10-K 1 form10k.htm FORM 10-K  

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

 

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the fiscal period ended December 31, 2013 or

 

 

 

 

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from              to

 

 

 

Commission
file number

Registrant, State of Incorporation or Organization, Address of Principal Executive Offices, and Telephone Number

IRS Employer
Identification No.

 

1-32853

 

DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION

(a Delaware Corporation)

550 South Tryon Street

Charlotte, NC 28202-1803

704-382-3853

20-2777218

 

Commission file number

Registrant, State of Incorporation or Organization, Address of Principal Executive Offices, and Telephone Number

 

Commission file number

Registrant, State of Incorporation or Organization, Address of Principal Executive Offices, and Telephone Number

 

1-4928

DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC

(a North Carolina limited liability company)

526 South Church Street

Charlotte, North Carolina 28202-1803

704-382-3853

56-0205520

 

1-3274

DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, INC.

(a Florida corporation)

299 First Avenue North

St. Petersburg, Florida 33701

704-382-3853

59-0247770

 

1-15929

PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.

(a North Carolina corporation)

410 South Wilmington Street

Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-1748

704-382-3853

56-2155481

 

1-1232

DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.

(an Ohio corporation)

139 East Fourth Street

Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

704-382-3853

31-0240030

 

1-3382

DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, INC.

(a North Carolina corporation)

410 South Wilmington Street

Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-1748

704-382-3853

56-0165465

 

1-3543

DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, INC.

(an Indiana corporation)

1000 East Main Street

Plainfield, Indiana 46168

704-382-3853

35-0594457

 

 

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(B) OF THE ACT:

 

Registrant

Title of each class

Name of each exchange on
which registered

 

Duke Energy Corporation (Duke Energy)

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

New York Stock Exchange, Inc.

 

Duke Energy

5.125% Junior Subordinated Debentures due January 15, 2073

New York Stock Exchange, Inc.

 

Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (Duke Energy Carolinas)

All of the registrant’s limited liability company member interests are directly owned by Duke Energy.

 

Progress Energy, Inc. (Progress Energy)

All of the registrant’s common stock is directly owned by Duke Energy.

 

Duke Energy Progress, Inc. (Duke Energy Progress)

All of the registrant’s common stock is indirectly owned by Duke Energy.

 

Duke Energy Florida, Inc. (Duke Energy Florida)

All of the registrant’s common stock is indirectly owned by Duke Energy.

 

Duke Energy Ohio, Inc. (Duke Energy Ohio)

All of the registrant’s common stock is indirectly owned by Duke Energy.

 

Duke Energy Indiana, Inc. (Duke Energy Indiana)

All of the registrant’s common stock is indirectly owned by Duke Energy.

 

 

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(G) OF THE ACT:  None

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Duke Energy

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Florida

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Carolinas

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Ohio

Yes ¨ 

No

 

Progress Energy

Yes ¨ 

No

 

Duke Energy Indiana

Yes ¨ 

No

 

Duke Energy Progress

Yes

No ¨ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports to pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.
Yes
¨  No (Response applicable to all registrants.)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrants (1) have filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No ¨ 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrants have submitted electronically and posted on their corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes No ¨ 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.

 

Duke Energy

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Florida

Yes

No ¨ 

Duke Energy Carolinas

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Ohio

Yes

No ¨ 

Progress Energy

Yes

No ¨ 

 

Duke Energy Indiana

Yes

No ¨ 

Duke Energy Progress

Yes

No ¨ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether Duke Energy is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):  Large accelerated filer   Accelerated filer ¨   Non-accelerated filer ¨   Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana are large accelerated filers, accelerated filers, non-accelerated filers, or smaller reporting companies. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):  Large accelerated filer ¨   Accelerated filer ¨   Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrants are a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨  No  

 

 

 

Estimated aggregate market value of the common equity held by nonaffiliates of Duke Energy at June 30, 2013.

47,550,155,353

 

Number of shares of Common Stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding at February 25, 2014.

706,455,305

 

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Duke Energy definitive proxy statement for the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Shareholders or an amendment to this Annual Report are incorporated by reference into PART III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 hereof.

This combined Form 10-K is filed separately by seven registrants: Duke Energy, Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana (collectively the Duke Energy Registrants). Information contained herein relating to any individual registrant is filed by such registrant solely on its own behalf. Each registrant makes no representation as to information relating exclusively to the other registrants.

Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana meet the conditions set forth in General Instructions I(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-K and are, therefore, filing this form with the reduced disclosure format specified in General Instructions I(2) of Form 10-K.

 

 

                                                   

 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

FORM 10-K FOR THE YEAR ENDED December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 Item 

Page

 

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

 

 

 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

 

 

 

PART I.

 

1.

BUSINESS............................................................................................................................................

8

 

 

DUKE ENERGY

 

 

 

General.........................................................................................................................................

 

 

 

Business Segments........................................................................................................................

 

 

 

Geographic Regions........................................................................................................................

 

 

 

Employees.....................................................................................................................................

 

 

 

Executive Officers..........................................................................................................................

 

 

 

Environmental Matters.....................................................................................................................

 

 

 

DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS

 

 

 

PROGRESS ENERGY

 

 

 

DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS

 

 

 

DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA

 

 

 

DUKE ENERGY OHIO

 

 

 

DUKE ENERGY INDIANA

 

 

 

1A.

RISK FACTORS...................................................................................................................................

19

 

 

 

1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS..................................................................................................

24

 

 

 

2.

PROPERTIES.......................................................................................................................................

25

 

 

 

3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.......................................................................................................................

29

 

 

 

4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES...........................................................................................................

30

 

 

PART II.

 

5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES..............................................................................

31

 

 

 

6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.............................................................................................................

33

 

 

 

7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS......................................................................................................................................

34

 

 

 

7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK................................

67

 

 

 

8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA..............................................................

72

 

 

 

9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.......................................................................................................................................

215

 

 

 

9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES......................................................................................................

215

 

 

PART III.

 

10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE...................................

215

 

 

 

11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION............................................................................................................

216

 

 

 

12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS...............................................................................................

216

 

 

 

13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.............................................................................................................................................................

216

 

 

 

14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES............................................................................

216

 

 

PART IV.

 

15.

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES ...................................................................

218

 

 

SIGNATURES............................................................................................................................

220

 

 

EXHIBIT INDEX..........................................................................................................................

Exhibit-1

 


 

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This document includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are based on management’s beliefs and assumptions. These forward-looking statements, which are intended to cover Duke Energy and the applicable Duke Energy Registrants, are identified by terms and phrases such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “intend,” “estimate,” “expect,” “continue,” “should,” “could,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “will,” “potential,” “forecast,” “target,” “guidance,” “outlook,” and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to be materially different from the results predicted. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated in any forward-looking statement include, but are not limited to:

·       State, federal and foreign legislative and regulatory initiatives, including costs of compliance with existing and future environmental requirements or climate change, as well as rulings that affect cost and investment recovery or have an impact on rate structures or market prices;

·       The ability to recover eligible costs, including those associated with future significant weather events, and earn an adequate return on investment through the regulatory process;

·       The costs of decommissioning Crystal River Nuclear Station – Unit 3 (Crystal River Unit 3) could prove to be more extensive than are currently identified and all costs may not be fully recoverable through the regulatory process;

·       The risk that the credit ratings of the company or its subsidiaries may be different from what the companies expect;

·       Costs and effects of legal and administrative proceedings, settlements, investigations and claims;

·       Industrial, commercial and residential growth or decline in service territories or customer bases resulting from customer usage patterns, including energy efficiency efforts and use of alternative energy sources, including self-generation and distributed generation technologies;

·       Additional competition in electric markets and continued industry consolidation;

·       Political and regulatory uncertainty in other countries in which Duke Energy conducts business;

·       The influence of weather and other natural phenomena on operations, including the economic, operational and other effects of severe storms, hurricanes, droughts and tornadoes;

·       The ability to successfully operate electric generating facilities and deliver electricity to customers;

·       The impact on facilities and business from a terrorist attack, cyber security threats, data security breaches, and other catastrophic events;

·       The inherent risks associated with the operation and potential construction of nuclear facilities, including environmental, health, safety, regulatory and financial risks;

·       The timing and extent of changes in commodity prices, interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates and the ability to recover such costs through the regulatory process, where appropriate, and their impact on liquidity positions and the value of underlying assets;

·       The results of financing efforts, including the ability to obtain financing on favorable terms, which can be affected by various factors, including credit ratings and general economic conditions;

·       Declines in the market prices of equity securities and fixed income securities and resultant cash funding requirements for defined benefit pension plans, other post-retirement benefit plans, and nuclear decommissioning trust funds;

·       Changes in rules for regional transmission organizations, including changes in rate designs and new and evolving capacity markets, and risks related to obligations created by the default of other participants;

