10-K 1 d10k.htm ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K Annual Report on Form 10-K
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)     

x

   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2004

¨

   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             .

 

Commission file number 0-15086

 

SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   94-2805249
(State of incorporation)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
4150 Network Circle   (650) 960-1300
Santa Clara, CA 95054   (Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
(Address of principal executive offices,   http://www.sun.com/aboutsun/investor
including zip code)   (Registrant’s url)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:    None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

*  Common Stock             

*  Share Purchase Rights

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES    x         No    ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).    YES    x        No    ¨

 

The aggregate market value of the voting stock (Common Stock) held by non-affiliates of the registrant, as of December 26, 2003 (the last business day of registrant’s second quarter of fiscal 2004), was approximately $14.1 billion based upon the last sale price reported for such date on The Nasdaq National Market. For purposes of this disclosure, shares of Common Stock held by persons who hold more than 5% of the outstanding shares of Common Stock and shares held by officers and directors of the Registrant have been excluded because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination is not necessarily conclusive.

 

The number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock (par value $0.00067) outstanding as of September 2, 2004 was 3,344,424,447.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Parts of the Proxy Statement for the 2004 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 hereof.

 



Table of Contents

INDEX

 

PART I

         

Item 1.

   Business    3

Item 2.

   Properties    13

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings    13

Item 4.

  

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

   14
    

Executive Officers of the Registrant

   14

PART II

         

Item 5.

   Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters    16

Item 6.

   Selected Financial Data    17

Item 7.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    18

Item 7A.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk    50

Item 8.

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data    51
    

Consolidated Statements of Operations

   52
    

Consolidated Balance Sheets

   53
    

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   54
    

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

   55
    

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   56

Item 9.

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure    94

Item 9A.

   Controls and Procedures    94

PART III

         

Item 10.

   Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant    94

Item 11.

   Executive Compensation    94

Item 12.

   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters    94

Item 13.

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions    95

Item 14.

   Principal Accountant Fees and Services    95

PART IV

         

Item 15.

   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules    96

SIGNATURES

   98

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1.    BUSINESS

 

GENERAL

 

Sun’s business is singularly focused on providing network computing products and services. Network computing has been at the core of our offerings for the 22 years of our existence and is based on the premise that the power of a single computer system can be increased dramatically when interconnected with other computer systems for the purposes of communication and sharing of computing power. Together with our partners, we provide network computing infrastructure solutions that comprise computer systems (hardware and software), network storage systems (hardware and software), support services, and professional and knowledge services.

 

Our customers use our products and services to build mission-critical network computing environments on which they operate essential elements of their businesses. Our network computing infrastructure solutions are used in a wide range of technical/scientific, business and engineering applications in industries such as telecommunications, government, financial services, manufacturing, education, retail, life sciences, media and entertainment, transportation, energy/utilities and healthcare.

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2004, we had revenues of $11.2 billion, employed approximately 35,000 employees and conducted business in over 100 countries. We were incorporated in California in February 1982 and reincorporated in Delaware in July 1987.

 

We can be reached on the Internet at http://www.sun.com. Our most recent annual report on Form 10-K and certain of our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) are available in PDF format through our Investor Relations website at http://www.sun.com/investors. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports are also available on the SEC website at http://www.sec.gov which can be reached from our Investor Relations website. The contents of these websites are not intended to be incorporated by reference into this report or in any other report or document we file, and our references to the addresses of these websites are intended to be inactive textual references only.

 

BUSINESS STRATEGY

 

Our business strategy is built around our singular focus on network computing. Our computer systems (hardware and software), network storage systems (hardware and software), support services, and professional and knowledge services are designed to enable network solutions that attack cost and complexity, accelerate service delivery and provide mobility with security. The core elements of our business strategy include:

 

  An end-to-end architecture that extends our common Java technology-based programming environment across our SPARC® (Scalable Processor Architecture) technology implementation and new line of x86-based products. These products provide exceptional price-performance, flexibility and choice for devices as small as smart cards and cell phones up through large multi-million dollar systems;

 

  On-going innovation in microprocessor architecture, systems design, networking integration and software to help ensure continuing technology leadership and resulting price-performance advantage;

 

  A commitment to interoperability and open application programming interfaces;

 

  A solution-based selling model with an emphasis on utilizing our end-to-end network computing architecture platform to integrate our products and services to address customers’ strategic business challenges and information technology needs;

 

  A robust partner community (iForce), including independent software vendors (ISVs), system integrators, resellers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), which adds value to Sun products and services and extends our reach and expertise; and

 

  A leading services organization that enables Sun and our partners to deliver open, innovative solutions and optimize availability and capabilities of our customers’ IT environment in a cost-effective manner.

 

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End-to-End Architecture

 

Developing and deploying services over the network requires an infrastructure platform that is enterprise-ready, developer-rich and economically compelling. This means that we are focused on providing the optimal combination of software, hardware and services that will give the customer the best value. With this strategy, we are focused on offering the customer a platform that entails lower annual administrative costs, lower developer training costs and lower downtime costs, which decreases customers’ “total cost of ownership.”

 

In fiscal 2004, we introduced a number of new products supporting our strategy as an end-to-end infrastructure platform company. We improved the performance of our UltraSPARC® III processor and introduced the dual-thread UltraSPARC IV processor across our mid and high-end server lines. Targeted for mission-critical enterprise, High Performance Technical Computing (HPTC) and other compute-intensive applications, the UltraSPARC IV processor provides up to 2x the throughput of UltraSPARC III based systems. The UltraSPARC IV processor is fully binary compatible with our previous generation processor, so customers can run existing applications without the time and cost of rewriting applications.

 

We also strengthened our x86 low-end server product line and now provide customers the choice of either the Linux or Solaris Operating System on x86. We continued the deployment of our Solaris Operating System, which creates significant benefits to customers by reducing system downtime and upgrade costs because every release is designed to run existing applications currently running on previous Solaris Operating System releases.

 

Our software consists of Sun’s powerful and scalable Solaris Operating System, Sun Java Enterprise System, Java Desktop System, Java Mobility System, N1 Grid System and the Java Studio development environment. Our software builds upon our well-established Java technology to meet the needs of developers, CIOs and operators to provide information, data and applications anywhere, anytime and on any device, using open application programming interfaces that work with a wide array of operating systems and applications.

 

Innovation

 

We believe that in order to be a leading developer of enterprise and network computing products and technologies, we must continue to invest and innovate. As indicated by our research and development investments of approximately 15-17% of annual revenues during each of the last three fiscal years, we are continually focused on technological innovation. Over the past few years, we have made significant investments in several of our product and services technologies, including investments in:

 

  The highly scalable UltraSPARC processor and systems architecture, including our next generation processors that enable chip multithreading to drive throughput computing at the processor level;

 

  The x86 system architecture and advanced systems technology, including technology acquired through our purchases of Kealia and Nauticus and our new AMD Opteron-based systems;

 

  The highly reliable and scalable Solaris Operating System;

 

  Mission critical clustering, messaging, directory and web services infrastructure software;

 

  The cross-platform Java software development environment, spanning smart cards, cellular handsets, set top boxes, desktop computers and servers — used by our customers and independent software vendor partners;

 

  Virtualization, provisioning and monitoring software architecture for network computing resource optimization and systems management simplification;

 

  Network-based storage systems and software, including storage management software and Sun QFS and Sun SAM-FS software; and

 

  Connectivity tools to provide remote diagnostics and preventive services for our customers.

 

Many of these technologies provide us with a competitive advantage and differentiation in the marketplace. By investing in research and development, we believe we are able to develop and deliver more valuable systems technology to our customers. We intend to continue our investments into new computing technologies and are focused on continuing to develop and deliver leading-edge network computing products based upon our innovations.

 

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Interoperability

 

From inception, we have focused on developing products and technologies based upon open application programming interfaces (APIs). We believe the real power in computing lies in the ability to freely access and share information over the network, while unconstrained by proprietary software and hardware standards. To further strengthen our interoperability platform, and as part of our legal settlement with Microsoft Corporation, we entered into an agreement that is intended to enable greater interoperability of the two companies’ products.

 

The need for open APIs is at the heart of the Internet’s development. We believe that without them, too many proprietary software and hardware protocols cause both incompatibility and cost issues, making it too difficult and uneconomical for individuals and organizations to fully access and harness the power of the network. Through open APIs, we believe application adoption and service deployments over the network will grow more quickly, increasing workload on the network and leading to increased demand for our computer systems. In addition, by adhering to open APIs, we are able to deliver more flexible and compatible systems products to our customers, reducing administrative costs, enabling provisioning and adding to the demand for our systems.

 

We deliver this performance through industry standards pioneered by Sun to provide value to our customers. For example, we have created technologies, such as the Network File System (NFS), UltraSPARC architecture and the Java technologies, providing customers with flexibility for their networking environments and facilitating industry growth. In addition, through our Sun Java System software platform, we have extended our well-established Java technology platform and utilized Web industry standards including XML (Extensible Markup Language), SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery and Integration) and WSDL (Web Services Description Language).

 

Solutions-Based Selling Model

 

Our sales force is in the process of implementing a solutions-based selling model whereby we offer an integrated and consistent set of end-to-end networking architecture platform solutions to the marketplace. These solution sets currently encompass six core competencies and/or capabilities: the Data Center, Storage and Data Management, Desktop and Mobility, Identity and Security, Web Services Software and Network Manageability. These competencies line up directly with the three key strategies we present to our customers as part of the Sun vision — attacking cost and complexity, accelerating service delivery and enabling mobility with security. We believe our solutions-based selling approach allows us to engage with our customers over the entire life cycle of their key infrastructure projects, which brings our expertise to bear in accelerating the delivery of sustainable value from the products and services we produce.

 

Alliances and Partner Community

 

In fiscal 2004, we continued to form relationships with significant partners to extend our customer solutions. We partnered with Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) to bring Opteron processor-based x86 systems to our current line of entry-level systems giving customers greater platform choice with maximum price-performance. We also formed a strategic alliance with Fujitsu to collaborate on the development, delivery and support of a future generation of SPARC-based systems. This alliance is intended to strengthen the Solaris footprint, drive increased market share for our enterprise class systems and allow us to dedicate additional resources to throughput computing. In addition, we expanded our partnership with Accenture LTD to advance our knowledge management initiative, and we continued our relationship with Hitachi Data Systems to provide high-end storage solutions and extend Sun’s storage offering into enterprise environments.

 

Our partner community is essential to our success. While our product and service offerings are very broad, we recognize that no single supplier of computing solutions can meet all of the needs of all of its customers. We have established relationships with leading independent software vendors, value-added resellers, OEMs, channel development providers, independent distributors, computer systems integrators and service delivery partners to deliver solutions that our customers demand. Through these relationships, our goal is to optimize our ability to be the technology of choice, the platform of choice, the partner of choice and to provide the end-to-end solutions that customers require to compete.

 

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Services

 

We develop technology to solve complex network computing problems and we provide expertise through a broad range of global services including Support services, Professional services and Knowledge (formerly known as Educational) services which enable our customers to architect, implement and deploy systems within their IT environments. Combined with Sun Preventive Services introduced in fiscal 2004, these offerings provide a full range of system/network architecture, implementation and management as well as consulting, skills migration and training.

 

SALES, MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTION

 

Our Global Sales Organization manages and has primary responsibility for our field sales, relationships with our selling partners, technical sales support, sales operations and delivery of professional services. We sell end-to-end networking architecture platform solutions, including products and services, in most major markets worldwide through a combination of direct and indirect channels. We also offer component products such as central processor unit (CPU) chips and embedded boards on an OEM basis to other hardware manufacturers and supply after-market and peripheral products to their end-user installed base, both directly and through independent distributors and value-added resellers. In addition, our strategic alliance with Fujitsu will provide expanded distribution of both companies’ existing SPARC product lines.

 

Our sales force serves the telecommunications, government, financial services, manufacturing, education, retail, life sciences, media and entertainment, transportation, energy/utilities and healthcare industries. In fiscal 2004, we organized our sales coverage within four timezone groups, which consisted of U.S., International Americas (Canada and Latin America), EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) and APAC (Asia, Australia and New Zealand). Beginning in fiscal 2005, our sales coverage resources will be organized within 15 geographically established markets. We have approximately 130 sales and service offices in the United States and an additional 100 sales and service offices in 46 other countries. We employ independent distributors in over 100 countries. In general, our sales coverage model calls for independent distributors to be deployed in partnership with our direct sales force. However, in some smaller markets, independent distributors may be our sole means of sales, marketing and distribution.

 

Our relationships with channel partners are very important to our future revenues and profitability. Channel relationships accounted for more than 63% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2004 and more than 61% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2003. Our sales force is compensated on a channel-neutral basis to reduce potential conflict between our sales force and channel partners. Our channel partners include:

 

  Systems integrators, both government and commercial, who serve the market for large commercial projects requiring substantial analysis, design, development, implementation and support of custom solutions;

 

  Channel development providers who supply our products and provide product marketing and technical support services to our smaller resellers;

 

  Resellers who provide added value in the form of software packages, proprietary software development, high-end networking integration, vertical integration, vertical industry expertise, training, installation and support;

 

  OEMs who integrate our products with their hardware and software; and

 

  Independent distributors who primarily serve foreign markets in which we do not have a direct presence.

 

Additionally, ISV partners help us maximize our technology footprint by integrating their software products with our platforms and technologies.

 

We have a wide range of marketing activities. Our Worldwide Marketing Organization oversees Sun’s marketing planning, determines product and pricing strategy; coordinates advertising, demand creation and public relations activities; maintains strategic partnerships with major independent software vendors and performs competitive analyses.

 

Although our sales and other operating results can be influenced by a number of factors, and historical results are not necessarily indicative of future results, our sequential quarterly operating results generally fluctuate downward in the first and third quarters of each fiscal year when compared with the immediately preceding quarter.

 

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Revenues from outside the United States were approximately 57% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2004 and 56% and 53% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2003 and 2002, respectively. Direct sales we make outside of the United States are generally priced in local currencies and can be subject to currency exchange fluctuations. The net foreign currency impact on total net revenues and operating results cannot be precisely measured because of the various hedging strategies we employ. However, because of the general weakening of the U.S. dollar, our best estimate of the foreign exchange benefit approximated 4% of total net revenues for fiscal 2004.

 

The countries primarily contributing to our international sales are the United Kingdom (UK), Germany and Japan. The UK represented approximately 8% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2004, 7% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2003 and fiscal 2002. Germany represented approximately 8% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2003 and 7% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2002. Japan represented approximately 7% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2004, 8% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2003 and 8% of our total net revenues in fiscal 2002.

 

Some of our sales to international customers are made under export licenses that must be obtained from the United States Department of Commerce. In addition, all of our export transactions are subject to U.S. export control laws, and certain transactions could require prior approval of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Protectionist trade legislation in either the United States or other countries, such as a change in the current tariff structures, export compliance laws or other trade policies, could adversely affect our ability to sell or to manufacture in international markets. Furthermore, revenues from outside the United States are subject to inherent risks, including the general economic and political conditions in each country.

 

Sales to General Electric Company (GE) and its subsidiaries in the aggregate accounted for approximately 14%, 11% and 12% of our fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002 total net revenues, respectively. More than 90% of the revenue attributed to GE was generated through GE subsidiaries acting as either a reseller or financier of our products. The vast majority of the revenue included in the amounts above is from sales through a single GE subsidiary comprised 11%, 9% and 8% of total net revenues in fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. This GE subsidiary acts as a distributor of our products to resellers who in turn sell those products to end-users. Our business could be adversely affected if GE or another significant customer terminated its business relationship with us or significantly reduced the amount of business it did with us. See Note 16 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information concerning sales to international customers and business segments.

 

Our product order backlog at June 30, 2004 was $710 million, as compared with $705 million at June 30, 2003. Our backlog includes orders for which a delivery schedule within six months has been specified by the customer and shipped products for which revenue has not been recognized. Backlog levels vary with demand, product availability and our delivery lead times and are subject to significant decreases as a result of, among other things, customer order delays, changes or cancellations. As such, backlog levels may not be a reliable indicator of future operating results.

 

WORLDWIDE OPERATIONS

 

The Worldwide Operations organization manages company-wide purchasing of materials used in producing Sun products, assists in product design enhancements, oversees our own manufacturing operations and those of our manufacturing partners and coordinates logistics operations. Our manufacturing operations consist primarily of final assembly, test and quality control of enterprise and data center systems. For all other systems, we rely on external manufacturing partners. We manufacture primarily in Oregon and Scotland and distribute from California, the Netherlands and Japan. We have continued efforts to simplify the manufacturing process by reducing the diversity of system configurations offered and increasing the standardization of components across product types. In fiscal 2004, we implemented a new customer fulfillment architecture that enables us to ship some products directly from our suppliers to our customers reducing cost and complexity in the supply chain. In addition, we have continued to increase our focus on quality and processes that are intended to proactively identify quality issues. The early-identification of products containing defects in engineering, design and manufacturing processes, as well as defects in third-party components included in our products could result in delays of product shipments.

 

We depend on many suppliers for the necessary parts and components to manufacture our products. There are a number of vendors producing the parts and components that we need. However, there are some components that can only be purchased from a single vendor due to price, quality, or technology reasons. For example, we depend on Texas Instruments for our SPARC® microprocessors and several other companies for custom integrated circuits. If we were

 

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unable to purchase the necessary parts and components on acceptable terms from a particular vendor and we had to find a new supplier for such parts and components, our new and existing product shipments could be delayed, adversely affecting our business and operating results. Similarly, our ability to purchase components in sufficient quantities to meet customer demand could impact our future operating results. Further, we also face the risk of ordering too many components, or conversely, not enough components, because orders are generally based on forecasts of customer orders rather than actual orders, which subjects us to inventory risk.

 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 

Our research and product development programs are intended to sustain and enhance our competitive position by incorporating the latest worldwide advances in hardware, software, graphics, networking, data communications and storage technologies. In addition, we may extend our product offerings and intellectual property through acquisitions of businesses or technologies or other arrangements with our partners. Sun’s product development continues to focus on enhancing the performance, scalability, reliability, availability and serviceability of our existing systems and the development of new technology standards. Additionally, we remain focused on system software platforms for Internet and intranet applications, telecommunications and next-generation service provider networks, developing advanced workstation, server and storage architectures. We devote substantial resources to software development as we believe it provides and will continue to provide significant competitive differentiation.

 

We conduct research and development principally in the United States, United Kingdom, France, Ireland, Germany, Japan, Norway and India. Research and development (R&D) expenses were $1,926 million, $1,837 million and $1,832 million in fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively.

 

PRODUCTS

 

Our products consist of Computer Systems and Network Storage systems.

 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS

 

Our Computer Systems products and technologies, including our full line of scalable workgroup and enterprise servers, our UltraSPARC microprocessors and our software, are integrated systems designed, developed and produced for network computing environments.

 

Servers.    We offer a full range of servers from our data center/high-performance computing servers through our entry servers and blade systems.

 

Data Center servers.    Our data center servers, including the Sun Fire E25K, Sun Fire E20K, Sun Fire 15K and the Sun Fire 12K, are designed to offer greater performance and lower total cost of ownership than mainframe systems and are used for server consolidations, application migrations, data mining and warehousing, custom applications, on-line transaction support, enterprise resource planning, high performance technical computing and databases. The Sun Fire E25K server is one of the most scalable UNIX® platform-based systems in the marketplace and incorporates our UltraSPARC IV microprocessor, bringing dual-threaded capability to the datacenter.

 

Enterprise servers.    Our enterprise servers, including Sun Fire E6900, Sun Fire E4900, Sun Fire E2900, Sun Fire 6800, Sun Fire 4800 and Sun Fire V1280 servers, provide reliability, availability and scalability to address the needs of data centers and enterprise-scale network computing at a moderate cost. These servers are available with various options in processor and memory expandability, hardware redundancy and component accessibility and run on the Solaris Operating System. In fiscal 2004, we introduced the Sun Fire E2900, Sun Fire E4900 and Sun Fire E6900 servers which use the UltraSPARC IV processor and are built to deliver dual-threaded capability and fault management technology into our family of mid-range Sun Fire servers.

 

Entry server systems.    We also offer an expansive line of entry server systems differentiated by their size, their processor architecture (SPARC or x86), their form factor (rackable or stand-alone systems) and the environment for which they are targeted (general purpose or specialized systems).

 

Entry SPARC-based systems include our Sun Fire V880 and Sun Fire V480 servers, Sun Fire V240 and Sun Fire V210 that deliver network computing in a compact, low-cost package.

 

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Entry x86-based systems, including the Sun Fire V60x and Sun Fire V65x, provide high density, cost effective scalable solutions for both Solaris and Linux operating systems. During fiscal 2004, we introduced Sun Fire V20Z AMD Opteron-based server and V20Z Compute Grid Rack System to expand the x86 entry server line.

 

Our blade systems continue to combine high density hardware architecture and system management software. They allow for management of a pool of heterogeneous, modular, single board servers, such as SPARC and x86 architectures, Solaris and Linux operating systems and specialty blades, as one computing environment.

 

Desktops and Workstations.    Our desktops and workstations provide powerful solutions for a wide range of business and technical activities such as software development, mechanical design, financial analysis and education. Our product line includes high performance 64-bit workstations, graphics accelerator boards, newly released x86-based workstations and thin Sun Ray Ultra-Thin Client products. In fiscal 2004, we introduced Sun Blade 2500, 2000 and 1500 workstations for demanding graphics, visualization and compute applications. Additionally, we released the Sun Blade W1100z and Sun Blade W2200z, which are Sun’s first x86 based workstations. We recently introduced the AMD Opteron-based workstations that support Linux (Red Hat and SuSe, 32-Bit and 64-Bit) and the Solaris Operating System (32-Bit and eventually 64-Bit) and are intended to be Microsoft certified.

