otherwise unable to manage and react to changes in the global marketplace, our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially and adversely affected.
Our future growth is largely dependent upon our ability to continue to adapt our products, services and organization to meet the demands of local markets in both developed and emerging economies and by developing or acquiring new technologies that achieve market acceptance with acceptable margins.
Our businesses operate in global markets that are characterized by evolving industry standards. Although many of our largest competitors are also global industrial companies, we compete with thousands of smaller regional and local companies that may be positioned to offer products and services at lower cost than ours, particularly in emerging markets, or to capitalize on highly localized relationships and knowledge that are difficult for us to replicate. We have found that in several emerging markets potential customers prefer local suppliers, in some cases because of existing relationships and in other cases because of local legal restrictions or incentives that favor local businesses.
Accordingly, our future success depends upon a number of factors, including our ability to: adapt our products, services, organization, workforce and sales strategies to fit localities throughout the world, particularly in high growth emerging markets; identify emerging technological and other trends in our target end-markets; and develop or acquire, manufacture and bring competitive products and services to market quickly and cost-effectively. Adapting our businesses to serve more local markets will require us to invest considerable resources in building our distribution channels and engineering and manufacturing capabilities in those markets to ensure that we can address customer demand. Even when we invest in growing our business in local markets, we may not be successful for any number of reasons, including competitive pressure from regional and local businesses that may have superior local capabilities or products that are produced more locally at lower cost. Our ability to develop or acquire new products and services can affect our competitive position and requires the investment of significant resources. These acquisitions and development efforts divert resources from other potential investments in our businesses, and they may not lead to the development of new technologies, products or services on a timely basis. Moreover, as we introduce new products, we may be unable to detect and correct defects in the design of a product or in its application to a specified use,

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which could result in loss of sales or delays in market acceptance. Even after introduction, new or enhanced products may not satisfy consumer preferences and product failures may cause consumers to reject our products. As a result, these products may not achieve market acceptance and our brand images could suffer. In addition, the markets for our products and services may not develop or grow as we anticipate. As a result, the failure to effectively adapt our products and services to the needs of local markets, the failure of our technology, products or services to gain market acceptance, the potential for product defects or the obsolescence of our products and services could significantly reduce our revenues, increase our operating costs or otherwise materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We are exposed to greater risks of liability for employee acts or omissions, or system failure, than may be inherent in other businesses.
If a customer or third party believes that he or she has suffered harm to person or property due to an actual or alleged act or omission of one of our employees or a security or fire system failure, he or she may pursue legal action against us, and the cost of defending the legal action and of any judgment could be substantial. In particular, because our products and services are intended to protect lives and real and personal property, we may have greater exposure to litigation risks than businesses that provide other products and services. We could face liability for failure to respond adequately to alarm activations or failure of our fire protection systems to operate as expected. The nature of the services we provide exposes us to the risks that we may be held liable for employee acts or omissions or system failures. In an attempt to reduce this risk, our installation, service and monitoring agreements and other contracts contain provisions limiting our liability in such circumstances, and we typically maintain product liability insurance to mitigate the risk that our products and services fail to operate as expected. However, in the event of litigation with respect to such matters, it is possible that contract limitations may be deemed not applicable or unenforceable, that our insurance coverage is not adequate, or that insurance carriers deny coverage of our claims. As a result, such employee acts or omissions or system failures could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We face risks relating to doing business internationally that could adversely affect our business.
Our business operates and serves consumers worldwide. There are certain risks inherent in doing business internationally, including:
economic volatility and the impact of economic conditions in various regions;
the difficulty of enforcing agreements, collecting receivables and protecting assets, especially our intellectual property rights, through non-U.S. legal systems;
possibility of unfavorable circumstances from host country laws, regulations or licensing requirements;
fluctuations in revenues, operating margins and other financial measures due to currency exchange rate fluctuations and restrictions on currency and earnings repatriation;
trade protection measures, import or export restrictions, licensing requirements and local fire and security codes and standards;
increased costs and risks of developing, staffing and simultaneously managing a number of foreign operations as a result of distance as well as language and cultural differences;
issues related to occupational safety and adherence to local labor laws and regulations;
potentially adverse tax developments;
longer payment cycles;
changes in the general political, social and economic conditions in the countries where we operate, particularly in emerging markets;
the threat of nationalization and expropriation, as well as new or changed restrictions regarding foreign ownership of assets - in particular with respect to security products or services that may be viewed by certain governments as sovereign security interests;
the presence of corruption in certain countries; and
fluctuations in available municipal funding in those instances where a project is government financed.
One or more of these factors could adversely affect our business and financial condition.
In order to manage our day-to-day operations, we must overcome cultural and language barriers and assimilate different business practices. In addition, we are required to create compensation programs, employment policies and other administrative programs that comply with laws of multiple countries. We also must communicate and monitor standards and directives across our global network. Our failure to successfully manage our geographically diverse operations could impair our ability to react quickly to changing business and market conditions and to enforce compliance with standards and procedures, any of which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

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Volatility in currency exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
A significant portion of our revenue and certain of our costs, assets and liabilities, are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Certain of the foreign currencies to which we have exposure have undergone significant devaluation in the past, which can reduce the value of our local monetary assets, reduce the U.S. dollar value of our local cash flow and potentially reduce the U.S. dollar value of future local net income. Although we intend to enter into forward exchange contracts to economically hedge some of our risks associated with transactions denominated in certain foreign currencies, no assurances can be made that exchange rate fluctuations will not adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In addition, we are a large buyer of metals and other non-metal commodities, including fossil fuels for our manufacturing operations and our vehicle fleet, the prices of which have fluctuated significantly in recent years. Increases in the prices of some of these commodities could increase the costs of manufacturing our products and providing our services. We may not be able to pass on these costs to our customers or otherwise effectively manage price volatility and this could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. Further, in a declining price environment, our operating margins may contract because we account for inventory using the first-in, first-out method.
We monitor these exposures as an integral part of our overall risk management program. In some cases, we may enter into hedge contracts to insulate our results of operations from these fluctuations. These hedges are subject to the risk that our counterparty may not perform. As a result, changes in currency exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Our business strategy includes acquiring companies and making investments that complement our existing business. These acquisitions and investments could be unsuccessful or consume significant resources, which could adversely affect our operating results.
We will continue to analyze and evaluate the acquisition of strategic businesses or product lines with the potential to strengthen our industry position or enhance our existing set of product and services offerings. These acquisitions are likely to include businesses in emerging markets, which are often riskier than acquisitions in developed markets. We cannot assure you that we will identify or successfully complete transactions with suitable acquisition candidates in the future. Nor can we assure you that completed acquisitions will be successful.
Acquisitions and investments may involve significant cash expenditures, debt incurrence, operating losses and expenses that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Acquisitions involve numerous other risks, including:
diversion of management time and attention from daily operations;
difficulties integrating acquired businesses, technologies and personnel into our business;
inability to obtain required regulatory approvals and/or required financing on favorable terms;
potential loss of key employees, key contractual relationships, or key customers of acquired companies or of us;
assumption of the liabilities and exposure to unforeseen liabilities of acquired companies; and
dilution of interests of holders of our common shares through the issuance of equity securities or equity-linked securities.
It may be difficult for us to complete transactions quickly and to integrate acquired operations efficiently into our current business operations. Moreover, we may be unable to obtain strategic or operational benefits that are expected from our acquisitions. Any acquisitions or investments may ultimately harm our business or financial condition, as such acquisitions may not be successful and may ultimately result in impairment charges.
A significant percentage of our future growth is anticipated to come from emerging markets, and if we are unable to expand our operations in emerging markets, our growth rate could be negatively affected.
One aspect of our growth strategy is to seek significant growth in emerging markets, including China, India, Latin America and the Middle East, through both organic investments and through acquisitions. Emerging markets generally involve greater financial and operational risks than more mature markets, where legal systems are more developed and familiar to us. In some cases, emerging markets have greater political and economic volatility, greater vulnerability to infrastructure and labor disruptions, are more susceptible to corruption, and are locations where it may be more difficult to impose corporate standards and procedures and the extraterritorial laws of the United States. Negative or uncertain political climates and military disruptions in developing and emerging markets could also adversely affect us.

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We cannot guarantee that our growth strategy will be successful. If we are unable to manage the risks inherent in our growth strategy in emerging markets, including civil unrest, international hostilities, natural disasters, security breaches and failure to maintain compliance with multiple legal and regulatory systems, our results of operations and ability to grow could be materially adversely affected.
Failure to maintain and upgrade the security of our information and technology networks, including personally identifiable and other information; non-compliance with our contractual or other legal obligations regarding such information; or a violation of the Company's privacy and security policies with respect to such information, could adversely affect us.
We are dependent on information technology networks and systems, including the Internet, to process, transmit and store electronic information. In the normal course of our business, we collect and retain significant volumes of certain types of personally identifiable and other information pertaining to our customers, stockholders and employees, including video and other customer data obtained in connection with monitoring and analytical services. The legal, regulatory and contractual environment surrounding information security and privacy is constantly evolving and companies that collect and retain such information are under increasing attack by cyber-criminals around the world. A significant actual or potential theft, loss, fraudulent use or misuse of customer, stockholder, employee or our data, whether by third parties or as a result of employee malfeasance or otherwise, non-compliance with our contractual or other legal obligations regarding such data or a violation of our privacy and security policies with respect to such data could adversely impact our reputation and could result in significant costs, fines, litigation or regulatory action against us. In addition, we depend on our information technology infrastructure for business-to-business and business-to-consumer electronic commerce. Security breaches of this infrastructure can create system disruptions and shutdowns that could result in disruptions to our operations. Increasingly, our security products and services are accessed wirelessly and through the Internet, and security breaches in connection with the delivery of our services wirelessly or via the Internet may affect us and could be detrimental to our reputation, business, operating results and financial condition. We cannot be certain that advances in criminal capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other developments will not compromise or breach the technology protecting the networks that access our products and services.
Failure to maintain, upgrade and consolidate our information and technology networks could adversely affect us.
We are continuously upgrading and consolidating our systems, including making changes to legacy systems, replacing legacy systems with successor systems with new functionality, acquiring new systems with new functionality and moving to cloud-based technology solutions. These types of activities subject us to inherent costs and risks associated with replacing and changing these systems, including impairment of our ability to fulfill customer orders, potential disruption of our internal control structure, substantial capital expenditures, additional administration and operating expenses, retention of sufficiently skilled personnel to implement and operate the new systems, demands on management time, and other risks and costs of delays or difficulties in transitioning to new systems or of integrating new systems into our current systems. Our system implementations may not result in productivity improvements at a level that outweighs the costs of implementation, or at all. In addition, the implementation of new technology systems may cause disruptions in our business operations and have an adverse effect on our business and operations, if not anticipated and appropriately mitigated.
If we cannot obtain sufficient quantities of materials, components and equipment required for our manufacturing activities at competitive prices and quality and on a timely basis, or if our manufacturing capacity does not meet demand, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows may suffer.
We purchase materials, components and equipment from unrelated parties for use in our manufacturing operations. If we cannot obtain sufficient quantities of these items at competitive prices and quality and on a timely basis, we may not be able to produce sufficient quantities of product to satisfy market demand, product shipments may be delayed or our material or manufacturing costs may increase. In addition, because we cannot always immediately adapt our cost structures to changing market conditions, our manufacturing capacity may at times exceed or fall short of our production requirements. Any of these problems could result in the loss of customers, provide an opportunity for competing products to gain market acceptance and otherwise materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Failure to attract, motivate, train and retain qualified personnel could adversely affect our business.
Our culture and guiding principles focus on continuously training, motivating and developing employees, and in particular we strive to attract, motivate, train and retain qualified engineers and managers to handle the day-to-day operations of a highly diversified organization. Many of our manufacturing processes, and many of the integrated solutions we offer, are highly technical in nature. Our ability to expand or maintain our business depends on our ability to hire, train and retain engineers and other technical professionals with the skills necessary to understand and adapt to the continuously developing needs of our customers. This includes developing talent and leadership capabilities in emerging markets, where the depth of skilled employees is often limited and competition for resources is intense. Our geographic expansion strategy in emerging

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markets depends on our ability to attract, retain and integrate qualified managers and engineers. If we fail to attract, motivate, train and retain qualified personnel, or if we experience excessive turnover, we may experience declining sales, manufacturing delays or other inefficiencies, increased recruiting, training and relocation costs and other difficulties, and our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially and adversely affected.
We may be required to recognize substantial impairment charges in the future.
Pursuant to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, we are required to assess our goodwill, intangibles and other long-lived assets periodically to determine whether they are impaired. Disruptions to our business, unfavorable end-market conditions and protracted economic weakness, unexpected significant declines in operating results of reporting units, divestitures and market capitalization declines may result in material charges for goodwill and other asset impairments. We maintain significant goodwill and intangible assets on our balance sheet, and we believe these balances are recoverable. However, fair value determinations require considerable judgment and are sensitive to change. Impairments to one or more of our reporting units could occur in future periods whether or not connected with the annual impairment analysis. Future impairment charges could materially affect our reported earnings in the periods of such charges and could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Our residential and commercial security businesses may experience higher rates of customer attrition, which may reduce our future revenue and cause us to change the estimated useful lives of assets related to our security monitoring customers, increasing our depreciation and amortization expense.
If our residential or commercial security customers are dissatisfied with our products or services and switch to competitive products or services, or disconnect for other reasons, our recurring revenue and results of operations may be materially adversely affected. The risk is more pronounced in times of economic uncertainty, as customers may reduce amounts spent on the products and services we provide. We amortize the costs of acquired monitoring contracts and related customer relationships based on the estimated life of the customer relationships. Internally generated residential and commercial pools are similarly depreciated. If customer disconnect rates were to rise significantly, we may be required to accelerate the depreciation and amortization of subscriber system assets and intangible assets, which could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.
Divestitures of some of our businesses or product lines may materially adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
We continually evaluate the performance of all of our businesses and may sell businesses or product lines. Divestitures involve risks, including difficulties in the separation of operations, services, products and personnel, the diversion of management's attention from other business concerns, the disruption of our business, the potential loss of key employees and the retention of uncertain environmental or other contingent liabilities related to the divested business. In addition, divestitures may result in significant asset impairment charges, including those related to goodwill and other intangible assets, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in managing these or any other significant risks that we encounter in divesting a business or product line, and any divestiture we undertake could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Our business may be adversely affected by work stoppages, union negotiations, labor disputes and other matters associated with our labor force.
We employ over 57,000 people worldwide. Approximately 14% of these employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements or works council. Although we believe that our relations with the labor unions and works councils that represent our employees are generally good and we have experienced no material strikes or work stoppages recently, no assurances can be made that we will not experience in the future these and other types of conflicts with labor unions, works council, other groups representing employees or our employees generally, or that any future negotiations with our labor unions will not result in significant increases in our cost of labor. Additionally, a work stoppage at one of our suppliers could materially and adversely affect our operations if an alternative source of supply were not readily available. Stoppages by employees of our customers could also result in reduced demand for our products.
A material disruption of our operations, particularly at our monitoring and/or manufacturing facilities, could adversely affect our business.
If our operations, particularly at our monitoring facilities and/or manufacturing facilities, were to be disrupted as a result of significant equipment failures, natural disasters, power outages, fires, explosions, terrorism, sabotage, adverse weather conditions, public health crises, labor disputes or other reasons, we may be unable to effectively respond to alarm signals, fill

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customer orders and otherwise meet obligations to or demand from our customers, which could adversely affect our financial performance.
Interruptions in production could increase our costs and reduce our sales. Any interruption in production capability could require us to make substantial capital expenditures or purchase alternative material at higher costs to fill customer orders, which could negatively affect our profitability and financial condition. We maintain property damage insurance that we believe to be adequate to provide for reconstruction of facilities and equipment, as well as business interruption insurance to mitigate losses resulting from any production interruption or shutdown caused by an insured loss. However, any recovery under our insurance policies may not offset the lost sales or increased costs that may be experienced during the disruption of operations, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.
We may be unable to execute on our strategic priorities.
In connection with the spin-offs of our former North American residential and small business security business and flow control businesses in September 2012, we anticipated certain financial, operational, managerial and other benefits to Tyco, and in particular we commenced certain productivity and other strategic initiatives following the spin-offs intended to reduce complexity, restructure operations and leverage Tyco’s scale in certain areas such as sourcing. We may not be able to achieve the anticipated results of these actions on the scale that we expected, and the anticipated benefits of the spin-offs, and the productivity and other strategic initiatives may not be fully realized.
We and ADT have entered into non-compete and non-solicit restrictions that prohibited us from competing with ADT in the residential and small business security business in the United States and Canada, and prohibited ADT from competing with us in the commercial fire and security businesses, in each case until September 29, 2014.
The non-compete provisions included in the ADT Separation and Distribution Agreement entered into in connection with the spin-offs have expired. These provisions (i) prohibited us from competing with ADT in the residential and small business security business in the United States and Canada and (ii) prohibited ADT from competing with Tyco in the commercial fire and security businesses, subject to certain small business related exceptions, in each case until September 29, 2014. In addition, the ADT Separation and Distribution Agreement contains non-solicitation provisions that prevented (i) us from soliciting ADT’s residential small business customers in the United States and Canada and (ii) ADT from soliciting our security customers, in each case until September 29, 2014. These provisions effectively prevented us from expanding into ADT’s business, and ADT from expanding into our business, in these jurisdictions until September 29, 2014. Because these restrictions have expired, ADT is no longer contractually prohibited from competing with us for commercial security customers, especially smaller businesses. ADT has begun to compete with us and, if it is successful in this regard, it could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results and operations and cash flows.
In connection with the 2012 Separation, we re-branded our North American commercial security business to Tyco Integrated Security and we no longer own the right to use the ADT® brand name in the United States and Canada.
Prior to the spin-off of ADT in September 2012, we re-branded our North American commercial security business to Tyco Integrated Security. There is no assurance that we will be able to achieve name recognition or status under our new brand that is comparable to the recognition and status previously enjoyed. The failure of these initiatives could adversely affect our ability to attract and retain customers, resulting in reduced revenues. In addition, as a result of the spin-offs, we own the ADT® brand name in jurisdictions outside of the United States and Canada, and ADT owns the brand name in the United States and Canada. Although we have entered agreements with ADT designed to protect the value of the ADT® brand, we cannot assure you that actions taken by ADT will not negatively impact the value of the brand outside of the United States and Canada. These factors expose us to the risk that the ADT® brand name could suffer reputational damage or devaluation for reasons outside of our control, including ADT's business conduct in the United States and Canada. Any of these factors may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Risks Related to Legal, Regulatory and Compliance Matters
We are subject to a variety of claims and litigation that could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In the normal course of our business, we are subject to claims and lawsuits, including from time to time claims for damages related to product liability and warranties, litigation alleging the infringement of intellectual property rights, litigation alleging anti-competitive behavior, and litigation related to employee matters, wages and commercial disputes. In certain circumstances, patent infringement and anti-trust laws permit successful plaintiffs to recover treble damages. Furthermore, we face exposure to product liability claims in the event that any of our products results in personal injury or property damage. The defense of these lawsuits may involve significant expense and diversion of our management's attention. In addition, we