·       The ability to control operation and maintenance costs;

·       The level of creditworthiness of counterparties to transactions;

·       Employee workforce factors, including the potential inability to attract and retain key personnel;

·       The ability of subsidiaries to pay dividends or distributions to Duke Energy Corporation holding company (the Parent);

·       The performance of projects undertaken by our nonregulated businesses and the success of efforts to invest in and develop new opportunities;

·       The effect of accounting pronouncements issued periodically by accounting standard-setting bodies;

·       The impact of potential goodwill impairments;

·       The ability to reinvest retained earnings of foreign subsidiaries or repatriate such earnings on a tax-free basis; and

·       The ability to successfully complete future merger, acquisition or divestiture plans.

In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the events described in the forward-looking statements might not occur or might occur to a different extent or at a different time than the Duke Energy Registrants have described. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made; the Duke Energy Registrants undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise that occur after that date.

 


 

 

Glossary of Terms

 

The following terms or acronyms used in this Form 10-K are defined below:

 

 

Term or Acronym

Definition

 

 

the 2006 Plan.....................

Duke Energy’s 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan

 

 

the 2010 Plan.....................

Duke Energy’s 2010 Long-Term Incentive Plan

 

 

the 2012 Settlement............

Settlement agreement in 2012 among Duke Energy Florida, the OPC and other customer advocates

 

 

the 2013 Settlement............

Settlement agreement in 2013 among Duke Energy Florida, the OPC and other customer advocates

 

 

ACI......................................

Activated carbon injection for control of mercury emissions

 

 

AFUDC................................

Allowance for Funds Used During Construction

 

 

Aguaytia..............................

Aguaytia Integrated Energy Project

 

 

ALJ.....................................

Administrative Law Judge

 

 

ANEEL................................

Brazilian electricity regulatory agency

 

 

AOCI...................................

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

Bison...................................

Bison Insurance Company Limited

 

 

BPM....................................

Bulk Power Marketing

 

 

Brunswick............................

Brunswick Nuclear Station

 

 

CAA....................................

Clean Air Act

 

 

CAIR...................................

Clean Air Interstate Rule

 

 

Catawba..............................

Catawba Nuclear Station

 

 

Catawba Riverkeeper..........

Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation, Inc.

 

 

CCR....................................

Coal Combustion Residuals

 

 

CCS....................................

Carbon Capture and Storage

 

 

CT.......................................

Combustion Turbine

 

 

Cinergy................................

Cinergy Corp. (collectively with its subsidiaries)

 

 

CO2.....................................

Carbon Dioxide

 

 

COL....................................

Combined Construction and Operating License

 

 

CPCN..................................

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity

 

 

CRC....................................

Cinergy Receivables Company, LLC

 

 

CRES..................................

Competitive Retail Electric Supplier

 

 

Crescent..............................

Crescent Resources LLC

 

 

Crystal River Unit 3..............

Crystal River Nuclear Station – Unit 3

 

 

CSAPR................................

Cross-State Air Pollution Rule

 

 

DB.......................................

Defined Benefit (Pension Plan)

 

 

D.C. Circuit..........................

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia

 

 

DECAM...............................

Duke Energy Commercial Asset Management, Inc.

 

 

DEGS..................................

Duke Energy Generation Services, Inc.

 

 

DEIGP.................................

Duke Energy International Geracao Paranapenema S.A.

 

 

DENR..................................

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

 

 

DEPR..................................

Duke Energy Progress Receivables Company, LLC

 

 

DERF..................................

Duke Energy Receivables Finance Company, LLC

 

 

DETM..................................

Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, LLC

 

 

DOE....................................

U.S. Department of Energy

 

 

DOJ.....................................

U.S. Department of Justice

 

 

DSI......................................

Dry sorbent injection for control of acid gas emissions

 

 

DSM....................................

Demand Side Management

 

 

Duke Energy.......................

Duke Energy Corporation (collectively with its subsidiaries)

 

 

Duke Energy Carolinas........

Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC

 

 

Duke Energy Florida............

Duke Energy Florida, Inc.

 

 

Duke Energy Indiana...........

Duke Energy Indiana, Inc.

 

 

Duke Energy Kentucky........

Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc.

 

 

Duke Energy Ohio...............

Duke Energy Ohio, Inc.

 

 

Duke Energy Progress.........

Duke Energy Progress, Inc.

 

 

Duke Energy Registrants.....