 

Processor and Network Products.    The UltraSPARC microprocessors provide the computing power of most of Sun’s systems. We have three series of processors that use the SPARC architecture:  1) The UltraSPARC s-Series processors power the high-end and midrange server products from Sun, as well as power desktops, and offer our highest level of performance, scalability and leading-edge reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS);  2) The UltraSPARC i-Series processors offer a higher level of integration on the central processing unit enabling the price and performance design points deployed in Sun’s workgroup servers, rack mount servers and high performance desktops; and  3) The UltraSPARC e-Series processors balance cost, power consumption and performance, enabling economical 64-bit server and desktop solutions while maintaining binary compatibility with all SPARC processors, past and present. In addition, our networking and security products consist of a range of connectivity and encryption products to improve network performance and security.

 

Software.    Our software offerings consist primarily of enterprise infrastructure software systems, software desktop systems, developer software and infrastructure management software.

 

Solaris Operating System (OS).    The Solaris OS is a high performance, highly reliable, scalable and secure operating environment for SPARC and x86 platforms that is easy to install and use, is optimized for the Java platform and supports more than 12,000 applications. It is optimized for enterprise computing, Internet and intranet business requirements, powerful databases and high performance technical computing environments. The Solaris 9 OS, our latest release of the Solaris OS, creates a services platform by combining traditional operating systems functionality with application services and identity management (management of user identities over the Internet or complex corporate networks so that users can use a single sign-on to be authenticated and authorized to access multiple files). Solaris 9 OS integrates with the Java Enterprise System making it easier to build and deploy applications and web services based on Java and XML technologies. Our Trusted Solaris OS provides a high level of privacy and reduces the risk of security violations on a commercial-grade OS. Trusted Solaris OS is available for both SPARC and x86 platforms.

 

Java technology.    Our Java platform application environment allows development of application software independent of the underlying operating system or microprocessor. Java technology allows a developer to write applications once for a wide range of platforms and devices. Our Java platforms are based on a common core architecture and include the Java 2 Platform, Standard Edition (J2SE) technology used on personal computers and workstation clients and available on Solaris OS, Linux, HP-UX, AIX, Tru64 Unix, Windows, MacOS X and other platforms; Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) technology used to develop and deploy web services which enable secure, robust and interoperable business applications; Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition (J2ME) technology, which extends Java technology to consumer and embedded devices such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), digital set top boxes and residential gateways; and Java Card smart card technology.

 

Sun Java Studio Developer tools.    We develop and market software development tools designed to aid in application development and integration. The Java 2 Software Development Kit enables developers to create and run both applets (miniature applications written in the Java programming language) that run inside a web browser and applications that

 

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run outside of a browser. Our Sun Java Studio Developer Platform provides a desktop-to-mainframe development and test environment for programming in C, C++ and Java programming languages.

 

Sun Java Enterprise System.    Our Sun Java Enterprise System software enables enterprises to utilize their information and applications into services offered on intranets and the Internet. The Java Enterprise System software is an integrated suite of most of our infrastructure software, including application, directory, identity, integration, calendar, messaging and portal services for multiple platforms.

 

Sun Java Desktop System.    Our desktop software includes all the key components of a user’s environment, ranging from the user interface and desktop utilities to a browser, multimedia capabilities and the StarOffice personal productivity suite. The StarOffice office productivity suite has a fully integrated set of applications including word processing, spreadsheet, graphic design, presentations, database access, HTML editor, mail/news reader, event planner and formula editor tools. It runs on most major operating environments and platforms, including the Solaris OS, Microsoft Windows, Linux, OS/2 and Java platforms.

 

N1 Grid System.    N1 Grid software is our vision and architectural blueprint for reducing the cost and complexity of managing enterprise data centers by allowing a data center to work like a single system by combining an enterprise’s IT resources (e.g. servers, storage and network devices) with virtualization, provisioning, policy and automation, and monitoring.

 

NETWORK STORAGE

 

Our Network Storage systems integrate servers, storage and software to support heterogeneous environments.

 

Storage Systems.    Our high-end data storage systems provide a platform for direct attach storage or storage area network (SAN) solutions. They are designed for extreme availability, performance, scalability, connectivity and manageability. Our high-end data storage systems, including the Sun StorEdge 9980 and Sun StorEdge 9970, combine Hitachi Data Systems’ (HDS) high-end storage products with our resource management and file management software under an OEM agreement with HDS first signed in fiscal 2002.

 

We offer a wide range of flexible, scalable mid-range storage systems, including the Sun StorEdge 6320, Sun StorEdge 6120, Sun StorEdge 3910, Sun StorEdge A5200 Array and Sun StorEdge T3 Array, which support high-performance computing and enterprise SAN implementations, as well as storage virtualization technology. In fiscal 2004, we introduced the Sun StorEdge 6920 system, offering storage virtualization which delivers performance, flexibility and high availability for clustered environments such as high-performance computing and decision support systems.

 

Our Sun StorEdge products for workgroup applications, including the Sun StorEdge 3510 and 3511 Arrays, the Sun StorEdge 3310 Array, Sun StorEdge 3120 Array, Sun StorEdge S1 Array, Sun StorEdge D2 Array, Sun StorEdge A1000 and Sun StorEdge T3 Array for workgroup, offer a flexible, compact, cost-effective approach for growing storage demands. Their building-block architecture is designed to allow users to expand and customize as needed, offering performance and flexibility at low cost for a variety of environments for increased return on investment.

 

Storage Software.    Our Sun StorEdge software is an integral part of our complete storage solutions. Our Sun StorEdge software is based on the Sun Java System architecture and comprises an open, integrated and automated storage management software family. The Sun StorEdge software suites are focused on availability, utilization, performance and storage resource management.

 

SERVICES

 

Our services team provides expertise in helping our customers deploy network computing environments through a broad range of services comprised of Support services (support for hardware and software) and Professional and Knowledge services. Sun Services assists customers globally, provides support services to nearly 800,000 units under contracts in more than 100 countries, training approximately 400,000 students annually and providing consulting, integration and operations assistance to IT organizations worldwide.

 

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SUPPORT SERVICES

 

The SunSpectrumSM Support services product offerings allow customers the power and flexibility to customize their support services contracts. Customers can choose from four levels of support that range from mission critical to self-support. This service is sold separately or packaged with hardware, software and peripherals as a single-price support service. Each contract type is specifically designed to enable high availability and continuous operation for our customers. Our resources in the field for services delivery are complemented by third-party service providers who primarily deliver hardware support services such as spares inventories and manpower. Investments by these third-party service providers help us expand our geographic coverage without additional fixed cost investments on our part. Software support is primarily delivered by our software support engineers.

 

We are in the process of growing our managed customer services. These fully managed services comprise packaged services providing risk assessment, mitigation and measurement toward availability improvement for customers. They also enable businesses to shift their operational focus from non-core competency IT management functions to running their business for competitive advantage. During fiscal 2004, we released site support services, fully managed services, Sun Preventive Services and our developing utility computing capabilities.

 

PROFESSIONAL AND KNOWLEDGE SERVICES

 

Sun’s Professional services provides a suite of technical consulting and systems integration services to help customers architect, implement, and manage complex network computing environments. Our highly trained Professional services team specializes in providing customers with advanced systems, software, storage and network architecture design consulting, platform integration, enterprise systems management and operation such as network security and identity management, wireless network-based systems and advanced Sun Java System software integration solutions. We provide people, processes and technology and we partner with third-party systems integrators, to deliver solutions tailored to meet our customers’ needs. Our technical and project management experts help design IT architectures and plan migrations from legacy systems to network computing or help customers upgrade existing network computing environments. Additionally, to keep customer computing environments operating at peak performance, operations experts help customers manage the complexity of heterogeneous systems and networks.

 

Our Knowledge services group develops and delivers integrated learning solutions for enterprises, IT organizations and individual IT professionals. These solutions help ensure that the necessary talent is available and properly aligned to meet our clients’ network computing needs, as well as business objectives. Sun learning solutions include education consulting services, learning management technologies, multi-mode learning content and professional certifications.

 

COMPETITION

 

We compete in the computer hardware, software and services markets. These markets are intensely competitive. Our competitors are some of the largest, most successful companies in the world. They include International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Hewlett-Packard Company (HP), EMC Corporation (EMC), Fujitsu Limited (Fujitsu) and the Fujitsu-Siemens joint venture. We also compete with systems manufacturers and resellers of systems based on microprocessors manufactured by Intel Corporation (Intel) and the Windows family of operating systems software from Microsoft Corporation (Microsoft). These competitors include Dell Inc. and HP, in addition to Intel and Microsoft.

 

Customers make buying decisions based on many factors, including, among other things, new product and service offerings and features; product performance and quality; availability and quality of support and other services; price; platform; interoperability with hardware and software of other vendors; quality; reliability security features and availability of products; breadth of product line; ease of doing business; a vendor’s ability to adapt to customers’ changing requirements; responsiveness to shifts in the marketplace; business model (e.g., utility computing, subscription based software usage, consolidation versus outsourcing); contractual terms and conditions; vendor reputation and vendor viability. We believe competition has continued to remain intense over the last fiscal year. In this environment, each factor on which we compete is critical and the lack of competitive advantage with respect to one or more of these factors could lead to a loss of competitive position resulting in fewer customer orders, reduced revenues, reduced margins, reduced levels of profitability and loss of market share.

 

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We have encouraged the use of SPARC technology as a standard in the computer marketplace by licensing much of the technology and promoting open interfaces to the Solaris OS, as well as by offering microprocessors and enabling technologies to third party customers. As a result, several licensees, including Fujitsu and the Fujitsu-Siemens joint venture company, also offer products based on the Solaris OS and the SPARC architecture that compete directly with our products. We have also worked to make our Java programming language a standard for complex networks. We develop applications, tools and systems platforms, as well as work with third-parties to create products and technologies, in order to continue to enhance the Java platform’s capabilities. As part of this effort, we license Java technology which widely encourages competitors of Sun to also develop products competing with these applications, tools and platforms. If we are unable to compete effectively, our business could be harmed.

 

PATENTS, TRADEMARKS AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSES

 

We have used, registered or applied to register certain trademarks and service marks to distinguish genuine Sun products, technologies and services from those of our competitors in the U.S. and in foreign countries and jurisdictions. We enforce our trademark, service mark and trade name rights in the U.S. and abroad.

 

We hold a number of U.S. and foreign patents relating to various aspects of our products and technology. While we believe that patent protection is important, we also believe that patents are of less competitive significance than factors such as innovative skills and technological expertise. From time to time we have been notified that we may be infringing certain patents or other intellectual property rights of others. Several pending claims are in various stages of evaluation. With the exception of the matters further disclosed at Item 3. Legal Proceedings of this report, we believe no material litigation has arisen from these claims. We are evaluating the desirability of entering into licensing agreements in certain of these cases. Based on industry practice, we believe that any necessary licenses or other rights could be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. However, no assurance can be given that licenses can be obtained on acceptable terms or that litigation will not occur. The failure to obtain necessary licenses or other rights, or litigation arising out of such claims, could adversely affect our business.

 

EMPLOYEES

 

As of September 2, 2004, we had approximately 32,600 employees. We depend on key employees and face competition in hiring and retaining qualified employees. Our employees are vital to our success, and our key management, engineering and other employees are difficult to replace. Although we have entered into a limited number of employment contracts with certain current and former executive officers, we generally do not have employment contracts with our key employees. Further, we do not maintain key person life insurance on any of our employees. As our stock price has decreased and because we offer equity-based incentive compensation, our ability to continue to offer competitive compensation packages to current employees has been negatively impacted. Consequently, these pressures have affected our ability to attract and retain highly qualified personnel. If these adverse conditions continue, we may not be able to retain highly qualified employees in the future and this could harm our business.

 

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ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES

 

At June 30, 2004, Sun’s worldwide facilities represented aggregate floor space of 14.6 million square feet both in the U.S. and in 46 other countries. In square feet, our properties consisted of (in millions):

 

     U.S.

   Rest of the
World


   Total

Owned facilities

   4.8    0.8    5.6

Leased facilities

   5.5    3.5    9.0
    
  
  

Total facilities

   10.3    4.3    14.6
    
  
  

 

At June 30, 2004, our owned properties consisted of:

 

Location


   Square
Footage of
Facility


Bagshot, England

   25,995

Broomfield, Colorado

   916,045

Burlington, Massachusetts

   693,846

Farnborough (Guillemount Park), England

   320,000

Linlithgow, Scotland

   423,070

Menlo Park, California

   1,022,088

Newark, California

   1,404,309

Santa Clara, California

   816,240
    

Total

   5,621,593
    

 

At June 30, 2004, we had no offices under construction, however we have approximately 1.2 million square feet of facilities available for future construction. We continually evaluate our facility requirements in light of our business needs and stage the future construction accordingly. In addition, we own approximately 38 acres of undeveloped land in Austin, Texas.

 

Starting in fiscal 2001, we began to vacate properties in the U.S. and internationally. Of the properties that were vacated under all facility exit plans, 3.1 million square feet remain vacant or sub-leased of which 1.1 million square feet is under sub-lease to non-Sun businesses and 2.0 million square feet is vacant.

 

Substantially all of our facilities are used jointly by our Product groups, Sun Services group, Global Sales Organization and other functions. Our manufacturing facilities are located in Linlithgow (Scotland) and Beaverton (Oregon).

 

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

On February 11, 2002, Eastman Kodak Company (Kodak) filed a lawsuit against us entitled, Eastman Kodak Company v. Sun Microsystems, Inc., Civil Action No. 02-CV-6074, in the United States District Court for the Western District of New York and filed an amended complaint in that same court on March 22, 2002. Kodak alleges that some of our products, including aspects of our Java technology, infringe one or more Kodak patent claims contained in the following Kodak patents: U.S. Patent No. 5,206,951, U.S. Patent No. 5,421,012 and U.S. Patent No. 5,226,161 (collectively, the Kodak Patents). Kodak further alleges that we have contributed to and induced infringement of one or more claims of the Kodak Patents. Kodak seeks injunctive relief against future infringement, unspecified damages for past infringement and attorney’s fees and costs. We have filed responses denying liability and asserting various affirmative defenses. The parties participated in a court-ordered settlement conference on August 4, 2004, but were unable to reach a settlement. We believe that we have not infringed any valid and enforceable claim of any Kodak Patent. Trial is scheduled to begin on September 13, 2004 and we intend to present a vigorous defense.

 

On April 20, 2004, we were served with a complaint in a case entitled Gobeli Research (Gobeli) v. Sun Microsystems, Inc. and Apple Computer, Inc. (Apple). The complaint alleges that Sun products, including our Solaris Operating Environment, infringe on a Gobeli patent related to a system and method for controlling interrupt processing. Gobeli

 

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claims that Apple’s OS 9 and OS X operating systems violate that same patent. The case is pending in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. We have filed a response denying liability and stating various affirmative defenses, and we intend to present a vigorous defense.

 

On April 1, 2004, Sun and Microsoft Corporation (Microsoft) entered into several agreements including an agreement to settle all pending litigation between the two companies. Pursuant to the settlement agreement, Sun agreed to dismiss its litigation against Microsoft with prejudice and agreed to not initiate further steps to participate in the proceedings pending against Microsoft instituted by the Commission of the European Communities, and each party entered into a release of claims with respect to such matters. Microsoft agreed to pay to Sun the amount of $700 million under this settlement agreement.

 

Pursuant to a patent covenant and stand-still agreement, the parties agreed not to sue each other for past damages for patent infringement with respect to the other party’s products and technologies (the Covenant Not to Sue for Damages). Each year until 2014, Microsoft has the option of extending the Covenant Not to Sue for Damages to apply to the preceding year in exchange for an annual extension payment, so long as Microsoft has made all previous annual extension payments and so long as Microsoft has not sued Sun or authorized licensees of its commercial products for patent infringement prior to such time. At the end of the ten-year term, if Microsoft has made all such payments and not brought any such suits, then each party will automatically grant to the other party irrevocable, non-exclusive, perpetual licenses under all of its patents and patent applications existing at the end of such period in order to allow such other party to continue to commercialize its products shipping at the end of such period and any related successor products. In addition, the parties agreed, for a period of six months, not to bring any patent infringement suit (including a suit for injunctive relief) against the other party or authorized licensees of its commercial products relating to such other party’s products. Microsoft also agreed to pay to Sun the amount of $900 million under this patent covenant and standstill agreement.

 

Pursuant to a technical collaboration agreement, each party agreed to provide the other party with access to aspects of its desktop and server-based technology for use in developing interoperable server products. Microsoft also agreed to pay to Sun the amount of $350 million as a prepaid nonrefundable royalty under this technical collaboration agreement.

 

ITEM 4.    SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

 

No matters were submitted to a vote of stockholders of Sun during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004.

 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

The following sets forth certain information regarding our Executive Officers as of September 7, 2004.

 

Name


   Age

  

Position


Scott G. McNealy

   49    Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer

Jonathan I. Schwartz

   38    President and Chief Operating Officer

Crawford W. Beveridge

   58    Executive Vice President, People and Places, and Chief Human Resources Officer

Robyn M. Denholm

   40    Vice President and Corporate Controller

Michael A. Dillon

   45    Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

Stephen T. McGowan

   56    Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President, Corporate Resources

Gregory M. Papadopoulos

   46    Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer

 

Mr. McNealy is a Founder of Sun and has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer since April 2004, as Chairman of the Board of Directors, President and Chief Executive Officer from June 2002 to April 2004, as Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer from April 1999 to June 2002, as Chairman of the Board of Directors, President and Chief Executive Officer from December 1984 to April 1999, as President and Chief Operating Officer from February 1984 to December 1984 and as Vice President of Operations

 

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from February 1982 to February 1984. Mr. McNealy has served as a director of the Company since the incorporation of the Company in February 1982.

 

Mr. Schwartz has served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Sun since April 2004, as Executive Vice President, Software of Sun from July 2002 to April 2004, as Senior Vice President, Corporate Strategy and Planning from July 2000 to July 2002, as Vice President, Ventures Fund from October 1999 to July 2000, as Vice President, Internet and Application Products from May 1999 to October 1999, as Vice President, Enterprise Products Group from July 1998 to May 1999 and as Director, Product Marketing, Javasoft, from July 1997 to July 1998.

 

Mr. Beveridge has served as Executive Vice President, People and Places, and Chief Human Resources Officer of Sun since March 2000 and as Vice President, Corporate Resources from March 1985 to December 1990. From January 1991 to February 2000, Mr. Beveridge served as Chief Executive, Scottish Enterprise, a Scottish quasi-autonomous non-governmental organization involved in economic development in Scotland. Mr. Beveridge serves on the Board of Directors of Autodesk, Inc., a digital design and content company.

 

Ms. Denholm has served as Vice President and Corporate Controller since August 2003, as Vice President and Acting Corporate Controller from June 2003 through August 2003, as Vice President, Finance, Services and Finance Systems and Processes from August 2001 through June 2003, as Director, Asia Pacific Shared Financial Services from April 1998 through August 2001 and as Australasian Financial Controller, Computer Systems from January 1996 through April 1998.

 

Mr. Dillon has served as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of Sun since April 2004, and previously held the position of Vice President, Products Law Group, from July 2002 to March 2004. From October 1999 until June 2002, he served as Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of ONI Systems Corp, an optical networking company. Mr. Dillon initially joined Sun in 1993 and thereafter held successive management positions in several legal support groups until October 1999.

 

Mr. McGowan has served as Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President, Corporate Resources of Sun since July 2002, as Vice President, Finance, Global Sales Operations from July 2001 to June 2002, as Vice President, Staff Operations, Global Sales Operations from June 2000 to June 2001, as Vice President, Finance, Computer Systems, Network Storage and Network Service Providers from February 1998 to June 2000, as Vice President, Finance, Worldwide Financial Operations of Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation (SMCC), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Sun, from July 1994 to February 1998 and as Vice President, Finance, North America and Australia Field Operations of SMCC from October 1992 to July 1994.

 

Mr. Papadopoulos has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Sun since December 2002, as Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer from July 2000 to December 2002 and as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer from April 1998 to July 2000. He served as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation (SMCC), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Sun from March 1996 to April 1998, as Chief Technology Officer of SMCC from December 1995 to March 1996 and as Chief Scientist, Server Systems Engineering from September 1994 to December 1995. Mr. Papadopoulos had a part-time, non-compensated appointment as a Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from September 2002 to August 2003.

 

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PART II

 

  ITEM 5.    MARKET   FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Our common stock trades on The Nasdaq National Market under the symbol “SUNW”. As of September 2, 2004, there were approximately 23,400 stockholders of record and the closing price of Sun’s common stock was $3.97 per share as reported by The Nasdaq National Market.

 

The following table sets forth for the fiscal periods indicated the high and low sale prices for our common stock as reported by The Nasdaq National Market:

 

     Fiscal 2004

   Fiscal 2003

     High

   Low

   High

   Low

First Quarter

   $ 5.18    $ 3.39    $ 6.13    $ 2.55

Second Quarter

     4.59      3.14      4.58      2.34

Third Quarter

     5.93      3.87      3.95      3.02

Fourth Quarter

     5.12      3.64      5.64      3.13

 

No cash dividends were declared or paid in fiscal 2004 or fiscal 2003. We anticipate retaining available funds to finance future growth.

 

We issued unregistered shares of our common stock in connection with our acquisition of Kealia, Inc. (Kealia), which was completed on April 12, 2004. We issued an aggregate of approximately 20,000,000 shares of our common stock (including assumed options) in exchange for all of the outstanding stock and options of Kealia. The issuance of 15,032,475 of these shares was exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, by virtue of Rule 506 of Regulation D under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act. Based upon the small number of Kealia stockholders receiving shares of our common stock in the merger, their financial position and sophistication, the information provided to these persons, the receipt of investment representations from these persons and the absence of any general solicitation, we determined that this exemption was available. The remainder of the shares, which were issued for the assumption of Kealia options, were registered pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-8 filed on April 16, 2004. No underwriters were used in connection with any of the transactions described above.

