10-K 1 d836469d10k.htm FORM 10-K Form 10-K
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

FORM 10-K

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014

Commission file number 001-09718

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Pennsylvania

    

25-1435979

 
  (State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)      (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)  

One PNC Plaza

249 Fifth Avenue

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222-2707

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code - (412) 762-2000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class      

 Name of Each Exchange

    on Which Registered    

Common Stock, par value $5.00

    New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing a 1/4,000 Interest in a Share of Fixed-to-Floating Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series P

    New York Stock Exchange

Depositary Shares Each Representing a 1/4,000 Interest in a Share of 5.375% Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series Q

Warrants (expiring December 31, 2018) to purchase Common Stock

   

New York Stock Exchange

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

$1.80 Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock - Series B, par value $1.00

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes X No     

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes      No X

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes X No     

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes X No     

Indicate by check mark if the disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.     

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer X

  Accelerated filer        Non-accelerated filer        Smaller reporting company     

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes      No X

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s outstanding voting common stock held by nonaffiliates on June 30, 2014, determined using the per share closing price on that date on the New York Stock Exchange of $89.05, was approximately $47.3 billion. There is no non-voting common equity of the registrant outstanding.

Number of shares of registrant’s common stock outstanding at February 13, 2015: 520,689,714

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the definitive Proxy Statement of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A for the 2015 annual meeting of shareholders (Proxy Statement) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

PART I

     

Item 1

   Business.      1   

Item 1A

   Risk Factors.      15   

Item 1B

   Unresolved Staff Comments.      26   

Item 2

   Properties.      26   

Item 3

   Legal Proceedings.      26   

Item 4

   Mine Safety Disclosures.      26   

Executive Officers of the Registrant

     26   

Directors of the Registrant

     28   

PART II

     

Item 5

   Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.      28   
   Common Stock Performance Graph      29   

Item 6

   Selected Financial Data.      30   

Item 7

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A).      32   
  

Executive Summary

     32   
  

Consolidated Income Statement Review

     37   
  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Review

     39   
  

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements And Variable Interest Entities

     49   
  

Fair Value Measurements

     50   
  

Business Segments Review

     50   
  

Critical Accounting Estimates And Judgments

     61   
  

Status Of Qualified Defined Benefit Pension Plan

     65   
  

Recourse And Repurchase Obligations

     67   
  

Risk Management

     69   
  

2013 Versus 2012

     95   
  

Glossary Of Terms

     99   
  

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information

     103   

Item 7A

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.      104   

Item 8

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.      105   
   Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm      105   
   Consolidated Income Statement      106   
   Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income      107   
   Consolidated Balance Sheet      108   
   Consolidated Statement Of Changes In Equity      109   
   Consolidated Statement Of Cash Flows      110   
   Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements      112   
  

Note 1 Accounting Policies

     112   
  

Note 2 Loan Sale and Servicing Activities and Variable Interest Entities

     124   

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

     Page  

Item 8

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. (continued)   
  

Note 3 Asset Quality

     128   
  

Note 4 Purchased Loans

     142   
  

Note 5 Allowances for Loan and Lease Losses and Unfunded Loan Commitments and Letters of Credit

     143   
  

Note 6 Investment Securities

     146   
  

Note 7 Fair Value

     151   
  

Note 8 Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

     171   
  

Note 9 Premises, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements

     174   
  

Note 10 Time Deposits

     174   
  

Note 11 Borrowed Funds

     174   
  

Note 12 Capital Securities of a Subsidiary Trust and Perpetual Trust Securities

     175   
  

Note 13 Employee Benefit Plans

     177   
  

Note 14 Stock Based Compensation Plans

     184   
  

Note 15 Financial Derivatives

     187   
  

Note 16 Earnings Per Share

     195   
  

Note 17 Equity

     196   
  

Note 18 Other Comprehensive Income

     198   
  

Note 19 Income Taxes

     200   
  

Note 20 Regulatory Matters

     202   
  

Note 21 Legal Proceedings

     203   
  

Note 22 Commitments and Guarantees

     212   
  

Note 23 Parent Company

     218   
  

Note 24 Segment Reporting

     219   
  

Note 25 Subsequent Events

     221   
   Statistical Information (Unaudited)      222   

Item 9

   Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.      231   

Item 9A

   Controls and Procedures.      231   

Item 9B

   Other Information.      231   

PART III

  

Item 10

   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.      231   

Item 11

   Executive Compensation.      232   

Item 12

   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.      232   

Item 13

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.      234   

Item 14

   Principal Accounting Fees and Services.      234   

PART IV

     

Item 15

   Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.      234   

SIGNATURES

     235   

EXHIBIT INDEX

  

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

MD&A TABLE REFERENCE

 

Table

  

Description

  

Page

 

1

   Summary Financial Results      33   

2

   Summarized Average Balance Sheet      35   

3

   Results Of Businesses – Summary      36   

4

   Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin      37   

5

   Noninterest Income      37   

6

   Summarized Balance Sheet Data      39   

7

   Details Of Loans      40   

8

   Accretion – Purchased Impaired Loans      41   

9

   Purchased Impaired Loans – Accretable Yield      41   

10

   Valuation of Purchased Impaired Loans      42   

11

   Weighted Average Life of the Purchased Impaired Portfolios      42   

12

   Accretable Difference Sensitivity – Total Purchased Impaired Loans      42   

13

   Net Unfunded Loan Commitments      43   

14

   Investment Securities      43   

15

   Loans Held For Sale      45   

16

   Details Of Funding Sources      45   

17

   Shareholders’ Equity      46   

18

   Basel III Capital      47   

19

   Fair Value Measurements – Summary      50   

20

   Retail Banking Table      51   

21

   Corporate & Institutional Banking Table      54   

22

   Asset Management Group Table      56   

23

   Residential Mortgage Banking Table      58   

24

   BlackRock Table      59   

25

   Non-Strategic Assets Portfolio Table      60   

26

   Pension Expense – Sensitivity Analysis      66   

27

   Analysis of Quarterly Residential Mortgage Repurchase Claims by Vintage      68   

28

   Analysis of Residential Mortgage Unresolved Asserted Indemnification and Repurchase Claims      68   

29

   Analysis of Residential Mortgage Indemnification and Repurchase Claim Settlement Activity      68   

30

   Nonperforming Assets By Type      73   

31

   OREO and Foreclosed Assets      73   

32

   Change in Nonperforming Assets      74   

33

   Accruing Loans Past Due 30 To 59 Days      75   

34

   Accruing Loans Past Due 60 To 89 Days      75   

35

   Accruing Loans Past Due 90 Days Or More      75   

36

   Home Equity Lines of Credit – Draw Period End Dates      76   

37

   Consumer Real Estate Related Loan Modifications      77   

38

   Consumer Real Estate Related Loan Modifications Re-Default by Vintage      78   

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

MD&A TABLE REFERENCE (Continued)

Table

  

Description

  

Page

 

39

   Summary of Troubled Debt Restructurings      79   

40

   Loan Charge-Offs And Recoveries      80   

41

   Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses      81   

42

   PNC Bank Bank Notes Issued During 2014      87   

43

   PNC Bank Senior and Subordinated Debt      88   

44

   FHLB Borrowings      88   

45

   Parent Company Senior and Subordinated Debt and Hybrid Capital Instruments      89   

46

   Credit Ratings as of December 31, 2014 for PNC and PNC Bank      90   

47

   Contractual Obligations      90   

48

   Other Commitments      90   

49

   Interest Sensitivity Analysis      91   

50

   Net Interest Income Sensitivity to Alternative Rate Scenarios (Fourth Quarter 2014)      91   

51

   Alternate Interest Rate Scenarios: One Year Forward      92   

52

   Enterprise-Wide Gains/Losses Versus Value-at-Risk      92   

53

   Customer-Related Trading Revenue      92   

54

   Equity Investments Summary      93   

55

   Financial Derivatives Summary      95   

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS TABLE REFERENCE

 

Table

  

Description

  

Page

 

56

   Certain Financial Information and Cash Flows Associated with Loan Sale and Servicing Activities      125   

57

   Principal Balance, Delinquent Loans, and Net Charge-offs Related to Serviced Loans      126   

58

   Consolidated VIEs – Carrying Value      126   

59

   Non-Consolidated VIEs      127   

60

   Analysis of Loan Portfolio      129   

61

   Nonperforming Assets      130   

62

   Commercial Lending Asset Quality Indicators      132   

63

   Home Equity and Residential Real Estate Balances      133   

64

   Home Equity and Residential Real Estate Asset Quality Indicators – Excluding Purchased Impaired Loans      134   

65

   Home Equity and Residential Real Estate Asset Quality Indicators – Purchased Impaired Loans      135   

66

   Credit Card and Other Consumer Loan Classes Asset Quality Indicators      137   

67

   Summary of Troubled Debt Restructurings      138   

68

   Financial Impact and TDRs by Concession Type      139   

69

   TDRs that were Modified in the Past Twelve Months which have Subsequently Defaulted      140   

70

   Impaired Loans      141   

71

   Purchased Impaired Loans – Balances      142   

72

   Purchased Impaired Loans – Accretable Yield      143   

73

   Rollforward of Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses and Associated Loan Data      144   

74

   Rollforward of Allowance for Unfunded Loan Commitments and Letters of Credit      145   

75

   Investment Securities Summary      146   

76

   Gross Unrealized Loss and Fair Value of Securities Available for Sale      148   

77

   Credit Impairment Assessment Assumptions – Non-Agency Residential Mortgage-Backed and Asset-Backed Securities      149   

78

   Rollforward of Cumulative OTTI Credit Losses Recognized in Earnings      149   

79

   Gains (Losses) on Sales of Securities Available for Sale      150   

80

   Contractual Maturity of Debt Securities      150   

81

   Weighted-Average Expected Maturity of Mortgage and Other Asset-Backed Debt Securities      151   

82

   Fair Value of Securities Pledged and Accepted as Collateral      151   

83

   Fair Value Measurements – Recurring Basis Summary      157   

84

   Reconciliation of Level 3 Assets and Liabilities      159   

85

   Fair Value Measurements – Recurring Quantitative Information      162   

86

   Fair Value Measurements – Nonrecurring      165   

87

   Fair Value Measurements – Nonrecurring Quantitative Information      166   

88

   Fair Value Option – Changes in Fair Value      167   

89

   Fair Value Option – Fair Value and Principal Balances      168   

90

   Additional Fair Value Information Related to Other Financial Instruments      169   

91

   Changes in Goodwill by Business Segment      171   

92

   Other Intangible Assets      171   

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS TABLE REFERENCE (Continued)

Table

  

Description

  

Page

 

93

   Amortization Expense on Existing Intangible Assets      171   

94

   Summary of Changes in Customer-Related and Other Intangible Assets      171   

95

   Commercial Mortgage Servicing Rights Accounted for at Fair Value      172   

96

   Commercial Mortgage Servicing Rights Accounted for Under the Amortization Method      172   

97

   Residential Mortgage Servicing Rights      173   

98

   Commercial Mortgage Loan Servicing Rights – Key Valuation Assumptions      173   

99

   Residential Mortgage Loan Servicing Rights – Key Valuation Assumptions      173   

100

   Fees from Mortgage and Other Loan Servicing      173   

101

   Premises, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements      174   

102

   Depreciation and Amortization Expense      174   

103

   Lease Rental Expense      174   

104

   Bank Notes, Senior Debt and Subordinated Debt      174   

105

   Capital Securities of a Subsidiary Trust      175   

106

   Perpetual Trust Securities Summary      175   

107

   Summary of Replacement Capital Covenants of Perpetual Trust Securities      176   

108

   Summary of Contractual Commitments of Perpetual Trust Securities      176   

109

   Reconciliation of Changes in Projected Benefit Obligation and Change in Plan Assets      177   

110

   Asset Strategy Allocations      178   

111

   Pension Plan Assets – Fair Value Hierarchy      180   

112

   Rollforward of Pension Plan Level 3 Assets      181   

113

   Estimated Cash Flows      181   

114

   Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost      182   

115

   Net Periodic Costs – Assumptions      182   

116

   Other Pension Assumptions      182   

117

   Effect of One Percent Change in Assumed Health Care Cost      183   

118

   Estimated Amortization of Unamortized Actuarial Gains and Losses – 2015      183   

119

   Option Pricing Assumptions      184   

120

   Stock Option Rollforward      184   

121

   Nonvested Incentive/Performance Unit Share Awards and Restricted Stock/Share Unit Awards – Rollforward      185   

122

   Nonvested Cash-Payable Incentive/Performance Units and Restricted Share Units – Rollforward      186   

123

   Employee Stock Purchase Plan – Summary      186   

124

   Total Gross Derivatives      187   

125

   Derivatives Designated As Hedging Instruments under GAAP      188   

126

   Gains (Losses) on Derivatives and Related Hedged Items – Fair Value Hedges      188   

127

   Gains (Losses) on Derivatives and Related Cash Flows – Cash Flow Hedges      189   

128

   Gains (Losses) on Derivatives – Net Investment Hedges      189   

129

   Derivatives Not Designated As Hedging Instruments under GAAP      190   

130

   Gains (Losses) on Derivatives Not Designated As Hedging Instruments under GAAP      192   

131

   Credit Default Swaps      192   

 


Table of Contents

THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

Cross-Reference Index to 2014 Form 10-K (continued)

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS TABLE REFERENCE (Continued)

Table

  

Description

  

Page

 

132

   Credit Ratings of Credit Default Swaps      193   

133

   Referenced/Underlying Assets of Credit Default Swaps      193   

134

   Risk Participation Agreements Sold      193   

135

   Internal Credit Ratings of Risk Participation Agreements Sold      193   

136

   Derivative Assets and Liabilities Offsetting      194   

137

   Basic and Diluted Earnings per Common Share      195   

138

   Preferred Stock – Authorized, Issued and Outstanding      196   

139

   Terms of Outstanding Preferred Stock      196   

140

   Other Comprehensive Income      198   

141

   Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Components      200   

142

   Components of Income Tax Expense      200   

143

   Deferred Tax Assets and Liabilities      200   

144

   Reconciliation of Statutory and Effective Tax Rates      201   

145

   Net Operating Loss Carryforwards and Tax Credit Carryforwards      201   

146

   Change in Unrecognized Tax Benefits      201   

147

   Basel Regulatory Capital      202   

148

   Credit Commitments      212   

149

   Internal Credit Ratings Related to Net Outstanding Standby Letters of Credit      212   

150

   Analysis of Commercial Mortgage Recourse Obligations      214   

151

   Analysis of Indemnification and Repurchase Liability for Asserted Claims and Unasserted Claims      215   

152

   Reinsurance Agreements Exposure      216   

153

   Reinsurance Reserves – Rollforward      216   

154

   Resale and Repurchase Agreements Offsetting      217   

155

   Parent Company – Income Statement      218   

156

   Parent Company – Balance Sheet      218   

157

   Parent Company – Interest Paid and Income Tax Refunds (Payments)      218   

158

   Parent Company – Statement of Cash Flows      219   

159

   Results Of Businesses      221   

 


Table of Contents

PART I

Forward-Looking Statements: From time to time, The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (PNC or the Corporation) has made and may continue to make written or oral forward-looking statements regarding our outlook for earnings, revenues, expenses, capital and liquidity levels and ratios, asset levels, asset quality, financial position and other matters regarding or affecting PNC and its future business and operations or the impact of legal, regulatory or supervisory matters on our business operations or performance. This Annual Report on Form 10-K (the Report or Form 10-K) also includes forward-looking statements. With respect to all such forward-looking statements, you should review our Risk Factors discussion in Item 1A, our Risk Management, Critical Accounting Estimates And Judgments, and Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information sections included in Item 7, and Note 21 Legal Proceedings and Note 22 Commitments and Guarantees in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Report. See page 99 for a glossary of certain terms used in this Report.

 

ITEM 1 – BUSINESS

Business Overview

Headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, we are one of the largest diversified financial services companies in the United States. We have businesses engaged in retail banking, corporate and institutional banking, asset management, and residential mortgage banking, providing many of our products and services nationally, as well as other products and services in our primary geographic markets located in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Maryland, Indiana, North Carolina, Florida, Kentucky, Washington, D.C., Delaware, Virginia, Alabama, Missouri, Georgia, Wisconsin and South Carolina. We also provide certain products and services internationally. At December 31, 2014, our consolidated total assets, total deposits and total shareholders’ equity were $345.1 billion, $232.2 billion and $44.6 billion, respectively.

We were incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1983 with the consolidation of Pittsburgh National Corporation and Provident National Corporation. Since 1983, we have diversified our geographical presence, business mix and product capabilities through internal growth, strategic bank and non-bank acquisitions and equity investments, and the formation of various non-banking subsidiaries.

Review Of Business Segments

In addition to the following information relating to our lines of business, we incorporate the information under the captions Business Segment Highlights and Business Segments Review in Item 7 of this Report here by reference. Also, we include the financial and other information by business in Note 24 Segment Reporting in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report here by reference.

Assets, revenue and earnings attributable to foreign activities were not material in the periods presented. Business segment results for periods prior to 2014 have been reclassified to reflect current methodologies and current business and management structure and to present those periods on the same basis.

Retail Banking provides deposit, lending, brokerage, investment management and cash management services to consumer and small business customers within our primary geographic markets. Our customers are serviced through our branch network, ATMs, call centers, online banking and mobile channels. The branch network is located primarily in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Maryland, Indiana, North Carolina, Florida, Kentucky, Washington, D.C., Delaware, Virginia, Alabama, Missouri, Georgia, Wisconsin and South Carolina.

Our core strategy is to acquire and retain customers who maintain their primary checking and transaction relationships with PNC. We also seek revenue growth by deepening our share of our customers’ financial assets, such as savings and liquidity deposits, loans and investable assets, including retirement assets. A strategic priority for PNC is to redefine the retail banking business in response to changing customer preferences. A key element of this strategy is to expand the use of lower-cost alternative distribution channels while continuing to optimize the traditional branch network. In addition, we have a disciplined process to continually improve the engagement of both our employees and customers, which is a strong indicator of customer growth, retention and relationship expansion.

Corporate & Institutional Banking provides lending, treasury management, and capital markets-related products and services to mid-sized and large corporations, government and not-for-profit entities. Lending products include secured and unsecured loans, letters of credit and equipment leases. Treasury management services include cash and investment management, receivables management, disbursement services, funds transfer services, information reporting and global trade services. Capital markets-related products and services include foreign exchange, derivatives, securities, loan syndications, mergers and acquisitions advisory, equity capital markets advisory and related services. We also provide commercial loan servicing and real estate advisory and technology solutions for the commercial real estate finance industry. Products and services are generally provided within our primary geographic markets, with certain products and services offered nationally and internationally.

 

 

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. – Form 10-K    1


Table of Contents

Corporate & Institutional Banking’s strategy is to be the leading relationship-based provider of traditional banking products and services to its customers through the economic cycles. We aim to expand our market share and drive higher returns by growing and deepening customer relationships while maintaining prudent risk and expense management.

Asset Management Group includes personal wealth management for high net worth and ultra high net worth clients and institutional asset management. Wealth management products and services include investment and retirement planning, customized investment management, private banking, tailored credit solutions, and trust management and administration for individuals and their families. Hawthorn provides multi-generational family planning including wealth strategy, investment management, private banking, tax and estate planning guidance, performance reporting and personal administration services to ultra high net worth families. Institutional asset management provides investment management, custody administration and retirement administration services. Institutional clients include corporations, unions, municipalities, non-profits, foundations and endowments, primarily located in our geographic footprint.

Asset Management Group is focused on being one of the premier bank-held individual and institutional asset managers in each of the markets it serves. The business seeks to deliver high quality banking advice and trust and investment management services to our high net worth, ultra high net worth and institutional client sectors through a broad array of products and services. Asset Management Group’s primary goals are to service our clients, grow the business and deliver solid financial performance with prudent risk and expense management.

Residential Mortgage Banking directly originates first lien residential mortgage loans on a nationwide basis with a significant presence within the retail banking footprint. Mortgage loans represent loans collateralized by one-to-four-family residential real estate. These loans are typically underwritten to government agency and/or third-party standards, and either sold, servicing retained, or held on PNC’s balance sheet. Loan sales are primarily to secondary mortgage conduits of Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC), Federal Home Loan Banks and third-party investors, or are securitized and issued under the Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA) program, as described in more detail in Note 2 Loan Sale and Servicing Activities and Variable Interest Entities in Item 8 of this Report and included here by reference. The mortgage servicing operation performs all functions related to servicing mortgage loans, primarily those in first lien position, for various investors and for loans owned by PNC.

Residential Mortgage Banking is focused on adding value to the PNC franchise by building stronger customer relationships, providing quality investment loans and mortgage servicing opportunities, and delivering acceptable returns consistent with our desired risk appetite. A strategic priority for PNC is to build a stronger residential mortgage business offering seamless delivery to customers while improving efficiencies. Our national distribution capability provides volume that drives economies of scale, risk dispersion and cost-effective extension of the retail banking footprint for cross-selling opportunities.

BlackRock, in which we hold an equity investment, is a leading publicly traded investment management firm providing a broad range of investment and risk management services to institutional and retail clients worldwide. Using a diverse platform of active and index investment strategies across asset classes, BlackRock develops investment outcomes and asset allocation solutions for clients. Product offerings include single- and multi-asset class portfolios investing in equities, fixed income, alternatives and money market instruments. BlackRock also offers an investment and risk management technology platform, risk analytics and advisory services and solutions to a broad base of institutional investors. We hold our equity investment in BlackRock as a key component of our diversified revenue strategy. BlackRock is a publicly traded company, and additional information regarding its business is available in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Non-Strategic Assets Portfolio includes a consumer portfolio of mainly residential mortgage and brokered home equity loans and lines of credit and a small commercial/commercial real estate loan and lease portfolio. We obtained a significant portion of these non-strategic assets through acquisitions of other companies.

Subsidiaries

Our corporate legal structure at December 31, 2014 consisted of one domestic subsidiary bank, including its subsidiaries, and approximately 80 active non-bank subsidiaries, in addition to various affordable housing investments. Our bank subsidiary is PNC Bank, National Association (PNC Bank), a national bank headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For additional information on our subsidiaries, see Exhibit 21 to this Report.

