DEF 14A 1 def14a2013.htm DEF 14A DEF14A2013


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
SCHEDULE 14A
(Rule 14a-101)
 
INFORMATION REQUIRED IN PROXY STATEMENT
SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION
 
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a)
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
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Filed by a party other than the Registrant  ¨
Check the appropriate box:
¨
  
Preliminary proxy statement
  
¨
  
Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))
ý
  
Definitive proxy statement
  
 
  
¨
  
Definitive additional materials
  
 
  
¨
  
Soliciting material pursuant to §240.14a-12
  
 
  
 
INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
(Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
 

Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)
 
Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):
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No fee required.
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Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.
 
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Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the form or schedule and the date of its filing.
 
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INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
 
 
 
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS TO BE HELD ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2013
 
 
 
We will hold the 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Annual Meeting”) of Integrated Device Technology, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Company”), on Tuesday, September 17, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., local time, at the Company’s principal place of business located at 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, California, for the following purposes:
 
1.
To elect John Schofield, Peter Feld, Jeffrey McCreary, Umesh Padval, Gordon Parnell, Donald Schrock, Ron Smith, Ph.D., Norman Taffe, and Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D. as members of our Board of Directors to serve until the next Annual Meeting of Stockholders or until their successors are duly elected and qualified;
2.
To approve, on a non-binding, advisory basis, the compensation of our named executive officers as disclosed in the proxy statement accompanying this notice (the “Proxy Statement”) pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“Say-on-Pay”);
3.
To approve an amendment and restatement to the 2004 Equity Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder from 36,800,000 to 41,800,000;
4.
To ratify the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as the independent registered public accounting firm of the Company for its fiscal year ending March 30, 2014; and
5.
To transact such other business as may properly come before the Annual Meeting or any adjournment or postponement thereof.
 
The foregoing items of business are more fully described in the Proxy Statement. Stockholders of record on July 26, 2013 are entitled to notice of, and to vote at, the Annual Meeting or any adjournment or postponement thereof.
 
The majority of the Company’s outstanding shares must be represented at the Annual Meeting (in person or by proxy) to transact business. To assure proper representation at the Annual Meeting, please mark, sign and date the enclosed proxy and mail it promptly in the enclosed self-addressed envelope. You may also vote online at www.envisionreports.com/idti. Your proxy will not be used if you revoke it either before or at the Annual Meeting.
 
San Jose, California
July 29, 2013
 
                            
 
By Order of the Board of Directors
 
/s/ Matthew D. Brandalise
 
Matthew D. Brandalise
Secretary
 
YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT. IN ORDER TO ASSURE YOUR REPRESENTATION AT THE MEETING, PLEASE SIGN AND DATE THE ENCLOSED PROXY AND RETURN IT PROMPTLY IN THE ENCLOSED ENVELOPE, OR VOTE ONLINE AT WWW.ENVISIONREPORTS.COM/IDTI.





 
 
INTEGRATED DEVICE TECHNOLOGY, INC.
6024 Silver Creek Valley Road
San Jose, California 95138
(408) 284-8200
 
 
 
2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
PROXY STATEMENT
 
 
 
July 29, 2013
 
The accompanying proxy is solicited on behalf of the Board of Directors of Integrated Device Technology, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Company”), for use at the 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Annual Meeting”) to be held on Tuesday, September 17, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., local time, or at any adjournment or postponement thereof. The Annual Meeting will be held at the Company’s principal place of business located at 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, California 95138. Only holders of record of the Company’s common stock as of the close of business on July 26, 2013 (the “Record Date”) are entitled to notice of, and to vote at, the Annual Meeting. On the Record Date, the Company had 148,561,413 shares of common stock outstanding and entitled to vote. A majority of such shares, present in person or represented by proxy, will constitute a quorum for the transaction of business.
 
This Proxy Statement and the accompanying form of proxy will be first mailed to stockholders on or about August 6, 2013. An Annual Report on Form 10-K with an Annual Report Wrap for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 are being mailed concurrently with the mailing of the Notice of Annual Meeting and Proxy Statement to all stockholders of record as of the Record Date. The Annual Report on Form 10-K and the Annual Report Wrap are not incorporated by reference into this Proxy Statement and are not considered proxy solicitation material.

 
VOTING RIGHTS AND SOLICITATION OF PROXIES
 
Holders of the Company’s common stock are entitled to one vote for each share held as of the Record Date, except that in the election of directors, each stockholder has cumulative voting rights and is entitled to a number of votes equal to the number of shares held by such stockholder multiplied by the number of directors to be elected. The stockholder may cast these votes all for a single candidate or distribute the votes among any or all of the candidates. No stockholder will be entitled to cumulate votes for a candidate, however, unless that candidate’s name has been placed in nomination prior to the voting and the stockholder, or any other stockholder, has given notice at the Annual Meeting, prior to the voting, of an intention to cumulate votes. In such an event, the proxy holder may allocate among the director nominees, if more than one, the votes represented by proxies in the proxy holder’s sole discretion.
 
The directors in Proposal No. 1 will be elected by a plurality of the votes cast. Abstentions will have no effect with regard to Proposal No. 1, because approval of a percentage of shares present or outstanding is not required for Proposal No. 1. Broker non-votes will have no effect on the outcome of Proposal No. 1. Proposal Nos. 2, 3, and 4 each require for approval the affirmative vote of the majority of shares of common stock present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting and entitled to vote on such proposal. Abstentions have the same effect as a vote against Proposal Nos. 2, 3, and 4. Broker non-votes will have no effect on the outcome of Proposal Nos. 2, 3 and 4.
 
Unless there are different instructions on the proxy, all shares represented by valid proxies (and not revoked prior to the vote) will be voted at the Annual Meeting: (1) FOR the election of the director nominees listed in Proposal No. 1; (2) FOR the approval, on a non-binding, advisory basis, of the executive compensation of our named executive officers (“NEOs”) in Proposal No. 2 (“Say-on-Pay”); (3) FOR the approval of an amendment and restatement to the 2004 Equity Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder from 36,800,000 to 41,800,000 in Proposal No. 3; and (4) FOR the ratification of the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm in Proposal No. 4.
 

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Because the vote on Proposal No. 2 is advisory, it will not be binding on the Board of Directors, the compensation committee of the Board of Directors or IDT. With respect to Proposal No. 2, the Board of Directors will review the voting results and take them into consideration when making future decisions about executive compensation.
 
All votes will be tabulated by the inspector of election appointed for the Annual Meeting who will separately tabulate, for each proposal, affirmative and negative votes, abstentions and broker non-votes. Abstentions will be considered present and entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting and will be counted towards determining whether or not a quorum is present. Broker non-votes will be counted towards a quorum, but are not counted for any purpose in determining whether a matter has been approved. There are no statutory or contractual rights of appraisal or similar remedies available to those stockholders who dissent from any matter to be acted on at the Annual Meeting.
 
The expenses of soliciting proxies to be voted at the Annual Meeting will be paid by the Company. Following the original mailing of the proxies and other soliciting materials, certain officers or employees of the Company and/or its agents may also solicit proxies by mail, telephone and facsimile or in person. No additional compensation will be paid to such officers, regular employees or agents of the Company for such services. Following the original mailing of the proxies and other soliciting materials, the Company will request that brokers, custodians, nominees and other record holders of the Company’s common stock forward copies of the proxy and other soliciting materials to persons for whom they hold shares of common stock and request authority for the exercise of proxies. In such cases, the Company, upon request of the record holders, will reimburse such holders for their reasonable expenses.
 
Voting results will be announced by the filing of a Current Report on Form 8-K within four business days after the Annual Meeting. If final voting results are unavailable at that time, we will file an amended Current Report on Form 8-K within four business days of the day the final results are available.

 
REVOCABILITY OF PROXIES
 
Any person signing a proxy in the form accompanying this Proxy Statement has the power to revoke it prior to the Annual Meeting or at the Annual Meeting prior to the vote. A proxy may be revoked prior to the vote and exercise of the proxy by: (i) a written notice delivered to the Company stating that the proxy is revoked, (ii) a subsequent proxy that is signed by the person who signed the earlier proxy and that is presented at the Annual Meeting or (iii) attendance at the Annual Meeting and voting in person. Please note, however, that if a stockholder’s shares are held of record by a broker, bank or other nominee and that stockholder wishes to vote at the Annual Meeting, the stockholder must bring to the Annual Meeting a letter from the broker, bank or other nominee confirming such stockholder’s beneficial ownership of the shares.

 
STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS TO BE PRESENTED AT NEXT ANNUAL MEETING
 
Any stockholder who meets the requirements of the proxy rules under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) may submit to the Board of Directors proposals to be considered for inclusion in next year’s proxy statement for the Annual Meeting in 2014. Your proposal must comply with the requirements of Rule 14a-8 under the Exchange Act and be submitted in writing by notice delivered or mailed by first-class United States mail, postage prepaid, to our Secretary at Integrated Device Technology, Inc., 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, California 95138, and must be received no later than March 28, 2014; provided, however, that if the date of our 2014 Annual Meeting is not within 30 days before or after September 17, 2014, then your proposal must be received no later than a reasonable time before we begin to print and send our proxy materials for the 2014 Annual Meeting.
 
Our Amended and Restated Bylaws (“Bylaws”) also provide for separate advance notice procedures to recommend a person for nomination as a director or to propose business to be considered by stockholders at a meeting. To be considered timely under these provisions, the stockholder’s notice must be received by our Secretary at our principal executive offices at the address set forth above no earlier than May 19, 2014 and no later than June 18, 2014; provided, however, that if the date of our 2014 Annual Meeting is not within 30 days before or 60 days after September 17, 2014, the notice must be delivered no earlier than 120 days before the 2014 Annual Meeting and no later than 90 days before the 2014 Annual Meeting, or no later than the 10th day following the day on which the first public announcement of the date of the 2014 Annual Meeting was made. Our Bylaws also specify requirements as to the form and content of a stockholder’s notice. For more information on stockholder nominations for director, see “Consideration of Stockholder Nominees for Director” below. You are also advised to review our Bylaws, which contain additional requirements about advance notice of stockholder proposals and director nominations.
 
The rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and our Bylaws also establish a deadline with respect to discretionary voting for submission of stockholder proposals that are not intended to be included in the Company’s proxy statement (the “Discretionary Vote Deadline”). The Discretionary Vote Deadline for the Annual Meeting in 2014 is June 18, 2014.
 

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The chairman of the meeting may refuse to acknowledge the introduction of your proposal if it is not made in compliance with the foregoing procedures or the applicable provisions of our Bylaws. Our Bylaws were filed with the SEC and can be viewed by visiting the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. You may also obtain a copy by writing to our Secretary at our principal executive offices located at 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, California 95138.

 
CONSIDERATION OF STOCKHOLDER NOMINEES FOR DIRECTOR
 
The Nominating & Governance Committee of our Board of Directors will consider properly submitted stockholder nominations for candidates to serve on our Board of Directors. Pursuant to our Bylaws, a stockholder who wishes to nominate persons for election to the Board of Directors at the 2014 Annual Meeting must be a stockholder of record when such holder gives the Company notice, must be entitled to vote at the meeting and must comply with the notice provisions in our Bylaws. A stockholder’s notice must be delivered to the Company’s Secretary by the close of business not less than 90 days nor more than 120 days prior to the one year anniversary of the preceding year’s annual meeting; provided, however, that in the event that the date of the annual meeting is more than 30 days before or more than 60 days after such anniversary date, notice by the stockholder to be timely must be delivered not earlier than the 120th day prior to such annual meeting and not later than the 90th day prior to such annual meeting or, if later, the 10th day following the day on which public disclosure of the date of such annual meeting was first made. For our 2014 Annual Meeting, the notice must be delivered between May 19, 2014, and June 18, 2014. However, if the date of our 2014 Annual Meeting is not within 30 days before or 60 days after September 17, 2014, the notice must be delivered no earlier than 120 days before the 2014 Annual Meeting and no later than 90 days before the 2014 Annual Meeting, or no later than the 10th day following the day on which the first public announcement of the date of the 2014 Annual Meeting was made.
 
The stockholder’s notice must include the following information, for the person proposed to be nominated: (1) his or her name, age, nationality, and business and residence addresses; (2) his or her principal occupation and employment; (3) the class and number of shares of stock owned beneficially or of record by him or her; and (4) any other information required to be disclosed in a proxy statement or otherwise required by the Exchange Act. The stockholder’s notice must also include the following information, for the stockholder giving the notice and the beneficial owner, if any, on whose behalf the nomination or proposal is made: (1) their names and addresses; (2) the class and number of shares of stock owned beneficially and of record by them; (3) a description of any arrangements or understandings between them and each proposed nominee and any other persons (including their names) pursuant to which the nominations are to be made; (4) a representation that they intend to appear in person or by proxy at the 2014 Annual Meeting to nominate the person named in the notice; (5) a representation as to whether they are part of a group that intends to deliver a proxy statement or solicit proxies in support of the nomination; and (6) any other information that would be required to be included in a proxy statement or otherwise required by the Exchange Act or by the Company’s Bylaws.
 
The chairman of the meeting will determine if the procedures in the Bylaws have been followed, and if not, declare that the nomination be disregarded. If the nomination was made in accordance with the procedures in our Bylaws, the Nominating & Governance Committee of the Board of Directors will apply the same criteria in evaluating the nominee as it would any other board nominee candidate and will recommend to the Board of Directors whether or not the stockholder nominee should be nominated by the Board of Directors and included in our proxy statement. The nominee and nominating stockholder must be willing to provide any information reasonably requested by the Nominating & Governance Committee in connection with its evaluation.

 
COMMUNICATIONS WITH THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OR NON-MANAGEMENT DIRECTORS
 
Stockholders who wish to communicate with our Board of Directors or with only the non-management directors serving on our Board of Directors may send their communications in writing to: Integrated Device Technology, Inc., 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, California 95138, Attention: Secretary. The Secretary of the Company will forward these communications to the Chairman of the Board of Directors if the Chairman is a non-employee director, or otherwise to the Lead In dependent Director of the Board of Directors. Stockholders should direct their communications to either the Board of Directors or the Chairman of the Board of Directors. Communications will not be forwarded to the Chairman of the Board of Directors unless the stockholder submitting the communication identifies itself by name and sets out the class and number of shares of stock owned by it, beneficially or of record.

 
Important Notice Regarding Internet Availability of Proxy Materials for the 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders:
 
The Notice and Proxy Statement, and the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 are available at www.edocumentview.com/idti.

 

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CODE OF BUSINESS ETHICS
 
The Company has adopted a Code of Business Ethics that applies to all of our directors, officers, employees, and representatives. The Code of Business Ethics is available on our website at http://ir.idt.com/governance.cfm. If the Company makes any substantive amendments to the Code of Business Ethics or grants any waiver from a provision of the Code of Business Ethics to any of our directors or officers, the Company will promptly disclose the nature of the amendment or waiver on the Company’s website.

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PROPOSAL NO. 1
 
ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
 
Our Board of Directors consists of nine members. Our Board of Directors has nominated each of John Schofield, Peter Feld, Jeffrey McCreary, Umesh Padval, Gordon Parnell, Donald Schrock, Ron Smith, Ph.D., Norman Taffe, and Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D. for re-election to the Board of Directors. All nine of the nominees listed below are currently serving on the Board of Directors and each has indicated a willingness to continue serving if elected. Unless otherwise instructed, the proxy holders will vote the proxies received by them for the nine nominees named below. Proxies cannot be voted for a greater number of persons than the number of nominees standing for election. In the event that any nominee becomes unable or declines to serve as a director, the proxies will be voted for any nominee who shall be designated by the current Board of Directors to fill the vacancy, or the Board of Directors may reduce the authorized number of directors in accordance with the Company’s Restated Certificate of Incorporation, as amended, and its Bylaws. We are not aware of any nominee who will be unable or will decline to serve as a director. The term of office for each person elected as a director will continue until the next annual meeting or until a successor has been duly elected and qualified.
 
Nominees
 
The names of the nominees and certain information about them, as of July 26, 2013, are set forth below:
 
Name of Nominee
 
Age
 
Position with Company
 
Director Since
John Schofield(2)(3)
 
64
 
Chairman of the Board of Directors
 
2001
Peter Feld(2)(3)
 
34
 
Director
 
2012
Jeffrey McCreary(1)(3)
 
56
 
Director
 
2012
Umesh Padval(1)(2)
 
55
 
Director
 
2008
Gordon Parnell(1)(3)
 
63
 
Director
 
2008
Donald Schrock(1)(3)
 
67
 
Director
 
2009
Ron Smith, Ph.D.(1)(2)
 
63
 
Director
 
2004
Norman Taffe (1)(2)
 
46
 
Director
 
2012
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
 
56
 
Director, President and Chief Executive Officer
 
2008
 
(1)
Member of the Audit Committee.
(2)
Member of the Compensation Committee.
(3)
Member of the Nominating & Governance Committee.
 
Mr. Schofield has been a director of the Company since April 2001 and has served as the Chairman of the Board of Directors since January 2008. Mr. Schofield brings to IDT extensive experience in the areas of executive management, global sales and marketing, risk analysis, corporate governance and administration. Mr. Schofield’s experience is especially relevant to his roles as Chairman of the Board and the Nominating & Governance Committee. Mr. Schofield has been a private investor since his retirement from Tellabs, Inc. (“Tellabs”) in January 2005. Mr. Schofield served as the Chief Executive Officer and President of Advanced Fibre Communications, Inc. (“AFC”) from 1999 until the acquisition of AFC by Tellabs on November 30, 2004, at which time AFC became the Access Division of Tellabs. Mr. Schofield also served as a member of the board of directors of AFC, and in October 2001, he was elected to the position of chairman of the board of directors of AFC. From 1992 to 1999, Mr. Schofield served as Senior Vice President, and later, President, of the Integrated Solutions Group of ADC Telecommunications, Inc., a world-wide supplier of network equipment, software solutions and integration services for broadband and multiservice networks. Mr. Schofield also serves as a director of Sonus Networks, Inc., a supplier of telecommunications network equipment and services. Mr. Schofield is a 2011, 2012 and 2013 National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) Board Leadership Fellow. He has demonstrated his commitment to boardroom excellence by completing NACD’s comprehensive program of study for experienced corporate directors—a rigorous suite of courses spanning leading practices for boards and committees. Mr. Schofield supplements his board leadership skills through ongoing engagement with the director community and access to leading practices. Mr. Schofield holds a Diploma of Electronics and Communications Engineering (the equivalent of a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering) from NSW Institute of Technology in Sydney, Australia.
 