 

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ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA(1)

 

The following selected financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

 

     Fiscal Years Ended June 30,

     2004

    2003

    2002

    2001

    2000

     Dollars

    %

    Dollars

    %

    Dollars

    %

    Dollars

    %

    Dollars

   %

     (In millions, except per share amounts)

Net revenues

   $ 11,185     100.0     $ 11,434     100.0     $ 12,496     100.0     $ 18,250     100.0     $ 15,721    100.0

Cost of sales

     6,669     59.6       6,492     56.8       7,580     60.7       10,040     55.0       7,540    48.0
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Gross margin

     4,516     40.4       4,942     43.2       4,916     39.3       8,210     45.0       8,181    52.0

Operating expenses:

                                                                   

Research and development

     1,926     17.2       1,837     16.1       1,832     14.7       2,016     11.0       1,630    10.4

Selling, general and administrative

     3,317     29.7       3,329     29.1       3,806     30.5       4,445     24.4       4,053    25.8

Restructuring charges

     344     3.1       371     3.2       517     4.1       75     0.4         

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

     49     0.4       2,125     18.6       6           1           21    0.1

Goodwill amortization

                                   285     1.6       72    0.4

Purchased in-process research and development

     70     0.6       4           3           77     0.4       12    0.1
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Total operating expenses

     5,706     51.0       7,666     67.0       6,164     49.3       6,899     37.8       5,778    36.8
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Operating income (loss)

     (1,190 )   (10.6 )     (2,724 )   (23.8 )     (1,248 )   (10.0 )     1,311     7.2       2,393    15.2

Gain (loss) on equity investments, net

     (64 )   (0.6 )     (84 )   (0.7 )     (99 )   (0.8 )     (90 )   (0.5 )     208    1.3

Other income, net

     94     0.8       155     1.3       299     2.4       363     2.0       170    1.1

Settlement income

     1,597     14.3                                       
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Income (loss) before taxes

     437     3.9       (2,653 )   (23.2 )     (1,048 )   (8.4 )     1,584     8.7       2,771    17.6

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     825     7.4       776     6.8       (461 )   (3.7 )     603     3.3       917    5.8

Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle, net

                                   (54 )   (0.3 )       
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Net income (loss)

   $ (388 )   (3.5 )   $ (3,429 )   (30.0 )   $ (587 )   (4.7 )   $ 927     5.1     $ 1,854    11.8
    


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

  

Net income (loss) per common share-diluted(1)

   $ (0.12 )         $ (1.07 )         $ (0.18 )         $ 0.27           $ 0.55     

Shares used in the calculation of net income (loss) per common share-diluted(1)

     3,277             3,190             3,242             3,417             3,379     

 

     As of June 30,

 
     2004

    2003

    2002

    2001

    2000

 

Cash, cash equivalents and marketable debt securities

   $ 7,608     $ 5,741     $ 5,864     $ 6,171     $ 6,436  

Total assets

   $ 14,503     $ 12,985     $ 16,522     $ 18,181     $ 14,152  

Long-term debt

   $ 1,425 (2)   $ 1,531     $ 1,653 (2)   $ 1,565     $ 1,523  

Other non-current obligations

   $ 1,220 (3)   $ 384 (3)   $ 202 (3)   $ 884 (3)   $ 774 (3)

(1)   Share and per share amounts for all periods presented have been adjusted to reflect stock splits through June 30, 2004.
(2)   Includes approximately $250 million and $204 million classified as current portion of long-term debt as of June 30, 2004 and 2002, respectively.
(3)   Includes long-term tax liabilities as of June 30, 2004, 2001 and 2000 and long-term restructuring liabilities as of June 30, 2004, 2003, 2002 and 2001.

 

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  ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT’S   DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Overview

 

Sun provides network computing infrastructure solutions that include Computer Systems (hardware and software), Network Storage systems (hardware and software), Support services and Professional and Knowledge services. Sun’s solutions are based on major Sun technology innovations such as the Java platform, the Solaris operating system, Sun Java products and N1 Grid architecture and the SPARC microprocessor technology, as well as other widely deployed technologies such as the Linux operating system and x86 microprocessor-based systems. Our network computing infrastructure solutions are used in a wide range of technical/scientific, business and engineering applications in industries such as telecommunications, government, financial services, manufacturing, education, retail, life sciences, media and entertainment transportation, energy/utilities and healthcare. We sell end-to-end networking architecture platform solutions, including products and services, in most major markets worldwide through a combination of direct and indirect channels.

 

While we continued to face business challenges throughout the year, we saw improvement in fourth quarter total net revenues both sequentially and on a year over year basis. We saw improvement in fourth quarter revenues across most of our geographies, product lines and our larger vertical markets, including communications, financial services and government. In the fourth quarter, we saw server system unit shipment growth both sequentially and on a year over year basis. Fourth quarter revenue in the U.S. grew on a sequential basis almost 31%. We believe part of the increase is the result of our improved demand related to UltraSPARC IV-based systems, which were available across our enterprise and data center product lines. The entry level of our product line was rounded out by the successful launch of the Opteron processor based servers. In addition, an increase in our services contract penetration rate assisted our services organization in reporting its highest revenue quarter ever, exceeding $1 billion.

 

In fiscal 2004 total net revenues declined $249 million or 2.2% as compared to fiscal 2003 primarily due to a decrease in products net revenues. While our unit sales of Computer Systems and Network Storage systems increased as compared with fiscal 2003, we responded to competitive pressures with price reductions and sales discounting actions resulting in a decrease in fiscal 2004 products net revenue. An increase in fiscal 2004 services net revenues, as compared with fiscal 2003, partially offset the decline in products net revenues. Although services revenues were also affected by competitive pricing pressures, services revenues grew primarily due to an increase in the support services contract penetration rate, as we increased contract renewals with existing customers and entered into a higher percentage of support services contracts with new products sales.

 

Our overall gross margin percentage in fiscal 2004, declined $426 million or 2.8 percentage points as compared to fiscal 2003. Our products gross margin declined as compared to fiscal 2003, due to the unfavorable impact of planned list price reductions and additional discounts and product mix which were partially offset by manufacturing and component costs savings. The decline in our services gross margin as compared to fiscal 2003 was also a result of competitive pressures which increased discounting, as well as increased costs associated with specific solution-based sales.

 

On April 1, 2004, we entered into several agreements with Microsoft, including an agreement to settle all pending litigation between the two companies, a patent covenant and stand-still agreement, and a technical collaboration agreement. As further described in Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, we received $1,950 million in cash and recognized approximately $1.6 billion in settlement income during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004.

 

In fiscal 2004, we continued to reduce our on-going cost structure by reducing our global workforce, consolidating our global property portfolio and taking other expense reduction measures. Our fiscal 2004 results included $344 million of restructuring charges related to this and other activities and we expect to record additional charges of approximately $130 million over the next several quarters.

 

Additionally, during fiscal 2004 we recorded a non-cash charge of approximately $300 million related to an increase to the valuation allowance of our net deferred tax assets. This increase is the result of the updating of our assumptions underlying the realization of the net deferred tax assets.

 

During fiscal 2004, our operating activities generated cash flows of $2,226 million, which includes the cash received in connection with the settlement with Microsoft of $1,950 million. Our focus on cash management remains a top priority

 

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and we plan to continue to focus on driving improvement in our cash conversion cycle. We ended the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004 with a cash conversion cycle of 40 days, an improvement of 6 days from June 30, 2003. At June 20, 2004, we had a total cash, cash equivalents and marketable debt securities position of approximately $7.6 billion.

 

Changes to Previously Announced Fiscal 2004 Fourth Quarter and Annual Results

 

On July 20, 2004, we announced our fiscal 2004 fourth quarter and annual results. Subsequent to that date, we obtained additional information related to certain estimates primarily related to our asset retirement obligations from leased facilities. We also finalized our accounting for the settlement with Microsoft. As a result, we adjusted our previously announced fiscal 2004 results by decreasing our fourth quarter net income by $12 million and diluted net income per common share by $0.01 and by increasing our annual net loss by $12 million and basic and diluted net loss per common share by $0.01.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The accompanying discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (U.S. GAAP). The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. These estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. However, future events are subject to change and the best estimates and judgments routinely require adjustment. We are required to make estimates and judgments in many areas, including those related to fair value of derivative financial instruments, recording of various accruals, bad debt and inventory reserves, the useful lives of long-lived assets such as property and equipment, warranty obligations and potential losses from contingencies and litigation. We believe the policies discussed below are the most critical to our financial statements because their application places the most significant demands on management’s judgment. Senior management has discussed the development, selection and disclosure of these estimates with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. Our critical accounting policies are described in the following paragraphs.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

As discussed in Note 2 to our Consolidated Financial Statements, we enter into agreements to sell hardware, software, services and multiple deliverable arrangements that include combinations of products and/or services. Additionally, while the majority of our sales transactions contain standard business terms and conditions, there are some transactions that contain non-standard business terms and conditions. As a result, significant contract interpretation is sometimes required to determine the appropriate accounting including: (1) whether an arrangement exists; (2) how the arrangement consideration should be allocated among the deliverables if there are multiple deliverables; (3) when to recognize revenue on the deliverables; and (4) whether undelivered elements are essential to the functionality of delivered elements. In addition, our revenue recognition policy requires an assessment as to whether collectibility is probable, which inherently requires us to evaluate the creditworthiness of our customers. Changes in judgments on these assumptions and estimates could materially impact the timing of revenue recognition.

 

We recognize revenue as work progresses on fixed price professional services contracts when we can reliably evaluate progress to completion. We perform periodic analyses of these contracts in order to determine if the applicable estimates regarding total revenue, total cost and the extent of progress toward completion require revision. For fixed price professional services contracts, when the current estimates of total contract revenue and contract cost indicate a loss, the estimated loss is recognized in the period the loss becomes evident. Changes in assumptions underlying these estimates and cost could materially impact the timing of revenue recognition and loss recognition.

 

Channel Partners selling our high volume products generally carry Sun products as inventory and we recognize revenue when we sell to the Channel Partners, if our revenue recognition criteria are met. Channel Partners selling our high-end products generally purchase our products at the time an end-user is identified. The revenue we recognize associated with channel sales transactions requires us to make estimates in several areas including: (1) creditworthiness of the Channel Partner; (2) the amount of credits we will give for subsequent changes in our price list (i.e., price protection); (3) the amount of credits we will give for additional discounts in certain competitive transactions

 

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(i.e., margin protection); (4) the amount of stock rotation; and (5) the likelihood of returns. Changes in assumptions could require us to make significant revisions to our estimates that could materially impact the amount of net revenue recognized.

 

Goodwill

 

We review goodwill for impairment on an annual basis and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of goodwill may not be recoverable. In testing for a potential impairment of goodwill, we: (1) allocate goodwill to the various Sun businesses to which the acquired goodwill relates; (2) estimate the fair value of those Sun businesses to which goodwill relates; and (3) determine the carrying value (book value) of those businesses, as some of the assets and liabilities related to those businesses, such as property and equipment and accounts receivable, are not held by those businesses but by functional departments (for example, our Global Sales Organization and Worldwide Operations organization). Prior to this allocation of the assets to the reporting units, we are required to assess long-lived assets for impairment in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No. 144 (SFAS 144), “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets.” Furthermore, if the estimated fair value is less than the carrying value for a particular business, then we are required to estimate the fair value of all identifiable assets and liabilities of the business, in a manner similar to a purchase price allocation for an acquired business. This can require independent valuations of certain internally generated and unrecognized intangible assets such as in-process research and development and developed technology. Only after this process is completed is the amount of any goodwill impairment determined.

 

The process of evaluating the potential impairment of goodwill is subjective and requires significant judgment at many points during the analysis. In estimating the fair value of the businesses with recognized goodwill for the purposes of our annual or periodic analyses, we make estimates and judgments about the future cash flows of these businesses. Although our cash flow forecasts are based on assumptions that are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses, there is significant judgment in determining the cash flows attributable to these businesses over their estimated remaining useful lives. In addition, we make certain judgments about allocating shared assets such as accounts receivable and property and equipment to the estimated balance sheet for those businesses. We also consider our market capitalization (adjusted for unallocated monetary assets such as cash, marketable debt securities and debt) on the date we perform the analysis.

 

We performed our fiscal 2004 annual goodwill impairment analysis in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004. Based on our estimates of forecasted discounted cash flows as well as our market capitalization, at that time, we concluded that all of the recorded goodwill of $49 million in our Knowledge services reporting unit was impaired and needed to be expensed as a non-cash charge to continuing operations during the fourth quarter of 2004. The impairment primarily related to goodwill acquired from our acquisitions of ISOPIA, Inc. of $39 million and Ed Learning Systems, Inc. of $7 million. At June 30, 2004, our remaining goodwill had a net book value of $406 million.

 

We may incur charges for impairment of goodwill in the future if the net book value of our operating reporting units exceeds the estimated fair value. If we incur additional impairments to our goodwill, it could have an adverse impact on our future earnings.

 

Other Intangible Assets

 

SFAS 144 is the authoritative standard on the accounting for the impairment of other intangible assets. As required, we perform tests for impairment of intangible assets other than goodwill (Other Intangible Assets) whenever events or circumstances suggest that Other Intangible Assets may be impaired. In April 2004, due to (1) our reorganization plans; (2) certain decisions made regarding the utilization of acquired technologies and other intangible assets; and (3) decreases in cash flow projections related to certain acquired technologies and other intangible assets; we concluded there were sufficient indicators to require us to perform an analysis to assess whether any portion of our Other Intangible Assets balance was impaired. As a result of this analysis, we determined that no impairment charges were necessary at that time. We recognized $98 million and $6 million in fiscal 2003 and 2002, respectively, as impairment charges against the carrying value of Other Intangible Assets. At June 30, 2004, we had Other Intangible Assets with a carrying value of approximately $141 million. These Other Intangible Assets consist of $127 million in intangible assets associated with business combinations and a $14 million intangible asset associated with a revenue generating technology license, which was acquired as part of the Strategic Alliance with Time Warner (see Notes 4 and 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion). To evaluate potential impairment, SFAS 144

 

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requires us to assess whether the future cash flows related to these assets will be greater than their carrying value at the time of the test. Accordingly, while our cash flow assumptions are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses, there is significant judgment in determining the cash flows attributable to our Other Intangible Assets over their respective estimated useful lives. For example, if we reduced the estimated useful life of all intangible assets as of June 30, 2004, by one year or reduced the projected cash flows by 20%, up to $27 million of our Other Intangible Assets would be considered to be impaired and we would be required to recognize an impairment based on the difference between the fair value of these Other Intangible Assets and their carrying value.

 

We are required to periodically evaluate our Other Intangible Assets balances for impairments. If we incur additional impairments to our Other Intangible Assets, it could have an adverse impact on our future earnings.

 

Restructuring

 

We have engaged and may continue to engage in restructuring actions and activities associated with productivity improvement initiatives and expense reduction measures, which require us to make significant estimates in several areas including: 1) realizable values of assets made redundant, obsolete or excess; 2) expenses for severance and other employee separation costs; 3) the ability to generate sublease income, as well as our ability to terminate lease obligations at the amounts we have estimated; and 4) other costs. The amounts we have accrued represents our best estimate of the obligations we expect to incur in connection with these actions, but could be subject to change due to various factors including market conditions and the outcome of negotiations with third parties. Should the actual amounts differ from our estimates, the amount of the restructuring charges could be materially impacted. For a full description of our restructuring actions, refer to our discussion of restructuring charges and workforce rebalancing efforts in the Results of Operations section. Any additional restructuring actions could have an adverse impact on our operating results in the period in which any such action is made.

 

Equity Investments in Privately-Held Companies

 

Our investments in privately-held companies are made as part of Sun’s strategic equity investment strategy. Our strategy is to invest up to certain authorized amounts in companies developing products, markets and services that are strategic to Sun’s business and technology. These equity investments are generally made in connection with a round of financing with other third-party investors. At June 30, 2004, we had approximately $59 million of equity investments in privately-held companies. As our equity investments generally do not permit us to exert significant influence or control over the entity in which we are investing, these amounts generally represent our cost of the investment, less any adjustments we make when we determine that an investment’s net realizable value is less than its carrying cost.

 

The process of assessing whether a particular equity investment’s net realizable value is less than its carrying cost requires a significant amount of judgment. In making this judgment, we carefully consider the investee’s cash position, projected cash flows (both short and long-term), financing needs, recent financing rounds, most recent valuation data, the current investing environment, management/ownership changes, and competition. This valuation process is based primarily on information that we request from these privately-held companies. This information is not subject to the same disclosure and audit requirements as the reports required of U.S. public companies, and as such, the reliability and accuracy of the data may vary. Based on our evaluation, we recorded net impairment charges, which are reflected in loss on equity investments, net in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations, related to our investments in privately-held companies of $67 million, $72 million and $64 million in fiscal years 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively.

 

Estimating the net realizable value of investments in privately-held early-stage technology companies is inherently subjective and may contribute to significant volatility in our reported results of operations. If we incur additional impairments to our equity investments in privately-held companies, it could have an adverse impact on our future earnings.

 

Income Taxes

 

Estimates and judgments are required in the calculation of certain tax liabilities and in the determination of the recoverability of certain of the deferred tax assets, which arise from net operating losses, tax carryforwards and temporary differences between the tax and financial statement recognition of revenue and expense. SFAS No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (SFAS 109), also requires that the deferred tax assets be reduced by a valuation

 

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allowance, if based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the recorded deferred tax assets will not be realized in future periods.

 

In evaluating our ability to recover our deferred tax assets, in full or in part, we consider all available positive and negative evidence including our past operating results, the existence of cumulative losses in the most recent fiscal years and our forecast of future taxable income on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis. In determining future taxable income, we are responsible for assumptions utilized including the amount of state, federal and international pre-tax operating income, the reversal of temporary differences and the implementation of feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. These assumptions require significant judgment about the forecasts of future taxable income and are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses. Cumulative losses incurred in the U.S. and Japan in recent years represented sufficient negative evidence to require a full and partial valuation allowances in these jurisdictions, respectively. At June 30, 2004 we established a valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets in these jurisdictions, which we intend to maintain until sufficient positive evidence exists to support reversal of the valuation allowance. Future reversals or increases to our valuation allowance could have a significant impact on our future earnings.

 

In addition, the calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations in a multitude of jurisdictions. We recognize potential liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues in the U.S. and other tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes and interest will be due. If events occur and the payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result.

 

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a full description of recent accounting pronouncements including the respective expected dates of adoption and effects on results of operations and financial condition.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Net Revenues

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions, except revenue per employee dollars in thousands)

 

           
     2004

    Change

   2003

    Change

   2002

 

Computer Systems products

   $ 5,854     (6.2)%    $ 6,243     (15.6)%    $ 7,396  

Network Storage products

     1,501     (3.2)%      1,550     (8.7)%      1,697  
    


      


      


Products net revenue

   $ 7,355     (5.6)%    $ 7,793     (14.3)%    $ 9,093  

Percentage of total net revenues

     65.8 %   (2.4) pts      68.2 %   (4.6) pts      72.8 %

Support services

   $ 2,999     5.5%    $ 2,844     12.1%    $ 2,538  

Professional and Knowledge services

     831     4.3%      797     (7.9)%      865  
    


      


      


Services net revenue

   $ 3,830     5.2%    $ 3,641     7.0%    $ 3,403  

Percentage of total net revenues

     34.2 %   2.4 pts      31.8 %   4.6 pts      27.2 %

Total net revenues

   $ 11,185     (2.2)%    $ 11,434     (8.5)%    $ 12,496  
   

Services contract penetration rate(1)

     44.3 %   8.2 pts      36.1 %   5.8 pts      30.3 %
   

Revenue per employee(2)

   $ 313     2.0%    $ 307     1.0%    $ 304  
(1)  

The services contract penetration rate is calculated by dividing the number of systems under a Support service contract, by the installed base. Systems under a Support service contract represent the total number of systems under an active Support service contract as of the last day of a fiscal quarter. Installed base is defined as the total number of units in active use which is calculated by dividing the number of units shipped, by our estimate of the product’s useful life. These estimates range between three and five years, varying by product, and are a function of system type, product complexity, degree of self-support attributes, the level of criticality to a customer and the average selling price. The services contract penetration rate is a key measure we use to assess the performance of

 

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the Support services business as it measures our ability to capture an ongoing revenue stream from the Computer Systems and Network Storage products we sell.

 

(2)   Revenue per employee is calculated by dividing the revenue during the period, by the average number of employees during the period, including contractors. We use this as a measure of our productivity.

 

Due to the general weakening of the U.S. dollar during fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2003, our total net revenues were favorably impacted by foreign exchange as compared with fiscal 2003 and fiscal 2002, respectively. The net foreign currency impact to our total net revenues is difficult to precisely measure because of the various hedging strategies we employ. However, our best estimate of the foreign exchange benefit in fiscal 2004 as compared with fiscal 2003, approximated 4% of total net revenue and in fiscal 2003 as compared with fiscal 2002, approximated 4% of total net revenue.

 

Products Net Revenue

 

Products net revenue consists of revenue generated from the sale of Computer Systems and Network Storage products.

 

During fiscal 2004 our Computer Systems and Network Storage products net revenue decreased, compared with fiscal 2003, primarily as a result of an intensely competitive environment. During fiscal 2004, while our shipments of units for both Computer Systems and Network Storage systems increased as compared with fiscal 2003, we responded to competitive pressures for both product groups with price reductions, which negatively impacted our revenue. Network Storage products revenue was impacted to a lesser degree than Computer Systems products revenue during fiscal 2004, as Network Storage products revenue benefited from our continued focus on including storage products as an element of our solution-based selling strategy.

 

During fiscal 2003, our Computer Systems and Network Storage products net revenue decreased, as compared with fiscal 2002, primarily as a result of an intensely competitive environment as well as the adverse macroeconomic conditions that began at the end of the second quarter of fiscal 2001. By “adverse macroeconomic conditions” we mean specifically the adverse financial conditions brought on by the general recessionary downturns in the U.S. and other global economies during this time period. This economic recession affected most of our customers and caused reductions in technology capital spending by our customers, particularly those in the telecommunications, financial services and manufacturing industries. In addition, the recession in some cases resulted in the loss of customers due to bankruptcies or the winding down of these companies, most notably in the so-called “dot-com” and telecommunications industries, which effects were most prevalent in the U.S. During fiscal 2003, we experienced continued lower sales volumes and competitive pricing pressure for both Computer Systems and Network Storage products. In addition to the factors noted above, we also experienced particularly intense competitive pressure at the lower end of our Computer Systems product line. Network Storage products revenue was impacted to a lesser degree than Computer Systems products revenue during fiscal 2003, as Network Storage products revenue benefited during fiscal 2003 from our introduction of new storage products, which expanded our total network storage offering.