 

 

2    The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. – Form 10-K


Table of Contents

Statistical Disclosure By Bank Holding Companies

The following statistical information is included on the indicated pages of this Report and is incorporated herein by reference:

 

     Form 10-K page

Average Consolidated Balance Sheet And Net Interest Analysis

  223-224

Analysis Of Year-To-Year Changes In Net Interest Income

  225

Book Values Of Securities

  43-44

and 146-151

Maturities And Weighted-Average Yield Of Securities

  150-151

Loan Types

  39-43,

129-130 and 226

Selected Loan Maturities And Interest Sensitivity

  230

Nonaccrual, Past Due And Restructured Loans And Other Nonperforming Assets

  72-79,

116-119,
128-141 and 228

Potential Problem Loans And Loans Held For Sale

  45 and 72-82

Summary Of Loan Loss Experience

  80-82, 128-145

and 229

Assignment Of Allowance For Loan And Lease Losses

  80-82 and 229

Average Amount And Average Rate Paid On Deposits

  223-224

Time Deposits Of $100,000 Or More

  174 and 230

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

  30-31

Short-term borrowings – not included as average balances during 2014, 2013, and 2012 were less than 30% of total shareholders’ equity at the end of each period.

   

Supervision and Regulation

PNC is a bank holding company (BHC) registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (BHC Act) and a financial holding company under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLB Act).

We are subject to numerous governmental regulations, some of which are highlighted below. See Note 20 Regulatory Matters in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for additional information regarding our regulatory matters. Applicable laws and regulations restrict our permissible activities and investments, impose conditions and requirements on the products and services we offer and the manner in which they are offered and sold, and require compliance with protections for loan, deposit, brokerage,

fiduciary, investment management and other customers, among other things. They also restrict our ability to repurchase stock or pay dividends, or to receive dividends from our bank subsidiary, and impose capital adequacy requirements. The consequences of noncompliance can include substantial monetary and nonmonetary sanctions.

In addition, we are subject to comprehensive supervision and periodic examination by, among other regulatory bodies, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). These examinations consider not only compliance with applicable laws, regulations and supervisory policies of the agency, but also capital levels, asset quality and risk, management ability and performance, earnings, liquidity and various other factors. The results of examination activity by any of our federal bank regulators potentially can result in the imposition of significant limitations on our activities and growth. These regulatory agencies generally have broad discretion to impose restrictions and limitations on the operations of a regulated entity and take enforcement action against a regulated entity where the relevant agency determines, among other things, that such operations fail to comply with applicable law or regulations or are conducted in an unsafe or unsound manner. This supervisory framework, including the examination reports and supervisory ratings (which are not publicly available) of the agencies, could materially impact the conduct, growth and profitability of our operations.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is responsible for examining PNC Bank and its affiliates (including PNC) for compliance with most federal consumer financial protection laws, including the laws relating to fair lending and prohibiting unfair, deceptive or abusive acts or practices in connection with the offer, sale or provision of consumer financial products or services, and for enforcing such laws with respect to PNC Bank and its affiliates. The results of the CFPB’s examinations, which are not publicly available, also can result in restrictions or limitations on the operations of a regulated entity as well as enforcement actions against a regulated entity, including the imposition of monetary penalties and nonmonetary requirements.

We also are subject to regulation by the SEC by virtue of our status as a public company and by the SEC and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) due to the nature of some of our businesses. Our banking and securities businesses with operations outside the United States, including those conducted by BlackRock, are also subject to regulation by appropriate authorities in the foreign jurisdictions in which they do business.

As a regulated financial services firm, our relationships and good standing with regulators are of fundamental importance to the operation and growth of our businesses. The Federal Reserve, OCC, CFPB, SEC, CFTC and other domestic and

 

 

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foreign regulators have broad enforcement powers, and certain of the regulators have the power to approve, deny, or refuse to act upon our applications or notices to conduct new activities, acquire or divest businesses, assets or deposits, or reconfigure existing operations.

We anticipate new legislative and regulatory initiatives over the next several years, focused specifically on banking and other financial services in which we are engaged. Legislative and regulatory developments to date, as well as those that come in the future, have had and are likely to continue to have an impact on the conduct of our business. The more detailed description of the significant regulations to which we are subject included in this Report is based on the current regulatory environment and is subject to potentially material change. See also the additional information included as Risk Factors in Item 1A of this Report discussing the impact of financial regulatory reform initiatives, including Dodd-Frank and regulations promulgated to implement it, on the regulatory environment for PNC and the financial services industry.

Among other areas that have been receiving a high level of regulatory focus over the last several years are compliance with the Bank Secrecy Act and anti-money laundering laws, the oversight of arrangements with third-party vendors and suppliers, the protection of confidential customer information, and cyber-security more generally. In addition, there is an increased focus on fair lending and other consumer protection issues.

Additional legislation, changes in rules promulgated by federal financial regulators, other federal and state regulatory authorities and self-regulatory organizations, or changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, may directly affect the method of operation and profitability of our businesses. The profitability of our businesses could also be affected by rules and regulations that impact the business and financial communities in general, including changes to the laws governing taxation, antitrust regulation and electronic commerce.

There are numerous rules governing the regulation of financial services institutions and their holding companies. Accordingly, the following discussion is general in nature and does not purport to be complete or to describe all of the laws, regulations and supervisory policies that apply to us. To a substantial extent, the purpose of the regulation and supervision of financial services institutions and their holding companies is not to protect our shareholders and our non-customer creditors, but rather to protect our customers (including depositors) and the financial markets in general.

Dodd-Frank Act

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank), which was signed into law on July 21, 2010, comprehensively reformed the regulation of financial institutions, products and services. Dodd-Frank

requires various federal regulatory agencies to implement numerous new rules and regulations. Because federal agencies are granted broad discretion in drafting these rules and regulations, and many implementing rules have not yet been issued, have only been issued in proposed form, or have only recently been finalized, many of the details and much of the impact of Dodd-Frank may not be known for months or years. Among other things, Dodd-Frank established the CFPB; provided for new capital standards that eliminate the treatment of trust preferred securities as Tier 1 regulatory capital; required that deposit insurance assessments be calculated based on an insured depository institution’s assets rather than its insured deposits; raised the minimum Designated Reserve Ratio (the balance in the Deposit Insurance Fund divided by estimated insured deposits) to 1.35%; established a comprehensive regulatory regime for the derivatives activities of financial institutions; prohibited banking entities, after a transition period, from engaging in certain types of proprietary trading, as well as having investments in, sponsoring, and maintaining certain types of relationships with hedge funds and private equity funds (through provisions commonly referred to as the “Volcker Rule”); placed limitations on the interchange fees charged for debit card transactions; and established new minimum mortgage underwriting standards for residential mortgages.

Financial Stability Oversight Council. Dodd-Frank also established the 10-member inter-agency Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC), which is charged with identifying and monitoring systemic risks and strengthening the regulation of financial holding companies and certain non-bank companies deemed to be “systemically important.” In extraordinary cases, the FSOC, in conjunction with the Federal Reserve, could order the break-up of financial firms that are deemed to present a grave threat to the financial stability of the United States.

Banking Regulation and Supervision

Enhanced Prudential Requirements. Dodd-Frank requires the Federal Reserve to establish enhanced prudential standards for BHCs with total consolidated assets of $50 billion or more, such as PNC, as well as systemically important non-bank financial companies designated by the FSOC for Federal Reserve supervision. For such BHCs, these enhanced standards must be more stringent than the standards and requirements applicable to BHCs with less than $50 billion in assets, and must increase in stringency based on the Federal Reserve’s assessment of a BHC’s risk to the financial system. The FSOC may make recommendations to the Federal Reserve concerning the establishment and refinement of these enhanced prudential standards.

The Federal Reserve in February 2014 issued final rules that establish the new enhanced prudential standards related to liquidity risk management and overall risk management for BHCs with $50 billion or more in assets. These new rules, which took effect for PNC on January 1, 2015, among other

 

 

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things, require that covered BHCs conduct liquidity stress tests at least monthly, maintain a contingency funding plan and sufficient highly liquid assets to meet net stress cash-flow needs (as projected under the company’s liquidity stress tests) for 30 days, and establish certain oversight and governance responsibilities for the chief risk officer, the board of directors and the risk committee of the board of directors of a covered company. In addition, the rules implement the provisions of Dodd-Frank that require the Federal Reserve to impose a maximum 15-to-1 debt to equity ratio on a BHC if the FSOC determines that the company poses a grave threat to the financial stability of the United States and that the imposition of such a debt-to-equity requirement would mitigate such risk. The rules issued in February 2014 did not finalize the other enhanced prudential standards that the Federal Reserve proposed in December 2011, including counterparty credit exposure limits and early remediation requirements, although the Federal Reserve has indicated that these matters remain under development. See the Recent Market and Industry Developments portion of Item 7 MD&A and Item 1A Risk Factors for additional information.

Regulatory Capital Requirements, Stress Testing and Capital Planning. PNC and PNC Bank are subject to the regulatory capital requirements established by the Federal Reserve and the OCC, respectively. These requirements have changed, and will continue to change significantly, as a result of the rules adopted by the U.S. banking agencies in July 2013 to implement the new international guidelines for determining regulatory capital established by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (Basel Committee) known as “Basel III,” as well as to implement certain provisions of Dodd-Frank. The rules adopted in July 2013 generally have three fundamental parts.

The first part, referred to as the Basel III capital rule, among other things, narrows the definition of regulatory capital, requires banking organizations with $15 billion or more in assets (including PNC) to phase-out trust preferred securities from Tier 1 regulatory capital, establishes a new common equity Tier 1 capital regulatory requirement for banking organizations, and revises the capital levels at which PNC and PNC Bank would be subject to prompt corrective action. These rules also require that significant common stock investments in unconsolidated financial institutions (as defined in the rule), as well as mortgage servicing rights and deferred tax assets, be deducted from Tier 1 common regulatory capital to the extent such items individually exceed 10%, or in the aggregate exceed 15%, of the organization’s adjusted Basel III common equity Tier 1 regulatory capital. We previously referred to Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital as Basel III Tier 1 common capital. The Basel III capital rule also significantly limits the extent to which minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries (including minority interests in the form of REIT preferred securities) may be included in regulatory capital. In addition, for banking organizations, like PNC, which are subject to the advanced

approaches (described below), the rule includes other comprehensive income related to both available for sale securities and pension and other post-retirement plans as a component of common equity Tier 1 capital. The Basel III capital rule became effective on January 1, 2014 for PNC and PNC Bank, although many provisions are phased-in over a period of years, with the rules generally fully phased-in as of January 1, 2019.

The second part of the rules adopted in July 2013 is referred to as the advanced approaches and materially revises the framework for the risk-weighting of assets under Basel II. The Basel II framework, which was adopted by the Basel Committee in 2004, seeks to provide more risk-sensitive regulatory capital calculations and promote enhanced risk management practices among large, internationally active banking organizations. The advanced approaches modifications adopted by the U.S. banking agencies became effective on January 1, 2014, and generally apply to banking organizations that have $250 billion or more in total consolidated assets or that have $10 billion or more in on-balance sheet foreign exposure. Prior to fully implementing the advanced approaches to calculate risk-weighted assets, PNC and PNC Bank must successfully complete a “parallel run” qualification phase. PNC and PNC Bank entered this parallel run qualification phase on January 1, 2013. Although the minimum parallel run qualification period is four quarters, the parallel run period for PNC and PNC Bank, now in its third year, is consistent with the experience of other U.S. banks that have all had multi-year parallel run periods.

The third major part of the rules adopted in July 2013 is referred to as the standardized approach and materially revises the framework for the risk-weighting of assets under Basel I. The standardized approach, for example, establishes a new framework for the risk-weighting of securitization and non-U.S. sovereign exposures, and increases the risk-weights on certain types of assets including high-volatility commercial real estate and past due corporate and retail exposures. The standardized approach took effect on January 1, 2015.

The risk-based capital and leverage rules that the federal banking regulators have adopted require the capital-to-assets ratios of banking organizations, including PNC and PNC Bank, to meet certain minimum standards. The Basel III rule generally divides regulatory capital into three components: common equity Tier 1 capital, additional Tier 1 capital (which, together with common equity Tier 1 capital, comprises Tier 1 capital) and Tier 2 capital. Common equity Tier 1 capital is generally common stock, retained earnings, qualifying minority interest and, for advanced approaches banking organizations, accumulated other comprehensive income, less the deductions required to be made from common equity Tier 1 capital. Additional Tier 1 generally includes, among other things, perpetual preferred stock and qualifying minority interests, less the deductions required to be made from additional Tier 1. Tier 2 capital generally comprises qualifying subordinated debt.

 

 

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Total capital is the sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital, less the deductions required from total capital. For additional information regarding the differences between Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital and Basel I Tier 1 common capital, see the Capital section of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of Item 7 of this Report.

Under the regulatory capital rules, a banking organization’s risk-based capital ratios are calculated by allocating assets and specified off-balance sheet financial instruments into risk-weighted categories (with higher levels of capital being required for the categories perceived as representing greater risk), which are used to determine the amount of a banking organization’s total risk-weighted assets (RWAs). Under the standardized approach, the nominal dollar amounts of assets and credit equivalent amounts of off-balance sheet items are generally multiplied by one of several risk adjustment percentages set forth in the rules and that increase as the perceived credit risk of the relevant asset increases. For certain types of exposures, such as securitization exposures, the standardized approach establishes one or more methodologies that are to be used to calculate the risk-weighted asset amount for the exposure.

As a result of the staggered effective dates of the final U.S. capital rules issued in July 2013, as well as the fact that PNC remains in the parallel run qualification phase for the advanced approaches, PNC’s regulatory risk-based capital ratios in 2014 were based on the definitions of, and deductions from, capital under Basel III (as such definitions and deductions are phased-in for 2014) and Basel I risk-weighted assets (but subject to certain adjustments as defined by the Basel III rules). As of January 1, 2015, and until PNC has exited parallel run, PNC’s regulatory risk-based Basel III ratios will be calculated using the standardized approach for determining risk-weighted assets, and the definitions of, and deductions from, capital under Basel III (as such definitions and deductions are phased-in through 2019). Once PNC exits parallel run, its regulatory risk-based capital ratios will be the lower of the ratios calculated under the standardized approach or the advanced approaches. We refer to the capital ratios calculated using the phased-in Basel III provisions as the Transitional Basel III ratios. The Transitional Basel III regulatory capital ratios of PNC and PNC Bank as of December 31, 2014 exceeded the applicable minimum levels in effect for 2014. For additional information regarding the Transitional Basel III capital ratios of PNC and PNC Bank as of December 31, 2014, as well as the levels necessary to exceed the regulatory minimums and those needed to be considered “well capitalized”, see the Capital portion of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of Item 7 of this Report.

The Basel III capital rule requires that banking organizations maintain a minimum common equity Tier 1 ratio of 4.5%, a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0%, and a total capital ratio of 8.0%. Moreover, when fully phased-in on January 1, 2019, the rule

will require banking organizations to maintain a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of at least 7.0%, a Tier 1 capital ratio of at least 8.5%, and a total capital ratio of at least 10.5% to avoid limitations on capital distributions (including common stock dividends and share repurchases) and certain discretionary incentive compensation payments. For banking organizations that are subject to the advanced approaches, these higher capital conservation buffer levels above the regulatory minimums could be supplemented by a countercyclical capital buffer of up to an additional 2.5% during periods of excessive credit growth, although this buffer is initially set at zero in the United States.

In December 2014, the Federal Reserve requested comment on proposed rules that would apply an additional risk-based common equity Tier 1 capital surcharge of between 1.0% and 4.5% (when fully phased-in on January 1, 2019) to firms identified as globally systemically important banks (GSIBs) using a scoring methodology that is based on five measures of global systemic importance (size, interconnectedness, substitutability, complexity, and cross-jurisdictional activity). Based on the methodology proposed, PNC would not be subject to the proposed GSIB surcharge. In its December 2014 release, the Federal Reserve indicated that there is a significant gap between the systemic scores of the eight U.S. BHCs that would be subject to the proposed GSIB surcharge and other BHCs (such as PNC).

The regulatory capital framework adopted by the federal banking regulators also requires that banking organizations maintain a minimum amount of Tier 1 capital to average consolidated assets, referred to as the leverage ratio. Banking organizations are required to maintain a minimum leverage ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of 4.0%. As of December 31, 2014, the leverage ratios of PNC and PNC Bank were above the required minimum level.

Under the Basel III capital rule, banking organizations subject to the advanced approaches (such as PNC and PNC Bank) also will be subject to a new minimum 3.0% supplementary leverage ratio that becomes effective on January 1, 2018, with public regulatory reporting of the ratio beginning in 2015. Unlike the existing leverage ratio, the denominator of the supplementary leverage ratio takes into account certain off-balance sheet items, including loan commitments and potential future exposure under derivative contracts. Consistent with the January 2014 Basel Committee revisions to the leverage ratio, the U.S. banking agencies in September 2014 adopted final rules that, among other things, revise the denominator of the supplementary leverage ratio and the supplementary leverage ratio disclosures that covered banking organizations are required to make beginning in 2015. In April 2014, the U.S. banking agencies released final rules imposing a higher supplementary leverage ratio requirement on BHCs with total consolidated assets of more than $700 billion or assets under custody of more than $10 trillion, as well as the insured depository institution subsidiaries of these BHCs.

 

 

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Based on the asset and custody thresholds adopted in the final rules, these higher supplementary leverage requirements do not apply to PNC or PNC Bank.

The Federal Reserve and the international bodies responsible for establishing globally applicable regulatory standards for banks (the Financial Stability Board (FSB) and the Basel Committee) have been working during the past few years on developing a minimum total loss absorbing capacity (TLAC) requirement that would facilitate the orderly resolution of GSIBs by requiring that such firms maintain a minimum amount of regulatory capital and eligible debt that could be converted to equity upon failure. In November 2014, the FSB requested comment on a consultative document that would establish a global framework for the implementation of such a TLAC requirement. As the proposal would apply only to firms that are identified as a GSIB by the FSB, it would not apply to PNC. The comment period on the FSB proposal ended on February 2, 2015.

Failure to meet applicable capital guidelines could subject a banking organization to a variety of enforcement remedies available to the federal bank regulatory agencies, including a limitation on the ability to pay dividends or repurchase shares, the issuance of a capital directive to increase capital and, in severe cases, the termination of deposit insurance by the FDIC, and the appointment of a conservator or receiver. In some cases, the extent of these powers depends upon whether the institution in question is considered “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized” or “critically undercapitalized.” Generally, the smaller an institution’s capital base in relation to its risk-weighted or total assets, the greater the scope and severity of the agencies’ powers, ultimately permitting the agencies to appoint a receiver for the institution. Business activities may also be affected by an institution’s capital classification. For instance, only a “well capitalized” insured depository institution may accept brokered deposits without prior regulatory approval. In addition, in order to remain a financial holding company and engage in the broader range of financial activities authorized for such a company, PNC and PNC Bank must remain “well capitalized.” At December 31, 2014, PNC and PNC Bank exceeded the required ratios for classification as “well capitalized.” The Basel III capital rule revised the thresholds at which an insured depositary institution is considered “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized” or “critically undercapitalized.” The new thresholds among other things (i) include the common equity Tier 1 capital metric; (ii) generally increase the amount of Tier 1 capital required to remain within each capital category (other than the “critically undercapitalized” category); and (iii) for institutions subject to the advanced approaches, include a supplementary leverage ratio threshold in the definitions of “adequately capitalized” and “undercapitalized” once the supplementary leverage ratio takes effect as a minimum requirement in 2018. The revised thresholds generally took effect on January 1, 2015. For

additional discussion of capital adequacy requirements, we refer you to the Capital portion of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of Item 7 of this Report and to Note 20 Regulatory Matters in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

In addition to these regulatory capital requirements, PNC is subject to the Federal Reserve’s capital plan rule, annual capital stress testing requirements and Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) process, as well as the annual and mid-year Dodd-Frank capital stress testing (DFAST) requirements of the Federal Reserve and the OCC. As part of the CCAR process, the Federal Reserve undertakes a supervisory assessment of the capital adequacy of BHCs, including PNC, that have $50 billion or more in total consolidated assets. This capital adequacy assessment is based on a review of a comprehensive capital plan submitted by each participating BHC to the Federal Reserve that describes the company’s planned capital actions during the nine quarter review period, as well as the results of stress tests conducted by both the company and the Federal Reserve under different hypothetical macro-economic scenarios, including a supervisory adverse and a severely adverse scenario provided by the Federal Reserve. In evaluating a BHC’s capital plan, the Federal Reserve considers a number of qualitative factors. In assessing these qualitative factors, which have become increasingly important in the CCAR process in recent years, the Federal Reserve considers whether the BHC’s capital adequacy processes are supported by strong foundational risk management, effective loss and capital estimation methodologies, a sufficient capital adequacy assessment process, comprehensive capital policies and capital planning processes, robust internal controls, and effective governance. From a quantitative perspective, the Federal Reserve considers whether under different hypothetical macro-economic scenarios, including the supervisory severely adverse scenario, the company would be able to maintain throughout each quarter of the nine quarter planning horizon, even if it maintained its base case planned capital actions, (i) a projected pro forma Basel I Tier 1 common capital ratio above 5%, and (ii) regulatory risk-based and leverage capital ratios that exceed the minimums that are, or would then be, in effect for the company, taking into account the Basel III capital rules adopted in July 2013 and any applicable phase-in periods. In addition, the Federal Reserve evaluates a company’s projected path towards compliance with the Basel III regulatory capital framework on a fully implemented basis. After completing its review, the Federal Reserve may object or not object to the BHC’s proposed capital actions, such as plans to pay or increase common stock dividends, reinstate or increase common stock repurchase programs, or redeem preferred stock or other regulatory capital instruments. In connection with the 2015 CCAR exercise, PNC filed its capital plan and stress testing results using financial data as of September 30, 2014 with the Federal Reserve on January 5, 2015. PNC expects to receive the Federal Reserve’s response (either a

 

 

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non-objection or objection) to the capital plan submitted as part of the 2015 CCAR in March 2015.

As part of the CCAR and annual DFAST processes, both the Federal Reserve and PNC release certain revenue, loss and capital results from their stress testing exercises. For the 2015 exercises, the Federal Reserve has announced that it intends to publish its supervisory revenue, loss and capital projections for participating BHCs under the supervisory adverse and severely adverse macro-economic scenarios using the common assumptions concerning capital distributions established by the Federal Reserve in its DFAST regulations (DFAST capital action assumptions), as well as capital ratio information using the firm’s proposed base case capital actions. Within 15 days after the Federal Reserve publishes its DFAST results, PNC also is required to publicly disclose its own estimates of certain capital, revenue and loss information under the same hypothetical supervisory severely adverse macro-economic scenario and applying the DFAST capital action assumptions. Federal Reserve regulations also require that PNC and other large BHCs conduct a separate mid-year stress test using financial data as of March 31 and three company-derived macro-economic scenarios (base, adverse and severely adverse) and publish a summary of the results under the severely adverse scenario. For the 2015 mid-year stress test, PNC must publish its results in the period between July 5 and August 4, 2015.