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may be required to pay damage awards or settlements, become subject to injunctions or other equitable remedies or suffer from adverse publicity that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We are subject to product liability claims relating to products we manufacture or install. These claims could result in significant costs and liabilities and reduce our profitability.
We face exposure to product liability claims in the event that any of our products results in personal injury or property damage. In addition, if any of our products prove to be defective, we may be required to recall or redesign such products, which could result in significant unexpected costs. Any insurance we maintain may not be available on terms acceptable to us, such coverage may not be adequate for liabilities actually incurred, and our insurance carriers may deny coverage for claims made by us. Any claim or product recall could result in adverse publicity against us, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
In addition, we could face liability for failure to respond adequately to alarm activations or failure of our fire protection systems to operate as expected. The nature of the services we provide exposes us to the risks that we may be held liable for employee acts or omissions or system failures. In an attempt to reduce this risk, our alarm monitoring agreements and other contracts contain provisions limiting our liability in such circumstances. We cannot provide assurance, however, that these limitations will be enforced. Losses from such litigation could be material to our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Our businesses operate in regulated industries and are subject to a variety of complex and continually changing laws and regulations.
Our operations and employees are subject to various U.S. federal, state and local licensing laws, fire and security codes and standards and other laws and regulations. In certain jurisdictions, we are required to obtain licenses or permits to comply with standards governing employee selection and training and to meet certain standards in the conduct of our business. The loss of such licenses, or the imposition of conditions to the granting or retention of such licenses, could have a material adverse effect on us. Furthermore, our systems generally must meet fire and building codes in order to be installed, and it is possible that our current or future products will fail to meet such codes, which could require us to make costly modifications to our products or to forgo marketing in certain jurisdictions.
Changes in laws or regulations could require us to change the way we operate or to utilize resources to maintain compliance, which could increase costs or otherwise disrupt operations. In addition, failure to comply with any applicable laws or regulations could result in substantial fines or revocation of our operating permits and licenses. If laws and regulations were to change or if we or our products failed to comply, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Due to the international scope of our operations, the system of laws and regulations to which we are subject is complex and includes regulations issued by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security, the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control and various non U.S. governmental agencies, including applicable export controls, customs, currency exchange control and transfer pricing regulations, and laws regulating the foreign ownership of assets. No assurances can be made that we will continue to be found to be operating in compliance with, or be able to detect violations of, any such laws or regulations. In addition, we cannot predict the nature, scope or effect of future regulatory requirements to which our international operations might be subject or the manner in which existing laws might be administered or interpreted.
We could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar anti-bribery laws outside the United States.
The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the "FCPA") and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to government officials or other persons for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Recent years have seen a substantial increase in anti-bribery law enforcement activity, with more frequent and aggressive investigations and enforcement proceedings by both the Department of Justice ("DOJ") and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), increased enforcement activity by non-U.S. regulators, and increases in criminal and civil proceedings brought against companies and individuals. Our policies mandate compliance with these anti-bribery laws. We operate in many parts of the world that are recognized as having governmental and commercial corruption and in certain circumstances, strict compliance with anti-bribery laws may conflict with local customs and practices. Because many of our customers and end users are involved in infrastructure construction and energy production, they are often subject to increased scrutiny by regulators. We cannot assure you that our internal control policies and procedures will always protect us from reckless or criminal acts committed by our employees or third party intermediaries. In the event that we believe or have reason to believe that our employees or agents have or may have violated applicable anti-

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corruption laws, including the FCPA, we may be required to investigate or have outside counsel investigate the relevant facts and circumstances, which can be expensive and require significant time and attention from senior management. Violations of these laws may result in criminal or civil sanctions, which could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, results of operations or financial condition.
Furthermore, in September 2012 we agreed to the settlement of charges related to alleged FCPA violations with the DOJ and SEC. In connection with the settlement, we entered into a consent agreement with the SEC and a non-prosecution agreement with the DOJ, and a subsidiary of ours (which is no longer part of Tyco as a result of the 2012 Separation) pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA. Pursuant to the three-year non-prosecution agreement, we have acknowledged that a number of our subsidiaries made payments, both directly and indirectly, to government officials in order to obtain and retain business with private and state-owned entities, and falsely described the payments in the subsidiaries' books, records and accounts. The non-prosecution agreement also acknowledges Tyco's timely, voluntary and complete disclosure to the DOJ, and our cooperation with the DOJ's investigation-including a global internal investigation concerning bribery and related misconduct-and extensive remediation. Under the non-prosecution and other agreements, we have agreed to cooperate with and report periodically to the DOJ and other governmental authorities on matters related to our compliance efforts, including informing the DOJ when we become aware of possible violations of the FCPA as a result of our global audit program, and to continue to implement an enhanced compliance program and internal controls designed to prevent and detect FCPA violations. Notwithstanding our settlement of the DOJ and SEC investigations, we may be subject to allegations of FCPA violations in the future and we may be subject to commercial impacts such as lost revenue from customers who decline to do business with us as a result of these compliance matters. If so, or if we are unable to comply with the provisions of the non-prosecution and other agreements, we may be subject to additional investigation or enforcement by the DOJ or SEC. In such a case, we could be subject to material fines, injunctions on future conduct, the imposition of a compliance monitor, or suffer other criminal or civil penalties or adverse impacts, including being subject to lawsuits brought by private litigants, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Our failure to satisfy international trade compliance regulations may adversely affect us.
Our global operations require importing and exporting goods and technology across international borders on a regular basis. From time to time, we obtain or receive information alleging improper activity in connection with imports or exports. Our policy mandates strict compliance with U.S. and international trade laws. When we receive information alleging improper activity, our policy is to investigate that information and respond appropriately, including, if warranted, reporting our findings to relevant governmental authorities. Nonetheless, we cannot provide assurance that our policies and procedures will always protect us from actions that would violate U.S. and/or foreign laws. Such improper actions could subject the Company to civil or criminal penalties, including material monetary fines, or other adverse actions including denial of import or export privileges, and could damage our reputation and our business prospects.
We are party to asbestos-related product litigation that could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We and certain of our subsidiaries, including Yarway Corporation (“Yarway”) and Grinnell LLC (“Grinnell”), along with numerous other third parties, are named as defendants in personal injury lawsuits based on alleged exposure to asbestos containing materials. Over 90% of cases pending against affiliates of the Company have been filed against Yarway or Grinnell, and have typically involved product liability claims based primarily on allegations of manufacture, sale or distribution of industrial products that either contained asbestos or were used with asbestos containing components. Claims filed against Yarway derive from Yarway’s purported use of asbestos-containing gaskets and packing in the sale or distribution of steam valves and traps and from its alleged manufacture of asbestos-containing expansion joint packing. Yarway’s alleged manufacture, distribution and/or sale of asbestos-containing materials ceased by 1988, and Yarway ceased substantially all of its manufacturing, distribution and sales operations in 2003. Claims filed against Grinnell typically allege that it manufactured, sold or distributed valves, gaskets, piping and sprinkler systems containing asbestos.
On April 22, 2013, Yarway filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code (“Chapter 11”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (“Bankruptcy Court”), and on October 9, 2014, the Company reached an agreement in principle with Yarway and the representatives of current and future Yarway asbestos claimants to fund a section 524(g) trust for the resolution and payment of current and future Yarway asbestos claims. Under the Chapter 11 plan to implement the trust, an asbestos settlement trust (the “Yarway Trust”) that conforms to the provisions of Section 524(g) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will be established and, on the effective date of the Chapter 11 plan, the Company and Yarway will contribute to the Yarway Trust a total of $325 million in cash (“Settlement Consideration”). In exchange for the Settlement Consideration, the Company and its affiliates will receive the benefit of a release from Yarway and an injunction under section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code permanently enjoining the assertion of Yarway Asbestos Claims against those Parties. The agreement in principle is subject, among other things, to the negotiation and filing of a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization for Yarway incorporating the terms of such agreement (the “Plan”), acceptance of the Plan by at least 75% of

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Yarway’s current asbestos claimants voting on such Plan, confirmation of the Plan by the Bankruptcy Court and approval of the injunction in favor of the Company and its affiliates by the United States District Court for the District of Delaware (“District Court”). Although the Company has agreed in principle to the terms of the Plan with representatives of current and future Yarway asbestos claimants, there can be no assurance that all of the conditions to implementation of the Plan will be met, or that the final Plan will reflect all of the terms agreed to in principle. If the Plan were not implemented in accordance with the terms agreed in principle, the Company and its affiliates may not receive the benefit of the injunction described above, and the relief ultimately granted by the Bankruptcy Court may not be satisfactory to Yarway, the Company or its affiliates. A failure to obtain satisfactory relief could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company performed a revised valuation of its non-Yarway asbestos-related liabilities and corresponding insurance assets and recorded a net charge, excluding Yarway, of $240 million. Although the Company’s methodology established a range of estimates of reasonably possible outcomes, the Company recorded its best estimate within such range based upon information known at the time. The Company's estimated gross asbestos liability, excluding Yarway, of $538 million was recorded within the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet as a liability for pending and future claims and related defense costs, and separately as an asset for insurance recoveries of $245 million. The amounts recorded by the Company for asbestos-related liabilities and insurance-related assets are based on the Company's strategies for resolving its asbestos claims, currently available information, and a number of estimates and assumptions. Key variables and assumptions include the number and type of new claims that are filed each year, the average cost of resolution of claims, the identity of defendants, the resolution of coverage issues with insurance carriers, amount of insurance, and the solvency risk with respect to the Company's insurance carriers. Many of these factors are closely linked, such that a change in one variable or assumption will impact one or more of the others, and no single variable or assumption predominately influences the determination of the Company's asbestos-related liabilities and insurance-related assets. Furthermore, predictions with respect to these variables are subject to greater uncertainty in the later portion of the projection period. Other factors that may affect the Company's liability and cash payments for asbestos-related matters include uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case, reforms of state or federal tort legislation and the applicability of insurance policies among subsidiaries. As a result, actual liabilities or insurance recoveries could be significantly higher or lower than those recorded if assumptions used in the Company's calculations vary significantly from actual results. If actual liabilities are significantly higher than those recorded, the cost of resolving such liabilities claims could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
Our operations expose us to the risk of material environmental liabilities, litigation and violations.
We have received notification from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and from other environmental agencies that conditions at several sites where we and others disposed of hazardous substances require cleanup and other possible remedial action and may require that we reimburse the government or otherwise pay for the cost of cleanup of those sites and/or for natural resource damages. We have projects underway at several current and former manufacturing facilities to investigate and remediate environmental contamination resulting from past operations by us or by other businesses that previously owned or used the properties. These projects relate to a variety of activities, including:
solvent, oil, metal and other hazardous substance contamination cleanup; and
structure decontamination and demolition, including asbestos abatement.
These projects involve both remediation expenses and capital improvements. In addition, we remain responsible for certain environmental issues at manufacturing locations previously sold by us.
Certain environmental laws assess liability on current or previous owners or operators of real property for the cost of removal or remediation of hazardous substances at their properties or at properties at which they have disposed of hazardous substances. In addition to cleanup actions brought by governmental authorities, private parties could bring personal injury or other claims due to the presence of, or exposure to, hazardous substances.
The ultimate cost of cleanup at disposal sites and manufacturing facilities is difficult to predict given uncertainties regarding the extent of the required cleanup, the interpretation of applicable laws and regulations and alternative cleanup methods. Environmental laws are complex, change frequently and have tended to become more stringent over time. While we have budgeted for future capital and operating expenditures to maintain compliance with such laws, we cannot provide assurance that our costs of complying with current or future environmental protection and health and safety laws, or our liabilities arising from past or future releases of, or exposures to, hazardous substances will not exceed our estimates or materially adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. We may also be subject to material liabilities for additional environmental claims for personal injury or cleanup in the future based on our past, present or future business activities or for existing environmental conditions of which we are not presently aware.

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We depend on third-party licenses for our products and services.
We rely on certain software technology that we license from third parties and use in our products and services to perform key functions and provide critical functionality, particularly in our commercial security business. Because our products and services incorporate software developed and maintained by third parties we are, to a certain extent, dependent upon such third parties' ability to maintain or enhance their current products and services, to ensure that their products are free of defects or security vulnerabilities, to develop new products and services on a timely and cost-effective basis, and to respond to emerging industry standards and other technological changes. Further, these third-party technology licenses may not always be available to us on commercially reasonable terms or at all. If our agreements with third-party vendors are not renewed or the third-party software fails to address the needs of our software products and services, we would be required to find alternative software products and services or technologies of equal performance or functionality. We cannot assure that we would be able to replace the functionality provided by third-party software if we lose the license to this software, it becomes obsolete or incompatible with future versions of our products and services or is otherwise not adequately maintained or updated. Furthermore, even if we obtain licenses to alternative software products or services that provide the functionality we need, we may be required to replace hardware installed at our monitoring centers and at our customers' sites, including security system control panels and peripherals, in order to effect our integration of or migration to alternative software products. Any of these factors could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Infringement or expiration of our intellectual property rights, or allegations that we have infringed the intellectual property rights of third parties, could negatively affect us.
We rely on a combination of patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, know-how, confidentiality provisions and licensing arrangements to establish and protect our proprietary rights. We cannot guarantee, however, that the steps we have taken to protect our intellectual property will be adequate to prevent infringement of our rights or misappropriation of our technology, trade secrets or know-how. For example, effective patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection may be unavailable or limited in some of the countries in which we operate. In addition, while we generally enter into confidentiality agreements with our employees and third parties to protect our trade secrets, know-how, business strategy and other proprietary information, such confidentiality agreements could be breached or otherwise may not provide meaningful protection for our trade secrets and know-how related to the design, manufacture or operation of our products. If it became necessary for us to resort to litigation to protect our intellectual property rights, any proceedings could be burdensome and costly, and we may not prevail. Further, adequate remedies may not be available in the event of an unauthorized use or disclosure of our trade secrets and manufacturing expertise. Finally, for those products in our portfolio that rely on patent protection, once a patent has expired, the product is generally open to competition. Products under patent protection usually generate significantly higher revenues than those not protected by patents. If we fail to successfully enforce our intellectual property rights, our competitive position could suffer, which could harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In addition, we are, from time to time, subject to claims of intellectual property infringement by third parties, including practicing entities and non-practicing entities. Regardless of the merit of such claims, responding to infringement claims can be expensive and time-consuming, and the litigation process is subject to inherent uncertainties, and we may not prevail in litigation matters regardless of the merits of our position. Intellectual property lawsuits or claims may become extremely disruptive if the plaintiffs succeed in blocking the trade of our products and services and they may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Police departments could refuse to respond to calls from monitored security service companies.
Police departments in a limited number of jurisdictions do not respond to calls from monitored security service companies, either as a matter of policy or by local ordinance. We have offered affected customers the option of receiving responses from private guard companies, in most cases through contracts with us, which increases the overall cost to customers. If more police departments, whether inside or outside the U.S., were to refuse to respond or be prohibited from responding to calls from monitored security service companies, our ability to attract and retain customers could be negatively impacted and our results of operations and cash flow could be adversely affected.
The Company may be subject to risks arising from regulations applicable to companies doing business with the United States government.
The Company’s customers include many Federal, state and local government authorities. Doing business with the United States government and state and local authorities subjects the Company to unusual risks, including dependence on the level of government spending and compliance with and changes in governmental procurement and security regulations. Agreements relating to the sale of products to government entities may be subject to termination, reduction or modification, either at the convenience of the government or for the Company's failure to perform under the applicable contract. The Company is subject to government investigations of business practices and compliance with government procurement and security regulations. If

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the Company were charged with wrongdoing as a result of any such investigation, it could be suspended from bidding on or receiving awards of new government contracts, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's results of operations.
Risks Related to Our Liquidity and Financial Markets
Disruptions in the financial markets could have adverse effects on us, our customers and our suppliers, by increasing our funding costs or reducing the availability of credit.
In the normal course of our business, we may access credit markets for general corporate purposes, which may include repayment of indebtedness, acquisitions, additions to working capital, repurchase of common shares, capital expenditures and investments in our subsidiaries. Although we believe we have sufficient liquidity to meet our foreseeable needs, our access to and the cost of capital could be negatively impacted by disruptions in the credit markets. In 2009 and 2010, credit markets experienced significant dislocations and liquidity disruptions, and similar disruptions in the credit markets could make financing terms for borrowers unattractive or unavailable. These factors may make it more difficult or expensive for us to access credit markets if the need arises. In addition, these factors may make it more difficult for our suppliers to meet demand for their products or for prospective customers to commence new projects, as customers and suppliers may experience increased costs of debt financing or difficulties in obtaining debt financing. Disruptions in the financial markets have had adverse effects on other areas of the economy and have led to a slowdown in general economic activity that may continue to adversely affect our businesses. These disruptions may have other unknown adverse effects. Based on these conditions, our profitability and our ability to execute our business strategy may be adversely affected.
Covenants in our debt instruments may adversely affect us.
Our bank credit agreements contain customary financial covenants, including a limit on the ratio of debt to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization and limits on incurrence of liens and subsidiary debt. In addition, the indentures governing our bonds contain customary covenants including limits on negative pledges, subsidiary debt and sale-leaseback transactions.
Although we believe none of these covenants are restrictive to our operations, our ability to meet the financial covenants can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot provide assurance that we will meet those tests. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under our credit agreements or indentures. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under any of our credit facilities or indentures, the lenders or trustees could elect to declare all amounts outstanding thereunder to be immediately due and payable and, in the case of credit facility lenders, terminate all commitments to extend further credit. If the lenders or trustees accelerate the repayment of borrowings, we cannot provide assurance that we will have sufficient assets to repay our credit facilities and our other indebtedness. Furthermore, acceleration of any obligation under any of our material debt instruments will permit the holders of our other material debt to accelerate their obligations, which could have a material adverse affect on our financial condition.
Material adverse legal judgments, fines, penalties or settlements could adversely affect our financial health and prevent us from fulfilling our obligations under our outstanding indebtedness.
We estimate that our available cash, our cash flow from operations and amounts available to us under our credit facilities will be adequate to fund our operations and service our debt for the foreseeable future. However, material adverse legal judgments, fines, penalties or settlements arising from litigation and similar contingencies could require additional funding. If such developments require us to obtain additional funding, we cannot provide assurance that we will be able to obtain the additional funding that we need on commercially reasonable terms or at all, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Such an outcome could have important consequences to you. For example, it could:
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, research and development efforts and other corporate purposes, including dividend payments;
increase our vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions;
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our businesses and the industries in which we operate;
restrict our ability to introduce new technologies or exploit business opportunities;
make it more difficult for us to satisfy our payment obligations with respect to our outstanding indebtedness; and
increase the difficulty and/or cost to us of refinancing our indebtedness.