 

Services Net Revenue

 

Services net revenue consists of revenue generated from Support services and Professional and Knowledge services.

 

Support services revenue consists primarily of maintenance contract revenue, which is recognized ratably over the contractual period and represents approximately 78% in fiscal 2004 and 2003 and approximately 75% in fiscal 2002 of services net revenue. During fiscal 2004, excluding the favorable foreign currency impact, the increase in Support Services net revenue as compared with fiscal 2003, was primarily due to a 8.2 percentage point increase in the services contract penetration rate as we renewed contracts with existing customers and entered into a higher percentage of Support services contracts with new products sales. This impact of the increase in the number of systems under an active Support service contract was substantially offset by competitive pricing pressures, a change in the mix towards maintenance contracts sold or renewed with reduced service levels and a shift in product sales mix to a greater proportion of low-end products, which are typically sold with reduced levels of services.

 

Professional and Knowledge services revenue consists primarily of professional services such as technical consulting to help customers plan, implement, and manage distributed network computing environments and, to a lesser extent, knowledge services such as development and delivery of integrated learning solutions for enterprises, IT organizations, and individual IT professionals. Excluding the favorable foreign currency impact, during fiscal 2004, the factors contributing to the overall increase in Professional and Knowledge services revenue as compared with fiscal 2003 included a combination of higher Professional services revenues resulting primarily from the success of our solution-

 

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based selling strategy in certain countries within EMEA in the fiscal year partially offset by (1) a reduction in customers’ discretionary spending related to Knowledge services, and, to a lesser extent, (2) the decline in new product revenues.

 

During fiscal 2003, the growth in Support services as compared to fiscal 2002 was primarily a result of an increase in the number of systems under contract from both the sale of new systems and contract renewals with existing customers. The decrease in Professional and Knowledge services revenue during fiscal 2003 as compared with fiscal 2002 was due primarily to reductions in customer IT spending, an intensely competitive environment and, to a lesser extent, the reduction in new product sales.

 

Net Revenues by Geographic Area

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

     2003

    Change

   2002

 

U.S.

   $ 4,768     (5.5)%      $ 5,048     (14.9)%    $ 5,935  

Percentage of net revenues

     42.6 %   (1.5) pts        44.1 %   (3.4) pts      47.5 %

Americas — Other (Canada and Latin America)

   $ 562     3.5%      $ 543     (5.2)%    $ 573  

Percentage of net revenues

     5.0 %   0.2 pts        4.8 %   (0.2) pts      4.6 %

EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa)

   $ 3,942     4.2%      $ 3,783     (1.2)%    $ 3,830  

Percentage of net revenues

     35.3 %   2.2 pts        33.1 %   2.5 pts      30.6 %

APAC (Asia, Australia and New Zealand)

   $ 1,913     (7.1)%      $ 2,060     (4.5)%    $ 2,158  

Percentage of net revenues

     17.1 %   (0.9) pts        18.0 %   0.7 pts      17.3 %

International revenues

   $ 6,417     0.5%      $ 6,386     (2.6)%    $ 6,561  

Percentage of net revenues

     57.4 %   1.5 pts        55.9 %   3.4 pts      52.5 %

Total net revenues

   $ 11,185     (2.2)%      $ 11,434     (8.5)%    $ 12,496  

 

In fiscal 2004, our total net revenues decreased by 2.2% as compared with fiscal 2003 primarily due to a decrease in total net revenues in the U.S. as the result of an intensely competitive environment. Although difficult to accurately quantify, our fiscal 2004 product transition from UltraSPARC III to UltraSPARC IV may have impacted revenue in the U.S. to a greater extent than other regions as the mix of products sold in the U.S. product market included a higher proportion of products undergoing the transition to UltraSPARC IV. In fiscal 2003, our total net revenues decreased 8.5% as compared with fiscal 2002 primarily due to the adverse macroeconomic conditions discussed above in “Products Net Revenue.”

 

The following table sets forth net revenues in countries or regions contributing significantly to changes in international net revenues during the last three fiscal years ended June 30:

 

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

   Change

    2003

   Change

    2002

United Kingdom (UK)

   $ 945    11.3 %   $ 849    (9.0 )%   $ 933

Germany

   $ 865    (7.1 )%   $ 931    13.5 %   $ 820

Japan

   $ 762    (18.6 )%   $ 936    (11.7 )%   $ 1,060

Central and North EMEA (CNE)(1)

   $ 675    2.3 %   $ 660    (9.2 )%   $ 727

 

(1)   CNE consists primarily of Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg and Switzerland. In prior quarterly and annual reports we included an international area called “Northern Europe” that consisted of Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Eastern European countries and Russia. The Eastern European countries and Russia have moved to another region. This change to CNE reflects the manner in which we manage our international operations.

 

During fiscal 2004 total net revenues in the majority our of products and service categories continued to grow in the UK primarily due to favorable foreign currency impact and overall growth in the UK economy, which resulted in increased sales activity in key vertical markets such as financial services. During fiscal 2003, we experienced lower sales in the UK, as compared with fiscal 2002, primarily due to adverse macroeconomic conditions similar to those experienced in the U.S.

 

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During fiscal 2004, we experienced lower revenues in Germany, as compared with fiscal 2003, primarily due to a decreased number of major infrastructure solution deals during fiscal 2004, an increase in the length of sales cycles, and intense product competition in a challenging economic environment. The increase in fiscal 2003 revenue, as compared with fiscal 2002, was primarily due to our success in selling our end-to-end networking architecture platform to certain major customers in that region, despite adverse economic conditions.

 

During fiscal 2004, we continued to experience a decline in revenue in Japan due to intense competitive pressures in a challenging Japanese economic environment. This has negatively impacted our overall share of the server market and in particular sales of our high-end server products. In Japan we have recently taken actions, which include a change in management and implementation of a plan to reduce our future costs, to adjust to the current intensely competitive business environment. If we are unable to compete effectively in this region, our results of operations and cash flows could be further adversely affected.

 

In CNE, the increase in our total net revenues in fiscal 2004, as compared to fiscal 2003, was primarily a result of the favorable foreign currency impact and an improving CNE telecommunications industry.

 

The decrease in our total net revenues in Japan and CNE in fiscal 2003, as compared to fiscal 2002, was primarily due to adverse macroeconomic conditions similar to those experienced in the U.S.

 

Gross Margin

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

   2003

    Change

   2002

 

Products gross margin

   $ 3,065     (11.2)%    $ 3,451     (3.8)%    $ 3,587  

Percentage of products net revenue

     41.7 %   (2.6) pts      44.3 %   4.9 pts      39.4 %

Services gross margin

   $ 1,451     (2.7)%    $ 1,491     12.2%    $ 1,329  

Percentage of services net revenue

     37.9 %   (3.1) pts      41.0 %   1.9 pts      39.1 %

Total gross margin

   $ 4,516     (8.6)%    $ 4,942     (8.6)%    $ 4,916  

Percentage of net revenues

     40.4 %   (2.8) pts      43.2 %   3.9 pts      39.3 %

 

Products Gross Margin

 

Products gross margin percentage is influenced by numerous factors including product mix, pricing, geographic mix, currency exchange rates and the mix between sales to resellers and end-users, third-party costs (including both raw material and manufacturing costs), volume, warranty costs and charges related to excess and obsolete inventory. Many of these factors influence, or are interrelated with, other factors. As a result, it is difficult to precisely quantify the impact of each item individually. Accordingly, the following quantification of the reasons for the change in the products gross margin percentage is an estimate only.

 

During fiscal 2004, as compared with fiscal 2003, the 2.6 percentage point decrease in our products gross margin percentage was primarily the result of the negative impact of reductions in product pricing (planned list price reductions and sales discounting actions) of approximately 7 percentage points and changes in product mix (greater proportion of lower margin products) of approximately 1 percentage point. These decreases were partially offset by manufacturing and component cost reductions benefiting products gross margin of approximately 6 percentage points, which primarily consisted of reductions in platform specific costs and lower costs of certain commodities including CPU boards, drives and removables.

 

During fiscal 2003, as compared with fiscal 2002, the 4.9 percentage point increase in our products gross margin percentage was primarily the result of: (1) lower purchased component costs, benefiting products gross margin by approximately 6 percentage points; (2) lower platform transition costs associated with the conversion of a majority of our product lines to the UltraSPARC III microprocessor that were incurred in the first half of fiscal 2002, and lower fixed manufacturing costs benefiting products gross margin by approximately 3 percentage points; and (3) lower amortization costs of certain of our intangible assets that were partially written-down during the second quarter of fiscal 2003, benefiting products gross margin by approximately 1 percentage point. These favorable factors were partially offset by: (1) reductions in product pricing (normal price list reductions and competitive transaction pricing), negatively impacting products gross margin by approximately 5 percentage points; and (2) changes in the sales products mix, negatively impacting products gross margin by approximately 1 percentage point.

 

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We experienced significant component cost reductions over the last several years that benefited our products gross margin. These cost reductions generally offset or were slightly less than the pricing actions we took in those prior periods to respond to competitive pressure and the shift in our product mix towards sales of lower margin products. We expect pricing pressures associated with competition to continue to impact our products gross margin and we may not be able to achieve the same level of component cost reductions, which could adversely impact our operating results.

 

Services Gross Margin

 

Services gross margin percentage is influenced by numerous factors including services mix, pricing, geography mix, currency exchange rates and third-party costs. Many of these factors influence, or are interrelated with, other factors. As a result, it is difficult to precisely quantify the impact of each item individually. Accordingly, the following quantification of the reasons for the change in the services gross margin percentage are estimates only.

 

During fiscal 2004, as compared with fiscal 2003, the 3.1 percentage point decrease in our services gross margin reflected the negative impact of competitive pricing pressures of approximately 3 percentage points and increased costs associated with specific solution-based sales of approximately 1 percentage point. These decreases were partially offset by efficiencies realized from increased sales volume over a fixed cost base of approximately 1 percentage point.

 

During fiscal 2003, as compared with fiscal 2002, the 1.9 percentage points increase in our services gross margin percentage reflected the impact of: (1) overall cost reductions, primarily from decreases in discretionary spending, and improved operating efficiencies across all lines of our services business, helped, in part, by lower overall headcount, benefiting services gross margin by approximately 3 percentage points; and (2) Support services revenue increasing as a percentage of total services net revenue (Support services generates a higher gross margin than Professional and Knowledge services), benefiting services gross margin by approximately 1 percentage point. The impact of these favorable items on services gross margin in fiscal 2003, as compared with fiscal 2002, was partially offset by competitive pricing pressures, which negatively impacted services gross margin by approximately 2 percentage points.

 

We expect pricing pressures associated with competition and the shift in product mix to solution-based sales, which have a greater proportion of professional services, to continue to impact our services gross margin and may not be able to achieve our targeted levels of cost reductions and operational efficiencies, either of which could adversely impact our operating results.

 

Operating Expenses

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

   2003

    Change

   2002

 

Research and development

   $ 1,926     4.8%    $ 1,837     —%    $ 1,832  

Percentage of net revenues

     17.2 %   1.1 pts      16.1 %   1.4 pts      14.7 %

Selling, general and administrative

   $ 3,317     (0.4)%    $ 3,329     (12.5)%    $ 3,806  

Percentage of net revenues

     29.7 %   0.6 pts      29.1 %   (1.4) pts      30.5 %

Restructuring charges

   $ 344     (7.3)%    $ 371     (28.2)%    $ 517  

Percentage of net revenues

     3.1 %   (0.1) pts      3.2 %   (0.9) pts      4.1 %

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

   $ 49     (97.7)%    $ 2,125     N/M    $ 6  

Percentage of net revenues

     0.4 %   (18.2) pts      18.6 %   18.6 pts      %

Purchased in-process research and development

   $ 70     N/M    $ 4     33.3%    $ 3  

Percentage of net revenues

     0.6 %   0.6 pts      %   — pts      %

Total operating expenses

   $ 5,706     (25.6)%    $ 7,666     24.4%    $ 6,164  

N/M — Not meaningful

                                  

 

Research and Development (R&D) Expenses

 

During fiscal 2004, R&D expenses increased $89 million, as compared with fiscal 2003, primarily as a result of: (1) $77 million increase in compensation costs associated with acquisitions and annual salary adjustments in effect since the third quarter of fiscal 2003 and (2) $29 million in variable compensation costs. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $15 million in depreciation and amortization.

 

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During fiscal 2003, R&D expenses in dollars remained relatively flat as compared to fiscal 2002; however, the components of R&D expenses in fiscal 2003, differed from those in fiscal 2002. During fiscal 2003 as compared with fiscal 2002, an $81 million net increase in compensation costs was substantially offset by a $76 million decrease in: (1) costs incurred for prototype development of $27 million; (2) depreciation costs of $22 million; (3) infrastructure costs of $21 million due to our restructuring plans; and (4) discretionary spending of $6 million.

 

We believe that to maintain our competitive position in a market characterized by rapid rates of technological advancement, we must continue to invest significant resources in new systems, software, and microprocessor development, as well as continue to enhance existing products.

 

Selling, General and Administrative (SG&A) Expenses

 

During fiscal 2004, SG&A expenses decreased $12 million, as compared with fiscal 2003, primarily as a result of: (1) $82 million decrease in depreciation and capital related costs; (2) $79 million reduction in discretionary spending in areas such as information technology and marketing; and (3) $32 million in savings associated with facilities restructuring efforts. These decreases were partially offset by: (1) $61 million increase in legal costs associated with settlements as well as various on-going proceedings; (2) $52 million increase in variable compensation, including commissions and bonuses; (3) $38 million in fiscal 2004 workforce rebalancing efforts; and (4) $24 million in compensation costs, which includes the impact of exchange rates and annual salary adjustments in effect since the third quarter of fiscal 2003, offset by workforce reduction actions.

 

During fiscal 2003, SG&A expenses decreased $477 million, as compared with fiscal 2002, primarily as a result of: (1) a $196 million decrease in discretionary spending in areas such as advertising and consulting; (2) a $179 million decrease in compensation costs (which is net of a $33 million decreased benefit from our annual mandatory shutdown in July 2002, as compared with our mandatory July 2001 shutdown, resulting from fewer required vacation days in July 2002 as compared with July 2001, a $20 million increase in benefits costs and a $31 million increase due to annual salary adjustments during the third quarter of fiscal 2003) primarily as a result of headcount reductions; and (3) a $102 million decrease in depreciation and occupancy costs as a result of reductions in capital expenditures and reductions from our facility exit plans.

 

We are continuing to focus our efforts on achieving additional operating efficiencies by reviewing and improving upon our existing business processes and cost structure. In the short-term, on a dollar basis, we expect to decrease our SG&A expenditures.

 

Restructuring Charges and Workforce Rebalancing Efforts

 

Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan

 

In March 2004, our Board of Directors and management approved a plan to reduce our cost structure and improve operating efficiencies by reducing our workforce, exiting facilities, and implementing productivity improvement initiatives and expense reduction measures (Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan). This plan includes reducing our workforce by at least 3,300 employees across all levels, business functions, operating units, and geographic regions, eliminating excess facility capacity in light of revised facility requirements, and other actions. In accordance with SFAS No. 112 “Employers’ Accounting for Post Employment Benefits” and SFAS No. 146, “Accounting for Costs Associated with Exit or Disposal Activities” (SFAS 146), in fiscal 2004 we recognized a total of $343 million in charges associated with the Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan (consisting of a $215 million workforce reduction charge and a $128 million excess facility charge). Of the estimated 3,300 employees, approximately 250 employees were terminated as of June 30, 2004. As a result, the cost benefits associated with our workforce reduction activities will not be completely realized until fiscal 2005.

 

During the second half of fiscal 2004, the charge relating to the consolidation of excess facilities included:

 

  $95 million of estimated future obligations for non-cancelable lease payments (net of estimated sublease income of $35 million) or termination fees resulting from exiting excess rental facilities. We estimated the cost of exiting and terminating the facility leases by referring to the contractual terms of the agreements and by evaluating the current real estate market conditions. In addition, we intend to sublease certain leased facilities and have estimated the sublease income by evaluating the current real estate market conditions or, where applicable, by referring to amounts being negotiated; and

 

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  $33 million for the impairment of property and equipment (primarily leasehold improvements) for which there are insufficient cash flows to support the carrying cost. The property and equipment impairment was determined based on the difference between the assets’ estimated fair value and their carrying value.

 

We expect to record additional charges totaling approximately $130 million related to our workforce and facilities reductions primarily over the next several quarters, the timing of which will depend upon the timing of notification of the remaining employees leaving the company as determined by local employment laws and as we exit facilities. Certain costs related to the facilities reductions that do not meet the initial recognition criteria of SFAS 146 will be expensed as they are incurred and will be reflected as restructuring charges in our consolidated statement of operations.

 

In addition, as part of the Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan, we anticipate incurring additional charges associated with productivity improvement initiatives and expense reduction measures. The total amount and timing of these charges will depend upon the nature, timing, and extent of these future actions.

 

Fiscal 2003 Restructuring Plan

 

In October 2002, we committed to and began implementing a workforce reduction and facility exit plan (Fiscal 2003 Restructuring Plan). The goal of this plan was to reduce costs and improve operating efficiencies in order to adjust to the current business environment. We implemented the plan by reducing our workforce by approximately 3,200 employees across all employee levels, business functions, operating units, and geographic regions and eliminating excess facility capacity in light of revised facility requirements. In accordance with EITF Issue No. 94-3, “Liability Recognition for Certain Employee Termination Benefits and Other Costs to Exit an Activity (including Certain Costs Incurred in a Restructuring),” we recognized $308 million in restructuring charges associated with the Fiscal 2003 Restructuring Plan (consisting of a $176 million workforce reduction charge and a $132 million excess facility charge).

 

During the second quarter of fiscal 2003, the charge relating to the consolidation of excess facilities included:

 

  $114 million of estimated future obligations for non-cancelable lease payments or termination fees resulting from exiting excess rental facilities. We estimated the cost of exiting and terminating the facility leases by referring to the contractual terms of the agreements and by evaluating the current real estate market conditions. In addition, we intend to sublease certain leased facilities and have estimated the sublease income by evaluating the current real estate market conditions or, where applicable, by referring to amounts being negotiated; and

 

  $18 million for the impairment of property and equipment (primarily leasehold improvements) for which there are insufficient cash flows to support the carrying cost. The property and equipment impairment was determined based on the difference between the assets’ estimated fair value and their carrying value.

 

All facilities relating to the amounts accrued under the restructuring were exited by June 30, 2004.

 

As of June 30, 2004, substantially all employees to be terminated as a result of the restructuring had been notified. While most of the severance and related fringe benefits have been paid, in accordance with local employment laws, we expect to pay the remaining restructuring accrual related to severance over the next few quarters.

 

Fiscal 2002 Restructuring Plan

 

In the second quarter of fiscal 2002, we implemented a workforce reduction and facility exit plan, which resulted in a charge of $511 million (consisting of a $146 million workforce reduction charge and a $365 million excess facility charge). The goal of the restructuring was to reduce costs and improve operating efficiencies in order to adjust to the then current business environment. Specifically, we reduced our workforce by approximately 9% (or 3,400 employees and 500 contractors) across all employee levels, business functions, operating units, and geographic regions and eliminated excess facilities in light of revised facility requirements.

 

During the second quarter of fiscal 2002, the charge related to the consolidation of excess facilities included:

 

  $282 million of estimated future obligations for non-cancelable lease payments or termination fees resulting from exiting excess leased facilities. Our estimate of the cost of exiting and terminating the facility leases was based on the contractual terms of the agreements and then current commercial real estate market conditions. In addition, we intend to sublease certain leased facilities and have estimated the sublease income based on then current real estate market conditions or, where applicable, amounts being negotiated;

 

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  $66 million for the impairment of in-process construction costs related to the termination of certain building construction projects; and

 

  $17 million for the impairment of property and equipment (primarily leasehold improvements) that were no longer in use. The property and equipment impairment was determined based on the difference between the assets’ estimated fair value and their carrying value.

 

All facilities relating to the amounts accrued under the restructuring were exited by December 31, 2002.

 

During the second half of fiscal 2002, we reduced our initial estimate, primarily to reflect the settlement of certain lease obligations, and recorded an adjustment of $20 million. During fiscal 2003, we increased our estimate and recorded an adjustment of $38 million which reflected a decrease in the estimate of sublease income due to the deterioration of certain commercial real estate markets.

 

Fiscal 2001 Facility Exit Plan

 

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2001, we elected to exit certain building leases and discontinue certain building projects. We incurred approximately $75 million for facility exit costs associated with this decision. As a result of the continued deterioration of certain commercial real estate markets, we reduced our sublease income assumptions and, accordingly, recorded an additional $26 million and $33 million charge in fiscal 2002 and fiscal 2003, respectively, to reflect this change in our estimates.

