10-K 1 a2012_form10-kxdraft.htm THE HERSHEY COMPANY FORM 10-K 2012_Form10-K_DRAFT

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
                                                                  
FORM 10-K
                                                                  
x    Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012
OR
¨
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from to
Commission File Number 1-183
                                                                 
THE HERSHEY COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
23-0691590
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
100 Crystal A Drive, Hershey, PA
17033
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (717) 534-4200
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, one dollar par value
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Title of class
Class B Common Stock, one dollar par value
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)
        Large accelerated filer  x                                                                                Accelerated filer ¨
        Non-accelerated filer ¨                                                                                                        Smaller reporting company ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes  ¨    No  x
State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.
Common Stock, one dollar par value—$10,983,764,663 as of June 29, 2012.
Class B Common Stock, one dollar par value—$1,289,697 as of June 29, 2012. While the Class B Common Stock is not listed for public trading on any exchange or market system, shares of that class are convertible into shares of Common Stock at any time on a share-for-share basis. The market value indicated is calculated based on the closing price of the Common Stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 29, 2012.
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date.
Common Stock, one dollar par value—163,458,859 shares, as of February 6, 2013.
Class B Common Stock, one dollar par value—60,628,737 shares, as of February 6, 2013.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Company’s Proxy Statement for the Company’s 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.




PART I
Item 1.
BUSINESS
The Hershey Company was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on October 24, 1927 as a successor to a business founded in 1894 by Milton S. Hershey. In this report, the terms “Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our” mean The Hershey Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries and entities in which it has a controlling financial interest, unless the context indicates otherwise.
We are the largest producer of quality chocolate in North America and a global leader in chocolate and sugar confectionery. Our principal product groups include chocolate and sugar confectionery products; pantry items, such as baking ingredients, toppings and beverages; and gum and mint refreshment products.
Reportable Segment
We operate as a single reportable segment in manufacturing, marketing, selling and distributing our products under more than 80 brand names. Our three operating segments comprise geographic regions including the United States, the Americas, and Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Africa (“AEMEA”). We market our products in approximately 70 countries worldwide.
For segment reporting purposes, we aggregate our operations in the United States and in the Americas, which includes Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Central and South America, Puerto Rico and our exports business in this region. We base this aggregation on similar economic characteristics; products and services; production processes; types or classes of customers; distribution methods; and the similar nature of the regulatory environment in each location. We aggregate our AEMEA operations with the United States and the Americas to form one reportable segment. Our AEMEA operations share most of the aggregation criteria and represent less than 10% of our consolidated revenues, operating profits and assets.
Organization
We operate under a matrix reporting structure designed to ensure continued focus on North America and on continuing our transformation into a more global company. Our business is organized around geographic regions and strategic business units. It is designed to enable us to build processes for repeatable success in our global markets.
Our geographic regions are accountable for delivering our annual financial plans. The key regions are:
Ÿ
The United States;
Ÿ
The Americas, including Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Central and South America, Puerto Rico and exports to this region; and
Ÿ
AEMEA, including Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and exports to these geographical areas.
In addition, The Hershey Experience manages our retail operations globally, including Hershey’s Chocolate World Stores in Hershey, Pennsylvania, New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, Shanghai, Niagara Falls (Ontario), Dubai, and Singapore.
Our two strategic business units are the chocolate business unit and the sweets and refreshment business unit. These strategic business units focus on certain components of our product line and are responsible for building and leveraging the Company’s global brands, and disseminating best demonstrated practices around the world.
Business Acquisition
In January 2012, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of Brookside Foods Ltd. (“Brookside”), a privately held confectionery company based in Abbottsford, British Columbia, Canada. As part of this transaction, we acquired two production facilities located in British Columbia and Quebec. The Brookside product line is primarily sold in the U.S. and Canada in a take home re-sealable pack type. At the time of the acquisition, annual net sales of the business were approximately $90 million. The business complements our position in North America and we are making investments in manufacturing capabilities and conducting market research that will enable future growth.

1


Products
United States
The primary products we sell in the United States include the following:
Under the HERSHEY’S brand franchise:
 
HERSHEY’S milk chocolate bar
HERSHEY’S BLISS chocolates
HERSHEY’S milk chocolate with almonds bar
HERSHEY’S COOKIES ‘N’ CRÈME candy bar
HERSHEY’S Extra Dark pure dark chocolate
HERSHEY’S COOKIES ‘N’ CRÈME DROPS candy
HERSHEY’S NUGGETS chocolates 
HERSHEY’S POT OF GOLD boxed chocolates
HERSHEY’S DROPS chocolates
HERSHEY’S sugar free chocolate candy
HERSHEY’S AIR DELIGHT aerated milk chocolate
HERSHEY’S HUGS candies
HERSHEY’S MINIATURES chocolate candy
HERSHEY'S SIMPLE PLEASURES candy

Under the REESE’S brand franchise:
REESE’S peanut butter cups
REESE’S sugar free peanut butter cups
REESE’S peanut butter cups minis
REESE’S crispy and crunchy bar
REESE’S PIECES candy
REESE’S WHIPPS candy bar
REESE’S BIG CUP peanut butter cups
REESESTICKS wafer bars
REESE’S NUTRAGEOUS candy bar
REESE’S FAST BREAK candy bar

Under the KISSES brand franchise:
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand milk chocolates
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand milk chocolates with almonds
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand milk chocolates with cherry cordial crème 
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand chocolate meltaway milk chocolates
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand milk chocolates filled with caramel
HERSHEY’S KISSES brand SPECIAL DARK mildly sweet chocolates

2


Our other products we sell in the United States include the following:
5th AVENUE candy bar
ROLO minis
ALMOND JOY candy bar
SKOR toffee bar
ALMOND JOY PIECES candy
SPECIAL DARK mildly sweet chocolate bar 
BROOKSIDE chocolate covered real fruit juice pieces
SPECIAL DARK PIECES candy
CADBURY chocolates
SYMPHONY milk chocolate bar
CARAMELLO candy bar
SYMPHONY milk chocolate bar with almonds and toffee
GOOD & PLENTY candy
TAKE5 candy bar
HEATH toffee bar
THINGAMAJIG candy bar
JOLLY RANCHER candy
TWIZZLERS candy
JOLLY RANCHER CRUNCH 'N CHEW candy
TWIZZLERS sugar free candy
JOLLY RANCHER sugar free candy
WHATCHAMACALLIT candy bar 
KIT KAT wafer bar
WHOPPERS malted milk balls
MAUNA LOA macadamia snack nuts
YORK peppermint pattie
MILK DUDS candy
YORK sugar free peppermint pattie
MOUNDS candy bar
YORK PIECES candy
MR. GOODBAR chocolate bar
ZAGNUT candy bar
PAYDAY peanut caramel bar
ZERO candy bar
ROLO caramels in milk chocolate
 
We also sell products in the United States under the following product lines:
Premium products
Artisan Confections Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Hershey Company, markets SCHARFFEN BERGER high-cacao dark chocolate products, and DAGOBA natural and organic chocolate products. Our SCHARFFEN BERGER products include chocolate bars, tasting squares and home baking products. DAGOBA products include chocolate bars, drinking chocolate and baking products.
Refreshment products
Our line of refreshment products includes ICE BREAKERS mints and chewing gum, ICE BREAKERS ICE CUBES chewing gum, BREATH SAVERS mints, and BUBBLE YUM bubble gum.
Pantry items
Pantry items include HERSHEY’S, REESE’S, HEATH, and SCHARFFEN BERGER baking products. Our toppings and sundae syrups include REESE’S, HEATH and HERSHEY’S. We sell hot cocoa mix under the HERSHEY’S BLISS brand name.
Americas
The primary products we sell in the Americas include the following:
Canada
In Canada we sell HERSHEY’S milk chocolate bars and milk chocolate with almonds bars; OH HENRY! candy bars; REESE PEANUT BUTTER CUPS candy; HERSHEY’S KISSES brand milk chocolates; TWIZZLERS candy; GLOSETTE chocolate-covered raisins, peanuts and almonds; JOLLY RANCHER candy; WHOPPERS malted milk balls; SKOR toffee bars; EAT MORE candy bars; POT OF GOLD boxed chocolates; BROOKSIDE chocolate-covered fruit, real fruit juice pieces and nuts; and CHIPITS chocolate chips.
Mexico
We manufacture, import, market, sell and distribute chocolate, sweets, refreshment and beverage products in Mexico, under the HERSHEY’S, KISSES, JOLLY RANCHER and PELÓN PELO RICO brands.

3


Brazil
We manufacture, import and market chocolate, sweets and refreshment products in Brazil, including HERSHEY’S chocolate and confectionery items and IO-IO items.
Exports
We also import, market, sell and distribute chocolate, sweets and refreshment products in Central America and Puerto Rico, and export products to other countries in the Americas.
Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa
We manufacture, market, sell and distribute sugar confectionery, beverage and cooking oil products in India, including NUTRINE and MAHA LACTO confectionery products and JUMPIN and SOFIT beverage products. We market, sell and distribute chocolate products in China, primarily under the HERSHEY’S and KISSES brands. We market, sell and distribute chocolate products in the Middle East, primarily under the HERSHEY’S, REESE’S and KISSES brands. We license the VAN HOUTEN brand name and related trademarks to sell chocolate products, cocoa, and baking products in Asia and the Middle East for the retail and duty-free distribution channels. We also export products to countries in the Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa regions.
Customers
Full-time sales representatives and food brokers sell our products to our customers. Our customers are mainly wholesale distributors, chain grocery stores, mass merchandisers, chain drug stores, vending companies, wholesale clubs, convenience stores, dollar stores, concessionaires and department stores. Our customers then resell our products to end-consumers in retail outlets in North America and other locations worldwide. In 2012, sales to McLane Company, Inc., one of the largest wholesale distributors in the United States to convenience stores, drug stores, wholesale clubs and mass merchandisers, amounted to approximately 22.2% of our total net sales. McLane Company, Inc. is the primary distributor of our products to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Marketing Strategy and Seasonality
The foundation of our marketing strategy is our strong brand equities, product innovation and the consistently superior quality of our products. We devote considerable resources to the identification, development, testing, manufacturing and marketing of new products. We have a variety of promotional programs for our customers as well as advertising and promotional programs for consumers of our products. We use our promotional programs to stimulate sales of certain products at various times throughout the year. Our sales are typically higher during the third and fourth quarters of the year, representing seasonal and holiday-related sales patterns.
Product Distribution
In conjunction with our sales and marketing efforts, our efficient product distribution network helps us maintain sales growth and provide superior customer service. We plan optimum stock levels and work with our customers to set reasonable delivery times. Our distribution network provides for the efficient shipment of our products from our manufacturing plants to strategically located distribution centers. We primarily use common carriers to deliver our products from these distribution points to our customers.
Price Changes
We change prices and weights of our products when necessary to accommodate changes in costs, the competitive environment and profit objectives, while at the same time maintaining consumer value. Price increases and weight changes help to offset increases in our input costs, including raw and packaging materials, fuel, utilities, transportation, and employee benefits.
Usually there is a time lag between the effective date of list price increases and the impact of the price increases on net sales. The impact of price increases is often delayed because we honor previous commitments to planned consumer and customer promotions and merchandising events subsequent to the effective date of the price increases. In addition, promotional allowances may be increased subsequent to the effective date, delaying or partially offsetting the impact of price increases on net sales. 