In October 2014, the Federal Reserve adopted amendments to its capital plan and stress testing rules that will modify the schedule for the CCAR and DFAST processes effective January 1, 2016. Beginning in 2016, covered BHCs are required to submit their annual capital plans and company-run stress test results to the Federal Reserve by April 5 of each year (rather than by January 5 as currently required). In order to transition to this new schedule, the Federal Reserve’s non-objection to a capital plan submitted in January 2015 will cover capital actions for the five quarter period from the second quarter of 2015 through and including the second quarter of 2016. Under the new schedule that becomes effective in 2016, the Federal Reserve will release its decisions on capital plans and release the results of its supervisory stress test by June 30, approximately three months later than currently. The amendments also shift the schedule for the company-run mid-cycle DFAST exercise, with PNC’s submission date for this exercise shifting to October 5 (from July 5) and the release date for company results moving to October (from July).

Basel III Liquidity Requirements. The Basel III framework adopted by the Basel Committee also includes new short-term liquidity standards (the “Liquidity Coverage Ratio” or “LCR”) and long-term funding standards (the “Net Stable Funding Ratio” or “NSFR”).

In September 2014, the U.S. banking agencies released final rules to implement the LCR. The LCR rules are designed to

ensure that covered banking organizations maintain an adequate level of cash and high quality, unencumbered liquid assets (HQLA) to meet estimated net liquidity needs in a short-term stress scenario using liquidity inflow and outflow assumptions provided in the rules (net cash outflow). An institution’s LCR is the amount of its HQLA, as defined and calculated in accordance with the haircuts and limitations in the rule, divided by its net cash outflow, with the quotient expressed as a percentage.

Top-tier BHCs (like PNC) that are subject to the advanced approaches for regulatory capital purposes, as well as any subsidiary depository institution of such a company that has $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets (such as PNC Bank), are subject to the full LCR (rather than the less stringent modified LCR) under the final rules that took effect January 1, 2015. However, the minimum required LCR and the requirement to calculate the LCR on a daily basis will be phased-in over a period of years. The minimum LCR PNC and PNC Bank are required to maintain in 2015 is 80% and increases to 90% in 2016 and then to 100% when fully phased-in in 2017. PNC and PNC Bank are required to calculate the LCR on a month-end basis until June 30, 2016, and then on a daily basis beginning on July 1, 2016. If an institution fails to meet the required minimum ratio, it must promptly notify its primary federal banking regulator and may be required to take remedial actions. An institution required to calculate its LCR on a month-end basis must consult with its regulator to determine whether the institution must provide a plan for achieving compliance with the minimum LCR. An institution required to calculate the LCR on a daily basis must promptly provide its regulator with a plan for achieving compliance with the minimum if its LCR is below the minimum for three consecutive business days.

For additional discussion of regulatory liquidity requirements, please refer to the Capital portion of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section and the Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of Item 7 of this Report.

The NSFR is designed to promote a stable maturity structure of assets and liabilities of banking organizations over a one-year time horizon. The Basel Committee, in October 2014, released the final NSFR framework. Under that framework, the NSFR would take effect as a minimum regulatory standard on January 1, 2018, although the U.S. banking agencies have not yet proposed rules to implement the NSFR.

Parent Company Liquidity and Dividends. The principal source of our liquidity at the parent company level is dividends from PNC Bank. PNC Bank is subject to various restrictions on its ability to pay dividends to PNC Bancorp, Inc., its direct parent, which is a wholly-owned direct subsidiary of PNC. PNC Bank is also subject to federal laws limiting extensions of credit to its parent holding company and non-bank affiliates as discussed in Note 20 Regulatory

 

 

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Matters in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report. Further information on bank level liquidity and parent company liquidity and on certain contractual restrictions is also available in the Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section and the Trust Preferred Securities and REIT Preferred Securities portion of the Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements And Variable Interest Entities section of Item 7 of this Report, and in Note 12 Capital Securities of a Subsidiary Trust and Perpetual Trust Securities in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

Federal Reserve rules provide that a BHC is expected to serve as a source of financial strength to its subsidiary banks and to commit resources to support such banks if necessary. Consistent with the “source of strength” policy for subsidiary banks, the Federal Reserve has stated that, as a matter of prudent banking, a BHC generally should not maintain a rate of cash dividends unless its net income available to common shareholders has been sufficient to fully fund the dividends and the prospective rate of earnings retention appears to be consistent with the corporation’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. Further, in providing guidance to the large BHCs participating in the 2015 CCAR, discussed above, the Federal Reserve stated that it expects capital plans submitted in 2015 to reflect conservative dividend payout ratios and net share repurchase programs, and that requests that imply common dividend payout ratios above 30% of projected after-tax net income available to common shareholders will receive particularly close scrutiny.

Additional Powers Under the GLB Act. The GLB Act permits a qualifying BHC to become a “financial holding company” and thereby engage in, or affiliate with financial companies engaging in, a broader range of activities than would otherwise be permitted for a BHC. Permitted affiliates include securities underwriters and dealers, insurance companies and companies engaged in other activities that are determined by the Federal Reserve, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to be “financial in nature or incidental thereto” or are determined by the Federal Reserve unilaterally to be “complementary” to financial activities. We became a financial holding company as of March 13, 2000. In order to be and remain a financial holding company, a BHC and its subsidiary depository institutions must be “well capitalized” and “well managed.” In addition, a financial holding company generally may not engage in a new financial activity, or acquire a company engaged in a new activity, if any of its insured depository institutions received a less than Satisfactory rating at its most recent evaluation under the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). Among other activities, we currently rely on our status as a financial holding company to conduct merchant banking activities and securities underwriting and dealing activities. As subsidiaries of a financial holding company under the GLB Act, our non-bank subsidiaries are generally allowed to conduct new financial activities, and PNC is generally permitted to acquire non-bank

financial companies that have less than $10 billion in assets, with after-the-fact notice to the Federal Reserve.

The Federal Reserve is the “umbrella” regulator of a financial holding company, with its operating entities, such as its subsidiary broker-dealers, investment advisers, insurance companies and banks, as well as investment companies advised by investment adviser subsidiaries of the financial holding company, also being subject to the jurisdiction of various federal and state “functional” regulators with normal regulatory responsibility for companies in their lines of business.

In addition, the GLB Act permits qualifying national banks to engage in expanded activities through the formation of a “financial subsidiary.” PNC Bank has filed a financial subsidiary certification with the OCC and currently engages in insurance agency activities through financial subsidiaries. PNC Bank may also generally engage through a financial subsidiary in any activity that is determined to be financial in nature or incidental to a financial activity by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Federal Reserve. Certain activities, however, are impermissible for a financial subsidiary of a national bank, including certain insurance underwriting activities, insurance company investment activities, real estate investment or development, and merchant banking. In order to have a financial subsidiary, a national bank and each of its depository institution affiliates must be and remain “well capitalized” and “well managed.” In addition, a financial subsidiary generally may not engage in a new financial activity, or acquire a company engaged in a new financial activity, if the national bank or any of its insured depository institution affiliates received a less than Satisfactory rating at its most recent evaluation under the CRA.

Volcker Rule. In December 2013, the U.S. banking agencies, SEC and CFTC issued final rules to implement the “Volcker Rule” provisions of Dodd-Frank. The rules prohibit banks and their affiliates (collectively, banking entities) from trading as principal on a short-term basis in securities, derivatives and certain other financial instruments, but also includes several important exclusions and exemptions from this prohibition. These exclusions and exemptions, for example, permit banking entities, subject to a variety of conditions and restrictions, to trade as principal for market making, risk-mitigating hedging, and securities underwriting purposes, and to trade in U.S. government and municipal securities. The rules also prohibit banking entities from investing in, sponsoring, and having certain relationships with private funds (such as, for example, private equity or hedge funds) that would be an investment company for purposes of the Investment Company Act of 1940 but for the exemptions in sections 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of that act (covered funds). Again there are exemptions from these restrictions which themselves are subject to a variety of conditions. Moreover, the rules prohibit banking entities from engaging in permitted trading

 

 

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or covered fund activities if the activity would involve or result in a material conflict of interest between the banking entity and its clients, customers, or counterparties, result in a material exposure by the banking entity to a high-risk asset or a high-risk trading strategy, or pose a threat to the safety and soundness of the banking entity or to the financial stability of the United States. Banking entities, like PNC, that have $50 billion or more in total assets are required to establish and maintain an enhanced compliance program designed to ensure that the entity complies with the requirements of the final rule. Based on the level of PNC’s trading assets and liabilities, PNC is not subject to the metrics reporting requirements of the final rules.

The Volcker rule’s prohibitions and restrictions generally become effective on July 21, 2015. In December 2014, the Federal Reserve granted an extension of the conformance period to give all banking entities until July 21, 2016 to conform their investments in, and relationships with, covered funds that were in place prior to December 31, 2013 (legacy covered funds). Moreover, the Federal Reserve indicated its intent to grant an additional one-year extension of the conformance period for legacy covered funds, which would give banking entities until July 21, 2017 to conform their ownership interests in, and relationships with, legacy covered funds. The Federal Reserve also has the ability to provide up to an additional 5-year conformance period for investments held as of May 1, 2010 in qualifying illiquid funds. For additional information concerning the potential impact of the Volcker Rule on PNC’s operations, please refer to Item 1A Risk Factors of this Report.

Other Federal Reserve and OCC Regulation and Supervision. The federal banking agencies possess broad powers to take corrective action as deemed appropriate for an insured depository institution and its holding company.

Laws and regulations limit the scope of our permitted activities and investments. National banks (such as PNC Bank) and their operating subsidiaries generally may engage only in activities that are determined by the OCC to be part of or incidental to the business of banking, although a financial subsidiary may engage in a broader range of activities as described above.

Moreover, examination ratings of “3” or lower, lower capital ratios than peer group institutions, regulatory concerns regarding management, controls, assets, operations or other factors, can all potentially result in practical limitations on the ability of a bank or BHC to engage in new activities, grow, acquire new businesses, repurchase its stock or pay dividends, or to continue to conduct existing activities. The OCC, moreover, has been applying certain heightened risk management and governance expectations in its supervision of large national banks, including PNC Bank. In September 2014, the OCC incorporated these expectations into final enforceable guidelines established under section 39 of the

Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act). The guidelines establish minimum standards for the design and implementation of a risk governance framework at large insured national banks, including PNC Bank. The guidelines describe the appropriate risk management roles and responsibilities of front line units, independent risk management, internal audit, and the board of directors, and provide that a bank should have a comprehensive written statement that articulates its risk appetite and serves as a basis for the framework (a risk appetite statement). PNC Bank is required to be in compliance with the guidelines by May 10, 2015. If the OCC determines that a national bank is not in compliance with these or other guidelines established under section 39 of the FDI Act, the OCC may require the bank to submit a corrective action plan and may initiate enforcement action against the bank if an acceptable plan is not submitted or the bank fails to comply with an approved plan.

The Federal Reserve’s prior approval is required whenever we propose to acquire all or substantially all of the assets of any bank or thrift, to acquire direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of any class of voting securities of any bank or thrift, or to merge or consolidate with any other BHC or thrift holding company. The BHC Act enumerates the factors the Federal Reserve must consider when reviewing the merger of BHCs, the acquisition of banks, or the acquisition of voting securities of a bank or BHC. These factors include the competitive effects of the proposal in the relevant geographic markets; the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the companies and banks involved in the transaction; the effect of the transaction on the financial stability of the United States; the organizations’ compliance with anti-money laundering laws and regulations; the convenience and needs of the communities to be served; and the records of performance under the CRA of the insured depository institutions involved in the transaction. In cases involving interstate bank acquisitions, the Federal Reserve also must consider the concentration of deposits nationwide and in certain individual states. Under Dodd-Frank, a BHC also is generally prohibited from merging or consolidating with, or acquiring, another company if the resulting company’s liabilities upon consummation would exceed 10% of the aggregate liabilities of the U.S. financial sector (including the U.S. liabilities of foreign financial companies). OCC prior approval is required for PNC Bank to acquire another insured bank or thrift by merger or to acquire deposits or substantially all of the assets of such institutions. In deciding whether to approve such a transaction, the OCC is required to consider factors similar to those that must be considered by the Federal Reserve. Our ability to grow through acquisitions could be limited by these approval requirements.

At December 31, 2014, PNC Bank had an “Outstanding” rating with respect to CRA.

 

 

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Because of PNC’s ownership interest in BlackRock, BlackRock is subject to the supervision and regulation of the Federal Reserve.

FDIC Insurance and Related Matters. PNC Bank is insured by the FDIC and subject to premium assessments. Regulatory matters could increase the cost of FDIC deposit insurance premiums to an insured bank as FDIC deposit insurance premiums are “risk based.” Therefore, higher fee percentages would be charged to banks that have lower capital ratios or higher risk profiles. These risk profiles take into account, among other things, weaknesses that are found by the primary banking regulator through its examination and supervision of the bank and the bank’s holdings of assets or liabilities classified as higher risk by the FDIC. For example, the amount of brokered deposits (as defined under the FDI Act) held by an insured depository institution can adversely affect the institution’s deposit insurance assessments. A negative evaluation by the FDIC or a bank’s primary federal banking regulator could increase the costs to a bank and result in an aggregate cost of deposit funds higher than that of competing banks in a lower risk category. The methodology for the deposit insurance base calculation currently uses average assets less average tangible equity.

On January 5, 2015, the FDIC issued guidance in the form of frequently asked questions regarding the definition of brokered deposits under the FDI Act, as well as the acceptance and regulatory reporting of brokered deposits by insured depository institutions. Federal banking laws and regulations apply a variety of requirements or restrictions on insured depository institutions with respect to brokered deposits. For example, only a “well capitalized” insured depository institution may accept brokered deposits without prior regulatory approval and brokered deposits are generally subject to higher outflow assumptions than other types of deposits for purposes of the LCR.

Resolution Planning. Dodd-Frank requires BHCs that have $50 billion or more in assets, such as PNC, to periodically submit to the Federal Reserve and the FDIC a resolution plan that includes, among other things, an analysis of how the company could be resolved in a rapid and orderly fashion if the company were to fail or experience material financial distress. The Federal Reserve and the FDIC may jointly impose restrictions on a covered BHC, including additional capital requirements or limitations on growth, if the agencies jointly determine that the company’s plan is not credible or would not facilitate a rapid and orderly resolution of the company under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code (or other applicable resolution framework), and additionally could require the company to divest assets or take other actions if the company did not submit an acceptable resolution plan within two years after any such restrictions were imposed. The FDIC also has adopted a rule that requires large insured depository institutions, including PNC Bank, to periodically submit a resolution plan to the FDIC that includes, among other things,

an analysis of how the institution could be resolved under the FDI Act in a manner that protects depositors and limits losses or costs to creditors of the bank in accordance with the FDI Act. Depending on how the agencies conduct their review of the resolution plans submitted by PNC and PNC Bank, these requirements could affect the ways in which PNC structures and conducts its business and result in higher compliance and operating costs. PNC and PNC Bank submitted their 2014 resolution plans under these rules in December 2014.

CFPB Regulation and Supervision. As noted above, Dodd-Frank gives the CFPB authority to examine PNC and PNC Bank for compliance with a broad range of federal consumer financial laws and regulations, including the laws and regulations that relate to credit card, deposit, mortgage, automobile loans and other consumer financial products and services we offer. In addition, Dodd-Frank gives the CFPB broad authority to take corrective action against PNC Bank and PNC as it deems appropriate. The CFPB also has the power to issue regulations and take enforcement actions to prevent and remedy acts and practices relating to consumer financial products and services that it deems to be unfair, deceptive or abusive, and to impose new disclosure requirements for any consumer financial product or service. These authorities are in addition to the authority the CFPB assumed on July 21, 2011 under existing consumer financial law governing the provision of consumer financial products and services. While the CFPB concentrated much of its initial rulemaking efforts on a variety of mortgage related topics required under Dodd-Frank, including ability-to-repay and qualified mortgage standards, mortgage servicing standards, loan originator compensation standards, high-cost mortgage requirements, appraisal and escrow standards and requirements for higher-priced mortgages, and disclosure requirements, it is also engaged in rulemakings relating to other products and services offered by PNC Bank, including prepaid cards.

In January 2014, new rules issued by the CFPB for mortgage origination and mortgage servicing became effective. The rules require lenders to conduct a reasonable and good faith determination at or before consummation of a residential mortgage loan that the borrower will have a reasonable ability to repay the loan. The regulations also define criteria for making Qualified Mortgages which entitle the lender and any assignee to either a conclusive or rebuttable presumption of compliance with the ability to repay rule. The new mortgage servicing rules include new standards for notices to consumers, loss mitigation procedures, and consumer requests for information. Both the origination and servicing rules create new private rights of action for consumers in the event of certain violations. In August 2015, broad new regulations take effect concerning the disclosures we provide to prospective residential mortgage customers. These regulations, among other things, require the provision of new disclosures near the time a prospective borrower submits an application and three days prior to closing of a mortgage loan. In addition to the

 

 

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exercise of its rulemaking authority, the CFPB is continuing its ongoing examination and supervisory activities with respect to a number of consumer businesses and products.

Securities and Derivatives Regulation

Our registered broker-dealer and investment adviser subsidiaries are subject to rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC.

Several of our subsidiaries are registered with the SEC as investment advisers and may provide investment advisory services to clients, other PNC affiliates or related entities, including registered investment companies. Certain of these advisers are registered as investment advisers to private equity funds under rules adopted under Dodd-Frank.

Broker-dealer subsidiaries are subject to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and related regulations. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) is the primary self-regulatory organization (SRO) for our registered broker-dealer subsidiaries. Investment adviser subsidiaries are subject to the requirements of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and related regulations. An investment adviser to a registered investment company is also subject to the requirements of the Investment Company Act of 1940 and related regulations. Our broker-dealer and investment adviser subsidiaries also are subject to additional regulation by states or local jurisdictions.

Over the past several years, the SEC and other regulatory agencies have increased their focus on the asset management, mutual fund and broker-dealer industries. Congress and the SEC have adopted regulatory reforms and are considering additional reforms that have increased, and are likely to continue to increase, the extent of regulation of the mutual fund and broker-dealer industries and impose additional compliance obligations and costs on our subsidiaries involved with those industries. Under provisions of the federal securities laws applicable to broker-dealers, investment advisers and registered investment companies and their service providers, a determination by a court or regulatory agency that certain violations have occurred at a company or its affiliates can result in fines, restitution, a limitation on permitted activities, disqualification to continue to conduct certain activities and an inability to rely on certain favorable exemptions. Certain types of infractions and violations can also affect a public company in its timing and ability to expeditiously issue new securities into the capital markets. In addition, certain changes in the activities of a broker-dealer require approval from FINRA, and FINRA takes into account a variety of considerations in acting upon applications for such approval, including internal controls, capital levels, management experience and quality, prior enforcement and disciplinary history and supervisory concerns.

Title VII of Dodd-Frank imposes new comprehensive and significant regulations on the activities of financial institutions

that are active in the U.S. over-the-counter derivatives and foreign exchange markets. Title VII was enacted to (i) address systemic risk issues, (ii) bring greater transparency to the derivatives markets, (iii) provide enhanced disclosures and protection to customers, and (iv) promote market integrity. Among other things, Title VII: (i) requires the registration of both “swap dealers” and “major swap participants” with one or both of the CFTC (in the case of non security-based swaps) and the SEC (in the case of security-based swaps); (ii) requires that most standardized swaps be centrally cleared through a regulated clearing house and traded on a centralized exchange or swap execution facility; (iii) subjects swap dealers and major swap participants to capital and margin requirements in excess of historical practice; (iv) subjects swap dealers and major swap participants to comprehensive new recordkeeping and real-time public reporting requirements; (v) subjects swap dealers and major swap participants to new business conduct requirements, including the provision of daily marks to counterparties and disclosing to counterparties (pre-execution) the material risks, material incentives, and any conflicts of interest associated with their swap; and (vi) imposes special duties on swap dealers and major swap participants when transacting a swap with a “special entity” (e.g., governmental agency (federal, state or local) or political subdivision thereof, pension plan or endowment).

Based on the definition of a “swap dealer” under Title VII, PNC Bank registered with the CFTC as a swap dealer on January 31, 2013. As a result, PNC Bank is subject to the regulations and requirements imposed on registered swap dealers, and the CFTC will have a meaningful supervisory role with respect to PNC Bank’s derivatives and foreign exchange businesses. Because of the limited volume of our security-based swap activities, PNC Bank has not registered with the SEC as a security-based swap dealer. The regulations and requirements applicable to swap dealers will collectively impose implementation and ongoing compliance burdens on PNC Bank and will introduce additional legal risks (including as a result of newly applicable antifraud and anti-manipulation provisions and private rights of action).

As originally enacted, the so-called “swap push-out” provisions of Section 716 of Dodd-Frank required an insured depository institution that is a “swaps entity” (defined to include a registered swap dealer like PNC Bank) to cease engaging in certain types of swaps by July 16, 2013, although the institution’s appropriate Federal banking agency could extend this transition period. In 2013, PNC Bank received such an extension of the transition period to July 16, 2015 from its appropriate Federal banking agency. In December 2014, the U.S. Congress significantly narrowed the “push-out” restrictions of Section 716. These amendments generally allow insured depository institutions that are a swaps entity to engage in all types of swaps other than structured finance swaps (defined as a swap that references either an asset-backed security or a group or index primarily comprised of

 

 

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asset-backed securities). However, an insured depository institution is permitted to engage in structured finance swaps for hedging or other risk mitigating purposes. An insured depository institution that fails to comply with the restrictions in Section 716 could face restrictions on the institution’s access to the Federal Reserve’s discount window or FDIC deposit insurance or guarantees.

In addition, an investment adviser to private funds or to registered investment companies may be required to register with the CFTC as a commodity pool operator. Registration could impose significant new regulatory compliance burdens. Presently, we expect our subsidiaries that serve as investment advisers to such entities to be eligible for exemptions from registration as a commodity pool operator.

BlackRock has subsidiaries in securities and related businesses subject to SEC, other governmental agencies, state, local and FINRA regulation, and a federally chartered nondepository trust company subsidiary subject to supervision and regulation by the OCC. For additional information about the regulation of BlackRock by these agencies and otherwise, we refer you to the discussion under the “Regulation” section of Item 1 Business in BlackRock’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, which may be obtained electronically at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

Competition

We are subject to intense competition from other regulated banking organizations, as well as various other types of financial institutions and non-bank entities that can offer a number of similar products and services without being subject to bank regulatory supervision and restrictions.

In making loans, PNC Bank competes with traditional banking institutions as well as consumer finance companies, leasing companies and other non-bank lenders, and institutional investors including collateralized loan obligation (CLO) managers, hedge funds, mutual fund complexes and private equity firms. Loan pricing, structure and credit standards are extremely important in the current environment as we seek to achieve appropriate risk-adjusted returns. Traditional deposit-taking activities are also subject to pricing pressures and to customer migration as a result of intense competition for deposits and investments.