Duke Energy, Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, and Duke Energy Indiana

 

 

Duke Energy Retail..............

Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC

 

 

Duke Energy Vermillion........

Duke Energy Vermillion II, LLC

 

 

DukeNet..............................

DukeNet Communications Holdings, LLC

 

 

DWQ...................................

North Carolina Division of Water Quality

 

 

EE.......................................

Energy efficiency

 

 

EIP......................................

Progress Energy’s Equity Incentive Plan

 

 

Electric Settlement...............

Settlement agreement in 2013 among Duke Energy Ohio and all intervening parties

 

 

ELG....................................

Effluent Limitation Guidelines

 

 

EPA....................................

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

EPC....................................

Engineering, Procurement and Construction

 

 

EPS....................................

Earnings Per Share

 

 

ERISA.................................

Employee Retirement Income Security Act

 

 

ESOP..................................

Employee Stock Ownership Plan

 

 

ESP....................................

Electric Security Plan

 

 

ETR.....................................

Effective tax rate

 

 

FASB..................................

Financial Accounting Standards Board

 

 

FERC..................................

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

 

 

Fitch....................................

Fitch Ratings, Inc.

 

 

Florida Progress..................

Florida Progress Corporation

 

 

FPSC..................................

Florida Public Service Commission

 

 

FRR.....................................

Fixed Resource Requirement

 

 

FTR.....................................

Financial transmission rights

 

 

Funding Corp......................

Florida Progress Funding Corporation

 

 

GAAP..................................

Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States

 

 

Gas Settlement...................

Settlement agreement in 2013 among Duke Energy Ohio, PUCO Staff and intervening parties

 

 

GBRA..................................

Generation Base Rate Adjustment recovery mechanism

 

 

GHG....................................

Greenhouse Gas

 

 

Global.................................

U.S. Global, LLC

 

 

GWh...................................

Gigawatt-hours

 

 

HAP....................................

Hazardous Air Pollutant

 

 

Harris...................................

Shearon Harris Nuclear Station

 

 

HB 998................................

North Carolina House Bill 998

 

 

IAP......................................

State Environmental Agency of Parana

 

 

IBAMA.................................

Brazil Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources

 

 

Ibener.................................

Iberoamericana de Energia Ibener, S.A.

 

 

IBNR...................................

Incurred but not yet reported

 

 

IC........................................

Internal combustion

 

 

IFRS....................................

International Financial Reporting Standards

 

 

IGCC...................................

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle

 

 

INPO...................................

Institute of Nuclear Power Operations

 

 

IRP......................................

Integrated Resource Plan

 

 

IRS......................................

Internal Revenue Service

 

 

ISO.....................................

Independent System Operator

 

 

ITC......................................

Investment Tax Credit

 

 

IURC...................................

Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission

 

 

Investment Trusts................

Grantor trusts of Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida and Duke Energy Indiana

 

 

JDA.....................................

Joint Dispatch Agreement

 

 

KPSC..................................

Kentucky Public Service Commission

 

 

kV.......................................

Kilovolt

 

 

kWh....................................

Kilowatt-hour

 

 

Lee Nuclear Station.............

William States Lee III Nuclear Station

 

 

Levy....................................

Duke Energy Florida’s proposed nuclear plant in Levy County, Fla.

 

 

Legacy Duke Energy Directors

Members of the pre-merger Duke Energy board of directors

 

 

LIBOR.................................

London Interbank Offered Rate

 

 

MATS..................................

Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (previously referred to as the Utility MACT Rule)

 

 

Mcf......................................

Thousand cubic feet

 

 

McGuire...............................

McGuire Nuclear Station

 

 

MGP....................................

Manufactured gas plant

 

 

MISO...................................

Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc.

 

 

MMBtu.................................

Million British Thermal Unit

 

 

Moody’s...............................

Moody’s Investor Service, Inc.

 

 

MTBE..................................

Methyl tertiary butyl ether

 

 

MTEP..................................

MISO Transmission Expansion Planning

 

 

MW.....................................

Megawatt

 

 

MVP....................................

Multi Value Projects

 

 

MWh...................................

Megawatt-hour

 

 

NCAG..................................

North Carolina Attorney General

 

 

NCEMC...............................

North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation

 

 

NCRC..................................

Florida’s Nuclear Cost Recovery Clause

 

 

NCSC..................................

North Carolina Supreme Court

 

 

NCUC..................................

North Carolina Utilities Commission

 

 

NC WARN...........................