4


In March 2011, we announced a weighted-average increase in wholesale prices of approximately 9.7% across the majority of our U.S., Puerto Rico and export portfolio, effective immediately. The price increase applied to our instant consumable, multi-pack, packaged candy and grocery lines. Direct buying customers were able to purchase transitional amounts of product into May, and seasonal net price realization did not occur until Easter 2012.
Raw Materials
Cocoa products are the most significant raw materials we use to produce our chocolate products. Cocoa products, including cocoa liquor, cocoa butter and cocoa powder processed from cocoa beans, are used to meet manufacturing requirements. Cocoa products are purchased directly from third-party suppliers. These third-party suppliers source cocoa beans which are grown principally in Far Eastern, West African and South American equatorial regions to produce the cocoa products which we purchase. West Africa accounts for approximately 70% of the world’s supply of cocoa beans.
Historically, there have been instances of adverse weather, crop disease, political unrest, and other problems in cocoa-producing countries that have caused price fluctuations, but have never resulted in total loss of a particular producing country’s cocoa crop and/or exports. In the event that such a disruption would occur in any given country, we believe cocoa from other producing countries and from current physical cocoa stocks in consuming countries would provide a significant supply buffer.
During 2012, the average cocoa futures contract prices decreased compared with 2011, and traded in a range between $1.17 and $1.00 per pound, based on the IntercontinentalExchange futures contract. After trading at 37-year highs in early 2011, cocoa prices moderated in 2012. The table below shows annual average cocoa futures prices, and the highest and lowest monthly averages for each of the calendar years indicated. The prices are the monthly averages of the quotations at noon of the three active futures trading contracts closest to maturity on the IntercontinentalExchange.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cocoa Futures Contract Prices
(dollars per pound) 
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
Annual Average
 
$
1.07

 
$
1.34

 
$
1.36

 
$
1.28

 
$
1.19

High
 
1.17

 
1.55

 
1.53

 
1.52

 
1.50

Low
 
1.00

 
0.99

 
1.26

 
1.10

 
0.86

Source: International Cocoa Organization Quarterly Bulletin of Cocoa Statistics
Our costs will not necessarily reflect market price fluctuations because of our forward purchasing and hedging practices, premiums and discounts reflective of varying delivery times, and supply and demand for our specific varieties and grades of cocoa liquor, cocoa butter and cocoa powder. As a result, the average futures contract prices are not necessarily indicative of our average costs.
The Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, impacts the prices of sugar, corn, peanuts and dairy products because it sets price support levels for these commodities.
During 2012, prices for fluid dairy milk ranged from a low of $0.14 to a high of $0.19 per pound, on a class II fluid milk basis. Higher feed prices resulting from the historic drought in the U.S. caused dairy prices to rise starting in July, but not to the price levels experienced during 2011. Our costs for certain dairy products may not necessarily reflect market price fluctuations because of our forward purchasing practices.
The price of sugar is subject to price supports under U.S. farm legislation. This legislation establishes import quotas and duties to support the price of sugar. As a result, sugar prices paid by users in the U.S. are currently substantially higher than prices on the world sugar market. In early 2012, sugar supplies in the U.S. were negatively impacted by government import restrictions; however, ideal weather in the North American sugar-growing regions caused prices to trade lower in the Fall of 2012. As a result, refined sugar prices decreased in 2012 compared with 2011, trading lower in a range from $0.54 to $0.37 per pound. Our costs for sugar will not necessarily reflect market price fluctuations primarily because of our forward purchasing and hedging practices.
Peanut prices in the U.S. began the year around $1.25 per pound and decreased during the year to $0.52 per pound. Price decreases were driven by a record crop of 3.4 million tons, up 85% from 2011. Almond prices began the year at $2.20 per pound and increased to $2.90 per pound during the year driven by a decrease in almond production of

5


approximately 8% versus 2011. Our costs for peanuts and almonds will not necessarily reflect market price fluctuations because of our forward purchasing practices.
We attempt to minimize the effect of future price fluctuations related to the purchase of major raw materials and certain energy requirements primarily through forward purchasing to cover our future requirements, generally for periods from 3 to 24 months. We enter into futures contracts and other commodity derivative instruments to manage price risks for cocoa products, sugar, corn sweeteners, natural gas, certain dairy products and transportation costs. However, the dairy futures markets are not as developed as many of the other commodities futures markets and, therefore, generally it is difficult to hedge our costs for dairy products by entering into futures contracts and other derivative instruments to extend coverage for long periods of time. Currently, active futures contracts are not available for use in pricing our other major raw material requirements, primarily peanuts and almonds. For more information on price risks associated with our major raw material requirements, see Commodities-Price Risk Management and Futures Contracts on page 38.
Product Sourcing
We manufacture or contract to our specifications for the manufacture of the products we sell. In addition, we contract with third-party suppliers to source certain ingredients. We enter into manufacturing contracts with third parties to improve our strategic competitive position and achieve cost effective production and sourcing of our products.
Competition
Many of our brands enjoy wide consumer acceptance and are among the leading brands sold in the marketplace in North America. We sell our brands in highly competitive markets with many other global multinational, national, regional and local firms. Some of our competitors are much larger firms that have greater resources and more substantial international operations.
Trademarks, Service Marks and License Agreements
We own various registered and unregistered trademarks and service marks, and have rights under licenses to use various trademarks that are of material importance to our business. We also grant trademark licenses to third parties to produce and sell pantry items, flavored milks and various other products primarily under the HERSHEY’S and REESE’S brand names.
We have license agreements with several companies to manufacture and/or sell and distribute certain products. Our rights under these agreements are extendible on a long-term basis at our option. Our most significant licensing agreements are as follows:
Company
Brand
 
Location
 
Requirements
 
 
 
 
 
Cadbury Ireland Limited

YORK
PETER PAUL ALMOND
   JOY
PETER PAUL MOUNDS

Worldwide
 
None
Cadbury UK Limited

CADBURY
CARAMELLO

United States
 
Minimum sales requirement exceeded in 2012
 
 
 
 
 
Société des
Produits Nestlé SA

KIT KAT
ROLO

United States
 
Minimum unit volume sales exceeded in 2012
 
 
 
 
 
Huhtamäki Oy affiliate

GOOD & PLENTY
HEATH
JOLLY RANCHER
MILK DUDS
PAYDAY
WHOPPERS

Worldwide
 
None

6


Backlog of Orders
We manufacture primarily for stock and fill customer orders from finished goods inventories. While at any given time there may be some backlog of orders, this backlog is not material in respect to our total annual sales, nor are the changes, from time to time, significant.
Research and Development
We engage in a variety of research and development activities in a number of countries, including the United States, Mexico, Brazil, India and China. We develop new products, improve the quality of existing products, improve and modernize production processes, and develop and implement new technologies to enhance the quality and value of both current and proposed product lines. Information concerning our research and development expense is contained in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 1, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.
Food Quality and Safety Regulation
The manufacture and sale of consumer food products is highly regulated. In the United States, our activities are subject to regulation by various government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Agriculture, the Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Commerce and the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as various state and local agencies. Similar agencies also regulate our businesses outside of the United States.
Our Product Excellence Program provides us with an effective product quality and safety program. This program assures that all products we purchase, manufacture and distribute are safe, are of high quality and comply with all applicable laws and regulations.
Through our Product Excellence Program, we evaluate the supply chain including ingredients, packaging, processes, products, distribution and the environment to determine where product quality and safety controls are necessary. We identify risks and establish controls to assure product quality and safety. Various government agencies, third-party firms and our quality assurance staff conduct audits of all facilities that manufacture our products to assure effectiveness and compliance with our program and all applicable laws and regulations.
Environmental Considerations
We made routine operating and capital expenditures during 2012 to comply with environmental laws and regulations. These expenditures were not material with respect to our results of operations, capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position.
Employees
As of December 31, 2012, we employed approximately 12,100 full-time and 2,100 part-time employees worldwide. Collective bargaining agreements covered approximately 4,800 employees. During 2013, agreements will be negotiated for certain employees at four facilities outside of the United States, comprising approximately 58% of total employees under collective bargaining agreements. We believe that our employee relations are good.
Financial Information by Geographic Area
Our principal operations and markets are located in the United States. The percentage of total consolidated net sales for our businesses outside of the United States was 16.1% for 2012, 15.6% for 2011 and 14.6% for 2010. The percentage of total consolidated assets outside of the United States as of December 31, 2012 was 20.5% and as of December 31, 2011 was 14.5%.
Corporate Social Responsibility
Our founder, Milton S. Hershey, established an enduring model of responsible citizenship while creating a successful business. Driving sustainable business practices, making a difference in our communities, and operating with the highest integrity are vital parts of our heritage. Milton Hershey School, established by Milton and Catherine Hershey, lies at the center of our unique heritage. Mr. Hershey donated and bequeathed almost his entire fortune to Milton Hershey School, which remains our primary beneficiary and provides a world-class education and nurturing home to nearly 2,000 children in need annually. We continue Milton Hershey's legacy of commitment to consumers, community and children by providing high-quality Hershey products while conducting our business in a socially responsible and environmentally

7


sustainable manner.
In 2012, we published our second corporate social responsibility (“CSR”) report, which provided an update on the progress we've made in advancing the priorities that were established in our first CSR report. The report outlines how we performed against the identified performance indicators within our four CSR pillars: environment, community, workplace and marketplace.
The safety and health of our employees, and the safety and quality of our products are consistently at the core of our operations and are areas of ongoing focus for Hershey in the workplace. Our over-arching safety goal is to consistently achieve best in class safety performance, and Hershey has achieved continuous improvement in employee safety in the workplace since 2007. We continue to invest in our quality management systems to ensure product quality and food safety remain top priorities. We carefully monitor and rigorously enforce our high standards of excellence for superior quality, consistency and taste, and absolute food safety.
For the first time, in 2012, Hershey was recognized for its environmental, social and governance performance by being named to the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (“DJSI”) - North America. The DJSI evaluates and selects the top 20% of companies, as determined by their financial and sustainability efforts, and Hershey was one of only seven companies in the Food and Beverage super-sector that were recognized in the DJSI.
Hershey has committed to minimizing the environmental impacts of our operations. Our environmental stewardship programs produced meaningful gains in 2011. Over our 2008 baseline, Hershey decreased waste generation by 23%, water usage by 12%, and green house gas emissions by 15%, while improving our company-wide recycling rate to 80%. Additionally, in 2012, we improved our Carbon Disclosure Score by 20%, and we moved up 172 spots in the Newsweek Green Rankings. Hershey now has three manufacturing facilities that have attained Zero-Waste-to-Landfill status with several others working to achieve this goal. We have installed more than 1,200 solar panels in Hershey, Pennsylvania, expected to generate an estimated 318 megawatt-hours of electricity per year. This project also included the installation of the region's first public electric vehicle charging stations, and we are piloting several 100% electric vehicles in our corporate fleet.
In the marketplace, Hershey focuses on promoting fair and ethical business dealings. A condition of doing business with us is compliance with our Supplier Code of Conduct, which outlines our expectations with regard to our suppliers' commitment to legal compliance and business integrity, social and working conditions, environment and food safety. We continue our leadership role in improving the lives of cocoa farming families through a variety of initiatives. In October 2012, we announced that it is our goal to source 100% certified cocoa for our global chocolate product lines by 2020, assuming adequate supply. Also, earlier in the year we pledged $10 million over 5 years to directly benefit 750,000 farmers through programs such as Hershey's Learn to Grow Farm and Family Center in Ghana. Our active engagement and financial support also continues for the World Cocoa Foundation, the International Cocoa Initiative, and CocoaLink, a first-of-its kind approach that uses mobile technology to deliver practical information on agricultural and social programs to rural cocoa farmers.
Our employees share their time and resources generously in their communities. Both directly and through the United Way, we contribute to hundreds of agencies that deliver much needed services and resources. In 2011, Hershey donated more than $9 million in cash and product to worthy causes, our employees volunteered more than 10,000 hours in their communities and we believe our results in 2012 have been even better. Our focus on “Kids and Kids at Risk” is supported through contributions to the Children's Miracle Network; Project Fellowship, where employees partner with student homes at the Milton Hershey School; an orphanage for special needs children in the Philippines; and a children's burn center in Guadalajara, Mexico, to name a few. In 2012, Hershey was recognized by The National Conference on Citizenship and Points of Light, the nation's definitive experts on civic engagement, in partnership with Bloomberg LP, as one of the 50 most community minded companies in America.
Our commitment to CSR is yielding powerful results. As we move into new markets and expand our leadership in North America, we are convinced that our values and heritage will be fundamental to our continuing success.
Available Information
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We file or furnish annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). You may obtain a copy of any of these reports, free of charge, from the Investors section of our website, www.thehersheycompany.com, shortly after we file or furnish the information to the SEC.