PNC Bank competes for deposits with:

   

Other commercial banks,

   

Savings banks,

   

Savings and loan associations,

   

Credit unions,

   

Treasury management service companies,

   

Insurance companies, and

   

Issuers of commercial paper and other securities, including mutual funds.

Our various non-bank businesses engaged in investment banking and alternative investment activities compete with:

   

Commercial banks,

   

Investment banking firms,

   

Merchant banks,

   

Insurance companies,

   

Private equity firms, and

   

Other investment vehicles.

In providing asset management services, our businesses compete with:

   

Investment management firms,

   

Large banks and other financial institutions,

   

Brokerage firms,

   

Mutual fund complexes, and

   

Insurance companies.

We include here by reference the additional information regarding competition and factors affecting our competitive position included in the Item 1A Risk Factors section of this Report.

Employees

Employees totaled 53,587 at December 31, 2014. This total includes 49,745 full-time and 3,842 part-time employees, of which 22,216 full-time and 3,274 part-time employees were employed by our Retail Banking business.

SEC Reports and Corporate Governance Information

We are subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act) and, in accordance with the Exchange Act, we file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements, and other information with the SEC. Our SEC File Number is 001-09718. You may read and copy this information at the SEC’s Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street NE, Room 1580, Washington, D.C. 20549. You can obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.

You can also obtain copies of this information by mail from the Public Reference Section of the SEC, 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549, at prescribed rates.

The SEC also maintains an internet website that contains reports, including exhibits, proxy and information statements, and other information about issuers, like us, who file electronically with the SEC. The address of that site is www.sec.gov. You can also inspect reports, proxy statements and other information about us at the offices of the New York Stock Exchange, 20 Broad Street, New York, New York 10005.

We also make our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed with or furnished to the

 

 

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SEC pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act available free of charge on our internet website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. PNC’s corporate internet address is www.pnc.com and you can find this information at www.pnc.com/secfilings. Shareholders and bondholders may also obtain copies of these filings without charge by contacting Shareholder Services at 800-982-7652 or via the online contact form at www.computershare.com/contactus for copies without exhibits, and by contacting Shareholder Relations at 800-843-2206 or via e-mail at investor.relations@pnc.com for copies of exhibits, including financial statement and schedule exhibits where applicable. The interactive data file (XBRL) exhibit is only available electronically.

Information about our Board of Directors and its committees and corporate governance at PNC is available on PNC’s corporate website at www.pnc.com/corporategovernance. Our PNC Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available on our corporate website at www.pnc.com/corporategovernance. In addition, any future amendments to, or waivers from, a provision of the PNC Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to our directors or executive officers (including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, and principal accounting officer or controller) will be posted at this internet address.

Shareholders who would like to request printed copies of the PNC Code of Business Conduct and Ethics or our Corporate Governance Guidelines or the charters of our Board’s Audit, Nominating and Governance, Personnel and Compensation, or Risk Committees (all of which are posted on the PNC corporate website at www.pnc.com/corporategovernance) may do so by sending their requests to PNC’s Corporate Secretary at corporate headquarters at One PNC Plaza, 249 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222-2707. Copies will be provided without charge to shareholders.

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the symbol “PNC.”

Internet Information

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.’s financial reports and information about its products and services are available on the internet at www.pnc.com. We provide information for investors on our corporate website under “About Us – Investor Relations,” such as Investor Events, SEC Filings, Financial Information (including Quarterly Earnings, Annual Reports, Proxy Statements and Regulatory Disclosures), Financial Press Releases, Message from the Chairman and Corporate Governance. Under “Investor Relations,” we will from time to time post information that we believe may be important or useful to investors. We use our Twitter account, @pncnews, as an additional way of disseminating public information from time to time to investors. We generally post the following on our corporate website shortly before or promptly following its

first use or release: financially-related press releases (including earnings releases), various SEC filings, including SEC Reports, presentation materials associated with earnings and other investor conference calls or events, and access to live and taped audio from earnings and other investor conference calls or events. In some cases, we may post the presentation materials for other investor conference calls or events several days prior to the call or event. For earnings and other conference calls or events, we generally include in our posted materials a cautionary statement regarding forward-looking and adjusted information and we provide GAAP reconciliations when we refer to adjusted information and results. Where applicable, we provide GAAP reconciliations for such additional information in materials for that event or in materials for other prior investor presentations or in our annual, quarterly or current reports. When warranted, we will also use our website to expedite public access to time-critical information regarding PNC in advance of distribution of a press release or a filing with the SEC disclosing the same information.

PNC is also required to provide additional public disclosure regarding estimated income, losses and pro forma regulatory capital ratios in March 2015 under a supervisory hypothetical severely adverse economic scenario and in September 2015 under a PNC-developed hypothetical severely adverse economic scenario, as well as information concerning its capital stress testing processes, pursuant to the stress testing regulations adopted by the Federal Reserve and the OCC. The timing of these disclosures will change beginning in 2016, as discussed in Regulatory Capital Requirements, Stress Testing and Capital Planning in the Supervision and Regulation section above. PNC also is required to make certain market risk-related public disclosures and certain additional regulatory capital-related disclosures under the regulatory capital rules adopted by the Federal banking agencies. Under these regulations, PNC may be able to satisfy at least a portion of these requirements through postings on its website, and PNC has done so and expects to continue to do so without also providing disclosure of this information through filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We also post on our website communications to our shareholders, such as the letter to shareholders that accompanies the Form 10-K mailed to shareholders, and may not file them as exhibits to filings with the SEC when not expressly required.

Where we have included web addresses in this Report, such as our web address and the web address of the SEC, we have included those web addresses as inactive textual references only. Except as specifically incorporated by reference into this Report, information on those websites is not part hereof.

 

 

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ITEM 1A – RISK FACTORS

We are subject to a number of risks potentially impacting our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. As a financial services organization, certain elements of risk are inherent in our transactions and operations and are present in the business decisions we make. Thus, we encounter risk as part of the normal course of our business, and we design risk management processes to help manage these risks.

Our success is dependent on our ability to identify, understand and manage the risks presented by our business activities so that we can appropriately balance revenue generation and profitability. These risks include, but are not limited to, credit risk, market risk, liquidity risk, operational risk, model risk, technology, compliance and legal risk, and strategic and reputation risk. We discuss our principal risk management processes and, in appropriate places, related historical performance in the Risk Management section included in Item 7 of this Report.

The following are the key risk factors that affect us. Any one or more of these risk factors could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows, in addition to presenting other possible adverse consequences, including those described below. These risk factors and other risks are also discussed further in other sections of this Report.

Difficult economic conditions or volatility in the financial markets would likely have an adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations.

As a financial services company, PNC’s business and overall financial performance are vulnerable to the impact of poor or weak economic conditions, particularly in the United States but also to some extent in the global economy. Recessionary conditions, particularly if severe such as was experienced starting in 2007 and ending in 2009, are likely to have a negative financial impact across the financial services industry, including on PNC. Recessionary economic conditions can lead to turmoil and volatility in financial markets, which can increase the adverse impact on financial institutions such as PNC, with the impact increased to the extent the conditions are more severe. A return to recessionary economic conditions in the United States would likely adversely affect PNC, its business and financial performance, with the impact potentially as or more detrimental than that of the last recession.

The economic recovery from the last recession continued in 2014, but at a slower pace than for recoveries from prior recessions. Although unemployment rates have dropped significantly from the highest levels during the recession, employment is not yet at robust levels. Consumer and business confidence is improving but remains in the cautious zone.

Although Congress and the President have recently been able to reach agreement on budgets and the U.S. government’s debt ceiling, significant long-term issues remain with respect to federal budgetary and spending matters, and it is unclear whether agreements to resolve these issues will be reached, particularly in light of the divided state of the U.S. government. Uncertainty resulting from these issues and recent difficulties in resolving these types of matters could contribute to slower economic growth. Another period where the Congress and the President cannot reach resolution of key federal budgetary and spending matters, leading to events such as actual or threatened government shutdowns or defaults, could adversely affect the U.S. economy. In recent years, a downgrade in the ratings for U.S. Treasury securities by a credit rating agency, an extended government shutdown, and substantial spending cuts through sequestration have resulted from government stalemate on budgetary issues.

The global recession and disruption of the financial markets led to concerns over the solvency of certain European countries, affecting these countries’ capital markets access and in some cases sovereign credit ratings, as well as market perception of financial institutions that have significant direct or indirect exposure to these countries. These concerns continue even as the global economy is recovering and some previously stressed European economies have experienced at least partial recoveries from their lowpoint during the recession. If measures to address sovereign debt and financial sector problems in Europe are inadequate, they may delay or weaken economic recovery, or result in the exit of one or more member states from the Eurozone or more severe economic and financial conditions. If realized, these risk scenarios could contribute to severe financial market stress or a global recession, likely affecting the economy and capital markets in the United States as well.

Other Risk Factors, presented below, address specific ways in which we may be adversely impacted by economic conditions.

Our business and financial results are subject to risks associated with the creditworthiness of our customers and counterparties.

Credit risk is inherent in the financial services business and results from, among other things, extending credit to customers, purchasing securities, and entering into financial derivative transactions and certain guarantee contracts. Credit risk is one of our most significant risks, particularly given the high percentage of our assets represented directly or indirectly by loans and the importance of lending to our overall business. We manage credit risk by assessing and monitoring the creditworthiness of our customers and counterparties and by diversifying our loan portfolio. Many factors impact credit risk.

A borrower’s ability to repay a loan can be adversely affected by several factors, such as business performance, job losses or

 

 

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health issues. A weak or deteriorating economy and changes in the United States or global markets also could adversely impact the ability of our borrowers to repay outstanding loans. Any decrease in our borrowers’ ability to repay loans would result in higher levels of nonperforming loans, net charge-offs, provision for credit losses and valuation adjustments on loans held for sale.

Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty, and other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including brokers and dealers, commercial banks, investment banks, mutual and hedge funds, and other institutional clients. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of default of our counterparty or client.

Despite maintaining a diversified loan portfolio, in the ordinary course of business, we may have concentrated credit exposure to a particular person or entity, industry, region or counterparty. Events adversely affecting specific customers, industries, regions or markets, a decrease in the credit quality of a customer base, or an adverse change in the risk profile of a market, industry, or group of customers could adversely affect us.

Our credit risk may be exacerbated when collateral held by us to secure obligations to us cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices that are not sufficient to recover the full amount of the loan or derivative exposure due us.

In part due to improvement in economic conditions, as well as actions taken by PNC to manage its portfolio, PNC’s provision for credit losses has declined substantially every year since the end of the recent recession. If we were to once again experience higher levels of provision for credit losses, it could result in lower levels of net income.

Our business and financial performance is impacted significantly by market interest rates and movements in those rates. The monetary, tax and other policies of governmental agencies, including the Federal Reserve, have a significant impact on interest rates and overall financial market performance over which we have no control and which we may not be able to predict adequately.

As a result of the high percentage of our assets and liabilities that are in the form of interest-bearing or interest-related instruments, changes in interest rates, in the shape of the yield curve, or in spreads between different market interest rates can have a material effect on our business, our profitability and the value of our financial assets and liabilities. For example:

   

Changes in interest rates or interest rate spreads can affect the difference between the interest that we earn on assets and the interest that we pay on liabilities,

   

which impacts our overall net interest income and profitability.

   

Such changes can affect the ability of borrowers to meet obligations under variable or adjustable rate loans and other debt instruments, and can, in turn, affect our loss rates on those assets.

   

Such changes may decrease the demand for interest rate-based products and services, including loans and deposit accounts.

   

Such changes can also affect our ability to hedge various forms of market and interest rate risk and may decrease the effectiveness of those hedges in helping to manage such risks.

   

Movements in interest rates also affect mortgage prepayment speeds and could result in impairments of mortgage servicing assets or otherwise affect the profitability of such assets.

The monetary, tax and other policies of the government and its agencies, including the Federal Reserve, have a significant impact on interest rates and overall financial market performance. These governmental policies can thus affect the activities and results of operations of banking companies such as PNC. An important function of the Federal Reserve is to regulate the national supply of bank credit and certain interest rates. The actions of the Federal Reserve influence the rates of interest that we charge on loans and that we pay on borrowings and interest-bearing deposits and can also affect the value of our on-balance sheet and off-balance sheet financial instruments. Both due to the impact on rates and by controlling access to direct funding from the Federal Reserve Banks, the Federal Reserve’s policies also influence, to a significant extent, our cost of funding. We cannot predict the nature or timing of future changes in monetary, tax and other policies or the effects that they may have on our activities and financial results. The current very low interest rate environment has had a negative impact on our ability to increase our net interest income, and its continuation, which is expected at least through mid-year 2015 based on statements by the Chair of the Federal Reserve, could affect consumer and business behavior in ways that are adverse to us in addition to continuing to affect our net interest income. Even once the Federal Reserve begins increasing the interest rates it directly influences, there may be a prolonged period before interest rates return to more historically typical levels.

In addition, monetary and fiscal policy actions by governmental and regulatory decision makers in other countries or in the European Union could have an impact on global interest rates, affecting rates in the United States as well as rates on instruments denominated in currencies other than the United States dollar, any of which could have one or more of the potential effects on PNC described above.

 

 

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Our business and financial performance are vulnerable to the impact of changes in the values of financial assets.

As a financial institution, a substantial majority of PNC’s assets and liabilities are financial in nature (items such as loans, securities, servicing rights, deposits and borrowings). Such assets and liabilities will fluctuate in value, often significantly, due to movements in the financial markets or market volatility as well as developments specific to the asset or liability in question.

Credit-based assets and liabilities will fluctuate in value due to changes in the perceived creditworthiness of the borrowers and also due to changes in market interest rates. A lessening of confidence in the creditworthiness of the United States or other governments whose securities we hold could impact the value of those holdings. Changes in loan prepayment speeds, usually based on fluctuations in market interest rates, could adversely impact the value of our mortgage servicing rights. The financial strength of counterparties, with whom we have hedged some of our exposure to certain types of assets, could affect the value of such transactions and assets. Additionally, the underlying value of an asset under lease may decrease due to supply and demand for the asset or the condition of the asset at the end of the lease. This could cause our recorded lease value to decline.

In many cases, PNC marks its assets and liabilities to market on its financial statements, either through its Net income and Retained earnings or through adjustments to Accumulated other comprehensive income on its balance sheet. We may need to record losses in the value of financial assets even where our expectation of realizing the face value of the underlying instrument has not changed.

In addition, asset management revenue is primarily based on a percentage of the value of the assets being managed and thus is impacted by general changes in market valuations. Thus, although we are not directly impacted by changes in the value of such assets, decreases in the value of those assets would affect related fee income.

Our business and financial performance are dependent on our ability to attract and retain customers for our products and services, which may be negatively impacted by a lack of consumer and business economic confidence as well as our actions, including our ability to anticipate and satisfy customer demands for products and services.

As a financial institution, our performance is subject to risks associated with the loss of customer confidence and demand. Economic and market developments, in the United States, Europe or elsewhere, may affect consumer and business confidence levels. If customers lose confidence due to a weak or deteriorating economy or uncertainty surrounding the future

of the economy, the demand for our products and services could suffer.

We may also fail to attract or retain customers if we are unable to develop and market products and services that meet evolving customer needs or demands or if we are unable to deliver them effectively and securely to our customers, particularly to the extent that our competitors are able to do so.

News or other publicity that impairs our reputation, or the reputation of our industry generally, also could cause a loss of customers.

If we fail to attract and retain customers, demand for our loans and other financial products and services could decrease and we could experience adverse changes in payment patterns. We could lose interest income from a decline in credit usage and fee income from a decline in product sales, investments and other transactions. PNC’s customers could remove money from checking and savings accounts and other types of deposit accounts in favor of other banks or other types of investment products. Deposits are a low cost source of funds. Therefore, losing deposits could increase our funding costs and reduce our net interest income.

For several years, the United States has been in a very low interest rate environment. This situation has decreased the attractiveness of alternatives to bank checking and savings accounts, which may lack deposit insurance and some of the convenience associated with more traditional banking products and which may no longer be able to offer much higher interest rates. If interest rates were to rise significantly, customers may be less willing to maintain balances in non-interest bearing or low interest bank accounts, which could result in a loss of deposits or a relatively higher cost of funds to PNC. This could also result in a loss of fee income.

In our asset management business, investment performance is an important factor influencing the level of assets that we manage. Poor investment performance could impair revenue and growth as existing clients might withdraw funds in favor of better performing products. Additionally, the ability to attract funds from existing and new clients might diminish. Overall economic conditions may limit the amount that customers are able or willing to invest as well as the value of the assets they do invest. The failure or negative performance of products of other financial institutions could lead to a loss of confidence in similar products offered by us without regard to the performance of our products. Such a negative contagion could lead to withdrawals, redemptions and liquidity issues in such products and have a material adverse impact on our assets under management and asset management revenues and earnings.

 

 

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As a regulated financial services firm, we are subject to numerous governmental regulations, and the financial services industry as a whole is subject to significant regulatory reform initiatives in the United States and elsewhere.

PNC is a bank holding company (BHC) and a financial holding company and is subject to numerous governmental regulations involving both its business and organization.

Our businesses are subject to regulation by multiple banking, consumer protection, securities and derivatives regulatory bodies. Applicable laws and regulations restrict our ability to repurchase stock or to receive dividends from subsidiaries that operate in the banking and securities businesses and impose capital adequacy requirements. PNC’s ability to service its obligations and pay dividends to shareholders is largely dependent on the receipt of dividends and advances from its subsidiaries, primarily PNC Bank. The Federal Reserve requires a BHC to act as a source of financial and managerial strength for its subsidiary banks. The Federal Reserve could require PNC to commit resources to PNC Bank when doing so is not otherwise in the interests of PNC or its shareholders or creditors.

Applicable laws and regulations restrict permissible activities and investments and require compliance with protections for loan, deposit, brokerage, fiduciary, mutual fund and other customers, and for the protection of customer information, among other things. We are also subject to laws and regulations designed to combat money laundering, terrorist financing, and transactions with persons, companies or foreign governments designated by U.S. authorities.

Starting shortly after the beginning of the financial crisis in 2007, we have faced, and expect to continue to face for the foreseeable future, increased regulation of the financial services industry as a result of initiatives intended to promote the safety and soundness of financial institutions, financial market stability, the transparency and liquidity of financial markets, and consumer and investor protection. We also expect, in many cases, more intense scrutiny from bank, consumer protection and other supervisors in the examination process and more aggressive enforcement of laws and regulations on both the federal and state levels. Compliance with regulations and other supervisory initiatives will likely increase the company’s costs and reduce its revenue, and may limit the company’s ability to pursue certain desirable business opportunities. New reforms will also introduce additional legal risk (including as a result of newly applicable antifraud and anti-manipulation provisions and private rights of action) and affect regulatory oversight, applicable capital and liquidity requirements, and residential mortgage and other consumer financial products. The consequences of noncompliance with applicable laws and regulations can include substantial monetary and nonmonetary sanctions as well as damage to our reputation and businesses.

A number of reform provisions are likely to significantly impact the ways in which banks and BHCs, including PNC, do business. Some of the reform initiatives have led to the formation of new regulatory bodies, such as the CFPB, which has authority to regulate consumer financial products and services sold by banks and non-bank companies and to supervise banks with assets of more than $10 billion and their affiliates for compliance with federal consumer protection laws. Other agencies have significant new powers relevant to PNC, such as the authority now held by the CFTC to regulate non security-based swaps, which, among other things, led PNC Bank to register with the CFTC as a swap dealer in early 2013.

See Supervision and Regulation in Item 1 of this Report for more information concerning the regulation of PNC and recent initiatives to reform financial institution regulation, including some of the matters discussed in this Risk Factor. Note 20 Regulatory Matters in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report also discusses some of the regulation applicable to PNC.

The following describes the key risks associated with some of the initiatives recently undertaken as part of the regulatory reform initiatives affecting the financial services industry, either where pending rules have not yet been finalized or where the impact of new rules has not been substantially realized.

   

In December 2013, the U.S. banking agencies, the SEC and the CFTC adopted regulations implementing the Volcker Rule provisions of Dodd-Frank. The Volcker Rule prohibits banks and their affiliates from engaging in some types of proprietary trading and restricts the ability of banks and their affiliates to sponsor, invest in or have specified other financial relationships with certain types of private funds (referred to as covered funds). We discuss the Volcker Rule in the Supervision and Regulation section included in Item 1 of this Report. PNC discontinued its designated proprietary trading operations several years ago. We currently do not expect the proprietary trading aspects of the final regulations to have a material effect on PNC’s businesses or revenue. Nevertheless, the Volcker Rule regulations place limits and conditions on many types of permissible trading activities, including transactions conducted for purposes of hedging, liquidity management, underwriting or to facilitate customer transactions. These limits and restrictions could cause PNC to forego engaging in hedging or other transactions that it would otherwise undertake in the ordinary course of business and, thus, to some extent, may limit the ability of PNC to most effectively hedge its risks, manage its balance sheet or provide products or services to its customers.

   

In addition, as of December 31, 2014, PNC held interests in private equity and hedge funds that are

 

 

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covered funds subject to the Volcker Rule regulations totaling approximately $579 million, including $140 million of sponsored funds. Certain of PNC’s REIT Preferred Securities also were issued by statutory trusts that, as currently structured, are considered covered funds. As of December 31, 2014, PNC also held approximately $1.5 billion of senior debt interests in collateralized loan obligations and certain other investment securities that may be considered ownership interests in covered funds. The unrealized loss associated with these securities was approximately $11 million. In December 2014, the Federal Reserve extended the conformance period for the Volcker Rule, which generally goes into effect on July 21, 2015, to give all banking entities until July 21, 2016 to conform their investments in, and relationships with, covered funds that were in place prior to December 31, 2013 (legacy covered funds). Moreover, the Federal Reserve also indicated its intent to grant an additional one-year extension of the conformance period for legacy covered funds in order to permit banking entities until July 21, 2017 to conform their ownership interests in, and relationships with, these funds. Substantially all of PNC’s interests in covered funds qualify for the extended conformance period granted for holdings in legacy covered funds. Moreover, certain of PNC’s legacy covered funds may qualify for an additional 5-year conformance period (i.e., until July 21, 2022), subject to Federal Reserve approval. It is likely that at least some of the amounts invested in legacy covered funds will reduce over time in the ordinary course before compliance is required. A forced sale or restructuring of PNC’s investments due to the Volcker Rule would likely result in PNC receiving less value than it would otherwise have received or experiencing other adverse consequences.