 

The following table sets forth an analysis of the restructuring accrual activity for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2004, 2003 and 2002 (in millions):

 

           
    Fiscal 2004
Restructuring Plan


    Fiscal 2003
Restructuring Plan


    Fiscal 2002
Restructuring Plan


    Fiscal 2001
Facility
Exit Plan


   

Total


 
  Severance
and
Benefits


   

Facilities
Related

and other


    Severance
and
Benefits


    Facilities
Related


    Severance
and
Benefits


    Facilities
Related


    Facilities
Related


   

Balance as of June 30, 2001

  $     $     $     $     $     $     $ 46     $ 46  

Severance and benefits

                            146                   146  

Accrued lease costs

                                  282             282  

Property and equipment impairment

                                  83             83  

Provision adjustments

                                  (20 )     26       6  
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Total restructuring charges

                            146       345       26       517  

Cash paid

                            (127 )     (93 )     (19 )     (239 )

Non-cash

                                  (83 )           (83 )
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Balance as of June 30, 2002

                            19       169       53       241  

Severance and benefits

                176                               176  

Accrued lease costs

                      114                         114  

Property and equipment impairment

                      18                         18  

Provision adjustments

                (4 )     (4 )     (2 )     40       33       63  
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Total restructuring charges

                172       128       (2 )     40       33       371  

Cash paid

                (148 )     (5 )     (17 )     (31 )     (26 )     (227 )

Non-cash

                      (13 )           3             (10 )
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Balance as of June 30, 2003

                24       110             181       60       375  

Severance and benefits

    215                                           215  

Accrued lease costs

          95                                     95  

Property and equipment impairment

          33                                     33  

Provision adjustments

                (3 )     (3 )                 7       1  
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Total restructuring charges

    215       128       (3 )     (3 )                 7       344  

Cash paid

    (49 )     (6 )     (21 )     (19 )           (28 )     (23 )     (146 )

Non-cash

          (34 )     1       2                   1       (30 )
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Balance as of June 30, 2004

  $ 166     $ 88     $ 1     $ 90     $     $ 153     $ 45     $ 543  
   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


   


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

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Our accrued liability for all four plans was net of approximately $94 million of estimated sublease income to be generated from sublease contracts not yet negotiated. Our ability to generate this amount of sublease income, as well as our ability to terminate lease obligations at the amounts we have estimated, is highly dependent upon the economic conditions, particularly commercial real estate market conditions in certain geographies, at the time we negotiate the lease termination and sublease arrangements with third parties. The amounts we have accrued represent our best estimate of the obligations we expect to incur in connection with these plans, and could be subject to change. Adjustments may be required as conditions and facts change throughout the implementation period.

 

The remaining cash expenditures relating to workforce reductions are expected to be paid over the next few quarters. Our accrual as of June 30, 2004 for facility related leases (net of anticipated sublease proceeds) will be paid over their respective lease terms through fiscal 2018. As of June 30, 2004, $273 million of the $543 million accrual was classified as current and the remaining $270 million was classified as non-current.

 

The above restructuring charges are based on estimates that are subject to change. Changes to the previous estimates have been reflected as “Provision adjustments” on the above table in the period the changes in estimates were made.

 

Workforce Rebalancing Efforts

 

Prior to the announcement of our Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan, we had initiated certain workforce rebalancing efforts during the first six months of fiscal 2004. As a result, we incurred $55 million of separation costs during this period. Approximately $3 million, $14 million, and $38 million of these separation costs were included in cost of sales, research and development and selling, general and administrative expenses, respectively. The remaining accrual of $1 million at June 30, 2004 is expected to be paid in the first half of fiscal 2005.

 

Impairment of Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

We performed our fiscal 2004 annual goodwill impairment analysis in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004. Based on our estimates of forecasted discounted cash flows as well as our market capitalization, at that time, we concluded that the goodwill in our Knowledge services reporting unit was impaired. The lower discounted cash flows attributable to our Knowledge services reporting unit in fiscal 2004 were primarily due to a decrease in revenue and gross margin, mostly resulting from the end-of-life of new enterprise learning platform licensing and hosting agreements, as well as reduced expectations for other products. Knowledge services revenues declined in fiscal 2004 by approximately 16% as compared to fiscal 2003. In measuring the amount of goodwill impairment, we did not make a hypothetical allocation of the estimated fair value of this reporting unit to the tangible and intangible assets (other than goodwill) within the reporting unit (as required by SFAS No. 142 “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets”). We did not make such a hypothetical allocation for the following reasons: (1) the estimated fair value of the reporting unit based on our estimates of forecasted discounted cash flows as well as our market capitalization was negative; and (2) any allocation of such negative fair value would have resulted in no implied value of the existing goodwill. As a result, we concluded that all of the recorded goodwill in the Knowledge services reporting unit ($49 million) was impaired and needed to be expensed as a non-cash charge to continuing operations during the fourth quarter of 2004. The impairment primarily related to goodwill acquired from our acquisitions of ISOPIA, Inc. of $39 million and Ed Learning Systems, Inc. of $7 million.

 

When we conducted our fiscal 2003 annual analysis in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2003, we concluded at that time that we did not have any impairment of goodwill based on our then forecasted discounted cash flows as well as our market capitalization. However, we did record impairment charges to goodwill during the second quarter of fiscal 2003, as described below.

 

In October 2002, based on a combination of factors, particularly: (1) our current and projected operating results; (2) our decision to reduce our workforce and eliminate excess facility space; and (3) our then current market capitalization, we concluded there were sufficient indicators to require us to assess whether any portion of our recorded goodwill balance was impaired. When we performed the analysis in October 2002, the estimated fair value of our reporting units decreased because our current forecasted discounted cash flows and market capitalization were lower than at the time of our previous analysis. Based on this analysis, we concluded that the goodwill in our Volume Systems and Network Storage reporting units was impaired. As required by SFAS 142, in measuring the amount of goodwill impairment, we made a hypothetical allocation of the estimated fair value of the reporting units to the tangible and intangible assets (other than

 

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goodwill) within these reporting units. Based on this allocation, we concluded that all of the recorded goodwill in the Volume Systems reporting unit ($1,566 million) and the Network Storage reporting unit ($461 million) was impaired and needed to be expensed as a non-cash charge to continuing operations during the second quarter of fiscal 2003.

 

We perform the impairment analysis at one level below the operating segment level (Note 16) as defined in SFAS 142. This analysis requires management to make a series of critical assumptions to: (1) evaluate whether any impairment exists; and (2) measure the amount of impairment. SFAS 142 requires that we estimate the fair value of our reporting units as compared with their estimated book value. If the estimated fair value of a reporting unit is less than the estimated book value, then an impairment is deemed to have occurred. In estimating the fair value of our reporting units, we primarily use the income approach (which utilizes forecasted discounted cash flows to estimate the fair value of the reporting unit) and the market approach (which estimates fair value based on market prices for comparable companies). We also consider Sun’s total market capitalization as of each date on which we conclude an analysis is required, and our average market capitalization for a period of time prior to and subsequent to each date on which we conclude an analysis is required, to adequately consider the impact of volatility on our market capitalization on that day. As required by SFAS 142, prior to conducting our goodwill impairment analysis, we assess long-lived assets for impairment in accordance with SFAS 144.

 

In April 2004, due to (1) our reorganization plans; (2) certain decisions made regarding the utilization of acquired technologies and other intangible assets; and (3) decreases in cash flow projections related to certain acquired technologies and other intangible assets; we concluded there were sufficient indicators to require us to perform an analysis to assess whether any portion of our Other Intangible Assets balance was impaired. As a result of this analysis, we determined that our Other Intangible Assets balance was not impaired.

 

Based on the same considerations outlined in the above discussion on goodwill, in October 2002, we concluded there were sufficient indicators to require us to assess whether a portion of our other intangible assets was impaired. SFAS 144 is the authoritative standard on the accounting for the impairment of other intangible assets. As a result of our analysis we recognized an impairment expense of $98 million in our Product Group reporting segment to reduce our Other Intangible Assets balance to its fair value during the second quarter of fiscal 2003. All impairments of non-goodwill intangible assets were recognized before we made a hypothetical allocation of the estimated fair value of the reporting units to the tangible and intangible assets (other than goodwill) within each reporting unit tested for goodwill impairment, as required by SFAS 142. The fair value of the other acquisition-related intangibles and a revenue generating technology license was determined based primarily on the income approach, which utilizes discounted cash flows to estimate the fair value of the asset.

 

Purchased In-Process Research and Development (IPRD)

 

Overview

 

IPRD expense of $70 million, $4 million, and $3 million in fiscal 2004, 2003, and 2002, respectively, is a result of in-process technologies associated with our acquisitions of: Pixo, Inc. (Pixo), Waveset Technologies, Inc. (Waveset), and Kealia, Inc. (Kealia) in fiscal 2004; Pirus Networks, Inc. (Pirus) and Terraspring, Inc. (Terraspring) in fiscal 2003; and ISOPIA, Inc. (Isopia) in fiscal 2002 (collectively the Acquired Companies). At the date of each acquisition noted above, the projects associated with the IPRD efforts had not yet reached technological feasibility and the IPRD had no alternative future uses. Accordingly, these amounts were expensed on the respective acquisition dates of each of the Acquired Companies. Also see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.

 

Valuation of IPRD

 

General

 

Amounts allocated to IPRD are calculated using established valuation techniques accepted in the high-technology industry. These calculations give consideration to relevant market sizes and growth factors, expected industry trends, the anticipated nature and timing of new product introductions by the company and our competitors, individual product sales cycles, and the estimated lives of each of the products’ underlying technology. The value of the IPRD reflects the relative value and contribution of the acquired research and development. We gave consideration to the R&D’s stage of completion, the complexity of the work completed to date, the difficulty of completing the remaining development, costs already incurred, and the expected cost to complete the project in determining the value assigned to IPRD.

 

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Approach Used for Valuation of IPRD in the Acquisitions Presented

 

The values assigned to developed technologies related to each acquisition were based upon discounted cash flows related to the future products’ projected income stream. Elements of the projected income stream included revenues, cost of sales (COS), SG&A expenses, and R&D expenses. The discount rates used in the present value calculations were generally derived from a weighted average cost of capital, adjusted upward to reflect the additional risks inherent in the development life cycle, including the useful life of the technology, profitability levels of the technology, and the uncertainty of technology advances that are known at the date of each acquisition. As each acquired entity’s IPRD is unique, the discount rate, revenue, COS, R&D and SG&A assumptions used varied on a case-by-case basis. In addition, we did not expect to achieve a material amount of expense reductions or synergies; therefore, the valuation assumptions did not include significant anticipated cost savings.

 

Valuation Assumptions

 

The following table summarizes the significant assumptions underlying the valuations related to the IPRD from each of the Acquired Companies in fiscal 2004, 2003, and 2002 (dollars in millions):

 

           

Acquired Company


   IPRD

  

Estimated Cost
to Complete
Technology

at Time of
Acquisition


   Percentage
Completed at
Time of
Acquisition


    Average
Revenue
Growth Rate


    Percentage of Revenue

 
             Average
COS


    Average
SG&A


    Average
R&D


    Discount
Rate Used


 

Fiscal 2004

                                                  

Pixo

   $ 1.0    $ 0.4    50 %   21  %   N/A     48 %   2 %   18 %

Waveset

   $ 0.2    $ 0.2    23 %   16 %   2 %   42 %   2 %   23 %

Kealia(1)

   $ 69.4    $ 7.9    5 %   37 %   65 %   20 %   2 %   35 %

Fiscal 2003

                                                  

Pirus

   $ 3.3    $ 3.8    30 %   15 %   51 %   31 %   4 %   22 %

Terraspring

   $ 0.2    $ 1.0    25 %   23 %   12 %   22 %   2 %   31 %

Fiscal 2002

                                                  

Isopia

   $ 3.2    $ 0.6    45 %   58 %   13 %   35 %   2 %   26 %

 

(1)   Refer to Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Overview of IPRD in Fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002

 

Included below are further details regarding the nature of the significant amounts of purchased technology acquired during fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002.

 

Given the uncertainties of the commercialization process, no assurance can be given that deviations from our estimates will not occur. At the time of the acquisitions, we believed there was a reasonable chance of realizing the economic return expected from the acquired in-process technology. However, as there is risk associated with the realization of benefits related to commercialization of an in-process project due to rapidly changing customer needs, the complexity of the technology, and growing competitive pressures, there can be no assurance that any project will meet commercial success. Failure to successfully commercialize an in-process project would result in the loss of the expected economic return inherent in the fair value allocation. Additionally, the value of our intangible assets acquired may become impaired.

 

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The following table provides information regarding the status of IPRD projects at the date of acquisition and as of June 30, 2004 (in millions):

 

       

Acquired Company/Business


   Estimated Cost to
Complete at Time
of Acquisition


   Actual Costs
Incurred as of
June 30, 2004


  

Actual/Expected
Product

Release Date


 

Pixo

   $ 0.4    $ 0.3    Q1FY2005  

Waveset

   $ 0.2    $    N/A (1)

Kealia

   $ 7.9    $ 2.4    Q3FY2005  

Pirus

   $ 3.8    $    N/A (1)

Terraspring

   $ 1.0    $    N/A (1)

Isopia

   $ 0.6    $ 1.2    Q3FY2002  

 

(1)   Projects identified as IPRD when we acquired the company have been delayed since the acquisition and are not currently part of any specific project roadmap.

 

Except for the acquisitions discussed under Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, we believe that the projections we used in performing our valuations for each acquisition, are still valid in all material respects; however, we cannot assure you that the projected results will be achieved. We continue to make substantial progress related to the development and commercialization of acquired technologies. Although we have experienced delays in the completion of certain of our development efforts and their related commercialization, the expected total costs to complete such technologies have not materially increased, individually or in the aggregate, from our estimates at the time of the acquisitions. We periodically evaluate our product development timeline and modify our overall business plan in response to various factors. Modifications to our business plan include the reallocation of resources among various alternative development projects. As of June 30, 2004, and for each of the three fiscal years then ended, the impact of delays in the realization of economic benefits related to acquired technologies, individually or in the aggregate, has not been material to our overall consolidated financial position.

 

Loss on Equity Investments

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

   2003

    Change

   2002

 

Loss on equity investments, net

   $ 64     (23.8)%    $ 84     (15.2)%    $ 99  

Percentage of net revenues

     0.6 %   (0.1) pts      0.7 %   (0.1) pts      0.8 %

 

Our equity investments portfolio, which primarily consists of investments in publicly traded and privately-held technology companies, has continued to be negatively impacted by the adverse macroeconomic conditions and declining equity valuations in the technology sectors in which we have invested during fiscal 2004. The loss on equity investments in fiscal 2004 of $86 million, as compared with $97 million in fiscal 2003 and $102 million in fiscal 2002, was primarily related to a decline in value of the portfolio that was considered other than temporary. This loss was partially offset by gains of $22 million in fiscal 2004, as compared with $13 million in fiscal 2003 and $3 million in fiscal 2002, relating to the valuation of warrants and the sale of certain marketable equity securities. See Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.

 

The ongoing valuation of our investment portfolio remains uncertain and may be subject to fluctuations based on whether we participate in the additional financing activity or other events occur outside of our control which impacts the valuation of our investee companies.

 

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Other Income, net

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

   

Change


   2003

   

Change


   2002

 

Interest income

   $ 137     (17.5)%    $ 166     (31.7)%    $ 243  

Interest expense

     (37 )   (14.0)%      (43 )   (25.9)%      (58 )

Gain (loss) on marketable debt securities

     (6 )   N/M      32     (71.9)%      114  

Settlement income

     1,597     100.0%          —           
    


      


      


Other income, net

   $ 1,691     N/M    $ 155     (48.2)%    $ 299  

Percentage of net revenues

     15.1 %   13.7 pts      1.4 %   (1.0) pts      2.4 %

 

During fiscal 2004, interest income decreased as compared with fiscal 2003 primarily due to: (1) a combination of lower interest rates and lower cash and marketable debt securities balances throughout fiscal 2004; and (2) lower realized gains on the sale of certain marketable debt securities.

 

Interest expense has decreased in fiscal 2004 as compared with fiscal 2003 and in fiscal 2003 as compared with fiscal 2002 as a result of lower interest rates.

 

The average duration of our portfolio of marketable securities increased to 0.82 year as of June 30, 2004 from 0.72 year as of June 30, 2003. In general, we would expect the volatility of this portfolio to increase as its duration increases.

 

Our interest income and expense are sensitive primarily to changes in the general level of U.S. interest rates. In this regard, changes in U.S. interest rates affect the interest earned on our cash equivalents and marketable securities, which are predominantly short-term fixed income instruments. To better match the interest rate characteristics of our investment portfolio and our issued fixed-rate unsecured senior debt securities, we have entered into interest rate swap transactions so that the interest associated with these debt securities effectively becomes variable.

 

On April 1, 2004, we entered into several agreements with Microsoft, including an agreement to settle all pending litigation between the two companies, a patent covenant and stand-still agreement, and a technical collaboration agreement. As further described in Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, based on the agreements with Microsoft we received $1,950 million in cash and recognized $1,597 million in settlement income during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004.

 

Income Taxes

For the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

   Change

   2003

   Change

   2002

 

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

   $ 825    6.3%    $ 776          N/M    $ (461 )

Percentage of income (loss) before taxes and cumulative effect of change in accounting principle

     N/A    N/A      N/A          N/A      44%  

 

In fiscal 2004, we recorded a provision for income taxes of $825 million on pretax income of $437 million. In fiscal 2003 and 2002, we recorded a provision of $776 million and a benefit of $461 million, respectively.

 

The tax expense for fiscal 2004 is due primarily to the taxes on income generated from the Microsoft settlement, an increase in the valuation allowance for deferred tax assets, income generated in certain foreign jurisdictions and adjustments for the difference between estimated amounts recorded and actual liabilities resulting from the filing of prior years’ tax returns.

 

In fiscal 2004, we recorded a non-cash charge of approximately $300 million to increase our valuation allowance for our deferred tax assets. This valuation allowance was determined in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (SFAS 109), which requires an assessment of both positive and negative evidence when determining whether it is more likely than not that deferred tax assets are realizable; such assessment is required

 

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on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis. Cumulative losses incurred in recent years represented sufficient negative evidence under SFAS 109 to record a valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets in the U.S. and Japan.

 

In the current year, we have provided a full valuation allowance on our U.S. deferred tax assets and a partial valuation allowance on our Japan deferred tax assets. We intend to maintain this valuation allowance until sufficient positive evidence exists to support reversal of the valuation allowance. Our income tax expense recorded in the future will be reduced to the extent of offsetting decreases in our valuation allowance.

 

The difference between our fiscal 2003 and 2002 tax expense and benefit, respectively, is primarily attributable to our increase in the valuation allowance of $1.1 billion in 2003.

 

Our future effective tax rate will continue to be calculated based on the statutory tax rate imposed on projected annual pre-tax income or loss in various jurisdictions and will be affected by changes in valuation allowance.

 

LIQUIDITY, CAPITAL RESOURCES AND FINANCIAL CONDITION

As of and for the fiscal year ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

     2003

    Change

     2002

 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 2,141     $ 126      $ 2,015     $ (9 )    $ 2,024  

Marketable debt securities

     5,467       1,741        3,726       (114 )      3,840  
    


 


  


 


  


Total cash, cash equivalents and marketable debt securities

   $ 7,608     $ 1,867      $ 5,741     $ (123 )    $ 5,864  
    


 


  


 


  


Percentage of total assets

     52.5 %     8.3 pts        44.2 %     8.7 pts        35.5 %
   

Cash provided by operating activities

   $ 2,226     $ 1,189      $ 1,037     $ 157      $ 880  

Cash provided by (used in) investing activities

     (2,311 )     (1,783 )      (528 )     (567 )      39  

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities

     211       729        (518 )     (151 )      (367 )
    


 


  


 


  


Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

   $ 126     $ 135      $ (9 )   $ (561 )    $ 552  
    


 


  


 


  


 

Changes in Cash Flow

 

During fiscal 2004, our operating activities generated cash flows of $2,226 million, which is $1,189 million higher than the cash flows provided by operating activities during fiscal 2003. Cash provided by operating activities during fiscal 2004 was primarily the result of: (1) cash received of $1,950 million related to the settlement with Microsoft; (2) increases in accrued liabilities and other of $281 million primarily related to short-term severance and facilities restructuring liabilities; and (3) increases of $271 million primarily associated with services contracts deferred revenues. In fiscal 2004, our $2,100 million use of cash for investing and financing activities was primarily attributable to the $1,820 million in purchases, net of proceeds from sales and maturities, of marketable debt securities and also includes $249 million in capital spending on equipment additions and $201 million paid for acquisitions during the period, which were offset by $239 million in proceeds from the issuance of our common stock. As a result, during fiscal 2004 our cash, cash equivalents and marketable debt securities increased by $1,867 million.

 

We have experienced positive cash flow from operations for the last 15 fiscal years, and anticipate being able to continue to generate positive cash-flow from operations unless competition intensifies and we are unable to increase our revenues and gross margins faster than we are able to reduce our costs of operations. Based on our current plan of record, we expect to generate positive cash flow from operations for the full fiscal year ending June 30, 2005, although there can be no assurance of this.

 

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For the quarter ended June 30,

(dollars in millions)

 

           
     2004

    Change

   2003

    Change

   2002

 

Days sales outstanding (DSO)(1)

   68     4    72        72  

Days of supply in inventory (DOS)(2)

   22        22     5    27  

Days payable outstanding (DPO)(3)

   (50 )   2    (48 )   1    (47 )
    

 
  

 
  

Cash conversion cycle

   40     6    46     6    52  
    

 
  

 
  

   

Inventory turns-products only

   9.8     1.2    8.6     1.9    6.7  

 

(1)   DSO measures the number of days it takes, based on a 90 day average, to turn our receivables into cash.
(2)   DOS measures the number of days it takes, based on a 90 day average, to sell our inventory.
(3)   DPO measures the number of days it takes, based on a 90 day average, to pay the balances of our accounts payable.

 

We ended the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004 with a cash conversion cycle of 40 days, an improvement of 6 days from June 30, 2003. The cash conversion cycle is the duration between purchase of inventories and services and the collection of the cash for the sale of our products and services and is a metric on which we have focused as we continue to try to efficiently manage our assets. The cash conversion cycle results from the calculation of days of sales outstanding (DSO) added to days of supply in inventories (DOS), reduced by days of payable outstanding (DPO). DSO decreased 4 days due to improved linearity and increased collection activity for service contract renewals from the June 30, 2003 levels. DOS remained unchanged from June 30, 2003. DPO increased as a result of negotiation of more favorable terms with our vendors.

 

Completed Acquisitions

 

See Note 3 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for a detailed discussion of completed acquisitions that have affected our liquidity.