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We may increase our debt or raise additional capital in the future, which could affect our financial health, and may decrease our profitability.
We may increase our debt or raise additional capital in the future, subject to restrictions in our debt agreements. If our cash flow from operations is less than we anticipate, or if our cash requirements are more than we expect, we may require more financing. However, debt or equity financing may not be available to us on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If we incur additional debt or raise equity through the issuance of additional capital stock, the terms of the debt or capital stock issued may give the holders rights, preferences and privileges senior to those of holders of our common stock, particularly in the event of liquidation. The terms of the debt may also impose additional and more stringent restrictions on our operations than we currently have. If we raise funds through the issuance of additional equity, your percentage ownership in us would decline. If we are unable to raise additional capital when needed, it could affect our financial health, which could negatively affect your investment in us.

Risks Relating to Tax Matters
Examinations and audits by tax authorities, including the IRS, could result in additional tax payments for prior periods.
Tyco’s and its subsidiaries' income tax returns periodically are examined by various tax authorities. In connection with these examinations, tax authorities, including the IRS, have raised issues and proposed tax adjustments, in particular, with respect to tax years preceding the 2007 Separation. We previously disclosed that in connection with U.S. federal tax audits, the IRS has raised a number of issues and proposed tax adjustments for periods beginning with the 1997 tax year. In particular, we have been unable to resolve with the IRS matters related to the treatment of certain intercompany debt transactions in existence prior to the 2007 Separation. As a result, on June 20, 2013, we received Notices of Deficiency from the IRS asserting that several of our former U.S. subsidiaries owe additional taxes of $883.3 million plus penalties of $154 million based on audits of the 1997 through 2000 tax years of Tyco and its subsidiaries as they existed at that time. In addition, we received Final Partnership Administrative Adjustments for certain U.S. partnerships owned by former U.S. subsidiaries with respect to which an additional tax deficiency of approximately $30 million is expected to be asserted. These amounts exclude interest and do not reflect the impact on subsequent periods if the IRS position described below is ultimately proved correct. In addition, the adjustments proposed by the IRS are subject to the sharing provisions of a tax sharing agreement entered in 2007 with Covidien and TE Connectivity (the "2007 Tax Sharing Agreement") under which Tyco, Covidien and TE Connectivity share 27%, 42% and 31%, respectively, of shared income tax liabilities that arise from adjustments made by tax authorities to Tyco's, Covidien's and TE Connectivity's U.S. and certain non-U.S. income tax returns.
The IRS asserted in the Notices of Deficiency that substantially all of Tyco’s intercompany debt originated during the 1997 - 2000 period should not be treated as debt for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and disallowed interest and related deductions recognized on U.S. income tax returns totaling approximately $2.9 billion. We strongly disagree with the IRS position and have filed petitions with the U.S. Tax Court contesting the IRS proposed adjustments. A trial date has been set for February 2016. We believe that we have meritorious defenses for our tax filings, that the IRS positions with regard to these matters is inconsistent with the applicable tax laws and existing Treasury regulations, and that the previously reported taxes for the years in question are appropriate. Furthermore, we believe that Tyco’s income tax reserves and the liabilities recorded in the Consolidated Balance Sheet for the tax sharing arrangements are appropriate. However, the ultimate resolution of these matters, and the impact of that resolution, are uncertain and could have a materially adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In particular, if the IRS is successful in asserting its claim, it would have an adverse impact on interest deductions related to the same intercompany debt in subsequent time periods, totaling approximately $6.6 billion, which is expected to be disallowed by the IRS.
We share responsibility for certain of our, Covidien's and TE Connectivity's income tax liabilities for tax periods prior to and including June 29, 2007.
In connection with the 2007 Separation, Tyco entered into the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement, which governs the rights and obligations of each party with respect to certain pre-2007 Separation tax liabilities and certain tax liabilities arising in connection with the 2007 Separation. As noted above, Tyco, Covidien and TE Connectivity share 27%, 42% and 31%, respectively, of income tax liabilities that arise from adjustments made by tax authorities to Tyco's, Covidien's and TE Connectivity's U.S. and certain non-U.S. income tax returns and certain taxes attributable to internal transactions undertaken in anticipation of the 2007 Separation. In the event the 2007 Separation, or certain related transactions, is determined to be taxable as a result of actions taken after the 2007 Separation by Tyco, Covidien, or TE Connectivity, the party responsible for such failure would be responsible for all taxes imposed on Tyco, Covidien, or TE Connectivity as a result thereof. If none of the companies is responsible for such failure, then Tyco, Covidien, and TE Connectivity would be responsible for such taxes in the

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same manner and in the same proportions as other shared tax liabilities under the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement. Costs and expenses associated with the management of these shared tax liabilities are generally shared equally among the parties.
If any party to the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement were to default in its obligation to another party to pay its share of the distribution taxes that arise as a result of no party's fault, each non-defaulting party would be required to pay, equally with any other non-defaulting party, the amounts in default. In addition, if another party to the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement that is responsible for all or a portion of an income tax liability were to default in its payment of such liability to a taxing authority, we could be legally liable under applicable tax law for such liabilities and required to make additional tax payments. Accordingly, under certain circumstances, we may be obligated to pay amounts in excess of our agreed-upon share of our, Covidien's and TE Connectivity's tax liabilities.
We share responsibility for certain of our, Pentair's and ADT's income tax liabilities for tax periods prior to and including the Distribution date.
In connection with the Distributions, we entered into the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement with Pentair and ADT that is separate from the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement and which governs the rights and obligations of Tyco, ADT and Pentair for certain tax liabilities before the Distributions, including Tyco's obligations under the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement. Under the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement Tyco, Pentair and ADT share (i) certain pre-Distribution income tax liabilities that arise from adjustments made by tax authorities to ADT's U.S., Tyco Flow Control's and Tyco's income tax returns, and (ii) payments required to be made by Tyco with respect to the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement, excluding approximately $175 million of pre-2012 Separation related tax liabilities that were anticipated to be paid prior to the 2012 Separation (collectively, "Shared Tax Liabilities"). Tyco will be responsible for the first $500 million of Shared Tax Liabilities. Pentair and ADT will share 42% and 58%, respectively, of the next $225 million of Shared Tax Liabilities. Tyco, Pentair and ADT will share 52.5% 20% and 27.5%, respectively, of Shared Tax Liabilities above $725 million. All costs and expenses associated with the management of these shared tax liabilities will generally be shared 20%, 27.5%, and 52.5% by Pentair, ADT and Tyco, respectively. As of September 28, 2012, Tyco established liabilities representing the fair market value of its obligations under the 2012 Tax Sharing Arrangement which is recorded in Other liabilities in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet with an offset to Tyco shareholders' equity. In addition, we entered into a non-income tax sharing agreement with ADT in connection with the ADT Distribution. To the extent we are responsible for any liability under these agreements, there could be a material adverse impact on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows or our effective tax rate in future reporting periods.
The 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement provides that, if any party were to default in its obligation to another party to pay its share of certain taxes that may arise as a result of the failure of the Distributions to be tax free (such taxes, as defined in the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement, "Distribution Taxes"), each non-defaulting party would be required to pay, equally with any other non-defaulting party, the amounts in default. In addition, if another party to the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement that is responsible for all or a portion of an income tax liability were to default in its payment of such liability to a taxing authority, we could be legally liable under applicable tax law for such liabilities and required to make additional tax payments. Accordingly, under certain circumstances, we may be obligated to pay amounts in excess of our agreed-upon share of our, Pentair's and ADT's tax liabilities.
If the Distributions or certain internal transactions undertaken in anticipation of the Distributions are determined to be taxable for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we, our shareholders that are subject to U.S. federal income tax and/or both ADT and Pentair could incur significant U.S. federal income tax liabilities.
Tyco has received a private letter ruling from the IRS regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the Distributions to the effect that, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the Distributions will qualify as tax-free under Sections 355 and/or 361 of the Code, except for cash received in lieu of a fractional share of ADT common stock or of Pentair common shares. The private letter ruling also provides that certain internal transactions undertaken in anticipation of the Distributions will qualify for favorable treatment under the Code. In addition to obtaining the private letter ruling, Tyco has received an opinion from the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP confirming the tax-free status of the Distributions for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The private letter ruling and the opinion rely on certain facts and assumptions, and certain representations and undertakings, from us, Pentair and ADT regarding the past and future conduct of our respective businesses and other matters.
Notwithstanding the private letter ruling and the opinion, the IRS could determine on audit that the Distributions or the internal transactions should be treated as taxable transactions if it determines that any of these facts, assumptions, representations or undertakings is not correct or has been violated, or that the Distributions or the internal transactions should be taxable for other reasons, including as a result of significant changes in stock ownership (which might take into account changes in Pentair stock ownership resulting from the Merger) or asset ownership after the Distributions. An opinion of counsel represents counsel's best legal judgment, is not binding on the IRS or the courts, and the IRS or the courts may not agree with the opinion. In addition, the opinions will be based on current law, and cannot be relied upon if current law changes with

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retroactive effect. If the Distributions ultimately are determined to be taxable, the Distributions could be treated as a taxable dividend or capital gain to you for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and you could incur significant U.S. federal income tax liabilities. In addition, we would recognize gain in an amount equal to the excess of the fair market value of the Pentair common shares and the shares of ADT common stock distributed to our shareholders on the distribution date over our tax basis in such common shares, but such gain, if recognized, generally would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax. However, we, Pentair or ADT could incur significant U.S. federal income tax liabilities if it is ultimately determined that certain internal transactions undertaken in anticipation of the Distributions are taxable.
In addition, under the terms of the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement, in the event the Distributions or the internal transactions were determined to be taxable as a result of actions taken after the Distributions by us, Pentair or ADT, the party responsible for such failure would be responsible for all taxes imposed on us, Pentair or ADT as a result thereof. If such failure is not the result of actions taken after the Distributions by us, Pentair or ADT, then we, Pentair and ADT will share the liability in the manner and according to the sharing percentages set forth in the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement. Such tax amounts could be significant. In the event that any party to the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement defaults in its obligation to pay Distribution Taxes to another party that arise as a result of no party's fault, each non-defaulting party would be responsible for an equal amount of the defaulting party's obligation to make a payment to another party in respect of such other party's taxes.
We might not be able to engage in desirable strategic transactions and equity issuances as a result of the Distributions because of restrictions relating to U.S. federal income tax requirements for tax-free distributions.
Our ability to engage in significant equity transactions could be limited or restricted as a result of the Distributions in order to preserve, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the tax-free nature of the Distributions. Even if the Distributions otherwise qualify for tax-free treatment under Section 355 of the Code, it may result in corporate-level gain to Tyco and certain of its affiliates under Section 355(e) of the Code if 50% or more, by vote or value, of our shares, Pentair's shares or ADT's shares are acquired or issued as part of a plan or series of related transactions that includes the Distributions. Any acquisitions or issuances of our shares, Pentair's shares or ADT's shares within two years after the Distributions generally will be presumed to be part of such a plan, although we, Pentair or ADT may be able to rebut that presumption.
To preserve the tax-free treatment to us of the Distributions, under the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement that we entered with Pentair and ADT, we are prohibited from taking or failing to take any action that prevents the Distributions and related transactions from being tax-free. These restrictions may limit our ability to pursue strategic transactions or engage in new business or other transactions that may maximize the value of our business. Moreover, the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement also provides that we will be responsible for any taxes imposed on Pentair or any of its affiliates or on ADT or any of its affiliates as a result of the failure of the Distributions or the internal transactions to qualify for favorable treatment under the Code if such failure is attributable to certain actions taken after the Distributions by or in respect of us, any of our affiliates or our shareholders.
Risks Relating to Our Jurisdiction of Incorporation
The anticipated benefits of our change in jurisdiction of incorporation may not be realized.
At a special general meeting held on September 9, 2014, our shareholders approved a merger agreement, dated May 30, 2014, between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland, as described in more detail in the proxy statement / prospectus mailed to shareholders on August 1, 2014 related to the merger. We expect this merger to close in November 2014. We may not realize the benefits we anticipate from the merger, and our failure to realize those benefits could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Legislative action in the United States could materially and adversely affect us.
Tax-Related Legislation
Legislative action may be taken by the U.S. Congress which, if ultimately enacted, could limit the availability of tax benefits or deductions that we currently claim, override tax treaties upon which we rely, or otherwise affect the taxes that the United States imposes on our worldwide operations. Such changes could have a material adverse effect on our effective tax rate and/or require us to take further action, at potentially significant expense, to seek to preserve our effective tax rate. In addition, if proposals were enacted that had the effect of disregarding or limiting our ability, currently as a Swiss company and in the near future as an Irish company, to take advantage of tax treaties with the United States, we could incur additional tax expense and/or otherwise incur business detriment.
 

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Legislation Relating to Governmental Contracts
Various U.S. federal and state legislative proposals that would deny governmental contracts to U.S. companies that move their corporate location abroad may affect us. We are unable to predict the likelihood that, or final form in which, any such proposed legislation might become law, the nature of regulations that may be promulgated under any future legislative enactments, or the effect such enactments and increased regulatory scrutiny may have on our business.
Your rights as a shareholder will change as a result of the Merger.
The completion of the merger between the Company and Tyco Ireland will change the governing law that applies to our shareholders from Swiss law (which applies to the Company and its common shares) to Irish law (which applies to Tyco Ireland and its ordinary shares). Many of the principal attributes of Tyco International Ltd. common shares and Tyco Ireland ordinary shares will be materially similar. However, when the merger is completed, your future rights as a shareholder under Irish corporate law will differ from your current rights as a shareholder under Swiss corporate law. In addition, Tyco Ireland’s proposed articles of association will differ from Tyco International Ltd.’s articles of association and organizational regulations. See “Comparison of Rights of Shareholders” in the proxy statement / prospectus related to the merger for more details.
Irish law differs from the laws in effect in the United States and may afford less protection to holders of our securities.
It may not be possible to enforce court judgments obtained in the United States against us in Ireland based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal or state securities laws. In addition, there is some uncertainty as to whether the courts of Ireland would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained against us or our directors or officers based on the civil liabilities provisions of the U.S. federal or state securities laws or hear actions against us or those persons based on those laws. We have been advised that the United States currently does not have a treaty with Ireland providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters. Therefore, a final judgment for the payment of money rendered by any U.S. federal or state court based on civil liability, whether or not based solely on U.S. federal or state securities laws, would not automatically be enforceable in Ireland.
As an Irish company, Tyco Ireland will be governed by the Irish Companies Acts, which differ in some material respects from laws generally applicable to U.S. corporations and shareholders, including, among others, differences relating to interested director and officer transactions and shareholder lawsuits. Likewise, the duties of directors and officers of an Irish company generally are owed to the company only. Shareholders of Irish companies generally do not have a personal right of action against directors or officers of the company and may exercise such rights of action on behalf of the company only in limited circumstances. Accordingly, holders of Tyco International plc securities may have more difficulty protecting their interests than would holders of securities of a corporation incorporated in a jurisdiction of the United States.
Our effective tax rate may increase.
Although we expect that the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland will not have a material effect on our worldwide effective tax rate, there is uncertainty regarding the tax policies of the jurisdictions where we operate, including the potential legislative actions described in these risk factors and our effective tax rate may increase. Additionally, the tax laws of Ireland and other jurisdictions could change in the future, and such changes could cause a material increase in our effective tax rate.
Tyco Ireland will seek Irish High Court approval of the creation of distributable reserves. Tyco Ireland expects this will be forthcoming but cannot guarantee this.
Under Irish law, dividends may only be paid (and share repurchases and redemptions must generally be funded) out of “distributable reserves,” which Tyco Ireland will not have immediately following the closing of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland. The creation of distributable reserves of Tyco Ireland by way of a capital reduction of Tyco Ireland requires the approval of the Irish High Court. The approval of the Irish High Court is expected within approximately six to twelve weeks following the closing of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland. We are not aware of any reason why the Irish High Court would not approve the creation of distributable reserves. However, the issuance of the required order is a matter for the discretion of the Irish High Court. Approval of the creation of distributable reserves by the Irish High Court may also take substantially longer than we anticipate. In the event that distributable reserves of Tyco Ireland are not created, no distributions by way of dividends, share repurchases or otherwise will be permitted under Irish law until such time as the group has created sufficient distributable reserves from its trading activities.
Transfers of Tyco Ireland ordinary shares may be subject to Irish stamp duty.
For the majority of transfers of Tyco Ireland ordinary shares, there will not be any Irish stamp duty. However, Irish stamp duty will become payable in respect of certain share transfers occurring after completion of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland. A transfer of Tyco Ireland ordinary shares from a seller who holds shares beneficially (i.e.

22


through DTC) to a buyer who holds the acquired shares beneficially will not be subject to Irish stamp duty (unless the transfer involves a change in the nominee that is the record holder of the transferred shares). A transfer of Tyco Ireland ordinary shares by a seller who holds shares directly (i.e. not through DTC) to any buyer, or by a seller who holds the shares beneficially to a buyer who holds the acquired shares directly, may be subject to Irish stamp duty (currently at the rate of 1% of the price paid or the market value of the shares acquired, if higher) payable by the buyer. A shareholder who directly holds shares may transfer those shares into his or her own broker account to be held through DTC without giving rise to Irish stamp duty provided that the shareholder has confirmed to Tyco Ireland’s transfer agent that there is no change in the ultimate beneficial ownership of the shares as a result of the transfer and, at the time of the transfer, there is no agreement in place for a sale of the shares.
Because of the potential Irish stamp duty on transfers of Tyco Ireland ordinary shares, we strongly recommend that all directly registered Tyco International Ltd. shareholders open broker accounts so they can transfer their shares into a broker account as soon as possible, and in any event prior to completion of the merger with Tyco Ireland. We also strongly recommend that any person who wishes to acquire Tyco Ireland ordinary shares after completion of the merger acquire such shares as a beneficial holder.
We currently intend to pay, or cause one of our affiliates to pay, stamp duty in connection with share transfers made in the ordinary course of trading by a seller who holds shares directly to a buyer who holds the acquired shares beneficially. In other cases Tyco Ireland may, in its absolute discretion, pay or cause one of its affiliates to pay any stamp duty. Tyco Ireland’s Memorandum and Articles of Association as they will be in effect after the merger provide that, in the event of any such payment, Tyco Ireland (i) may seek reimbursement from the buyer, (ii) may have a lien against the Tyco Ireland ordinary shares acquired by such buyer and any dividends paid on such shares and (iii) may set-off the amount of the stamp duty against future dividends on such shares. Parties to a share transfer may assume that any stamp duty arising in respect of a transaction in Tyco Ireland ordinary shares has been paid unless one or both of such parties is otherwise notified by Tyco Ireland.
Dividends you receive may be subject to Irish dividend withholding tax.
In certain circumstances, as an Irish tax resident company, we may be required to deduct Irish dividend withholding tax (currently at the rate of 20%) from dividends paid to our shareholders. Whether Tyco Ireland will be required to deduct Irish dividend withholding tax from dividends paid to a shareholder will depend largely on whether that shareholder is resident for tax purposes in a “relevant territory.” A list of the “relevant territories” is included as Annex C to the proxy statement/prospectus related to the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland.
Dividends received by you could be subject to Irish income tax.
Dividends paid in respect of Tyco Ireland’s ordinary shares generally will not be subject to Irish income tax where the beneficial owner of these dividends is exempt from dividend withholding tax, unless the beneficial owner of the dividend has some connection with Ireland other than his or her shareholding in Tyco Ireland.
Tyco Ireland shareholders who receive their dividends subject to Irish dividend withholding tax generally will have no further liability to Irish income tax on the dividend unless the beneficial owner of the dividend has some connection with Ireland other than his or her shareholding in Tyco.
If Tyco Ireland ordinary shares are not eligible for deposit and clearing within the facilities of DTC, then transactions in Tyco Ireland’s securities may be disrupted.
The facilities of DTC are a widely-used mechanism that allow for rapid electronic transfers of securities between the participants in the DTC system, which include many large banks and brokerage firms. Upon the completion of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland, Tyco Ireland ordinary shares will be eligible for deposit and clearing within the DTC system. Tyco Ireland has entered into arrangements with DTC whereby Tyco Ireland will agree to indemnify DTC for any stamp duty that may be assessed upon it as a result of its service as a depository and clearing agency for Tyco Ireland’s ordinary shares.
DTC is not obligated to accept Tyco Ireland ordinary shares for deposit and clearing within its facilities at the closing and, even if DTC does initially accept Tyco Ireland ordinary shares, it will generally have discretion to cease to act as a depository and clearing agency for Tyco Ireland ordinary shares. If DTC determines at any time after the completion of the merger that Tyco Ireland ordinary shares are not eligible for continued deposit and clearance within its facilities, then we believe Tyco Ireland ordinary shares would not be eligible for continued listing on a U.S. securities exchange or inclusion in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and trading in Tyco Ireland ordinary shares would be disrupted. While Tyco Ireland would pursue alternative arrangements to preserve its listing and maintain trading, any such disruption could have a material adverse effect on the trading price of the Tyco Ireland ordinary shares.