   

In February 2014, the Federal Reserve issued final rules establishing new enhanced prudential standards relating to liquidity risk and overall risk management for BHCs (like PNC) that have $50 billion or more in consolidated total assets. The Federal Reserve, however, continues to develop the other enhanced prudential standards that are required under Dodd-Frank for bank holding companies with $50 billion or more in consolidated total assets, including the counterparty credit exposure limits and early remediation requirements that were the subject of proposed rules issued in December 2011. Under these proposed rules, PNC could be subject to increasingly stringent actions by the Federal Reserve if its financial condition or risk management deteriorated as reflected by the company’s current or projected post-stress capital levels, compliance with supervisory liquidity and risk management standards and, in some instances, market-based indicators, such as credit default swap spreads. In addition, the

   

Federal Reserve has indicated that it intends to continue to develop the set of enhanced prudential standards that apply to large bank holding companies in order to further promote the resiliency of such firms and the U.S. financial system. Until the Federal Reserve’s rules and initiatives to establish these enhanced prudential standards are completed, we are unable to fully estimate their impact on PNC, although we expect these initiatives will result in increased compliance costs.

   

In October 2014, six federal agencies (the Federal Reserve, OCC, FDIC, SEC, Federal Housing Finance Agency and the Department of Housing and Urban Development) adopted final rules to implement the credit risk retention requirements of Section 941 of Dodd-Frank for asset-backed securitization transactions. The regulations specify when and how securitizers of different types of asset-backed securitizations, including transactions backed by residential mortgages, commercial mortgages, and commercial, credit card and auto loans, must comply with the Dodd-Frank requirement that they retain at least five percent of the credit risk of the assets being securitized. The final rules also implement the exemptions from these credit risk retention requirements for transactions that are backed by “qualified residential mortgages” or other high-quality commercial mortgage, commercial or automobile loans, each as defined in the final rules. The regulations will take effect on December 24, 2015 with respect to new securitization transactions backed by residential mortgages and on December 24, 2016 with respect to new securitization transactions backed by other types of assets. The final rules are likely to have an impact on PNC both directly as well as indirectly. The extent and magnitude of these impacts is not yet known and will, to some extent, depend on how the markets and market participants (including PNC) adjust to the new rules.

On the indirect impact side, PNC originates loans of a variety of types, including residential and commercial mortgages, credit card, auto, and student, that historically have commonly been securitized, and PNC is also a significant servicer of residential and commercial mortgages held by others, including securitization vehicles. PNC anticipates that the risk retention requirements will impact the market for loans of types that historically have been securitized, potentially affecting the volumes of loans securitized, the types of loan products made available, the terms on which loans are offered, consumer and business demand for loans, and the market for third-party loan servicers. The risk retention rules also could have the effect of slowing the rebound in the securitization markets. One effect of having substantially reduced

 

 

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opportunities to securitize loans would likely be a reduction in the willingness of banks, including PNC, to make loans due to balance sheet management requirements. Any of these potential impacts of the Dodd-Frank risk retention rules could affect the way in which PNC conducts its business, including its product offerings.

Even after new rules are finalized and become effective, it still may take a period of time before the manner in which the rules will be interpreted and administered by the relevant agencies becomes clarified and known. A failure to comply, or to have adequate policies and procedures designed to comply, with these and other regulatory requirements could expose us to damages, fines and regulatory penalties and other regulatory actions, which could be significant, and could also injure our reputation with customers and others with whom we do business.

New capital and liquidity standards will result in banks and bank holding companies needing to maintain more and higher quality capital and greater liquidity than has historically been the case.

We are subject to regulatory capital and liquidity requirements established by the Federal Reserve and the OCC, and discuss these requirements and standards in the Supervision and Regulation section included in Item 1 of this Report.

The regulatory capital requirements applicable to banks and BHCs have undergone, and continue to undergo, significant changes. For example, the final rules adopted by the U.S. banking agencies in July 2013 to implement the new international guidelines for determining regulatory capital established by the Basel Committee known as “Basel III”, as well as to implement certain provisions of Dodd-Frank, fundamentally altered the U.S. regulatory capital requirements for U.S. BHCs and banks. Significant parts of these rules became effective for PNC on January 1, 2014 and on January 1, 2015, although as a result of the staggered effective dates of the rules many provisions are phased-in over a period of years, with the rules generally fully phased-in as of January 1, 2019. The Basel Committee, moreover, continues to consider additional, significant changes to the international capital framework for banking organizations, including modifications that would significantly alter the international frameworks governing the market risk capital requirements for trading positions and the standardized risk weighting approach for credit risk, establish a capital floor for banking organizations subject to the advanced approaches for the risk weighting of assets, modify the treatment of securitization positions, and seek to enhance the transparency and consistency of capital requirements amongst banks and jurisdictions. It is unclear how these or other initiatives by the Basel Committee may be finalized and implemented in the

United States and, thus, we are unable to estimate what potential impact such initiatives may have on PNC.

The U.S. banking agencies also recently have implemented rules that significantly strengthen and alter the framework for liquidity regulation in the United States. In September 2014, the U.S. banking agencies adopted final rules to implement the LCR, a new, short-term quantitative liquidity requirement. These rules require PNC and PNC Bank to maintain an amount of qualifying high-quality liquid assets sufficient to cover the entity’s projected net cash outflows over a 30-day stress period using inflow, outflow and maturity assumptions included in the rule. The LCR rules became effective for PNC and PNC Bank on January 1, 2015, and the minimum required LCR and the requirement to calculate the LCR on a daily basis will be phased-in over a period of years, with the standard being fully implemented on January 1, 2017. In anticipation of the final rules, PNC undertook several actions to prepare for implementation of the LCR. The Federal Reserve’s new liquidity risk management requirements for bank holding companies with $50 billion or more in consolidated total assets (like PNC) also became effective on January 1, 2015. The new rules require covered BHCs to, among other things, conduct internal liquidity stress tests over a range of time horizons, maintain a buffer of highly liquid assets sufficient to meet projected net outflows under the BHC’s 30-day liquidity stress test, and maintain a contingency funding plan that meets detailed requirements.

Additional liquidity standards also are expected to be implemented in the coming years. For example, the Basel Committee, in October 2014, released the final framework for the NSFR standard, which is designed to ensure that banking organizations maintain a stable, long-term funding profile in relation to their asset composition and off-balance sheet activities. Under that framework, the NSFR would take effect as a minimum regulatory standard on January 1, 2018, although the U.S. banking agencies have not yet proposed rules to implement the NSFR.

The need to maintain more and higher quality capital, as well as greater liquidity, going forward than historically has been required could limit PNC’s business activities, including lending, and its ability to expand, either organically or through acquisitions. It could also result in PNC taking steps to increase its capital that may be dilutive to shareholders or being limited in its ability to pay dividends or otherwise return capital to shareholders, or selling or refraining from acquiring assets, the capital requirements for which are inconsistent with the assets’ underlying risks. In addition, the new liquidity standards require PNC to maintain holdings of highly liquid short-term investments, thereby reducing PNC’s ability to invest in longer-term or less liquid assets even if more desirable from a balance sheet or interest rate risk management perspective. Moreover, although these new requirements are being phased in over time, U.S. federal

 

 

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banking agencies have been taking into account expectations regarding the ability of banks to meet these new requirements, including under stressed conditions, in approving actions that represent uses of capital, such as dividend increases, share repurchases and acquisitions. Moreover, PNC, as a BHC that is subject to the advanced approaches for regulatory capital purposes, is subject to a higher LCR requirement than other BHCs that have more than $50 billion in total assets but are not subject to the advanced approaches. Until the scope and terms of pending or future rulemakings relating to capital, liquidity, or liability composition are known, the extent to which such rules may apply to PNC and the potential impact of such rules on PNC will remain uncertain.

We depend on information systems, both internally and through third-parties, to conduct our business and could suffer a material adverse impact from interruptions in the effective operation of, or security breaches affecting, those systems.

As a large financial company, we handle a substantial volume of customer and other financial transactions virtually on a continuous basis. As a result, we rely heavily on information systems to conduct our business and to process, record, and monitor our transactions. In recent years, PNC has increased substantially in size, scope and complexity. We have also seen more customer usage of technological solutions for financial needs and higher expectations of customers and regulators regarding effective and safe systems operation. We expect these trends to continue for the foreseeable future. The need to ensure proper functioning of these systems has become more challenging, and the costs involved in that effort are greater than ever.

The risks to these systems result from a variety of factors, both internal and external. In some cases, these factors are largely outside of our control, including the potential for bad acts on the part of hackers, criminals, employees and others. In other cases, our systems could fail to operate as needed due to factors such as design or performance issues, human error, unexpected transaction volumes, or inadequate measures to protect against unauthorized access or transmissions. We are also at risk for the impact of natural or other disasters, terrorism, international hostilities and the like on our systems or for the effect of outages or other failures involving power or communications systems operated by others. In addition, we face a variety of types of cyber attacks, some of which are discussed in more detail below. Cyber attacks often include efforts to disrupt our ability to provide services or to gain access to confidential company and customer information.

We rely on other companies for the provision of a broad range of products and services. Many of these products and services include information systems themselves or involve the use of such systems in connection with providing the products or services. In some cases, these other companies provide the infrastructure that supports electronic communications. These

other companies are generally subject to many of the same risks we face with respect to our systems. To the extent we rely on these other companies, we could be adversely affected if they are impacted by system failures, cyber attacks or employee misconduct.

All of these types of events, whether resulting from cyber attacks or other internal or external sources, expose customer and other confidential information to security risks. They also could disrupt our ability to use our accounting, deposit, loan and other systems and could cause errors in transactions with customers, vendors or other counterparties.

In addition, our customers often use their own devices, such as computers, smartphones and tablets, to do business with us. We have limited ability to assure the safety and security of our customers’ transactions with us to the extent they are utilizing their own devices.

We are faced with ongoing efforts by others to breach data security at financial institutions or with respect to financial transactions. Some of these involve efforts to enter our systems directly by going through or around our security protections. Others involve the use of schemes such as “phishing” to gain access to identifying customer information, often from customers themselves. Most corporate and commercial transactions are now handled electronically, and our retail customers increasingly use online access and mobile devices to bank with us. The ability to conduct business with us in this manner depends on the transmission of confidential information, which increases the risk of data security breaches.

Starting in late 2012, there have been several well-publicized series of apparently related denial of service attacks on large financial services companies, including PNC. In a denial of service attack, individuals or organizations flood commercial websites with extraordinarily high volumes of traffic, with the goal of disrupting the ability of commercial enterprises to process transactions and possibly making their websites unavailable to customers for extended periods of time. The attacks against PNC have resulted in temporary disruptions in customers’ ability to access the corporate website and to perform on-line banking transactions. To date, no customer data has been lost or compromised as a result of these attacks and these efforts have not had a material impact on PNC. We cannot, however, provide assurance that future attacks of this type might not have a greater effect on PNC.

As our customers regularly use PNC-issued credit and debit cards to pay for transactions with retailers and other businesses, there is the risk of data security breaches at those other businesses covering PNC account information. When our customers use PNC-issued cards to make purchases from those businesses, card account information may be provided to the business. If the business’s systems that process or store card account information are subject to a data security breach,

 

 

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holders of our cards who have made purchases from that business may experience fraud on their card accounts. PNC may suffer losses associated with reimbursing our customers for such fraudulent transactions on customers’ card accounts, as well as for other costs related to data security compromise events, such as replacing cards associated with compromised card accounts. In addition, PNC provides card transaction processing services to some merchant customers under agreements we have with payment networks such as Visa and MasterCard. Under these agreements, we may be responsible for certain losses and penalties if one of our merchant customers suffers a data security breach.

Over the last several years, several large retailers, prominently including Target and Home Depot, disclosed that they had suffered substantial data security breaches compromising millions of card accounts. To date, PNC’s losses and costs related to these breaches have not been material, but other similar events in the future could be more significant to PNC.

There have been other recent publicly announced cyber attacks that were not focused on gaining access to credit card information but instead sought access to a range of other types of confidential information including internal emails and other forms of customer financial information or sought to capture and possibly shutdown systems and devices maintained by target companies. Notable examples include attacks in 2014 on JP Morgan Chase and Sony Pictures and in early 2015 on Anthem. These other attacks have generally not had any financial impact on PNC but demonstrate the risks to confidential information and systems operations potentially posed by cyber attacks.

Methods used by others to attack information systems change frequently (with generally increasing sophistication), often are not recognized until launched against a target, may be supported by foreign governments or other well-financed entities, and may originate from less regulated and remote areas around the world. As a result, we may be unable to address these methods in advance of attacks, including by implementing adequate preventive measures.

We have policies, procedures and systems (including business continuity programs) designed to prevent or limit the effect of possible failures, interruptions or breaches in security of information systems. We design our business continuity and other information and technology risk management programs to manage our capabilities to provide services in the case of an event resulting in material disruptions of business activities affecting our employees, facilities, technology or suppliers. We regularly seek to test the effectiveness of and enhance these policies, procedures and systems.

Our ability to mitigate the adverse consequences of such occurrences is in part dependent on the quality of our business continuity planning and our ability to anticipate the timing and nature of any such event that occurs. The adverse impact of

natural and other disasters, terrorist activities, international hostilities and the like could be increased to the extent that there is a lack of preparedness on the part of national or regional governments, including emergency responders, or on the part of other organizations and businesses with which we deal, particularly those on which we depend but have no control over.

In recent years, we have incurred significant expense towards improving the reliability of our systems and their security against external and internal threats. Nonetheless, there remains the risk that an adverse event might occur. If one does occur, we might not be able to remediate the event or its consequences timely or adequately. To the extent that the risk relates to products or services provided by others, we seek to engage in due diligence and monitoring to limit the risk, but here as well we cannot eliminate it. Should an adverse event affecting another company’s systems occur, we may not have indemnification or other protection from the other company sufficient to compensate us or otherwise protect us from the consequences.

The occurrence of any failure, interruption or security breach of any of our information or communications systems, or the systems of other companies on which we rely, could result in a wide variety of adverse consequences to PNC. This risk is greater if the issue is widespread or results in financial losses to our customers. Possible adverse consequences include damage to our reputation or a loss of customer business. We also could face litigation or additional regulatory scrutiny. Litigation or regulatory actions in turn could lead to liability or other sanctions, including fines and penalties or reimbursement of customers adversely affected by a systems problem or security breach. Even if we do not suffer any material adverse consequences as a result of events affecting us directly, successful attacks or systems failures at other financial institutions could lead to a general loss of customer confidence in financial institutions, including PNC. Also, systems problems, including those resulting from third party attacks, whether at PNC or at our competitors, would likely increase regulatory and customer concerns regarding the functioning, safety and security of such systems generally. In that case, we would expect to incur even higher levels of costs with respect to prevention and mitigation of these risks.

We continually encounter technological change and we could falter in our ability to remain competitive in this arena.

The financial services industry is continually undergoing rapid technological change with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. The effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to better serve customers and to reduce costs. We have been investing in technology and connectivity to automate functions previously performed manually, to facilitate the ability of customers to engage in financial

 

 

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transactions, and otherwise to enhance the customer experience with respect to our products and services. On the retail side, this has included developments such as more sophisticated ATMs and expanded access to banking transactions through the internet, smart phones, tablets and other remote devices. These efforts have all been in response to actual and anticipated customer behavior and expectations. Our continued success depends, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide products and services that satisfy customer demands and create efficiencies in our operations. A failure to maintain or enhance our competitive position with respect to technology, whether because we fail to anticipate customer expectations or because our technological developments fail to perform as desired or are not rolled out in a timely manner, may cause us to lose market share or incur additional expense.

There are risks resulting from the extensive use of models in our business.

PNC relies on quantitative models to measure risks and to estimate certain financial values. Models may be used in such processes as determining the pricing of various products, grading loans and extending credit, measuring interest rate and other market risks, predicting losses, assessing capital adequacy, and calculating economic and regulatory capital levels, as well as to estimate the value of financial instruments and balance sheet items. Poorly designed or implemented models present the risk that our business decisions based on information incorporating models will be adversely affected due to the inadequacy of that information. Also, information we provide to the public or to our regulators based on poorly designed or implemented models could be inaccurate or misleading. Some of the decisions that our regulators make, including those related to capital distributions to our shareholders, could be affected adversely due to their perception that the quality of the models used to generate the relevant information is insufficient. See the Model Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section included in Item 7 of this Report.

Our asset and liability valuations and the determination of the amount of loss allowances and impairments taken on our assets are highly subjective, and inaccurate estimates could materially impact our results of operations or financial position.

We must use estimates, assumptions, and judgments when assets and liabilities are measured and reported at fair value. Assets and liabilities carried at fair value inherently result in a higher degree of financial statement volatility. Changes in underlying factors or assumptions in any of the areas underlying our estimates could materially impact our future financial condition and results of operations. During periods of market disruption, it may be more difficult to value certain of our assets if trading becomes less frequent and/or market data becomes less observable. There may be certain asset

classes that were historically in active markets with significant observable data that rapidly become illiquid due to market volatility, a loss in market confidence or other factors. Further, rapidly changing and unprecedented market conditions in any particular market could materially impact the valuation of assets as reported within our consolidated financial statements.

The determination of the amount of loss allowances and asset impairments varies by asset type and is based upon our periodic evaluation and assessment of known and inherent risks associated with the respective asset class. Management updates its evaluations regularly and reflects changes in allowances and impairments in operations as such evaluations are revised. Although we have policies and procedures in place to determine loss allowance and asset impairments, due to the substantial subjective nature of this area, there can be no assurance that our management has accurately assessed the level of impairments taken and allowances reflected in our financial statements. Furthermore, additional impairments may need to be taken or allowances provided for in the future. Historical trends may not be indicative of future impairments or allowances.

Our business and financial results could be impacted materially by adverse results in legal proceedings.

Many aspects of our business involve substantial risk of legal liability. We have been named or threatened to be named as defendants in various lawsuits arising from our business activities (and in some cases from the activities of companies we have acquired). In addition, we are regularly the subject of governmental investigations and other forms of regulatory inquiry. We also are at risk when we have agreed to indemnify others for losses related to legal proceedings, including litigation and governmental investigations and inquiries, they face, such as in connection with the sale of a business or assets by us. The results of these legal proceedings could lead to significant monetary damages or penalties, restrictions on the way in which we conduct our business, or reputational harm.

Although we establish accruals for legal proceedings when information related to the loss contingencies represented by those matters indicates both that a loss is probable and that the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated, we do not have accruals for all legal proceedings where we face a risk of loss. In addition, due to the inherent subjectivity of the assessments and unpredictability of the outcome of legal proceedings, amounts accrued may not represent the ultimate loss to us from the legal proceedings in question. Thus, our ultimate losses may be higher, and possibly significantly so, than the amounts accrued for legal loss contingencies.

We discuss further the unpredictability of legal proceedings and describe certain of our pending legal proceedings in Note 21 Legal Proceedings in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

 

 

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PNC faces legal and regulatory risk arising out of its residential mortgage businesses.

Numerous federal and state governmental, legislative and regulatory authorities are investigating practices in the business of mortgage and home equity loan lending and servicing and in the mortgage-related insurance and reinsurance industries. PNC has received inquiries from governmental, legislative and regulatory authorities on these topics and is responding to these inquiries. These inquiries and investigations could lead to administrative, civil or criminal proceedings, possibly resulting in remedies including fines, penalties, restitution, alterations in our business practices and additional expenses and collateral costs. They could also result in reputational harm to PNC, either individually or as part of the overall industry, regardless of the extent to which PNC is penalized.

In addition to governmental or regulatory inquiries and investigations, PNC, like other companies with residential mortgage and home equity loan origination and servicing operations, faces the risk of class actions, other litigation and claims from: the owners of, investors in, or purchasers of such loans originated or serviced by PNC (or securities backed by such loans), homeowners involved in foreclosure proceedings or various mortgage-related insurance programs, downstream purchasers of homes sold after foreclosure, title insurers, and other potential claimants. Included among these claims are claims from purchasers of mortgage and home equity loans seeking the repurchase of loans where the loans allegedly breached origination covenants and representations and warranties made to the purchasers in the purchase and sale agreements.

At this time PNC cannot predict the ultimate overall cost to or effect upon PNC from governmental, legislative or regulatory actions and private litigation or claims arising out of residential mortgage and home equity loan lending, servicing or reinsurance practices, although such actions, litigation and claims could, individually or in the aggregate, result in significant expense. See Note 21 Legal Proceedings and Note 22 Commitments and Guarantees in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for additional information regarding federal and state governmental, legislative and regulatory inquiries and investigations and additional information regarding potential repurchase obligations relating to mortgage and home equity loans.

There is a continuing risk of incurring costs related to further remedial and related efforts required by governmental or regulatory authorities and related to repurchase requests arising out of either the foreclosure process or origination issues. Reputational damage arising out of this industry-wide inquiry could also have an adverse effect upon our existing mortgage and home equity loan business and could reduce future business opportunities. Investors in mortgage loans and

other assets that we sell are more likely to seek indemnification from us against losses or otherwise seek to have us share in such losses.

The CFPB has issued new rules for mortgage origination and mortgage servicing. Both the origination and servicing rules create new private rights of action for consumers against lenders and servicers like PNC in the event of certain violations. For additional information concerning the mortgage rules, see Supervision and Regulation in Item 1 of this Report.

Additionally, two government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) (FHLMC and FNMA) are currently in conservatorship, with its primary regulator acting as a conservator. We cannot predict when or if the conservatorships will end or whether, as a result of legislative or regulatory action, there will be any associated changes to the structure of these GSEs or the housing finance industry more generally, including, but not limited to, changes to the relationship among these GSEs, the government and the private markets. The effects of any such reform on our business and financial results are uncertain.

Our regional concentrations make us at risk to adverse economic conditions in our primary retail banking footprint.

Our retail banking business is primarily concentrated within our retail branch network footprint. Although our other businesses are national in scope, to a lesser extent these other businesses also have a greater presence within these primary geographic markets. Thus, we are particularly vulnerable to adverse changes in economic conditions in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, and Southeast regions.

We grow our business in part by acquiring other financial services companies or assets from time to time, and these acquisitions present a number of risks and uncertainties related both to the acquisition transactions themselves and to the integration of the acquired businesses into PNC after closing.

Acquisitions of other financial services companies, financial assets and related deposits and other liabilities present risks and uncertainties to PNC in addition to those presented by the nature of the business acquired.

In general, acquisitions may be substantially more expensive or take longer to complete than anticipated (including unanticipated costs incurred in connection with the integration of the acquired company). Anticipated benefits (including anticipated cost savings and strategic gains, for example resulting from being able to offer product sets to a broader potential customer base) may be significantly harder or take longer to achieve than expected or may not be achieved in their entirety as a result of unexpected factors or events.

 

 

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Our ability to achieve anticipated results from acquisitions is often dependent also on the extent of credit losses in the acquired loan portfolios and the extent of deposit attrition, which are, in part, related to the state of economic and financial markets.