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Mr. Feld has been a director of the Company since June 2012. He has served as a Member of Principal GP and a member of the Management Committees of Starboard Value GP and Principal GP, since March 2011. Previously, Mr. Feld served as a Managing Director of Ramius LLC and a portfolio manager of Ramius Value and Opportunity Master Fund Ltd, a position he held between November 2008 and April 2011. Prior to becoming a Managing Director, Mr. Feld served as a Director at Ramius LLC from February 2007 to November 2008. Mr. Feld joined Ramius LLC as an Associate in February 2005. From June 2001 to July 2004, Mr. Feld was an investment banking analyst at Banc of America Securities, LLC, the investment banking arm of Bank of America Company, a bank and financial holding company. Mr. Feld has served since July 2011 as a member of the Board of Directors of Unwired Planet, Inc. (f/k/a Openwave Systems Inc.), a public company with a portfolio of patents many of which are considered foundational to mobile communications, and span smart devices, cloud technologies and unified messaging, and currently serves as its Chairman of the Board. Mr. Feld has served on the Board of Directors of SeaChange International, Inc., a company engaged in the delivery of multi-screen video, since December 2010. Mr. Feld previously served on the Board of Directors of CPI Corp. from July 2008 to July 2009 and on the Board of Directors of Sharper Image Company from August 2007 to January 2008. Mr. Feld contributes extensive knowledge of the capital markets and corporate governance practices as a result of his investment and private equity background.
 
Mr. McCreary has been a director of the Company since June 2012. He has been an independent management consultant since 2006, and since 2011 has been a member of the board of directors of MIPS Technologies, Inc., a leading provider of industry-standard processor architectures and cores for digital home, networking and mobile applications. Mr. McCreary has been a director of the Isola Group, a provider of materials used to manufacture printed circuit boards, since 2006. Mr. McCreary served as a board member of the Gennum Corporation, a provider of semiconductor solutions and intellectual property cores, from 2008 until its acquisition by Semtech Corporation in March 2012. Mr. McCreary is a former Senior Vice President at Texas Instruments, which develops analog, digital signal processing RF and DLP semiconductor technologies. Mr. McCreary was the Manager of Texas Instruments’ Worldwide Sales and Marketing, from 1998 through 2005, where he directed the global sales organization. Mr. McCreary held a variety of other executive positions within Texas Instruments, including the General Manager of Advanced Logic Products and General Manager of Worldwide Military Semiconductors. Mr. McCreary has led organizations conducting product design and development, manufacturing, marketing, and sales. His book, “Creating the I in Team” was published in 2007. He is also currently working as a special consultant to the National Hockey League Coaches Association. Additionally, Mr. McCreary is a long-time member of the Board of Trustees of the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Mr. McCreary holds a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and received an honorary doctorate in engineering from the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 2004. Mr. McCreary’s technology expertise, together with his experience as an executive and director of technology companies, including Texas Instruments, well qualifies him to serve on the Board of Directors of the Company.
 
Mr. Padval has been a director of the Company since October 2008. Mr. Padval currently serves as a Partner at Bessemer Venture Partners. Mr. Padval brings to IDT more than 25 years of experience in marketing, sales, and general management in high tech industries, including computing, mobile communications, and consumer digital entertainment. From August 2004 to August 2007, Mr. Padval served as Executive Vice President of the Consumer Products Group at LSI, and from June 2001 to August 2004, Senior Vice President of the Broadband Entertainment Division at LSI. Mr. Padval served as the Chief Executive Officer and Director of C-Cube from May 2000 until June 2001, when C-Cube was sold to LSI, and prior to that, as President of the Semiconductor Division of C-Cube from October 1998 to May 2000. Prior to joining C-Cube, Mr. Padval held senior management positions at VLSI Technology, Inc. and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. He currently serves on the boards of several private companies, including Avnera Corporation, Berkeley Design Automation, Avalanche Technologies, Tigo Energy, Ultrasolar, Xtreme Power, and Pinnacle Engines. Mr. Padval also serves on the boards of Entropic Communications Incorporated, a fabless semiconductor supplier of system solutions to enable connected home entertainment. Mr. Padval is also active on advisory boards for Stanford University. Mr. Padval holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Technology from Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, and an M.S. in Engineering from Stanford University. Mr. Padval's technology expertise and executive experience in the semiconductor industry qualifies him to serve on the Board of Directors of the Company.
 
Mr. Parnell has been a director of the Company since January 2008. Mr. Parnell brings to IDT extensive general and financial management experience, which is especially relevant to his role as Chairman of the Audit Committee. Mr. Parnell served as Vice President, Business Development and Investor Relations of Microchip Technology Incorporated (“Microchip”) from January 2009 to December 2012. Prior to this role, Mr. Parnell served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Microchip from May 2000 to December 2008. Prior to his role as CFO, Mr. Parnell served as Vice President, Controller, and Treasurer of Microchip. Mr. Parnell holds a finance/accounting qualification with the Association of Certified Accountants from Edinburgh College, Scotland.
 
Mr. Schrock has been a director of the Company since September 2009. Mr. Schrock brings to IDT extensive management experience in semiconductors, wireless, and consumer markets, as well as marketing and operational expertise, all of which have particular relevance to the Company’s significant presence in the wireless and wireline communications markets. Mr. Schrock is retired from his positions as President of Qualcomm CDMA Technologies Group and Executive Vice-President of Qualcomm, Inc.

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(“Qualcomm”), which he held from 2001 to 2003. Prior to joining Qualcomm, Mr. Schrock held key executive positions at GM Hughes Electronics, Applied Micro Circuit Corporation, Burr-Brown Corporation, and Motorola. He currently serves on the board of directors of Global Foundries, a semiconductor wafer fabrication company, and the board of directors of Maxlinear, a fabless semiconductor company that provides radio-frequency analog and mixed-signal SoC solutions for broadband communications applications. Mr. Schrock also served on the board of directors of Jazz Semiconductor Inc., a privately held mixed signal and RF wafer foundry, until its merger with Acquicor Technology in 2007. Mr. Schrock's executive experience in the technology industry, including the semiconductor field, qualifies him to serve on the Board of Directors of the Company.
 
Dr. Smith has been a director of the Company since March 2004. Dr. Smith brings to IDT extensive experience in executive management, engineering and product development, risk analysis, marketing, industry association and corporate governance. Dr. Smith is retired from Intel Corporation, where he last served as Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Wireless Communications and Computing Group from December 1999 to January 2004. Prior to this role, Dr. Smith held various senior executive positions in group and division general business management, product and technology development, and marketing during his 26-year tenure at Intel. Since 2005, Dr. Smith has served as a director of RagingWire Enterprise Solutions, Inc, a premier data center and managed Information Technology services provider, and served from 2004—2012 as a director for Arcsoft, Inc, an industry leading software developer of multimedia applications for both desktop and embedded platforms. Dr. Smith has also served as a Trustee of Gettysburg College since 2006, where he is a member of the executive, compensation, finance, campaign, and audit committees and he chairs the Information Technology Committee. He is a member of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges. Dr. Smith served as the Chairman of the Technology Strategy Committee and as Intel’s alternate Board of Directors member for the Semiconductor Industry Association from 1999-2004. Dr. Smith is a 2011 NACD Board Governance Fellow. Dr. Smith holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in physics from the University of Minnesota and a bachelor’s degree in physics from Gettysburg College. Dr. Smith's executive experience in the technology industry qualifies him to serve on the Board of Directors of the Company.
 
Mr. Taffe currently serves on the board of directors of Cypress Envirosystems, a Cypress Semiconductor-funded company that develops system-level products for reducing energy costs with wireless technology. From 2005 to 2012, Mr. Taffe served as executive vice president of Cypress Semiconductor. Mr. Taffe also currently holds the position of Board Chairman to the Second Harvest Food Bank. Mr. Taffe holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan. Mr. Taffe is qualified to serve on the Board of Directors due to his technological expertise and executive experience in the semiconductor industry. 
 
Dr. Tewksbury joined the Company as President and Chief Executive Officer in March 2008 and was appointed to the Board of Directors in April 2008. Dr. Tewksbury brings extensive general management and technical experience to his roles as Director, President and Chief Executive Officer. Prior to joining the Company, Dr. Tewksbury served as President and Chief Operating Officer of AMI Semiconductor from September 2006 to February 2008. Prior to that, Dr. Tewksbury served as general manager and managing director at Maxim Integrated Products, Inc. from February 2000 to August 2006, where he built and ran 11 product lines and established their high-speed data converter and high-performance RF businesses. Dr. Tewksbury also held senior business and technology leadership positions at IBM Microelectronics and Analog Devices, Inc. Dr. Tewksbury currently serves on the boards of Global Semiconductor Alliance and Entropic Communications, Inc., a fabless semiconductor company that designs, develops, and markets system solutions to enable connected home entertainment. Dr. Tewksbury holds a B.S. in Architectural Design, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
 
Messrs. Padval, Parnell, Schofield, Taffe and Schrock, and Drs. Smith and Tewksbury are members of the National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) and Messrs. Padval, Parnell, Schofield, and Schrock, and Dr. Smith have completed the two-day NACD course on Director Professionalism.

Vote Required
 
The nine nominees receiving the highest number of affirmative votes of the outstanding shares of votes cast shall be elected as directors to serve until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until their successors have been duly elected and qualified. Abstentions and broker non-votes will have no effect for purposes of determining whether this matter has been approved.

 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE FOR THE ELECTION OF
THE NOMINATED DIRECTORS.

 

7



CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
Board of Directors Meetings and Committees
 
The Board of Directors of the Company holds regularly scheduled meetings each quarter and may meet more often as needed. The Board of Directors held a total of twenty-four (24) meetings during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 (“fiscal 2013”). The Board of Directors also has an Audit Committee, a Compensation Committee and a Nominating & Governance Committee. The independent directors of the Board of Directors have established a practice of meeting in executive session, without the presence of Dr. Tewksbury, at the conclusion of each quarterly board meeting. During fiscal 2013, the independent directors met in executive session a total of four (4) times.
 
NASDAQ prescribes independence standards for companies listed on the NASDAQ, including IDT. These standards require a majority of the Board of Directors to be independent. They also require every member of the Audit Committee, Compensation Committee, and Nominating & Governance Committee to be independent. No director qualifies as independent unless the Board determines that the director has no direct or indirect material relationship with us. On an annual basis, each director and executive officer is obligated to complete a director and officer questionnaire which requires disclosure of any transactions with us in which the director or executive officer, or any member of his or her immediate family, has a direct or indirect material interest. We also review our relationship to any entity employing a director or on which the director currently serves as a member of the Board. Consistent with these considerations, after review of all relevant transactions or relationships between each director, or any of his or her immediate family members, and IDT, its senior management and its independent registered public accounting firm, the Board of Directors has determined that each of the members of our Board of Directors, except for Dr. Tewksbury, and each of the members of the Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating & Governance Committee is an “independent director” as defined in the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC and NASDAQ rules.
 
During fiscal 2013, upon the appointment of Mr. Taffe, the Audit Committee was composed of six (6) non-employee directors, Messrs. Parnell, Padval, McCreary, Schrock and Taffe and Dr. Smith, each of whom was “independent” as defined in the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC and the NASDAQ rules. Mr. Parnell currently serves as the Chair of the Audit Committee, and the Board of Directors has determined that he satisfies the “audit committee financial expert” designation in accordance with applicable SEC and NASDAQ rules. The Audit Committee operates under a written charter adopted by the Board of Directors that is available on the Company’s website at http://ir.idt.com/governance.cfm. The Audit Committee engages the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm and is primarily responsible for approving the services performed by the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm and for reviewing and evaluating the Company’s accounting practices and systems of internal controls. The Audit Committee meets privately with the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm, which has direct access to the Audit Committee at any time. The Audit Committee held five (5) meetings during fiscal 2013.
 
The Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors develops the compensation philosophy and objectives for the Company as a whole, reviews and approves all compensation decisions related to our NEOs and other executive officers and generally oversees our compensation programs. As members of our Board of Directors, the Compensation Committee receives regular updates on the Company’s business priorities, strategies, and results. As a result, the Compensation Committee has regular interaction with and open access to the NEOs. This gives them considerable opportunity to ask questions and assess the performance of the NEOs, other executive officers, and the Company. During fiscal 2013, upon the resignation of Mr. Lewis Eggebrecht and the appointment of Mr. Taffe, the Compensation Committee was composed of five (5) non-employee directors, Messrs. Padval, Feld, Schofield and Taffe and Dr. Smith, each of whom was independent under the applicable rules and regulations of the SEC, the rules of the NASDAQ and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended from time to time (the “Code). Dr. Smith currently serves as the Chair of the Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee operates under a written charter adopted by the Board of Directors that is available on the Company’s website at http://ir.idt.com/governance.cfm. In consultation with management and the Board of Directors, the Compensation Committee reviews, evaluates, and recommends to the Board of Directors for approval, the compensation plans, policies and practices of the Company. The Compensation Committee aims to ensure that the Company’s compensation programs encourage high performance, promote accountability, and assure that employee interests are aligned with the interests of the Company’s stockholders. The Compensation Committee determines the salaries and incentive compensation for executive officers, including the CEO, and oversees the administration of the Company’s equity plans, including approving the number of shares underlying stock options to be granted to each employee and the terms of such options. The Compensation Committee met six (6) times and acted by written consent fourteen (14) times during fiscal 2013.
 
The Compensation Committee’s specific responsibilities include:
 
Reviewing, revising and approving an industry-specific Peer Group (as defined below) to facilitate appropriate comparisons for compensation purposes;
Meeting in executive session to review and recommend for Board approval the corporate goals and objectives relating to the compensation of the CEO, evaluate the performance of the chief executive officer in light of these goals and objectives,

8



and establish the compensation of the CEO based on such evaluation and competitive market data pertaining to compensation at peer companies;
Reviewing and approving compensation for other officers, considering each Officer’s performance in light of Company goals and objectives and competitive market data pertaining to compensation at peer companies. The CEO of the Company may be present at meetings during which such compensation is under review and consideration, but may not vote;
Reviewing and making recommendations to the Board of Directors regarding executive compensation and benefit plans and programs;
Reviewing and approving the annual budget for employee merit salary increases, as recommended by management and determined by the Committee;
As requested by Company management, reviewing, consulting, and making recommendations and/or determinations regarding employee compensation and benefit plans generally, including employee bonus plans and programs;
Overseeing the administration of the Company’s equity incentive plans, including the review and grant of stock option and other equity incentive grants to Officers, and review and approval of the annual equity budget for all equity award types;
Overseeing administration of the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan;
Managing and reviewing executive employment agreements and the grant of change-in-control and perquisite benefits;
Reviewing and approving the Compensation Discussion and Analysis and the Report of the Compensation Committee to be included as part of the Company’s annual proxy statement;
Reviewing, along with the CEO, matters relating to management succession, including compensation-related issues and exercising final approval over such issues;
Reviewing the risks and mitigating factors associated with the Company’s compensation programs, practices and policies; and
Annually reviewing and reassessing the Compensation Committee Charter and recommending any changes to the Board of Directors for its consideration.
 
In carrying out the foregoing responsibilities, the Compensation Committee has the authority, in its sole discretion, to engage outside independent advisors as it deems necessary or appropriate. In addition, the Compensation Committee is entitled to delegate any or all of its responsibilities to a subcommittee of the Compensation Committee other than any responsibilities relating to matters that involve executive compensation or where it has determined such compensation is intended to comply with the requirements of Section 162(m) of the Code.
 
During fiscal 2013, upon the resignation of Mr. Lewis Eggebrecht at the 2012 Annual Meeting, the Nominating & Governance Committee was composed of five (5) non-employee directors, Messrs. Schofield, Parnell, McCreary, Feld, and Schrock, each of whom was “independent” as defined in the NASDAQ rules. Mr. Schofield currently serves as the Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee. The Nominating & Governance Committee operates under a written charter adopted by the Board of Directors that is available on the Company’s website at http://ir.idt.com/governance.cfm. The Nominating & Governance Committee identifies and recommends individuals qualified to serve on the Board of Directors and evaluates and recommends the adoption or amendment of corporate governance guidelines and principles applicable to the Company. In evaluating candidates to determine if they are qualified to become board members, the Nominating & Governance Committee looks for the following attributes, among others determined by the Nominating & Governance Committee in its discretion to be consistent with the Company’s guidelines: personal and professional character, integrity, ethics and values; experience in the Company’s industry and with relevant social policy concerns; general business experience and leadership profile, including experience in corporate management and corporate governance, such as serving as an officer or former officer of a publicly held company, or experience as a board member of another publicly held company; diversity of personal background, perspective and experience; academic expertise in an area of the Company’s operations; and communication and interpersonal skills and practical and mature business judgment. The Nominating & Governance Committee evaluates each individual in the context of our Board of Directors as a whole, with the objective of assembling a Board of Directors that can best perpetuate and enhance the success of the Company and represent stockholder interests through the exercise of sound judgment, using its diversity of experience in these various areas. Although the Nominating & Governance Committee uses these and other criteria to evaluate potential nominees, there are no stated minimum criteria for nominees. The Nominating & Governance Committee uses the same standards to evaluate all director candidates, whether or not the candidates were nominated by stockholders. The Nominating & Governance Committee held four (4) meetings during fiscal 2013.
 
Each director, other than Mr. Taffe, who joined the Board in October 2012, attended at least 75% of the aggregate of the total number of meetings of the Board of Directors and the total number of meetings held by all committees on which such director served during fiscal 2013. Mr. Taffe has attended all Board of Directors meetings and Committee meetings for which he serves since joining the Board in October 2012. The Company does not currently maintain a formal policy regarding director attendance

9



at the Annual Meeting; however, the Company invites nominees for directors to attend the Annual Meeting. Five directors on the Board in fiscal 2013 attended the 2012 Annual Meeting, either in person or by conference call.

 
Risk Oversight
 
Our Board of Directors has an active role, as a whole and also at the committee level, in overseeing management of our risks. Our Board of Directors generally oversees corporate risk in its review and deliberations relating to our activities, including financial and strategic risk relevant to our operations. In addition, our Board of Directors regularly reviews information regarding our credit, liquidity and operations, as well as the risks associated with each. The Audit Committee oversees management of financial risks. The Compensation Committee is responsible for overseeing the management of risks relating to our executive compensation plans and arrangements and employee retention. The Nominating & Governance Committee manages risks associated with the independence of the Board of Directors and potential conflicts of interest. While each committee is responsible for evaluating certain risks and overseeing the management of such risks, the entire Board of Directors is regularly informed through committee reports about such risks. Our Board of Directors believes its administration of its risk oversight function has not affected the leadership structure of the Board of Directors.
 
The Audit Committee reviews the Company’s policies with respect to risk assessment and risk management, discusses with management significant financial risks in conjunction with enterprise risk exposures, and the actions management has taken to limit, monitor or control financial and enterprise risk exposure. During fiscal 2013, an independent consulting firm was primarily responsible for testing of internal controls in compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation, and reported directly to our Chief Financial Officer and our Corporate Controller, and “dotted-line” to the Chair of the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee met with the independent consulting firm to receive updates on Sarbanes-Oxley testing and discuss any issues that the Committee believed warranted attention.
 
The Compensation Committee oversees risk management as it relates to the Company’s compensation programs, policies and practices in connection with designing our executive compensation programs and reviewing incentive compensation programs for other employees. The Compensation Committee has reviewed with management whether our compensation programs, policies, and practices may create incentives for our employees to take excessive or inappropriate risks which could have a material adverse effect on the Company.
 
We believe that the elements of our compensation programs, policies and practices do not encourage unnecessary or excessive risk-taking. Base salaries are fixed in amount. While our sales commission plans and bonus plans focus on achievement of short-term or annual goals, and short-term or annual goals may encourage the taking of short-term risks at the expense of long-term results, given our employees’ other compensation opportunities and our internal control procedures, we believe that the sales commission plans and bonus plans appropriately balance risk and the desire to focus employees on specific short-term goals that we believe are important to our success.
 