23


Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2.    Properties
Our locations include research and development facilities, manufacturing facilities, warehouse and distribution centers, sales and service offices and corporate offices. Additionally, our locations include approximately 30 monitoring call centers located around the world. All of our monitoring facilities operate 24 hours a day on a year-round basis. Incoming alarm signals are routed via an internal communications network to the next available operator. Operators are quickly updated with information including the name and location of the customer and site, and the nature of the alarm signal. Depending upon the type of service specified by the customer contract, operators respond to emergency-related alarms by calling the customer by telephone (for verification purposes) and relaying information to local fire or police departments, as necessary. Additional action may be taken by the operators as needed, depending on the specific situation.
We operate from approximately 900 locations in about 50 countries. These properties total approximately 14 million square feet, of which 10 million square feet are leased and 4 million square feet are owned.
NA Installation & Services operates through a network of offices, warehouse and distribution centers, and service and manufacturing facilities located in North America. The group occupies approximately 5 million square feet, of which 4 million square feet are leased and 1 million square feet are owned.
ROW Installation & Services operates through a network of offices, warehouse and distribution centers, and service and manufacturing facilities located in Central America, South America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. The group occupies approximately 4 million square feet, of which 3 million square feet are leased and 1 million square feet are owned.
Global Products has manufacturing facilities, network of offices, and warehouses and distribution centers throughout North America, Central America, South America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. The group occupies approximately 5 million square feet, of which 3 million square feet are leased and 2 million square feet are owned.
In the opinion of management, our properties and equipment are in good operating condition and are adequate for our present needs. We do not anticipate difficulty in renewing existing leases as they expire or in finding alternative facilities. See Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a description of our operating lease obligations.
Item 3.    Legal Proceedings
Legacy Matters Related to Former Management
The Company has been a party to several lawsuits involving disputes with former management, including its former chief executive officer, Mr. L. Dennis Kozlowski, and its former chief financial officer, Mr. Mark Swartz. The Company filed civil complaints against Mr. Kozlowski and Mr. Swartz for breach of fiduciary duty and other wrongful conduct relating to alleged abuses of the Company's Key Employee Loan Program and relocation program, unauthorized bonuses, unauthorized payments, self-dealing transactions and other improper conduct. In connection with Tyco's affirmative actions against Mr. Kozlowski and Mr. Swartz, Mr. Kozlowski, through counterclaims, and Mr. Swartz, through a separate lawsuit, sought an aggregate of approximately $140 million allegedly due in connection with their compensation and retention arrangements and under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act ("ERISA").
With respect to Mr. Kozlowski, in the first quarter of fiscal 2014, the parties signed an agreement resolving all outstanding disputes with Mr. Kozlowski, and with Mr. Kozlowski agreeing to release the Company from any claims to monetary amounts related to compensation, retention or other arrangements, including the Key Employee Loan Program, that were alleged to have existed between him and the Company. As a result, in the first quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company reversed the net liability of approximately $92 million, which was recorded in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the amounts allegedly due to him. Additionally, the Company will be entitled to a portion of the proceeds, if any, from the future sale of certain assets owned by Mr. Kozlowski, the timing and amount of which is uncertain at this time. During the quarter ended June 27, 2014, the Company received a $4 million recovery from the sale of property owned by Mr. Kozlowski, which was recognized as a reduction to Selling, general and administrative expenses.
With respect to Mr. Swartz, during the second quarter of fiscal 2012, the Company reversed a $50 million liability related to Mr. Swartz's pay and benefits due to the expiration of the statute of limitations and in July 2013, the parties reached an agreement in principle to resolve the matter, with Mr. Swartz agreeing to release the Company from any claims to monetary

24


amounts related to compensation, retention or other arrangements alleged to have existed between him and the Company. In November 2014, the parties executed a definitive settlement agreement and the Company received approximately $12 million in cash from Mr. Swartz, a portion of which will be shared with the members of the class action settlement.
Environmental Matters
Tyco is involved in various stages of investigation and cleanup related to environmental remediation matters at a number of sites. The ultimate cost of site cleanup is difficult to predict given the uncertainties regarding the extent of the required cleanup, the interpretation of applicable laws and regulations and alternative cleanup methods. As of September 26, 2014, Tyco concluded that it was probable that it would incur remedial costs in the range of approximately $38 million to $79 million. As of September 26, 2014, Tyco concluded that the best estimate within this range is approximately $42 million, of which $23 million is included in Accrued and other current liabilities and Accounts payable and $19 million is included in Other liabilities in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet.
The majority of the liabilities described above relate to ongoing remediation efforts at a facility in the Company's Global Products segment located in Marinette, Wisconsin, which the Company acquired in 1990 in connection with its acquisition of, among other things, the Ansul product line. Prior to Tyco's acquisition, Ansul manufactured arsenic-based agricultural herbicides at the Marinette facility, which resulted in significant arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater on the Marinette site and in parts of the adjoining Menominee River. Ansul has been engaged in ongoing remediation efforts at the Marinette site since 1990, and in February 2009 entered into an Administrative Consent Order (the "Consent Order") with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address the presence of arsenic at the Marinette site. Under this agreement, Ansul's principal obligations are to contain the arsenic contamination on the site, pump and treat on-site groundwater, dredge, treat and properly dispose of contaminated sediments in the adjoining river areas, and monitor contamination levels on an ongoing basis. Activities completed under the Consent Order since 2009 include the installation of a subsurface barrier wall around the facility to contain contaminated groundwater, the installation of a groundwater extraction and treatment system and the dredging and offsite disposal of treated river sediment. As of September 26, 2014, the Company concluded that its remaining remediation and monitoring costs related to the Marinette facility were in the range of approximately $27 million to $54 million. The Company's best estimate within that range is approximately $30 million, of which $18 million is included in Accrued and other current liabilities and $12 million is included in Other liabilities in the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet. During the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013, and September 28, 2012, the Company recorded nil, $100 million, and $17 million of charges, respectively, in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations. Although the Company has recorded its best estimate of the costs that it will incur to remediate and monitor the arsenic contamination at the Marinette facility, it is possible that technological, regulatory or enforcement developments, the results of environmental studies or other factors could change the Company's expectations with respect to future charges and cash outlays, and such changes could be material to the Company's future results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
Asbestos Matters
The Company and certain of its subsidiaries, including Yarway Corporation (“Yarway”) and Grinnell LLC (“Grinnell”), along with numerous other third parties, are named as defendants in personal injury lawsuits based on alleged exposure to asbestos containing materials. Over 90% of cases pending against affiliates of the Company have been filed against Yarway or Grinnell, and have typically involved product liability claims based primarily on allegations of manufacture, sale or distribution of industrial products that either contained asbestos or were used with asbestos containing components. Claims filed against Yarway derive from Yarway’s purported use of asbestos-containing gaskets and packing in the sale or distribution of steam valves and traps and from its alleged manufacture of asbestos-containing expansion joint packing. Yarway’s alleged manufacture, distribution and/or sale of asbestos-containing materials ceased by 1988, and Yarway ceased substantially all of its manufacturing, distribution and sales operations in 2003. Claims filed against Grinnell typically allege that it manufactured, sold or distributed valves, gaskets, piping and sprinkler systems containing asbestos.
As of September 26, 2014, the Company has determined that there were approximately 5,600 claims pending against it, which includes approximately 3,200 claims pending against Yarway. This amount reflects the Company's current estimate of the number of viable claims made against it and includes adjustments for claims that are not actively being prosecuted, identify incorrect defendants, are duplicative of other actions or for which the Company is indemnified by third parties. Additionally, as a result of the Yarway bankruptcy filing described below, claims against Yarway have been stayed since April 2013.

25


The following table summarizes the activity in the asset and liability accounts related to these asbestos matters for the year ended September 26, 2014 ($ in millions):
 
 
As of September 27, 2013
 
(Charge)/Benefit
 
Payments/(Receipts)
 
As of September 26, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yarway:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Insurance assets
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

  Gross asbestos liabilities
 
(90
)
 
(225
)
 

 
(315
)
Net liability position
 
$
(90
)
 
$
(225
)
 
$

 
$
(315
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Claims:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Insurance assets
 
$
152

 
$
93

 
$

 
$
245

  Gross asbestos liabilities
 
(231
)
 
(325
)
 
18

 
(538
)
Net liability position
 
$
(79
)
 
$
(232
)
 
$
18

 
$
(293
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Tyco:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Insurance assets
 
$
152

 
$
93

 
$

 
$
245

  Gross asbestos liabilities
 
(321
)
 
(550
)
 
18

 
(853
)
Total net liability position
 
$
(169
)
 
$
(457
)
 
$
18

 
$
(608
)
Yarway
As previously disclosed, on April 22, 2013, Yarway filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code (“Chapter 11”) in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware (“Bankruptcy Court”). As a result of this filing, the continuation or commencement of asbestos-related litigation against Yarway has been enjoined by the automatic stay imposed by the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Yarway's goal has been to negotiate, obtain approval of, and consummate a plan of reorganization that establishes a trust to fairly and equitably value and pay current and future Yarway asbestos claims, and that, in exchange for funding of the trust by the Company and/or its subsidiaries, provides permanent injunctive relief protecting the Company, each of its current and former affiliates and various other parties (the “Company Protected Parties”) from any further asbestos claims based on products manufactured, sold, and/or distributed by Yarway. On October 9, 2014, the Company reached an agreement in principle with Yarway, the Official Committee of Asbestos Claimants (“ACC”) appointed in the Yarway Chapter 11 case as the representative of current Yarway asbestos claimants, and the Future Claimants Representative (“FCR”) appointed in the Yarway Chapter 11 case as the representative of future Yarway asbestos claimants, to fund a section 524(g) trust for the resolution and payment of current and future Yarway asbestos claims. The agreement in principle, which will be implemented through a Chapter 11 plan for Yarway, will resolve the potential liability of the Company Protected Parties for pending and future derivative personal injury claims related to exposure to asbestos-containing products that were allegedly manufactured, distributed, and/or sold by Yarway (“Yarway Asbestos Claims”). Under the Chapter 11 plan, an asbestos settlement trust (the “Yarway Trust”) that conforms to the provisions of Section 524(g) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will be established and, on the effective date of the Chapter 11 plan, the Company and Yarway will contribute to the Yarway Trust a total of $325 million in cash (“Settlement Consideration”), which includes approximately $100 million relating to the settlement of intercompany amounts allegedly due to Yarway. In exchange for the Settlement Consideration, each of the Company Protected Parties will receive the benefit of a release from Yarway and an injunction under section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code permanently enjoining the assertion of Yarway Asbestos Claims against those Parties. The agreement in principle is subject, among other things, to the negotiation and filing of a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization for Yarway incorporating the terms of such agreement (the “Plan”), acceptance of the Plan by at least 75% of Yarway’s current asbestos claimants voting on such Plan, confirmation of the Plan by the Bankruptcy Court and approval of the injunction in favor of the Company Protected Parties by the United States District Court for the District of Delaware (“District Court”). On the effective date of the Plan, which is anticipated to occur in the second half of fiscal 2015, the Company and Yarway will pay the Settlement Consideration and Yarway Asbestos Claims against the Company Protected Parties will be permanently enjoined. Yarway is anticipated to become a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Yarway Trust and, accordingly, would no longer be owned by or be part of a consolidated group with the Company. Unless extended by a further agreement, the agreement in principle will expire if the order confirming the Plan and implementing the injunction has not been entered or affirmed by the District Court by April 30, 2015, or if the effective date of the Plan has not occurred by September 15, 2016. As a result of the agreement in principle to settle, the Company has recorded a charge of $225 million in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2014.

26


As a result of filing the voluntary bankruptcy petition during the third quarter of fiscal 2013, the Company recorded an expected loss upon deconsolidation of $10 million related to the Yarway Chapter 11 filing, which continues to represent the Company’s best estimate of its loss.
Other Claims
The Company continuously assesses the sufficiency of its estimated liability for pending and future asbestos claims and defense costs. On a quarterly basis, the Company evaluates actual experience regarding asbestos claims filed, settled and dismissed, amounts paid in settlements, and the recoverability of its insurance assets. If and when data from actual experience demonstrate an unfavorable discernible trend, the Company performs a valuation of its asbestos related liabilities and corresponding insurance assets including a comprehensive review of the underlying assumptions. In addition, the Company evaluates its ability to reasonably estimate claim activity beyond its current look-forward period in order to assess whether such period is appropriate. In addition to claims and litigation experience, the Company considers additional qualitative and quantitative factors such as changes in legislation, the legal environment, the Company’s strategy in managing claims and obtaining insurance, including its defense strategy, and health related trends in the overall population of individuals potentially exposed to asbestos. The Company evaluates all of these factors and determines whether a change in the estimate of its liability for pending and future claims and defense costs or insurance assets is warranted.
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company concluded that an unfavorable trend had developed in actual claim filing activity compared to projected claim filing activity established during the Company’s most recent valuation. Accordingly, the Company, with the assistance of independent actuarial service providers, performed a revised valuation of its asbestos-related liabilities and corresponding insurance assets. As part of the revised valuation, the Company assessed whether a change in its look-forward period was appropriate, taking into consideration its more extensive history and experience with asbestos-related claims and litigation (including its experience with Yarway), and determined that it was now possible to make a reasonable estimate of the actuarially determined ultimate risk of loss for pending and unasserted potential future asbestos-related claims through 2056. In connection with the revised valuation, the Company considered a recent settlement with one of its insurers calling for the establishment of a qualified settlement fund, and the results of a separate independent actuarial consulting firm report conducted in the fourth quarter to assist the Company in obtaining insurance to fully fund all estimable asbestos-related claims (excluding Yarway claims) incurred through 2056.
The independent actuarial service firm calculated a total estimated liability for asbestos-related claims of the Company, which reflects the Company’s best estimate of its ultimate risk of loss to resolve all pending and future claims (excluding Yarway claims) through 2056, which is the Company’s reasonable best estimate of the actuarially determined time period through which asbestos-related claims will be filed against Company affiliates.
In conjunction with determining the total estimated liability, the Company retained an independent third party to assist it in valuing its insurance assets responsive to asbestos-related claims, excluding Yarway claims. These insurance assets represent amounts due to the Company for previously settled claims and the probable reimbursements relating to its total liability for pending and unasserted potential future asbestos claims and defense costs. In calculating this amount, the Company used the estimated asbestos liability for pending and projected future claims and defense costs described above, and it also considered the amount of insurance available, the solvency risk with respect to the Company's insurance carriers, resolution of insurance coverage issues, gaps in coverage, allocation methodologies, and the terms of existing settlement agreements with insurance carriers.
As a result of the activity described above, the Company recorded a net charge, in addition to the amounts described above for Yarway, of $240 million in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations during the quarter ended September 26, 2014. Although the Company’s methodology established a range of estimates of reasonably possible outcomes, the Company recorded its best estimate within such range based upon currently known information. The Company's estimated gross asbestos liability, excluding Yarway, of $538 million was recorded within the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheet as a liability for pending and future claims and related defense costs, and separately as an asset for insurance recoveries of $245 million. The aforementioned total estimated liability is on a pre-tax basis, not discounted for the time-value of money, and includes defense costs, which is consistent with the Company’s historical accounting practices.
The effect of the change in our look-forward period reduced income from continuing operations before income taxes and net income by approximately $116 million and $71 million, respectively. In addition, the effect of the change decreased the Company's basic income from continuing operations and net income by $0.16 per share, and decreased the Company's diluted income from continuing operations and net income by $0.15 per share.
The amounts recorded by the Company for asbestos-related liabilities and insurance-related assets are based on the Company's strategies for resolving its asbestos claims, currently available information, and a number of estimates and

27


assumptions. Key variables and assumptions include the number and type of new claims that are filed each year, the average cost of resolution of claims, the identity of defendants, the resolution of coverage issues with insurance carriers, amount of insurance, and the solvency risk with respect to the Company's insurance carriers. Many of these factors are closely linked, such that a change in one variable or assumption will impact one or more of the others, and no single variable or assumption predominately influences the determination of the Company's asbestos-related liabilities and insurance-related assets. Furthermore, predictions with respect to these variables are subject to greater uncertainty in the later portion of the projection period. Other factors that may affect the Company's liability and cash payments for asbestos-related matters include uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case, reforms of state or federal tort legislation and the applicability of insurance policies among subsidiaries. As a result, actual liabilities or insurance recoveries could be significantly higher or lower than those recorded if assumptions used in the Company's calculations vary significantly from actual results.
In connection with the foregoing, during the third quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company resolved disputes with certain of its historical insurers and agreed that certain insurance proceeds will be used to establish and fund a qualified settlement fund (“QSF”), within the meaning of the Internal Revenue Code, which will be used for the resolution of asbestos liabilities of the Company, other than Yarway asbestos claims. It is intended that the QSF will receive future insurance payments and proceeds from third party insurers and, in addition, will fund and manage liabilities for certain historical operations of the Company. In addition, the Company expects to make cash contributions to the QSF structure within the next 12 months of approximately $275 million to purchase insurance that will be dedicated to, and is expected to fully fund, these liabilities.
Tax Matters
Tyco and its subsidiaries' income tax returns are examined periodically by various tax authorities. In connection with these examinations, tax authorities, including the IRS, have raised issues and proposed tax adjustments, in particular with respect to years preceding the 2007 Separation. The issues and proposed adjustments related to such years are generally subject to the sharing provisions of a tax sharing agreement entered in 2007 with Covidien and TE Connectivity (the "2007 Tax Sharing Agreement") under which Tyco, Covidien and TE Connectivity share 27%, 42% and 31%, respectively, of shared income tax liabilities that arise from adjustments made by tax authorities to Tyco's, Covidien's and TE Connectivity's U.S. and certain non-U.S. income tax returns. The costs and expenses associated with the management of these shared tax liabilities are generally shared equally among the parties. Tyco has previously disclosed that in connection with U.S. federal tax audits, the IRS has raised a number of issues and proposed tax adjustments for periods beginning with the 1997 tax year. Although Tyco has been able to resolve substantially all of the issues and adjustments proposed by the IRS for tax years through 2007, it has not been able to resolve matters related to the treatment of certain intercompany debt transactions during the period. As a result, on June 20, 2013, Tyco received Notices of Deficiency from the IRS asserting that several of Tyco's former U.S. subsidiaries owe additional taxes of $883.3 million plus penalties of $154 million based on audits of the 1997 through 2000 tax years of Tyco and its subsidiaries as they existed at that time. In addition, Tyco received Final Partnership Administrative Adjustments for certain U.S. partnerships owned by former U.S. subsidiaries with respect to which an additional tax deficiency of approximately $30 million is expected to be asserted. These amounts exclude interest and do not reflect the impact on subsequent periods if the IRS position described below is ultimately proved correct.
The IRS asserted in the Notices of Deficiency that substantially all of Tyco's intercompany debt originated during the 1997 - 2000 period should not be treated as debt for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and has disallowed interest and related deductions recognized on U.S. income tax returns totaling approximately $2.9 billion. Tyco strongly disagrees with the IRS position and has filed petitions with the U.S. Tax Court contesting the IRS proposed adjustments. A trial date has been set for February 2016. Tyco believes that it has meritorious defenses for its tax filings, that the IRS positions with regard to these matters are inconsistent with the applicable tax laws and existing Treasury regulations, and that the previously reported taxes for the years in question are appropriate.
No payments with respect to these matters would be required until the dispute is definitively resolved, which, based on the experience of other companies, could take several years. Tyco believes that its income tax reserves and the liabilities recorded in the Consolidated Balance Sheet for the tax sharing agreements continue to be appropriate. However, the ultimate resolution of these matters, and the impact of that resolution, are uncertain and could have a material impact on Tyco's financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In particular, if the IRS is successful in asserting its claim, it would have an adverse impact on interest deductions related to the same intercompany debt in subsequent time periods, totaling approximately $6.6 billion, which is expected to be disallowed by the IRS.
See Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to income tax matters.