Also, litigation and governmental investigations that may be pending at the time of the acquisition or be filed or commenced thereafter, as a result of an acquisition or otherwise, could impact the timing or realization of anticipated benefits to PNC. Note 21 Legal Proceedings in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report describes several legal proceedings related to pre-acquisition activities of companies we have acquired, including National City. Other such legal proceedings may be commenced in the future.

Integration of an acquired company’s business and operations into PNC, including conversion of the acquired company’s different systems and procedures, may take longer than anticipated or be more costly than anticipated or have unanticipated adverse results relating to the acquired company’s or PNC’s existing businesses. In some cases, acquisitions involve our entry into new businesses or new geographic or other markets, and these situations also present risks and uncertainties in instances where we may be inexperienced in these new areas.

Our ability to analyze the risks presented by prospective acquisitions, as well as our ability to prepare in advance of closing for integration, depends, in part, on the information we can gather with respect to the target, which is more limited than the information we have regarding companies we already own.

As a regulated financial institution, our ability to pursue or complete attractive acquisition opportunities could be negatively impacted by regulatory delays or other regulatory issues. In addition, our ability to make large acquisitions in the future may be negatively impacted by regulatory rules or future regulatory initiatives designed to limit the potential for a financial institution to become “too big to fail.”

We operate in a highly competitive environment, in terms of the products and services we offer and the geographic markets in which we conduct business, as well as in our labor markets where we compete for talented employees. Competition could adversely impact our customer acquisition, growth and retention, as well as our credit spreads and product pricing, causing us to lose market share and deposits and revenues.

We are subject to intense competition from various financial institutions as well as from non-bank entities that engage in many similar activities without being subject to bank regulatory supervision and restrictions. This competition is described in Item 1 of this Report under “Competition.”

Competition in our industry could intensify as a result of the increasing consolidation of financial services companies, in connection with current market conditions or otherwise.

In all, the principal bases for competition are pricing (including the interest rates charged on loans or paid on interest-bearing deposits), product structure, the range of products and services offered, and the quality of customer service (including convenience and responsiveness to customer needs and concerns). The ability to access and use technology is an increasingly important competitive factor in the financial services industry, and it is a critically important component to customer satisfaction as it affects our ability to deliver the right products and services.

Another increasingly competitive factor in the financial services industry is the competition to attract and retain talented employees across many of our business and support areas. This competition leads to increased expenses in many business areas and can also cause us to not pursue certain business opportunities. Limitations on the manner in which regulated financial institutions can compensate their officers and employees may make it more difficult for regulated financial institutions to compete with unregulated financial institutions for talent.

A failure to adequately address the competitive pressures we face could make it harder for us to attract and retain customers across our businesses. On the other hand, meeting these competitive pressures could require us to incur significant additional expense or to accept risk beyond what we would otherwise view as desirable under the circumstances. In addition, in our interest rate sensitive businesses, pressures to increase rates on deposits or decrease rates on loans could reduce our net interest margin with a resulting negative impact on our net interest income.

Our business and financial performance could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by disasters, natural or otherwise, by terrorist activities or by international hostilities.

Neither the occurrence nor the potential impact of disasters (such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods and other severe weather conditions, pandemics, dislocations, fires, explosions, and other catastrophic accidents or events), terrorist activities and international hostilities can be predicted. However, these occurrences could impact us directly (for example, by causing significant damage to our facilities or preventing us from conducting our business in the ordinary course), or indirectly as a result of their impact on our borrowers, depositors, other customers, suppliers or other counterparties. We could also suffer adverse consequences to the extent that disasters, terrorist activities or international hostilities affect the financial markets or the economy in general or in any particular region. These types of impacts could lead, for example, to an increase in delinquencies,

 

 

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bankruptcies or defaults that could result in our experiencing higher levels of nonperforming assets, net charge-offs and provisions for credit losses.

Our ability to mitigate the adverse consequences of such occurrences is in part dependent on the quality of our resiliency planning, and our ability, if any, to anticipate the nature of any such event that occurs. The adverse impact of disasters or terrorist activities or international hostilities also could be increased to the extent that there is a lack of preparedness on the part of national or regional emergency responders or on the part of other organizations and businesses that we deal with, particularly those that we depend upon but have no control over.

ITEM 1B – UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

There are no SEC staff comments regarding PNC’s periodic or current reports under the Exchange Act that are pending resolution.

ITEM 2 – PROPERTIES

Our executive and primary administrative offices are currently located at One PNC Plaza, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The 30-story structure is owned by PNC Bank, National Association.

We own or lease numerous other premises for use in conducting business activities, including operations centers, offices, and branch and other facilities. We consider the facilities owned or occupied under lease by our subsidiaries to be adequate for the purposes of our business operations. We include here by reference the additional information regarding our properties in Note 9 Premises, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item  8 of this Report.

ITEM 3 – LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

See the information set forth in Note 21 Legal Proceedings in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report, which is incorporated here by reference.

ITEM 4 – MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

Information regarding each of our executive officers as of February 23, 2015 is set forth below. Executive officers do not have a stated term of office. Each executive officer has held the position or positions indicated or another executive position with the same entity or one of its affiliates for the past five years unless otherwise indicated below.

 

Name   Age     Position with PNC   Year
Employed (a)
 

William S. Demchak

    52     

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President (b)

    2002   

Joseph C. Guyaux

    64     

Senior Vice Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and President of PNC Mortgage

    1972   

Orlando C. Esposito

    56     

Executive Vice President and Head of Asset Management Group

    1988   

Neil F. Hall

    66     

Executive Vice President and Head of Retail Banking

    1995   

Michael J. Hannon

    58     

Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer

    1982   

Vicki C. Henn

    46     

Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer

    1994   

Gregory B. Jordan

    55     

Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Head of Regulatory and Government Affairs

    2013   

Stacy M. Juchno

    39     

Executive Vice President and General Auditor

    2009   

Karen L. Larrimer

    52     

Executive Vice President and Chief Customer Officer

    1995   

Michael P. Lyons

    44     

Executive Vice President and Head of Corporate & Institutional Banking

    2011   

E. William Parsley, III

    49     

Executive Vice President, Chief Investment Officer, and Treasurer

    2003   

Robert Q. Reilly

    50     

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

    1987   

Joseph E. Rockey

    50     

Executive Vice President and Chief Risk Officer

    1999   

Steven Van Wyk

    56     

Executive Vice President and Head of Technology and Operations

    2013   

Gregory H. Kozich

    51     

Senior Vice President and Controller

    2010   
(a) Where applicable, refers to year employed by predecessor company.
(b) Mr. Demchak also serves as a director. Biographical information for Mr. Demchak is included in “Election of Directors (Item 1)” in our proxy statement for the 2015 annual meeting of shareholders. See Item 10 of this Report.
 

 

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Joseph C. Guyaux has served as Senior Vice Chairman since February 2012 and was appointed chief executive officer and president of PNC Mortgage in January 2015. Mr. Guyaux was Chief Risk Officer from February 2012 to January 2015, prior to which he served as President.

Orlando C. Esposito was appointed Executive Vice President and head of PNC’s Asset Management Group in April 2013. Prior to being named to his current position, he held numerous leadership positions including Executive Vice President of Corporate Banking from November 2006 to April 2013.

Neil F. Hall has been an Executive Vice President since April 2012 and head of PNC’s Retail Banking since February 2012. Prior to being named to his current position, Mr. Hall led the delivery of sales and service to PNC’s retail and small business customers, directed branch banking, business banking, community development and PNC Investments.

Michael J. Hannon has served as Executive Vice President since February 2009, prior to which he served as Senior Vice President. He has served as Chief Credit Officer since November 2001. He also served as Interim Chief Risk Officer from December 2011 to February 2012.

Vicki C. Henn has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer of PNC since July 2014. Ms. Henn joined PNC in 1994 and has held numerous management positions. Prior to being named to her current position, Ms. Henn was a Senior Vice President, responsible for Human Resources for Retail Banking.

Gregory B. Jordan joined PNC as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Head of Regulatory and Government Affairs in October 2013. Prior to joining PNC, he served as the Global Managing Partner for the last 13 years of his 29 year tenure at Reed Smith LLP.

Stacy M. Juchno has served as Executive Vice President and General Auditor of PNC since April 2014. Ms. Juchno joined PNC in 2009 and previously served as a Senior Vice President and Finance Governance and Oversight Director.

Karen L. Larrimer was appointed Executive Vice President in May 2013. She has served as Chief Customer Officer since April 2014, prior to which she served as Chief Marketing Officer.

Michael P. Lyons has been an Executive Vice President since November 2011 and is head of Corporate and Institutional Banking. Prior to joining PNC in October 2011, from May 2010 until October 2011, Mr. Lyons was head of corporate development and strategic planning for Bank of America. Prior to joining Bank of America, from September 2004 to May 2010, Mr. Lyons held various positions at Maverick Capital, most recently as a principal focused on financial institutions investments.

E. William Parsley, III has served as Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer since January 2004. He was appointed Executive Vice President in February 2009.

Robert Q. Reilly was appointed Chief Financial Officer in August 2013. He served as the head of PNC’s Asset Management Group from 2005 until April 2013. Previously, he held numerous management roles in both Corporate Banking and Asset Management. He was appointed Executive Vice President in February 2009.

Joseph E. Rockey was appointed Chief Risk Officer in January 2015. Prior to his appointment, Mr. Rockey led enterprise risk management and the Basel office within PNC’s risk management organization. Mr. Rockey joined PNC in 1999 and was appointed Executive Vice President in January 2015.

Steven Van Wyk joined PNC as Head of Technology and Operations in January 2013. From 2007 until joining PNC, Mr. Van Wyk served as Global Chief Operating Officer for ING. He was appointed Executive Vice President of PNC in February 2013.

Gregory H. Kozich has served as a Senior Vice President and Controller of PNC since 2011. Mr. Kozich joined PNC as Senior Vice President of PNC Bank in October 2010. Prior to joining PNC, Mr. Kozich was with FNMA from 2005 until late 2010, most recently serving as its corporate controller.

 

 

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DIRECTORS OF THE REGISTRANT

The name, age and principal occupation of each of our directors as of February 23, 2015 and the year he or she first became a director is set forth below:

   

Richard O. Berndt, 72, Managing Partner of Gallagher, Evelius & Jones LLP (law firm) (2007)

   

Charles E. Bunch, 65, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of PPG Industries, Inc. (coatings, sealants and glass products) (2007)

   

Paul W. Chellgren, 72, Operating Partner, Snow Phipps Group, LLC (private equity) (1995)

   

Marjorie Rodgers Cheshire, 46, President and Chief Operating Officer, A&R Development Corp. (real estate development company) (2014)

   

William S. Demchak, 52, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of PNC (2013)

   

Andrew T. Feldstein, 50, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chief Investment Officer of BlueMountain Capital Management, LLC (asset management firm) (2013)

   

Kay Coles James, 65, President and Founder of The Gloucester Institute (non-profit) (2006)

   

Richard B. Kelson, 68, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, ServCo LLC (strategic sourcing, supply chain management) (2002)

   

Anthony A. Massaro, 70, Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lincoln Electric Holdings, Inc. (manufacturer of welding and cutting products) (2002)

   

Jane G. Pepper, 69, Retired President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (non-profit) (1997)

   

Donald J. Shepard, 68, Retired Chairman of the Executive Board and Chief Executive Officer of AEGON N.V. (insurance) (2007)

   

Lorene K. Steffes, 69, Independent Business Advisor (executive, business management and technical expertise) (2000)

   

Dennis F. Strigl, 68, Retired President and Chief Operating Officer of Verizon Communications Inc. (telecommunications) (2001)

   

Thomas J. Usher, 72, Non-executive Chairman of Marathon Petroleum Corporation (oil and gas industry) (1992)

   

George H. Walls, Jr., 72, former Chief Deputy Auditor for the State of North Carolina (2006)

   

Helge H. Wehmeier, 72, Retired Vice Chairman of Bayer Corporation (international life sciences, polymers and specialty chemicals) (1992)

PART II

ITEM 5 – MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

(a) (1) Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is traded under the symbol “PNC.” At the close of business on February 18, 2015, there were 69,964 common shareholders of record.

Holders of PNC common stock are entitled to receive dividends when declared by the Board of Directors out of funds legally available for this purpose. Our Board of Directors may not pay or set apart dividends on the common stock until dividends for all past dividend periods on any series of outstanding preferred stock have been paid or declared and set apart for payment. The Board presently intends to continue the policy of paying quarterly cash dividends. The amount of any future dividends will depend on economic and market conditions, our financial condition and operating results, and other factors, including contractual restrictions and applicable government regulations and policies (such as those relating to the ability of bank and non-bank subsidiaries to pay dividends to the parent company and regulatory capital limitations). The amount of our dividend is also currently subject to the results of the supervisory assessment of capital adequacy and capital planning processes undertaken by the Federal Reserve and our primary bank regulators as part of the 2015 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) process as described in the Supervision and Regulation section in Item 1 of this Report.

The Federal Reserve has the power to prohibit us from paying dividends without its approval. For further information concerning dividend restrictions and other factors that could limit PNC’s ability to pay dividends, as well as restrictions on loans, dividends or advances from bank subsidiaries to the parent company, see the Supervision and Regulation section in Item 1, Item 1A Risk Factors, the Capital portion of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section, the Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section, and the Trust Preferred Securities and REIT Preferred Securities portion of the Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements And Variable Interest Entities section in Item 7, and Note 12 Capital Securities of a Subsidiary Trust and Perpetual Trust Securities and Note 20 Regulatory Matters in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report, which we include here by reference.

We include here by reference additional information relating to PNC common stock under the Common Stock Prices/Dividends Declared section in the Statistical Information (Unaudited) section of Item 8 of this Report.

We include here by reference the information regarding our compensation plans under which PNC equity securities are authorized for issuance as of December 31, 2014 in the table (with introductory paragraph and notes) that appears in Item 12 of this Report.

 

 

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Our stock transfer agent and registrar is:

Computershare Trust Company, N.A.

250 Royall Street

Canton, MA 02021

800-982-7652

Registered shareholders may contact the above phone number regarding dividends and other shareholder services.

We include here by reference the information that appears under the Common Stock Performance Graph caption at the end of this Item 5.

(a)(2) None.
(b) Not applicable.
(c) Details of our repurchases of PNC common stock during the fourth quarter of 2014 are included in the following table:

In thousands, except per share data

 

2014 period    Total shares
purchased (a)
     Average
price
paid per
share
     Total shares
purchased as
part of
publicly
announced
programs (b)
     Maximum
number of
shares that
may yet be
purchased
under the
programs (b)
 

October 1 – 31

     2,772       $ 82.77         2,734         11,417   

November 1 – 30

     1,311       $ 87.63         1,309         10,108   

December 1 – 31

     2,026       $ 90.38         2,022         8,086   

Total

     6,109       $ 86.33         6,065            
(a) Includes PNC common stock purchased in connection with our various employee benefit plans generally related to forfeitures of unvested restricted stock awards and shares used to cover employee payroll tax withholding requirements. Note 13 Employee Benefit Plans and Note 14 Stock Based Compensation Plans in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report include additional information regarding our employee benefit and equity compensation plans that use PNC common stock.
(b) On October 4, 2007, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 25 million shares of PNC common stock. The repurchases are made in open market or privately negotiated transactions and the repurchase program will remain in effect until fully utilized or until modified, superseded or terminated. The timing and exact amount of common stock repurchases will depend on a number of factors including, among others, market and general economic conditions, economic capital and regulatory capital considerations, alternative uses of capital, the potential impact on our credit ratings, and contractual and regulatory limitations, including the results of the supervisory assessment of capital adequacy and capital planning processes undertaken by the Federal Reserve and our primary bank regulators as part of the CCAR process.
     Our 2014 capital plan, submitted as part of the CCAR process and approved by the Federal Reserve, included share repurchase programs of up to $1.5 billion for the four quarter period beginning with the second quarter of 2014. This amount does not include share repurchases in connection with various employee benefit plans referenced in note (a). In the fourth quarter of 2014, in accordance with the 2014 capital plan, we repurchased 6.065 million shares of common stock on the open market, with an average price of $86.41 per share and an aggregate repurchase price of $524 million.

Common Stock Performance Graph

This graph shows the cumulative total shareholder return (i.e., price change plus reinvestment of dividends) on our common stock during the five-year period ended December 31, 2014, as compared with: (1) a selected peer group as set forth below and referred to as the “Peer Group;” (2) an overall stock market index, the S&P 500 Index; and (3) a published industry

index, the S&P 500 Banks. The yearly points marked on the horizontal axis of the graph correspond to December 31 of that year. The stock performance graph assumes that $100 was invested on January 1, 2010 for the five-year period and that any dividends were reinvested. The table below the graph shows the resultant compound annual growth rate for the performance period.

 

LOGO

 

    Base
Period
   

Assumes $100 investment at Close of
Market on December 31, 2009

Total Return = Price change plus
reinvestment

of dividends

    5-Year
Compound
Growth
Rate
 
     Dec. 09     Dec. 10     Dec. 11     Dec. 12     Dec. 13     Dec. 14         

PNC

    100        115.81        112.26        116.38        158.80        191.07        13.83

S&P 500 Index

    100        115.06        117.48        136.27        180.39        205.07        15.45

S&P 500 Banks

    100        119.84        107.00        132.74        180.15        208.10        15.79

Peer Group

    100        120.80        104.59        137.49        186.35        216.01        16.65

 

The Peer Group for the preceding chart and table consists of the following companies: BB&T Corporation; Comerica Inc.; Fifth Third Bancorp; KeyCorp; The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.; SunTrust Banks, Inc.; U.S. Bancorp; Regions Financial Corporation; Wells Fargo & Company; Capital One Financial, Inc.; Bank of America Corporation; M&T Bank; and JP Morgan Chase and Company. This Peer Group was approved for 2014 by the Board’s Personnel and Compensation Committee. Such Committee has approved a peer group of twelve for 2015, consisting of all of the same companies as those in the 2014 Peer Group other than Comerica Inc.

Each yearly point for the Peer Group is determined by calculating the cumulative total shareholder return for each company in the Peer Group from December 31, 2009 to December 31 of that year (End of Month Dividend Reinvestment Assumed) and then using the median of these returns as the yearly plot point.

In accordance with the rules of the SEC, this section, captioned “Common Stock Performance Graph,” shall not be incorporated by reference into any of our future filings made under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or the Securities Act of 1933. The Common Stock Performance Graph, including its accompanying table and footnotes, is not deemed to be soliciting material or to be filed under the Exchange Act or the Securities Act.

 

 

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ITEM 6 – SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

    Year ended December 31  
Dollars in millions, except per share data   2014 (a)           2013 (a)     2012 (a)     2011     2010  
SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS               

Interest income

  $ 9,431         $ 10,007      $ 10,734      $ 10,194      $ 11,150   

Interest expense

    906           860        1,094        1,494        1,920   

Net interest income

    8,525           9,147        9,640        8,700        9,230   

Noninterest income

    6,850           6,865        5,872        5,626        5,946   

Total revenue

    15,375           16,012        15,512        14,326        15,176   

Provision for credit losses

    273           643        987        1,152        2,502   

Noninterest expense (b)

    9,488           9,681        10,486        9,022        8,529   

Income from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interests

    5,614           5,688        4,039        4,152        4,145   

Income taxes (b)

    1,407           1,476        1,045        1,087        1,127   

Income from continuing operations before noncontrolling interests

    4,207           4,212        2,994        3,065        3,018   

Income from discontinued operations (net of income taxes of zero, zero, zero, zero and $338) (c)

                                       373   

Net income (b)

    4,207           4,212        2,994        3,065        3,391   

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests (b)

    23           11        (7     16        (11

 Preferred stock dividends (d)

    232           237        177        56        146   

 Preferred stock discount accretion and redemptions (d)

    5           12        4        2        255   

Net income attributable to common shareholders (d)

  $ 3,947         $ 3,952      $ 2,820      $ 2,991      $ 3,001   

PER COMMON SHARE

              

Basic earnings

              

Continuing operations (b)

  $ 7.44         $ 7.45      $ 5.33      $ 5.69      $ 5.06   

Discontinued operations (c)

                                       .72   

Net income

  $ 7.44         $ 7.45      $ 5.33      $ 5.69      $ 5.78   

Diluted earnings

              

Continuing operations (b)

  $ 7.30         $ 7.36      $ 5.28      $ 5.62      $ 5.00   

Discontinued operations (c)

                                       .72   

Net income

  $ 7.30         $ 7.36      $ 5.28      $ 5.62      $ 5.72   

Book value (b)

  $ 77.61         $ 72.07      $ 66.95      $ 61.44      $ 56.22   

Cash dividends declared

  $ 1.88           $ 1.72      $ 1.55      $ 1.15      $ .40   
(a) Includes the impact of RBC Bank (USA), which we acquired on March 2, 2012.
(b) Amounts for prior periods have been updated to reflect the first quarter 2014 adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-01 related to investments in low income housing tax credits.
(c) Includes results of operations for PNC Global Investment Servicing Inc. (GIS) through June 30, 2010 and the related after-tax gain on sale. We sold GIS effective July 1, 2010, resulting in a gain of $639 million, or $328 million after taxes, recognized during the third quarter of 2010.
(d) We redeemed the Series N (TARP) Preferred Stock on February 10, 2010. In connection with the redemption, we accelerated the accretion of the remaining issuance discount on the Series N Preferred Stock and recorded a corresponding reduction in retained earnings of $250 million in the first quarter of 2010. This resulted in a noncash reduction in net income attributable to common shareholders and related basic and diluted earnings per share. The Series N Preferred Stock was issued on December 31, 2008.

Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform with the current period presentation, which we believe is more meaningful to readers of our consolidated financial statements.

This Selected Financial Data should be reviewed in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes included in Item 8 of this Report as well as the other disclosure in this Report concerning our historical financial performance, our future prospects and the risks associated with our business and financial performance.