We also believe that compensation in the form of long-term equity awards is important to help further align employee interests with those of our stockholders. We do not believe that these awards encourage unnecessary or excessive risk taking because the ultimate value of the awards is tied to our stock price, and because award grants are staggered and subject to long-term vesting schedules that we believe help ensure that employees have significant value tied to long-term stock price performance.
 
Based on the foregoing, we do not believe that our compensation policies and practices create inappropriate or unintended risk to the Company as a whole. Further, we do not believe that our incentive compensation arrangements encourage risk-taking beyond the organization’s ability to effectively identify and manage significant risks. We believe such arrangements are compatible with effective internal controls and the risk management practices of the Company, and are supported by the oversight and administration of the Compensation Committee with regard to executive compensation programs.
 
This Proxy Statement, including the preceding paragraphs, contains forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events. Forward-looking statements contained in this Proxy Statement should be considered in light of the many uncertainties that affect our business and specifically those factors discussed from time to time in our public reports filed with the SEC, such as those discussed under the heading “Risk Factors,” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, and as may be updated in subsequent SEC filings.

 
Leadership Structure of the Board
 
In accordance with our Bylaws, our Board of Directors appoints our officers, including our Chief Executive Officer. Our Board of Directors does not have a policy on whether the roles of the Chairman of the Board of Directors and the Chief Executive Officer should be separate and, if they are to be separate, whether the Chairman should be selected from the non-employee directors

10



or be an employee and, if they are to be combined, whether a lead independent director should be selected. However, our Board of Directors is committed to corporate governance practices and values independent board oversight as an essential component of strong corporate performance. Currently, we separate the role of Chairman from the Chief Executive Officer position in order to ensure independent leadership of the Board of Directors and in recognition of the difference between the two roles. The Chief Executive Officer is responsible for setting the strategic direction of the Company and for the day-to-day leadership and performance of the Company’s business, while the Chairman is responsible for leading the Board of Directors in overseeing management, and our Board of Directors believes that this current structure is appropriate to fulfill the duties of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer effectively and efficiently.

 
Director Compensation
 
During fiscal 2013, the members of the Board of Directors who were not also officers or employees of the Company were each paid an annual retainer in the amount of $50,000. The Chairman of the Board received an additional annual retainer of $30,000. The Chair of the Audit Committee received an additional annual retainer of $20,000 and the other members of the Audit Committee received an additional annual retainer of $10,000. The Chair of the Compensation Committee received an additional annual retainer of $20,000 and the other members of the Compensation Committee received an additional annual retainer of $7,500. The Chair of the Nominating & Governance Committee received an additional annual retainer of $7,500 and the remaining members of the Nominating & Governance Committee received an additional annual retainer of $5,000. All annual retainer amounts are paid in equal quarterly installments.
 
Each non-employee director is initially granted a stock option to purchase 40,000 shares of the Company’s common stock on or about the 15th day of the month following the month of such non-employee director’s first election or appointment to the Board of Directors. Initial option grants to non-employee directors have a term of seven (7) years and become exercisable as to 25% of the shares subject to such options on the first anniversary of their date of election or appointment, and then as to 1/36 of the remaining shares each month thereafter.
 
Annually, after receipt of the initial grant, each non-employee director is granted a restricted stock unit award for the number of shares of the Company’s common stock equivalent to $50,000 in value, based on the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the trading day immediately preceding the date of grant, and a stock option to purchase 12,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. All annual grants for non-employee directors are made during the Company’s first open trading window subsequent to the Company’s annual meeting of stockholders. Annual option grants have a term of seven (7) years. Annual option and restricted stock unit awards vest and become exercisable on the earlier of (i) the first anniversary of the stockholder meeting date or (ii) if a director is not standing for re-election or fails to be re-elected at the next annual meeting of stockholders, then on the date of such annual meeting. 
 
The following table sets forth compensation information for the Company’s non-employee directors for fiscal 2013.
 
DIRECTOR COMPENSATION FOR FISCAL 2013
 
Name
 
Fees Earned
or Paid in
Cash
($)
 
Stock
Awards
($)(1)
 
Option
Awards
($)(2)(3)
 
Total
($)
John Schofield
 
95,000

  
50,000
 
23,356
 
168,356
Peter Feld
 
45,000

 
50,000
 
97,790
 
192,790
Gordon Parnell
 
75,000

  
50,000
 
23,356
 
148,356
Ron Smith, Ph.D.
 
83,750

(4)
50,000
 
23,356
 
157,106
Umesh Padval
 
67,500

  
50,000
 
23,356
 
140,856
Donald Schrock
 
65,000

  
50,000
 
23,356
 
138,356
Norman Taffe
 
16,875

 
 
89,225
 
106,100
Jeff McCreary
 
47,500

 
50,000
 
97,790
 
195,290
Lewis Eggebrecht (4)(5)
 
50,625

 
 
 
50,625
 
(1)
Stock awards consist of restricted stock unit awards for 8,834 shares of the Company’s common stock granted on November 15, 2012 under the 2004 Equity Plan. The amounts reported do not reflect compensation actually received by

11



the director; instead, the amounts reported represent the grant date fair value of the restricted stock unit awards granted during fiscal 2013, calculated in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standard Board Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718, “Stock Compensation,” or ASC Topic 718. For a detailed discussion of the assumptions used to calculate the value of the restricted stock unit awards, please refer to Note 9 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2013. As of March 31, 2013, each of the current directors except for Mr. Taffe held outstanding restricted stock unit awards for an aggregate of 8,834 shares of the Company’s common stock.
(2)
As of March 31, 2013, Mr. Schofield held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 74,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Mr. Feld held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 52,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Mr. Parnell held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 94,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Dr. Smith held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 74,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Mr. Padval held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 84,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Mr. Schrock held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 74,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, Mr. McCreary held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 52,000 shares of the Company's common stock, and Mr. Taffe held outstanding stock options to purchase an aggregate of 40,000 shares of the Company's common stock.
(3)
The amounts reported do not represent compensation actually received by the director; instead, the amounts represent the grant date fair value of the stock options granted during fiscal 2013 calculated in accordance with ASC Topic 718. For a detailed discussion of the assumptions used to calculate the value of the options, please refer to Note 9 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2013. The amounts reported relate to Mr. Feld and Mr. McCreary's initial director's grant of options to purchase 40,000 shares of the Company's common stock, made on July 16, 2012 with an exercise price of $4.94 per share, Mr. Taffe's initial director's grant of options to purchase 40,000 shares, and each director’s, except for Mr. Taffe, annual grant of a stock option to purchase 12,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, made on November 15, 2012 with an exercise price of $5.66 per share.
(4)
Dr. Smith and Mr. Eggebrecht received an additional $5,000 payment for their work on the Technology Advisory Committee, an ad hoc committee of the Board of Directors formed to monitor industry technology developments and advise the Board of Directors and the Company’s management with respect to new technology developments and opportunities in the industry which may affect the Company’s current products or present future opportunities for the Company’s business.
(5)
Mr. Eggebrecht retired from the Board of Directors as of September 13, 2012.

 


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PROPOSAL NO. 2
 
ADVISORY VOTE TO APPROVE NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICER COMPENSATION
 
In accordance with Section 14A of the Exchange Act, the Company is providing stockholders an opportunity to cast a non-binding, advisory vote on the compensation of our NEOs (sometimes referred to as a “Say-on-Pay” vote). Accordingly, you have the opportunity to vote “For” or “Against” or to “Abstain” from voting on the following non-binding resolution at the Annual Meeting:
 
“Resolved, that the stockholders approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of the Company’s named executive officers as disclosed in the Company’s proxy statement for the 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the SEC, including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the accompanying compensation tables and the related narrative disclosure in the proxy statement.”
 
Strong Stockholder Support
 
At our annual meeting of our stockholders last fiscal year, our stockholders approved the compensation of our fiscal 2012 NEOs, with over a 98% approval rating. The Compensation Committee believes that the strong support from our stockholders demonstrates that our executive compensation programs are designed appropriately to reward company and stock performance with responsible and balanced incentives. The Compensation Committee is continuously working to ensure that management’s interests are aligned with our stockholders’ interest to support long-term value creation.
 
In deciding how to vote on this proposal, you are encouraged to read the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” the accompanying compensation tables and the related narrative disclosure. As described in detail in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” our compensation programs are designed to reward, motivate, attract and retain top talent by rewarding performance based upon achievement of pre-approved annual goals and objectives. A portion of each NEO’s compensation is contingent upon overall corporate performance as well as specific performance metrics particular to each NEO’s position and consistent with the NEO’s role on the management team. We believe that our compensation programs align the interests of our NEOs with that of our stockholders and provide motivation for high performance levels from our NEOs.
 
Vote Required
 
Approval, on a non-binding, advisory basis, of the compensation of our NEOs, as disclosed in this Proxy Statement pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the SEC, requires the affirmative vote of the majority of shares of common stock present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting and entitled to vote on such proposal. Abstentions and broker non-votes will be counted towards a quorum. Abstentions will have the same effect as an “Against” vote for purposes of determining whether this matter has been approved. Broker non-votes will not be counted for any purpose in determining whether this matter has been approved.
 
While your vote on this proposal is advisory and will not be binding on the Board of Directors, the Compensation Committee, the Company, and the Board of Directors value the opinions of the stockholders on executive compensation matters and will take into consideration the outcome of the vote when making future executive compensation decisions, to the extent they can determine the cause or causes of any significant negative voting results. Unless the Board of Directors modifies its determination on the frequency of future Say-On-Pay advisory votes, the next Say-On-Pay advisory vote will be held at the fiscal 2014 annual meeting of stockholders.
 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE FOR THE APPROVAL OF THE COMPENSATION OF THE NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AS DISCLOSED IN THIS PROXY STATEMENT.


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PROPOSAL NO. 3

APPROVAL OF AMENDMENT AND RESTATEMENT TO THE COMPANY'S 2004 EQUITY PLAN

Stockholders are being asked to approve an amendment and restatement to the Company's 2004 Equity Plan (the “2004 Plan”) to increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder from 36,800,000 shares to 41,800,000 shares (an increase of 5,000,000 shares), provided, however, that the aggregate number of common shares available for issuance under the 2004 Plan is reduced by 1.74 shares for each common share delivered in settlement of any full value award, which are awards other than stock options and stock appreciation rights, granted under the 2004 Plan on or after September 23, 2010. On July 23, 2013, the Board of Directors of the Company approved the proposed amendment and restatement to the 2004 Plan, as described above, which also includes an extension of the term of the 2004 Plan to July 21, 2023, to be effective upon stockholder approval of this proposal. Our Board of Directors is also requesting this vote by the stockholders to approve the 2004 Plan to satisfy the shareholder approval requirements of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) and the material terms of the performance goals for awards that may be granted under the 2004 Plan as required under Section 162(m) of the Code, in order to satisfy the stockholder approval requirements of Section 162(m) of the Code.

Upon stockholder approval of the amended and restated 2004 Plan, it will become effective and will supersede in its entirety the current 2004 Plan. If the stockholders do not approve the amended and restated 2004 Plan, it will not become effective, the current 2004 Plan will continue in effect, and we may continue to grant awards under the current 2004 Plan, subject to its terms, conditions and limitations.
 
Below is a summary of the principal provisions of the 2004 Plan assuming approval of the above amendment and restatement, which summary is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the 2004 Plan, as attached hereto as Appendix A.
2004 Equity Plan History
In July, 2004 the Board of Directors adopted the 2004 Plan and, on September 16, 2004, it was approved by the stockholders of the Company. 2,500,000 shares of common stock were originally reserved for issuance under the 2004 Plan, of which no more than 1,000,000 shares were eligible for grant as full value awards. In June 2005, the Board of Directors approved an amendment to the 2004 Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder to 19,500,000 in connection with the Company's merger with Integrated Circuit Systems, Inc., and on September 14, 2005, the amendment was approved by the stockholders of the Company. In July 2006, the Board of Directors approved an amendment to the 2004 Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder to 24,500,000 of which no more than 2,000,000 shares were eligible for grant as full value awards, and on September 14, 2006, the amendment was approved by the stockholders of the Company. In July 2008, the Board of Directors approved an amendment to the 2004 Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder to 28,500,000 of which no more than 4,000,000 shares were eligible for grant as full value awards, and on September 12, 2008, the amendment was approved by the stockholders of the Company. On July 21, 2010, the Board of Directors approved an amendment and restatement to the 2004 Plan to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance thereunder to 36,800,000, and remove the full value award limitation, and on September 23, 2010, the amendment and restatement was approved by the stockholders of the Company. A maximum of 6,927,683 shares were available for issuance as of July 22, 2013 pursuant to the 2004 Plan. Assuming approval of the proposed amendment, a maximum of 11,927,683 would be available for issuance as of the Annual Meeting date pursuant to the 2004 Plan.
Summary of the 2004 Plan
Purpose of the 2004 Plan
The purpose of the 2004 Plan is to provide additional incentive for directors, employees and consultants to further the growth, development and financial success of the Company and its subsidiaries by personally benefiting through the ownership of the Company's common stock or other rights which recognize such growth, development and financial success. The Board of Directors also believes that the 2004 Plan will enable the Company to obtain and retain the services of directors, employees, and consultants who are considered essential to the Company's long-range success by offering them an opportunity to own stock and other rights that reflect the Company's financial success.
Securities Subject to the 2004 Plan
If the amendment and restatement to the 2004 Plan is approved, the aggregate number of common shares reserved for issuance pursuant to options, restricted stock awards, stock appreciation rights (“SARs”), performance share awards, performance stock unit awards, restricted stock unit awards, performance-based awards and other stock-based awards will be equal to 41,800,000; provided, however, that the aggregate number of common shares available for issuance under the 2004 Plan are reduced by 1.74 shares for each common share delivered in settlement of any full value award granted on or after September 23, 2010.

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Generally, common shares subject to an award under the 2004 Plan that terminates, expires or lapses for any reason are made available for issuance again under the 2004 Plan, except that each share subject to a full value award granted on or after September 23, 2010 that terminates, expires or lapses for any reason increases the number of shares that can be issued under the 2004 Plan, by 1.74 shares. Common shares tendered or withheld to satisfy the grant or exercise price or tax withholding obligation pursuant to any award and common shares that were subject to a stock-settled SAR that are not issued upon exercise of the SAR will not be available for issuance again under the 2004 Plan. The payment of dividend equivalents in cash in conjunction with outstanding awards will not be counted against the shares available for issuance under the 2004 Plan.

The closing share price for the Company's common stock on the Nasdaq Global Market on the last trading day prior to July 22, 2013 was $8.97. The Board of Directors or a committee of the Board of Directors appointed to administer the 2004 Plan has the authority in its discretion to appropriately adjust: (1) the number and kind of shares of common stock (or other securities or property) with respect to which awards may be granted or awarded under the 2004 Plan; (2) the number and kind of shares of common stock (or other securities or property) subject to outstanding awards under the 2004 Plan; and (3) the grant or exercise price with respect to any award; if there is any stock dividend, stock split, recapitalization, or other subdivision, combination or reclassification of shares of common stock. The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors will be the administrator of the 2004 Plan unless the Board of Directors assumes authority for administration.

Shares subject to expired or canceled options or surrendered or repurchased shares of restricted stock will be available for future grant or sale under the 2004 Plan, except as set forth above. However, no shares may be optioned, granted, or awarded under the 2004 Plan if such action would cause an “incentive stock option” to fail to qualify as an “incentive stock option” under Section 422 of the Code.

Awards Under the 2004 Plan
The 2004 Plan provides that the administrator may grant or issue stock options, restricted stock, stock appreciation rights, performance share awards, performance stock unit awards, restricted stock units, performance-based awards and other stock-based awards or any combination thereof. Each award will be set forth in a separate agreement with the person receiving the award and will indicate the type, terms and conditions of the award.
Nonqualified Stock Options (“NQSOs”) will provide for the right to purchase common shares of the Company at a specified price which may not be less than fair market value on the date of grant, and usually will become exercisable (in the discretion of the administrator) in one or more installments after the grant date, subject to the satisfaction of individual or company performance criteria established by the administrator. The administrator shall determine the times at which NQSOs may be exercised; provided that the term of any NQSO granted under the 2004 Plan shall not exceed ten years.
Incentive Stock Options (“ISOs”) will be designed to comply with the applicable provisions of the Code and will be subject to certain restrictions contained in the Code. Among such restrictions, ISOs must have an exercise price not less than the fair market value of the Company's common stock on the date of grant, may only be granted to employees, must expire within a specified period of time following the optionee's termination of employment, and generally must be exercised within ten years after the date of grant. ISOs may be subsequently modified and such modification may disqualify them from treatment as ISOs. The total fair market value of shares with respect to which an ISO is first exercisable by an optionee during any calendar year cannot exceed $100,000. To the extent this limit is exceeded, the options granted in excess of $100,000 are NQSOs. In the case of an ISO granted to an individual who owns (or is deemed to own) at least 10% of the total combined voting power of all of the Company's classes of stock (a “10% Owner”) the 2004 Plan provides that the exercise price must be at least 110% of the fair market value of a common share on the date of grant and the ISO must expire no later than the fifth anniversary of the date of its grant.
Restricted stock may be sold to participants at various prices or granted with no purchase price, and may be made subject to such restrictions as may be determined by the administrator. Restricted stock, typically, may be repurchased by the Company at the original purchase price if the conditions or restrictions of the sale or grant are not met. In general, restricted stock may not be sold, or otherwise hypothecated or transferred except to certain permitted transferees as set forth in the 2004 Plan, until restrictions are removed or expire. Purchasers of restricted stock, unlike recipients of options, will have voting rights and will receive dividends, if any, prior to the time when the restrictions lapse, subject to such restrictions as the administrator may impose.
Stock appreciation rights may be granted in connection with stock options, or separately. SARs granted by the administrator in connection with stock options or other awards typically will provide for payments to the holder based upon increases in the price of the Company's common stock over the exercise price of the related option or other awards. The exercise price of each SAR shall not be less than 100% of the fair market value of the underlying common stock on the date of grant, and other terms, conditions and restrictions may be imposed by the administrator in the SAR agreements. The administrator may elect to pay SARs in cash, in shares of common stock, or in a combination of both. The 2004 Plan also permits the administrator to cause outstanding options to be converted into SARs that are exercisable for the same number shares of stock as the substituted option would have been exercisable for (and shall also have the same exercise price and remaining term as the substituted option).