N.C. Waste Awareness and Reduction Network

 

 

NDTF...................................

Nuclear decommissioning trust funds

 

 

NEIL....................................

Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited

 

 

NMC....................................

National Methanol Company

 

 

NOL....................................

Net operating loss

 

 

NOx.....................................

Nitrogen oxide

 

 

Non-GHG............................

Non Greenhouse Gas

 

 

NPNS..................................

Normal purchase/normal sale

 

 

NRC....................................

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

 

 

NSPS..................................

New Source Performance Standard

 

 

NSR....................................

New Source Review

 

 

NWPA.................................

Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

 

 

NYSE..................................

New York Stock Exchange

 

 

Oconee...............................

Oconee Nuclear Station

 

 

OPC....................................

Florida Office of Public Counsel

 

 

OPEB..................................

Other Post-Retirement Benefit Obligations

 

 

ORS....................................

South Carolina Office of Regulatory Staff

 

 

OUCC..................................

Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor

 

 

OVEC..................................

Ohio Valley Electric Corporation

 

 

the Parent...........................

Duke Energy Corporation Holding Company

 

 

PJM.....................................

PJM Interconnection, LLC

 

 

Progress Energy..................

Progress Energy, Inc.

 

 

PSCSC................................

Public Service Commission of South Carolina

 

 

PSD....................................

Prevention of Significant Deterioration

 

 

Public Staff..........................

North Carolina Utilities Commission Public Staff

 

 

PUCO..................................

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

 

 

QF.......................................

Qualified Facilities

 

 

QSPE..................................

Qualifying Special Purpose Entity

 

 

QUIPS.................................

Quarterly Income Preferred Securities

 

 

Relative TSR.......................

TSR of Duke Energy stock relative to a pre-defined peer group

 

 

REPS..................................

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard

 

 

Robinson.............................

Robinson Nuclear Station

 

 

RPM....................................

Reliability Pricing Model

 

 

RSP....................................

Rate Stabilization Plan

 

 

RTO....................................

Regional Transmission Organization

 

 

SAFSTOR...........................

Safe Storage Configuration

 

 

SCOA..................................

Sumitomo Corporation of America

 

 

SEC....................................

Securities and Exchange Commission

 

 

Segment Income.................

Income from continuing operations net of income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

 

SO2.....................................

Sulfur dioxide

 

 

Spectra Energy...................

Spectra Energy Corp.

 

 

Spectra Capital....................

Spectra Energy Capital, LLC (formerly Duke Capital LLC)

 

 

S&P....................................

Standard & Poor’s Rating Services

 

 

SSO....................................

Standard Service Offer

 

 

Subsidiary Registrants.........

Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana

 

 

Supreme Court....................

U.S. Supreme Court

 

 

Sutton.................................

L.V. Sutton combined cycle facility

 

 

the Trust..............................

FPC Capital I Trust

 

 

TSR.....................................

Total shareholder return

 

 

VEBA I................................

Duke Energy Corporation Employee Benefits Trust

 

 

Vermillion.............................

Vermillion Generating Station

 

 

VIE......................................

Variable Interest Entity

 

 

VSP....................................

Voluntary Severance Program

 

 

WACC.................................

Weighted Average Cost of Capital

 

 

WVPA.................................

Wabash Valley Power Association, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

DUKE ENERGY

 

General

Duke Energy Corporation (collectively with its subsidiaries, Duke Energy) is an energy company headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, subject to regulation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Duke Energy operates in the U.S. primarily through its direct and indirect wholly owned subsidiaries, Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (Duke Energy Carolinas), Duke Energy Progress, Inc. (Duke Energy Progress) (formerly Carolina Power & Light Company d/b/a Progress Energy Carolinas), Duke Energy Florida, Inc. (Duke Energy Florida) (formerly Florida Power Corporation d/b/a Progress Energy Florida), Duke Energy Ohio, Inc. (Duke Energy Ohio), and Duke Energy Indiana, Inc. (Duke Energy Indiana), as well as in Latin America. When discussing Duke Energy’s consolidated financial information, it necessarily includes the results of its six separate subsidiary registrants, Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, Progress Energy, Inc. (Progress Energy), Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, and Duke Energy Indiana, which are collectively referred to as the Subsidiary Registrants. All of these entities, along with Duke Energy, are collectively referred to as the Duke Energy Registrants.

The Duke Energy Registrants electronically file reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxies and amendments to such reports.