28


Other Matters
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, Tyco disclosed the improper recording of revenue in the Company's ROW Installation & Services segment related to security contracts in China. The Company pursued collection under its insurance policy and in the second fiscal quarter of 2014, the Company recorded a $21 million insurance recovery within the ROW Installation & Services segment as a result of a settlement with the insurance carrier. The insurance recovery was recorded in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations.
During the first quarter of fiscal 2014, Tyco settled a tax dispute with its former subsidiary, CIT Group, Inc. ("CIT"). Under the terms of the settlement agreement, Tyco received $60 million during the first quarter of 2014, which was subject to the sharing provisions of the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement. As a result, the Company recorded a $16 million gain in Selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and established payables of $25 million and $19 million due to Covidien and TE Connectivity, respectively, as of December 27, 2013. The Company paid these amounts to Covidien and TE Connectivity during the second fiscal quarter of 2014.
SimplexGrinnell LP (“SG”), a subsidiary of the Company in the North America Installation & Services segment, has been named as a defendant in several lawsuits seeking damages for SG’s alleged failure to pay prevailing wages in connection with work performed on state and local municipal projects.   In New York, the U.S. District Court had granted SG’s  motion for summary judgment dismissing plaintiffs’ claims for prevailing wages on testing and inspection work, which was based primarily on a 2009 opinion of the New York Department of Labor (“DOL”) that testing and inspection work would be considered covered by the prevailing wage law only on a prospective basis.   Plaintiffs appealed this decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which in turn asked the NY Court of Appeals whether the lower court should have given deference to the DOL’s prospective-only application of law.  The NY Court of Appeals recently ruled that the lower court did not have to give deference to the DOL based on an amicus brief submitted by the DOL in which it stated the Court need not have given it deference.  As a result, the Company recorded a $10 million charge in Cost of services in the Consolidated Statement of Operations during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014. SG also is a defendant in two other lawsuits related to prevailing wages in New Jersey and California.   SG has agreed in principle to settle the California lawsuit for approximately $5 million subject to Court approval, which the Company had previously reserved.
In November 2014, the Company received and responded to recent inquiries from the US Department of the Navy regarding the formulation of certain aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) concentrates. The Company is investigating such matters and ceased selling certain AFFF and other foam products pending the outcome of its investigation.  One AFFF product has been removed from the Navy’s Qualified Products List (QPL). The Company is in communication with appropriate governmental authorities about its investigation and is also communicating with the government regarding the qualification of these products. At this time, we cannot predict the outcome of these inquiries and whether this will result in further action by the Navy or other governmental authorities, but it is possible that the Company could be required to pay material fines, consent to injunctions on future conduct, experience suspension or debarment from government contracts, or suffer other criminal or civil penalties or adverse impacts, including being subject to lawsuits brought by private litigants, each of which may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In addition to the foregoing, the Company is subject to claims and suits, including from time to time, contractual disputes and product and general liability claims, incidental to present and former operations, acquisitions and dispositions. With respect to many of these claims, the Company either self-insures or maintains insurance through third-parties, with varying deductibles. While the ultimate outcome of these matters cannot be predicted with certainty, the Company believes that the resolution of any such proceedings, whether the underlying claims are covered by insurance or not, will not have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations or cash flows beyond amounts recorded for such matters.
Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

29


Part II
Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The number of registered holders of Tyco's common shares as of November 7, 2014 was 20,460.
Tyco common shares are listed and traded on the NYSE under the symbol "TYC." The following table sets forth the high and low closing sales prices of Tyco common shares as reported by the NYSE, and the dividends declared on Tyco common shares, for the quarterly periods presented below.

 
Year Ended September 26, 2014
 
Year Ended September 27, 2013
 
Market Price
Range
 
 
 
Market Price
Range
 
 
 
Dividends Declared
Per Common
Share(1)
 
Dividends Declared
Per Common
Share(1)
Quarter
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
 
First
$
41.21

 
$
34.20

 
$
0.16

 
$
29.48

 
$
26.50

 
$
0.15

Second
43.82

 
39.40

 
0.16

 
32.34

 
29.25

 
0.15

Third
46.46

 
40.61

 
0.18

 
34.50

 
30.70

 
0.16

Fourth
45.95

 
42.70

 
0.18

 
35.91

 
32.93

 
0.16

 
 

 
 

 
$
0.68

 
 

 
 

 
$
0.62

_______________________________________________________________________________

(1) 
Dividends proposed by Tyco's Board of Directors are subject to shareholder approval. Shareholders approved an annual cash dividend of $0.72 at the Company's annual general meeting on March 5, 2014, covering quarterly dividend payments from May 2014 through February 2015. Shareholders approved an annual cash dividend of $0.64 at the Company's annual general meeting on March 6, 2013, covering quarterly dividend payments from May 2013 through February 2014. Shareholders approved cash dividends of $0.50 (pre-2012 Separation) and $0.30 (reflecting the impact of the 2012 Separation) at the annual meeting held on March 7, 2012 and the special general meeting held on September 17, 2012, respectively, covering quarterly dividend payments through February 2013.
Dividend Policy
The Company makes dividend payments from its contributed surplus equity position. These payments are made free of Swiss withholding taxes and are effectively denominated in U.S. dollars. Under Swiss law, the authority to declare dividends is vested in the Company's general meeting of shareholders.
Upon the closing of the merger transaction between Tyco International Ltd. and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Tyco Ireland, which is expected to occur in November 2014, our jurisdiction of incorporation will change from Switzerland to Ireland. As a result, the authority to declare and pay dividends will be vested in the Board of Directors. The timing, declaration and payment of future dividends to holders of our common shares will be determined by our Board of Directors and will depend upon many factors, including our financial condition and results of operations, the capital requirements of our businesses, industry practice and any other relevant factors.
Under Irish law, dividends may only be paid (and share repurchases and redemptions must generally be funded) out of “distributable reserves,” which Tyco Ireland will not have immediately following the closing of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland. The creation of distributable reserves of Tyco Ireland by way of a capital reduction of Tyco Ireland requires the approval of the Irish High Court and, in connection with seeking such court approval, we have obtained the approval of our shareholder to create distributable reserves for Tyco Ireland (through the reduction of the share premium account of Tyco Ireland).
The approval of the Irish High Court is expected within approximately six to twelve weeks following the closing of the merger between Tyco International Ltd. and Tyco Ireland. We are not aware of any reason why the Irish High Court would not approve the creation of distributable reserves. However, the issuance of the required order is a matter for the discretion of the Irish High Court. In the event that distributable reserves of Tyco Ireland are not created, no distributions by way of dividends, share repurchases or otherwise will be permitted under Irish law (with the exception of the dividend that is scheduled to be paid in February 2015) until such time as the group has created sufficient distributable reserves from its trading activities.

30


Performance Graph
Set forth below is a graph comparing the cumulative total shareholder return on Tyco's common shares against the cumulative return on the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Industrials Index, assuming investment of $100 on September 25, 2009, including the reinvestment of dividends. The graph shows the cumulative total return as of the fiscal years ended September 24, 2010, September 30, 2011, September 28, 2012, September 27, 2013 and September 26, 2014.

31



Comparison of Cumulative Five Year Total Return
Total Return To Shareholders
(Includes reinvestment of dividends)
 
Annual Return Percentage Years Ended
Company/Index
9/10
 
9/11
 
9/12
 
9/13
 
9/14
Tyco International Ltd. 
16.16

 
8.06

 
40.85

 
26.95

 
28.66

S&P 500 Index
12.23

 
0.49

 
30.20

 
20.06

 
19.64

S&P 500 Industrials Index
20.95

 
(5.28
)
 
29.60

 
29.29

 
15.42


 
9/09
 
9/10
 
9/11
 
9/12
 
9/13
 
9/14
Tyco International Ltd. 
$
100

 
$
116.16

 
$
125.52

 
$
176.79

 
$
224.44

 
$
288.76

S&P 500 Index
100

 
112.23

 
112.77

 
146.83

 
176.29

 
210.91

S&P 500 Industrials Index
100

 
120.95

 
114.57

 
148.49

 
191.98

 
221.59


Equity Compensation Plan Information
The following table provides information as of September 26, 2014 with respect to Tyco's common shares issuable under its equity compensation plans:
 
Equity Compensation Plan
Plan Category
Number of
securities to be
issued upon
exercise of
outstanding
options
(a)
 


Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding
options
(b)
 
Number of
securities remaining
available for future
issuance under
equity compensation plans
(excluding securities
reflected in column (a))
(c)
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
2012 Stock and Incentive Plan(1)
8,519,966

 
$
30.83

 
35,087,826

2004 Stock and Incentive Plan(2)
10,461,375

 
20.54

 

ESPP(3)

 
 
 
2,919,845

 
18,981,341

 
 
 
38,007,671

Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
Broadview Security Plans(4)
19,526

 
12.00

 

 
19,526

 
 
 

Total
19,000,867

 
 
 
38,007,671


32




(1) 
The Tyco International Ltd. 2012 Stock and Incentive Plan ("2012 Plan") provides for the award of stock options, restricted stock units, performance share units and other equity and equity-based awards to members of the Board of Directors, officers and non-officer employees. The amount in column (a) consists of:
5,555,909

Shares that may be issued upon the exercise of stock options;
1,573,753

Shares that may be issued upon the vesting of restricted stock units;
1,387,651

Shares that may be issued upon the vesting of performance share units; and
2,653

Dividend equivalents earned on deferred stock units ("DSU") granted under the Company’s Long Term Incentive Plan ("LTIP I") and its 2004 Stock and Incentive Plan ("2004 Plan").
8,519,966

Total

The amount in column (c) includes the aggregate shares available under the 2012 Plan and includes shares that were subject to awards under the 2004 Plan that were outstanding between September 28, 2013 and September 26, 2014, but which had been forfeited for any reason as of September 26, 2014 (other than by reason of exercise or settlement of the awards).

(2) 
The 2004 Plan provided for the award of stock options, restricted stock units, performance share units and other equity and equity-based awards to members of the Board of Directors, officers and non-officer employees. The amount in column (a) consists of:
9,550,930

Shares that may be issued upon the exercise of stock options;
837,547

Shares that may be issued upon the vesting of restricted stock units; and
72,898

DSUs and dividend equivalents earned on DSUs.
10,461,375

Total

As of October 1, 2012, the 2004 Plan was effectively terminated and no new awards are permitted to be granted under the 2004 Plan as it was replaced with the 2012 Plan. Shares subject, as of October 1, 2012, to outstanding awards under the 2004 Plan that cease for any reason to be subject to such awards (other than by reason of exercise or settlement of the awards) shall be available under the 2012 Plan.

(3) 
Shares available for future issuance under the Tyco Employee Stock Purchase Plan ("ESPP"), which represents the number of remaining shares registered for issuance under this plan. All of the shares delivered to participants under the ESPP were purchased in the open market. The ESPP was suspended indefinitely during the fourth quarter of 2009.

(4) 
In connection with the acquisition of Broadview Security in May 2010, options outstanding under the Brink's Home Security Holdings, Inc. 2008 Equity Incentive Plan and the Brink's Home Security Holdings, Inc. Non-Employee Director's Equity Plan were converted into options to purchase Tyco common shares.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Period
Total Number of
Shares
Purchased
 
Average
Price Paid
Per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced
Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Approximate Dollar
Value of Shares that
May Yet Be Purchased
Under Publicly
Announced
Plans or Programs (1)
6/28/2014 - 7/25/2014
7,034,189

 
$
45.44

 
7,029,336

 


7/26/2014 - 8/29/2014
8,068,419

 
44.18

 
8,068,419

 


8/30/2014 - 9/26/2014
7,896,692

 
44.44

 
7,894,970

 
$
1,416,789,994

(1) The Company's Board of Directors approved a $1 billion share repurchase program in September 2014.

The transactions in the table above represent the repurchase of common shares on the New York Stock Exchange. During the fourth quarter of 2014, there were approximately 23 million common shares repurchased on the New York Stock Exchange under the existing share repurchase authority. In addition, certain transactions in the table above represent the acquisition of shares by the Company from certain employees in order to satisfy employee tax withholding requirements in connection with the vesting of restricted shares. The average price paid per share is calculated by dividing the total cash paid

33


for the shares by the total number of shares repurchased. As of September 26, 2014, after including the $1 billion approved authority described above, approximately $1.4 billion in share repurchase authority remained outstanding.
Item 6.    Selected Financial Data
The following table sets forth selected consolidated financial data of Tyco. This data is derived from Tyco's Consolidated Financial Statements for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013, September 28, 2012, September 30, 2011, and September 24, 2010, respectively. Tyco has a 52 or 53-week fiscal year that ends on the last Friday in September. Fiscal years 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2010 were all 52-week years, while fiscal 2011 was a 53-week year.
Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform with current period presentation. Specifically, the Company has reclassified the operations of its South Korean security business and several businesses in the ROW Installation & Services segment to income from discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and the assets and liabilities as held for sale within the Consolidated Balance Sheets as they satisfied the criteria to be presented as discontinued operations. See Note 3 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012(3)(4)
 
2011
 
2010
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenue
$
10,340

 
$
10,073

 
$
9,892

 
$
10,081

 
$
10,610

Income (loss) from continuing operations attributable to Tyco common shareholders (1)
794

 
443

 
(412
)
 
548

 
233

Net income attributable to Tyco common shareholders(2)
1,838

 
536

 
472

 
1,719

 
1,130

Basic earnings per share attributable to Tyco
 common shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
1.74

 
0.96

 
(0.89
)
 
1.16

 
0.48

Net income
4.04

 
1.15

 
1.02

 
3.63

 
2.33

Diluted earnings per share attributable to Tyco common shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
1.71

 
0.94

 
(0.89
)
 
1.14

 
0.48

Net income
3.97

 
1.14

 
1.02

 
3.59

 
2.31

Cash dividends per share
0.68

 
0.62

 
0.90

 
0.99

 
0.86

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data (End of Year):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
11,809

 
$
12,176

 
$
12,365

 
$
26,702

 
$
27,066

Long-term debt
1,443

 
1,443

 
1,481

 
4,105

 
3,608

Total Tyco shareholders' equity
4,647

 
5,098

 
4,994

 
14,149

 
14,066

_______________________________________________________________________________

(1) 
Income (loss) from continuing operations attributable to Tyco common shareholders for the fiscal years 2014 and 2012 includes asbestos related charges of $462 million and $111 million, respectively. Fiscal 2014 also includes $96 million of legacy legal reversal and recoveries. In addition, fiscal 2013 includes $100 million in environmental remediation costs related to our Marinette facility. See Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
(2) 
Net income attributable to Tyco common shareholders for the fiscal years 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010 includes Income from discontinued operations of $1,044 million, $93 million, $80 million, $69 million and $62 million primarily related to ADT Korea. Net income (loss) attributable to Tyco common shareholders for the fiscal years 2012, 2011, and 2010 also includes Income from discontinued operations of $804 million, $1,102 million, and $835 million, respectively, which is primarily related to ADT and Tyco Flow Control. The increase in net income attributable to common shareholders for 2014 also includes a gain of $216 million relating to the sale of Atkore. See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
(3) 
The decrease in total assets and total Tyco shareholders' equity in fiscal 2012 is due to the distribution of our former North American residential security and flow control businesses.
(4) 
The decrease in long-term debt is due to the $2.6 billion redemption of various debt securities in connection with the 2012 Separation. See Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