8


You may obtain a copy of any of these reports directly from the SEC’s Public Reference Room. Contact the SEC by calling them at 1-800-SEC-0330 or by submitting a written request to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, 100 F Street N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. You can obtain additional information on how to request public documents from the SEC on their website. The electronic mailbox address of the SEC is publicinfo@sec.gov.
We have a Code of Ethical Business Conduct that applies to our Board of Directors, all company officers and employees, including, without limitation, our Chief Executive Officer and “senior financial officers” (including the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer and persons performing similar functions). You can obtain a copy of our Code of Ethical Business Conduct from the Investors section of our website, www.thehersheycompany.com. If we change or waive any portion of the Code of Ethical Business Conduct that applies to any of our directors, executive officers or senior financial officers, we will post that information on our website within four business days. In the case of a waiver, such information will include the name of the person to whom the waiver applied, along with the date and type of waiver.
We also post our Corporate Governance Guidelines and charters for each of the Board’s standing committees in the Investors section of our website, www.thehersheycompany.com. The Board of Directors adopted these Guidelines and charters.
We will provide to any stockholder a copy of one or more of the Exhibits listed in Part IV of this report, upon request. We charge a small copying fee for these exhibits to cover our costs. To request a copy of any of these documents, you can contact us at The Hershey Company, Attn: Investor Relations Department, 100 Crystal A Drive, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033-0810.
Item 1A.
RISK FACTORS
We are subject to changing economic, competitive, regulatory and technological risks and uncertainties because of the nature of our operations. In connection with the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, we note the following factors that, among others, could cause future results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements, expectations and assumptions expressed or implied in this report. Many of the forward-looking statements contained in this document may be identified by the use of words such as “intend,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “should,” “planned,” “projected,” “estimated” and “potential,” among others. Among the factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results projected in our forward-looking statements are the risk factors described below.
Issues or concerns related to the quality and safety of our products, ingredients or packaging could cause a product recall and/or result in harm to the Company’s reputation, negatively impacting our operating results.
In order to sell our iconic, branded products, we need to maintain a good reputation with our customers and consumers. Issues related to quality and safety of our products, ingredients or packaging, could jeopardize our Company’s image and reputation. Negative publicity related to these types of concerns, or related to product contamination or product tampering, whether valid or not, might negatively impact demand for our products, or cause production and delivery disruptions. We may need to recall products if any of our products become unfit for consumption. In addition, we could potentially be subject to litigation or government actions, which could result in payments of fines or damages. Costs associated with these potential actions could negatively affect our operating results.
Increases in raw material and energy costs along with the availability of adequate supplies of raw materials could affect future financial results.
We use many different commodities for our business, including cocoa products, sugar, dairy products, peanuts, almonds, corn sweeteners, natural gas and fuel oil.

9


Commodities are subject to price volatility and changes in supply caused by numerous factors, including:
Ÿ
Commodity market fluctuations;
Ÿ
Currency exchange rates;
Ÿ
Imbalances between supply and demand;
Ÿ
The effect of weather on crop yield;
Ÿ
Speculative influences;
Ÿ
Trade agreements among producing and consuming nations;
Ÿ
Supplier compliance with commitments;
Ÿ
Political unrest in producing countries; and
Ÿ
Changes in governmental agricultural programs and energy policies.
Although we use forward contracts and commodity futures and options contracts, where possible, to hedge commodity prices, commodity price increases ultimately result in corresponding increases in our raw material and energy costs. If we are unable to offset cost increases for major raw materials and energy, there could be a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.
Price increases may not be sufficient to offset cost increases and maintain profitability or may result in sales volume declines associated with pricing elasticity.
We may be able to pass some or all raw material, energy and other input cost increases to customers by increasing the selling prices of our products or decreasing the size of our products; however, higher product prices or decreased product sizes may also result in a reduction in sales volume and/or consumption. If we are not able to increase our selling prices or reduce product sizes sufficiently to offset increased raw material, energy or other input costs, including packaging, direct labor, overhead and employee benefits, or if our sales volume decreases significantly, there could be a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.
Market demand for new and existing products could decline.
We operate in highly competitive markets and rely on continued demand for our products. To generate revenues and profits, we must sell products that appeal to our customers and to consumers. Our continued success is impacted by many factors, including the following:
Ÿ
Effective retail execution;
Ÿ
Appropriate advertising campaigns and marketing programs;
Ÿ
Our ability to secure adequate shelf space at retail locations;
Ÿ
Product innovation, including maintaining a strong pipeline of new products;
Ÿ
Changes in product category consumption;
Ÿ
Our response to consumer demographics and trends; and
Ÿ
Consumer health concerns, including obesity and the consumption of certain ingredients.
In these markets, there continue to be competitive product and pricing pressures, as well as challenges in maintaining profit margins. We must maintain mutually beneficial relationships with our key customers, including retailers and distributors, to compete effectively. Our largest customer, McLane Company, Inc., accounted for approximately 22.2% of our total net sales in 2012. McLane Company, Inc. is one of the largest wholesale distributors in the United States to convenience stores, drug stores, wholesale clubs and mass merchandisers, including Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Increased marketplace competition could hurt our business.
The global confectionery packaged goods industry is intensely competitive and consolidation in this industry continues. Some of our competitors are much larger firms that have greater resources and more substantial international operations. In order to protect our existing market share or capture increased market share in this highly competitive retail environment, we may be required to increase expenditures for promotions and advertising, and continue to introduce and establish new products. Due to inherent risks in the marketplace associated with advertising and new product

10


introductions, including uncertainties about trade and consumer acceptance, increased expenditures may not prove successful in maintaining or enhancing our market share and could result in lower sales and profits. In addition, we may incur increased credit and other business risks because we operate in a highly competitive retail environment.
Disruption to our supply chain could impair our ability to produce or deliver our finished products, resulting in a negative impact on our operating results.
Disruption to our manufacturing operations or our supply chain could result from, but are not limited to, the following:
Ÿ
Natural disaster;
Ÿ
Pandemic outbreak of disease;
Ÿ
Weather;
Ÿ
Fire or explosion;
Ÿ
Terrorism or other acts of violence;
Ÿ
Labor strikes or other labor activities;
Ÿ
Unavailability of raw or packaging materials; and
Ÿ
Operational and/or financial instability of key suppliers, and other vendors or service providers.
We take adequate precautions to mitigate the impact of possible disruptions. We have strategies and plans in place to manage such events if they were to occur, including our global supply chain strategies and our principle-based global labor relations strategy. If we are unable, or if it is not financially feasible, to effectively mitigate the likelihood or potential impact of such disruptive events, our results of operations and financial condition could be negatively impacted.
Our financial results may be adversely impacted by the failure to successfully execute or integrate acquisitions, divestitures and joint ventures.
From time to time, we may evaluate potential acquisitions, divestitures or joint ventures that align with our strategic objectives. The success of such activity depends, in part, upon our ability to identify suitable buyers, sellers or business partners; perform effective assessments prior to contract execution; negotiate contract terms; and, if applicable, obtain government approval. These activities may present certain financial, managerial, staffing and talent, and operational risks, including diversion of management’s attention from existing core businesses; difficulties integrating or separating businesses from existing operations; and challenges presented by acquisitions or joint ventures which may not achieve sales levels and profitability that justify the investments made. If the acquisitions, divestitures or joint ventures are not successfully implemented or completed, there could be a negative impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Changes in governmental laws and regulations could increase our costs and liabilities or impact demand for our products.
Changes in laws and regulations and the manner in which they are interpreted or applied may alter our business environment. These negative impacts could result from changes in food and drug laws, laws related to advertising and marketing practices, accounting standards, taxation requirements, competition laws, employment laws and environmental laws, among others. It is possible that we could become subject to additional liabilities in the future resulting from changes in laws and regulations that could result in an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
Political, economic, and/or financial market conditions could negatively impact our financial results.
Our operations are impacted by consumer spending levels and impulse purchases which are affected by general macroeconomic conditions, consumer confidence, employment levels, availability of consumer credit and interest rates on that credit, consumer debt levels, energy costs and other factors. Volatility in food and energy costs, sustained global recessions, rising unemployment and declines in personal spending could adversely impact our revenues, profitability and financial condition.
Changes in financial market conditions may make it difficult to access credit markets on commercially acceptable terms which may reduce liquidity or increase borrowing costs for our Company, our customers and our suppliers. A significant reduction in liquidity could increase counterparty risk associated with certain suppliers and service providers,

11


resulting in disruption to our supply chain and/or higher costs, and could impact our customers, resulting in a reduction in our revenue, or a possible increase in bad debt expense.
International operations could fluctuate unexpectedly and adversely impact our business.
In 2012, we derived approximately 16.1% of our net sales from customers located outside of the United States. Additionally, 20.5% of our total consolidated assets were located outside of the United States as of December 31, 2012. As part of our global growth strategy, we are increasing our investments outside of the United States, particularly in Mexico, Brazil, India and China. As a result, we are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties relating to international sales and operations, including:
Ÿ
Unforeseen global economic and environmental changes resulting in business interruption, supply constraints, inflation, deflation or decreased demand;
Ÿ
Difficulties and costs associated with compliance and enforcement of remedies under a wide variety of complex laws, treaties and regulations;
Ÿ
Unexpected changes in regulatory environments;
Ÿ
Political and economic instability, including the possibility of civil unrest, terrorism, mass violence or armed conflict;
Ÿ
Nationalization of our properties by foreign governments;
Ÿ
Tax rates that may exceed those in the United States and earnings that may be subject to withholding requirements and incremental taxes upon repatriation;
Ÿ
Potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws;
Ÿ
The imposition of tariffs, quotas, trade barriers, other trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;
Ÿ
Increased costs, disruptions in shipping or reduced availability of freight transportation;
Ÿ
The impact of currency exchange rate fluctuations between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies;
Ÿ
Failure to gain sufficient profitable scale in certain international markets resulting in losses from impairment or sale of assets; and
Ÿ
Failure to recruit, retain and build an engaged global workforce.
Disruptions, failures or security breaches of our information technology infrastructure could have a negative impact on our operations.
Information technology is a critically important part of our business operations. We use information technology to manage all business processes including manufacturing, financial, logistics, sales, marketing and administrative functions. These processes collect, interpret and distribute business data and communicate internally and externally with employees, suppliers, customers and others.
We invest in industry standard security technology to protect the Company’s data and business processes against risk of data security breach and cyber attack. Our data security management program includes identity, trust, vulnerability and threat management business processes as well as adoption of standard data protection policies. We measure our data security effectiveness through industry accepted methods and remediate significant findings. Additionally, we certify our major technology suppliers and any outsourced services through accepted security certification standards. We maintain and routinely test backup systems and disaster recovery, along with external network security penetration testing by an independent third party as part of our business continuity preparedness. We also have processes in place to prevent disruptions resulting from the implementation of new software and systems of the latest technology.
While we believe that our security technology and processes are adequate in preventing security breaches and in reducing cybersecurity risks, disruptions or failure of information technology systems is possible and could have a negative impact on our operations or business reputation. Failure of our systems, including failures due to cyber attacks that would prevent the ability of systems to function as intended, could cause transaction errors, loss of customers and sales, and could have negative consequences to our Company, our employees, and those with whom we do business.

12


Future developments related to the investigation by government regulators of alleged pricing practices by members of the confectionery industry and civil antitrust lawsuits in the United States could negatively impact our reputation and our operating results.
In 2007, the Competition Bureau of Canada began an inquiry into alleged violations of the Canadian Competition Act in the sale and supply of chocolate products sold in Canada between 2002 and 2008 by members of the confectionery industry, including Hershey Canada, Inc. The U.S. Department of Justice also notified the Company in 2007 that it had opened an inquiry, but has not requested any information or documents. We also are party to a number of civil antitrust lawsuits in the United States, including individual, class, and putative class actions. Additional information about these proceedings is contained in Item 3. Legal Proceedings of this Form 10-K. Competition and antitrust law investigations can be lengthy and violations are subject to civil and/or criminal fines and other sanctions. Class action civil antitrust lawsuits are expensive to defend and could result in significant judgments, including in some cases, payment of treble damages
and/or attorneys' fees to the successful plaintiff. Additionally, negative publicity involving these proceedings could affect our Company's brands and reputation, possibly resulting in decreased demand for our products. These possible consequences, in our opinion, should not materially impact our financial position or liquidity but could materially impact our results of operations and cash flows in the period in which they are accrued or paid, respectively.
Pension costs or funding requirements could increase at a higher than anticipated rate.
We sponsor a number of defined benefit pension plans. Changes in interest rates or in the market value of plan assets could affect the funded status of our pension plans. This could cause volatility in our benefits costs and increase future funding requirements for our pension plans. Additionally, we could incur pension settlement losses if a significant number of employees who have retired or have left the Company decide to withdraw substantial lump sums from their pension accounts. A significant increase in pension expense, in pension settlement losses or in future funding requirements could have a negative impact on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. For more information, refer to page 41.