 

Stock Repurchases

 

From time to time, our Board of Directors approves common stock repurchase programs allowing management to repurchase shares of our common stock in the open market pursuant to price-based formulas. In February 2001, we announced our intention to acquire up to $1.5 billion of our outstanding common stock under a stock repurchase program authorized by our Board of Directors. Under the February 2001 program, the timing and actual number of shares subject to repurchase are at the discretion of our management and are contingent on a number of factors, including our projected cash flow requirements, our return to sustained profitability and our share price. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2004, we did not repurchase common stock under our repurchase program and during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2003 we repurchased common stock under our repurchase program for an aggregate purchase price of $499 million. All such repurchases were made in compliance with Rule 10b-18 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. As of June 30, 2004, approximately $230 million of the $1.5 billion remains available for repurchase.

 

Borrowings

 

Our $1.3 billion Senior Notes outstanding are due at various times between August 2004 and August 2009. The Senior Notes are subject to compliance with certain covenants that do not contain financial ratios. Accordingly, the impairment charge on goodwill and other intangible assets taken during fiscal 2003 had no impact on our debt covenants. We are currently in compliance with these covenants. If we failed to be in compliance with these covenants, the trustee of the Senior Notes or holders of not less than 25% in principal amount of the Senior Notes would have the ability to demand immediate payment of all amounts outstanding.

 

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Contractual Obligations and Contingencies

 

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at June 30, 2004 (in millions):

 

           

Contractual Obligations


   Total

  

Payments Due
in Less

Than 1 Year


  

Payments
Due in

1-3 Years


  

Payments
Due in

4-5 Years


   Payments
Due After
5 Years


Senior Notes

   $ 1,300    $ 250    $ 500    $ 550    $

Non-cancelable operating leases

   $ 1,279    $ 247    $ 384    $ 240    $ 408

Asset retirement obligations

   $ 42    $ 9    $ 14    $ 2    $ 17

 

Our asset retirement obligations arise from leased facilities where we have contractual commitments to remove leasehold improvements and return the property to a specified condition when the lease terminates.

 

Through the normal course of our business, we purchase or place orders for the necessary components of our products from various suppliers. We estimate that our contractual obligations at June 30, 2004 is between $340 million and $380 million. This range does not include contractual obligations recorded on the balance sheet as current liabilities. In addition, we have a contractual obligation under the terms of our strategic alliance with Fujitsu, whereby we have committed to buy Fujitsu products with a list price of $230 million and $265 million in fiscal years 2005 and 2006, respectively, at a predetermined discount from list price, depending upon the type of product purchased. Contractual obligations for the purchase of goods or services are defined as agreements that are enforceable and legally binding on Sun and that specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased, fixed, minimum or variable price provisions, and the appropriate timing of the transactions. Our purchase orders are based on our current manufacturing needs and are fulfilled by our vendors within a short time.

 

Sun is insured by nationally recognized insurers for certain potential liabilities, including worker’s compensation, general liability, automotive liability, employer’s liability, errors and omissions liability, employment practices liability, property, cargo and crime and directors and officers liability. We have self-insured between $2 and $25 million per occurrence on these lines of coverage. Sun performs an annual actuarial analysis to develop an estimate of amounts to be paid for both claims reported and potential losses on activities that have occurred but have not yet been reported. Loss accruals were $27 million and $24 million as of June 30, 2004 and 2003, respectively.

 

During the normal course of our business, we issue guarantees and letters of credit to numerous third-parties and for various purposes such as lease obligations and state and local governmental agencies requirements. At June 30, 2004, we had approximately $18 million of outstanding letters of credit.

 

In the normal course of business, we enter into contractual arrangements under which we may agree to indemnify the third party to such arrangement from any losses incurred relating to the services they perform on behalf of Sun or for losses arising from certain events as defined within the particular contract, which may include, for example, litigation or claims relating to past performance. Such indemnification obligations may not be subject to maximum loss clauses. Historically, payments made related to these indemnifications have been immaterial.

 

In addition, we have uncommitted lines of credit aggregating approximately $566 million. No amounts were drawn from these lines of credit as of June 30, 2004. Interest rates and other terms of borrowing under these lines of credit vary from country to country depending on local market conditions at the time of borrowing. There is no guarantee that the banks would approve our request for funds under these uncommitted lines of credit.

 

We are currently under examination by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for tax returns filed in the fiscal years 1997 through 2000. Although the ultimate outcome is unknown, we believe that adequate amounts have been provided for any adjustments that may result from the current examination and that the final outcome will not have a material adverse effect on Sun’s results of operations. Based upon current facts and circumstances, we anticipate that the current audit will be completed or a tentative agreement will be reached within the next fiscal year and the additional taxes and interest we may pay would be between $200 million to $250 million.

 

In addition to the current IRS audit of fiscal years 1997 through 2000, Sun has provided adequate amounts for anticipated tax audit adjustments in the U.S., state and other foreign tax jurisdictions based on our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes and interest will be due. If events occur that indicate payment of these

 

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amounts are unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result.

 

Off-Balance-Sheet Arrangements

 

As of June 30, 2004, we did not have any significant off-balance-sheet arrangements, as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of SEC Regulation S-K.

 

Capital Resources and Financial Condition

 

Our long-term strategy is to maintain a minimum amount of cash and cash equivalents in subsidiaries for operational purposes and to invest the remaining amount of our cash in interest bearing cash equivalents and highly liquid marketable debt securities. Accordingly, in addition to the $2,141 million in cash and cash equivalents, we currently have approximately $5,467 million in marketable debt securities that are available for shorter-term requirements, such as future operating, financing and investing activities, for a total cash and marketable debt securities position of $7,608 million. However, approximately $1,099 million represents earnings generated from operations domiciled in foreign tax jurisdictions that are designated as permanently invested in the respective tax jurisdictions. If these funds are required for our operations in the U.S., we would be required to accrue and pay additional taxes to repatriate these funds. Currently, we do not anticipate a need to repatriate these funds to our U.S. Operations. Deposits in foreign countries of approximately $410 million are subject to local banking laws and may bear higher or lower risk than cash deposited in the United States.

 

We believe that the liquidity provided by existing cash, cash equivalents, marketable debt securities, and cash generated from operations will provide sufficient capital to meet our requirements for at least the next 12 months. We believe our level of financial resources is a significant competitive factor in our industry and we may choose at any time to raise additional capital to strengthen our financial position, facilitate growth, and provide us with additional flexibility to take advantage of business opportunities that arise.

 

DILUTIVE EFFECT OF STOCK OPTIONS ISSUED TO DIRECTORS AND EMPLOYEES

 

Our stock option program is a broad-based, long-term retention program that is intended to attract and retain talented employees and align stockholder and employee interests. We primarily rely on three stock option plans that provide broad discretion to our Board of Directors to create appropriate equity incentives for members of our board of directors and our employees. Our 1990 Long-Term Equity Incentive Plan is the primary plan under which most of our options are granted. The 1996 Equity Compensation Acquisition Plan is the plan under which we grant options to employees hired in connection with the acquisition of another company, and the 1988 Directors’ Stock Option Plan provides for the automatic grant of stock options to non-employee directors on the date each person initially becomes a director, and on the date of each annual meeting of stockholders to non-employee directors who are elected and who have served as a member of our board of directors for at least six months. Substantially all of our employees participate in our stock option program.

 

We also have a stock repurchase program in place whereby we can mitigate the dilutive effect generated by the exercise of stock options. In implementing our stock option program, we carefully monitor both the potential and actual dilution associated with our stock option program. However, during fiscal 2003, the shares we repurchased under our stock repurchase program negatively impacted our net loss per share amount by approximately four cents. We view dilution from stock option exercises as the difference between the number of options exercised reduced by the number of shares repurchased in a given fiscal year as a percentage of the number of shares outstanding at the beginning of the year (exercise dilution). We also monitor the potential dilution from net option grants in a given year by comparing the option grants reduced by cancellations in a given year with the number of shares outstanding at the beginning of the year (grant dilution). In addition, we monitor the net cash cost of our stock repurchase programs.

 

As of June 30, 2004, the total outstanding options held by the seven most highly compensated executive officers identified in our 2004 Proxy Statement (the “Named Executive Officers”) amounted to approximately 35.7 million or 5.9% of the approximately 603 million outstanding options held by all employees. For a given year, the percentage of options granted to the Named Executive Officers is calculated by comparing the options granted to such executives to net options granted as noted below.

 

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The following table illustrates the grant dilution, exercise dilution and the net cash outlay for our stock repurchase programs associated with our stock option program (in millions, except percentages):

 

           
    2004

    2003

    2002

    2001

    2000

 

Shares outstanding at beginning of year

    3,587       3,537       3,536       3,495       3,493  

Less treasury stock outstanding at beginning of year

    (351 )     (303 )     (288 )     (301 )     (359 )
   


 


 


 


 


Net shares outstanding

    3,236       3,234       3,248       3,194       3,134  
   


 


 


 


 


Grants and assumptions

    111       115       119       124       132  

Less option cancellations

    (54 )     (58 )     (35 )     (18 )     (22 )
   


 


 


 


 


Net option grants

    57       57       84       106       110  
   


 


 


 


 


Grant dilution

    1.8 %     1.8 %     2.6 %     3.3 %     3.5 %
   


 


 


 


 


Options exercised

    41       26       28       63       70  

Less shares repurchased

          (126 )     (62 )     (52 )     (18 )
   


 


 


 


 


Net shares issued (repurchased)

    41       (100 )     (34 )     11       52  
   


 


 


 


 


Exercise dilution

    1.3 %     (3.1 )%     (1.1 )%     0.3 %     1.7 %
   


 


 


 


 


Cost of shares repurchased

  $     $ 499     $ 554     $ 1,123     $ 505  

Less proceeds from options exercised

    (103 )     (46 )     (78 )     (202 )     (174 )

Less tax benefit from options exercised

    (4 )     (9 )     (98 )     (816 )     (708 )
   


 


 


 


 


Net cash (inflow) outflow

  $ (107 )   $ 444     $ 378     $ 105     $ (377 )
   


 


 


 


 


Options granted to the five (seven in fiscal 2004) most highly compensated executive officers

    5.5       2.3       3.8       2.9       2.9  
   


 


 


 


 


Options granted to the Named Executive Officers as a percentage of options granted and assumed during the year(1)

    5.0 %     2.0 %     3.2 %     2.3 %     2.2 %
   


 


 


 


 


Options granted to the Named Executive Officers as a percentage of options granted and assumed net of cancellations during the year(1)

    9.6 %     4.0 %     4.5 %     2.7 %     2.6 %
   


 


 


 


 


 

(1)   Includes 7 Named Executive Officers for 2004 versus 5 Named Executive Officers for 2003 and includes an extraordinary grant of 1,000,000 shares to Mr. Schwartz in connection with his promotion to President and Chief Operating Officer in April 2004.

 

Options Granted during Fiscal 2004 to the Most Highly Compensated Executive Officers Named in our 2004 Proxy Statement

 

     

Name


  

Number of

Options Granted


  

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price


Scott G. McNealy

   1,500,000    $ 3.85

Jonathan I. Schwartz

   1,500,000    $ 3.88

Crawford W. Beveridge

   500,000    $ 3.85

Stephen T. McGowan

   500,000    $ 3.85

Gregory M. Papadopoulos

   500,000    $ 3.85

Mark Tolliver(1)

   500,000    $ 3.85

David Yen(2)

   500,000    $ 3.85

 

(1)   Effective April 15, 2004, Mr. Tolliver was no longer an Executive Officer of the Company.
(2)   Effective June 29, 2004, Mr. Yen was no longer an Executive Officer of the Company.

 

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NON-AUDIT SERVICES OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Our auditors, Ernst & Young LLP, perform the following non-audit services that have been pre-approved by our Audit Committee of the Board of Directors: expatriate tax and relocation services, international and U.S. tax planning and compliance services, and tax due diligence for acquisitions. Starting in fiscal 2004, our expatriate officers no longer received tax services including personal tax return preparation from Ernst & Young LLP. In addition, for fiscal 2005 we selected another firm to perform expatriate tax and relocation services and are in the process of transitioning these services from Ernst & Young LLP.

 

RISK FACTORS

 

Because of the following factors, as well as other factors affecting our operating results and financial condition, past financial performance should not be considered to be a reliable indicator of future performance, and investors should not use historical trends to anticipate results or trends in future periods.

 

If we are unable to compete effectively with existing or new competitors, the loss of our competitive position could result in price reductions, fewer customer orders, reduced revenues, reduced margins, reduced levels of profitability, and loss of market share.

 

We compete in the computer systems (hardware and software) and network storage (hardware and software) products and services markets. These markets are intensely competitive. If we fail to compete successfully in these markets, the demand for our products and services would decrease. Any reduction in demand could lead to fewer customer orders, reduced revenues, pricing pressures, reduced margins, reduced levels of profitability and loss of market share. These competitive pressures could adversely affect our business and operating results.

 

Our competitors are some of the largest, most successful companies in the world. They include International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Hewlett-Packard Company (HP), EMC Corporation (EMC), Fujitsu Limited (Fujitsu) and the Fujitsu-Siemens joint venture. We also compete with systems manufacturers and resellers of systems based on microprocessors from Intel Corporation (Intel) and the Windows family of operating systems software from Microsoft Corporation (Microsoft). These competitors include Dell Inc. (Dell) and HP, in addition to Intel and Microsoft. Certain of these competitors compete aggressively on price and seek to maintain very low cost structures. Some of these competitors are seeking to increase their market share in the enterprise server market which creates increased pressure, including pricing pressure, on our workstation and lower-end server product lines. In particular, we are seeing increased competition and pricing pressures from competitors offering systems running Linux software and other open source software. In addition, certain of our competitors, including IBM and HP, have financial and human resources scale that are substantially greater than ours, which increases the competitive pressures we face.

 

Customers make buying decisions based on many factors, including among other things, new product and service offerings and features; product performance and quality; availability and quality of support and other services; price; platform; interoperability with hardware and software of other vendors; quality; reliability, security features and availability of products; breadth of product line; ease of doing business; a vendor’s ability to adapt to customers’ changing requirements; responsiveness to shifts in the marketplace; business model (e.g., utility computing, subscription based software usage, consolidation versus outsourcing); contractual terms and conditions; vendor reputation and vendor viability. As competition increases, each factor on which we compete becomes more important and the lack of competitive advantage with respect to one or more of these factors could lead to a loss of competitive position resulting in fewer customer orders, reduced revenues, reduced margins, reduced levels of profitability and loss of market share. We expect competitive pressure to remain intense.

 

Fujitsu and its subsidiaries have, for many years, been key strategic channel partners for Sun, distributing substantial quantities of our products throughout the world. In addition, on May 31, 2004, we entered into a number of agreements with Fujitsu intended to substantially increase the scope of our relationship with them, including through collaborative selling efforts and joint development and marketing of a future generation of server products. However, Fujitsu is also a competitor of Sun and, as a licensee of various technologies from Sun and others, it has developed products that currently compete directly with our products.

 

Over the last several years, we have invested significantly in our network storage products business with a view to increasing the sales of these products both on a stand-alone basis to customers using the systems of our competitors,

 

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and as part of the systems that we sell. The intelligent storage products business is intensely competitive. EMC is currently a leader in the network storage products market and our primary competitor.

 

We are in the process of implementing a solution-based selling approach. While our strategy is that this will enable us to increase our revenues and margins, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in this approach. In fact, our implementation to this selling model may result in reductions in our revenues and/or margins, particularly in the short term, as we compete to attract business. In addition, if our emphasis on solution-based sales increases, we face strong competition from systems integrators such as IBM, Fujitsu-Siemens and HP. Our inability to successfully implement this model in the long term would have an adverse impact on our revenues and margins.

 

We maintain higher research and development costs, as a percentage of revenues, than many of our competitors and our earnings are dependent upon maintaining revenues and gross margins at a sufficient level to offset these costs.

 

One of our business strategies is to derive a competitive advantage and a resulting enhancement of our gross margins from our investment in innovative new technologies which customers value. As a result, as a percentage of revenues, we incur higher fixed R&D costs than many of our competitors. To the extent that we are unable to develop and sell products with attractive gross margins in sufficient volumes, our earnings may be materially adversely affected by our cost structure. During fiscal 2003 and 2004, we added new products to our entry-level server product line that are offered at a lower price point and, accordingly, provide us with a lower gross margin percentage than our products as a whole. Although our strategy is to sell these products as part of overall systems which include other products with higher gross margin percentages, to the extent that the mix of our overall revenues represented by sales of lower gross margin products increases, as it did during much of fiscal 2004, our gross margins and earnings may be adversely affected.

 

In addition, one of our business strategies is to grow incremental revenue through hardware and software enabled, recurring service models, such as, subscriptions, leasing, and pay-per-use. Under these recurring service models, we would recognize revenue for the contract incrementally over time or based upon usage rather than all at once upon the initial sale of a hardware or software product. However, if we increase our recurring service model base either (1) while not maintaining or increasing our point product sales; or (2) not growing them sufficiently to cover the decline in point product sales, we will incur a near-term reduction in our revenues as revenues that ordinarily would have been recognized upon the initial sale of products will be deferred until future periods. As a result, our revenues, gross margins and earnings will initially be adversely affected.

 

The products we make are very complex. If we are unable to rapidly and successfully develop and introduce new products and manage our inventory, we will not be able to satisfy customer demand.

 

We operate in a highly competitive, quickly changing environment, and our future success depends on our ability to develop and introduce new products that our customers choose to buy. If we are unable to develop new products, our business and operating results could be adversely affected. We must quickly develop, introduce, and deliver in quantity new, complex systems, software, and hardware products and components. These include products which incorporate our UltraSPARC III and UltraSPARC IV architectures and the Solaris Operating System, the Java platform, Sun Java System portfolio and N1 Grid architecture, among others. The development process for these complicated products is very uncertain. It requires high levels of innovation from both our product designers and the suppliers of the components used in our products. The development process is also lengthy and costly. If we fail to accurately anticipate our customers’ needs and technological trends, or are otherwise unable to complete the development of a product on a timely basis, we will be unable to introduce new products into the market on a timely basis, if at all, and our business and operating results would be adversely affected.

 

The manufacture and introduction of our new products is also a complicated process. Once we have developed a new product we face several challenges in the manufacturing process. We must be able to manufacture new products in sufficient volumes so that we can have an adequate supply of new products to meet customer demand. We must also be able to manufacture the new products at acceptable costs. This requires us to be able to accurately forecast customer demand so that we can procure the appropriate components at optimal costs. Forecasting demand requires us to predict order volumes, the correct mix of our hardware and software products, and the correct configurations of these products. We must manage new product introductions and transitions, such as the product transition from UltraSPARC III to UltraSPARC IV microprocessors to minimize the impact of customer-delayed purchases of existing products in

 

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anticipation of new product releases. We must also try to reduce the levels of older product and component inventories to minimize inventory write-offs. If we have excess inventory, it may be necessary to reduce our prices and write down inventory, which could result in lower gross margins. Additionally, our customers may delay orders for existing products in anticipation of new product introductions. As a result, we may decide to adjust prices of our existing products during this process to try to increase customer demand for these products. Our future operating results would be adversely affected if such pricing adjustments were to occur and we were unable to mitigate the resulting margin pressure by maintaining a favorable mix of systems, software, service and other products, or if we were unsuccessful in achieving component cost reductions, operating efficiencies and increasing sales volumes.

 

If we are unable to timely develop, manufacture, and introduce new products in sufficient quantity to meet customer demand at acceptable costs, or if we are unable to correctly anticipate customer demand for our new and existing products, our business and operating results could be materially adversely affected.

 

We face numerous risks associated with our strategic alliance with Fujitsu.

 

On May 31, 2004, we entered into a number of agreements with Fujitsu intended to substantially increase the scope of our relationship with them. These agreements contemplate collaborative sales and marketing efforts and the joint development and manufacturing of a future generation of server products known as the Advanced Product Line (APL). We anticipate that the APL will ultimately replace a large proportion of our server product line and have agreed not to sell certain products which may compete with the APL at certain times as well as to purchase certain components solely from Fujitsu at certain times. In addition, the agreements contemplate that we dedicate substantial financial and human resources to this new relationship. As such, our future performance and financial condition will be substantially impacted by the success or failure of this relationship.

 

Joint development and marketing of a complex new product line is an inherently difficult undertaking and is subject to numerous risks. If Fujitsu and Sun are unable to agree upon aspects of the relationship, such as development objectives or product features, or if either Sun or Fujitsu fails to timely complete its development duties, the development project may be delayed, become more expensive or fail entirely, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. In addition, if we do not satisfy certain development or supply obligations under the agreements, or if we otherwise violate the terms of the agreements, we may be subject to significant contractual or legal penalties. Further, if Fujitsu encounters any of a number of potential problems in its business, such as intellectual property infringement claims, supply difficulties or financial challenges, these could impact our strategic relationship with them and could result in a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.

 

The contractual arrangements contain objectives and deliverables that are to be concluded in the near term, known in the agreements as the “Interim Period.” As the Interim Period commitments are foundational to the overall alliance, failure to achieve those commitments will place the overall alliance at risk.

 

There can be no assurance that our strategic relationship with Fujitsu will be successful or that the economic terms of the agreements establishing the relationship will ultimately prove to be favorable to us. If any of the risks described above come to pass, they may result in a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

The competitive advantage we derive from controlling the development of our Solaris operating system may be reduced if and when we convert it to open source software.

 

We have announced our intention to release our Solaris operating system to the open source development community as open source software. Although open source licensing models vary, generally open source software licenses permit the liberal copying, modification and distribution of a software program allowing a diverse programming community to contribute to the software. Following any such release, there could be an impact on revenue related to our Solaris operating system and we may no longer be able to exercise control over some aspects of the future development of the Solaris operating system. As a result, following any release of the Solaris operating system to the open source community, the feature set and functionality of the Solaris operating system may diverge from those that best serve our strategic objectives, move in directions in which we do not have competitive expertise or fork into multiple, potentially incompatible variations. We currently derive a significant competitive advantage from our development and licensing of Solaris and any of these events could reduce our competitive advantage or impact market demand for our products, software and services.