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Performance share awards may be granted by the administrator to employees or consultants based upon, among other things, the contributions, responsibilities, and other compensation of the particular employee or consultant. Generally, these awards will be based on specific performance criteria and may be paid in cash or in shares of common stock, or in a combination of both. Performance share awards to consultants and employees may also include bonuses granted by the administrator, which may be payable in cash or in shares of common stock, or in a combination of both.
Restricted stock units and performance stock units may be awarded to participants, typically without payment of consideration, but subject to vesting conditions based on performance criteria established by the administrator. Upon vesting, the Company will transfer to the holder one unrestricted, fully transferable share of common stock for each restricted stock unit or performance stock unit vested and not previously forfeited.
Other stock-based awards may be authorized by the administrator in the form of common stock or an option or other right to purchase common stock and may, without limitation, be linked to the achievement of specific performance criteria.
The administrator may designate employees as participants whose compensation for a given fiscal year may be subject to the limit on deductible compensation imposed by Section 162(m) of the Code. The administrator may grant to such persons restricted stock, SARs, performance share awards, restricted stock units, performance stock unit awards and other stock-based awards that are paid, vest or become exercisable upon the attainment of company performance criteria which are related to one or more of the following performance goals as applicable to the Company or any subsidiary, division or operating unit:
net earnings (either before or after interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization);
economic value-added (as determined by the Compensation Committee);
sales or revenue;
net income (either before or after taxes);
operating earnings;
cash flow (including, but not limited to, operating cash flow and free cash flow);
cash flow return on capital;
return on net assets;
return on stockholders' equity;
return on assets;
return on capital;
stockholder returns;
return on sales;
gross or net profit margin;
productivity;
expense;
margins;
operating efficiency;
customer satisfaction;
working capital;
earnings per share;
price per share of stock; and
market share.

The maximum number of shares which may be subject to equity awards granted under the 2004 Plan to any individual in any fiscal year may not exceed 1,000,000 shares of common stock. The maximum amount of cash payable to any participant in any calendar year pursuant to a cash-based award under the 2004 Plan is $1,000,000.

Grant and Terms of Awards
Employees and Consultants
The administrator shall have the authority under the 2004 Plan to determine: (1) which employees, directors and consultants should be granted awards; (2) the number of shares to be subject to awards granted to selected employees and consultants; and (3) the terms and conditions of the awards, including whether option grants are ISOs or NQSOs.
The administrator may not grant an ISO under the 2004 Plan to any 10% Owner unless the stock option conforms to the applicable provisions of Section 422 of the Code. Only the Company's employees may be granted ISOs under the 2004 Plan. Employees, consultants, and directors may receive all other awards under the 2004 Plan; however, awards made to non-employee directors shall be granted as described in the paragraph below. Each award will be evidenced by a written or electronic agreement.

16



Independent Directors
The 2004 Plan provides for grants of awards to any director that is a non-employee director, the terms and conditions of which are to be made pursuant to a written policy adopted by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors has adopted a policy that non-employee directors will be eligible to receive grants under the 2004 Plan. Under this policy each non-employee director will receive an option to purchase 40,000 shares of common stock upon the individual's initial appointment to the Board of Directors, and an option to purchase 12,000 shares of common stock and a restricted stock unit award for a number of shares of the Company's common stock equivalent to $50,000 in value, based on the closing price of the Company's common stock on the trading day immediately preceding the date of grant, during the Company's first open window following each annual stockholders meeting. The shares subject to each non-employee director's initial option grant, as described herein, will become vested, subject to the non-employee director's continuous service with the Company, over four years from the date of the director's appointment with 25% of the shares subject to each option vesting upon the one-year anniversary of the date of appointment, and the remaining shares vesting monthly for the 36 months thereafter. The shares subject to each non-employee director's annual option and restricted stock unit grants, as described herein, will become vested and exercisable, subject to the non-employee director's continuous service with the Company, on the earlier of (i) the first anniversary of the stockholder meeting date or (ii) if a director is not standing for re-election or fails to be re-elected at the next annual meeting of stockholders, then on the date of such annual meeting. Each of the options granted to non-employee directors have a seven year term, and shall be granted at 100% of the fair market value.
Pricing
The exercise or purchase price, if any, for the awards granted under the 2004 Plan will be specified in each award agreement. The exercise price for options granted under the 2004 Plan shall not be less than the fair market value for a common share subject to such option on the date the option is granted as specified in the 2004 Plan. In the case of ISOs granted to a 10% Owner, the exercise price may not be less than 110% of the fair market value of a common share subject to such option on the date the option is granted.
For purposes of the 2004 Plan, the fair market value of a common share as of a given date shall be the closing trading price for a common share as reported by Nasdaq on the trading day immediately preceding the grant date.
Term of Awards
The term of any award granted under the 2004 Plan shall be set by the Compensation Committee in its discretion; however, the term of options granted under the 2004 Plan shall not be more than 10 years from the date of grant, or if such option is granted to a 10% Owner, five years from the date of the grant. In addition, the term of SARs granted under the 2004 Plan shall not be more than 10 years from the date of grant. Generally, an award granted to an employee, director or consultant may only be exercised or purchased while such person remains the Company's employee, director or consultant, as applicable, or for a limited period of time subsequent to the termination of employment, directorship, or the consulting relationship, as applicable, subject to any limitations of Section 422 of the Code.
Vesting of Awards
For awards granted to the Company's employees and consultants, each award agreement will contain the period during which the right to exercise or purchase the award in whole or in part vests in the participant, or the period during which forfeiture restrictions upon such award lapse. At any time after the grant of an award, the administrator may accelerate the period during which such award vests or forfeiture restrictions lapse. Notwithstanding the foregoing, full value awards made to employees or consultants will become vested over a period of not less than three years (or, if vesting is performance-based, over a period of not less than one year) following the date such award is made; provided, however, that full value awards that result in the issuance of an aggregate of up to 5% of common stock available under the 2004 Plan may be granted to any one or more participants without respect to such minimum vesting provisions. Generally, no portion of an award which is unexercisable at a participant's termination of employment or termination of consulting relationship will subsequently become exercisable, except as may be otherwise provided by the administrator either in the agreement or by action following the grant of the award.
Exercise of Options/Purchase of Awards
An option may be exercised for any vested portion of the shares subject to the option until the option expires. Only whole common shares may be purchased. The administrator shall determine the methods by which the exercise price of an option may be paid, including, without limitation, cash; shares of stock held for such period of time as may be required by the administrator having a fair market value on the date of delivery equal to the aggregate exercise price of the option; or other property acceptable to the administrator (including allowing an optionee to place a market sell order with a broker with respect to common shares then issuable on exercise of the option, directing the broker to pay a sufficient portion of the net proceeds of the sale to the Company in satisfaction of the option exercise price), and the methods by which shares of stock shall be delivered to the participant.
Restricted stock and other stock-based awards may be purchased by participants at various prices or granted with no purchase price, subject to such restrictions as may be determined by the administrator.

17



SARs may be exercisable as determined by the administrator and may be exercised in cash or common shares, or a combination thereof, as determined by the administrator. In the event SARs are exercised using common shares, the restrictions described above for the exercise of options using common shares shall apply.

Eligibility
The Company's employees, consultants and directors are eligible to receive awards under the 2004 Plan, but only employees are eligible to receive ISOs under the 2004 Plan. As of July 22, 2013, the Company had approximately 1,642 employees, 0 consultants, and 11 executive officers, nine directors, eight of whom are independent directors, all of whom are eligible to participate in the 2004 Plan. The administrator determines which of the Company's employees, consultants and directors will be granted awards, except that in the case of the granting of options and restricted stock to non-employee directors, such determinations are made by the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors, or any successor committee thereto. No employee or consultant is entitled to participate in the 2004 Plan as a matter of right nor does any such participation constitute assurance of continued employment. Only those employees and consultants who are selected to receive grants by the administrator may participate in the 2004 Plan.
Administration of the 2004 Plan
The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors will be the administrator of the 2004 Plan unless the Board of Directors assumes authority for administration. The Compensation Committee must consist solely of two or more non-employee directors. The administrator has the power to: (1) construe and interpret the terms of the 2004 Plan and awards granted pursuant to the 2004 Plan; (2) adopt rules for the administration, interpretation and application of the 2004 Plan that are consistent with the 2004 Plan; and (3) interpret, amend or revoke any of the newly adopted rules of the 2004 Plan.
Transferability of Awards
Awards generally may not be sold, pledged, transferred, or disposed of in any manner other than by will or by the laws of descent and distribution and may be exercised, during the lifetime of the holder, only by the holder or such transferees to whom they have been transferred pursuant to court order with the administrator's consent. No award may be transferred by a participant to a third-party for consideration absent stockholder approval.
Changes in Capital Structure
Adjustments
In the event of any stock dividend, stock split, combination or exchange of shares, merger, consolidation, spin-off, recapitalization or other distribution (other than normal cash dividends) of assets to the stockholders or any other change affecting the common stock, the administrator will make appropriate adjustments in the number and type of shares of stock subject to the 2004 Plan, the terms and conditions of any award outstanding under the 2004 Plan, and the grant or exercise price of any such award.
In the event of certain stated events in the 2004 Plan which may affect the Company, any affiliate, or the financial statements of the Company or any affiliate (including any change in control), the administrator, in its sole discretion, may (i) provide for either a termination of any award in exchange for an amount of cash or the replacement of the award with other rights; (ii) provide that any award be assumed or an equivalent option or right may be substituted by the successor corporation; or (iii) make adjustments in the number and type of common shares subject to outstanding awards and/or in the terms and conditions and the criteria included in outstanding awards which may be granted in the future.
Acceleration Upon Change in Control or Hostile Takeover
In the event of a change in control, the vesting of each outstanding award shall accelerate (i.e., become exercisable immediately in full) if the successor corporation refuses to assume the awards, or to substitute substantially equivalent awards. In the event of a hostile takeover, each outstanding award will become fully exercisable and all forfeiture restrictions on such awards will lapse before the consummation of the hostile takeover.
Amendment, Modification, and Termination of the 2004 Plan
The Board of Directors may not, without stockholder approval given before or after the Board of Director's action, amend the 2004 Plan to (i) increase the number of shares of stock that may be issued under the 2004 Plan; (ii) allow the administrator to grant options or SARs with an exercise price below the fair market value on the date of grant; (iii) allow the administrator to extend the exercise period for an option or SAR beyond ten years from the date of grant; or (iv) materially increase benefits or change eligibility requirements.
Notwithstanding any provision in this Plan to the contrary, absent approval of the stockholders of the Company, no option or SAR may be amended to reduce the per share exercise price of the shares subject to such option or SAR below the per share exercise price as of the date the option or SAR is granted and, except as permitted with regard to changes in capital structure, no option or SAR may be granted in exchange for, or in connection with, the cancellation or surrender of an option, SAR or other

18



Award having a higher per share exercise price. Further, without stockholder approval, the administrator may not offer to buy out for a payment in cash, an option or stock appreciation right previously granted.
The Board of Directors may terminate the 2004 Plan at any time. The 2004 Plan will be in effect until terminated by the Board of Directors. The 2004 Plan previously specified that in no event may any award be granted thereunder after July 21, 2020. As ameded, the 2004 Plan provides that in no event may any award be granted under the 2004 Plan after July 21, 2023. Except as indicated above, the Board of Directors may also modify the 2004 Plan from time to time.
Federal Income Tax Consequences Associated With the 2004 Plan
The following is a general summary under current law of the material federal income tax consequences to participants in the 2004 Plan and the Company. The summary deals with the general tax principles that apply and is provided only for general information. Some kinds of taxes, such as state and local income taxes, are not discussed. Tax laws are complex and subject to change and may vary depending on individual circumstances and from locality to locality.
The summary does not discuss all aspects of income taxation that may be relevant in light of a holder's personal investment circumstances. The summary is based on the assumption that the awards granted under the 2004 Plan will either comply with or not be subject to provisions of Section 409A of the Code, a provision governing specified deferred compensation arrangements. This summarized tax information is not tax advice.
Non-Qualified Stock Options
For federal income tax purposes, if an optionee is granted NQSOs under the 2004 Plan, the optionee will not have taxable income on the grant of the option, nor will the Company be entitled to any deduction. Generally, on exercise of NQSOs the optionee will recognize ordinary income, and the Company will be entitled to a deduction, in an amount equal to the difference between the option exercise price and the fair market value of a common share on the date each such option is exercised. The optionee's basis for the stock for purposes of determining gain or loss on subsequent disposition of such shares generally will be the fair market value of the common stock on the date the optionee exercises such option. Any subsequent gain or loss will be generally taxable as capital gains or losses.
Incentive Stock Options
There is no taxable income to an optionee when an optionee is granted an ISO or when that option is exercised. However, the amount by which the fair market value of the shares at the time of exercise exceeds the option price will be an “item of adjustment” for the optionee for purposes of the alternative minimum tax. Gain realized by the optionee on the sale of an ISO is taxable at capital gains rates, and no tax deduction is available to the Company, unless the optionee disposes of the shares (1) within two years after the date of grant of the option or (2) within one year of the date the shares were transferred to the optionee. If the common shares are sold or otherwise disposed of before the end of the two-year and one-year periods specified above, the difference between the option exercise price and the fair market value of the shares on the date of the option's exercise will be taxed at ordinary income rates, and the Company will be entitled to a deduction to the extent the optionee must recognize ordinary income. If such a sale or disposition takes place in the year in which the optionee exercises the option, the income the optionee recognizes upon sale or disposition of the shares will not be considered income for alternative minimum tax purposes.
An ISO exercised more than three months after an optionee terminates employment, other than by reason of death or disability, will be taxed as a NQSO, and the optionee will have been deemed to have received income on the exercise taxable at ordinary income rates. The Company will be entitled to a tax deduction equal to the ordinary income, if any, realized by the optionee.
Stock Appreciation Rights
No taxable income is generally recognized upon the receipt of a SAR, but upon exercise of the SAR the fair market value of the shares (or cash in lieu of shares) received generally will be taxable as ordinary income to the recipient in the year of such exercise. The Company generally will be entitled to a compensation deduction for the same amount which the recipient recognizes as ordinary income.
Restricted Stock, Performance Shares, Restricted Stock Units and Performance Stock Units
An employee to whom restricted stock, performance shares or restricted stock units or performance stock units are issued generally will not recognize taxable income upon such issuance and the Company generally will not then be entitled to a deduction unless, with respect to restricted stock or performance shares, an election is made by the participant under Section 83(b) of the Code. However, when restrictions on shares of such award lapse, such that the shares are no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture, the employee generally will recognize ordinary income and the Company generally will be entitled to a deduction for an amount equal to the excess of the fair market value of the shares at the date such restrictions lapse over the purchase price. If a timely election is made under Section 83(b) with respect to such award, the participant generally will recognize ordinary income on the date of issuance equal to the excess, if any, of the fair market value of the shares at that date over the purchase price therefore, and the Company will be entitled to a deduction for the same amount. With regard to restricted stock units and performance stock units, when such awards vest and stock is issued to the participant, the participant generally will recognize ordinary income and

19



the Company generally will be entitled to a deduction for the amount equal to the fair market value of the shares at the date of issuance. A Section 83(b) election is not permitted with regard to the grant of such equity awards.
Performance Awards
A participant who has been granted a performance award generally will not recognize taxable income at the time of grant, and the Company will not be entitled to a deduction at that time. When an award is paid, whether in cash or common shares, the participant generally will recognize ordinary income, and the Company will be entitled to a corresponding deduction.
Other Stock-Based Awards
A participant who receives other stock-based awards, such as a stock payment in lieu of a cash payment that would otherwise have been made, will general recognize ordinary income and the Company generally will be entitled to a corresponding deduction at the time the award is paid.
Section 162(m) of the Code
In general, under Section 162(m), income tax deductions of publicly-held corporations may be limited to the extent total compensation (including base salary, annual bonus, stock option exercises and non-qualified benefits paid) for specified executive officers exceeds $1,000,000 (less the amount of any “excess parachute payments” as defined in Section 280G of the Code) in any one year. However, under Section 162(m), the deduction limit does not apply to certain “performance-based compensation” as provided for by the Code and established by an independent compensation committee which is adequately disclosed to, and approved by, stockholders. In particular, stock options and SARs may qualify as “performance-based compensation” if the awards are made by a qualifying compensation committee, the underlying plan sets the maximum number of shares that can be granted to any person within a specified period and the compensation is based solely on an increase in the stock price after the grant date (i.e., the option exercise price is equal to or greater than the fair market value of the stock subject to the award on the grant date). Performance or incentive awards granted under the 2004 Plan may qualify as “qualified performance-based compensation” for purposes of Section 162(m) if such awards are granted or vest upon the pre-established objective performance goals described above.
The 2004 Plan is intended to be designed to meet the requirements of Section 162(m); however, awards granted under the 2004 Plan will only be treated as qualified performance-based compensation under Section 162(m) if the awards and the procedures associated with them comply with all requirements of Section 162(m). There can be no assurance that compensation attributable to awards granted under the 2004 Plan will be treated as qualified performance-based compensation under Section 162(m) and thus be deductible to us.
In calculating our stock burn rate, we use the methodology specified by Risk Metrics Group. Under this methodology, based on our stock price volatility for fiscal year 2011, fiscal 2012, and fiscal 2013, we count each full-value share twice in our calculations of stock burn rates for each of these three fiscal years. The gross stock burn rate is determined by dividing the sum of all options granted during the fiscal year plus two times all RSUs granted during the fiscal year plus two times any performance units earned during the fiscal year by the average shares outstanding during the fiscal year. During fiscal 2013, gross options issued totaled 3,116,596, gross RSUs issued totaled 1,700,271 and no performance units were earned. The average number of shares outstanding as of March 31, 2013 was 144,014,000, resulting in a gross stock burn rate of 4.53%.
Our gross burn rate was 3.95% in fiscal year 2011, 4.47% in fiscal 2012, and 4.53% in fiscal 2013.
We have no program, plan, or practice to coordinate equity grants with the release of material information. The Committee does not have a current policy to accelerate or delay equity grants in response to material information, nor do we delay the release of information due to plans for making equity grants.



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Historical Grants Table
The following table provides information with respect to awards granted under the 2004 Plan to our named executive officers, director nominees and employees as of July 22, 2013. As stated above, it is not possible to determine the amounts of awards that will be granted in the future to participants under the 2004 Plan.
Name and Position


Number of
Shares Underlying
Option Grant
 
Number of
Shares
Underlying
Restricted Stock
Unit Grants
 


Number of
Shares
Underlying
Performance
Unit Grants
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
2,025,000

 
150,000

 
125,000

Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
480,000

 
44,000

 
70,000

Arman Naghavi
600,000

 
45,000

 
64,444

Mario Montana
438,000

 
33,371

 
45,000

Christian Kermarrec
225,000

 

 
55,000

All Current Executive Officers as a Group
4,401,498

 
325,509

 
478,888

All Directors Who Are Not Executive Officers as a Group
2,170,949

 
193,346

 

John Schofield
54,000

 
31,252

 

Peter Feld
52,000

 
8,834

 

Jeffrey McCreary
52,000

 
8,834

 

Umesh Padval
34,000

 
27,252

 

Gordon Parnell
74,000

 
29,252

 

Donald Schrock
34,000

 
22,252

 

Ron Smith, Ph.D.
54,000

 
31,252

 

Norman Taffe
40,000

 

 

All Employees Who Are Not Executive Officers as a Group
33,952,977

 
8,479,448

 
682,500


Vote Required
Approval of the amendment and restatement to the 2004 Plan requires the affirmative vote of the majority of shares of common stock present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting and entitled to vote on such proposal.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE FOR APPROVAL OF THE AMENDMENT AND RESTATEMENT TO THE 2004 PLAN.