Item 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.  
Item 2.
PROPERTIES
Our principal properties include the following:
Country
 
Location
 
Type
 
Status
(Own/Lease)
United States
 
Hershey, Pennsylvania
(2 principal plants)
 
Manufacturing—confectionery products and pantry items
 
Own
 
 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania
 
Manufacturing—confectionery products
 
Own
 
 
Robinson, Illinois
 
Manufacturing—confectionery products, and pantry items
 
Own
 
 
Stuarts Draft, Virginia
 
Manufacturing—confectionery products and pantry items
 
Own
 
 
Edwardsville, Illinois
 
Distribution
 
Own
 
 
Palmyra, Pennsylvania
 
Distribution
 
Own
 
 
Ogden, Utah
 
Distribution
 
Own
Canada
 
Mississauga, Ontario (1)
 
Distribution
 
Lease
Mexico
 
Monterrey, Mexico
 
Manufacturing—confectionery products
 
Own
                
(1) The lease of the distribution center located in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada expires in 2013. We have entered into an agreement with the Ferrero Group for the construction and use of a warehouse and distribution facility located in Brantford, Ontario, Canada beginning in 2013.
In addition to the locations indicated above, we also own or lease several other properties and buildings worldwide which we use for manufacturing, sales, distribution and administrative functions. Our facilities are well maintained and generally have adequate capacity to accommodate seasonal demands, changing product mixes and certain additional

13


growth. The largest facilities are located in Hershey and Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Monterrey, Mexico; and Stuarts Draft, Virginia. Many additions and improvements have been made to these facilities over the years and they include equipment of the latest type and technology.
Item 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
In 2007, the Competition Bureau of Canada began an inquiry into alleged violations of the Canadian Competition Act in the sale and supply of chocolate products sold in Canada between 2002 and 2008 by members of the confectionery industry, including Hershey Canada, Inc. The U.S. Department of Justice also notified the Company in 2007 that it had opened an inquiry, but has not requested any information or documents.
Subsequently, 13 civil lawsuits were filed in Canada and 91 civil lawsuits were filed in the United States against the Company. The lawsuits were instituted on behalf of direct purchasers of our products as well as indirect purchasers that purchase our products for use or for resale. Several other chocolate and confectionery companies were named as defendants in these lawsuits as they also were the subject of investigations and/or inquiries by the government entities referenced above. The cases seek recovery for losses suffered as a result of alleged conspiracies in restraint of trade in connection with the pricing practices of the defendants. The Canadian civil cases were settled in 2012. The Canadian Competition Bureau investigation remains pending. However, Hershey Canada, Inc. has reached a tentative settlement agreement with the Canadian government with regard to its investigation and the Company has accrued a liability related thereto. We do not believe the terms of the tentative settlement agreement should have a material impact on the Company's results of operations, financial position or liquidity.
With regard to the U.S. lawsuits, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation assigned the cases to the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania. Plaintiffs are seeking actual and treble damages against the Company and other defendants based on an alleged overcharge for certain, or in some cases all chocolate products sold in the U.S. between 2003 and 2008. The lawsuits have been proceeding on different scheduling tracks for different groups of plaintiffs.
Defendants have briefed summary judgment against the plaintiffs that have not sought class certification (the “Opt-Out Plaintiffs”). The plaintiffs that purchased products from defendants directly (the “Direct Purchaser Plaintiffs”) were granted class certification in December 2012. Defendants will conduct expert discovery on liability and damages and brief summary judgment against the Direct Purchaser Plaintiffs through the third quarter of 2013. The hearing on summary judgment for the Direct Purchaser Plaintiffs is scheduled for September 2013, combined with the summary judgment hearing for the Opt-Out Plaintiffs. Putative class plaintiffs that purchased product indirectly for resale (the “Indirect Purchasers for Resale”) have a May 1, 2013 deadline to file for class certification. Putative class plaintiffs that purchased product indirectly for use (the “Indirect End Users”) may seek class certification after summary judgment against the Direct Purchaser Plaintiffs and the Opt-Out Plaintiffs has been resolved. No trial date has been set for any group of plaintiffs. The Company will continue to vigorously defend against these lawsuits.
At this stage, we are unable to predict the range of any potential liability that is reasonably possible as a result of the proceedings outlined above. Competition and antitrust law investigations can be lengthy and violations are subject to civil and/or criminal fines and other sanctions. Class action civil antitrust lawsuits are expensive to defend and could result in significant judgments, including in some cases, payment of treble damages and/or attorneys' fees to the successful plaintiff. Additionally, negative publicity involving these proceedings could affect our Company's brands and reputation, possibly resulting in decreased demand for our products. These possible consequences, in our opinion, should not materially impact our financial position or liquidity, but could materially impact our results of operations and cash flows in the period in which they are accrued or paid, respectively. Please refer to Item 1A. Risk Factors, beginning on page 9, for additional information concerning the key risks to achieving the Company's future performance goals.
We have no other material pending legal proceedings, other than ordinary routine litigation incidental to our business.
Pursuant to the disclosure requirements of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) Revenue Procedure 2005-51, in the second quarter of 2012, the IRS assessed an accuracy-related penalty of $222,975 on a reportable transaction understatement for the 2008 tax year and that this penalty was paid in full in 2012. The penalty was imposed by §6662A(a) of the Internal Revenue Code at the 30% rate determined under §6662A(c) of the Internal Revenue Code. The penalty was imposed for a reportable transaction understatement with respect to which the relevant facts affecting the tax treatment of the sale by the Company in 2008 of a 49% interest in its wholly-owned subsidiary, Hershey do Brasil LTDA, were not adequately disclosed under §6011 of the Internal Revenue Code in the Company's 2008 federal income tax return.

14


Item 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

15


 
PART II
Item 5.
MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
We paid $341.2 million in cash dividends on our Common Stock and Class B Common Stock (“Class B Stock”) in 2012 and $304.1 million in 2011. The annual dividend rate on our Common Stock in 2012 was $1.56 per share.
On January 29, 2013, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend of $0.42 per share of Common Stock payable on March 15, 2013, to stockholders of record as of February 25, 2013. It is the Company’s 333rd consecutive Common Stock dividend. A quarterly dividend of $0.38 per share of Class B Stock also was declared.
Our Common Stock is listed and traded principally on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the ticker symbol “HSY.” Approximately 260.2 million shares of our Common Stock were traded during 2012. The Class B Stock is not publicly traded.
The closing price of our Common Stock on December 31, 2012, was $72.22. There were 36,964 stockholders of record of our Common Stock and our Class B Stock as of December 31, 2012.
The following table shows the dividends paid per share of Common Stock and Class B Stock and the price range of the Common Stock for each quarter of the past 2 years:
 
Dividends Paid Per
Share
 
 
Common Stock 
Price Range* 
 
Common
Stock
 
 
Class B
Stock
 
 
High 
 
Low 
2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1st Quarter
$
0.380

 
$
0.344

 
$61.94
 
$59.49
2nd Quarter
0.380

 
0.344

 
72.03

 
59.81

3rd Quarter
0.380

 
0.344

 
73.16

 
70.09

4th Quarter
0.420

 
0.380

 
74.64

 
68.85

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
$
1.560

 
$
1.412

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends Paid Per
Share
 
 
Common Stock 
Price Range*  
 
Common
Stock
 
 
Class B
Stock
 
 
High 
 
Low
2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1st Quarter
$
0.345

 
$
0.3125

 
$55.05
 
$46.24
2nd Quarter
0.345

 
0.3125

 
58.20

 
53.77

3rd Quarter
0.345

 
0.3125

 
60.96

 
53.83

4th Quarter
0.345

 
0.3125

 
62.26

 
55.32

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
$
1.380

 
$
1.2500

 
 
 
 
                                                       
* NYSE-Composite Quotations for Common Stock by calendar quarter.
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
None.


16


Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Purchases of equity securities during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012:  
Period 
 
(a) Total
Number of
Shares
Purchased
 
(b) Average
Price Paid per
Share
 
(c) Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or
Programs 
 
(d) Approximate Dollar
Value of Shares that
May Yet Be Purchased
Under the Plans or
Programs(1) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(in thousands of dollars)
October 1 through
October 28, 2012
 

 

 
 
$125,069
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
October 29 through
November 25, 2012
 
187,570

 
$69.68
 
 
$125,069
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
November 26 through
December 31, 2012
 

 

 
 
$125,069
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
187,570

 
$69.68
 
 
 
                                             
(1)
In April 2011, our Board of Directors approved a $250 million share repurchase program. This authorization is in addition to the Company’s policy of repurchasing shares in the open market to replace Treasury Stock shares issued in connection with stock option exercises or other equity-based compensation programs.
 
Performance Graph
The following graph compares our cumulative total stockholder return (Common Stock price appreciation plus dividends, on a reinvested basis) over the last five fiscal years with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and the Standard & Poor’s Packaged Foods Index.
                                         
*Hypothetical $100 invested on December 31, 2007 in Hershey Common Stock, S&P 500 Index and S&P 500 Packaged Foods Index, assuming reinvestment of dividends.

17


Item 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
SIX-YEAR CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL SUMMARY
All dollar and share amounts in thousands except market price
and per share statistics
 
5-Year
Compound
Growth Rate
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008 
 
2007 
Summary of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Sales
6.1
 %
 
$
6,644,252

 
6,080,788

 
5,671,009

 
5,298,668

 
5,132,768

 
4,946,716

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of Sales
2.7
 %
 
$
3,784,370

 
3,548,896

 
3,255,801

 
3,245,531

 
3,375,050

 
3,315,147

Selling, Marketing and Administrative
13.7
 %
 
$
1,703,796

 
1,477,750

 
1,426,477

 
1,208,672

 
1,073,019

 
895,874

Business Realignment and Impairment Charges (Credits), Net
(30.5
)%
 
$
44,938

 
(886
)
 
83,433

 
82,875

 
94,801

 
276,868

Interest Expense, Net
(4.2
)%
 
$
95,569

 
92,183

 
96,434

 
90,459

 
97,876

 
118,585

Provision for Income Taxes
23.0
 %
 
$
354,648

 
333,883

 
299,065

 
235,137

 
180,617

 
126,088

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income
25.3
 %
 
$
660,931

 
628,962

 
509,799

 
435,994

 
311,405

 
214,154

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income Per Share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Basic—Class B Stock
25.7
 %
 
$
2.73

 
2.58

 
2.08

 
1.77

 
1.27

 
0.87

—Diluted—Class B Stock
25.5
 %
 
$
2.71

 
2.56

 
2.07

 
1.77

 
1.27

 
0.87

—Basic—Common Stock
25.7
 %
 
$
3.01

 
2.85

 
2.29

 
1.97

 
1.41

 
0.96

—Diluted—Common Stock
25.5
 %
 
$
2.89

 
2.74

 
2.21

 
1.90

 
1.36

 
0.93

Weighted-Average Shares Outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
—Basic—Common Stock


 
164,406

 
165,929

 
167,032

 
167,136

 
166,709

 
168,050

—Basic—Class B Stock


 
60,630

 
60,645

 
60,708

 
60,709

 
60,777

 
60,813

—Diluted


 
228,337

 
229,919

 
230,313

 
228,995

 
228,697

 
231,449

Dividends Paid on Common Stock
6.1
 %
 
$
255,596

 
228,269

 
213,013

 
198,371

 
197,839

 
190,199

Per Share
6.5
 %
 
$
1.56

 
1.38

 
1.28

 
1.19

 
1.19

 
1.14

Dividends Paid on Class B Stock
6.6
 %
 
$
85,610

 
75,814

 
70,421

 
65,032

 
65,110

 
62,064

Per Share
6.7
 %
 
$
1.41

 
1.25

 
1.16

 
1.07

 
1.07

 
1.02

Depreciation
(9.8
)%
 
$
174,788

 
188,491

 
169,677

 
157,996

 
227,183

 
292,658

Advertising
30.3
 %
 
$
480,016

 
414,171

 
391,145

 
241,184

 
161,133

 
127,896

Payroll
1.9
 %
 
$
709,621

 
676,482

 
641,756

 
613,568

 
645,456

 
645,083

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year-end Position and Statistics
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital Additions
6.4
 %
 
$
258,727

 
323,961

 
179,538

 
126,324

 
262,643

 
189,698

Capitalized Software Additions
6.3
 %
 
$
19,239

 
23,606

 
21,949

 
19,146

 
20,336

 
14,194

Total Assets
2.3
 %
 
$
4,754,839

 
4,407,094

 
4,267,627

 
3,669,926

 
3,629,614

 
4,242,008

Short-term Debt and Current Portion of Long-term Debt
(15.2
)%
 
$
375,898

 
139,673

 
285,480

 
39,313

 
501,504

 
856,392

Long-term Portion of Debt
3.6
 %
 
$
1,530,967

 
1,748,500

 
1,541,825

 
1,502,730

 
1,505,954

 
1,279,965

Stockholders’ Equity
10.7
 %
 
$
1,048,373

 
880,943

 
945,896

 
768,634

 
358,239

 
631,815

Full-time Employees
 
 
12,100

 
11,800

 
11,300

 
12,100

 
12,800

 
12,400

Stockholders’ Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Outstanding Shares of Common Stock and Class B Stock at Year-end
 