 

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Our reliance on single source suppliers could delay product shipments and increase our costs.

 

We depend on many suppliers for the necessary parts and components to manufacture our products. There are a number of vendors producing the parts and components that we need. However, there are some components that can only be purchased from a single vendor due to price, quality, or technology reasons. For example, we currently depend on Texas Instruments for the manufacture of our UltraSPARC microprocessors and several other companies for custom integrated circuits. If we were unable to purchase on acceptable terms or experienced significant delays or quality issues in the delivery of necessary parts and/or components from a particular vendor and we had to find a new supplier for such parts and/or components, our new and existing product shipments could be delayed, adversely affecting our business and operating results.

 

Our future operating results depend on our ability to purchase a sufficient amount of components to meet the demands of our customers.

 

We depend heavily on our suppliers to design, manufacture, and deliver on a timely basis the necessary components for our products. While many of the components we purchase are standard, we do purchase some components, including color monitors, custom power supplies, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and custom memory and graphics devices, that require long lead times to manufacture and deliver. Long lead times make it difficult for us to plan component inventory levels in order to meet the customer demand for our products. In addition, in the past, we have experienced shortages in certain of our components (specifically, ASICs, dynamic random access memories (DRAMs) and static random access memories (SRAMs)). If a component delivery from a supplier is delayed, if we experience a shortage in one or more components, or if we are unable to provide for adequate levels of component inventory, our new and/or existing product shipments could be delayed and our business and operating results could be adversely affected.

 

Since we may order components from suppliers in advance of receipt of customer orders for our products which include these components, we could face a material inventory risk.

 

As part of our component planning, we place orders with or pay certain suppliers for components in advance of receipt of customer orders. We occasionally enter into negotiated orders with vendors early in the manufacturing process of our microprocessors to make sure we have enough of these components for our new products to meet anticipated customer demand. Because the design and manufacturing process for these components is very complicated it is possible that we could experience a design or manufacturing flaw that could delay or even prevent the production of the components for which we have previously committed to pay. We also face the risk of ordering too many components, or conversely, not enough components, since supply orders are generally based on forecasts of customer orders rather than actual customer orders. In addition, in some cases, we make noncancelable order commitments to our suppliers for work-in-progress, supplier’s finished goods, custom sub-assemblies and/or Sun unique raw materials that are necessary to meet our lead times for finished goods. If we cannot change or be released from supply orders, we could incur costs from the purchase of unusable components, either due to a delay in the production of the components or other supplies or as a result of inaccurately predicting supply orders in advance of customer orders. Our business and operating results could be adversely affected as a result of these increased costs.

 

Delays in product development or customer acceptance and implementation of new products and technologies could seriously harm our business.

 

Generally, the computer systems we sell to customers incorporate various hardware and software products that we sell, such as UltraSPARC microprocessors, various software elements, from the Solaris Operating System to the Java platform, Sun Java System portfolio, N1 and Sun StorEdge array products. Any delay in the development, delivery or acceptance of key elements of the hardware or software included in our systems could delay our shipment of these systems. Delays in the development and introduction of our products may occur for various reasons.

 

In addition, if customers decided to delay the adoption and implementation of new releases of our Solaris Operating System this could also delay customer acceptance of new hardware products tied to that release. Implementing a new release of an operating environment requires a great deal of time and money for a customer to convert its systems to the new release. The customer must also work with software vendors who port their software applications to the new operating system and make sure these applications will run on the new operating system. As a result, customers may

 

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decide to delay their adoption of a new release of an operating system because of the cost of a new system and the effort involved to implement it. Such delays in product development and customer acceptance and implementation of new products could adversely affect our business.

 

Our products may have quality issues that could adversely affect our sales and reputation.

 

In the course of conducting our business, we experience and address quality issues. Some of our hardware and software products contain defects, including defects in our engineering, design and manufacturing processes, as well as defects in third-party components included in our products, which may be beyond our control. Often defects are identified during our design, development and manufacturing processes and we are able to correct many of these. Sometimes defects are identified after introduction and shipment of new products or enhancements to existing products.

 

When a quality issue is identified, we work extensively with our customers to remedy such issues. We may test the affected product to determine the root cause of the problem and to determine appropriate solutions. We may find an appropriate solution (often called a “patch”) or offer a temporary fix while a permanent solution is being determined. If we are unable to determine the root cause, find an appropriate solution or offer a temporary fix, we may delay shipment to customers. We may, however, ship products while we continue to explore a suitable solution if we believe the defect is not significant to the product’s functionality.

 

Finding solutions to quality issues for our customers can be expensive and may result in additional warranty and other costs to Sun, reducing our operating results. For example, we can reserve for proactive product remediation, such as diagnosing and replacing components within systems in our installed base. We have in the past, developed a diagnostic software program to identify the installed base customers who would likely experience the component problem in the future and sought to systematically remediate those identified customer’s components. In recent periods we have implemented new quality control measures intended to make it more likely that any quality issues are identified prior to product shipment. As a result of these measures, we may delay more product shipments in future periods as a result of the identification of quality issues or potential quality issues. There can be no assurance that future stop shipments will not have a material adverse effect on our revenues, operating results, cash flows from operations and financial condition. Delays in product shipments to our customers will delay revenue recognition and could adversely affect our revenues and reported results. If we are unable to fix identified errors or adequately address quality issues, our relationships with customers can be impaired, our reputation can suffer and we can lose customers or sales which could have a material adverse effect on our revenues, operating results, cash flows from operations and financial condition.

 

Our international customers and operations subject us to a number of risks.

 

Currently more than half of our revenues come from international sales. In addition, a portion of our operations consists of manufacturing and sales activities outside of the U.S. Our ability to sell our products and conduct our operations internationally is subject to a number of risks. Local economic, political and labor conditions in each country could adversely affect demand for our products and services or disrupt our operations in these markets. We may also experience reduced intellectual property protection or longer and more challenging collection cycles as a result of different customary business practices in certain countries where we do business which could have an adverse effect on our business operations and financial results. Currency fluctuations could also adversely affect our business in a number of ways. Although we take steps to reduce or eliminate certain foreign currency exposures that can be identified or quantified, we may incur currency translation losses as a result of our international operations. Further, in the event that currency fluctuations cause our products to become more expensive in overseas markets in local currencies, there could be a reduction in demand for our products or we could lower our pricing in some or all of these markets resulting in reduced revenue and margins. Alternatively, a weakening dollar could result in greater costs to us for our overseas operations. Changes to and compliance with a variety of foreign laws and regulations may increase our cost of doing business in these jurisdictions. Trade protection measures and import and export licensing requirements subject us to additional regulation and may prevent us from shipping products to a particular market, and increase our operating costs. In addition, we could be subject to regulations, fines and penalties for violations of import and export regulations such as our products being shipped directly or through a third-party to certain countries. Such violations could result in penalties, including prohibiting us from exporting our products to one or more countries, and could adversely affect our business. See “We could lose our ability to export our products if we violate export control laws” below for a description of certain matters that were recently settled with the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Office of Export Enforcement (BIS).

 

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Moreover, local laws and customs in many countries differ significantly from those in the United States. We incur additional legal compliance costs associated with our international operations and could become subject to legal penalties in foreign countries if we do not comply with local laws and regulations which may be substantially different from those in the United States. In many foreign countries, particularly in those with developing economies, it is common to engage in business practices that are prohibited by United States regulations applicable to us such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Although we implement policies and procedures designed to ensure compliance with these laws, there can be no assurance that all of our employees, contractors and agents, including those based in or from countries where practices which violate such United States laws may be customary, will not take actions in violations of our policies. Any violation of foreign or United States laws by our employees, contractors or agents, even if such violation is prohibited by our policies, could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Failure to successfully implement our resourcing activities could adversely affect our results of operations

 

We continuously seek to make our cost structure more efficient and focus on our core strengths. We recently announced our intent to develop and implement a global resourcing strategy and operating model which includes outsourcing activities and is focused on increasing workforce flexibility and scalability, and improving overall competitiveness by leveraging external talent and skills worldwide. To the extent we rely on partners or third party service providers for the provision of key business process functions, we may incur increased business continuity risks. If we are unable to effectively develop and implement our resourcing strategy, we may not realize cost structure efficiencies and our operating and financial results could be materially adversely affected. In addition, if we are unable to effectively utilize or integrate and interoperate with external resources or if our partners or third party service providers experience business difficulties or are unable to provide business process services as anticipated, we may need to seek alternative service providers or resume providing such business processes internally which could be costly and time consuming and have an adverse material effect on our operating and financial results.

 

We expect our quarterly revenues, cash flows and operating results to fluctuate for a number of reasons.

 

Future operating results and cash flows will continue to be subject to quarterly fluctuations based on a wide variety of factors, including:

 

Seasonality.    Although our sales and other operating results can be influenced by a number of factors and historical results are not necessarily indicative of future results, our sequential quarterly operating results generally fluctuate downward in the first and third quarters of each fiscal year when compared with the immediately preceding quarter.

 

Linearity.    Our quarterly sales have historically reflected a pattern in which a disproportionate percentage of such quarter’s total sales occur in the last month and weeks and days of the quarter. This pattern makes prediction of revenues, earnings and working capital for each financial period especially difficult and uncertain and increases the risk of unanticipated variations in quarterly results and financial condition.

 

Deferred Tax Assets.    Estimates and judgments are required in the calculation of certain tax liabilities and in the determination of the recoverability of certain of the deferred tax assets, which arise from net operating losses, tax carryforwards and temporary differences between the tax and financial statement recognition of revenue and expense. SFAS No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes,” also requires that the deferred tax assets be reduced by a valuation allowance, if based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the recorded deferred tax assets will not be realized in future periods.

 

In evaluating our ability to recover our deferred tax assets, in full or in part, we consider all available positive and negative evidence including our past operating results, the existence of cumulative losses in the most recent fiscal years and our forecast of future taxable income on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis. In determining future taxable income, we are responsible for assumptions utilized including the amount of state, federal and international pre-tax operating income, the reversal of temporary differences and the implementation of feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. These assumptions require significant judgment about the forecasts of future taxable income and are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses. Cumulative losses incurred in the U.S. and Japan in recent years represented sufficient negative evidence to require a full and partial valuation allowances in these jurisdictions, respectively. At June 30, 2004, we have established a valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets in these jurisdictions, which will remain until sufficient positive evidence exists to support reversal. Future reversals or increases to our valuation allowance could have a significant impact on our future earnings.

 

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Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets.    We perform an analysis on our goodwill balances to test for impairment on an annual basis or whenever events occur that may indicate impairment possibly exists. Goodwill is deemed to be impaired if the net book value of the reporting unit exceeds the estimated fair value. The impairment of a long-lived intangible asset is only deemed to have occurred if the sum of the forecasted undiscounted future cash flows related to the asset are less than the carrying value of the intangible asset we are testing for impairment. If the forecasted cash flows are less than the carrying value, then we must write down the carrying value to its estimated fair value. We recognized an impairment charge of $49 million related to our goodwill during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2004 and an impairment charge of $2,125 million related to our goodwill and other intangible assets during the second quarter of fiscal 2003. As of June 30, 2004, we had a goodwill balance of $406 million. Going forward we will continue to review our goodwill and other intangible assets for possible impairment. Any additional impairment charges could adversely affect our future earnings.

 

Investments.    We have an investment portfolio that includes minority equity and debt investments. In most cases, we do not attempt to reduce or eliminate our market exposure on these investments and may incur losses related to the impairment of these investments. Our risk exposure in our marketable securities investments is concentrated across a relatively small number of entities and could be subject to substantial volatility if any of these entities experiences material changes to its business or securities. In addition, we have made and continue to evaluate and make, strategic equity investments in privately-held technology companies. Because these companies are typically early-stage ventures with either unproven business models, products that are not yet fully developed or products that have not yet achieved market acceptance, these investments are inherently risky due to factors beyond our control.

 

We are dependent on significant customers and specific industries.

 

Sales to General Electric Company (GE) and its subsidiaries in the aggregate accounted for approximately 14%, 11% and 12% of our fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002 net revenues, respectively. More than 90% of the revenue attributed to GE was generated through GE subsidiaries acting as either a reseller or financier of our products. The vast majority of this revenue is from a single GE subsidiary, comprising 11%, 9% and 8% of net revenues in 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. This GE subsidiary acts as a distributor of our products to resellers who in turn sell those products to end-users. No other customer accounted for more than 10% of revenues. The revenues from GE are generated in the Product Group and Sun Services segments.

 

We also depend on the telecommunications, financial services and manufacturing industries for a significant portion of our revenues. Our revenues are dependent on the level of technology capital spending in the U.S. and international economies. If the current uncertain economic conditions continue in some or all of these industries and geographies, we would expect that the significant reduction and deferrals of capital spending could continue. If capital spending declines in these industries over an extended period of time, our business will continue to be adversely affected. We continue to execute on our strategy to reduce our dependence on these industries by expanding our product reach into new industries, but no assurance can be given that this strategy will be successful.

 

We could lose our ability to export our products if we violate export control laws.

 

We entered into settlement agreements with the United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Office of Export Enforcement (BIS) on December 15, 2003 addressing certain BIS charges that we had violated export control regulations. The settlement includes a one year suspended denial of our worldwide export privileges. In the event that we violate export control laws during the one year suspension period, the BIS order denying us worldwide export privileges could take effect. We are highly dependent upon the export of our products and services overseas. For example, our net revenues for fiscal 2004 for sales outside of the United States were approximately 57% of our total net revenues. Accordingly, in the event that the BIS imposed the extreme sanction of a denial of all export privileges, such penalty would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.

 

Our business may suffer if it is alleged or found that we have infringed the intellectual property rights of others.

 

From time to time we have been notified that we may be infringing certain patents or other intellectual property rights of others. Responding to such claims, regardless of their merit, can be time consuming, result in costly litigation, divert management’s attention and resources and cause us to incur significant expenses. Several pending claims are in various stages of evaluation. From time to time, we consider the desirability of entering into licensing agreements in certain of

 

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these cases. No assurance can be given that licenses can be obtained on acceptable terms or that litigation will not occur. In the event there is a temporary or permanent injunction entered prohibiting us from marketing or selling certain of our products, or a successful claim of infringement against us requiring us to pay royalties to a third party, and we fail to license such technology on acceptable terms and conditions or to develop or license a substitute technology, our business, results of operations or financial condition could be materially adversely affected. See Part I, Item 3. Legal Proceedings for further discussion.

 

Our acquisition and alliance activities could disrupt our ongoing business.

 

We intend to continue to make investments in companies, products, and technologies, either through acquisitions or investments or alliances. For example, we have purchased several companies in the past and have also formed alliances, such as our strategic relationship with Fujitsu for the development, manufacturing and marketing of server products and our OEM relationship with Hitachi Data Systems for the collaboration on, and delivery of, a broad range of storage products and services. We also rely on IT services partners and independent software developers to enhance the value to our customers of our products and services. Acquisitions and alliance activities often involve risks, including: (1) difficulty in assimilating the acquired operations and employees; (2) difficulty in managing product co-development activities with our alliance partners; (3) retaining the key employees of the acquired operation; (4) disruption of our ongoing business; (5) inability to successfully integrate the acquired technology and operations into our business and maintain uniform standards, controls, policies, and procedures; and (6) lacking the experience to enter into new product or technology markets. In addition, from time to time, our competitors acquire or enter into exclusive arrangements with companies with whom we do business or may do business in the future. Reductions in the number of partners with whom we may do business in a particular context may reduce our ability to enter into critical alliances on attractive terms or at all, and the termination of an existing alliance by a business partner may disrupt our operations.

 

We depend on key employees and face competition in hiring and retaining qualified employees.

 

Our employees are vital to our success, and our key management, engineering, and other employees are difficult to replace. We generally do not have employment contracts with our key employees. Further, we do not maintain key person life insurance on any of our employees. Because our compensation packages include equity-based incentives, pressure on our stock price could affect our ability to continue to offer competitive compensation packages to current employees. In addition, we must continue to motivate employees and keep them focused on our strategies and goals, which may be difficult due to morale challenges posed by our workforce reductions and related uncertainties. Should these conditions continue, we may not be able to retain highly qualified employees in the future which could adversely affect our business.

 

Our credit rating is subject to downgrade.

 

On March 5, 2004, Standard & Poors lowered its rating on Sun to non-investment grade from BBB to BB+ and removed us from CreditWatch. The two other rating agencies that follow us, continue to rate us as investment grade. Our rating from Fitch Ratings is BBB- and they have placed us on stable outlook. Moody’s Investor Services has given us a Baa3 rating and placed us on negative outlook. These ratings reflect those credit agencies’ expectations that the intense competitive environment facing Sun in its core markets will continue over at least the near-term to challenge Sun’s sales and profitability. If we were to be further downgraded by these ratings agencies, such downgrades could increase our costs of obtaining, or make it more difficult to obtain or issue, new debt financing. In addition, further downgrades could affect our interest rate swap agreements that we use to modify the interest characteristics of any new debt. Any of these events could adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

Our use of a self-insurance program to cover certain claims for losses suffered and costs or expenses incurred could negatively impact our business upon the occurrence of an uninsured event.

 

Sun has adopted a program of self-insurance with regard to certain risks such as California earthquakes and as supplemental coverage for certain potential liabilities including, but not limited to general liability, directors and officers liability, workers compensation, errors and omissions liability and property. We self-insure when the lack of availability and high cost of commercially available insurance products do not make the transfer of this risk a reasonable approach. In the event that the frequency of losses experienced by Sun increased unexpectedly, the

 

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aggregate of such losses could materially increase our liability and adversely affect our financial condition, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations. In addition, while the insurance market continues to limit the availability of certain insurance products while increasing the costs of such products, we will continue to evaluate the levels of claims we include in our self-insurance program. Any increases to this program increases our risk exposure and therefore increases the risk of a possible material adverse effect on our financial condition, liquidity, cash flows and results of operations. In addition, we have made certain judgments as to the limits on our existing insurance coverage that we believe are in line with industry standards, as well as in light of economic and availability considerations. Unforeseen catastrophic loss scenarios could prove our limits to be inadequate, and losses incurred in connection with the known claims we self-insure could be substantial. Either of these circumstances could materially adversely affect our financial and business condition.

 

Recent and proposed regulations related to equity compensation could adversely affect our ability to attract and retain key personnel.

 

Since our inception, we have used stock options and other long-term equity incentives as a fundamental component of our employee compensation packages. We believe that stock options and other long-term equity incentives directly motivate our employees to maximize long-term stockholder value and, through the use of vesting, encourage employees to remain with Sun. The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has proposed changes to U.S. GAAP that, if implemented, would require us to record a charge to earnings for employee stock option grants. This pending regulation would negatively impact our earnings. For example, recording a charge for employee stock options under SFAS 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation” would have increased net loss by $818 million, $555 million and $647 million for fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. See also Note 2 to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — Summary of Significant Accounting Policies: Stock Options Plans. In addition, new regulations implemented by The Nasdaq National Market requiring shareholder approval for all stock option plans, as well as new regulations implemented by the New York Stock Exchange prohibiting NYSE member organizations from giving a proxy to vote on equity-compensation plans unless the beneficial owner of the shares has given voting instructions, could make it more difficult for us to grant options to employees in the future. To the extent that new regulations make it more difficult or expensive to grant stock options to employees, we may incur increased compensation costs, change our equity compensation strategy or find it difficult to attract, retain and motivate employees, each of which could materially and adversely affect our business.

 

Business interruptions could adversely affect our business.

 

Our operations and those of our suppliers are vulnerable to interruption by fire, earthquake, power loss, telecommunications failure, terrorist attacks and other events beyond our control. A substantial portion of our facilities, including our corporate headquarters and other critical business operations, are located near major earthquake faults. In addition, some of our facilities are located on filled land and, therefore, may be more susceptible to damage if an earthquake occurs. We do not carry earthquake insurance for direct earthquake-related losses. In addition, we do not carry business interruption insurance for, nor do we carry financial reserves against, business interruptions arising from earthquakes or certain other events. If a business interruption occurs, our business could be seriously harmed.

 

Our Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan may not result in the anticipated cost saving and benefits.

 

In March 2004, our Board of Directors and management approved the Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan. Our ability to achieve the cost savings and operating efficiencies anticipated by the Fiscal 2004 Restructuring Plan is dependent on a number of factors, including the speed with which we are able to implement the workforce and excess capacity reductions contemplated and the effectiveness of these implementations. If we are unable to implement these initiatives quickly and effectively, we may not achieve the level of cost savings and efficiency benefits expected for fiscal year 2005 and beyond.

 

Uncertain economic conditions could affect our ability to sublease properties in our portfolio.

 

In response to the global economic slowdown, we implemented facility exit plans in each of the last four fiscal years as part of our ongoing efforts to consolidate excess facilities. The uncertain economic conditions in the United States and in many of the countries in which we have significant leased properties have resulted in a surplus of business facilities

 

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making it difficult to sublease properties. We may be unable to sublease our excess properties, or we may not meet our expected estimated levels of subleasing income, and accordingly our results of operations could be negatively affected.

 

Environmental regulations and costs could result in significant liabilities for us.

 

Some of our operations are subject to regulation under various federal, state and international laws governing the environment and hazardous substances. While we endeavor to be in compliance with environmental laws at all times, any failure to so comply can subject us to material liability. Also, particularly in Europe, we may be subject to compliance with developing product content requirements relating to recycling as well as product take back requirements that would make us responsible for recycling and/or disposing of products we have sold. These and other environmental laws may become stricter over time and require us to incur substantial costs for compliance. In addition, we could be subject to liability for investigation and remediation of hazardous substances if our operations have caused contamination or any of our owned or leased properties are found to be contaminated. Although costs relating to environmental matters have not resulted in a material adverse effect on us to date, there can be no assurance that we will not be required to incur such costs in the future.

 

Our stock price can be volatile.