34


Item 7.    Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Results of Operations
The following discussion and analysis of the Company's financial condition and results of operations should be read together with the Selected Financial Data and our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report. This discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. The Company's actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including but not limited to those under the headings "Risk Factors" and "Forward-Looking Information".
Organization
The Consolidated Financial Statements include the consolidated results of Tyco International Ltd., a company organized under the laws of Switzerland, and its subsidiaries (hereinafter collectively referred to as "we", the "Company" or "Tyco"). The financial statements have been prepared in United States dollars ("USD"), in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP").
On May 30, 2014, we entered into a Merger Agreement ("Merger Agreement") with Tyco International plc, a newly-formed Irish public limited company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tyco ("Tyco Ireland"). Under the Merger Agreement, Tyco will merge with and into Tyco Ireland, with Tyco Ireland being the surviving company. This Merger will result in Tyco Ireland becoming Tyco's publicly-traded parent company and change the jurisdiction of organization of Tyco from Switzerland to Ireland. The Merger received shareholder approval at the special general meeting of shareholders on September 9, 2014. We expect the Merger to become effective in November 2014.
We operate and report financial and operating information in the following three segments:
North America Installation & Services ("NA Installation & Services") designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, institutional and governmental customers in North America.
Rest of World Installation & Services ("ROW Installation & Services") designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers in the Rest of World ("ROW") regions.
Global Products designs, manufactures and sells fire protection, security and life safety products, including intrusion security, anti-theft devices, breathing apparatus and access control and video management systems, for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers worldwide, including products installed and serviced by our NA and ROW Installation & Services segments.
We also provide general corporate services to our segments which is reported as a fourth, non-operating segment, Corporate and Other. References to the segment data are to the Company's continuing operations.
Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform with current period presentation. Specifically, the Company has reclassified the operations of its ADT Korea business and several other ROW Installation & Services businesses to Income from discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and the Assets and liabilities as held for sale within the Consolidated Balance Sheets as they satisfied the criteria to be presented as discontinued operations. We completed the sale of ADT Korea on May 22, 2014 and we expect to complete the sale of the other identified ROW Installation & Services businesses by the third quarter of fiscal 2015. See Note 3 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Recent Transactions
On May 22, 2014, the Company, together with its wholly-owned subsidiary Tyco Far East Holdings Ltd. (the “Seller”) completed the sale of Tyco Fire & Security Services Korea Co. Ltd. and its subsidiaries that form and operate the Company’s ADT Korea business to an affiliate of The Carlyle Group. The transaction took the form of a sale by the Seller of all of the stock of Tyco Fire & Security Services Korea Co. Ltd. for an aggregate purchase price of $1.93 billion.
On March 6, 2014, the Company announced Atkore International Group Inc.'s (“Atkore”) intention to redeem all of the Company’s remaining common equity stake in Atkore. The redemption was completed on April 9, 2014 for aggregate cash proceeds of $250 million.
Effective September 28, 2012, Tyco completed the spin-offs of The ADT Corporation ("ADT") and Pentair Ltd. (formerly known as Tyco Flow Control International Ltd. ("Tyco Flow Control")), formerly our North American residential security and

35


flow control businesses, respectively, into separate, publicly traded companies in the form of a distribution to Tyco shareholders. Immediately following the spin-off, Pentair, Inc. was merged with a subsidiary of Tyco Flow Control in a tax-free, all-stock merger ("the Merger"), with Pentair Ltd. ("Pentair") succeeding Pentair Inc. as an independent publicly traded company. The distribution was made on September 28, 2012, to Tyco shareholders of record on September 17, 2012. The distributions, the Merger and related transactions are collectively referred to herein as the "2012 Separation".
As a result of the 2012 Separation, we incurred separation related costs during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 including professional services, marketing and information technology related costs, and we expect to continue to incur separation related costs during fiscal 2015. During fiscal 2014, the Company incurred pre-tax costs related to the 2012 Separation of $53 million recorded within continuing operations (primarily in Selling, general and administrative expenses) and pre-tax costs of $1 million within discontinued operations. During 2013, the Company incurred pre-tax costs related to the 2012 Separation of $69 million recorded within continuing operations (primarily within Selling, general and administrative expenses) and pre-tax gain of $8 million within discontinued operations. During 2012, we incurred separation related costs including debt refinancing, tax restructuring, professional services, restructuring and impairment charges and employee-related costs. During 2012, the Company incurred pre-tax costs related to the 2012 Separation of $561 million recorded within continuing operations and $278 million within discontinued operations. Costs incurred within continuing operations in fiscal 2012 include a charge of $453 million due to the early extinguishment of debt, as the Company refinanced its long-term debt as a result of the 2012 Separation.
During fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively, the Company paid $58 million and $165 million in separation costs, all of which is included within continuing operations. During fiscal 2012, the Company paid $186 million in separation costs, $18 million of which is included within continuing operations. See Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Business Overview
We are a leading global provider of security products and services, fire detection and suppression products and services and life safety products. We utilize our extensive global footprint of approximately 900 locations, including manufacturing facilities, service and distribution centers, monitoring centers and sales offices, to provide solutions and localized expertise to our global customer base. We provide an extensive range of product and service offerings to over 3 million customers in more than 100 countries through multiple channels. Our revenues are broadly diversified across the United States and Canada (collectively “North America”); Central America and South America (collectively “Latin America”); Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (collectively “EMEA”) and the Asia-Pacific geographic areas. The following chart reflects our fiscal 2014 net revenue by geographic area.

36



Fiscal 2014 Net Revenue by Geographic Area
Our end-use customers, to whom we may sell directly or through wholesalers, distributors, commercial builders or contractors, are also broadly diversified and include:
Commercial customers, including residential and commercial property developers, financial institutions, food service businesses and commercial enterprises;
Industrial customers, including companies in the oil and gas, power generation, mining, petrochemical and other industries;
Retail customers, including international, regional and local consumer outlets, from national chains to specialty stores;
Institutional customers, including a broad range of healthcare facilities, academic institutions, museums and foundations;
Governmental customers, including federal, state and local governments, defense installations, mass transportation networks, public utilities and other government-affiliated entities and applications; and
Residential and small business customers outside of North America, including owners of single family homes and local providers of a wide range of goods and services.
As a global business with a varied customer base and an extensive range of products and services, our operations and results are impacted by global, regional and industry specific factors, and by political factors. Our geographic diversity and the diversity in our customer base and our products and services has helped mitigate the impact of any one industry or the economy of any single country on our consolidated operating results, financial condition and cash flows. Due to the global nature of our business and the variety of our customers, products and services, no single factor is predominantly used to forecast Company results. Rather, management monitors a number of factors to develop expectations regarding future results, including the activity of key competitors and customers, order rates for longer lead time projects, and capital expenditure budgets and spending patterns of our customers. We also monitor trends throughout the commercial and residential fire and security markets, including building codes and fire-safety standards. Our commercial installation businesses are impacted by trends in

37


commercial construction starts, while our residential business, which is located outside of North America, is impacted by new housing starts.
Results of Operations
Consolidated financial information is as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
 
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
 
Net revenue
$
10,340

 
$
10,073

 
$
9,892

 
Net revenue growth
2.7
%
 
1.8
%
 
NA

 
Organic revenue growth
2.6
%
 
0.8
%
 
NA

 
Operating income
$
697

 
$
709

 
$
578

 
Operating margin
6.7
%
 
7.0
%
 
5.8
%
 
Interest income
$
14

 
$
16

 
$
18

 
Interest expense
97

 
100

 
209

 
Other expense, net
1

 
29

 
454

 
Income tax expense
(24
)
 
(108
)
 
(320
)
 
Equity income (loss) in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries
206

 
(48
)
 
(26
)
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations attributable to Tyco common shareholders
794

 
443

 
(412
)
 
Net Revenue:
Fiscal 2014
Net revenue for the year ended September 26, 2014 increased by $267 million, or 2.7%, to $10,340 million as compared to net revenue of $10,073 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. On an organic basis, net revenue grew by $255 million, or 2.6%, year over year as a result of growth in all three segments, led primarily by Global Products and to a lesser extent ROW and NA Installation & Services. Net revenue was favorably impacted by $201 million, or 2.0%, as a result of acquisitions primarily within our ROW Installation & Services and Global Products segments. Net revenue growth was unfavorably impacted by divestitures of $107 million, or 1.1%, primarily in our ROW and NA Installation & Services segments. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates, primarily in our ROW Installation & Services segment, unfavorably impacted net revenue by $82 million, or 0.8%.
Fiscal 2013
Net revenue for the year ended September 27, 2013 increased by $181 million, or 1.8%, to $10,073 million as compared to net revenue of $9,892 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. On an organic basis, net revenue grew by $82 million, or 0.8%, year over year, primarily as a result of revenue growth in our Global Products segment, partially offset by a decline in our NA Installation & Services segment driven by our security business. Net revenue was favorably impacted by acquisitions of $168 million, or 1.7%, primarily within our ROW Installation & Services and Global Products segments. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates, primarily in our ROW Installation & Services segment, unfavorably impacted net revenue by $70 million, or 0.7%. Net revenue growth was also unfavorably impacted by divestitures of $38 million, or 0.4%, primarily in our NA Installation & Services segment.
Operating Income:
Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 decreased $12 million, or 1.7%, to $697 million, as compared to operating income of $709 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 was unfavorably impacted by asbestos related charges of $225 million relating to an agreement in principle reached with creditors of Yarway, an indirect subsidiary of the Company, and $240 million as a result of an updated valuation performed over the Company's estimated liability for asbestos related claims (excluding Yarway claims). Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 was favorably impacted by the reversal of a compensation reserve of $92 million established in respect of legacy litigation with former management, a gain of $16 million relating to a settlement with CIT, a former subsidiary of the Company, and a $21 million insurance recovery related to China. In addition, the year ended September 26, 2014 was also favorably impacted by a $100 million decline in environmental remediation costs related to our Global Products facility in Marinette, Wisconsin and a decrease in restructuring charges of $62 million. See Note 13 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on our asbestos, environmental and legacy legal matters.

38


Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 increased $131 million, or 22.7%, to $709 million, as compared to operating income of $578 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was favorably impacted by our net revenue growth, a smaller corporate footprint as a result of the 2012 Separation, as well as a higher mix of service revenue and operational improvements across all of our businesses. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was also favorably impacted by a $99 million decline in net asbestos charges. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was unfavorably impacted by an $83 million increase in environmental remediation charges as well as an increase in restructuring charges. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was also unfavorably impacted by a charge of $27 million resulting from the write-off of an insurance receivable that had been established in respect of a legacy claim.
Items impacting operating income for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 are as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
 
 
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
 
 
Restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, net
$
93

 
$
131

 
$
104

 
 
Environmental remediation costs - Marinette

 
100

 
17

 
 
Asbestos related charges
462

 
12

 
111

 
 
(Gain) loss on divestitures
(2
)
 
20

 
14

 
 
Separation costs
53

 
69

 
75

 
 
Legacy legal (gains) charges
(96
)
 
27

 
(4
)
 
 
China insurance recovery
(21
)
 

 

 
 
CIT settlement gain
(16
)
 

 

 
 
Loss on sale of investment
7

 

 

 
 
Acquisition and integration costs
3

 
4

 
9

 
 
IRS litigation costs
4

 

 

 
 
We continue to identify and pursue opportunities for cost savings through restructuring activities and workforce reductions to improve operating efficiencies across our businesses. Additionally, we initiated certain global actions during fiscal 2013 designed to reduce our cost structure and improve future profitability by streamlining operations and better aligning functions, which we refer to as repositioning actions. The Company expects to incur approximately $100 million to $150 million of restructuring and repositioning charges in fiscal 2015. See Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Income (loss) from continuing operations attributable to Tyco common shareholders:
Interest Income and Expense
Interest income was $14 million in 2014, as compared to $16 million and $18 million in 2013 and 2012, respectively. Interest income decreased in 2014 compared to 2013 primarily due to interest income received in fiscal 2013 related to a working capital adjustment related to the 2012 spin-off of Tyco Flow Control.
Interest expense was $97 million in 2014, as compared to $100 million and $209 million in 2013 and 2012, respectively. The weighted-average interest rate on total debt outstanding was 6.5% for all three fiscal years. The decrease in interest expense from 2012 to 2013 was primarily related to savings realized from the $2.6 billion debt redemptions in 2012. See Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

39


Other Income (Expense), Net
Significant components of other income (expense), net for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 are as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Loss on extinguishment of debt (see Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements)
$

 
$

 
$
(453
)
2012 Tax Sharing Agreement income (see Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements)
15

 
(32
)
 

2007 Tax Sharing Agreement loss (see Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements)
(21
)
 

 
(4
)
Other
5
 
3
 
3

   Total
$
(1
)
 
$
(29
)
 
$
(454
)
Effective Income Tax Rate
Our effective income tax rate was 3.9% during the year ended September 26, 2014. Our effective tax rate is affected by the mix of jurisdictions in which income is earned. Our effective tax rate for the year was favorably impacted by asbestos related charges that generated a tax benefit in a high tax jurisdiction, partially offset by a reversal of a compensation reserve established in respect of legacy litigation with former management that generated tax expense in a high tax jurisdiction.
Our effective income tax rate was 18.1% during the year ended September 27, 2013. Our effective tax rate for the year was favorably impacted by taxes on the environmental remediation charges incurred during the second quarter of 2013, partially offset by Tax Sharing Agreement adjustments incurred throughout the year and enacted tax law changes in the fourth quarter of 2013.
Our effective income tax rate for the year ended September 28, 2012 was not meaningful primarily as a result of separation related charges which were incurred for which no tax benefit was recognized, as well as a valuation allowance of $235 million recorded due to net operating loss carryforwards which we do not expect to realize in future periods. Additionally, our effective income tax rate for the year ended September 28, 2012 was impacted by enacted tax law changes, favorable audit resolutions in multiple jurisdictions and a non-recurring item generating a tax benefit.
The rate can vary from period to period due to discrete items such as the settlement of income tax audits and changes in tax laws, as well as recurring factors, such as the geographic mix of income before taxes.
The valuation allowance for deferred tax assets of $2.0 billion and $1.9 billion as of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, respectively, relates principally to the uncertainty of the utilization of certain deferred tax assets, primarily tax loss and credit carryforwards in various jurisdictions. Specifically, the valuation allowance as of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013 includes separation related charges associated with the early extinguishment of debt which further increased a net operating loss carryforward which the Company does not expect to realize in future periods. The valuation allowance was calculated and recorded when the Company determined that it was more-likely-than-not that all or a portion of our deferred tax assets would not be realized. The Company believes that it will generate sufficient future taxable income to realize the tax benefits related to the remaining net deferred tax assets on the Company's Consolidated Balance Sheets.
The calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations in a multitude of jurisdictions across our global operations. We record tax liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues in the U.S. and other tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes will be due. These tax liabilities are reflected net of related tax loss carryforwards. We adjust these liabilities in light of changing facts and circumstances; however, due to the complexity of some of these uncertainties, the ultimate resolution may result in a payment that is materially different from our current estimate of the tax liabilities. Substantially all of these potential tax liabilities are recorded in Other liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheets as payment is not expected within one year.
Equity Income (Loss) in Earnings of Unconsolidated Subsidiaries
Equity income (loss) in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries in 2014, 2013 and 2012 reflects our share of Atkore International Group Inc.'s ("Atkore") net income or loss, which is accounted for under the equity method of accounting. Equity income (loss) in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries during the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 was a gain of $206 million, and losses of $48 million and $26 million, respectively.

40


On March 6, 2014, we announced Atkore's intention to redeem all of our remaining common equity stake in Atkore, and on April 9, 2014, the redemption was completed for aggregate cash proceeds of $250 million. We recognized a net gain of $216 million related to this transaction, which is comprised of a $227 million gain on the sale of the equity investment, partially offset by an $11 million loss, which is our share of loss on Atkore's debt extinguishment undertaken in connection with the redemption. See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Segment Results
The following chart reflects our net revenue by operating segment, as well as the percent of net revenue by operating segment, for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012, respectively.
The segment discussions that follow describe the significant factors contributing to the changes in results for each of our segments included in continuing operations.
NA Installation & Services
NA Installation & Services designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, institutional and governmental customers in North America.
Financial information for NA Installation & Services for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Net revenue
$
3,876

 
$
3,891

 
$
3,962

Net revenue decline
(0.4
)%
 
(1.8
)%
 
NA

Organic revenue growth (decline)
1.0
 %
 
(1.1
)%
 
NA

Operating income
$
450

 
$
388

 
$
374

Operating margin
11.6
 %
 
10.0
 %
 
9.4
%

41


The change in net revenue compared to the prior periods is attributable to the following:
Factors Contributing to Year-Over-Year Change
Fiscal 2014
Compared to
Fiscal 2013
 
Fiscal 2013
Compared to
Fiscal 2012
Organic revenue growth (decline)
$
37

 
$
(45
)
Acquisitions
19

 
7

Divestitures
(42
)
 
(28
)
Impact of foreign currency
(29
)
 
(3
)
Other

 
(2
)
   Total change
$
(15
)
 
$
(71
)
Net revenue decreased $15 million, or 0.4%, to $3,876 million for the year ended September 26, 2014 as compared to $3,891 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. The organic revenue growth for the year ended September 26, 2014 was primarily driven by an increase in both service and installation revenue. The impact of acquisitions was $19 million, or 0.5%, due to the acquisition of Westfire, Inc. ("Westfire"), a fire protection services company, in the first quarter of fiscal 2014, which was integrated into the NA Installation & Services and ROW Installation and Services segments. See Note 5 to our Consolidated Financial Statements. Net revenue was unfavorably impacted by $42 million, or 1.1%, primarily due to the divestiture of our North America guarding business in the third quarter of fiscal 2013. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates unfavorably impacted net revenue by $29 million, or 0.7%.
Net revenue decreased $71 million, or 1.8% to $3,891 million for the year ended September 27, 2013 as compared to $3,962 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Organic revenue decline for the year ended September 27, 2013 was primarily driven by a decline in revenue in the North America security business as a result of the non-residential construction market and project selectivity, partially offset by increased service revenue growth in our North America fire business. Net revenue was unfavorably impacted by $28 million, or 0.7%, primarily due to the divestiture of our North America guarding business in the third quarter of fiscal 2013.
Operating Income
Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 increased $62 million, or 16.0%, to $450 million, as compared to operating income of $388 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 increased due to a higher mix of service revenue, improved execution, lower restructuring costs, and savings realized from restructuring activities and productivity initiatives.
Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 increased $14 million, or 3.7%, to $388 million, as compared to operating income of $374 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 increased due to a higher mix of service revenue and efficiencies gained through improved installation execution and project selectivity for the North American security business. Additionally, the year ended September 28, 2012 included a charge of $29 million for the settlement of an ERISA partial withdrawal liability assessment. These items were partially offset by unfavorable impacts due to separation costs as well as dis-synergy costs related to the 2012 separation.
Key items impacting operating income for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Separation costs
$
51

 
$
49

 
$
2

Restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, net
13

 
36

 
45

Legacy legal charges

 

 
29

ROW Installation & Services:
ROW Installation & Services designs, sells, installs, services and monitors electronic security systems and fire detection and suppression systems for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers in our Continental Europe, United Kingdom, Asia, Pacific and Growth Markets regions, which are collectively our ROW regions.