 
223,786

 
225,206

 
227,030

 
227,998

 
227,035

 
227,050

Market Price of Common Stock at
Year-end
12.9
 %
 
$
72.22

 
61.78

 
47.15

 
35.79

 
34.74

 
39.40

Price Range During Year (high)
 
 
$
74.64

 
62.26

 
52.10

 
42.25

 
44.32

 
56.75

Price Range During Year (low)
 
 
$
59.49

 
46.24

 
35.76

 
30.27

 
32.10

 
38.21



18


Item 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW
Results for the year ended December 31, 2012 were strong with increases in net sales, earnings per share and profitability despite continued macroeconomic challenges. Net sales increased 9.3% compared with 2011 due to net price realization and volume increases in the United States and key international markets as we continued our focus on core brands and innovation. Advertising expense increased 15.9% for the year supporting core brands along with new product launches. Net income and earnings per share-diluted also increased at greater rates than our long-term growth targets. The investments we have made in both productivity and cost savings resulted in a business model that is more efficient and effective, enabling us to deliver predictable, consistent and achievable marketplace and financial performance. We continue to generate strong cash flow from operations and our financial position remains solid.
Adjusted Non-GAAP Financial Measures
Our “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” section includes certain measures of financial performance that are not defined by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). For each of these non-GAAP financial measures, we are providing below (1) the most directly comparable GAAP measure; (2) a reconciliation of the differences between the non-GAAP measure and the most directly comparable GAAP measure; (3) an explanation of why our management believes these non-GAAP measures provide useful information to investors; and (4) additional purposes for which we use these non-GAAP measures.
We believe that the disclosure of these non-GAAP measures provides investors with a better comparison of our year-to-year operating results. We exclude the effects of certain items from Income before Interest and Income Taxes (“EBIT”), Net Income and Income per Share-Diluted-Common Stock (“EPS”) when we evaluate key measures of our performance internally, and in assessing the impact of known trends and uncertainties on our business. We also believe that excluding the effects of these items provides a more balanced view of the underlying dynamics of our business.
Adjusted non-GAAP financial measures exclude the impacts of charges or credits recorded during the last four years associated with our business realignment initiatives and impairment charges related to goodwill and certain trademarks. Non-service-related pension expenses are also excluded for each of the last four years, along with acquisition closing and integration costs, primarily associated with the acquisition of Brookside in 2012, and a gain on the sale of certain non-core trademark licensing rights in 2011.
Non-service-related pension expenses include interest costs, the expected return on pension plan assets, the amortization of actuarial gains and losses, and certain curtailment and settlement losses or credits. Non-service-related pension expenses may be very volatile from year-to-year as a result of changes in interest rates and market returns on pension plan assets. Therefore, we have excluded non-service-related pension expense from our results in accordance with GAAP. We believe that non-GAAP financial results excluding non-service-related pension expenses will provide investors with a better understanding of the underlying profitability of our ongoing business. We believe that the service cost component of our total pension benefit costs closely reflects the operating costs of our business and provides for a better comparison of our operating results from year-to-year. Our most significant defined benefit pension plans were closed to most new participants after 2007, resulting in ongoing service costs that are stable and predictable.

19


For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
EBIT 
 
Net
Income
 
 
EPS 
 
EBIT 
 
Net
Income
 
EPS
In millions of dollars except per share amounts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Results in accordance with GAAP
 
$
1,111.1

 
$
660.9

 
$
2.89

 
$
1,055.0

 
$
628.9

 
$
2.74

Adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business realignment charges included in cost of sales (“COS”)
 
36.4

 
23.7

 
0.10

 
45.1

 
28.4

 
0.12

Non-service-related pension expense included in COS
 
8.6

 
5.3

 
0.03

 

 

 

Acquisition integration costs included in COS
 
4.1

 
3.0

 
0.01

 

 

 

Business realignment charges included in selling, marketing and administrative (“SM&A”)
 
2.4

 
1.6

 
0.01

 
5.0

 
3.0

 
0.01

Non-service-related pension expense included in SM&A
 
12.0

 
7.4

 
0.03

 
2.8

 
2.0

 
0.01

Acquisition integration costs included in SM&A
 
9.3

 
6.2

 
0.03

 

 

 

Gain on sale of trademark licensing rights included in SM&A
 

 

 

 
(17.0
)
 
(11.1
)
 
(0.05
)
Business realignment and impairment charges(credits) , net
 
45.0

 
31.9

 
0.14

 
(0.9
)
 
(0.5
)
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted non-GAAP results
 
$
1,228.9

 
$
740.0

 
$
3.24

 
$
1,090.0

 
$
650.7

 
$
2.83


For the years ended December 31,
 
2010
 
2009
 
 
EBIT 
 
Net
Income
 
 
EPS 
 
EBIT 
 
Net
Income
 
EPS  
In millions of dollars except per share amounts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Results in accordance with GAAP
 
$
905.3

 
$
509.8

 
$
2.21

 
$
761.6

 
$
436.0

 
$
1.90

Adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business realignment charges included in COS
 
13.7

 
8.4

 
0.04

 
10.1

 
6.3

 
0.03

Non-service-related pension expense included in COS
 
0.9

 
0.6

 

 
14.7

 
9.1

 
0.04

Business realignment charges included in SM&A
 
1.5

 
0.9

 

 
6.1

 
3.8

 
0.02

Non-service-related pension expense included in SM&A
 
5.0

 
3.2

 
0.02

 
6.8

 
4.2

 
0.02

Business realignment and impairment charges, net
 
83.4

 
68.6

 
0.30

 
82.9

 
50.7

 
0.22

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted non-GAAP results
 
$
1,009.8

 
$
591.5

 
$
2.57

 
$
882.2

 
$
510.1

 
$
2.23


 
 
Adjusted Non-GAAP Results
Key Annual Performance Measures
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Increase in Net Sales
 
9.3
%
 
7.2
%
 
7.0
%
Increase in adjusted EBIT
 
12.7
%
 
7.9
%
 
14.5
%
Improvement in adjusted EBIT Margin in basis points (“bps”)
 
60bps

 
10bps

 
110bps

Increase in adjusted EPS
 
14.5
%
 
10.1
%
 
15.2
%

20


SUMMARY OF OPERATING RESULTS
Analysis of Selected Items from Our GAAP Income Statement
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Percent Change
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Increase (Decrease)
For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2012-2011

2011-2010
In millions of dollars except per share amounts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Sales
 
$
6,644.3

 
$
6,080.8

 
$
5,671.0

 
9.3
%
 
7.2
 %
Cost of Sales
 
3,784.4

 
3,548.9

 
3,255.8

 
6.6

 
9.0

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross Profit
 
2,859.9

 
2,531.9

 
2,415.2

 
13.0

 
4.8

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross Margin
 
43.0
%
 
41.6
%
 
42.6
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SM&A Expense
 
1,703.8

 
1,477.8

 
1,426.5

 
15.3

 
3.6

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SM&A Expense as a percent of sales
 
25.6
%
 
24.3
%
 
25.2
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business Realignment and Impairment
   Charges (Credits), Net
 
45.0

 
(0.9
)
 
83.4

 
N/A

 
(101.1
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EBIT
 
1,111.1

 
1,055.0

 
905.3

 
5.3

 
16.5

EBIT Margin
 
16.7
%
 
17.4
%
 
16.0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest Expense, Net
 
95.6

 
92.2

 
96.4

 
3.7

 
(4.4
)
Provision for Income Taxes
 
354.6

 
333.9

 
299.1

 
6.2

 
11.6

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effective Income Tax Rate
 
34.9
%
 
34.7
%
 
37.0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income
 
$
660.9

 
$
628.9

 
$
509.8

 
5.1

 
23.4

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net Income Per Share—Diluted
 
$
2.89

 
$
2.74

 
$
2.21

 
5.5

 
24.0

Net Sales
2012 compared with 2011
Net sales increased 9.3% in 2012 compared with 2011 due to net price realization and sales volume increases in the U.S. and for our international businesses. Net price realization contributed approximately 5.7% to the net sales increase. Sales volume increased net sales by approximately 2.2% due primarily to sales of new products in the U.S. The Brookside acquisition contributed approximately 1.9% to the net sales increase. These increases were partially offset by the unfavorable impact of foreign currency exchange rates which reduced net sales by approximately 0.5%.
Excluding incremental sales from the Brookside acquisition, net sales in the U.S. increased approximately 7.1% compared with 2011, primarily reflecting net price realization, along with sales volume increases from the introduction of new products. Net sales in U.S. dollars for our businesses outside of the U.S. increased approximately 9.1% in 2012 compared with 2011, reflecting sales volume increases and net price realization. Net sales increases for our international businesses were offset somewhat by the impact of unfavorable foreign currency exchange rates.
2011 compared with 2010
Net sales increased 7.2% in 2011 compared with 2010 due to net price realization and sales volume increases in the U.S. and for our international businesses. Net price realization contributed approximately 3.5% to the net sales increase primarily due to the impact of list price increases, offset somewhat by higher promotional rates. Sales volume increased net sales by approximately 3.4% due primarily to sales of new products in the U.S. The favorable impact of foreign currency exchange rates increased net sales by approximately 0.3%.
Net sales in the U.S. increased approximately 5.9% compared with 2010, with essentially equal contribution from net price realization and sales volume gains. Net sales for our businesses outside of the U.S. increased approximately 14.5% in 2011 compared with 2010, reflecting sales volume increases and net price realization, particularly for our focus markets in Mexico, Brazil, China and India.

21


Key U.S. Marketplace Metrics
For the 52 weeks ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Consumer Takeaway Increase
 
5.7
%
 
7.8
%
 
5.3
%
Market Share Increase
 
0.6

 
0.8

 
0.3

Consumer takeaway and the change in market share for 2012 are provided for measured channels of distribution accounting for approximately 90% of our U.S. confectionery retail business. These channels of distribution primarily include food, drug, mass merchandisers, including Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., and convenience stores.
Consumer takeaway for 2011 and 2010 is provided for channels of distribution accounting for approximately 80% of our U.S. confectionery retail business. These channels of distribution include food, drug, mass merchandisers, including Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., and convenience stores. The change in market share for 2011 and 2010 is provided for channels measured by syndicated data which include sales in the food, drug, convenience store and mass merchandiser classes of trade, excluding sales of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Cost of Sales and Gross Margin
2012 compared with 2011
The cost of sales increase of 6.6% in 2012 compared with 2011 was primarily due to higher input costs, the impact of sales volume increases and higher supply chain costs which together increased cost of sales by approximately 7.1%. An increase in cost of sales of 2.0% resulted from the Brookside acquisition. Supply chain productivity improvements reduced cost of sales by approximately 2.5%. Business realignment and impairment charges of $36.4 million were included in cost of sales in 2012, compared with $45.1 million in the prior year.
Gross margin increased by 1.4 percentage points in 2012 compared with 2011, primarily as a result of price realization and supply chain productivity improvements which together improved gross margin by 4.1 percentage points. These improvements were substantially offset by higher input and supply chain costs which reduced gross margin by a total of 2.9 percentage points. The impact of lower business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2012 compared with 2011 increased gross margin by 0.2 percentage points.
2011 compared with 2010
The cost of sales increase of 9.0% in 2011 compared with 2010 was primarily associated with higher sales volume and significantly higher commodity costs which together increased cost of sales by approximately 8.0%, each contributing about half of the increase. Increases in other supply chain costs were essentially offset by productivity improvements. Business realignment and impairment charges of $45.1 million were included in cost of sales in 2011, compared with $13.7 million in the prior year, contributing approximately 1.0% of the cost of sales increase.
Gross margin decreased by 1.0 percentage point in 2011 compared with 2010. Higher commodity and other supply chain costs reduced gross margin by about 3.2 percentage points, substantially offset by productivity improvements and price realization of approximately 2.8 percentage points. Supply chain productivity and net price realization each contributed approximately half of this gross margin improvement. The impact of higher business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2011 compared with 2010 reduced gross margin by 0.6 percentage points.
Selling, Marketing and Administrative
2012 compared with 2011
Selling, marketing and administrative expenses increased $226.0 million or 15.3% in 2012. The increase was primarily a result of increased advertising, marketing research and consumer promotion expenses, higher employee-related expenses, increased incentive compensation costs and expenses associated with the Brookside acquisition. In addition, selling, marketing and administrative costs were reduced in 2011 by a $17.0 million gain on the sale of non-core trademark licensing rights. Advertising expense increased approximately 15.9% compared with 2011. Business realignment charges of $2.5 million were included in selling, marketing and administrative expenses in 2012 compared with $5.0 million in 2011.
2011 compared with 2010
Selling, marketing and administrative expenses increased $51.3 million or 3.6% in 2011. The increase was primarily a result of higher marketing and employee-related expenses, offset somewhat by the $17.0 million gain on the sale of non-core