 

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     At or for the year ended December 31  
Dollars in millions, except as noted    2014 (a)           2013 (a)     2012 (a)     2011     2010  

BALANCE SHEET HIGHLIGHTS

                

Assets (b) (c)

   $ 345,072          $ 320,192      $ 305,029      $ 271,141      $ 264,230   

Loans (c) (d)

     204,817            195,613        185,856        159,014        150,595   

Allowance for loan and lease losses (c)

     3,331            3,609        4,036        4,347        4,887   

Interest-earning deposits with banks (c) (e)

     31,779            12,135        3,984        1,169        1,610   

Investment securities (c)

     55,823            60,294        61,406        60,634        64,262   

Loans held for sale (d)

     2,262            2,255        3,693        2,936        3,492   

Goodwill and other intangible assets

     10,947            11,290        10,869        10,144        10,753   

Equity investments (b) (c) (f)

     10,728            10,560        10,799        10,070        9,166   

Noninterest-bearing deposits

     73,479            70,306        69,980        59,048        50,019   

Interest-bearing deposits

     158,755            150,625        143,162        128,918        133,371   

Total deposits

     232,234            220,931        213,142        187,966        183,390   

Transaction deposits (g)

     198,267            186,391        176,705        147,637        134,654   

Borrowed funds (c) (d) (h)

     56,768            46,105        40,907        36,704        39,488   

Total shareholders’ equity (b)

     44,551            42,334        38,948        34,010        30,206   

Common shareholders’ equity (b)

     40,605            38,392        35,358        32,374        29,560   

CLIENT INVESTMENT ASSETS (billions)

                

Discretionary client assets under management

   $ 135          $ 127      $ 112      $ 107      $ 108   

Nondiscretionary client assets under management

     128            120        112        103        104   

Total client assets under administration

     263            247        224        210        212   

Brokerage account client assets

     43            41        38        34        34   

Total

   $ 306          $ 288      $ 262      $ 244      $ 246   

SELECTED RATIOS

                

Net interest margin (i)

     3.08         3.57     3.94     3.92     4.14

Noninterest income to total revenue

     45            43        38        39        39   

Efficiency (b)

     62            60        68        63        56   

Return on

                

Average common shareholders’ equity (b)

     9.91            10.85        8.29        9.56        10.87   

Average assets (b)

     1.28            1.38        1.02        1.16        1.28   

Loans to deposits

     88            89        87        85        82   

Dividend payout (b)

     25.3            23.1        29.1        20.2        6.8   

Transitional Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital ratio (j) (k)

     10.9            N/A        N/A        N/A        N/A   

Transitional Basel III Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (j) (k)

     12.6            N/A        N/A        N/A        N/A   

Pro forma fully phased-in Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital ratio (k) (l) (m)

     10.0            9.4        7.5        N/A        N/A   

Basel I Tier 1 common capital ratio (m)

     N/A            10.5        9.6        10.3        9.8   

Basel I Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (m)

     N/A            12.4        11.6        12.6        12.1   

Common shareholders’ equity to total assets (b)

     11.8            12.0        11.6        11.9        11.2   

Average common shareholders’ equity to average assets (b)

     12.1            11.9        11.5        11.9        10.4   

SELECTED STATISTICS

                

Employees

     53,587            54,433        56,285        51,891        50,769   

Retail Banking branches

     2,697            2,714        2,881        2,511        2,470   

ATMs

     8,605            7,445        7,282        6,806        6,673   

Residential mortgage servicing portfolio – Serviced for Third Parties (in billions)

   $ 108          $ 114      $ 119      $ 118      $ 125   

Commercial mortgage servicing portfolio – Serviced for PNC and Others (in billions)

   $ 336            $ 308      $ 282      $ 267      $ 266   
(a) Includes the impact of RBC Bank (USA), which we acquired on March 2, 2012.
(b) Amounts for prior periods have been updated to reflect the first quarter 2014 adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-01 related to investments in low income housing tax credits.
(c) Amounts include consolidated variable interest entities. See Consolidated Balance Sheet in Item 8 of this Report for additional information.
(d) Amounts include assets and liabilities for which we have elected the fair value option. See Consolidated Balance Sheet in Item 8 of this Report for additional information.
(e) Amounts include balances held with the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland of $31.4 billion, $11.7 billion, $3.5 billion, $.4 billion and $1.0 billion as of December 31, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
(f) Amounts include our equity interest in BlackRock.
(g) Represents the sum of interest-bearing money market deposits, interest-bearing demand deposits, and noninterest-bearing deposits.
(h) Includes long-term borrowings of $41.5 billion, $27.6 billion, $19.3 billion, $20.9 billion and $24.8 billion for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Borrowings which mature more than one year after December 31, 2014 are considered to be long-term.
(i) Calculated as taxable-equivalent net interest income divided by average earning assets. The interest income earned on certain earning assets is completely or partially exempt from federal income tax. As such, these tax-exempt instruments typically yield lower returns than taxable investments. To provide more meaningful comparisons of net interest margins for all earning assets, we use net interest income on a taxable-equivalent basis in calculating net interest margin by increasing the interest income earned on tax-exempt assets to make it fully equivalent to interest income earned on taxable investments. This adjustment is not permitted under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP) on the Consolidated Income Statement. The taxable-equivalent adjustments to net interest income for the years 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010 were $189 million, $168 million, $144 million, $104 million and $81 million, respectively.
(j) Calculated using the regulatory capital methodology applicable to PNC during 2014.
(k) See capital ratios discussion in the Supervision and Regulation section of Item 1 and in the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section in Item 7 of this Report for additional discussion on these capital ratios.
(l) Pro forma ratios as of December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were calculated under the standardized approach and the pro forma ratio as of December 31, 2012 was calculated under the advanced approaches. The prior period ratios have not been updated to reflect the first quarter 2014 adoption of ASU 2014-01 related to investments in low income housing tax credits.
(m) See additional information on the pro forma ratios and Basel I ratios in the Statistical Information (Unaudited) section in Item 8 of this Report.

 

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ITEM 7 – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (MD&A)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Key Strategic Goals

At PNC we manage our company for the long term. We are focused on the fundamentals of growing customers, loans, deposits and fee revenue and improving profitability, while investing for the future and managing risk, expenses and capital. We continue to invest in our products, markets and brand, and embrace our corporate responsibility to the communities where we do business.

We strive to expand and deepen customer relationships by offering a broad range of deposit, fee-based and credit products and services. We are focused on delivering those products and services where, when and how our customers choose with the goal of offering insight that addresses their specific needs. Our approach is concentrated on organically growing and deepening client relationships that meet our risk/return measures. Our strategies for growing fee income across our lines of business are focused on achieving deeper market penetration and cross selling our diverse product mix.

Our strategic priorities are designed to enhance value over the long term. A key priority is to drive growth in acquired and underpenetrated geographic markets, including in the Southeast. In addition, we are seeking to attract more of the investable assets of new and existing clients. PNC is focused on transforming our retail banking business to a more customer-centric and sustainable model while lowering delivery costs as customer banking preferences evolve. We are also working to build a stronger residential mortgage banking business with the goal of becoming the provider of choice for our customers. Additionally, we continue to focus on expense management while investing in technology and business infrastructure and streamlining our processes.

Our capital priorities are to support client growth and business investment, maintain appropriate capital in light of economic uncertainty and the Basel III framework and return excess capital to shareholders, in accordance with the capital plan included in our 2015 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) submission to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve). We continue to maintain a strong capital position and expect to build capital through retention of future earnings net of dividend payments and share repurchases. PNC has increased its liquidity positions at both PNC and PNC Bank, National Association (PNC Bank). For more detail, see the Capital and Liquidity Actions portion of this Executive Summary, the Capital portion of the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section and the Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk

Management section of this Item 7 and the Supervision and Regulation section in Item 1 Business of this Report.

PNC faces a variety of risks that may impact various aspects of our risk profile from time to time. The extent of such impacts may vary depending on factors such as the current economic, political and regulatory environment, merger and acquisition activity and operational challenges. Many of these risks and our risk management strategies are described in more detail elsewhere in this Report.

Recent Market and Industry Developments

There have been numerous legislative and regulatory developments and significant changes in the competitive landscape of our industry over the last several years. The United States and other governments have undertaken major reform of the regulation of the financial services industry, including engaging in new efforts to impose requirements designed to strengthen the stability of the financial system and protect consumers and investors. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank), enacted in July 2010, mandates the most wide-ranging overhaul of financial industry regulation in decades. Many parts of the law are now in effect, and others are now in the implementation stage, which is likely to continue for several years. We expect to face further increased regulation of our industry as a result of Dodd-Frank as well as other current and future initiatives intended to enhance the regulation of financial services companies, the stability of the financial system, the protection of consumers and investors, and the liquidity and solvency of financial institutions and markets. We also expect in many cases more intense scrutiny from our supervisors in the examination process and more aggressive enforcement of laws and regulations on both the federal and state levels. Compliance with new regulations will increase our costs and reduce our revenue. Some new regulations may limit our ability to pursue certain desirable business opportunities.

On January 20, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court denied a writ of certiorari in NACS v. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, with the effect that the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in this case will stand. In March 2014, the court of appeals had upheld the Federal Reserve’s network processing rule and its interchange fee rule except as to the issue of transaction monitoring costs, which it remanded to the Federal Reserve for further explanation. The court of appeals decision reversed the grant of summary judgment in July 2013 by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in favor of the plaintiffs in this case vacating these rules.

For additional information concerning recent legislative and regulatory developments, as well as certain governmental, legislative and regulatory inquiries and investigations that may affect PNC, please see the Supervision and Regulation section of Item 1 Business, Item 1A Risk Factors, and Note 21 Legal

 

 

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Proceedings and Note 22 Commitments and Guarantees in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

Key Factors Affecting Financial Performance

Our financial performance is substantially affected by a number of external factors outside of our control, including the following:

   

General economic conditions, including the continuity, speed and stamina of the current U.S. economic expansion in general and on our customers in particular,

   

The monetary policy actions and statements of the Federal Reserve and the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC),

   

The level of, and direction, timing and magnitude of movement in, interest rates and the shape of the interest rate yield curve,

   

The functioning and other performance of, and availability of liquidity in, the capital and other financial markets,

   

Loan demand, utilization of credit commitments and standby letters of credit, and asset quality,

   

Customer demand for non-loan products and services,

   

Changes in the competitive and regulatory landscape and in counterparty creditworthiness and performance as the financial services industry restructures in the current environment,

   

The impact of the extensive reforms enacted in the Dodd-Frank legislation and other legislative, regulatory and administrative initiatives and actions, including those outlined elsewhere in this Report and in our other SEC filings, and

   

The impact of market credit spreads on asset valuations.

In addition, our success will depend upon, among other things:

   

Focused execution of strategic priorities for organic customer growth opportunities,

   

Further success in growing profitability through the acquisition and retention of customers and deepening relationships,

   

Driving growth in acquired and underpenetrated geographic markets, including our Southeast markets,

   

Our ability to effectively manage PNC’s balance sheet and generate net interest income,

   

Revenue growth from fee income and our ability to provide innovative and valued products to our customers,

   

Our ability to utilize technology to develop and deliver products and services to our customers and protect PNC’s systems and customer information,

   

Our ability to bolster our critical infrastructure and streamline our core processes,

   

Our ability to manage and implement strategic business objectives within the changing regulatory environment,

   

A sustained focus on expense management,

   

Improving our overall asset quality,

   

Managing the non-strategic assets portfolio and impaired assets,

   

Continuing to maintain and grow our deposit base as a low-cost funding source,

   

Prudent risk and capital management related to our efforts to manage risk to acceptable levels and to meet evolving CCAR compliance, regulatory capital and liquidity standards,

   

Actions we take within the capital and other financial markets,

   

The impact of legal and regulatory-related contingencies, and

   

The appropriateness of reserves needed for critical accounting estimates and related contingencies.

For additional information, please see the Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information section in this Item 7 and Item 1A Risk Factors in this Report.

Table 1: Summary Financial Results

 

Year ended December 31    2014     2013  

Net income (millions)

   $ 4,207      $ 4,212   

Diluted earnings per common share from net income

   $ 7.30      $ 7.36   

Return from net income on:

      

Average common shareholders’ equity

     9.91     10.85

Average assets

     1.28     1.38

Income Statement Highlights

Our performance in 2014 included the following:

   

Net income for 2014 of $4.2 billion was stable compared with 2013, as a 4% decrease in revenue was mostly offset by a reduction in provision for credit losses and a 2% decline in noninterest expense. Lower revenue in the comparison was driven by a 7% decline in net interest income, as noninterest income was essentially unchanged. For additional detail, please see the Consolidated Income Statement Review section in this Item 7.

   

Net interest income of $8.5 billion for 2014 decreased 7% compared with 2013, as lower yields on loans and investment securities, a decline in investment securities balances and a reduction in purchase accounting accretion were partially offset by commercial and commercial real estate loan growth.

   

Net interest margin decreased to 3.08 % for 2014 compared to 3.57 % for 2013. The decline reflected the impact of lower loan and securities yields in the ongoing low rate environment, lower purchase accounting accretion and the impact of higher interest-earning deposits with the Federal Reserve Bank.

 

 

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Noninterest income was $6.9 billion for 2014 and 2013, as strong overall client fee income was offset by lower residential mortgage revenue, declines in asset valuations and reduced sales of securities.

   

The provision for credit losses decreased to $273 million for 2014 compared to $643 million for 2013 due to overall credit quality improvement.

   

Noninterest expense was $9.5 billion for 2014, a decrease of 2% compared with 2013, primarily reflecting well managed expenses.

Credit Quality Highlights

 

   

Asset quality trends in 2014 improved from 2013. For additional detail, see the Credit Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7.

   

Nonperforming assets decreased $.6 billion, or 17%, to $2.9 billion at December 31, 2014 compared to December 31, 2013. Nonperforming assets to total assets were 0.83% at December 31, 2014, compared to 1.08% at December 31, 2013.

   

Overall loan delinquencies of $1.9 billion at December 31, 2014 decreased $.5 billion, or 22%, compared with December 31, 2013.

   

The allowance for loan and lease losses was 1.63% of total loans and 133% of nonperforming loans at December 31, 2014, compared with 1.84% and 117% at December 31, 2013, respectively.

   

Net charge-offs of $.5 billion in 2014 declined 51% compared to net charge-offs of $1.1 billion for 2013. Net charge-offs were 0.27% of average loans in 2014 and 0.57% of average loans in 2013. These comparisons were impacted by alignment with interagency guidance in the first quarter of 2013 on practices for loans and lines of credit related to consumer lending. In the first quarter 2013, this alignment had the overall effect of (i) accelerating charge-offs, (ii) increasing nonperforming loans and (iii) in the case of loans accounted for under the fair value option, increasing nonaccrual loans.

Balance Sheet Highlights

 

   

Total loans increased by $9.2 billion to $205 billion at December 31, 2014 compared to December 31, 2013.

   

Total commercial lending increased by $11.2 billion, or 10%, as a result of growth in commercial and commercial real estate loans.

   

Total consumer lending decreased $2.0 billion, or 3%, due to lower home equity, education and residential mortgage loans, partially offset by growth in automobile loans.

   

Total deposits increased by $11.3 billion, or 5%, to $232 billion at December 31, 2014 compared with December 31, 2013, driven by growth in transaction deposits.

   

PNC further increased its liquidity position as reflected in higher deposit balances maintained with the Federal Reserve Bank.

   

The regulatory short-term Liquidity Coverage Ratio became effective for PNC as an advanced approaches bank beginning January 1, 2015, with a minimum phased-in requirement of 80% in 2015, calculated as of month end. The estimated pro forma ratio at December 31, 2014 exceeded 100% and 95% for PNC and PNC Bank, respectively.

   

PNC’s well-positioned balance sheet remained core funded with a loans to deposits ratio of 88% at December 31, 2014.

   

The Transitional Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital ratio, calculated using the regulatory capital methodology applicable to PNC during 2014, was 10.9% at December 31, 2014.

   

Pro forma fully phased-in Basel III common equity Tier 1 capital ratio increased to an estimated 10.0% at December 31, 2014 from 9.4% at December 31, 2013 based on the standardized approach rules. See the Capital discussion and Table 18 in the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of this Item 7 and the December 31, 2013 capital ratio tables in the Statistical Information (Unaudited) section in Item 8 of this Report for more detail.

Our Consolidated Income Statement and Consolidated Balance Sheet Review sections of this Item 7 describe in greater detail the various items that impacted our results during 2014 and 2013 and balances at December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively.

Capital and Liquidity Actions

Our ability to take certain capital actions, including plans to pay or increase common stock dividends or to repurchase shares under current or future programs, is subject to the results of the supervisory assessment of capital adequacy undertaken by the Federal Reserve and our primary bank regulators as part of the CCAR process.

In connection with the 2014 CCAR, PNC submitted its 2014 capital plan, as approved by its Board of Directors, to the Federal Reserve in January 2014. As we announced on March 26, 2014, the Federal Reserve accepted the capital plan and did not object to our proposed capital actions, which included a recommendation to increase the quarterly common stock dividend in the second quarter of 2014. The capital plan also included share repurchase programs of up to $1.5 billion for the four quarter period beginning in the second quarter of 2014 under PNC’s existing common stock repurchase authorization. These programs include repurchases of up to $200 million to mitigate the financial impact of employee benefit plan transactions. In the last three quarters of 2014, in

 

 

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accordance with the 2014 capital plan, we repurchased 12.9 million shares of common stock on the open market, with an average price of $85.95 per share and an aggregate repurchase price of $1.1 billion.

On April 3, 2014, consistent with our 2014 capital plan, our Board of Directors approved an increase to PNC’s quarterly common stock dividend from 44 cents per common share to 48 cents per common share beginning with the May 5, 2014 dividend payment.

In connection with the 2015 CCAR, PNC submitted its 2015 capital plan, as approved by its Board of Directors, to the Federal Reserve in January 2015. PNC expects to receive the Federal Reserve’s response (either a non-objection or objection) to the capital plan submitted as part of the 2015 CCAR in March 2015. For additional information concerning the CCAR process and the factors the Federal Reserve takes into consideration in evaluating capital plans, see the Supervision and Regulation section of Item 1 of this Report.

See the Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7 for more detail on our 2014 capital and liquidity actions.

 

 

Average Consolidated Balance Sheet Highlights

Table 2: Summarized Average Balance Sheet

 

Year ended December 31                 Change  
Dollars in millions   2014     2013     $     %  

Average assets

         

Interest-earning assets

         

Investment securities

  $ 55,820      $ 57,319      $ (1,499     (3 )% 

Loans

    199,648        189,973        9,675        5

Interest-earning deposits with banks

    19,204        4,910        14,294        291

Other

    8,633        8,443        190        2

Total interest-earning assets

    283,305        260,645        22,660        9

Noninterest-earning assets

    44,548        45,019        (471     (1 )% 

Total average assets

  $ 327,853      $ 305,664      $ 22,189        7

Average liabilities and equity

         

Interest-bearing liabilities

         

Interest-bearing deposits

  $ 152,814      $ 146,000      $ 6,814        5

Borrowed funds

    48,817        40,022        8,795        22

Total interest-bearing liabilities

    201,631        186,022        15,609        8

Noninterest-bearing deposits

    70,108        66,168        3,940        6

Other liabilities

    10,768        11,159        (391     (4 )% 

Equity

    45,346        42,315        3,031        7

Total average liabilities and equity

  $ 327,853      $ 305,664      $ 22,189        7

 

Total assets were $345.1 billion at December 31, 2014 compared with $320.2 billion at December 31, 2013. The increase from year end 2013 was primarily due to higher interest-earning deposits with banks and loan growth, partially offset by lower investment securities.

Various seasonal and other factors impact our period-end balances, whereas average balances are generally more indicative of underlying business trends apart from the impact of acquisitions and divestitures. The Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of this Item 7 provides information on changes in selected Consolidated Balance Sheet categories at December 31, 2014 compared with December 31, 2013.

Average investment securities decreased during 2014 compared with 2013, primarily due to a net decline in average residential and commercial mortgage-backed securities from principal payments, partially offset by an increase in average U.S. Treasury and government agencies securities, which was largely driven by purchases to enhance our liquidity position.

Total investment securities comprised 20% of average interest-earning assets in 2014 and 22% in 2013.

Average loans grew in 2014, driven by increases in average commercial loans of $6.4 billion and average commercial real estate loans of $3.2 billion. The overall increase in loans reflected organic loan growth, primarily in our Corporate & Institutional Banking segment.

Loans represented 70% of average interest-earning assets for 2014 and 73% of average interest-earning assets for 2013.

 

 

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Average interest-earning deposits with banks, which are primarily maintained with the Federal Reserve Bank, increased significantly in the comparison to the prior year period as we continued to enhance our liquidity position.

Average noninterest-earning assets decreased in 2014 compared with 2013, primarily reflecting lower unsettled securities sales, partially offset by higher investment securities valuation adjustments, both of which are included in noninterest-earning assets for average balance sheet purposes.

Average total deposits increased $10.8 billion in 2014 compared with the prior year, driven by an increase of $12.1 billion in average transaction deposits, which grew to $189 billion in 2014. Higher average money market deposits, average noninterest-bearing deposits, and average interest-bearing demand deposits drove the increase in both commercial and consumer average transaction deposits. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $2.6 billion in average retail certificates of deposit attributable to runoff of

maturing accounts. Total deposits at December 31, 2014 were $232.2 billion compared with $220.9 billion at December 31, 2013 and are further discussed within the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of this Item 7.

Average total deposits represented 68% of average total assets for 2014 and 69% for 2013.

Average borrowed funds increased in 2014 compared with 2013 primarily due to increases in average Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) borrowings, average bank notes and senior debt, and average subordinated debt, in part to enhance our liquidity position. These increases were partially offset by a decline in average commercial paper. Total borrowed funds at December 31, 2014 were $56.8 billion compared with $46.1 billion at December 31, 2013 and are further discussed within the Consolidated Balance Sheet Review section of this Item 7. The Liquidity Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7 includes additional information regarding our borrowed funds.

 

 

Business Segment Highlights

Total business segment earnings were $3.9 billion in 2014 and $4.0 billion in 2013. The Business Segments Review section of this Item 7 includes further analysis of our business segment results during 2014 and 2013, including presentation differences from Note 24 Segment Reporting in our Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report. Note 24 Segment Reporting presents results of businesses for 2014, 2013 and 2012.

We provide a reconciliation of total business segment earnings to PNC total consolidated net income as reported on a GAAP basis in Note 24 Segment Reporting in our Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

Table 3: Results Of Businesses – Summary

(Unaudited)

 

Year ended December 31    Net Income (a)      Revenue      Average Assets (a) (b)  
In millions    2014      2013      2014      2013      2014      2013  

Retail Banking

   $ 728       $ 550       $ 6,049       $ 6,100       $ 75,046       $ 74,971   

Corporate & Institutional Banking

     2,106         2,264         5,476         5,506         122,927         112,970   

Asset Management Group

     181         162         1,107         1,040         7,745         7,366   

Residential Mortgage Banking

     35         148         800         1,100         7,857         9,896   

BlackRock

     530         469         703         621         6,640         6,272   

Non-Strategic Assets Portfolio

     367         379         587         742         8,338         9,987   

Total business segments

     3,947         3,972         14,722         15,109         228,553         221,462   

Other (c) (d) (e)

     260         240         653         903         99,300         84,202   

Total

   $ 4,207       $ 4,212       $ 15,375       $ 16,012       $ 327,853       $ 305,664   
(a) Amounts for 2013 period have been updated to reflect the first quarter 2014 adoption of ASU 2014-01 related to investments in low income housing tax credits.
(b) Period-end balances for BlackRock.
(c) “Other” average assets include investment securities associated with asset and liability management activities.
(d) “Other” includes differences between the total business segment financial results and our total consolidated net income. Additional detail is included in Note 24 Segment Reporting in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.
(e) Net income for “Other” in 2014 increased slightly compared to 2013 as lower noninterest expense due to a reduction in benefits costs was mostly offset by lower interest income from investment securities.