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PROPOSAL NO. 4
 
RATIFICATION OF SELECTION OF
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
The Board of Directors has appointed PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending March 30, 2014, and the stockholders are being asked to ratify such selection. Stockholder ratification of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm is not required by the Company’s Bylaws or otherwise. However, the Board of Directors is submitting the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP to the stockholders for ratification as good corporate practice. In the event the stockholders fail to ratify the appointment, the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors will consider the vote of the stockholders in making a decision whether to select another independent registered public accounting firm for the subsequent fiscal year. Even if the selection is ratified, the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors in their discretion may direct the appointment of a different independent registered public accounting firm at any time if they determine that such a change would be in the best interests of the Company and its stockholders.
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP has been engaged as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm since 1993. Representatives of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP are expected to be present at the Annual Meeting, will have the opportunity to make a statement if they desire to do so, and are expected to be available to respond to appropriate questions.

 
Fees Billed to Company
 
The aggregate fees incurred by the Company with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP for the annual audit and other services for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2013, and April 1, 2012, were as follows:
 
 
 
Fiscal Year
2013
 
Fiscal Year
2012
Audit fees(1)
 
$
1,267,840

 
$
1,132,000

Audit–related fees(2)
 
185,000

 
50,000

Tax fees(3)
 
42,574

 
59,000

All other fees(4)
 
5,161

 
5,000

Total fees
 
$
1,500,575

 
$
1,246,000

 
(1)
Represents audit and accounting advisory services for the Company’s annual financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K, for reviews of the financial statements included in the Company’s Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, for the audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, as well as for statutory audit services which amounted to $98,000 and $102,000 in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2013 and April 1, 2012, respectively.
(2)
Consists primarily of services rendered in connection with divestitures.
(3)
Consists of tax filing and tax-related compliance and other advisory services.
(4)
Consists primarily of consulting services including access to PWC accounting information databases. The Company incurred no financial information systems design and implementation fees in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013.
 
In accordance with the Audit Committee charter, the Audit Committee’s policy is to pre-approve all audit and non-audit services provided by the independent registered public accounting firm, including the estimated fees and other terms of any such engagement. These services may include audit services, audit-related services, tax services and other services. The Audit Committee may elect to delegate pre-approval authority to one or more designated committee members in accordance with its charter. The Audit Committee considers whether such audit or non-audit services are consistent with the SEC’s rules on auditor independence.
 
The Audit Committee approved the engagement of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP pursuant to established pre-approval policies and procedures. The Audit Committee has determined the rendering of non-audit services by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP is compatible with maintaining the auditor’s independence. The Audit Committee pre-approved all of the fees set forth in the table above for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2013 and April 1, 2012, respectively.

 
Vote Required
 
Ratification of the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm requires the affirmative vote of the majority of shares of common stock present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual

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Meeting and entitled to vote on such proposal. Abstentions and broker non-votes will be counted towards a quorum. Abstentions will have the same effect as an “Against” vote for purposes of determining whether this matter has been approved. As this proposal is considered a routine matter, there will be no broker non-votes with respect to this proposal.

 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS A VOTE FOR RATIFICATION OF SELECTION OF PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS LLP AS THE COMPANY’S INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM.

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SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT
 
The following table sets forth certain information, as of June 30, 2013 (or as otherwise noted below), with respect to the beneficial ownership of the Company’s common stock by: (a) each stockholder known by the Company to be the beneficial owner of more than five percent of the Company’s common stock; (b) each director and nominee; (c) each Named Executive Officer (as set forth below); and (d) all executive officers and directors as a group. As of June 30, 2013, the Company had 148,257,154 shares of common stock outstanding.
 
SECURITY OWNERSHIP
 
Name and Address of Beneficial Owner
 
Shares
Beneficially Owned(1)
 
Percentage of
Beneficial Ownership(1)
5% Stockholders:
 
 
 
 
Entities affiliated with RS Investment Management Co. LLC(2)
388 Market Street—1700
San Francisco, CA 94111-5312
 
17,627,290

 
11.89
%
Starboard Value, L.P.(3)
599 Lexington Avenue, 19th Floor
New York, NY 10022
 
12,150,000

 
8.20
%
BlackRock Inc.(4)
40 East 52nd Street
New York, NY 10022
 
10,620,210

 
7.16
%
The Vanguard Group(5)
100 Vanguard Boulevard
Malvern, PA 19355
 
8,032,496

 
5.42
%
Non-Employee Directors:
 
 
 
 
John Schofield(6)
 
85,418

 
*

Norman Taffe(7)
 

 
*

Gordon Parnell(8)
 
108,418

 
*

Donald Schrock(9)
 
74,584

 
*

Ron Smith, Ph.D.(10)
 
91,067

 
*

Umesh Padval(11)
 
90,418

 
*

Peter Feld(12)
 
12,161,666

 
8.21
%
Jeffrey McCreary(13)
 
88,666

 
*

Named Executive Officers:
 
 
 
 
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.(14)
 
1,636,648

 
1.10
%
Richard D. Crowley, Jr.(15)
 
516,908

 
*

Arman Naghavi(16)
 
405,269

 
*

Mario Montana(17)
 
342,821

 
*

Christian Kermarrec(18)
 
25,000

 
*

All Executive Officers and Directors as a
Group (16 persons)(19)
 
15,848,936

 
10.46
%
*    Represents less than 1% of the issued and outstanding shares.
(1)
Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock subject to options and warrants which are currently exercisable, or will become exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013, are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person or entity holding such securities but are not outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person or entity. Except as indicated by footnote, and subject to the community property laws where applicable, to the Company’s knowledge the persons named in the table above have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock shown as beneficially owned by them. Unless otherwise indicated, the address for each person is the Company’s address at 6024 Silver Creek Valley Road, San Jose, CA 95138.
(2)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 15, 2013 by RS Investment Management Co. LLC.
(3)
Based solely on a Schedule 13D/A filed with the SEC on June 20, 2012 by Starboard Value L.P.
(4)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 8, 2013 by BlackRock, Inc.
(5)
Based solely on a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 11, 2013 by The Vanguard Group.
(6)
Represents 23,418 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Schofield and 62,000 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.

24



(7)
Represents 0 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Taffe and 0 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(8)
Represents 26,418 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Parnell and 82,000 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(9)
Represents 13,418 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Schrock and 61,166 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(10)
Represents 22,418 shares beneficially owned by Dr. Smith, 6,649 shares beneficially owned by the Smith Family Trust and 62,000 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(11)
Represents 18,418 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Padval and 72,000 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(12)
7,253,224 shares owned directly by Starboard Value and Opportunity Master Fund Ltd; 1,907,974 shares owned directly by Starboard Value and Opportunity S LLC; 2,988,802 shares held in an account managed by Starboard Value LP. Mr. Feld, solely by virtue of his position as a member of the Management Committee of Starboard Value GP LLC (“Starboard Value GP”), the general partner of the investment manager of Starboard Value and Opportunity Master Fund, and as a member and member of the Management Committee of Starboard Principal Co GP LLC, the general partner of the member of Starboard Value GP, may be deemed to beneficially own the shares owned directly by Starboard Value and Opportunity Master Fund for purposes of Section 16. Further, Mr. Feld, solely by virtue of his position as a member of the Management Committee of Starboard Value GP, the general partner of the manager of Starboard Value and Opportunity S LLC, and as a member of the Management Committee of Starboard Principal Co GP LLC, the general partner of the member of Starboard Value GP, may be deemed to beneficially own the shares owned directly by Starboard Value and Opportunity S LLC for purposes of Section 16. Finally, Mr. Feld, solely by virtue of his position as a member of the Management Committee of Starboard Value GP, the general partner of Starboard Value LP, and as a member of the Management Committee of Starboard Principal Co. GP LLC, the general partner of the member of Starboard Value GP, may be deemed to beneficially own the shares held in the Managed Account for purposes of Section 16. Mr. Feld expressly disclaims beneficial ownership of all such shares, except to the extent of his pecuniary interest therein. Also includes 11,666 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(13)
Represents 77,000 shares beneficially owned by Mr. McCreary and 11,666 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(14)
Represents 74,149 shares beneficially owned by Dr. Tewksbury and 1,562,499 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(15)
Represents 46,534 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Crowley and 470,374 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(16)
Represents 39,542 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Naghavi and 365,727 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(17)
Represents 4,134 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Montana and 338,687 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(18)
Represents 0 shares beneficially owned by Mr. Kermarrec and 25,000 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013.
(19)
Includes the shares described in notes 6-18, and an additional 20,352 shares beneficially owned and 201,701 shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of June 30, 2013 held by executive officers not listed in the table.
 
Stock Ownership Guidelines
 
On October 19, 2007, Company adopted a policy establishing the following mandatory stock ownership guidelines for its Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chairman of the Board and other non-employee directors, as follows:
 
Chief Executive Officer
  
Value* equal to 1.0 times annual base salary
Chief Financial Officer
  
Value* equal to 0.5 times annual base salary
Chairman of the Board
  
15,000 shares of common stock
Board of Directors
  
10,000 shares of common stock
* “Value” is defined as the amount expended to acquire the stock, including taxes paid to acquire RSUs.
 
The foregoing mandatory ownership amounts are to be achieved no later than five years after commencement of service in the designated position, or in the case of board members serving as of October 19, 2007, then five years from that date. The purpose of the mandatory stock ownership guidelines is to give our top executives and board members a vested interest in the long term success of the Company.
 

25



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
 
Our executive officers and their respective ages as of June 30, 2013 are as follows:
 
Name
Age
Position
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
56
President and Chief Executive Officer
Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
56
Sr. Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
Subramanyan Dakshinamoorthy
61
Vice President, Worldwide Operations
Thomas Sparkman
51
Sr. Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Vice President and General Manager, Communications Division
Mario Montana
51
Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Computing Division
Arman Naghavi
51
Vice President and General Manager, Analog and Power Division
Christian Kermarrec
63
Vice President and General Manager, Timing and Synchronization Division and Wireless Systems
Graham Robertson
45
Vice President, Corporate Marketing
Sean Fan
47
Vice President and General Manager, IDT China
Anja Hamilton
42
Vice President, Worldwide Human Resources
Matthew Brandalise
48
Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
 
Dr. Tewksbury joined IDT as President and Chief Executive Officer in March 2008. Prior to joining IDT, Dr. Tewksbury served as the President and Chief Operating Officer of AMI Semiconductor from October 2006 to February 2008. Prior to August 2006, Dr. Tewksbury held a managing director position at Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.
 
Mr. Crowley joined IDT as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in October 2009. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Crowley served as Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Micrel, Inc. Prior to Micrel, Mr. Crowley served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Vantis Corporation. Prior to Micrel, Mr. Crowley was employed by National Semiconductor Corporation, where his last position was Vice President and Corporate Controller.
 
Mr. Dakshinamoorthy joined IDT as Vice President, Quality in 2012. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Dakshinamoorthy held several management positions at Freescale Semiconductor, serving most recently as Freescale’s Vice President, Final Manufacturing Engineering and Probe Operations. Prior to Freescale, Mr. Dakshinamoorthy held various management positions at Reticle Technology Centre, Tohoku Semiconductor Corp., the MOS15 Fab in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina and Western Digital.
 
Mr. Sparkman joined IDT in November 2011, as Vice President and general manager of the Communications division. Senior Vice President, WW Sales / Vice President & General Manager, Communications Division. In April 2012, Mr. Sparkman was appointed Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Sparkman was Chief Executive Officer of Samplify Systems, a leader in data compression technologies, in which IDT was a strategic investor. Prior to joining Samplify, Mr. Sparkman held various positions within the semiconductor industry for 23 years, serving chiefly at Maxim Integrated Products, Inc., an international supplier of analog and mixed-signal products. Mr. Sparkman holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.
 
Mr. Montana has been with IDT since 1997 and was appointed Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Computing Division in February 2007. Prior to his current role, Mr. Montana was General Manager, IDT Serial Switching Division, Director, IDT Serial-Switching Division and Director, IDT Strategic Marketing Group. Mr. Montana has also served as Product Line Director for IDT’s Telecommunications, FIFO, Logic and Timing groups, respectively. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Montana held various product marketing and engineering positions at Zarlink Semiconductor, Exar, Raytheon and Hewlett Packard.
 
Mr. Naghavi joined IDT as Vice President and General Manager, Audio and Power Division in October 2009 and became Vice President and General Manager, Analog and Power Division in 2010. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Naghavi served as Vice President and General Manager of Analog, Mixed-signal, and Power Division at Freescale Semiconductor. Prior to Freescale, Mr. Naghavi held various engineering and management positions at Intersil Corporation and Analog Devices, Inc.
 
Mr. Kermarrec joined IDT in 2012 and became Vice President and General Manager, TSD (Timing and Synchronization Division) and Wireless Systems in IDT's Communications Division. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Kermarrec was corporate Vice President and President of MediaTek's wireless operations in the United States and Europe, having joined MediaTek in 2008 through its acquisition of Analog Devices' RF and Wireless Business Unit. Prior to joining Analog Devices, Mr. Kermarrec held various

26



technical and management functions at M/A-COM and Tachonics in the United States, Spar Aeroscape in Canada, and Philips and Alcatel in France. Mr. Kermarrec holds an M.S. in electrical engineering from the Conservatoire des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), France.
 
Mr. Robertson joined IDT in March, 2010 as Vice President, Corporate Marketing. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Robertson served as Vice President of Global Marketing and Corporate Communications at International Rectifier. Prior to International Rectifier, Mr. Robertson held sales and marketing communications positions at Future Electronics, and other senior marketing positions within various marketing and promotion solutions organizations in Europe. Mr. Robertson earned his Master of Business Administration degree from Edinburgh’s Heriot Watt University and a Master of Science degree in Marketing from the University of Glamorgan South Wales, United Kingdom. He is currently completing his Doctorate degree in Business from Heriot Watt University.
 
Mr. Fan joined IDT in 1999 as marketing manager for the Company’s telecommunications business unit. In 2011, Mr. Fan became vice president and general manager of IDT China. In his current position, Mr. Fan is also responsible for managing multiple business and functional units of the Company located in China. Prior to his current position, Mr. Fan held various management roles at IDT, including Vice President and General Manager of the Memory Interface Division, General Manager of Standard Product Operations, and Senior Director of Silicon Timing Solutions. Prior to joining IDT, Mr. Fan served in various engineering and management roles with Lucent Microelectronics, Mitel Semiconductor, and the National Lab of Telecom Research in China. Mr. Fan holds a Master of Science degree in Computer Engineering from University of Cincinnati, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Telecommunications from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications.
 
Ms. Hamilton joined IDT in February 2011, and became VP, Worldwide Human Resources in October 2012. Prior to her current role, Ms. Hamilton was the Sr. Director, Worldwide Compensation and HRIS. Prior to joining IDT Ms. Hamilton held various compensation management positions at Atmel, eBay and Electronic Arts. Ms. Hamilton has 21 years of business management experience, with 15 of those in human resources. Ms. Hamilton received her business education in Germany, and holds several certifications in Human Resource Management.
 
Mr. Brandalise joined IDT in 2000 and was promoted to General Counsel in 2012. Prior to his current role, Mr. Brandalise served as Senior Director and Director in IDT's Legal Department. Mr. Brandalise has also held corporate counsel and senior corporate counsel positions in the IDT Legal Department. Mr. Brandalise joined IDT with 8 years of prior law firm experience in the areas of commercial litigation, commercial transactions, corporate law, and mergers and acquisitions.

 

27



COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
 
This Compensation Discussion and Analysis provides information about the material components of our executive compensation program for:
 
Dr. Theodore L. Tewksbury III, our President and Chief Executive Officer (our “CEO”);
Richard Crowley, Jr., our Sr. Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (our “CFO”);
Arman Naghavi, our Vice President and General Manager, Analog and Power Division;
Mario Montana, our Vice President, Enterprise Computing Division;
Christian Kermarrec, our Vice President and General Manager, Timing and Synchronization Division and Wireless Systems;
 
We refer to these executive officers collectively in this Compensation Discussion and Analysis as the “NEOs”, and to the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors as the “Committee”.
 
Specifically, this Compensation Discussion and Analysis provides an overview of our executive compensation philosophy, the overall objectives of our executive compensation program, and each compensation component that we provide to our executive officers, including the NEOs. In addition, we explain how and why the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors (the "Committee") arrived at the specific compensation actions and decisions involving our executive officers during fiscal 2013.

 
Executive Summary
 
Executive Compensation Structure
 
We design, develop, manufacture, and market a broad range of low-power, high-performance mixed signal semiconductor solutions for the advanced communications, computing, and consumer industries. To compete in this dynamic industry, our executive compensation programs are designed to provide competitive compensation opportunities that reward, motivate, attract, and retain top talent.
 
Our executive compensation programs are designed to reward performance based upon the actual achievement of annual goals and objectives established by the Committee at the beginning of each fiscal year, and link the priorities and performance of the executives to the attainment and furtherance of long-term business strategies, and with the interest of stockholders.
 
A significant portion of the compensation payable to the executives is tied directly to the Company’s financial performance, and accordingly, the compensation package for executives is designed to fluctuate with the financial performance of the Company as a whole. We have found this approach, which emphasizes the creation of sustainable long-term stockholder value, ensures that our executives are rewarded for their efforts only to the extent that they have produced profitable operating results.
 
Our executive compensation program is designed to further these principles in the following ways: 
Base salaries, which comprise only a modest portion of each executive’s compensation package, generally target the median of the competitive market for similarly situated companies;
A substantial portion of each executive’s compensation package is comprised of short-term incentive compensation in the form of a performance bonus, which is based on our ability to attain profitability goals reflected in our annual operating plan and each executive officer’s contributions toward that achievement; and
A substantial portion of each executive officer’s compensation package is comprised of long-term incentive compensation; in 2013 this was delivered in the form of
stock options, the value of which is directly linked to the performance of the Company’s common stock
performance stock units, delivered to each Executive reporting to the CEO, the value of which is linked to the performance of company operating margin and revenue growth to peers.
 

28



The incentive compensation of our NEOs is designed to enhance total shareholder return (“TSR”). We strive to continuously improve TSR and, therefore, align short-term compensation with short-term performance and long-term compensation with long-term performance and return. The link between the compensation of our CEO and TSR is disclosed in the following graph, which shows how both total compensation and incentive compensation for our CEO has fluctuated over the past five years with the Company's five-year TSR: 
(1)
The above chart illustrates CEO Pay and CEO Incentive Cash for Dr. Tewksbury for fiscal 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.
(2)
CEO Total Pay includes base salary and actual cash bonus paid, other compensation paid (zero) and the "in-the-money" value of the equity awards issued during each fiscal year using the closing price of our common stock on March 28, 2013 of $7.47. CEO Total Pay excludes relocation-related expenses. The equity value assumes equity awards are 100% vested upon grant, even though such awards vest over a 4-year period.
(3)
CEO Incentive Cash includes the actual cash bonus paid for each fiscal year.
(4)
Our fiscal year ends on a different day each year because our fiscal year ends at midnight on the Sunday nearest to March 31 of each calendar year. However, for convenience, the TSR and equity calculations in the above chart are based on a March 31 fiscal year end.