 

Our stock price, like that of other technology companies, continues to be volatile. For example, our stock price can be affected by many factors such as quarterly increases or decreases in our earnings, speculation in the investment community about our financial condition or results of operations and changes in revenue or earnings estimates, downgrades in our credit ratings, announcement of new products, technological developments, alliances, acquisitions or divestitures by us or one of our competitors or the loss of key management personnel. In addition, general macroeconomic and market conditions unrelated to our financial performance may also affect our stock price.

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This annual report, including the following sections, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, particularly statements regarding our belief that we must continue to invest and innovate, our intent to continue our investments into new computing technologies, our focus on continuing to develop and deliver leading-edge network computing products based upon our innovations, our belief that the real power in computing lies in the ability to freely access and share information over the network, our intention to enable greater interoperability between Microsoft and our products, our belief that application adoption and service deployments over the network will grow more quickly, our intention that our alliance with Fujitsu will strengthen the Solaris footprint, drive increased market share for our enterprise class systems and allow us to dedicate additional resources to throughput computing, our belief that devoting substantial resources to software development provides and will continue to provide significant competitive differentiation, our belief that competition has continued to remain intense over the last fiscal year, that we continually evaluate our facility requirements in light of our business needs and stage the future construction accordingly, our intent to continue to engage in restructuring actions and activities associated with productivity improvement initiatives and expense reduction measures, our expectation that pricing pressures associated with competition will continue to impact our products and services gross margins, that we may not be able to achieve the same level of component cost reductions, our belief that the projections we used in performing valuations for each acquisition are still valid in all material respects, that we continue to make substantial progress related to the development and commercialization of acquired technologies, our expectations that the total costs to complete such technologies have not materially increased, our expectation that the volatility of our portfolio of marketable securities to increase as its duration increases, statements regarding our effective tax rate, our intention to maintain our valuation allowance for deferred tax assets, our belief that we must continue to invest significant resources in new systems, software and microprocessor development and enhance existing products, our continued focus on achieving operating efficiencies, our expectations regarding SG&A expenditures on a dollar basis, our plan to reduce our workforce across all employee levels, business functions, operating units and geographic regions and eliminate excess facility capacity, our expectation to pay remaining restructuring costs over the next few quarters and our expectation to incur additional charges related to productivity improvement initiatives and expense reduction measures in the future, our intention to sublease certain of our leased facilities, our anticipation that the Advanced Product Line will ultimately replace a large proportion of our server product line, our intention to develop and implement a global resorting strategy that includes outsourcing, our anticipation of being able to generate positive cash

 

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flow from operations, including our expectation of generating positive cash flow from operations for the full fiscal year ending June 30, 2005, our belief regarding adequate provisions for any potential adjustments resulting from a current examination by the IRS and our expectations regarding the timing and financial impact of this audit, our focus on cash management and our plan to focus on improvement in our cash conversion cycle, our long-term strategy to maintain a minimum amount of cash and cash equivalents in subsidiaries and to invest the remaining amount of cash in interest bearing cash equivalents and highly liquid marketable debt securities, our belief that the liquidity provided by existing cash, cash equivalents, marketable debt securities and cash generated from operations will provide sufficient capital to meet our requirements for at least the next 12 months, our belief that our level of financial resources is a significant competitive factor in our industry, our current plans not to discontinue our hedging programs, our belief that we have not infringed any valid and enforceable claim of certain Kodak patents and our intent to present a vigorous defense, and our intent to present a vigorous defense in the patent infringement case involving Gobeli Research.

 

These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, and the cautionary statements set forth below and those contained in “RISK FACTORS,” identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those predicted in any such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, increased competition, continued adverse economic conditions in the U.S. and internationally, including adverse economic conditions in the specific markets for our products, adverse business conditions, failure to design, develop and manufacture new products, lack of success in technological advancements, pricing pressures, lack of acceptance of new products, unexpected changes in the demand for our products and services, the inability to successfully manage inventory pricing pressures, failure to reduce costs or improve operating efficiencies, changes to and compliance with international laws and regulations, currency fluctuations, failures in our Fujitsu and Microsoft relationships, failure to prevail in patent infringement cases and our ability to attract, hire and retain key and qualified employees.

 

ITEM 7A.     QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, and equity security prices. To mitigate some of these risks, we utilize derivative financial instruments to hedge these exposures. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes. All of the potential changes noted below are based on sensitivity analyses performed on our financial position at June 30, 2004. Actual results may differ materially.

 

Interest Rate Sensitivity

 

Our investment portfolio consists primarily of fixed income instruments with an average duration of 0.82 year as of June 30, 2004, as compared with 0.72 year as of June 30, 2003. The primary objective of our investments in debt securities is to preserve principal while maximizing yields, without significantly increasing risk. These available-for-sale securities are subject to interest rate risk. The fair market value of these securities may fluctuate with changes in interest rates. A sensitivity analysis was performed on this investment portfolio based on a modeling technique that measures the hypothetical fair market value changes (using a three month horizon) that would result from a parallel shift in the yield curve of plus 150 basis points (BPS). Based on this analysis, for example, a hypothetical 150 BPS increase in interest rates would result in an approximate $75 million decrease in the fair value of our investments in debt securities as of June 30, 2004, as compared with a $50 million decrease as of June 30, 2003.

 

We also entered into various interest-rate swap agreements to modify the interest characteristics of the Senior Notes so that the interest payable on the Senior Notes effectively becomes variable and thus matches the shorter-term rates received from our cash and marketable securities. Accordingly, interest rate fluctuations impact the fair value of our Senior Notes outstanding, which will be offset by corresponding changes in the fair value of the swap agreements. However, by entering into these swap agreements, we have a cash flow exposure related to the risk that interest rates may increase. For example, at June 30, 2004, a hypothetical 150 BPS increase in interest rates would result in an approximate $20 million increase in interest expense over a one year period.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

Our revenue, expense, and capital purchasing activities are primarily transacted in U.S. dollars. However, since a portion of our operations consists of manufacturing and sales activities outside of the U.S., we enter into transactions in other currencies. We are primarily exposed to changes in exchange rates for the euro, Japanese yen, and British pound.

 

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We are a net receiver of currencies other than the U.S. dollar and, as such, can benefit from a weaker dollar, and can be adversely affected by a stronger dollar relative to major currencies worldwide. Accordingly, changes in exchange rates, and in particular a strengthening of the U.S. dollar, may adversely affect our consolidated sales and operating margins as expressed in U.S. dollars. To minimize currency exposure gains and losses, we often borrow funds in local currencies, enter into forward exchange contracts, purchase foreign currency options and promote natural hedges by purchasing components and incurring expenses in local currencies. Currently, we have no plans to discontinue our hedging programs, however, we continually evaluate the benefits of our hedging strategies and may choose to discontinue them in the future.

 

Based on our foreign currency exchange instruments outstanding at June 30, 2004, we estimate a maximum potential one-day loss in fair value of approximately $4 million, as compared with $6 million as of June 30, 2003, using a Value-at-Risk (VAR) model. The VAR model estimates were made assuming normal market conditions and a 95% confidence level. We used a Monte Carlo simulation type model that valued foreign currency instruments against three thousand randomly generated market price paths. Anticipated transactions, firm commitments, receivables, and accounts payable denominated in foreign currencies were excluded from the model. The VAR model is a risk estimation tool, and as such is not intended to represent actual losses in fair value that will be incurred by us. Additionally, as we utilize foreign currency instruments for hedging anticipated and firmly committed transactions, a loss in fair value for those instruments is generally offset by increases in the value of the underlying exposure.

 

Equity Security Price Risk

 

We are exposed to price fluctuations on the marketable portion of equity securities included in our portfolio of equity investments. These investments are generally in companies in the high-technology industry sector, many of which are small capitalization stocks. We typically do not attempt to reduce or eliminate the market exposure on these securities. A 20% adverse change in equity prices would result in an approximate $7 million decrease in the fair value of our available-for-sale equity investments as of June 30, 2004, as compared with $3 million as of June 30, 2003. At June 30, 2004, three equity securities represented approximately $27 million of the $35 million total fair value of the marketable equity securities, as compared with June 30, 2003, at which time, three equity securities represented approximately $12 million of the $15 million total fair value of the marketable equity securities. Refer to Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional discussion on Sun’s marketable equity securities.

 

ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page

Consolidated Financial Statements of Sun Microsystems, Inc.:

    

Consolidated Statements of Operations for each of the three fiscal years ended June 30, 2004

   52

Consolidated Balance Sheets at June 30, 2004 and June 30, 2003

   53

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for each of the three fiscal years ended June 30, 2004

   54

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for each of the three fiscal years ended June 30, 2004

   55

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   56

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   93

 

Schedules not listed above have been omitted since they are not applicable or are not required, or the information required to be set forth therein is included in the Consolidated Financial Statements or Notes thereto.

 

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SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

     Fiscal Years Ended June 30,

 
     2004

    2003

    2002

 

Net revenues:

                        

Products

   $ 7,355     $ 7,793     $ 9,093  

Services

     3,830       3,641       3,403  
    


 


 


Total net revenues

     11,185       11,434       12,496  

Cost of sales:

                        

Cost of sales-products

     4,290       4,342       5,506  

Cost of sales-services

     2,379       2,150       2,074  
    


 


 


Total cost of sales

     6,669       6,492       7,580  
    


 


 


Gross margin

     4,516       4,942       4,916  

Operating expenses:

                        

Research and development

     1,926       1,837       1,832  

Selling, general and administrative

     3,317       3,329       3,806  

Restructuring charges

     344       371       517  

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

     49       2,125       6  

Purchased in-process research and development

     70       4       3  
    


 


 


Total operating expenses

     5,706       7,666       6,164  
    


 


 


Operating loss

     (1,190 )     (2,724 )     (1,248 )

Loss on equity investments, net

     (64 )     (84 )     (99 )

Interest income

     137       166       243  

Interest expense

     (37 )     (43 )     (58 )

Gain (loss) on marketable debt securities

     (6 )     32       114  

Settlement income

     1,597              
    


 


 


Income (loss) before income taxes

     437       (2,653 )     (1,048 )

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     825       776       (461 )
    


 


 


Net loss

   $ (388 )   $ (3,429 )   $ (587 )
    


 


 


Net loss per common share-basic and diluted

   $ (0.12 )   $ (1.07 )   $ (0.18 )
    


 


 


Shares used in the calculation of net loss per common share-basic and diluted

     3,277       3,190       3,242  
    


 


 


 

See accompanying notes.

 

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SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in millions, except par values)

 

     June 30,

 
     2004

    2003

 

ASSETS

                

Current assets:

                

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 2,141     $ 2,015  

Short-term marketable debt securities

     1,460       1,047  

Accounts receivable, net of bad debt reserves of $91 in 2004 and $112 in 2003

     2,339       2,381  

Inventories

     464       416  

Deferred and prepaid tax assets

     62       133  

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     837       787  
    


 


Total current assets

     7,303       6,779  

Property, plant and equipment, net

     1,996       2,267  

Long-term marketable debt securities

     4,007       2,679  

Goodwill

     406       326  

Other acquisition-related intangible assets, net

     127       91  

Other non-current assets, net

     664       843  
    


 


     $ 14,503     $ 12,985  
    


 


LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

                

Current liabilities:

                

Current portion of long-term debt and short-term borrowings

   $ 257     $  

Accounts payable

     1,057       903  

Accrued payroll-related liabilities

     622       479  

Accrued liabilities and other

     1,308       1,027  

Deferred revenues

     1,617       1,453  

Warranty reserve

     252       267  
    


 


Total current liabilities

     5,113       4,129  

Long-term debt

     1,175       1,531  

Long-term deferred revenue

     557       450  

Other non-current obligations

     1,220       384  

Commitments and contingencies (note 12)

                

Stockholders’ equity:

                

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 10 shares authorized (1 share of which has been designated as Series A Preferred participating stock); no shares issued and outstanding

            

Common stock and additional paid-in-capital, $0.00067 par value, 7,200 shares authorized; issued and outstanding: 3,602 shares in 2004 and 3,587 shares in 2003

     6,607       6,647  

Treasury stock, at cost: 266 shares in 2004 and 351 shares in 2003

     (2,776 )     (3,169 )

Unearned equity compensation

     (47 )     (33 )

Retained earnings

     2,481       2,869  

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     173       177  
    


 


Total stockholders’ equity

     6,438       6,491  
    


 


     $ 14,503     $ 12,985  
    


 


 

See accompanying notes.

 

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SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in millions)

 

     Fiscal Years Ended June 30,

 
     2004

    2003

    2002

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

                        

Net loss

   $ (388 )   $ (3,429 )   $ (587 )

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:

                        

Depreciation and amortization

     730       918       970  

Amortization of other intangible assets and unearned equity compensation

     83       110       122  

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

     49       2,125       6  

Tax benefits from employee stock plans

     4       9       98  

Deferred taxes

     620       706       (673 )

Loss on equity investments, net

     64       84       99  

Purchased in-process research and development

     70       4       3  

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

                        

Accounts receivable, net

     61       387       211  

Inventories

     (44 )     181       458  

Prepaid and other assets

     (34 )     31       383  

Accounts payable

     158       (133 )     (7 )

Other liabilities

     853       44       (203 )
    


 


 


Net cash provided by operating activities

     2,226       1,037       880  
    


 


 


Cash flows from investing activities:

                        

Purchases of marketable debt securities

     (8,469 )     (6,958 )     (14,921 )

Proceeds from sales of marketable debt securities

     5,795       6,476       15,377  

Proceeds from maturities of marketable debt securities

     854       578       377  

Purchases of equity investments

     (19 )     (21 )     (41 )

Proceeds from sales of equity investments

     49       17       7  

Acquisition of property, plant and equipment, net

     (249 )     (373 )     (559 )

Acquisition of spare parts and other assets

     (71 )     (217 )     (152 )

Payments for acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     (201 )     (30 )     (49 )
    


 


 


Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

     (2,311 )     (528 )     39  
    


 


 


Cash flows from financing activities:

                        

Acquisition of common stock

           (499 )     (591 )

Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net

     239       182       237  

Principal payments on borrowings and other obligations

     (28 )     (201 )     (13 )
    


 


 


Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

     211       (518 )     (367 )
    


 


 


Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     126       (9 )     552  

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

     2,015       2,024       1,472  
    


 


 


Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

   $ 2,141     $ 2,015     $ 2,024  
    


 


 


Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:

                        

Interest paid (net of interest received from swap agreements of $72, $70 and $44 in fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively)

   $ 26     $ 36     $ 115  

Income taxes paid (received) (net of refunds of $143, $351 and $329 in fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively)

   $ 70     $ (91 )   $ 93  

Supplemental schedule of noncash investing activities:

                        

Stock and options issued in connection with acquisitions

   $ 125     $ 193     $ 29  

 

See accompanying notes.

 

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SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in millions)

 

   

Common Stock
and Additional

Paid-in-Capital


    Treasury Stock

    Unearned
Equity
Compensation


    Retained
Earnings


    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)


    Total
Stockholders’
Equity


 
    Shares

    Amount

    Shares

    Amount

         

Balances as of June 30, 2001

  3,536     $ 6,238     (288 )   $ (2,435 )   $ (73 )   $ 6,885     $ (29 )   $ 10,586  

Net loss

                              (587 )           (587 )

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on investments, net of taxes

                                    (28 )     (28 )

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments, net of taxes

                                    (46 )     (46 )

Translation adjustments

                                    72       72  
                                                       


Total comprehensive loss

                                          (589 )

Issuance of stock, net of repurchases

  (1 )     116     49       121                         237  

Treasury stock purchased

            (64 )     (591 )                       (591 )

Tax benefit from employee stock transactions and other

        100                                   100  

Issuance of common stock and assumption of stock options in connection with acquisitions

  2       31                 (27 )                 4  

Amortization of unearned equity compensation

                        54                   54  
   

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


Balances as of June 30, 2002

  3,537       6,485     (303 )     (2,905 )     (46 )     6,298       (31 )     9,801  

Net loss

                              (3,429 )           (3,429 )

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on investments, net of taxes

                                    6       6  

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments, net of taxes

                                    11       11  

Translation adjustments

                                    191       191  
                                                       


Total comprehensive loss

                                          (3,221 )

Issuance of stock, net of repurchases

        (51 )   78       235                         184  

Treasury stock purchased

            (126 )     (499 )                       (499 )

Tax benefit from employee stock transactions and other

        20                                   20  

Issuance of common stock and assumption of stock options in connection with acquisitions

  50       193                 (19 )                 174  

Amortization of unearned equity compensation

                        32                   32  
   

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


Balances as of June 30, 2003

  3,587       6,647     (351 )     (3,169 )     (33 )     2,869       177       6,491  

Net loss

                              (388 )           (388 )

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on investments, net of taxes

                                    (48 )     (48 )

Change in unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments, net of taxes

                                    14       14  

Translation adjustments

                                    30       30  
                                                       


Total comprehensive loss

                                          (392 )

Issuance of stock, net of repurchases

        (157 )   85       393                         236  

Tax benefit from employee stock transactions and other

        4                                   4  

Issuance of common stock and assumption of stock options in connection with acquisitions

  15       113                 (38 )                 75  

Amortization of unearned equity compensation

                        24                   24  
   

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


Balances as of June 30, 2004

  3,602     $ 6,607     (266 )   $ (2,776 )   $ (47 )   $ 2,481     $ 173     $ 6,438  
   

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 

See accompanying notes.

 

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SUN MICROSYSTEMS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.    Description of Business

 

Sun’s business is singularly focused on providing products and services for network computing. Network computing has been at the core of our offerings for the 22 years of our existence and is based on the premise that the power of a single computer can be increased dramatically when interconnected with other computer systems for the purposes of communication and sharing of computing power. Together with our partners, we provide network computing infrastructure solutions that comprise Computer systems (hardware and software), Network Storage systems (hardware and software), Support services and Professional and Knowledge (formerly known as Educational) services. Our customers use our products and services to build mission-critical network computing environments on which they operate essential elements of their businesses. Our network computing infrastructure solutions are used in a wide range of technical/scientific, business and engineering applications in industries such as telecommunications, government, financial services, manufacturing, education, retail, life sciences, media and entertainment, transportation, energy/utilities and healthcare.

 

2.    Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sun and its subsidiaries. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Certain amounts from prior years, primarily relating to deferred revenue presented on the consolidated balance sheets, have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

 

Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (U.S. GAAP). The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. These estimates form the basis for judgments we make about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates and judgments in several areas, including those related to impairment of intangible assets and equity investments, revenue recognition, recoverability of inventory and accounts receivable, the probability that restoration provisions of asset retirement obligation will not be enforced, the fair value of derivative financial instruments, the recording of various accruals (including our accrual for restructuring charges), the useful lives of long-lived assets such as property and equipment, income taxes, warranty obligations and potential losses from contingencies and litigation. These estimates are based on management’s knowledge and expectations about current events and actions the company may undertake in the future. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

Cash equivalents consist primarily of highly liquid investments with insignificant interest rate risk and original maturities of three months or less at the date of purchase.

 

Bad Debt Reserves

 

We evaluate the collectibility of our accounts receivable based on a combination of factors. In cases where we are aware of circumstances that may impair a specific customer’s ability to meet its financial obligations to us, we record a specific allowance against amounts due to us, and thereby reduce the net recognized receivable to the amount we reasonably believe will be collected. For all other customers, we recognize allowances for doubtful accounts based on the length of time the receivables are past due, industry and geographic concentrations, the current business environment and our historical experience. At June 30, 2004 and 2003, our bad debt reserves were $91 million and $112 million, respectively. We expensed amounts related to bad debt reserves of $4 million, $37 million, and $46 million for fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. During fiscal years 2004, 2003 and 2002, we wrote-off bad debt reserves against gross accounts receivable of approximately $25 million, $39 million and $43 million, respectively.

 

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Investments

 

Investments consist of marketable debt securities, marketable equity securities and other investments.

 

Marketable Debt Securities

 

Investments in marketable debt securities consist primarily of corporate notes and bonds, asset and mortgage backed securities and U.S. government notes and bonds with original maturities beyond three months. Short-term investments are marketable debt securities with maturities of less than one year from the balance sheet date (except cash equivalents), while long-term investments represent all other marketable debt securities. All marketable debt securities are held in Sun’s name and deposited primarily with one major financial institution. Sun’s policy is to protect the value of its investment portfolio and minimize principal risk by earning returns based on current interest rates. We only invest in marketable debt securities with a minimum rating of single A or above from a nationally recognized credit rating agency. At June 30, 2004 and 2003 all of Sun’s marketable debt securities were classified as available-for-sale and were carried at fair market value.

 

Marketable Equity Securities

 

Investments in marketable equity securities consist of equity holdings in public companies. Marketable equity securities are initially recorded at cost upon acquisition and are classified as available-for-sale when there are no restrictions on Sun’s ability to liquidate such securities within 12 months. Investments in marketable equity securities were $35 million and $15 million at June 30, 2004 and 2003, respectively. At June 30, 2004, all marketable equity investments were classified as available-for-sale and are included in “Other non-current assets, net” in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Changes in the fair value of these securities are recognized in “Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss),” net of tax in the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity. Net unrealized gains, net of tax, on marketable equity investments were $7 million, $5 million, and none at June 30, 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. Marketable equity securities at June 30, 2004 and 2003 were (in millions):

 

     2004

  

Adjusted

Cost


  

Gross

Unrealized

Gains


  

Gross

Unrealized

Losses


    Fair
Value


Marketable equity securities with no unrealized losses

   $ 5    $ 9    $     $ 14

Marketable equity securities with unrealized losses

     23           (2 )     21
    

  

  


 

Total marketable equity securities

   $ 28    $ 9    $ (2 )   $ 35
    

  

  


 

     2003

    

Adjusted

Cost


  

Gross

Unrealized

Gains


  

Gross

Unrealized

Losses


    Fair
Value


Marketable equity securities with no unrealized losses

   $ 5    $ 9    $     $ 14

Marketable equity securities with unrealized losses

     1                 1
    

  

  


 

Total marketable equity securities

   $ 6    $ 9    $     $ 15