22


trademark licensing rights as well as lower costs related to the consideration of potential acquisitions and divestitures in 2011. Advertising expense increased approximately 5.9% compared with 2010. Selling and administrative expenses increased approximately 6.6%, reflecting investments in enhancing and executing our global go-to-market strategies, including increases in selling, marketing and certain administrative staff levels. Business realignment charges of $5.0 million were included in selling, marketing and administrative expenses in 2011 compared with $1.5 million in 2010.
Business Realignment and Impairment Charges
In June 2010, we announced Project Next Century (the “Next Century program”) as part of our ongoing efforts to create an advantaged supply chain and competitive cost structure. As part of the program, production was to transition from the Company's century-old facility at 19 East Chocolate Avenue in Hershey, Pennsylvania, to an expanded West Hershey facility, which was built in 1992. Production from the 19 East Chocolate Avenue plant, as well as a portion of the workforce, was fully transitioned to the West Hershey facility during 2012.
We estimate that the Next Century program will incur pre-tax charges and non-recurring project implementation costs of $190 million to $200 million. This estimate includes $170 million to $180 million in pre-tax business realignment and impairment charges and approximately $20 million in project implementation and start-up costs, in addition to pension settlement losses of $15.8 million which were recorded in 2012. As of December 31, 2012, total costs of $173.6 million have been recorded over the last three years for the Next Century program. Total costs of $76.3 million were recorded during 2012. Total costs of $43.4 million were recorded in 2011 and total costs of $53.9 million were recorded in 2010.
In September 2011, we entered into a sale and leasing agreement for the 19 East Chocolate Avenue manufacturing facility with Chocolate Realty DST, a Delaware Statutory Trust. Chocolate Realty DST is not affiliated with the Milton Hershey School Trust. We are leasing a portion of the building for administrative office space under the agreement. As a result of our continuing involvement and use of the property, we are deemed to be the owner of the property for accounting purposes. We received net proceeds of $47.6 million and recorded a lease financing obligation of $50.0 million under the leasing agreement in 2011. The initial term of the agreement expires in 2041.
In December 2012, the Board of Directors of Tri-US, Inc. decided to immediately cease operations and dissolve the company as a result of operational difficulties, quality issues and competitive constraints. In December 2012, the Company recorded non-cash asset impairment charges of approximately $7.5 million, primarily associated with the write off of goodwill and other intangible assets, including a reduction to reflect the share of the charges associated with the noncontrolling interests.
During the second quarter of 2010 we completed an impairment evaluation of goodwill and other intangible assets associated with Godrej Hershey Ltd. Based on this evaluation, we recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $44.7 million, including a reduction to reflect the share of the charge associated with the noncontrolling interests.
During 2009, we completed our comprehensive, three-year supply chain transformation program (the “global supply chain transformation program”).

23


Charges (credits) associated with business realignment initiatives and impairment recorded during 2012, 2011 and 2010 were as follows:
For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales
 
 
 
 
 
 
Next Century program
 
$
36,383

 
$
39,280

 
$
13,644

Global supply chain transformation program
 

 
5,816

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total cost of sales
 
36,383

 
45,096

 
13,644

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, marketing and administrative - Next Century program
 
2,446

 
4,961

 
1,493

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business realignment and impairment charges, net
 
 
 
 
 
 
Next Century program:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pension settlement loss
 
15,787

 

 

Plant closure expenses and fixed asset impairment
 
20,780

 
8,620

 
5,516

Employee separation costs (credits)
 
914

 
(9,506
)
 
33,225

Tri-US, Inc. asset impairment charges
 
7,457

 

 

Godrej Hershey Ltd. goodwill impairment
 

 

 
44,692

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total business realignment and impairment charges (credits), net
 
44,938

 
(886
)
 
83,433

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total net charges associated with business realignment initiatives and impairment
 
$
83,767

 
$
49,171

 
$
98,570

Next Century Program
The charge of $36.4 million recorded in cost of sales during 2012 related primarily to start-up costs and accelerated depreciation of fixed assets over a reduced estimated remaining useful life associated with the Next Century program. A charge of $2.4 million was recorded in selling, marketing and administrative expenses during 2012 for project administration related to the Next Century program. The level of lump sum withdrawals during 2012 from one of the Company's pension plans by employees retiring or leaving the Company, primarily under the Next Century program, resulted in a non-cash pension settlement loss of $15.8 million. Expenses of $20.8 million were recorded in 2012 primarily related to costs associated with the closure of a manufacturing facility and the relocation of production lines.
The charge of $39.3 million recorded in cost of sales during 2011 related primarily to accelerated depreciation of fixed assets over a reduced estimated remaining useful life associated with the Next Century program. A charge of $5.0 million was recorded in selling, marketing and administrative expenses during 2011 for project administration related to the Next Century program. Plant closure expenses of $8.6 million were recorded in 2011 primarily related to costs associated with the relocation of production lines. Employee separation costs were reduced by $9.5 million during 2011, which consisted of an $11.2 million credit reflecting lower expected costs related to voluntary and involuntary terminations at the two manufacturing facilities and a net benefits curtailment loss of $1.7 million also related to the employee terminations.
The charge of $13.6 million recorded in cost of sales during 2010 related primarily to accelerated depreciation of fixed assets over a reduced estimated remaining useful life associated with the Next Century program. A charge of $1.5 million was recorded in selling, marketing and administrative expenses during 2010 for project administration. Fixed asset impairment charges of $5.5 million were recorded during 2010. In determining the costs related to fixed asset impairments, fair value was estimated based on the expected sales proceeds. Employee separation costs of $33.2 million during 2010 were related to expected voluntary and involuntary terminations at the two manufacturing facilities.
Global Supply Chain Transformation Program
The charge of $5.8 million recorded in 2011 was due to a decline in the estimated net realizable value of two properties being held for sale.

24


Tri-US, Inc. Impairment Charges
In February 2011, we acquired a 49% interest in Tri-US, Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, a company that manufactures, markets and sells nutritional beverages under the “mix1” brand name. We invested $5.8 million and accounted for this investment using the equity method until January 2012. In January 2012, we made an additional investment of $6.0 million in Tri-US, Inc., resulting in a controlling ownership interest of approximately 69%. In December 2012, the Board of Directors of Tri-US, Inc. decided to immediately cease operations and dissolve the company as a result of operational difficulties, quality issues and competitive constraints. It was determined that investments necessary to continue the business would not generate a sufficient return. Accordingly, in December 2012, the Company recorded non-cash asset impairment charges of approximately $7.5 million, primarily associated with the write off of goodwill and other intangible assets. These charges excluded the portion of the losses attributable to the noncontrolling interests.
Godrej Hershey Ltd. Goodwill Impairment
As a result of operating performance that was below expectations, we completed an impairment evaluation of goodwill and other intangible assets of Godrej Hershey Ltd. during the second quarter of 2010. As a result of reduced expectations for future cash flows from lower than expected profitability, we determined that the carrying amount of Godrej Hershey Ltd. exceeded its fair value. As a result, we recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $44.7 million to reduce the carrying value of Godrej Hershey Ltd. to its fair value, including a reduction to reflect the share of the charge associated with the noncontrolling interests. There was no tax benefit associated with this charge. For more information on our accounting policies for goodwill and other intangible assets see pages 44 and 45.
Liabilities Associated with Business Realignment Initiatives
As of December 31, 2012, the liability balance relating to the Next Century program was $7.6 million primarily for estimated employee separation costs which were recorded in 2011 and 2010. We made payments against the liabilities recorded for the Next Century program of $12.8 million in 2012 and $2.2 million in 2011 related to employee separation and project administration costs and the remainder will be paid in 2013.
Income Before Interest and Income Taxes and EBIT Margin
2012 compared with 2011
EBIT increased in 2012 compared with 2011 as a result of higher gross profit, substantially offset by higher selling, marketing and administrative expenses, and business realignment and impairment charges. Pre-tax net business realignment and impairment charges of $83.8 million were recorded in 2012 compared with $49.2 million recorded in 2011.
EBIT margin decreased from 17.4% in 2011 to 16.7% in 2012 primarily as a result of higher selling, marketing and administrative expenses as a percentage of sales and the impact of higher business realignment and impairment costs which more than offset the increase in gross margin. EBIT margin in 2012 was reduced by 0.3 percentage points compared with 2011 as a result of the gain on the sale of trademark licensing rights recorded in 2011. The net impact of business realignment, impairment and acquisition charges recorded in 2012 reduced EBIT margin by 1.3 percentage points. Net business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2011 reduced EBIT margin by 0.8 percentage points.
2011 compared with 2010
EBIT increased in 2011 compared with 2010 as a result of higher gross profit and lower business realignment and impairment charges. Higher selling, marketing and administrative expenses were offset somewhat by the pre-tax gain of $17.0 million on the sale of trademark licensing rights. Pre-tax net business realignment and impairment charges of $49.2 million were recorded in 2011 compared with $98.6 million recorded in 2010.
EBIT margin increased from 16.0% in 2010 to 17.4% in 2011 primarily as a result of the impact of lower business realignment and impairment charges and lower selling, marketing and administrative expenses as a percentage of sales. The gain on the sale of trademark licensing rights increased EBIT margin by 0.3 percentage points in 2011. The net impact of business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2011 reduced EBIT margin by 0.8 percentage points. Net business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2010 reduced EBIT margin by 1.7 percentage points.
Interest Expense, Net
2012 compared with 2011
Net interest expense in 2012 was higher than in 2011 primarily as a result of higher short-term borrowings and a decrease in capitalized interest, partially offset by lower interest expense on long-term debt.
2011 compared with 2010
Net interest expense in 2011 was lower than in 2010 as a result of increased capitalized interest and a reduction of

25


$5.9 million associated with the tender offer and repurchase of $57.5 million of 6.95% Notes recorded in December 2010. These reductions were partially offset by increased interest expense resulting from higher average outstanding short-term debt.
Income Taxes and Effective Tax Rate
2012 compared with 2011
Our effective income tax rate was 34.9% for 2012 compared with 34.7% for 2011. The effective income tax rate was slightly higher in 2012 primarily reflecting the impact of tax rates associated with business realignment and impairment charges recorded in 2012 compared with 2011 and the mix of the Company's income among various tax jurisdictions.
2011 compared with 2010
Our effective income tax rate was 34.7% for 2011 compared with 37.0% for 2010. The effective income tax rate was reduced by 0.1 percentage points in 2011 as a result of the effective tax rates associated with the gain on the sale of trademark licensing rights and business realignment and impairment charges. In 2010, the effective income tax rate was increased by 1.8 percentage points as a result of the tax rates associated with business realignment and impairment charges recorded during the period. Excluding the impact of tax rates associated with the gain on sale of the trademark licensing rights and business realignment and impairment charges, our effective tax rate decreased in 2011 as a result of discrete tax benefits recognized in 2011.
Net Income and Net Income Per Share
2012 compared with 2011
Earnings per share-diluted increased $0.15, or 5.5% in 2012 compared with 2011. Net income in 2012 was reduced by $57.2 million, or $0.25 per share-diluted, as a result of net business realignment and impairment charges. Net income was reduced by $9.2 million, or $0.04 per share-diluted, in 2012 as a result of closing and integration costs for the Brookside acquisition and by $12.7 million or $0.06 per share-diluted related to non-service-related pension expenses in 2012. In 2011, net income was increased by $11.1 million, or $0.05 per share-diluted, as a result of the gain on sale of trademark licensing rights and reduced by $30.9 million, or $0.13 per share-diluted, as a result of net business realignment and impairment charges. Non-service-related pension expenses reduced net income by $2.0 million, or $0.01 per share-diluted in 2011. Excluding the impact of business realignment and impairment charges and non-service-related pension expenses from both periods, the acquisition closing and integration costs in 2012 and the gain on the sale of trademark licensing rights in 2011, adjusted earnings per share-diluted increased $0.41 per share, or 14.5% in 2012 compared with 2011.
2011 compared with 2010
Earnings per share-diluted increased $0.53, or 24.0% in 2011 compared with 2010. Net income in 2011 was increased by $11.1 million, or $0.05 per share-diluted, as a result of the gain on sale of trademark licensing rights and was reduced by $30.9 million, or $0.13 per share-diluted, as a result of net business realignment and impairment charges. In 2010, net income was reduced by $77.9 million or $0.34 per share-diluted as a result of business realignment and impairment charges. Net income was reduced by $2.0 million, or $0.01 per share-diluted, in 2011 and by $3.8 million, or $0.02 per share-diluted, in 2010 as a result of non-service-related pension expenses. Excluding the gain on the sale of trademark licensing rights and the impact of business realignment and impairment charges and non-service-related pension expenses, adjusted earnings per share-diluted increased $0.26 per share, or 10.1% in 2011 compared with 2010.
FINANCIAL CONDITION
Our financial condition remained strong during 2012 reflecting strong cash flow from operations.
Business Acquisitions
Acquisitions of businesses are accounted for as purchases and, accordingly, their results of operations have been included in the consolidated financial statements since the respective dates of the acquisitions. The purchase price for each of the acquisitions is allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed.
In January 2012, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of Brookside Foods Ltd. (“Brookside”), a privately held confectionery company based in Abbottsford, British Columbia, Canada. As part of this transaction, we acquired two production facilities located in British Columbia and Quebec. The Brookside product line is primarily sold in the U.S. and Canada in a take home re-sealable pack type. At the time of the acquisition, annual net sales of the business were approximately $90 million. The business complements our position in North America and we are making investments in manufacturing capabilities and conducting market research that will enable future growth.