The public may read and copy any materials the Duke Energy Registrants file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov. Additionally, information about the Duke Energy Registrants, including reports filed with the SEC, is available through Duke Energy’s website at http://www.duke-energy.com. Such reports are accessible at no charge and are made available as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is filed with or furnished to the SEC.

Business Segments

Duke Energy conducts its operations in three business segments; Regulated Utilities, International Energy and Commercial Power. The remainder of Duke Energy’s operations are presented as Other. Duke Energy’s chief operating decision maker regularly reviews financial information about each of these business segments in deciding how to allocate resources and evaluate performance. For additional information on each of these business segments, including financial and geographic information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

The following sections describe the business and operations of each of Duke Energy’s reportable business segments, as well as Other.

regulated utilities

Regulated Utilities conducts operations primarily through Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Indiana, and the regulated transmission and distribution operations of Duke Energy Ohio. These electric and gas operations are subject to the rules and regulations of the FERC, the North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC), the Public Service Commission of South Carolina (PSCSC), the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC), the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO), the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC), and the Kentucky Public Service Commission (KPSC).

Regulated Utilities serves 7.2 million retail electric customers in six states in the Southeast and Midwest regions of the United States. Its service area covers approximately 104,000 square miles with an estimated population of 21 million people. Regulated Utilities serves 500,000 retail natural gas customers in southwestern Ohio and northern Kentucky. Electricity is also sold wholesale to incorporated municipalities, electric cooperative utilities and other load-serving entities.

The following table represents the distribution of billed sales by customer class for the year ended December 31, 2013.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Duke Energy Carolinas(a)

Duke Energy Progress(a)

Duke Energy Florida(b)

Duke Energy Ohio(c)

Duke Energy Indiana(d)

Residential

 32 

%  

 29 

%  

 49 

%  

 36 

%  

 27 

%  

General service

 32 

%  

 25 

%  

 39 

%  

 38 

%  

 25 

%  

Industrial

 25 

%  

 18 

%  

 8 

%  

 24 

%  

 31 

%  

Total retail sales

 89 

%  

 72 

%  

 96 

%  

 98 

%  

 83 

%  

Wholesale sales

 11 

%  

 28 

%  

 4 

%  

 2 

%  

 17 

%  

Total sales

 100 

%  

 100 

%  

 100 

%  

 100 

%  

 100 

%  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

(a)

Primary general service sectors include healthcare, education, financial services, information technology and military buildings. Primary industrial sectors include textiles, chemicals, rubber and plastics, paper, food and beverage, and auto manufacturing.

(b)

Primary general service sectors include tourism, healthcare and agriculture. Primary industrial sectors include phosphate rock mining and processing, electronics design and manufacturing, and citrus and other food processing.

(c)

Primary general service sectors include healthcare, education, real estate and rental leasing, financial and insurance services, and wholesale trade services. Primary industrial sectors include aerospace, primary metals, chemicals and food.

(d)

Primary general service sectors include retail, financial, healthcare and education services. Primary industrial sectors include primary and fabricated metals, transportation equipment, building materials, food and beverage, and chemicals.

  

  

 

The number of residential, general service and industrial customers within the Regulated Utilities service territory is expected to increase over time. However, growth in the near-term is being hampered by the current economic conditions. Average usage per residential customer is

9 

 


 

PART I

expected to remain flat for the foreseeable future. While total industrial sales increased in 2013 when compared to 2012, the growth rate was modest when compared to historical periods.

Seasonality and the Impact of Weather

Regulated Utilities’ costs and revenues are influenced by seasonal patterns. Peak sales of electricity occur during the summer and winter months, resulting in higher revenue and cash flows in these periods. By contrast, lower sales of electricity occur during the spring and fall, allowing for scheduled plant maintenance. Peak gas sales occur during the winter months. Residential and general service customers are most impacted by weather. Estimated weather impacts are based on actual current period weather compared to normal weather conditions. Normal weather conditions are defined as the long-term average of actual historical weather conditions.

The estimated impact of weather on earnings is based on the number of customers, temperature variances from a normal condition and customers’ historic usage levels and patterns. The methodology used to estimate the impact of weather does not and cannot consider all variables that may impact customer response to weather conditions such as humidity and relative temperature changes. The precision of this estimate may also be impacted by applying long-term weather trends to shorter term periods.