42


Financial information for ROW Installation & Services for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Net revenue
$
3,920

 
$
3,843

 
$
3,830

Net revenue growth (decline)
2.0
%
 
0.3
 %
 
NA

Organic revenue growth
1.9
%
 
(0.2
)%
 
NA

Operating income
$
409

 
$
333

 
$
349

Operating margin
10.4
%
 
8.7
 %
 
9.1
%
The change in net revenue compared to the prior periods is attributable to the following:
Factors Contributing to Year-Over-Year Change
Fiscal 2014
Compared to
Fiscal 2013
 
Fiscal 2013
Compared to
Fiscal 2012
Organic revenue growth
$
71

 
$
(6
)
Acquisitions
119

 
93

Divestitures
(67
)
 
(10
)
Impact of foreign currency
(46
)
 
(64
)
   Total change
$
77

 
$
13

Net revenue increased $77 million, or 2.0%, to $3,920 million for the year ended September 26, 2014 as compared to $3,843 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. Organic revenue growth for the year ended September 26, 2014 was driven by service and installation growth in Growth Markets and installation growth in Asia. Growth in these regions were offset by declines in both service and installation revenue in our Pacific, and to a lesser extent, Continental Europe regions. Net revenue was favorably impacted by $119 million, or 3.1%, primarily due to the acquisitions within the Growth Markets and our Pacific regions during fiscal 2013. Net revenue was unfavorably impacted by $67 million, or 1.7% due to divestitures in the Pacific region. Changes in foreign currency exchanges rates unfavorably impacted net revenue by $46 million or 1.2%.
Net revenue increased $13 million, or 0.3%, to $3,843 million for the year ended September 27, 2013 as compared to $3,830 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Organic revenue decline for the year ended September 27, 2013 was primarily driven by declines in the United Kingdom, Pacific and Continental Europe, partially offset by an increase in Growth Markets. Net revenue was favorably impacted by the impact of acquisitions of $93 million, or 2.4%, primarily due to the acquisitions within the United Kingdom and our Pacific regions during fiscal 2013 as well as acquisitions in Asia during fiscal 2012. Net revenue was unfavorably impacted by the impact of divestitures of $10 million, or 0.3%. Changes in foreign currency exchanges rates unfavorably impacted net revenue by $64 million, or 1.7%.
Operating Income
Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 increased $76 million, or 22.8%, to $409 million, as compared to operating income of $333 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 was favorably impacted by a decrease in restructuring charges and loss on divestitures, a $21 million insurance recovery related to China and the benefit of ongoing productivity initiatives, partially offset by a lower mix of high-margin service revenue in the Pacific region.
Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 decreased $16 million, or 4.6%, to $333 million, as compared to operating income of $349 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 declined primarily due higher restructuring costs, partially offset by increased price focus on higher margin products and services and the ongoing benefit of cost containment and restructuring savings in most regions.

43


Key items impacting operating income for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, net
$
31

 
$
64

 
$
36

China insurance recovery
(21
)
 

 

Loss on divestitures
1

 
14

 
7

Acquisition and integration costs
3

 
2

 
4

Loss on sale of investment
7

 

 

Global Products:
Global Products designs, manufactures and sells fire protection, security and life safety products, including intrusion security, anti-theft devices, breathing apparatus and access control and video management systems, for commercial, industrial, retail, residential, small business, institutional and governmental customers worldwide, including products installed and serviced by our NA and ROW Installation & Services segments.
Financial information for Global Products for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Net revenue
$
2,544

 
$
2,339

 
$
2,100

Net revenue growth
8.8
%
 
11.4
%
 
NA

Organic revenue growth
6.3
%
 
6.3
%
 
NA

Operating income
$
458

 
$
307

 
$
353

Operating margin
18.0
%
 
13.1
%
 
16.8
%
The change in net revenue compared to the prior periods is attributable to the following:
Factors Contributing to Year-Over-Year Change
Fiscal 2014
Compared to
Fiscal 2013
 
Fiscal 2013
Compared to
Fiscal 2012
Organic revenue growth
$
147

 
$
133

Acquisitions
63

 
68

Impact of foreign currency
(7
)
 
(3
)
Other
2

 
41

   Total change
$
205

 
$
239

Net revenue increased $205 million, or 8.8%, to $2,544 million for the year ended September 26, 2014 as compared to $2,339 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. Organic revenue growth for the year ended September 26, 2014 was driven by growth across all three of our product platforms, particularly in security products. The impact of acquisitions was $63 million, or 2.7%, primarily due to the acquisition of Exacq Technologies ("Exacq"), a developer of open architecture video management systems for security and surveillance applications, during 2013. Exacq has been integrated into the Global Products segment. See Note 5 to our Consolidated Financial Statements.
Net revenue increased $239 million, or 11.4%, to $2,339 million for the year ended September 27, 2013 as compared to $2,100 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Organic revenue growth for the year ended September 27, 2013 was driven by growth across all three of our product platforms. Net revenue was favorably impacted by acquisitions of $68 million, or 3.2%, primarily due to acquisitions within our fire and security products businesses during fiscal 2013 and 2012. Net revenue was also favorably impacted by contractual revenue from ADT under the 2012 Separation and Distribution Agreement of $39 million or 1.9%, included within Other above.

44


Operating Income
Operating income for the year ended September 26, 2014 increased $151 million, or 49.2%, to $458 million, as compared to operating income of $307 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. The increase was driven by net revenue growth in the current year and the unfavorable impact of an environmental remediation charge in the comparable period, partially offset by additional investments in research and development and sales and marketing costs. See Note 13 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 decreased $46 million, or 13.0%, to $307 million, as compared to operating income of $353 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. Operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was unfavorably impacted by charges of $100 million recorded in the first half of fiscal 2013 for additional environmental remediation activities planned for a facility located in Marinette, Wisconsin. Our operating income for the year ended September 27, 2013 was favorably impacted by net revenue growth and operational improvements partially offset by additional investments in research and development and sales and marketing costs.
Key items impacting operating income for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 are as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Environmental remediation costs - Marinette
$

 
$
100

 
$
17

Restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, net
12

 
12

 
10

Acquisition and integration costs

 
2

 
4

Corporate and Other
Corporate expense increased $301 million, or 94.4%, to $620 million for the year ended September 26, 2014 as compared to $319 million for the year ended September 27, 2013. The increase in Corporate expense for the year ended September 26, 2014 was primarily due to asbestos related charges of $225 million relating to an agreement in principle reached with creditors of Yarway, an indirect subsidiary of the Company, and $240 million as a result of an updated valuation performed over the Company's estimated liability for asbestos related claims (excluding Yarway claims). The increase in expense was also due to higher restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, partially offset by a $96 million reversal and recoveries from settlements with former management. The increase in expense was also partially offset to a lesser extent by lower separation costs and a gain related to a legal settlement with CIT. See Note 13 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to our asbestos and legacy legal matters.
Corporate expense decreased $179 million, or 35.9%, to $319 million for the year ended September 27, 2013 as compared to $498 million for the year ended September 28, 2012. The decrease in Corporate expense for the year ended September 27, 2013 was primarily due to a smaller corporate footprint as a result of the 2012 Separation as well as lower separation costs. Corporate expense also decreased due to a decline in net asbestos charges to $12 million in the year ended September 27, 2013 from $111 million in the prior year period. The net asbestos charges for the year ended September 27, 2013 primarily relate to the Yarway Corporation, which filed for bankruptcy protection during the third quarter of fiscal 2013. The net asbestos charges during the year ended September 28, 2012 were primarily due to the Company revising its look-back period for historical claim experience and its look-forward period related to the projection of future claims. The decreases in Corporate expense were partially offset by a charge of $27 million resulting from the write-off of an insurance receivable that had been established in respect of a legacy claim as well as a net benefit in the prior year period of approximately $33 million, primarily resulting from the reversal of a compensation reserve established in respect of legacy litigation with former management. See Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to our asbestos and legacy legal matters.

45


Key items included in corporate expense for the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Legacy legal (gains) charges
$
(96
)
 
$
27

 
$
17

Separation costs
2

 
20

 
70

Restructuring, repositioning and asset impairment charges, net
37

 
19

 
13

Asbestos related charges
462

 
12

 
111

(Gain) loss on divestitures
(3
)
 
5

 
7

Former management compensation reversal

 

 
(50
)
CIT settlement gain
(16
)
 

 

IRS litigation costs
4

 

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to use judgment in making estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses. The following accounting policies are based on, among other things, judgments and assumptions made by management that include inherent risks and uncertainties. Management's estimates are based on the relevant information available at the end of each period.
Depreciation and Amortization Methods for Security Monitoring-Related Assets—Tyco considers assets related to the acquisition of new customers in its electronic security business in three asset categories: internally generated residential subscriber systems outside of North America, internally generated commercial subscriber systems (collectively referred to as subscriber system assets) and customer accounts acquired through the ADT dealer program primarily outside of North America (referred to as dealer intangibles). Subscriber system assets include installed property, plant and equipment for which Tyco retains ownership and deferred costs directly related to the customer acquisition and system installation. Subscriber system assets and any deferred revenue resulting from the customer acquisition are accounted for over the expected life of the subscriber. In certain geographical areas where the Company has a large number of customers that behave in a similar manner over time, the Company accounts for subscriber system assets and related deferred revenue using pools, with separate pools for the components of subscriber system assets and any related deferred revenue based on the month and year of acquisition. The Company depreciates its pooled subscriber system assets and related deferred revenue using an accelerated method with lives up to 15 years. The accelerated method utilizes declining balance rates based on geographical area ranging from 140% to 360% for commercial subscriber pools and dealer intangibles and converts to a straight line methodology when the resulting depreciation charge is greater than that from the accelerated method. The Company uses a straight-line method with a 14-year life for non-pooled subscriber system assets (primarily in Europe, Latin America and Asia) and related deferred revenue, with remaining balances written off upon customer termination.
Revenue Recognition—Contract sales for the installation of fire protection systems, large security intruder systems and other construction-related projects are recorded primarily under the percentage-of-completion method. Profits recognized on contracts in process are based upon estimated contract revenue and related total cost of the project at completion. The risk of this methodology is its dependence upon estimates of costs at completion, which are subject to the uncertainties inherent in long-term contracts. Provisions for anticipated losses are made in the period in which they become determinable.
Sales of security monitoring systems may have multiple elements, including equipment, installation, monitoring services and maintenance agreements. We assess our revenue arrangements to determine the appropriate units of accounting. When ownership of the system is transferred to the customer, each deliverable provided under the arrangement is considered a separate unit of accounting. Revenues associated with sale of equipment and related installations are recognized once delivery, installation and customer acceptance is completed, while the revenue for monitoring and maintenance services are recognized as services are rendered. Amounts assigned to each unit of accounting are based on an allocation of total arrangement consideration using a hierarchy of estimated selling price for the deliverables. The selling price used for each deliverable will be based on Vendor Specific Objective Evidence ("VSOE") if available, Third Party Evidence ("TPE") if VSOE is not available, or estimated selling price if neither VSOE or TPE is available. Revenue recognized for equipment and installation is limited to the lesser of their allocated amounts under the estimated selling price hierarchy or the non-contingent up-front consideration received at the time of installation, since collection of future amounts under the arrangement with the customer is contingent upon the delivery of monitoring and maintenance services.

46


Product discounts granted are based on the terms of arrangements with direct, indirect and other market participants. Rebates are estimated based on sales terms, historical experience and trend analysis.
Loss Contingencies—Accruals are recorded for various contingencies including legal proceedings, self-insurance and other claims that arise in the normal course of business. The accruals are based on judgment, the probability of losses and, where applicable, the consideration of opinions of internal and/or external legal counsel and actuarially determined estimates. Additionally, the Company records receivables from third party insurers when recovery has been determined to be probable.
Asbestos-Related Contingencies and Insurance Receivables—We and certain of our subsidiaries along with numerous other companies are named as defendants in personal injury lawsuits based on alleged exposure to asbestos-containing materials. We estimate the liability and corresponding insurance recovery for pending and future claims and defense costs based on the Company's historical claim experience, and estimates of the number and resolution cost of potential future claims that may be filed. The Company's legal strategy for resolving claims also impacts these estimates. The Company considers various trends and developments in evaluating the period of time (the look-back period) over which historical claim and settlement experience is used to estimate and value claims reasonably projected to be made in the future during a defined period of time (the look-forward period). On a quarterly basis, the Company assesses the sufficiency of its estimated liability for pending and future claims and defense costs by evaluating actual experience regarding claims filed, settled and dismissed, and amounts paid in settlements. In addition to claims and settlement experience, the Company considers additional quantitative and qualitative factors such as changes in legislation, the legal environment, and the Company's defense strategy. The Company also evaluates the recoverability of its insurance receivable on a quarterly basis. The Company evaluates all of these factors and determines whether a change in the estimate of its liability for pending and future claims and defense costs or insurance receivable is warranted.
In connection with the recognition of liabilities for asbestos-related matters, we record asbestos-related insurance recoveries that are probable. The estimate of asbestos-related insurance recoveries represents estimated amounts due to us for previously paid and settled claims and the probable reimbursements relating to estimated liability for pending and future claims. In determining the amount of insurance recoverable, we consider available insurance, allocation methodologies, solvency and creditworthiness of the insurers. See Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion on management's judgments applied in the recognition and measurement of asbestos-related assets and liabilities.
Insurable Liabilities—The Company records liabilities for its workers' compensation, product, general and auto liabilities. The determination of these liabilities and related expenses is dependent on claims experience. For most of these liabilities, claims incurred but not yet reported are estimated by utilizing actuarial valuations based upon historical claims experience. Certain insurable liabilities are discounted using a risk-free rate of return when the pattern and timing of the future obligation is reliably determinable. The Company records receivables from third party insurers when recovery has been determined to be probable.
Income Taxes—In determining taxable income for financial statement purposes, we must make certain estimates and judgments. These estimates and judgments affect the calculation of certain tax liabilities and the determination of the recoverability of certain of the deferred tax assets, which arise from temporary differences between the tax and financial statement recognition of revenue and expense.
In evaluating our ability to recover our deferred tax assets we consider all available positive and negative evidence including our past operating results, the existence of cumulative losses in the most recent years and our forecast of future taxable income. In estimating future taxable income, we develop assumptions including the amount of future pre-tax operating income, the reversal of temporary differences and the implementation of feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. These assumptions require significant judgment about the forecasts of future taxable income and are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses.
We currently have recorded valuation allowances that we will maintain until it is more-likely-than-not the deferred tax assets will be realized. Our income tax expense recorded in the future may be reduced to the extent of decreases in our valuation allowances. The realization of our remaining deferred tax assets is primarily dependent on future taxable income in the appropriate jurisdiction. Any reduction in future taxable income including but not limited to any future restructuring activities may require that we record an additional valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. An increase in the valuation allowance could result in additional income tax expense in such period and could have a significant impact on our future earnings.
Changes in tax laws and rates could also affect recorded deferred tax assets and liabilities in the future. Management records the effect of a tax rate or law change on the Company's deferred tax assets and liabilities in the period of enactment. Future tax rate or law changes could have a material effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

47


In addition, the calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations in a multitude of jurisdictions across our global operations. We recognize potential liabilities and record tax liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues in the U.S. and other tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes will be due. These tax liabilities are reflected net of related tax loss carryforwards. We adjust these reserves in light of changing facts and circumstances; however, due to the complexity of some of these uncertainties, the ultimate resolution may result in a payment that is materially different from our current estimate of the tax liabilities. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, an additional charge to expense would result. If payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be less than the recorded amounts, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary.
Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Asset Impairments—Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are assessed for impairment annually and more frequently if triggering events occur. In performing these assessments, management relies on and considers a number of factors, including operating results, business plans, economic projections, anticipated future cash flows, comparable market transactions (to the extent available), other market data and the Company's overall market capitalization. We elected to make the first day of the fourth quarter the annual impairment assessment date for all goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets.
When testing for goodwill impairment, we first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If we conclude it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, a quantitative fair value test is performed. Based upon our most recent annual impairment test completed as of June 30, 2014, it is more likely than not that the fair value of each reporting unit was in excess of its carrying value.
We recorded no goodwill impairments in conjunction with our annual goodwill impairment assessment performed during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014.
Fair value determinations require considerable judgment and are sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions and factors. As a result, there can be no assurance that the estimates and assumptions made for purposes of the annual goodwill impairment test will prove to be accurate predictions of the future. Examples of events or circumstances that could reasonably be expected to negatively affect the underlying key assumptions and ultimately impact the estimated fair value of the aforementioned reporting units may include such items as follows:
A prolonged downturn in the business environment in which the reporting units operate (i.e. sales volumes and prices) especially in the commercial construction and retailer end markets;
An economic recovery that significantly differs from our assumptions in timing or degree;
Volatility in equity and debt markets resulting in higher discount rates; and
Unexpected regulatory changes.
While historical performance and current expectations have resulted in fair values of goodwill in excess of carrying values, if our assumptions are not realized, it is possible that in the future an impairment charge may need to be recorded. However, it is not possible at this time to determine if an impairment charge would result or if such a charge would be material.
Long-Lived Assets—Asset groups held and used by the Company, including property, plant and equipment and amortizable intangible assets, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset group may not be fully recoverable. Tyco performs undiscounted operating cash flow analyses to determine if impairment exists. For purposes of recognition and measurement of an impairment for assets held for use, Tyco groups assets and liabilities at the lowest level for which cash flows are separately identified. If an impairment is determined to exist, any related impairment loss is calculated based on fair value. Impairments to long-lived assets to be disposed of are recorded based upon the fair value less cost to sell of the applicable assets. The calculation of the fair value of long-lived assets is based on assumptions concerning the amount and timing of estimated future cash flows and assumed discount rates, reflecting varying degrees of perceived risk. Since judgment is involved in determining the fair value and useful lives of long-lived assets, there is a risk that the carrying value of our long-lived assets may be overstated or understated.
Pension and Postretirement Benefits—Our pension expense and obligations are developed from actuarial valuations. Two critical assumptions in determining pension expense and obligations are the discount rate and expected long-term return on plan assets. We evaluate these assumptions at least annually. Other assumptions reflect demographic factors such as retirement, mortality and turnover and are evaluated periodically and updated to reflect our actual experience. Actual results may differ from actuarial assumptions resulting in actuarial gains and losses. For active plans, such actuarial gains and losses will be amortized over the average expected service period of the participants and in the case of inactive plans over the average remaining life expectancy of participants. The discount rate represents the market rate for high-quality fixed income investments and is used to calculate the present value of the expected future cash flows for benefit obligations under our

48


pension plans. A decrease in the discount rate increases the present value of pension benefit obligations. A 25 basis point decrease in the discount rate would increase the present value of pension obligations by approximately $87 million and increase our annual pension expense by approximately $2 million. We consider the relative weighting of plan assets by class, historical performance of asset classes over long-term periods, asset class performance expectations as well as current and future economic conditions in determining the expected long-term return on plan assets. A 25 basis point decrease in the expected long-term return on plan assets would increase our annual pension expense by approximately $5 million.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
A fundamental objective of the Company is to have sufficient liquidity, balance sheet strength, and financial flexibility to fund the operating and capital requirements of its core businesses around the world. The primary source of funds to finance our operations and capital expenditures is cash generated by operations. In addition, we maintain a commercial paper program, have access to a committed revolving credit facility and have access to equity and debt capital from public and private sources. We continue to balance our operating, investing and financing uses of cash through investments and acquisitions in our core businesses, dividends and share repurchases. In addition, we believe our cash position, amounts available under our credit facility, commercial paper program and cash provided by operating activities will be adequate to cover our operational and business needs in the foreseeable future.
As of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, our cash and cash equivalents, short- and long-term debt, and Tyco shareholder's equity are as follows:
 
As of
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
Cash and cash equivalents
$
892

 
$
563

Total debt
$
1,463

 
$
1,463

Shareholders' equity
$
4,647

 
$
5,098

Total debt as a % of total capital (1)
23.9
%
 
22.3
%
(1) Total capital represents the aggregate amount of total debt and total shareholders' equity which was $6,110 million and $6,561 million as of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, respectively.
Sources and uses of cash
In summary, our cash flows from operating, investing, and financing from continuing operations for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 were as follows:
 
For the Years Ended
($ in millions)
September 26, 2014
 
September 27, 2013
 
September 28, 2012
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
831

 
$
694

 
$
556

Net cash used in investing activities
(221
)
 
(545
)
 
(470
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(261
)
 
(419
)
 
(475
)
Cash flow from operating activities
Cash flow from operating activities can fluctuate significantly from period to period as working capital needs and the timing of payments for items such as restructuring activities, pension funding, income taxes and other items impact reported cash flow.
The net change in working capital reduced operating cash flow by $53 million in fiscal 2014. The significant changes in working capital included a $93 million increase in accounts receivable, a $98 million increase in contracts in progress and a $91 million increase in prepaid expenses and other assets, partially offset by a $205 million increase in accrued expenses and other liabilities and a $53 million increase in accounts payable.
The net change in working capital reduced operating cash flow by $393 million in fiscal 2013. The significant changes in working capital included a $226 million decrease in accrued expenses and other liabilities, a $75 million increase in accounts receivable, a $36 million increase in inventories, a $32 million decrease in deferred revenue and a $31 million decrease in income taxes payable, partially offset by a $31 million decrease in prepaid expenses and other assets.