26


Our financial statements reflect the final accounting for the Brookside acquisition. The purchase price for the acquisition was approximately $172.9 million. The purchase price allocation of the Brookside acquisition is as follows:
In thousands of dollars
Purchase Price Allocation
 
Estimated Useful Life in Years
Goodwill
$
67,974

 
Indefinite
Trademarks
60,253

 
25
Other intangibles(1)
51,057

 
6
to
17
Other assets, net of liabilities assumed of $18.7 million
21,673

 
 
Non-current deferred tax liabilities
(28,101
)
 
 
Purchase Price
$
172,856

 
 
(1)
Includes customer relationships, patents and covenants not to compete.
The excess purchase price over the estimated value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets was recorded to goodwill. The goodwill is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes.
In February 2011, we acquired a 49% interest in Tri-US, Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, a company that manufactures, markets and sells nutritional beverages under the “mix1” brand name. We invested $5.8 million and accounted for this investment using the equity method until January 2012. In January 2012, we made an additional investment of $6.0 million in Tri-US, Inc., resulting in a controlling ownership interest of approximately 69%. In December 2012, the Board of Directors of Tri-US, Inc. decided to immediately cease operations and dissolve the company as a result of operational difficulties, quality issues and competitive constraints. It was determined that investments necessary to continue the business would not generate a sufficient return. Accordingly, in December 2012, the Company recorded non-cash impairment charges of approximately $7.5 million, primarily associated with the write off of goodwill and other intangible assets. These charges excluded the portion attributable to the noncontrolling interests in Tri-US, Inc.
We included results subsequent to the acquisition dates in the consolidated financial statements. If we had included the results of the acquisitions in the consolidated financial statements for each of the periods presented, the effect would not have been material.
Assets
A summary of our assets is as follows:
December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
 
$
2,113,485

 
$
2,046,558

Property, plant and equipment, net
 
1,674,071

 
1,559,717

Goodwill and other intangibles
 
802,716

 
628,658

Deferred income taxes
 
12,448

 
33,439

Other assets
 
152,119

 
138,722

 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
 
$
4,754,839

 
$
4,407,094

l
The change in current assets from 2011 to 2012 was primarily due to the following:
 
Ÿ
Higher cash and cash equivalents in 2012 reflecting strong cash flow from operations and short-term borrowings which exceeded our cash requirements for the year;
 
Ÿ
An increase in accounts receivable reflecting higher sales in December 2012 compared with December 2011, in addition to incremental accounts receivable associated with the Brookside acquisition;

27


 
Ÿ
Raw materials and finished goods inventories were higher due to increased costs and the Brookside acquisition in 2012, however, these increases were partially offset by a decline in raw material inventories associated with manufacturing requirements and lower finished goods inventories which were higher at the end of 2011 in anticipation of the transition of production to our West Hershey manufacturing facility in 2012. In addition, the impact of inventory cost increases in 2012 was offset by adjustments associated with inventories valued under the last-in, first-out method, resulting in lower total inventories as of December 31, 2012; and
 
Ÿ
A decrease in deferred income taxes principally related to the effect of hedging transactions.
l
Property, plant and equipment was higher in 2012, reflecting capital additions of $258.7 million, partly offset by depreciation expense of $174.8 million. Depreciation expense included accelerated depreciation of fixed assets of $15.3 million at a manufacturing facility that was closed during 2012, as well as certain asset retirements resulting primarily from the Next Century program.
l
Goodwill and other intangibles increased primarily due to the Brookside acquisition.
l
Other assets increased primarily due to the loan to our affiliate in China to finance the expansion of manufacturing capacity.
Liabilities
A summary of our liabilities is as follows:
December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
$
1,471,110

 
$
1,173,775

Long-term debt
 
1,530,967

 
1,748,500

Other long-term liabilities
 
668,732

 
603,876

Deferred income taxes
 
35,657

 

 
 
 
 
 
Total liabilities
 
$
3,706,466

 
$
3,526,151

l
Changes in current liabilities from 2011 to 2012 were primarily the result of the following:
 
Ÿ
Higher accounts payable reflecting the timing of payments associated with inventory deliveries to support manufacturing requirements and an increase in amounts payable for marketing programs, partially offset by lower amounts payable for capital expenditures;
 
Ÿ
Higher accrued liabilities related to promotions, incentive compensation and interest rate swap agreements, partially offset by lower liabilities associated with the Next Century program and employee benefits;
 
Ÿ
An increase in short-term debt primarily associated with the financing of the Brookside acquisition in January 2012, along with higher short-term borrowings for certain international businesses, partially offset by the repayment of short-term debt of Godrej Hershey Ltd. after we acquired the remaining 49% interest in September 2012; and
 
Ÿ
An increase in the current portion of long-term debt reflecting the reclassification of $250 million of 5.0% Notes due in 2013 from long-term debt, partially offset by the repayment of 6.95% Notes in 2012.
l
A decrease in long-term debt reflecting the reclassification of $250 million of 5.0% Notes due in November 2013, partially offset by obligations under an agreement with the Ferrero Group (“Ferrero”), an international packaged goods company, for the construction of a warehouse and distribution facility.
l
An increase in other long-term liabilities reflecting the change in the funded status of our pension plans as of December 31, 2012.
l
Deferred income tax liabilities as of December 31, 2012, resulting from temporary differences related to certain intangible assets associated with the Brookside acquisition.

28


Capital Structure
We have two classes of stock outstanding, Common Stock and Class B Stock. Holders of the Common Stock and the Class B Stock generally vote together without regard to class on matters submitted to stockholders, including the election of directors. Holders of the Common Stock have one vote per share. Holders of the Class B Stock have 10 votes per share. Holders of the Common Stock, voting separately as a class, are entitled to elect one-sixth of our Board of Directors. With respect to dividend rights, holders of the Common Stock are entitled to cash dividends 10% higher than those declared and paid on the Class B Stock.
Hershey Trust Company, as trustee for the benefit of Milton Hershey School maintains voting control over The Hershey Company. In this section, we refer to Hershey Trust Company, in its capacity as trustee for the benefit of Milton Hershey School, as the “Milton Hershey School Trust” or the “Trust.” In addition, the Milton Hershey School Trust currently has three representatives who are members of the Board of Directors of the Company, one of whom is the Chairman of the Board. These representatives, from time to time in performing their responsibilities on the Company’s Board, may exercise influence with regard to the ongoing business decisions of our Board of Directors or management. The Trust has indicated that, in its role as controlling stockholder of the Company, it intends to retain its controlling interest in The Hershey Company and the Company Board, and not the Trust Board, is solely responsible and accountable for the Company’s management and performance.
As previously reported, Pennsylvania enacted legislation that requires that the Office of Attorney General be provided advance notice of any transaction that would result in the Milton Hershey School Trust no longer having voting control of the Company. The law provides specific statutory authority for the Attorney General to intercede and petition the Court having jurisdiction over the Milton Hershey School Trust to stop such a transaction if the Attorney General can prove that the transaction is unnecessary for the future economic viability of the Company and is inconsistent with investment and management considerations under fiduciary obligations. This legislation could have the effect of making it more difficult for a third party to acquire a majority of our outstanding voting stock and thereby delay or prevent a change in control of the Company.
Noncontrolling Interests in Subsidiaries
In May 2007, we entered into an agreement with Godrej Beverages and Foods, Ltd., a consumer goods, confectionery and food company, to manufacture and distribute confectionery products, snacks and beverages across India. Under the agreement, we owned a 51% controlling interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. In June 2010, the Company and the noncontrolling interests executed a rights agreement with Godrej Hershey Ltd. in the form of unsecured compulsorily and fully convertible debentures. The Company contributed cash of approximately $11.1 million and the noncontrolling interests contributed $9.3 million associated with the rights agreement. The ownership interest percentages in Godrej Hershey Ltd. did not change significantly as a result of these contributions. The noncontrolling interests in Godrej Hershey Ltd. were included in the equity section of the Consolidated Balance Sheets. In September 2012, we acquired the remaining 49% interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. for approximately $15.8 million. Since the Company had a controlling interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd., the difference between the amount paid and the carrying amount of the noncontrolling interest of $10.3 million was recorded as a reduction to additional paid-in capital and the noncontrolling interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. was eliminated as of September 30, 2012.
We own a 51% controlling interest in Hershey do Brasil under a cooperative agreement with Pandurata Netherlands B.V. (“Bauducco”), a leading manufacturer of baked goods in Brazil whose primary brand is Bauducco. During 2012, the Company contributed cash of approximately $3.1 million to Hershey do Brasil and Bauducco contributed approximately $2.9 million. During 2012, we also loaned $7.0 million to Hershey do Brasil to finance manufacturing capacity expansion. In September 2010, the Company contributed cash of approximately $1.0 million to Hershey do Brasil and Bauducco contributed approximately $0.9 million. The noncontrolling interest in Hershey do Brasil is included in the equity section of the Consolidated Balance Sheets.
The decrease in noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries from $23.6 million as of December 31, 2011 to $11.6 million as of December 31, 2012 reflected the impact of the acquisition of the remaining 49% interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. in September 2012 and the noncontrolling interests’ share of losses of these entities, as well as the impact of currency translation adjustments. These decreases were partially offset by the impact of the cash contributed by Bauducco. The share of losses pertaining to the noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries was $9.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, $7.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 and $8.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. This was reflected in selling, marketing and administrative expenses.