Degree-day data are used to estimate energy required to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures based on each day’s average temperature. Heating-degree days measure the variation in weather based on the extent the average daily temperature falls below a base temperature. Cooling-degree days measure the variation in weather based on the extent the average daily temperature rises above the base temperature. Each degree of temperature below the base temperature counts as one heating-degree day and each degree of temperature above the base temperature counts as one cooling-degree day.

Competition

Retail

Regulated Utilities’ businesses operate as the sole supplier of electricity within their service territories, with the exception of Ohio, which has a competitive electricity supply market. Regulated Utilities owns and operates all of the facilities necessary to generate, transmit and distribute electricity. Services are priced by state commission approved rates designed to include the costs of providing these services and a reasonable return on invested capital. This regulatory policy is intended to provide safe and reliable electricity at fair prices. Competition in the regulated electric distribution business is primarily from on-site generation of industrial customers and distributed generation, such as rooftop solar, at residential, general service and/or industrial customer sites.

Regulated Utilities is not aware of any proposed legislation in any jurisdiction that would give its retail customers the right to choose their electricity provider or otherwise restructure or deregulate the electric industry.

Although there is no pending legislation at this time, if the retail jurisdictions served by Regulated Utilities become subject to deregulation, the recovery of stranded costs could become a significant consideration. Stranded costs primarily include the generation assets of Regulated Utilities whose value in a competitive marketplace may be less than their current book value, as well as above-market purchased power commitments from qualified facilities (QFs). QFs are typically small power production facilities that generate power within a utility company’s service territory for which the utility companies are legally obligated to purchase the energy at an avoided cost rate. Thus far, all states that have passed restructuring legislation have provided for the opportunity to recover a substantial portion of stranded costs.

Regulated Utilities’ largest stranded cost exposure is primarily related to Duke Energy Florida’s purchased power commitments with QFs, under which it has future minimum expected capacity payments through 2025 of $3.5 billion. Duke Energy Florida was obligated to enter into these contracts under provisions of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Duke Energy Florida continues to seek ways to address the impact of escalating payments under these contracts. However, the FPSC allows full recovery of the retail portion of the cost of power purchased from QFs. See Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Commitments and Contingencies” for additional information related these purchased power commitments.

In Ohio, Regulated Utilities conducts competitive auctions for electricity supply. The cost of energy purchased through these auctions is recovered from retail customers. Regulated Utilities earns retail margin in Ohio on the transmission and distribution of electricity only and not on the cost of the underlying energy.

Wholesale

Regulated Utilities competes with other utilities and merchant generators for bulk power sales, sales to municipalities and cooperatives, and wholesale transactions. The principal factors in competing for these sales are price, availability of capacity and power, and reliability of service. Prices are influenced primarily by market conditions and fuel costs.

Increased competition in the wholesale electric utility industry and the availability of transmission access could affect Regulated Utilities’ load forecasts, plans for power supply and wholesale energy sales and related revenues. Wholesale energy sales will be impacted by the extent to which additional generation is available to sell to the wholesale market and the ability of Regulated Utilities to attract new customers and to retain existing customers.

Energy Capacity and Resources

Regulated Utilities owns approximately 50,000 megawatts (MW) of generation capacity. For additional information on Regulated Utilities’ generation facilities, see Item 2, “Properties.”

Energy and capacity are also supplied through contracts with other generators and purchased on the open market. Factors that could cause Regulated Utilities to purchase power for its customers include generating plant outages, extreme weather conditions, generation reliability, growth, and price. Regulated Utilities has interconnections and arrangements with its neighboring utilities to facilitate planning, emergency assistance, sale and purchase of capacity and energy, and reliability of power supply.

10 

 


 

PART I

Regulated Utilities’ generation portfolio is a balanced mix of energy resources having different operating characteristics and fuel sources designed to provide energy at the lowest possible cost to meet its obligation to serve retail customers. All options, including owned generation resources and purchased power opportunities, are continually evaluated on a real-time basis to select and dispatch the lowest-cost resources available to meet system load requirements.