49


The net change in working capital reduced operating cash flow by $481 million in fiscal 2012. The significant changes in working capital included a $179 million decrease in income taxes payable, a $121 million increase in accounts receivable, an $81 million decrease in accrued and other liabilities, and a $71 million increase in inventories, partially offset by a $44 million increase in accounts payable.
During fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, we paid approximately $74 million, $81 million and $89 million, respectively, in cash related to restructuring activities. See Note 4 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding our restructuring activities.
In connection with the 2012 Separation, we paid $58 million, $165 million and $18 million in separation costs during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
During fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, we made environmental remediation payments related to environmental remediation activities for a facility located in Marinette, Wisconsin, of $63 million, $51 million and $10 million, respectively.
During the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 we made required contributions of $54 million, $50 million and $81 million, respectively, to our U.S. and non-U.S. pension plans. We also made voluntary contributions of nil during the years ended September 26, 2014, September 27, 2013 and September 28, 2012 to our U.S. plans. The Company anticipates that it will contribute at least the minimum required to its pension plans in 2015 of $13 million for the U.S. plans and $23 million for non-U.S. plans.
Income taxes paid, net of refunds, related to continuing operations were $102 million, $134 million and $129 million in fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
Net interest paid related to continuing operations was $84 million, $80 million and $202 million in fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
Cash flow from investing activities
Cash flows related to investing activities consist primarily of cash used for capital expenditures and acquisitions, proceeds derived from divestitures of businesses and assets and the purchase and sales and maturities of investments.
We made capital expenditures of $288 million, $270 million and $295 million during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The level of capital expenditures in fiscal year 2015 is expected to exceed the spending levels in fiscal year 2014 and is also expected to exceed depreciation expense.
During 2014, we paid cash for acquisitions included in continuing operations totaling $65 million, net of $1 million cash acquired, which is related to acquisitions included in our NA Installation & Services and ROW Installation & Services segments. During 2013, we paid cash for acquisitions included in continuing operations totaling $229 million, net of $9 million cash acquired, which primarily related to the acquisition of Exacq Technologies within our Global Products segment. During 2012, we paid cash for acquisitions included in continuing operations totaling $217 million, net of cash acquired of $17 million, which primarily related to the acquisition of Visonic Ltd. within our Global Products segment.
During fiscal 2014 and 2013, we received cash proceeds, net of cash divested, of $1 million and $17 million, respectively, for divestitures. During 2012, cash paid related to divestitures was $5 million. See Note 3 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
We maintain captive insurance companies to manage certain of our insurable liabilities. The captive insurance companies held certain investment accounts for the purposes of providing collateral for our insurable liabilities. During fiscal 2014, the portfolio of investments was liquidated and we now provide letters of credit as collateral.
During fiscal 2014, we made net purchases of investments of $103 million. This represented the purchase of time deposits of $275 million, and $62 million of trading securities which will serve to partially offset changes in the market value of liabilities for an unfunded non-qualified defined contribution pension plan. These purchases were partially offset by the liquidation of the portfolio of investments held by the captive insurance companies. During fiscal 2013 and 2012, we made purchases of investments of $45 million, and sales of investments of $41 million, respectively. See Note 12 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
During fiscal 2014, we also generated $250 million in proceeds from the sale of our equity method investment in Atkore, as described in Note 3 to our Consolidated Financial Statements.

50


Cash flow from financing activities
Cash flows from financing activities relate primarily to proceeds received from incurring debt and issuing stock, and cash used to repay debt, repurchase stock, and make dividend payments to shareholders.
During the fourth quarter of 2012, in connection with the Separation, Tyco and its finance subsidiary, Tyco International Finance S.A. ("TIFSA"), redeemed various debt securities maturing from 2013 to 2023 issued by TIFSA and/or Tyco, in an aggregate principal amount of $2.6 billion. See Note 10 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
On June 22, 2012, TIFSA, as the Borrower, and the Company as the Guarantor, entered into a Five-Year Senior Unsecured Credit Agreement providing for revolving credit commitments in the aggregate amount of $1.0 billion. As of September 26, 2014, there were no amounts drawn under this revolving credit facility.
TIFSA's revolving credit facility contains customary terms and conditions, and financial covenants that limit the ratio of our debt to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization and that limit our ability to incur subsidiary debt or grant liens on our property. Our indentures contain customary covenants including limits on negative pledges, subsidiary debt and sale/leaseback transactions. None of these covenants are considered restrictive to our business.
During 2014, 2013 and 2012, TIFSA issued commercial paper to U.S. institutional accredited investors and qualified institutional buyers. Borrowings under the commercial paper program are available for general corporate purposes. As of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, TIFSA had no commercial paper outstanding. The maximum aggregate amount of unsecured commercial paper notes available to be issued, on a private placement basis, under the commercial paper program is $1 billion as of September 26, 2014.
Pursuant to our share repurchase program, we may repurchase Tyco shares from time to time in open market purchases at prevailing market prices, in negotiated transactions off the market, or pursuant to an approved trading plan in accordance with applicable regulations. In January 2013, the Company's Board of Directors approved a $600 million share repurchase program. In March 2014, and September 2014, the Company's Board of Directors authorized an additional $1.75 billion and $1 billion in share repurchases. During the year ended September 26, 2014, we repurchased approximately 42 million common shares for approximately $1.8 billion. During the year ended September 27, 2013, we repurchased approximately 10 million common shares for approximately $300 million. During the year ended September 28, 2012, we repurchased approximately 11 million common shares for approximately $500 million.
On March 5, 2014, our shareholders approved a cash dividend of $0.72 per common share payable to shareholders in four quarterly installments of $0.18 in May 2014, August 2014, November 2014 and February 2015. During fiscal years 2014, 2013 and 2012, we paid cash dividends of approximately $311 million, $288 million and $461 million, respectively. See Note 15 to our Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.
During fiscal 2014, we paid $66 million in cash to purchase the remaining ownership interest of a joint venture in Brazil, which is part of the Company's ROW Installation & Services segment.
Management believes that cash generated by or available to us should be sufficient to fund our capital and operational business needs for the foreseeable future, including capital expenditures, quarterly dividend payments, share repurchases, separation-related and other expenses.
Commitments and Contingencies
For a detailed discussion of contingencies related to tax and litigation matters and governmental investigations, see Notes 6 and 13 to our Consolidated Financial Statements.

51


Contractual Obligations
Contractual obligations and commitments for debt, minimum lease payment obligations under non-cancelable operating leases and purchase obligations as of September 26, 2014 are as follows ($ in millions):
 
Fiscal Year
 
 
 
 
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
Thereafter
 
Total
Debt principal(1)
$

 
$
258

 
$

 
$
67

 
$
364

 
$
746

 
$
1,435

Interest payments(2)
93

 
88

 
84

 
83

 
66

 
63

 
477

Operating leases
185

 
163

 
122

 
81

 
44

 
82

 
677

Purchase obligations(3)
375

 
66

 
28

 
1

 
1

 

 
471

Total contractual cash obligations(4)
$
653

 
$
575

 
$
234

 
$
232

 
$
475

 
$
891

 
$
3,060

_______________________________________________________________________________

(1) 
Debt principal consists of the aggregate principal amount of our public debt outstanding, excluding debt discount, swap activity and interest.
(2) 
Interest payments consist of interest on our fixed interest rate debt.
(3) 
Purchase obligations consist of commitments for purchases of goods and services.
(4) 
Other long-term liabilities excluded from the above contractual obligation table primarily consist of the following: pension and postretirement costs (see Note 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements), income taxes (see Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements), contingent consideration (see Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements), warranties (see Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements) and environmental liabilities (see Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements). We are unable to estimate the timing of payment for these items due to the inherent uncertainties related to these obligations. However, the minimum required contributions to our pension plans are expected to be approximately $36 million in 2015 and we do not expect to make any material contributions in 2015 related to other postretirement benefit plans.
As of September 26, 2014, we recorded gross unrecognized tax benefits of $267 million and gross interest and penalties of $36 million. We are unable to make a reasonably reliable estimate of the timing for the remaining payments in future years; therefore, such amounts have been excluded from the above contractual obligation table. However, based on the current status of our income tax audits, we believe that it is reasonably possible that between nil and $20 million in unrecognized tax benefits may be resolved in the next twelve months. Although the Company had unrecognized tax benefits that, if recognized, would affect the effective tax rate, the Company had net operating loss carryforwards which would offset the cash impact of any such recognition of unrecognized tax benefits relating to the current year.
In the normal course of business, we are liable for contract completion and product performance. In the opinion of management, such obligations will not significantly affect our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
In connection with the 2012 Separation we entered into a liability sharing agreement regarding certain actions that were pending against Tyco prior to the 2012 Separation. Under the 2012 Tax Sharing Agreement, Pentair, Tyco and ADT share (i) certain pre-Distribution income tax liabilities that arise from adjustments made by tax authorities to Tyco Flow Control's, Tyco's and ADT's U.S. income tax returns, and (ii) payments required to be made by Tyco with respect to the 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement, excluding approximately $175 million of pre-2012 Separation related tax liabilities that were anticipated to be paid prior to the 2012 Separation (collectively, "Shared Tax Liabilities"). The Company will be responsible for the first $500 million of Shared Tax Liabilities. Pentair and ADT will share 42% and 58%, respectively, of the next $225 million of Shared Tax Liabilities. Pentair, ADT and Tyco will share 20%, 27.5% and 52.5%, respectively, of Shared Tax Liabilities above $725 million. The Company expects to pay $21 million to settle certain pre-2012 Separation related tax liabilities. The timing and amounts of these payments are subject to a number of uncertainties and could change. See Notes 13 and 6, respectively, to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
In connection with the 2007 Separation, we entered into a liability sharing agreement regarding certain actions that were pending against Tyco prior to the 2007 Separation. Under the 2007 Separation and Distribution Agreement and 2007 Tax Sharing Agreement, we have assumed 27%, Covidien has assumed 42% and TE Connectivity has assumed 31% of certain Tyco pre-Separation contingent and other corporate liabilities, which, as of September 26, 2014, primarily relate to tax contingencies and potential actions with respect to the spin-offs or the distributions made or brought by any third party.

52


Backlog
We had a backlog of unfilled orders of $4,862 million and $4,812 million as of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, respectively.
The Company's backlog includes recurring revenue-in-force and long-term deferred revenue for upfront fees from its NA and ROW Installation & Services segments. Revenue-in-force represents 12 months' revenue associated with monitoring and maintenance services under contract in the security and fire business. Backlog by segment was as follows ($ in millions):
 
NA Installation
& Services
 
ROW
Installation
& Services
 
Global
Products
 
Total
As of September 27, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Backlog
$
908

 
$
939

 
$
196

 
$
2,043

  Recurring Revenue in Force
1,239

 
1,194

 

 
2,433

  Deferred Revenue
296

 
40

 

 
336

Total Backlog
$
2,443

 
$
2,173

 
$
196

 
$
4,812

As of September 26, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Backlog
$
992

 
$
999

 
$
181

 
$
2,172

  Recurring Revenue in Force
1,243

 
1,143

 

 
2,386

  Deferred Revenue
266

 
38

 

 
304

Total Backlog
$
2,501

 
$
2,180

 
$
181

 
$
4,862

Backlog increased $50 million, or 1.0%, to $4,862 million as of September 26, 2014 as compared to $4,812 million in the prior year. The net increase in backlog as of September 26, 2014 was primarily due to a $58 million increase in total backlog in our NA Installation & Services segment relating to our fire business. This increase was partially offset by a decline in recurring revenue in force and deferred revenue in our security business. The $7 million increase in our ROW Installation & Services segment total backlog was driven by an increase in Growth Markets and Asia, which was further improved by the Westfire and other acquisitions. Total backlog for our Global Products segment declined by $15 million due to our fire products and life safety businesses, which was partially offset by growth in our security business. Changes in foreign currency had an unfavorable impact on backlog of $128 million, or 2.7%, and primarily related to the ROW Installation & Services segment.
Guarantees
Certain of our business segments have guaranteed the performance of third-parties and provided financial guarantees for uncompleted work and financial commitments. The terms of these guarantees vary with end dates ranging from fiscal year 2015 through the completion of such transactions and would typically be triggered in the event of nonperformance. The Company's performance under the guarantees, if required, would not have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
There are certain guarantees or indemnifications extended among Tyco, Covidien, TE Connectivity, ADT and Pentair in accordance with the terms of the 2007 and 2012 Separation and Distribution Agreements and the Tax Sharing Agreements. The guarantees primarily relate to certain contingent tax liabilities included in the Tax Sharing Agreements. At the time of the 2007 and 2012 Separations, we recorded liabilities necessary to recognize the fair value of such guarantees and indemnifications. See Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion of the Tax Sharing Agreements. In addition, prior to the 2007 and 2012 Separations we provided support in the form of financial and/or performance guarantees to various Covidien, TE Connectivity, ADT and Tyco Flow Control operating entities. To the extent these guarantees were not assigned in connection with the 2007 and 2012 Separations, we assumed primary liability on any remaining such support. See Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion of these liabilities.
In disposing of assets or businesses, we often provide representations, warranties and/or indemnities to cover various risks including, for example, unknown damage to the assets, environmental risks involved in the sale of real estate, liability to investigate and remediate environmental contamination at waste disposal sites and manufacturing facilities, and unidentified tax liabilities and legal fees related to periods prior to disposition. We have no reason to believe that these uncertainties would have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. We have recorded liabilities for known indemnifications included as part of environmental liabilities.

53


In the normal course of business, we are liable for contract completion and product performance. We record estimated product warranty costs at the time of sale. In the opinion of management, such obligations will not significantly affect our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
During the year ended September 26, 2014, Tyco replaced available for sale investments held as collateral for the Company's insurable liabilities with letters of credit of approximately $137 million. As of September 26, 2014 and September 27, 2013, we had total outstanding letters of credit and bank guarantees of approximately $662 million and $424 million, respectively.
For a detailed discussion of guarantees and indemnifications, see Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Accounting Pronouncements
See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements and Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements.
Non-U.S. GAAP Measure
In an effort to provide investors with additional information regarding our results as determined by U.S. GAAP, we also disclose the non-U.S. GAAP measure of organic revenue growth (decline). We believe that this measure is useful to investors in evaluating our operating performance for the periods presented. When read in conjunction with our U.S. GAAP revenue, it enables investors to better evaluate our operations without giving effect to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates and acquisition and divestiture activity, either of which may be significant from period to period. In addition, organic revenue growth (decline) is a factor we use in internal evaluations of the overall performance of our business. This measure is not a financial measure under U.S. GAAP and should not be considered as a substitute for revenue as determined in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and it may not be comparable to similarly titled measures reported by other companies. Organic revenue growth (decline) presented herein is defined as revenue growth (decline) excluding the effects of foreign currency fluctuations, acquisitions and divestitures and other changes that may not reflect underlying results and trends. Our organic growth (decline) calculations incorporate an estimate of prior year reported net revenue associated with acquired entities that have been fully integrated within the first year, and exclude prior year net revenue associated with entities that do not meet the criteria for discontinued operations which have been divested within the past year ("adjusted number"). We calculate the rate of organic growth (decline) based on the adjusted number to better reflect the rate of growth (decline) of the combined business, in the case of acquisitions, or the remaining business, in the case of dispositions. We base the rate of organic growth (decline) for acquired businesses that are not fully integrated within the first year upon unadjusted historical net revenue. Foreign currency fluctuations are calculated by subtracting (i) the U.S. dollar equivalent of local currencies for the current period using monthly weighted average exchange rates for the prior period from (ii) the U.S. dollar equivalent of local currencies for the current period using monthly weighted average exchange rates for the current period. We may use organic revenue growth (decline) as a component of our compensation programs.
The table below details the components of organic revenue growth and reconciles the non-U.S. GAAP measure to U.S. GAAP net revenue growth.
Fiscal 2014
 
Net
Revenue
for
Fiscal 2013
 
Base Year
Adjustments
(Divestitures)
 
Adjusted
Fiscal 2013
Base Revenue
 
Foreign
Currency
 
Acquisitions
 
Organic
Revenue
 
Organic Growth
Percentage(1)
 
Net
Revenue
for
Fiscal 2014
 
($ in millions)
NA Installation & Services
$
3,891

 
$
(42
)
 
$
3,849

 
$
(29
)
 
$
19

 
$
37

 
1.0
%
 
$
3,876

ROW Installation & Services
3,843

 
(67
)
 
3,776

 
(46
)
 
119

 
71

 
1.9
%
 
3,920

Global Products
2,339

 
2

 
2,341

 
(7
)
 
63

 
147

 
6.3
%
 
2,544

Total Net Revenue
$
10,073

 
$
(107
)
 
$
9,966

 
$
(82
)
 
$
201

 
$
255

 
2.6
%
 
$
10,340

_______________________________________________________________________________

(1) 
Organic revenue growth percentage based on adjusted fiscal 2013 base revenue.

54



Fiscal 2013
 
Net
Revenue
for
Fiscal 2012
 
Base Year
Adjustments
(Divestitures)
 
Adjusted
Fiscal 2012
Base Revenue
 
Foreign
Currency
 
Acquisitions
 
Other(2)
 
Organic
Revenue
 
Organic
Growth (Decline)
Percentage(1)
 
Net
Revenue
for
Fiscal 2013
 
($ in millions)
NA Installation & Services
$
3,962

 
$
(30
)
 
$
3,932

 
$
(3
)
 
$
7

 
$

 
$
(45
)
 
(1.1
)%
 
$
3,891

ROW Installation & Services
3,830

 
(10
)
 
3,820

 
(64
)