29


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Our principal source of liquidity is operating cash flows. Our net income and, consequently, our cash provided from operations are impacted by: sales volume, seasonal sales patterns, timing of new product introductions, profit margins and price changes. Sales are typically higher during the third and fourth quarters of the year due to seasonal and holiday-related sales patterns. Generally, working capital needs peak during the summer months. We meet these needs primarily by utilizing cash on hand or by issuing commercial paper.
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Our cash flows provided from (used by) operating activities were as follows:
For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
660,931

 
$
628,962

 
$
509,799

Depreciation and amortization
 
210,037

 
215,763

 
197,116

Stock-based compensation and excess tax benefits
 
16,606

 
29,471

 
48,083

Deferred income taxes
 
13,785

 
33,611

 
(18,654
)
Gain on sale of trademark licensing rights, net of tax
 

 
(11,072
)
 

Non-cash business realignment and impairment
     charges
 
38,144

 
34,660

 
62,104

Contributions to pension and other benefit plans
 
(44,208
)
 
(31,671
)
 
(27,723
)
Working capital
 
(2,133
)
 
(116,909
)
 
96,853

Changes in other assets and liabilities
 
201,665

 
(194,948
)
 
33,845

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided from operating activities
 
$
1,094,827

 
$
587,867

 
$
901,423

l
Over the past three years, total cash provided from operating activities was approximately $2.6 billion.
l
Depreciation and amortization expenses decreased in 2012, as compared with 2011, principally as the result of lower accelerated depreciation charges related to the Next Century program somewhat offset by higher depreciation and amortization charges related to the Brookside acquisition. Depreciation and amortization expenses increased in 2011, in comparison with 2010, primarily due to higher accelerated depreciation charges related to the Next Century program. Accelerated depreciation recorded in 2012 was approximately $15.3 million compared with approximately $33.0 million recorded in 2011 and $12.4 million recorded in 2010. Depreciation and amortization expenses represent non-cash items that impacted net income and are reflected in the consolidated statements of cash flows to reconcile cash flows from operating activities.
l
The deferred income tax provision was lower in 2012 than in 2011 primarily as a result of the lower tax impact associated with bonus depreciation resulting from reduced capital expenditures in 2012 for the Next Century program. The deferred tax provision in 2011 primarily reflected the tax impact associated with bonus depreciation related to capital expenditures and other charges recorded in 2011 for the Next Century program. The deferred income tax benefit in 2010 primarily resulted from the tax impact of deferred taxes associated with charges recorded in 2010 for the Next Century program. Deferred income taxes represent non-cash items that impacted net income and are reflected in the consolidated statements of cash flows to reconcile cash flows from operating activities.
l
During the third quarter of 2011, we recorded an $11.1 million gain, net of tax, on the sale of certain non-core trademark licensing rights.
l
We contributed $103.6 million to our pension and other benefit plans over the past three years primarily to pay benefits under the non-funded pension plans and our other benefit plans.


30


l
Over the three-year period, cash provided from working capital tended to fluctuate due to the timing of sales and cash collections during December of each year and working capital management practices, including initiatives implemented to reduce working capital. The increase in cash used by accounts receivable in 2012 was associated with higher sales in December 2012 compared with December 2011. Cash provided from changes in inventories in 2012 resulted from lower inventory levels which were higher at the end of 2011 in anticipation of the transition of production under the Next Century program. The increase in cash provided from changes in accounts payable in 2012 were associated with the timing of payments for inventory deliveries and marketing programs. Changes in cash used by inventories in 2011 was primarily associated with increases in inventory levels in anticipation of the transition of production under the Next Century program, along with higher inventories to support seasonal sales. Changes in cash provided by accounts payable in 2010 principally related to the timing of inventory deliveries to meet manufacturing requirements and, in 2010, also reflected increases in accounts payable associated with the timing of expenditures for advertising.
l
During the three-year period, cash provided from or used by changes in other assets and liabilities reflected the effect of hedging transactions and the impact of business realignment initiatives, along with the related tax effects. Cash provided from changes in other assets and liabilities in 2012 compared with cash used by changes in other assets and liabilities in 2011 primarily reflected the effect of hedging transactions of $304.2 million, the effect of changes in deferred and accrued income taxes of $44.1 million and business realignment initiatives of $46.8 million. Cash used by changes in other assets and liabilities in 2011 compared with cash provided by changes in other assets and liabilities in 2010 was primarily associated with the effect of hedging transactions of $158.5 million and the effect of changes in deferred and accrued income taxes of $35.4 million and business realignment initiatives of $26.7 million, partially offset by an increase in cash provided by the timing of payments associated with selling and marketing programs of $23.2 million.
l
Taxable income and related tax payments in 2012 and 2011 were reduced primarily by bonus depreciation tax deductions driven by capital expenditures associated with the Next Century program. This was offset somewhat by increases in income taxes paid associated with higher net income.
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
Our cash flows provided from (used by) investing activities were as follows:
For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital additions
 
$
(258,727
)
 
$
(323,961
)
 
$
(179,538
)
Capitalized software additions
 
(19,239
)
 
(23,606
)
 
(21,949
)
Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment
 
453

 
312

 
2,201

Proceeds from sale of trademark licensing rights
 

 
20,000

 

Loan to affiliate
 
(23,000
)
 
(7,000
)
 

Business acquisitions
 
(172,856
)
 
(5,750
)
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash used by investing activities
 
$
(473,369
)
 
$
(340,005
)
 
$
(199,286
)
l
Capital additions associated with our Next Century program in 2012 were $74.7 million, in 2011 were $179.4 million and in 2010 were $34.0 million. Other capital additions were primarily related to modernization of existing facilities and purchases of manufacturing equipment for new products.
l
Capitalized software additions were primarily for ongoing enhancement of our information systems.
l
We anticipate total capital expenditures, including capitalized software, of approximately $300 million in 2013.
l
The loans to affiliate in 2012 and 2011 were associated with financing the expansion of capacity under our manufacturing agreement in China with Lotte Confectionery Company LTD.
l
In January 2012, the Company acquired Brookside for approximately $172.9 million.

31


Cash Flows from Financing Activities
Our cash flows provided from (used by) financing activities were as follows:
 
For the years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
In thousands of dollars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net change in short-term borrowings
 
$
77,698

 
$
10,834

 
$
1,156

Long-term borrowings
 
4,025

 
249,126

 
348,208

Repayment of long-term debt
 
(99,381
)
 
(256,189
)
 
(71,548
)
Proceeds from lease financing agreement
 

 
47,601

 

Cash dividends paid
 
(341,206
)
 
(304,083
)
 
(283,434
)
Exercise of stock options and excess tax benefits
 
295,473

 
198,408

 
93,418

Net (payments to) contributions from noncontrolling interests
 
(12,851
)
 

 
10,199

Repurchase of Common Stock
 
(510,630
)
 
(384,515
)
 
(169,099
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash used by financing activities
 
$
(586,872
)
 
$
(438,818
)
 
$
(71,100
)
 
l
In addition to utilizing cash on hand, we use short-term borrowings (commercial paper and bank borrowings) to fund seasonal working capital requirements and ongoing business needs. The increase in short-term borrowings in 2012 was primarily associated with the Brookside acquisition and our international businesses, partially offset by repayments of Godrej Hershey debt. Additional information on short-term borrowings is included under Borrowing Arrangements below.
l
In November 2011, we issued $250 million of 1.5% Notes due in 2016 and in December 2010, we issued $350 million of 4.125% Notes due in 2020. The long-term borrowings in 2011 and 2010 were issued under a shelf registration statement on Form S-3 filed in May 2009 described under Registration Statements below.
l
In August 2012, we repaid $92.5 million of 6.95% Notes due in 2012. Additionally, in September 2011 we repaid $250.0 million of 5.3% Notes due in 2011.
l
In December 2010, we paid $63.4 million to repurchase $57.5 million of our 6.95% Notes due in 2012 as part of a cash tender offer. As a result of the repurchase, we recorded interest expense of $5.9 million, which reflected the premium paid on the tender offer. We used a portion of the proceeds from the $350 million of 4.125% Notes issued in December 2010 to fund the repurchase.
l
In September 2011, we entered into a sale and leasing agreement for the 19 East Chocolate Avenue manufacturing facility. Based on the leasing agreement, we are deemed to be the owner of the property for accounting purposes. We received net proceeds of $47.6 million and recorded a lease financing obligation of $50.0 million under the leasing agreement.
l
In May 2007, we entered into an agreement with Godrej Beverages and Foods, Ltd., a consumer goods, confectionery and food company, to manufacture and distribute confectionery products, snacks and beverages across India. Under the agreement, we owned a 51% controlling interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. In September 2012, we acquired the remaining 49% interest in Godrej Hershey Ltd. for approximately $15.8 million. Payments to noncontrolling interests associated with Godrej Hershey Ltd. were partially offset by equity contributions of $2.9 million by the noncontrolling interests in Hershey do Brasil, in addition to the contribution from the noncontrolling interests in Hershey do Brasil received in 2010.
l
We paid cash dividends of $255.6 million on our Common Stock and $85.6 million on our Class B Stock in 2012.
l
Cash used for the repurchase of Common Stock was partially offset by cash received from the exercise of stock options and the impact of excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation.

32


Repurchases and Issuances of Common Stock
For the years ended December 31, 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
In thousands
 
Shares 
 
Dollars
 
Shares
 
Dollars
 
Shares
 
Dollars
Shares repurchased under authorized programs:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Open market repurchases
 
2,054

 
$
124,931

 
1,903

 
$
100,015

 

 
$

Shares repurchased to replace reissued shares
 
5,599

 
385,699

 
5,179

 
284,500

 
3,932

 
169,099

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total share repurchases
 
7,653

 
510,630

 
7,082

 
384,515

 
3,932

 
169,099

Shares issued for stock-based compensation programs
 
(6,233
)
 
(210,924
)
 
(5,258
)
 
(177,654
)
 
(2,964
)
 
(96,627
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net change
 
1,420

 
$
299,706

 
1,824

 
$
206,861

 
968

 
$
72,472

l
We intend to repurchase shares of Common Stock in order to replace Treasury Stock shares issued for exercised stock options and other stock-based compensation. The value of shares purchased in a given period will vary based on stock options exercised over time and market conditions.
l
In April 2011, our Board of Directors approved a new $250 million authorization to repurchase shares of our Common Stock. As of December 31, 2012, $125.1 million remained available for repurchases of our Common Stock.
Cumulative Share Repurchases and Issuances
A summary of cumulative share repurchases and issuances is as follows:
 
 
Shares

Dollars
 
 
In thousands
Shares repurchased under authorized programs:
 
 
 
 
Open market repurchases
 
61,393

 
$
2,209,377

Repurchases from the Milton Hershey School Trust
 
11,918

 
245,550

Shares retired
 
(1,056
)
 
(12,820
)
 
 
 
 
 
Total repurchases under authorized programs
 
72,255

 
2,442,107

Privately negotiated purchases from the Milton Hershey School Trust
 
67,282

 
1,501,373

Shares repurchased to replace reissued shares
 
41,339

 
1,902,552

Shares issued for stock-based compensation programs and employee benefits
 
(44,760
)
 
(1,287,364
)
 
 
 
 
 
Total held as Treasury Stock as of December 31, 2012
 
136,116

 
$
4,558,668


33


Borrowing Arrangements
We maintain debt levels we consider prudent based on our cash flow, interest coverage ratio and percentage of debt to capital. We use debt financing to lower our overall cost of capital which increases our return on stockholders’ equity.
l
In October 2011, we entered into a new five-year agreement establishing an unsecured revolving credit facility to borrow up to $1.1 billion, with an option to increase borrowings by an additional $400 million with the consent of the lenders. As of December 31, 2012, $1.1 billion was available to borrow under the agreement. The unsecured revolving credit agreement contains certain financial and other covenants, customary representations, warranties and events of default. As of December 31, 2012, we complied with all of these covenants. We may use these funds for general corporate purposes, including commercial paper backstop and business acquisitions.
l
In addition to the revolving credit facility, we maintain lines of credit with domestic and international commercial banks. As of December 31, 2012, we could borrow up to approximately $176.7 million in various currencies under the lines of credit and as of December 31, 2011, we could borrow up to $76.9 million.
Registration Statements
l
In May 2009, we filed a shelf registration statement on Form S-3 that registered an indeterminate amount of debt securities. This registration statement was effective immediately upon filing under Securities and Exchange Commission regulations governing “well-known seasoned issuers” (the “2009 WKSI Registration Statement”).
l
In November 2011, we issued $250 million of 1.50% Notes due November 1, 2016 and, in December 2010, we issued $350 million of 4.125% Notes due December 1, 2020. The Notes were issued under the 2009 WKSI Registration Statement.
l
The 2009 WKSI Registration Statement expired in May 2012. Accordingly, in May 2012, we filed a new registration statement on Form S-3 to replace the 2009 WKSI Registration Statement. The registration statement filed in May 2012 registered an undeterminate amount of debt securities effective immediately.
l
Proceeds from the debt issuances and any other offerings under the registration statement filed in 2012 may be used for general corporate requirements. These may include reducing existing borrowings; financing capital additions; and funding contributions to our pension plans, future business acquisitions and working capital requirements.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS, CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND COMMITMENTS
As of December 31, 2012, our contractual cash obligations by year were as follows:
 
 
Payments Due by Year
 
 
In thousands of dollars
Contractual Obligations
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
Thereafter
 
Total
Unconditional Purchase Obligations
 
$
1,216,200

 
$
497,600

 
$
298,700

 
$
155,500

 
$

 
$

 
$
2,168,000

Lease Obligations
 
13,688

 
11,782

 
10,904

 
9,881

 
8,005

 
5,544

 
59,804

Minimum Pension Plan Funding Obligations
 
2,780

 
5,280

 
5,650

 
5,750

 
9,652

 
48,335

 
77,447