 

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CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT REVIEW

Our Consolidated Income Statement is presented in Item 8 of this Report.

Net income for 2014 of $4.2 billion was stable compared with 2013, as a 4% decrease in revenue was mostly offset by a reduction in provision for credit losses and a 2% decline in noninterest expense. Lower revenue in the comparison was driven by a 7% decline in net interest income, as noninterest income was essentially unchanged.

Net Interest Income

Table 4: Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin

 

     Year ended
December 31
 
Dollars in millions    2014     2013  

Net interest income

   $ 8,525      $ 9,147   

Net interest margin

     3.08     3.57

 

Changes in net interest income and margin result from the interaction of the volume and composition of interest-earning assets and related yields, interest-bearing liabilities and related rates paid, and noninterest-bearing sources of funding. See the Statistical Information (Unaudited) – Average Consolidated Balance Sheet And Net Interest Analysis and Analysis Of Year-To-Year Changes In Net Interest Income in Item 8 of this Report and the discussion of purchase accounting accretion on purchased impaired loans in the Consolidated Balance Sheet review in this Item 7 for additional information.

Net interest income decreased by $622 million, or 7%, in 2014 compared with 2013 reflecting the ongoing low rate environment. Lower yields on loans and investment securities, a decline in investment securities balances and a reduction in purchase accounting accretion were partially offset by commercial and commercial real estate loan growth. Lower net interest income also included the impact from the second quarter 2014 correction to reclassify certain commercial facility fees from net interest income to noninterest income.

Net interest margin decreased in the comparison to the prior year, driven by a 50 basis point decline in the yield on total interest-earning assets, which included the impact of lower purchase accounting accretion, continued spread compression, and repricing of new and existing loans and securities in the ongoing low rate environment. The decline also included the impact of the second quarter 2014 correction to reclassify certain commercial facility fees and the impact of higher interest-earning deposits maintained with the Federal Reserve Bank.

We expect net interest income for the first quarter of 2015 to remain stable with fourth quarter 2014. However, for full year 2015, we expect purchase accounting accretion to be down approximately $225 million compared to 2014.

Noninterest Income

Table 5: Noninterest Income

 

Year ended December 31                  Change  
Dollars in millions    2014     2013     $     %  

Noninterest income

          

Asset management

   $ 1,513      $ 1,342      $ 171        13

Consumer services

     1,254        1,253        1          

Corporate services

     1,415        1,210        205        17

Residential mortgage

     618        871        (253     (29 )% 

Service charges on deposits

     662        597        65        11

Net gains on sales of securities

     4        99        (95     (96 )% 

Net other-than-temporary impairments

     (11     (16     5        (31 )% 

Other

     1,395        1,509        (114     (8 )% 

Total noninterest income

   $ 6,850      $ 6,865      $ (15       

 

Noninterest income remained relatively stable in 2014 compared to the prior year, as strong overall client fee income was offset by lower residential mortgage revenue, declines in asset valuations and reduced sales of securities. Noninterest income as a percentage of total revenue was 45% for 2014, up from 43% for 2013.

Asset management revenue increased in 2014 compared to 2013, driven by increased earnings from our BlackRock investment, as well as stronger average equity markets and positive net flows, after adjustments for cyclical client activities. Discretionary client assets under management in the Asset Management Group increased to $135 billion at December 31, 2014 compared with $127 billion at December 31, 2013.

Consumer service fees were relatively unchanged in 2014 compared to the prior year, as higher consumer service fees in Retail Banking were offset by lower revenue from previously discontinued insurance programs, as well as the termination of our debit card rewards program in the fourth quarter of 2013, which resulted in a prior year benefit and consequently diluted the year-over-year growth comparison.

Corporate service fees increased to $1.4 billion in 2014 compared to $1.2 billion in 2013, driven by higher merger and acquisition advisory fees from a record year for our mergers and acquisition advisory firm, Harris Williams, and the impact of the second quarter 2014 correction to reclassify certain commercial facility fees from net interest income to noninterest income. These increases were partially offset by lower net commercial mortgage servicing rights valuation gains, which were $38 million in 2014 compared to $68 million in 2013.

 

 

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Residential mortgage revenue decreased to $618 million in 2014 from $871 million in 2013, primarily due to lower loan sales revenue from a reduction in origination volume and significantly lower net hedging gains on residential mortgage servicing rights, partially offset by higher loan servicing fee revenue and the impact of second quarter 2014 gains on sales of previously underperforming portfolio loans.

Lower residential mortgage revenue in the comparison also reflected the impact of the 2013 net benefit from release of reserves for residential mortgage repurchase obligations of $53 million, as the impact to 2014 was not significant. This net release of reserves in 2013 was largely the result of agreements with two government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs), FHLMC and FNMA, for loans sold into agency securitizations. See the Recourse And Repurchase Obligations section of this Item 7 for further detail.

Service charges on deposits increased in 2014, benefitting from changes in product offerings and higher customer-related activity.

Other noninterest income decreased to $1.4 billion in 2014 compared to $1.5 billion in 2013. The decline was driven by a reduction in asset valuations, lower revenue associated with private equity investments, decreased revenue due to the lower market value of investments related to deferred compensation obligations, and lower revenue associated with customer-related derivative activities, including credit valuations. These decreases were partially offset by higher gains on sales of other assets.

The decline in revenue from credit valuations for customer-related derivatives activities was driven primarily by market interest rate changes impacting the valuations. The 2013 impact of these customer-related derivatives activities was $56 million, while the 2014 impact was not significant.

Higher gains on sales of other assets in the comparison included $94 million on the fourth quarter 2014 sale of PNC’s Washington, D.C. regional headquarters building, as well as increased gains on sales of Visa Class B Common shares, which were $209 million on sales of 3.5 million shares in 2014 compared to $168 million on the sale of 4 million shares in 2013. As of December 31, 2014, we held approximately 7 million Visa Class B common shares with a fair value of approximately $742 million and a recorded investment of approximately $77 million.

Other noninterest income typically fluctuates from period to period depending on the nature and magnitude of transactions completed. Further details regarding our customer-related trading activities are included in the Market Risk Management – Customer-Related Trading Risk portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7. Further details regarding private and other equity investments are included in the Market Risk Management – Equity And Other Investment Risk section, and further details regarding gains or losses related to our equity investment in BlackRock are included in the Business Segments Review section of this Item 7.

In the first quarter of 2015, we expect fee income to be down mid-single digits, on a percentage basis, compared with the fourth quarter of 2014 due to seasonality.

For full year 2015, we expect revenue to continue to be under pressure compared with 2014, as we expect the combined revenue growth from our businesses to partially offset the decline in purchase accounting accretion.

Provision For Credit Losses

The provision for credit losses totaled $273 million in 2014 compared with $643 million in 2013. The decrease in provision reflected improved overall credit quality, including lower consumer loan delinquencies. A contributing economic factor was the increasing value of residential real estate, which improved expected cash flows from our purchased impaired loans.

We currently expect our provision for credit losses in the first quarter of 2015 to be between $50 million and $100 million.

The Credit Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7 includes additional information regarding factors impacting the provision for credit losses.

Noninterest Expense

Noninterest expense was $9.5 billion for 2014, a decrease of $.2 billion, or 2%, from $9.7 billion for 2013, reflecting overall disciplined expense management. The decline was driven by a decrease in personnel expense related to lower headcount and benefits costs, partially offset by investments in technology and infrastructure. Additionally, noncash charges of $57 million in 2013 for unamortized discounts related to redemption of trust preferred securities contributed to the decline. See Note 14 Capital Securities of Subsidiary Trusts and Perpetual Trust Securities in Item 8 of our 2013 Form 10-K for additional detail on the 2013 redemption of trust preferred securities.

During 2014, we completed actions and exceeded our 2014 continuous improvement goal of $500 million in cost savings. These cost savings are funding investments in our infrastructure, including those related to cybersecurity and our datacenters, and investments in our diversified businesses, including our Retail Banking transformation, consistent with our strategic priorities.

In 2015, we expect to continue this approach and have a goal of an additional $400 million in cost savings through our Continuous Improvement Program, which again we expect will help to fund our business and technology investments.

For the first quarter of 2015, we expect noninterest expense to be down by high-single digits on a percentage basis compared with the fourth quarter of 2014.

 

 

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Effective Income Tax Rate

The effective income tax rate was 25.1% for 2014 compared with 25.9% for 2013. The effective tax rate is generally lower than the statutory rate primarily due to tax credits PNC receives from our investments in low income housing and new markets investments, as well as earnings in other tax exempt investments.

The effective tax rates for both 2014 and 2013 reflect the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2014-01, which relates to amortization of investments in low income housing tax credits. See the Recently Adopted Accounting Standards portion of Note 1 Accounting Policies in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for further detail. The retrospective application of this guidance resulted in increased income tax expenses in both periods due to the reclassification of noninterest expense associated with these investments.

 

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET REVIEW

Table 6: Summarized Balance Sheet Data

 

Dollars in millions

  

December 31

2014

   

December 31

2013

     Change  
        $     %  

Assets

                                 

Interest-earning deposits with banks

   $ 31,779      $ 12,135       $ 19,644        162

Loans held for sale

     2,262        2,255         7       

Investment securities

     55,823        60,294         (4,471     (7 )% 

Loans

     204,817        195,613         9,204        5

Allowance for loan and lease losses

     (3,331     (3,609      278        (8 )% 

Goodwill

     9,103        9,074         29       

Other intangible assets

     1,844        2,216         (372     (17 )% 

Other, net

     42,775        42,214         561        1

Total assets

   $ 345,072      $ 320,192       $ 24,880        8

Liabilities

           

Deposits

   $ 232,234      $ 220,931       $ 11,303        5

Borrowed funds

     56,768        46,105         10,663        23

Other

     9,996        9,119         877        10

Total liabilities

     298,998        276,155         22,843        8

Equity

           

Total shareholders’ equity

     44,551        42,334         2,217        5

Noncontrolling interests

     1,523        1,703         (180     (11 )% 

Total equity

     46,074        44,037         2,037        5

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 345,072      $ 320,192       $ 24,880        8

The summarized balance sheet data above is based upon our Consolidated Balance Sheet in Item 8 of this Report.

The increase in total assets was primarily due to higher interest-earning deposits with banks and loan growth, partially offset by lower investment securities. The increase in interest-earning deposits with banks was driven by higher deposit balances maintained with the Federal Reserve Bank due to regulatory short-term liquidity standards that became effective for PNC as an advanced approaches bank beginning January 1, 2015. Interest-earning deposits with banks included balances held with the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland of $31.4 billion and $11.7 billion at December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively. The increase in liabilities was largely due to growth in deposits and higher Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings and issuances of bank notes and senior debt and subordinated debt, partially offset by a decline in federal funds purchased and repurchase agreements. An analysis of changes in selected balance sheet categories follows.

 

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Loans

Outstanding loan balances of $204.8 billion at December 31, 2014 and $195.6 billion at December 31, 2013 were net of unearned income, net deferred loan fees, unamortized discounts and premiums, and purchase discounts and premiums totaling $1.7 billion at December 31, 2014 and $2.1 billion at December 31, 2013, respectively. The balances include purchased impaired loans but do not include future accretable net interest (i.e., the difference between the undiscounted expected cash flows and the carrying value of the loan) on those loans.

Table 7: Details Of Loans

 

     December 31      December 31      Change  
Dollars in millions    2014      2013      $     %  

Commercial lending

            

Commercial

            

Retail/wholesale trade

   $ 16,972       $ 15,530       $ 1,442        9

Manufacturing

     18,744         16,208         2,536        16

Service providers

     14,103         13,052         1,051        8

Real estate related (a)

     10,812         10,729         83        1

Financial services

     6,178         4,927         1,251        25

Health care

     9,017         8,690         327        4

Other industries

     21,594         19,242         2,352        12

Total commercial

     97,420         88,378         9,042        10

Commercial real estate

            

Real estate projects (b)

     14,577         13,613         964        7

Commercial mortgage

     8,685         7,578         1,107        15

Total commercial real estate

     23,262         21,191         2,071        10

Equipment lease financing

     7,686         7,576         110        1

Total commercial lending (c)

     128,368         117,145         11,223        10

Consumer lending

            

Home equity

            

Lines of credit

     20,361         21,696         (1,335     (6 )% 

Installment

     14,316         14,751         (435     (3 )% 

Total home equity

     34,677         36,447         (1,770     (5 )% 

Residential real estate

            

Residential mortgage

     13,885         14,418         (533     (4 )% 

Residential construction

     522         647         (125     (19 )% 

Total residential real estate

     14,407         15,065         (658     (4 )% 

Credit card

     4,612         4,425         187        4

Other consumer

            

Education

     6,626         7,534         (908     (12 )% 

Automobile

     11,616         10,827         789        7

Other

     4,511         4,170         341        8

Total consumer lending                    

     76,449         78,468         (2,019     (3 )% 

Total loans

   $ 204,817       $ 195,613       $ 9,204        5
(a) Includes loans to customers in the real estate and construction industries.
(b) Includes both construction loans and intermediate financing for projects.
(c) Construction loans with interest reserves and A/B Note restructurings are not significant to PNC.

 

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The increase in loans was driven by the increase in commercial lending as a result of growth in commercial and commercial real estate loans, primarily from new customers and organic growth. The decline in consumer lending resulted from lower home equity, education and residential mortgage loans, partially offset by growth in automobile loans.

Loans represented 59% of total assets at December 31, 2014 and 61% at December 31, 2013. Commercial lending represented 63% of the loan portfolio at December 31, 2014 and 60% at December 31, 2013. Consumer lending represented 37% of the loan portfolio at December 31, 2014 and 40% at December 31, 2013.

Commercial real estate loans represented 11% of total loans at both December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013 and represented 7% of total assets at both December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013. See the Credit Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7 for additional information regarding our loan portfolio.

Total loans above include purchased impaired loans of $4.9 billion, or 2% of total loans, at December 31, 2014, and $6.1 billion, or 3% of total loans, at December 31, 2013.

Our loan portfolio continued to be diversified among numerous industries, types of businesses and consumers across our principal geographic markets.

Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses (ALLL)

Our total ALLL of $3.3 billion at December 31, 2014 consisted of $1.6 billion and $1.7 billion established for the commercial lending and consumer lending categories, respectively. The ALLL included what we believe to be appropriate loss coverage on all loans, including higher risk loans, in the commercial and consumer portfolios. We do not consider government insured or guaranteed loans to be higher risk as defaults have historically been materially mitigated by payments of insurance or guarantee amounts for approved claims. Additional information regarding our higher risk loans is included in the Credit Risk Management portion of the Risk Management section of this Item 7 and Note 1 Accounting Policies, Note 3 Asset Quality and Note 5 Allowances for Loan and Lease Losses and Unfunded Loan Commitments and Letters of Credit in our Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Report.

Purchase Accounting Accretion and Valuation of Purchased Impaired Loans

Information related to purchase accounting accretion and accretable yield for 2014 and 2013 follows. Additional information is provided in Note 4 Purchased Loans in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Report.

Table 8: Accretion – Purchased Impaired Loans

 

In millions   2014     2013  

Accretion on purchased impaired loans

     

Scheduled accretion

  $ 460      $ 580   

Reversal of contractual interest on impaired loans

    (253     (314

Scheduled accretion net of contractual interest

    207        266   

Excess cash recoveries (a)

    127        115   

Total

  $ 334      $ 381   
(a) Relates to excess cash recoveries for purchased impaired commercial loans.

Table 9: Purchased Impaired Loans – Accretable Yield

 

In millions    2014     2013  

January 1

   $ 2,055      $ 2,166   

Scheduled accretion

     (460     (580

Excess cash recoveries

     (127     (115

Net reclassification to accretable from non-accretable and other activity (a)

     90        584   

December 31 (b)

   $ 1,558      $ 2,055   
(a) Approximately 93% and 37% of the net reclassifications for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, were driven by the commercial portfolio and were due to improvements of cash expected to be collected on acquired loans in future periods, with the remainder predominantly due to future cash flow changes in the consumer portfolio.
(b) As of December 31, 2014, we estimate that the reversal of contractual interest on purchased impaired loans will total approximately $.9 billion in future periods. This will partially offset the total net accretable interest in future interest income of $1.6 billion on purchased impaired loans.
 

 

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Information related to the valuation of purchased impaired loans at December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013 follows.

Table 10: Valuation of Purchased Impaired Loans

 

     December 31, 2014      December 31, 2013  
Dollars in millions    Balance      Net Investment      Balance      Net Investment  

Commercial and commercial real estate loans:

             

Outstanding balance (a)

   $ 466          $ 937        

Recorded investment

   $ 310          $ 673        

Allowance for loan losses

     (79               (133         

Net investment/Carrying value

   $ 231         50    $ 540         58

Consumer and residential mortgage loans:

             

Outstanding balance (a)

   $ 4,541          $ 5,548        

Recorded investment

   $  4,548          $ 5,433        

Allowance for loan losses

     (793               (871         

Net investment/Carrying value

   $ 3,755         83    $ 4,562         82

Total purchased impaired loans:

             

Outstanding balance (a)

   $ 5,007          $ 6,485        

Recorded investment

   $ 4,858          $ 6,106        

Allowance for loan losses

     (872               (1,004         

Net investment/Carrying value

   $ 3,986         80    $ 5,102         79
(a) Outstanding balance represents the balance on the loan servicing system for active loans. It is possible for the outstanding balance to be lower than the recorded investment for certain loans due to the use of pool accounting. See Note 4 Purchased Loans for more information on purchased impaired loans.

 

At December 31, 2014, our largest individual purchased impaired loan had a recorded investment of $9 million. We currently expect to collect total cash flows of $5.6 billion on purchased impaired loans, representing the $4.0 billion net investment at December 31, 2014 and the accretable net interest of $1.6 billion shown in Table 9.

Weighted Average Life of the Purchased Impaired Portfolios

The table below provides the weighted average life (WAL) for each of the purchased impaired portfolios as of December 31, 2014.

Table 11: Weighted Average Life of the Purchased Impaired Portfolios

 

As of December 31, 2014

Dollars in millions

   Recorded Investment      WAL (a)  

Commercial

   $ 74         1.8 years   

Commercial real estate

     236         1.3 years   

Consumer (b)

     1,989         3.9 years   

Residential real estate

     2,559         4.8 years   

Total

   $ 4,858         4.1 years   
(a) Weighted average life represents the average number of years for which each dollar of unpaid principal remains outstanding.
(b) Portfolio primarily consists of nonrevolving home equity products.

Purchased Impaired Loans – Accretable Difference Sensitivity Analysis

The following table provides a sensitivity analysis on the Total Purchased Impaired Loans portfolio. The analysis reflects hypothetical changes in key drivers for expected cash flows over the life of the loans under declining and improving conditions at a point in time. Any unusual significant economic events or changes, as well as other variables not considered below (e.g., natural or widespread disasters), could result in impacts outside of the ranges represented below. Additionally, commercial and commercial real estate loan settlements or sales proceeds can vary widely from appraised values due to a number of factors including, but not limited to, special use considerations, liquidity premiums and improvements/deterioration in other income sources.

Table 12: Accretable Difference Sensitivity – Total Purchased Impaired Loans

 

In billions    December 31,
2014
    Declining
Scenario (a)
    Improving
Scenario (b)
 

Expected cash flows

   $ 5.6      $ (.2   $ .2   

Accretable difference

     1.6                 

Allowance for loan and lease losses

     (.9     (.1     .2   
(a) Declining Scenario – Reflects hypothetical changes that would decrease future cash flow expectations. For consumer loans, we assume home price forecast decreases by ten percent and unemployment rate forecast increases by two percentage points; for commercial loans, we assume that collateral values decrease by ten percent.
(b) Improving Scenario – Reflects hypothetical changes that would increase future cash flow expectations. For consumer loans, we assume home price forecast increases by ten percent, unemployment rate forecast decreases by two percentage points and interest rate forecast increases by two percentage points; for commercial loans, we assume that collateral values increase by ten percent.
 

 

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The present value impact of declining cash flows is primarily reflected as an immediate impairment charge to the provision for credit losses, resulting in an increase to the allowance for loan and lease losses. The present value impact of increased cash flows is first recognized as a reversal of the allowance with any additional cash flow increases reflected as an increase in accretable yield over the life of the loan.

Net unfunded credit commitments are comprised of the following:

Table 13: Net Unfunded Loan Commitments

 

In millions    December 31
2014
     December 31
2013
 

Total commercial lending (a)

   $ 99,837       $ 90,104   

Home equity lines of credit

     17,839         18,754   

Credit card

     17,833         16,746   

Other

     4,178         4,266   

Total

   $ 139,687       $ 129,870   
(a) Less than 5% of net unfunded loan commitments relate to commercial real estate at each date.

Commitments to extend credit represent arrangements to lend funds or provide liquidity subject to specified contractual conditions.

Standby bond purchase agreements totaled $1.1 billion at December 31, 2014 and $1.3 billion at December 31, 2013 and are included in the preceding table, primarily within the Total commercial lending category.

In addition to the credit commitments set forth in the table above, our net outstanding standby letters of credit totaled $10.0 billion at December 31, 2014 and $10.5 billion at December 31, 2013. Standby letters of credit commit us to make payments on behalf of our customers if specified future events occur.

Information regarding our credit extension commitments and our allowance for unfunded loan commitments and letters of credit is included in Note 1 Accounting Policies, Note 5 Allowances for Loan and Lease Losses and Unfunded Loan Commitments and Letters of Credit and Note 22 Commitments and Guarantees in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.

 

 

Investment Securities

The following table presents the distribution of our investment securities portfolio. We have included credit ratings information because the information is an indicator of the degree of credit risk to which we are exposed. Changes in credit ratings classifications could indicate increased or decreased credit risk and could be accompanied by a reduction or increase in the fair value of our investment securities portfolio. For those securities, where during our quarterly security-level impairment assessments we determined losses represented other-than-temporary impairment (OTTI), we have recorded cumulative credit losses of $1.2 billion in earnings and accordingly have reduced the amortized cost of our securities. See Table 78 in Note 6 Investment Securities in the Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for more detail. The majority of these cumulative impairment charges related to non-agency residential mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities rated BB or lower.

Table 14: Investment Securities

 

     December 31, 2014      December 31, 2013     

Ratings (a)

As of December 31, 2014

 
Dollars in millions    Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
    

AAA/

AA

    A     BBB    

BB

and

Lower

   

No

Rating

 

U.S. Treasury and government agencies

   $ 5,485       $ 5,714       $ 4,229