Fiscal 2013 Business Highlights

During Fiscal 2013, IDT announced the following business achievements:

The acquisition of NXP's high-speed data converter business and Alvand Technologies, a leading analog IP company specializing in data converters, to expand the Company’s product offering for wireless base stations manufacturers.
The acquisition of Fox Electronics to increase IDT’s product offering, capability and penetration of the $3 billion frequency control end market.
The industry's lowest-power low-distortion diversity mixer for 4G wireless base stations.
Qualcomm selected IDT as its silicon partner to develop an integrated receiver IC for Qualcomm's wireless charging solution.
Intel selected IDT to develop an integrated transmitter and receiver chipset for Intel's wireless charging technology based on resonance technology for deployment in Ultrabooks™, all-in-one (AiO) PCs, smartphones, and standalone chargers.
The industry's lowest-power DDR3 LRDIMM memory buffer and the first capable of operating with transfer speeds up to 1866 megatransfers per second (MT/s).

29



The world's first DDR4 register and temperature sensor that meet the industry's stringent performance requirements. The new products are designed to facilitate the next generation of DRAM modules to enable advancements in server and storage sub-system performance, scalability and power efficiency.
The world's lowest-power PCI Express® timing family.
The industry’s most integrated wireless power transmitter solutions for the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) Tx-A5, Tx-A6, and Tx-A11 configurations.
A new RF digital step attenuator that reduces glitches by up to 95 percent in cellular base station and industrial applications.
The industry’s first low-power dual 16-bit 1.5 GSPS digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with an advanced JESD204B serial interface for multi-carrier broadband wireless applications.
The availability of the industry’s first complete chipset for DDR4 load reduced dual inline memory modules (LRDIMMs).
The divestiture of its smart meter business to Atmel in an all-cash transaction.
The industry’s first dual-mode wireless power receiver IC compatible with both WPC and PMA standards.
The industry’s first intelligent, scalable power management solution with distributed output current capability to meet varying SoC power requirements and overcome thermal limitations.
Intel selected IDT’s PMIC for their next-generation Atom™ SoC for use in micro servers, tablets, netbooks and embedded applications.
The world’s lowest jitter MEMS oscillators with integrated frequency margining capability.

Fiscal 2013 CEO Compensation Actions

For fiscal 2013, the Committee took the following actions with respect to the compensation of our CEO:

We increased our CEO’s individual incentive target from 100% to 115% of base salary, to align target total cash compensation to the 50th percentile of market and make a larger portion of our CEOs total pay dependent on achieving financial and strategic goals.

Based on the achievement of the minimum level of non-GAAP Operating Profit necessary for bonuses to be paid and the CEO's achievement of some significant goals that further our position in the market, including revenue and profitability goals, new product developments, and strategic initiatives to achieve profitability targets, we paid a performance bonus to our CEO in the amount of $34,777, which represents 5% of his target annual incentive compensation award for fiscal 2013.

We granted our CEO a stock option award of 625,000 option shares with a grant date fair value at approximately the 25th- 50th percentile of the competitive market as measured by our peer group. The Committee believes that it is in the best interests of the Company and our stockholders to link this long-term incentive compensation opportunity to the performance of the Company’s common stock, as well as to further our retention objectives.


30



The majority of the direct compensation pay of our NEOs is dependent on performance, and as such is at risk. The following graphs illustrate the compensation elements for our CEO as a percentage of his total direct compensation:

 
CEO 2013 Target Pay Mix
 
    
Pay Elements not at Risk
  Base Salary
20.7
%
   Other Compensation
0.0
%
• Total
20.7
%
 
 
 
 
Pay Elements at Risk
   Target Bonus
23.8
%
  Stock Options
55.4
%
• Total
79.3
%
 
The following graph illustrates how much of the total 79.3% of target pay at risk for fiscal 2013 was realizable by our CEO based on fiscal 2013 performance metrics, as of the end of fiscal 2013. As shown below, of the Target Pay of $2,895,664 our CEO earned $1,697,295.
The stock values used in the following chart are intended to illustrate the targeted "fair value" at grant of the equity award compared to the “in-the-money” value at the end of the fiscal year. This methodology of illustrating stock value is different from the equity portion reported in the Summary Compensation Table, which is calculated using historical stock price data and does not take into account the effect of stock movement on pay after an equity grant is given.
We believe that our executive compensation program appropriately incents and rewards our NEOs and other key personnel in light of the performance of the Company, and that our executive pay aligns well with our overall compensation philosophy of paying for performance.


31



Comparison of CEO 2013 Target Pay vs. Realizable Pay at Fiscal Year End
Target Pay—fiscal 2013 base salary, target cash bonus amount, other compensation paid (zero) and the targeted "fair value" at grant of equity awards. The “fair value” is calculated using the Black-Scholes methodology for stock options. At the time of the CEOs’ fiscal 2013 equity decision, Radford provided a Black-Scholes Value for the options of $2.569 per share.
Realizable Pay—fiscal 2013 actual base salary and actual cash bonus paid, other compensation paid (zero) and the "in-the-money" value of all equity awards issued during fiscal year 2013 using the closing price of our common stock on March 28, 2013 of $7.47. Realizable Pay assumes equity awards are 100% vested upon grant, even though such awards vest 25% on the first anniversary of the grant date with the remainder vesting ratably over 36 months.

32



To provide additional context for the illustration above, the table below outlines key details of each pay item and provides an update as to the amount of target pay that was "realizable" as of March 31, 2013 for each item.

Item
 
Description
 
Update as of March 31, 2013
Stock Options
 
•   TARGET VALUE: $1,605,625
 
•   55.4% of our CEO’s target pay
 
•   To realize any value from this award, our stock price must appreciate from the closing price on the date of grant.
 
•   Awards vest 25% on the first anniversary of the grant date with the remainder vesting monthly thereafter for 36 months.
 
 
•   REALIZABLE VALUE: $1,062,500
 
The 625,000 options granted to our CEO on 5/15/12 were "in-the-money" as of 3/31/13 since the closing price of our common stock on 3/28/13 of $7.47 was above the exercise price of $5.77.
Other Comp
 
•   TARGET VALUE: Not established
 
•   0% of our CEO’s target pay
 
•   Consistent with our emphasis on at risk pay, we only provide executive perquisites in very limited, individual circumstances. NEOs are eligible to participate in benefits programs offered by the Company to its employees generally, on the same terms as all other employees.
 
 
•   REALIZABLE VALUE: $0
 
Our CEO received no other compensation in fiscal 2013.
Cash Bonus
 
•   TARGET VALUE: $690,021
 
•   23.8% of our CEO’s target pay
 
•   No payment unless minimum financial goals are attained.
 
•   Actual payment based on attainment of revenue, operating profit, as well as strategic corporate goals.
 
 
•   REALIZABLE VALUE: $34,777
 
In fiscal 2013, we achieved the minimum level of non-GAAP Operating Profit necessary for bonuses to be paid, but fell short of our target. As a result, our CEO received only ~5% of his target bonus.
Base Salary
 
•   TARGET VALUE: $600,018
 
•   20.7% of our CEO’s target pay
 
•   Intended to compensate our executives for performing their day-to-day responsibilities and to ensure a baseline level of market competitiveness.
 
 
•   REALIZABLE VALUE: $600,018
 
Base salary amounts, once established, are not “at risk” and our CEO’s salary was paid in full during fiscal 2013.
 
 
Fiscal 2013 Corporate Governance Highlights
 
We endeavor to maintain good corporate governance standards in designing and administering our executive compensation policies and practices, as highlighted by the following:

Our change in control agreements with the NEOs contain “double trigger” provisions;
We award long-term incentive compensation to our executive officers in the form of stock options and performance-based restricted stock, which we believe create a significant “pay-for-performance” connection for our executive officers since a significant portion of their net worth is dependent on long-term performance of the market price of the Company's common stock as well as specifically defined financial goals that further our position in the market;
We do not provide excise tax payments or “gross-ups” in the event of a change in control of the Company;
We only provide executive perquisites in very limited, individual circumstances;
We do not currently offer, nor do we have plans to provide, pension arrangements or retirement plans for our employees;
Our option plans specifically preclude the re-pricing of stock options and stock appreciation rights, absent stockholder approval;
We maintain mandatory stock ownership guidelines for our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chairman of the Board and other non-employee directors;

33



For several years, we have separated the roles of Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer; and
The Committee has engaged its own independent compensation consultant that does not provide any services to the Company and has no prior relationship with any of the NEOs.
 
Compensation Philosophy and Objectives
 
Our executive compensation programs are designed to:
provide competitive compensation opportunities that reward, motivate, attract, and retain top talent;
reward performance based upon the actual achievement of annual goals and objectives established by the Committee at the beginning of each fiscal year; and
link the priorities and performance of the executives to the attainment and furtherance of long-term business strategies, and with the interest of stockholders.

The Committee believes that a significant portion of compensation payable to NEOs should be tied directly to the Company's financial performance. Accordingly, the compensation package for our NEOs is designed to fluctuate with the financial performance of the Company as a whole. During years when the Company's performance experiences a downturn, NEO compensation will be lower; likewise, during years where the Company experiences increased revenues and profitability, NEO compensation is designed to increase. The Committee feels this compensation philosophy aligns the interests of our NEOs with that of our stockholders and provides motivation for high performance levels from our NEOs.

In fiscal 2013, important factors driving our Company's financial performance that were identified in the setting and awarding of short-term compensation include:
revenue growth;
improved operating margin;
product sales;
new product development; and
operational excellence.

The Committee identified these priorities for our 2013 incentive program given their importance in driving increased value for our stockholders and because these are areas over which management can exert the greatest amount of control, thus increasing the potential for immediate and long term profitability.

 
Setting Executive Target Compensation
 
During fiscal 2013, the Committee retained Radford, an AON Hewitt Company, as its independent compensation consultant on all matters related to the compensation of NEOs and other senior executives. Radford reports to the Committee and the Committee reviews and evaluates Radford's performance and compensation. Radford does not provide any other consulting services to the Company outside of its compensation consulting services to the Committee. Independent of its consulting services, the Company subscribes to and participates in Radford's Global Sales and Technology Compensation Surveys. Radford provides strategic guidance to the Committee by leveraging its extensive database and significant industry expertise. As requested by the Committee, Radford provided to the Committee and the Committee requested that Radford provide it with comparative market data on industry best practices and data related to our NEOs and senior executives. For the compensation evaluation, in addition to publicly available data for our peers, Radford also relied on its 2012 Radford Global Technology Survey(1).

The Committee used data compiled by Radford to compare our NEOs' compensation with the compensation of executive officers at comparable companies in the semiconductor industry. The Committee, after consultation with management and Radford, established a specific group of peer companies to assist in the assessment of job levels and compensation programs and practices. In defining an appropriate peer group for purposes of comparing compensation data, consideration was given to the following factors:

companies with whom the Company competes for business and executive talent in the semiconductor industry;
companies with revenues generally between $300 million and $1.2 billion reflecting businesses of similar scope and complexity;

(1) The survey encompasses seventeen Peer Group members, public semiconductor/capital equipment companies and public high technology companies all with revenues between $300 million and $1 billion.

 

34



 
companies with market capitalization generally between $500 million and $3 billion reflecting businesses of similar maturity; and
companies with 1,000 to 4,000 employees reflecting a similar organizational complexity and scale.

Based on these factors, the Committee reviewed and revised our list of peers from fiscal year 2012 (“fiscal 2012”). In fiscal 2013 the Committee added Ixys and Monolithic Power and removed Linear Tech and Microchip Technology to help balance our peer group with respect to revenue and market capitalization. Standard Micro was acquired and thus also removed from the peer group. As a result the following companies (collectively, the “Peer Group”) were included in the compensation analysis for fiscal 2013:
Cypress Semiconductor
  
Micrel
  
RF Micro Devices
Cirrus Logic
  
Microsemi
  
Semtech
Fairchild Semiconductor
  
Monolithic Power System
  
Silicon Laboratories
International Rectifier
  
OmniVision Technologies
  
Skyworks Solutions
Intersil
  
PMC-Sierra
  
Triquint
Ixys
  
Power Integrations
  
 
 
At the beginning of fiscal 2013, as requested by the Committee, Radford presented the Committee with Peer Group and broader market survey data related to the compensation of executives holding positions comparable to the positions of each of our NEOs employed by the Company at that time, including data regarding base salaries, performance bonuses and equity awards. In order to assist the Committee with evaluation of our NEOs' compensation packages, 2012 Radford Global Technology Survey data was combined with proxy data, where sufficient proxy data was available, to create a final market average which was used to assess compensation levels. Compensation data for NEOs who report to the CEO are reviewed by the Committee with the CEO and Radford. Data and criteria related to the CEO's compensation, including peer group market data, are reviewed and evaluated only within the Committee and with Radford, and not with the CEO.

Our philosophy is to generally set our NEOs' target pay levels close to the 50th percentile of market, with variations based on experience, operational complexity, strategic impact and scope of position. The following table illustrates the market levels we target for each compensation component.
 
Base Salary
  
Target Total Cash (Base plus
Short-Term Incentives)
  
Long-Term Incentives
  
Total Direct Compensation
50th Percentile
  
50th Percentile
  
50th Percentile
  
50th Percentile
 
Base salaries and target performance bonuses (collectively, “Total Cash Compensation”) are determined upon offer of employment, and then on an annual basis thereafter at the beginning of each fiscal year. The Committee reviews market data provided by Radford for Total Cash Compensation based on the Peer Group and broader market survey data at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles. Total Cash Compensation is considered an important part of the executive compensation package in order to remain competitive in attracting and retaining executive talent. Total Cash Compensation is designed to fluctuate with Company performance. In fiscal years when the Company exhibits superior financial performance, Total Cash Compensation is designed to be above average competitive levels. When financial performance is below the targeted goal for a particular fiscal year, Total Cash Compensation is designed to be below average competitive levels. Both elements of Total Cash Compensation are determined and reviewed against market references, in conjunction with the NEO's experience, performance, internal comparisons, and the position's operational complexity, strategic impact, and scope.

Total Cash Compensation in combination with equity awards (collectively, “Total Direct Compensation”) is also reviewed at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of market based on the Peer Group and broader market survey data provided by Radford. Equity awards are granted to the NEOs shortly after being hired or promoted and generally within approximately six weeks of the beginning of each fiscal year, and are the Company's only form of long-term incentive compensation. Equity awards are determined based on experience, performance, current equity holdings, retention risk, internal comparisons, and the position's operational complexity, strategic impact, and scope in addition to the Peer Group and broader market survey data provided by Radford.

 
Role of CEO in Compensation Decisions
 
The Company’s CEO reviews and evaluates, as applicable, the other NEO's performance, expected future contributions, internal comparisons, and also considers the market survey data provided by Radford in making recommendations to the Committee

35



on the NEOs’ compensation. Any recommendations made by Dr. Tewksbury regarding the base salaries, bonuses and equity awards of the NEOs are subject to the final review and approval of the Committee.
 
Dr. Tewksbury was invited to provide input to the Committee with regard to his own performance, but he did not participate in the Committee’s determination of his proposed compensation, or the Committee’s final recommendation to the Board or the Board’s final determination of his compensation.
 
Individual Elements of NEO Compensation
 
Each NEO is compensated through base salary, a performance bonus, equity awards, and participation in employee benefit plans.
 
Base Salary
 
Base salaries are reviewed and determined annually at the beginning of each fiscal year, based upon the criteria outlined above and a review of the data referred to under “Setting Executive Target Compensation”.
 
At the beginning of fiscal 2013, the CEO proposed and the Committee approved increases in base salary for the NEOs based on consideration of the NEOs' performance, strategic impact and scope of position, and position to market.
 
Radford and the Committee reviewed CEO compensation against the approved peer companies and found that the base salary was at the Company's stated pay philosophy of targeting the 50th percentile. As a result, no base pay increase was given to the CEO in fiscal 2013.
 
The following table lists the 2013 base salary changes for our NEOs, the pay position relative to the Peer Group, and the decision factors for each increase, or lack of increase, as the case may be.
 
Named Executive Officer
 
2013
Base Salary ($)
 
2012
to 2013
Increase
(%)
 
Approximate Position of
 2013 Base Salary to
Peer Group
 
Decision Factors
Dr. Tewksbury
 
600,018
 
 
50th percentile
 
No increase based on competitive market data and fiscal 2013 performance
Mr. Crowley
 
360,506
 
 
50th - 75th percentile
 
No increase based on competitive market data and fiscal 2013 performance
Mr. Naghavi
 
309,026
 
 
50th - 75th percentile
 
No increase based on competitive market data and fiscal 2013 performance
Mr. Montana
 
285,293
 
4.5
 
50th percentile
 
Adjustment to more closely align with 50th percentile to retain competitiveness with market
Mr. Kermarrec
 
309,026
 
8.4
 
50th – 75th percentile
 
Promotional increase to recognize additional responsibilities for our Timing and Synchronization Division, in addition to Wireless Systems

 

36



Performance Bonus
 
During fiscal 2013, the NEOs participated with other eligible employees in the Company's Annual Incentive Plan (“AIP”). The AIP was established to link compensation to financial performance by tying group goals and objectives of participating employees to the Company's profitability. Through the AIP, a portion of an eligible employee's total cash compensation opportunity is directly linked to the annual results of the performance of the group in which the employee works, the Company performance, and the individual's performance.

The primary objectives of the AIP are:

Encourage outstanding performance from individual employees, as well as collaboration and execution of business units and the Company as a whole;
Link a portion of employees' pay to the financial performance of the business; and
Reflect the financial performance of the Company and the value delivered to Stockholders in its funding methodology.

The AIP payout is determined based on the individual bonus target amount, the achievement of specific objectives for the fiscal year, and the plan funding. The AIP's two components, Individual and Group, measure and reward individual and division performance respectively. The weighting of each of these two components depends on the level of responsibility toward divisional versus individual goals, with the highest level of responsibility toward divisional goals having the heaviest weighting of the Group component. The Group component for our NEOs is weighted 100%.

The Group component payout is determined based on the achievement of specific goals that are set at the beginning of the fiscal year, and approved by the Compensation Committee for the CEO. For the other NEOs, the goals are approved by the CEO.

Incentive payments earned under the AIP are paid in cash in two installments. The first installment is paid in November reflecting actual performance over the first two quarters and expected year-end performance for the full fiscal year. The mid-year payout is equivalent to 45% of the estimated annual payout, based on the mid-year analysis of estimated year-end performance. The second installment, the year-end payout, is paid in May which reflects the overall performance for the entire previous fiscal year, after deducting the first installment paid in the previous November. The Company maintains this biannual payment schedule in order to provide continual incentive and reward for employees throughout the year and also to maintain a current assessment of where individual employees, business units and the Company as a whole stand in relation to meeting the goals that have been set for the fiscal year.


Plan Funding

The AIP plan is funded based on Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement levels that are set based on a scale from 25% (threshold) to 200% (maximum). If the Company's actual Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement is below the threshold of 25%, the Annual Incentive Plan is not funded and no bonus is paid to any participant including the NEOs, regardless of individual or group performance. For fiscal 2013 the Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement scale was reviewed and approved by the Committee.

For fiscal 2013, the Committee established the following Non-GAAP Operating Income achievement scale: $34 million - threshold funding equal to 25% of target, and $135 million - target funding equal to 100% of target.  The Non-GAAP Operating Income amounts in the achievement scale include the expense related to the AIP.  

An analysis was made at mid-year of the estimated year-end Non-GAAP Operating Profit Achievement and a mid-year payout was made to participants, because the estimated year-end achievement was above the minimum threshold of 25%. In fiscal 2013 the AIP payout at mid-year was funded based on an estimated year-end Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement of 41%.

The year-end payout is calculated based on the full annual performance less any mid-year payout. The actual non-GAAP Operating Income for fiscal year 2013, including the expense of the AIP, was $38.6 million, which resulted in an achievement level of 32%.

The AIP funding mechanism is designed to fund the Individual Component first, and the Group and Company Components second. To ensure that the Company's AIP payout does not exceed the funded pool, a Funding Factor is applied to the Group component. . The mid-year Funding Factor for fiscal 2013 was 16% based on the estimated year-end Non-GAAP Operating Profit

37



achievement of 49%. The year-end Funding Factor was 0% based on the actual year-end Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement of 32%.

The non-GAAP Operating Income of $38.6 million excludes restructuring-related costs, acquisition and divestiture-related charges, share-based compensation expense, and certain other expenses and benefits which totaled $64.5 million in the Company's fiscal year 2013 GAAP consolidated statements of operations.
 
The following table provides a reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP financial measures.
 
 
Twelve Months
Ended March 31,
2013 (in thousand $)
GAAP Operating Income
$(25,917)
Acquisition Related
 
Amortization of acquisition related intangibles
20,546

Acquisition related legal and consulting fees
12,594

Other acquisition related costs
3,000

Fair market value adjustment to acquired inventory sold
458

Restructuring Related
 
Severance and retention costs
5,522

Facility closure costs
62

Assets impairment
(212
)
Other
 
Stock based compensation expense
13,479

Assets impairment
6,308

Expenses related to stockholder activities
1,614

Compensation expense – deferred compensation plan
1,135

Non-GAAP Operating Income
38,589

 
Individual Incentive Targets
 
Each eligible employee, including the NEOs, is assigned an Individual Incentive Target based on a percentage of annual base salary. This target is established in consideration of the employee's job level, job role, job function, and competitive data provided by Radford, as well as accomplishments within the employee's job level for employees who were employed by the Company at the beginning of the fiscal year.

The Individual Incentive Targets for the NEOs are reviewed annually by the CEO and the Committee. Any adjustment made to the Individual Incentive Target for the NEOs other than the CEO is made at the recommendation of the CEO and is subject to the final review and approval of the Committee. Any adjustment made to the Individual Incentive Target for the CEO is made at the recommendation of the Committee and is subject to the final review and approval of the Board. For fiscal 2013, the CEO recommended and the Committee reviewed and approved a change to the Individual Incentive Target for Arman Naghavi from 55% to 65% of base salary. This change positioned Mr. Naghavi' Incentive Target close to the 75th percentile of market, in recognition of Mr. Naghavi's criticality to the development and growth of our Analog and Power business. The Committee also approved a change to the Individual Incentive Target for our CEO from 100% to 115% of base salary. This change was made to align target total cash with the 50th percentile. While Dr. Tewksbury's base was competitive, his target total cash was at the 25th to 50th percentile. This change positioned Dr. Tewksbury's target total cash at the 50th percentile of market and was entirely limited to his at-risk pay.

Group Achievement

The Committee approved annual goals and objectives for the CEO, and the CEO established annual goals and objectives for the NEOs at the beginning of fiscal 2013. The achievement of these goals was measured at the end of fiscal 2013, and used as a basis for the AIP payout calculation. Our CEOs goal achievement was reviewed and approved by the Committee, and our NEOs achievement was reviewed and approved by the CEO and the Committee at the end of fiscal 2013.

Group goals are established on a scale from 50% (threshold) to 125% (maximum). If the Group achievement is below the threshold of 50%, 0% of that goal is counted toward the final weighted score. The annual goals and objectives and their achievement for the CEO and NEOs are presented in the following tables.

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While the annual goals for each of the NEOs are specific and measurable, at the end of the fiscal year, the CEO may exercise reasonable discretion in changing the group component score due to issues related to quality, cost management, or other unforeseen performance issues. Such discretion could have a direct impact on an NEO's bonus payout.

The following tables list the 2013 goals and objectives for each of our NEOs. Certain targets under the Group Component, which is comprised of internal business-unit performance targets established by the Company, represent confidential information, the disclosure of which would cause competitive harm to the Company. The Group Component targets not disclosed are comprised of specific business-unit level targets that are based on the internal development strategy of the Company. The Company transacts business in the highly competitive semiconductor industry, and disclosure of the forward-looking targets and product-specific business-unit targets would cause substantial economic harm to the Company and, as a result, place the Company in a competitively disadvantageous position.

The specific targets omitted for the individual component are comprised of pre-established, forward-looking targets relating to revenue, cumulative earnings per share and new product development and business-unit level performance. The forward-looking measures are not disclosed in the Company's financial statements or otherwise made available to the public. Instead, the targets are measured based upon internal forecasts made at the time the Compensation Committee evaluates performance. These goals and the related internal forecasts that are used to determine whether the performance target has been achieved, if disclosed, would give competitors insight into the current operational goals of the Company as well as its forecast for future developments. These goals would also provide insight into the Company's overall future strategy, which could be used by competitors to formulate their own strategies.
   
The non-forward looking Group Component targets that the Company has not disclosed are comprised of specific business-unit level targets that are based on the attainment of pre-established revenue, gross margin and product development. Disclosure of these targets would place the Company at a competitive disadvantage by providing competitors with valuable insight into the Company's internal profitability goals, growth strategies and product commercialization and launch objectives at a business-unit level for the coming years. This information would provide competitors insight into the internal goals of the Company's various business units and allow them to more effectively glean specific business unit strategies and adjust their own operational objectives or take other competitive measures, such as modifying the timing of competing product launches or commercialization strategies, or instituting particular sales or marketing programs, in each case which could hinder, delay or frustrate the achievement of the Company's strategic objectives for its business units. Moreover, this competitive advantage would be significantly magnified in this instance, as similar information is not available to the Company regarding its major competitors and such business unit performance is not otherwise made available to the public.

Dr. Theodore L. Tewksbury III (President and Chief Executive Officer)
 
2013 Group Performance Metrics
 
Actual
 
Actual
Score
 
Weight
 
Weighted
Score
Revenue: Grow FY13 revenue to $580M
 
$487.2
 
50%
 
30%
 
15.0%
Profitability: Achieve FY13 non-GAAP operating income of $86.1M
 
$44.4M(1)
 
50%
 
30%
 
15.0%
Grow New Product Revenue in FY13 to $90M from $53M in FY12
 
$86.4M
 
75%
 
10%
 
7.5%
New Product Introductions: Introduce 28 new products
 
27
 
75%
 
10%
 
7.5%
New Product Starts: Launch 32 new projects into design
 
38
 
125%
 
10%
 
12.5%
Strategic Initiatives: Complete planned acquisition and divestiture actions to achieve Op Margin targets
 
partially achieved
 
50%
 
10%
 
5.0%
 
 
Group Achievement Percentage
 
62.5%
 
(1)
A reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP Operating Income is listed under the section “Plan Funding”. Additionally, both the operating profit target and achievement for the CEO excludes the cost of our fiscal 2013 AIP.
 

39



Richard Crowley, Jr ( Sr. Vice President and Chief Financial Officer)
 
2013 Group Performance Metrics
 
Actual
 
Actual Score
 
Weight
 
Weighted
Score
Revenue: Grow FY13 revenue to $580M
 
$487.2M
 
50.0%
 
25.0%
 
12.5%
Profitability: Achieve FY13 non-GAAP operating profit of $86.1M
 
$44.4M(1)
 
50.0%
 
25.0%
 
12.5%
Strategic Initiatives:
Complete planned acquisition and divestiture actions to achieve Op Margin targets
Manage integration of acquired businesses or transition of divested businesses
 
partially achieved
 
68.8%
 
20.0%
 
13.8%
New Product Introduction/Innovation:
Develop process and systems for business portfolio management and decision making
Implement centralized New Product Introductions tracking system
Align new product business cases to 90% confidence level
Implement engineering compute farm upgrades at major design sites
 
partially achieved
 
95.0%
 
5.0%
 
4.8%
Capital Structure & Shareholder Value Creation:
Extend TECS financing arrangement
Add sell side coverage by a top tier investment bank
Execute financing contracts and funding to support M&A and general corporate requirements
Execute share repurchase
Conduct perception study to obtain investors' and sell side analysts' current views on pre-determined areas, such as company strategy, financial metrics used to value company, management credibility, investor messaging, etc.
 
partially achieved
 
80.0%
 
5.0%
 
4.0%
Profitability and productivity:
Manage operating expense to annual operating plan
Execute cost reductions to achieve spending budget targets
Insource FAS123R tax accounting to reduce legal spending
Implement new costing in SAP to enable gross margin reports by product line, roll-forward reports to reconcile device inventory quantities, yield loss, etc.
Evaluate and recommend opportunities to improve FY13 profitability
 
partially achieved
 
83.3%
 
10.0%
 
8.3%
Information Technology:
Complete several business application software upgrade projects
Implement several specified new IT business systems applications and enhancements
Complete Business Intelligence reporting tool enhancements
 
achieved
 
100.0%
 
10.0%
 
10.0%
 
 
Group Achievement Percentage
 
65.8%
 
(1)
A reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP Operating Income is listed under the section “Plan Funding”. Additionally, both the operating profit target and achievement for the CFO excludes the cost of our fiscal 2013 AIP.


40



Arman Naghavi (Vice President and General Manager,Analog and Power Division)
 
2013 Group Performance Metrics
 
Actual
 
Actual
Score
 
Weight
 
Weighted
Score
Revenue: Achieve Revenue Target for Analog and Power Division
 
partially achieved
 
75.0%
 
15.0%
 
11.3%
Profitability: Achieve Operating Income Target for Analog and Power Division
 
exceeded
 
125.0%
 
15.0%
 
18.8%
Win 4 Strategic Design Wins
 
4
 
100.0%
 
20.0%
 
20.0%
New Product Introductions: Introduce 15 new products
 
13
 
75.0%
 
15.0%
 
11.3%
New Product Starts: Launch 14 new projects into design
 
17
 
125.0%
 
15.0%
 
18.8%
Strategic Initiatives: Achieve targeted key development milestones to enhance product portfolio and drive higher revenues
 
partially achieved
 
90.0%
 
10.0%
 
9.0%
Improve Product Quality, measured through Customer Quality Index (meet target quality issues reported by customer)
 
exceeded
 
125.0%
 
10.0%
 
12.5%
 
 
Group Achievement Percentage
 
101.5
%
 
Mario Montana (Vice President, Enterprise Computing Division)
 
2013 Group Performance Metrics
 
Actual
 
Actual
Score
 
Weight
 
Weighted
Score
Revenue: Achieve Revenue Target for the Enterprise and Computing Division
 
not achieved
 
—%
 
15.0%
 
—%
Profitability: Achieve Operating Income Target for Enterprise and Computing Division
 
not achieved
 
—%
 
15.0%
 
—%
Win 4 Strategic Design Wins
 
4
 
100.0%
 
20.0%
 
20.0%
New Product Introductions: Introduce 4 new products
 
4
 
100.0%
 
15.0%
 
15.0%
New Product Starts: Launch 4 new projects into design
 
4
 
100.0%
 
15.0%
 
15.0%
Strategic Initiatives: Achieve targeted key development milestones to enhance product portfolio and drive higher revenues
 
achieved
 
100.0%
 
10.0%
 
10.0%
Improve Product Quality, measured through Customer Quality Index (meet target quality issues reported by customer)
 
exceeded
 
125.0%
 
10.0%
 
12.5%
 
 
Group Achievement Percentage
 
72.5%
 
Christian Kermarrec (Vice President and General Manager, Timing and Synchronization Division and Wireless Systems)
 
2013 Group Performance Metrics
 
Actual
 
Actual
Score
 
Weight
 
Weighted
Score
Revenue: Achieve Revenue Target for Timing and Synchronization Division
 
partially achieved
 
50.0%
 
15.0%
 
7.5%
Profitability: Achieve Operating Income Target for Timing and Synchronization Division
 
partially achieved
 
75.0%
 
15.0%
 
11.3%
Win 4 Strategic Design Wins
 
2
 
50.0%
 
20.0%
 
10.0%
New Product Introductions: Introduce 9 new products
 
3
 
—%
 
15.0%
 
—%
New Product Starts: Launch 9 new projects into design
 
8
 
75.0%
 
15.0%
 
11.3%
Strategic Initiatives: Achieve targeted key development milestones to enhance product portfolio and drive higher revenues
 
achieved
 
100.0%
 
10.0%
 
10.0%
Improve Product Quality, measured through Customer Quality Index (meet target quality issues reported by customer)
 
exceeded
 
125.0%
 
10.0%
 
12.5%
 
 
Group Achievement Percentage
 
62.5%
 

41



Calculation of Performance Bonus
 
The AIP payout for each NEO is calculated based on each NEO's fiscal 2013 base earnings, individual incentive target, Group achievement, and AIP funding, using the following calculation.
 
Mid-Year Payment
Mid-Year 2013 Award =
Estimated Fiscal 2013 Base Earnings x Individual Incentive Target x Estimated Fiscal 2013 Group Achievement x Estimated Fiscal 2013 Funding Factor

Year-End Payment
Year-End 2013 Award =
(Actual Fiscal 2013 Base Earnings x Individual Incentive Target x Actual Fiscal 2013 Group Achievement x Actual
Fiscal 2013 Funding Factor) - Mid Year 2013 Award

Group goals require a 50% achievement each to count toward the final weighted score. No awards are paid out if the plan is not at least funded at 25% of our Target Non-GAAP Operating Profit. Target awards are set at levels difficult to attain, as a means of continually managing our organization to performance above previous years. None of the NEOs earned full bonus awards in fiscal 2013 commensurate with achievement of 100% target performance levels under our AIP. Maximum award targets reflect very ambitious goals, which can only be attained when business results are exceptional, thus justifying higher award payments. To date, none of the NEOs have earned a bonus award based on an achievement of maximum performance levels under our AIP.

The Compensation Committee has approved the following achievements and AIP payouts for fiscal 2013.
 
Performance Bonus Payments Earned in Fiscal 2013
 
Performance Bonus Threshold, Target, Maximum, and Actual Payment
NEO
 
FY2013 Target
Award (% of
Base Earnings)
 
FY2013
Payment
Threshold
Award
($)(1)
 
FY2013
Payment Target
Award ($)(2)
 
FY2013 Payment
Maximum
Award
($)(3)
 
FY2013 Actual
Award ($)
Dr. Tewksbury
 
115
 
 
690,021
 
1,714,701
 
34,777
Mr. Crowley
 
70
 
 
252,354
 
627,100
 
13,809
Mr. Naghavi
 
65
 
 
200,867
 
499,154
 
13,450
Mr. Montana
 
55
 
 
155,871
 
387,339
 
8,754
Mr. Kermarrec
 
55
 
 
160,496
 
398,831
 
9,519
 
Mid-Year 2013 Bonus Payment
NEO
 
Estimated FY2013
Target Award
($)
 
Estimated FY2013 Group
Achievement
(%)
 
Estimated FY2013 Funding
Factor (%)
 
FY2013 Mid-Year Award ($)
 
Percent of
Target
(%)
Dr. Tewksbury
 
690,021

 
70
 
16
 
34,777
 
5
Mr. Crowley
 
252,354

 
76
 
16
 
13,809
 
5
Mr. Naghavi
 
200,867

 
93
 
16
 
13,450
 
7
Mr. Montana
 
155,871

 
78
 
16
 
8,754
 
6
Mr. Kermarrec
 
153,737

(4) 
86
 
16
 
9,519
 
6


42



Year-End 2013 Bonus Payment
NEO
 
Actual FY2013
Target Award
($)
 
Estimated FY2013 Group
Achievement
(%)
 
Estimated FY2013 Funding
Factor (%)
 
FY2013
Year-End Award
($)
 
Percent of
Target
(%)
Dr. Tewksbury
 
690,021
 
63
 
 
 
Mr. Crowley
 
252,354
 
66
 
 
 
Mr. Naghavi
 
200,867
 
102
 
 
 
Mr. Montana
 
155,871
 
73
 
 
 
Mr. Kermarrec
 
160,496
 
63
 
 
 
 
(1)
The AIP funding threshold is 25% of actual Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement. At threshold funding levels employees who have an Individual components to their AIP target may receive a payment for Individual performance. The NEOs do not have an Individual component, and, as a result, will receive no payment at the threshold funding level.
(2)
The payment target award is calculated using the NEO's Actual Fiscal 2013 Base Earnings.
(3)
The amounts reported in the Maximum column represent the maximum payment level at 125% group performance and 200% funding based on the maximum achievement of non-GAAP Operating Profit. As the AIP funding mechanism is designed to fund the Individual component first, and the Group and Company Components second, the funding multiplier (Funding Factor as explained in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” under “Plan Funding”) is dependent upon the company's AIP eligible employee population. For purposes of disclosing the Maximum Payouts under this section, we calculated maximum funding based on the eligible employee population for our fiscal 2013 year-end payout, which would result in a Funding Factor of 198.8%.
(4)
Mr. Kermarrec's Estimated Fiscal 2013 Target Award was determined prior to his promotion and salary increase.
 

Equity Awards for the NEOs in Fiscal 2013
 
Equity awards are reviewed and determined annually at the beginning of each fiscal year, based upon the criteria outlined above and a review of the data referred to under “Setting Executive Target Compensation”.
 
The equity compensation for the NEOs in fiscal 2013 was granted in stock options and performance stock units (with exception of the CEO whose equity award was awarded in 100% stock options).

Stock Options

The emphasis on stock options at the upper levels of the Company is intended to place more of the executive's total compensation at risk and dependent upon the Company's stock performance, because all stock options are granted with an exercise price equal to the “fair market” value on the date of grant and as such, only have value if our stock price increases, thus ensuring a strong alignment with stockholders.

Stock options generally expire seven years after the date of the grant. Our option plans specifically preclude the re-pricing of stock options and stock appreciation rights, absent stockholder approval. Stock options granted by the Company have an exercise price equal to the closing price of our stock on the last trading day before the grant date and typically vest over a four-year period based upon continued employment, with 25% vesting on the first anniversary of the grant date and the remainder vesting monthly thereafter for the remaining 36 months.


43



The following table sets forth a comparison to benchmark data of the equity award for each NEO, and the factors considered by the Committee in determining the respective award amounts.
Name
 
FY2013 Option
Award
(# of Shares)
 
FY2013  Option
Award
(in thousands $)(1)
 
Approximate Position of Equity Award to Peer Group(2)
 
Decision Factors
Dr. Tewksbury
 
625,000
 
$1,606
 
25th - 50th percentile
 
Competitive market data
Mr. Crowley
 
175,000
 
$450
 
50th percentile
 
Competitive market data
Mr. Naghavi
 
175,000
 
$450
 
50th - 75th percentile
 
Competitive market data, strategic importance to the company
Mr. Montana
 
130,000
 
$334
 
50th percentile
 
Competitive market data
Mr. Kermarrec
 
125,000
 
$321
 
50th percentile
 
Competitive market data
 
(1)
The Long-Term Incentive Value is calculated using the Black-Scholes methodology for stock options and a 30-Day average Stock Price for restricted stock. At the time of the equity decisions, Radford provided the company a Black-Scholes Value of $2.569 and a 30-Day Average Stock Price of $7.00.
(2)
Peer Group Long-Term Incentive Value is measured using the Black-Scholes methodology for options and face value on the grant date for restricted stock.


Performance Stock Units

Each of our NEOs, with the exception the CEO, received a performance stock unit grant as part of an Executive Retention Plan (the “Retention Plan”), The Compensation Committee believed that historically low bonus payments which were dependent on achieving stretch goal operating margins, presented a retention risk for our NEOs. The Retention Plan ties a portion of the NEOs' equity to performance requirements in line with our business strategy to meet specific operating martin goals and to outpace our peers' revenue growth in fiscal 2014. The performance period under the Retention Plan is the Company's fiscal year 2014 for which performance goals related to the Company's annual non-GAAP operating margin and revenue growth relative to our proxy peer group, weighted 60% and 40%, respectively, were established by the Committee. The number of shares of Company common stock issuable upon vesting of the performance stock units is dependent on the level of performance achievement and ranges from 0% to 150% of the target performance stock unit grant.

The Committee approved the following grants of performance stock units to the NEOs listed in the table below for the fiscal year 2014 performance period. The Committee will assess performance under the fiscal year 2014 performance period following the completion of the performance period. Any shares of Company common stock earned by performance stock unit holders will vest and be issued in two equal installments, the first on the date the Committee determines the achievement of the performance goals and the second on the first anniversary of such determination.
NEO
 
Number of Target Performance Stock Units
Dr. Tewksbury
 
Mr. Crowley
 
25,000
Mr. Naghavi
 
24,444
Mr. Montana
 
15,000
Mr. Kermarrec
 
15,000

Performance Stock Units will be part of equity mix for the CEO and Senior Executives going forward. Additional information on the equity awards granted to the NEOs during fiscal 2013 is set forth in the “Grants of Plan Based Awards for Fiscal Year 2013” table.



44



Retirement and Other Benefits
 
Section 401(k) Plan. The Company offers the NEOs the opportunity to participate in its Section 401(k) plan. NEOs participate under the same plan provisions as all other employees. Participating NEOs may contribute up to 75% of their eligible compensation as a pre-tax or Roth after-tax contribution to a maximum of $17,000 in calendar year 2012. Currently, key provisions of the plan include a Company match of $0.50 per $1.00 of the employee’s contributions up to 6% of base salary, with maximum calendar year contributions from the Company capped at $6,000 per employee. This matching practice is viewed by the Company as consistent with industry norms and required to provide a total compensation plan that is competitive with other high technology and semiconductor companies. The Company’s contributions vest over four years and if an employee terminates his or her employment prior to four years, the Company’s contributions will be prorated according to the number of years worked.
 
Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan. The Company maintains an unfunded non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan eligible to provide benefits to director level employees and above. Under this plan, participants can defer up to 100% of their regular salaries, bonuses or other compensation such as commissions or special awards. Participants can select from among 20 different investment options from which their earnings are measured. A participant is credited with the return of the underlying investment option and there is currently no matching of contributions by the Company. A participant may invest in any one or more of the following investment alternatives and may change his or her investment selections at any time: Vanguard Mid Cap Index Inv, Dreyfus Small Cap Stock Index, 1st Eagle Overseas, Royce Micro-cap Inv, Vanguard Windsor II Inv, VIP Freedom 2010, VIP Freedom 2015, VIP Freedom 2020, VIP Freedom 2025, VIP Freedom 2030, VIP II Contrafund, VIP II Index 500, VIP III Mid Cap, VIP International Capital Appreciation, VIP Real Estate, Pimco Real Return BD, Pimco Total Return, VIP Freedom Income, VIP High Income, or Fidelity Retirement Money Market. Participant balances are always 100% vested. Additionally, the Company has set aside assets in a separate trust designed to meet the obligations under the plan. The trust assets are invested in a manner that is intended to offset the investment performance of the funds selected by the participants. The deferral accounts are distributed following a participant’s termination of employment with the Company, unless the participant has elected an in-service withdrawal (scheduled or hardship withdrawal). Generally, distributions are made in a lump sum payment; however, in the event of a distribution due to retirement, a participant may elect a single lump sum distribution or annual installment distributions paid over two to 15 years. The Committee believes this plan is an important vehicle that allows plan participants to reach their retirement objectives over the long term. No NEO participated in the non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan in fiscal 2013.
 
Employee Stock Purchase Plan. The Company maintains an Employee Stock Purchase Plan that was approved by stockholders at the Company’s 2009 Annual Meeting. NEOs participate under the same plan provisions as all other eligible employees. Under the plan, eligible employees can purchase Company stock on the last day of each designated three-month purchase period. The per share purchase price is the lesser of 85% of the fair market value of the stock on the first day of the three-month purchase period or 85% of the fair market value of the stock on the last day of the three-month purchase period. The maximum number of shares of stock which may be purchased is 2,500 shares per purchase period. During fiscal 2013, Messrs. Crowley, Naghavi, and Montana participated in the Employee Stock Purchase Plan. Messrs. Kermarrec and Tewksbury did not participate in the Employee Stock Purchase Plan at any time during fiscal 2013.
 
Other Benefits. The NEOs are eligible to participate in all other benefits programs offered by the Company to its employees generally, on the same terms as all other employees. These programs include, but are not limited to, group medical, group dental, basic life insurance, supplemental life insurance, long-term disability insurance, relocation expense reimbursement, and other such benefits programs.
 
Change of Control Agreements
 
The Board recognizes that from time to time it is possible that another entity may consider acquiring the Company or a change in control might otherwise occur, with or without the approval of the Board. The Board has determined that it is in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders to assure that the Company will have the continued dedication and objectivity of the CEO and each NEO, notwithstanding the possibility, threat, or occurrence of a change of control. Therefore, the Company has entered into a Change of Control Agreement with the CEO and each of the other NEOs. See the discussion below under “Executive Compensation—Severance and Change of Control Benefits.”
 
Deductibility of Executive Compensation
 
Section 162(m) of the Code (“Section 162(m)”) generally provides that publicly held corporations may not deduct in any taxable year certain compensation in excess of $1 million paid to certain executive officers. The Company believes that its stock option related compensation generally satisfies the requirements for deductibility under Section 162(m). However, the Committee considers one of its primary responsibilities to provide a compensation program that will attract, retain, and reward executive talent necessary to maximize stockholder returns. Accordingly, the Committee believes that the Company’s interests are best served in

45



some circumstances by providing compensation (such as salary, incentive compensation, perquisites, restricted stock and restricted stock unit awards) which might be subject to the tax deductibility limitation of Section 162(m).
 
Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation in Compensation Decisions
 
During fiscal 2013, the members of the Committee were all non-employee directors of the Company and have not at any time been officers or employees of the Company. No interlocking relationship exists between the Board of Directors or the Compensation Committee and the board of directors or compensation committee of any other company, nor did any such interlocking relationship exist during fiscal 2013.
 
Recoupment Policy
 
In accordance with the AIP, in the event of a restatement of the Company’s earnings due to material noncompliance with any financial reporting requirement under the U. S. securities laws, the Company is entitled to and shall recoup the difference between incentive-based compensation paid to all current executive officers who received incentive-based compensation under the AIP during the three years preceding the restatement, which incentive payments were paid on the basis of erroneous data, and the amount of incentive-based compensation that would have been paid based on the corrected data. This provision of the AIP may be amended by the Compensation Committee at any time to comply with any rules promulgated by the SEC.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
The following table discloses the compensation information for the Company's Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, the Company's three other most highly compensated executive officers who were serving as executive officers as of the end of fiscal 2013 (together, the “Named Executive Officers” or “NEOs”). This information includes the dollar value of base salaries, stock option, restricted stock unit and performance stock unit awards, bonus payments, and certain other compensation, if any, whether paid or deferred. The Company did not grant stock appreciation rights and has no long-term compensation benefits other than stock options, restricted stock units and performance stock units. No disclosure is provided for 2011 or 2012 for those persons who were not named executive officers in 2011 and 2012.
 

46



Summary Compensation Table for Fiscal 2013
Name and Principal Position
 
Fiscal
Year
 
Salary
($)(1)
 
Bonus
($)
 
Stock
Awards
($)(2)
 
Option
Awards
($)(3)
 
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)(4)
 
Change in
Pension
Value and
Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
 
All Other
Compensation
($)(5)
 
Total
($)
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
 
2013
 
600,018
 
 
 
1,377,801
 
34,777
 
 
 
2,012,596
President and Chief Executive Officer
 
2012
 
596,171
 
 
 
1,756,289
 
83,005
 
 
 
2,435,465
2011
 
582,708
 
 
431,250
 
644,620
 
329,871
 
 
5,845
 
1,994,294
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
 
2013
 
360,506
 
 
187,500
 
385,784
 
13,809
 
 
6,000
 
953,599

Sr. Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
 
2012
 
358,890
 
 
 
534,523
 
55,922
 
 
5,556
 
954,891
2011
 
358,655
 
 
143,750
 
214,874
 
167,230
 
 
5,785
 
890,294
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Arman Naghavi
 
2013
 
314,968
 
 
183,330
 
385,784
 
13,450
 
 
6,416
 
903,948

Vice President and General Manager, Analog and Power Division
 
2012
 
307,640
 
 
 
473,435
 
32,335
 
 
6,452
 
819,862
2011
 
308,670
 
 
143,750
 
161,155
 
114,781
 
 
4,294
 
732,650
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mario Montana(6)
 
2013
 
283,402
 
 
112,500
 
286,583
 
8,754
 
 
5,091
 
696,330

Vice President, Enterprise Computing Division
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Christian Kermarrec (6)
 
2013
 
291,810
 
 
112,500
 
272,883
 
9,519
 
 
6,915
 
693,627
Vice President and General Manager, Timing and Synchronization Division and Wireless Systems
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
The amounts reported represent total base salary paid for the covered fiscal year and are inclusive of any amounts deferred in the covered fiscal year under the Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plan.
(2)
Stock awards consist of restricted stock unit awards and performance stock unit awards granted under the 2004 Equity Plan. The amounts reported represent the grant date fair value of restricted stock unit awards and performance stock unit awards granted during the covered fiscal year calculated in accordance with ASC Topic 718. For a detailed discussion of the assumptions used to calculate the value of the restricted stock unit awards and performance stock unit awards, please refer to Note 9 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2013. The table below sets forth the grant date fair value determined in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 principles (i) based upon the probable outcome of the performance stock unit awards and (ii) based upon achieving the maximum level of performance as of the grant date. The actual value, if any, that an NEO may realize from an award is contingent upon the satisfaction of the conditions to vesting in that award and there is no assurance that the value, if any, eventually realized by the NEO will correspond to the amount reported. The Company did not grant restricted stock units to our NEOs in 2012 or 2013. The Company granted performance stock units to our NEOs, except Dr. Tewksbury, in 2013.

47



Named Executive Officer
Grant Date
Probable Outcome of Performance Conditions Grant Date Fair Value ($)
Maximum Outcome of Performance Conditions Grant Date Fair Value ($)
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
1/15/2013
187,500
281,250
Arman Naghavi
1/15/2013
183,330
274,995
Mario Montana
1/15/2013
112,500
168,750
Christian Kermarrec
1/15/2013
112,500
168,750

(3)
The amounts reported represent the grant date fair value of stock options granted during the covered fiscal year calculated in accordance with ASC Topic 718. For a detailed discussion of the assumptions and estimates used to calculate the value of the option awards, please refer to Note 9 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 filed with the SEC on May 29, 2013. The actual value, if any, that an NEO may realize from a stock option is contingent upon the satisfaction of the conditions to vesting in the option and upon the excess of the market price of the Company's common stock over the exercise price, if any, on the date of exercise and there is no assurance that the value, if any, eventually realized by the NEO will correspond to the amount reported.
(4)
The amounts reported represent total bonus payments earned under our Annual Incentive Plan for the covered fiscal year. See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Individual Elements of NEO Compensation-Performance Bonus” in this Proxy Statement for a more complete description of the amounts earned.
(5)
The amounts reported include the following: the Company's matching contributions to the individual Section 401(k) accounts of the NEOs and a cash out of unused vacation for Mr. Naghavi.
(6)
Mr. Montana and Mr. Kermarrec received mid-year base salary adjustments.

 
Grants of Plan-Based Awards for Fiscal 2013
 
The following table shows all plan-based awards granted to the NEOs in fiscal 2013. The equity awards identified in the table below are also reported in the table “Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End for 2013,” below. The amounts reported for the non-equity awards identified below are the threshold, target, and maximum amounts payable under the AIP that could have been earned in fiscal 2013. For additional information regarding plan-based awards to our NEOs, see “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” above.
 

48



Name
Grant Date
 
Estimated Future Payouts
Under Non-Equity Incentive
Plan Awards(1)
 
 
Estimated Future Payouts
Under Equity Incentive
Plan Awards(8)
 
All
Other
Stock
Awards:
Number
of
Shares
of Stock
or Units
(#)(5)
 
All Other
Option
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Options
(#)(5)
 
Exercise
or Base
Price of
Option
Awards
($/
Share)(6)
 
Closing
Market
Price
on
Date of
Grant
($/
Share)
 
Grant
Date Fair
Value of
Stock
and
Option
Awards
($)(7)
Threshold
($)(2)
 
Target
($)(3)
 
Maximum
($)(4)
 
Threshold
(#)
 
Target
(#)
 
Maximum
(#)
 
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
5/15/2012
 
 
690,021

 
1,714,701

 
 
 
 
 
 
625,000

 
5.77

 
5.73

 
1,377,801

Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
5/15/2012
 
 
252,354

 
627,100

 
 
 
 
 
 
175,000

 
5.77

 
5.73

 
385,784

 
1/15/2013
 
 

 

 
 
25,000
 
37,500
 
 
 

 
 
 
187,500

Arman Naghavi
5/15/2012
 
 
200,867

 
499,154

 
 
 
 
 
 
175,000

 
5.77

 
5.73

 
385,784

 
1/15/2013
 
 

 

 
 
24,444

 
36,666

 
 
 

 

 

 
183,330

Mario Montana
5/15/2012
 
 
155,871

 
387,339

 
 
 
 
 
 
130,000

 
5.77

 
5.73

 
286,583

 
1/15/2013
 
 

 

 
 
15,000

 
22,500

 
 
 

 

 

 
112,500

Christian Kermarrec
5/15/2012
 
 
160,496

 
398,831

 
 
 
 
 
 
75,000

 
5.77
 
5.73

 
162,876

 
10/15/2012
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
50,000

 
5.59
 
5.84
 
110,007

 
1/15/2013
 
 

 

 
 
15,000
 
22,500
 
 
 

 
 

 
112,500

 
(1)
Amounts represent the Annual Incentive Plan (AIP) award that is dependent on actual funding based on the corporate performance measure of non-GAAP Operating Profit, and the achievement of actual results against pre-established group goals. The actual payout amounts under the plan for fiscal year 2013 are included in the “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation” column of the “Summary Compensation Table.”
(2)
The AIP funding threshold is 25% of actual Non-GAAP Operating Profit achievement. At threshold funding levels, employees who have an Individual Component to their AIP target may receive a payment for Individual performance. The NEOs do not have an Individual component to their AIP target, and, as a result, will receive no payment at the threshold funding level.
(3)
The amounts reported in the Target column represent the target payment level at 100% group performance and 100% funding based on the target achievement of non-GAAP Operating Profit.
(4)
The amounts reported in the Maximum column represent the maximum payment level at 125% group performance and 200% funding based on the maximum achievement of non-GAAP Operating Profit. As the AIP funding mechanism is designed to fund the Individual component first, and the Group and Company Components second, the funding multiplier (Funding Factor as explained in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” under “Plan Funding”) is dependent upon the company's AIP eligible employee population. For purposes of disclosing the Maximum Payouts in this table, we calculated maximum funding based on the eligible employee population for our fiscal 2013 year-end payout, which would result in a Funding Factor of 198.8%.
(5)
The amounts reported are for stock options granted under the Company's 2004 Equity Plan. Each stock option expires seven years from the date of grant. Each stock option vests 25% on the first anniversary of the grant date, or in the case of new-hire grants, on the anniversary of the hire date, and monthly thereafter over the remaining three years until fully vested at the end of four years.

49



(6)
For purposes of determining the exercise price of the stock options granted under the Company's stock option plans, the fair market value on the date of grant is defined as the closing market price of the Company's common stock reported by the NASDAQ on the trading day immediately preceding the date of grant.
(7)
These amounts reported represent the grant date fair value of the equity awards computed in accordance with ASC Topic 718. For a detailed discussion of our grant date fair value calculation methodology, including related assumptions and estimates, please refer to Note 9 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, filed with the SEC on May 29, 2013.
(8)
Amounts represent performance stock unit awards granted pursuant to the Retention Plan. The target number of shares was granted; the “threshold” number of shares shown is 0% of the target number of shares, representing the lowest possible amount of vesting under the plan. The “maximum” number of shares shown is 150% of target number of shares. Please see the section “Compensation Discussion and Analysis-Equity Awards for the NEOs in Fiscal 2013-Performance Stock Units” for a detailed discussion of the performance stock unit awards.
 
Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table and Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table:
 
See “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” in this Proxy Statement for a more complete description of the amounts earned or awards granted, as well as an explanation of the amount of salary and bonus in proportion to the total compensation for each NEO.

50




Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal 2013 Year-End
 
 
 
 
OPTION AWARDS
 
STOCK AWARDS
Name
(a)
 
Grant Date
or Vesting
Commence-
ment Date
(b)(1)
 
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Exercisable
(c)
 
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
Unexercisable
(d)(1)
 
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Unearned
Options (#)
(e)
 
Option
Exercise
Price
(f)
 
Option
Expiration
Date
(g)
 
Numbers
of Shares
or Units
of Stock
That
Have Not
Vested
(#)
(h)(2)
 
Market
Value of
Shares
or Units
of Stock
That
Have Not
Vested
($)
(i)(3)
 
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number
of
Unearned
Shares,
Units or
Other
Rights
That
Have Not
Vested
(#)(j)(4)
 
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Market
or Payout
Value of
Unearned
Shares,
Units or
Other
Rights
That
Have Not
Vested
($)(k)(3)
Theodore L. Tewksbury III, Ph.D.
 
4/15/2008
 
500,000

 

 
 
 
9.25

  
4/15/2015
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/15/2009
 
287,500

 
12,500

 
 
 
5.05

  
5/15/2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/17/2010
 
212,500

 
87,500

 
 
 
5.75

  
5/17/2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/16/2011
 
263,541

 
311,459

 
 
 
8.49

  
5/16/2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/15/2012
 

 
625,000

 
 
 
5.77

 
5/15/2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/15/2009
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6,250

 
46,687

 
 
 
 
 
 
5/17/2010
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
37,500

 
280,125

 
 
 
 
Richard D. Crowley, Jr.
 
11/17/2008
 
200,000

 

 
 
 
5.14

  
11/17/2015
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/15/2009
 
34,500

 
1,500

 
 
 
5.05

  
5/15/2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/17/2010
 
70,833

 
29,167

 
 
 
5.75

  
5/17/2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/16/2011
 
80,208

 
94,792