Recently Completed Generation Projects

Regulated Utilities completed its generation fleet modernization program in 2013. The additional capacity from this program has allowed Regulated Utilities to retire or plan to retire older, less efficient capacity. The following table summarizes the generation projects constructed and placed in service during the past three years.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Megawatts

  

Fuel

  

Commercial Operation

  

Cost

(in millions)

Duke Energy Carolinas

Cliffside Unit 6

 825 

  

Coal

  

2012 

  

$

 2,100 

Duke Energy Carolinas

Buck Combined Cycle

 620 

  

Natural Gas

  

2011

  

  

 675 

Duke Energy Carolinas

Dan River Combined Cycle

 620 

  

Natural Gas

  

2012 

  

  

 675 

Duke Energy Progress

H.F. Lee Combined Cycle

 920 

  

Natural Gas

  

2012

  

  

 725 

Duke Energy Progress

Smith Combined Cycle

 1,084 

  

Natural Gas

  

2011

  

  

 575 

Duke Energy Progress

L.V. Sutton Combined Cycle

 625 

  

Natural Gas

  

2013

  

  

 575 

Duke Energy Indiana

Edwardsport IGCC

 618 

  

Coal

  

2013

  

  

 3,550 

Total

  

 5,312 

  

  

  

  

  

$

 8,875 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Potential Plant Retirements

The Subsidiary Registrants periodically file Integrated Resource Plans (IRP) with state regulatory commissions. The IRPs provide a view of forecasted energy needs over a long term (15-20 years) and options being considered to meet those needs. The IRPs filed by the Subsidiary Registrants in 2013 and 2012 included planning assumptions to potentially retire certain coal-fired generating facilities earlier than their current estimated useful lives. These facilities do not have the requisite emission control equipment, primarily to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that are not yet effective. These facilities total approximately 2,447 MW at five sites. Duke Energy continues to evaluate the potential need to retire these coal-fired generating facilities earlier than the current estimated useful lives, and plans to seek regulatory recovery for amounts that would not be otherwise recovered when any assets are retired. For additional information related to potential plant retirements see Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Regulatory Matters.”

Sources of Electricity

Regulated Utilities relies principally on coal, natural gas and nuclear fuel for its generation of electricity. The following table lists sources of electricity and fuel costs for the three years ended December 31, 2013.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Generation by Source(a)(e)

  

Cost of Delivered Fuel per Net

Kilowatt-hour Generated (Cents)(a)(e)

  

2013 

  

2012 

  

2011   

  

2013 

  

2012 

  

2011  

Coal(b)

 35.7 

%

  

 39.1 

%

  

 52.6 

%  

  

 3.67 

  

 3.55 

  

 3.17  

Nuclear(b)

 28.7 

%

  

 30.8 

%

  

 33.0 

%  

  

 0.66 

  

 0.62 

  

 0.55  

Oil and gas(b)

 21.3 

%

  

 14.0 

%

  

 1.2 

%  

  

 4.18 

  

 4.03 

  

 5.89  

All fuels (cost-based on weighted average)(b)

 85.7 

%

  

 83.9 

%

  

 86.8 

%  

  

 2.79 

  

 2.55 

  

 2.21  

Hydroelectric and solar(c)

 1.5 

%

  

 0.8 

%

  

 0.9 

%  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Total generation  

 87.2 

%

  

 84.7 

%

  

 87.7 

%  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Purchased power and net interchange(d)

 12.8 

%

  

 15.3 

%

  

 12.3 

%  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Total sources of energy  

 100.0 

%

  

 100.0 

%

  

 100.0 

%  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

(a)

Statistics include Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida beginning July 2, 2012.  

(b)

Statistics related to all fuels reflect Regulated Utilities' ownership interest in jointly owned generation facilities.  

(c)

Generating figures are net of output required to replenish pumped storage facilities during off-peak periods.  

(d)

Purchased power includes renewable energy purchases.  

(e)

Includes the effect of the Joint Dispatch Agreement (JDA) and Mitigation Sales. Mitigation sales are excluded from the Regulated Utilities segment.  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Coal

Regulated Utilities meets its coal demand through a portfolio of long-term purchase contracts and short-term spot market purchase agreements. Large amounts of coal are purchased under long-term contracts with mining operators who mine both underground and at the surface. Regulated Utilities uses spot-market purchases to meet coal requirements not met by long-term contracts. Expiration dates for its long-term contracts, which have various price adjustment provisions and market re-openers, range from 2014 to 2016 for Duke Energy Carolinas, 2014 to 2018 for Duke Energy Progress, 2014 to 2016 for Duke Energy Florida, and 2014 to 2025 for Duke Energy Indiana. Regulated Utilities expects to renew these contracts or enter into similar contracts with other suppliers as existing contracts expire, though prices will fluctuate over time as coal markets change. Coal purchased for the Carolinas is primarily produced from mines in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia and the Illinois Basin. Coal purchased for Florida is primarily produced from mines in Central Appalachia and the Illinois Basin. Coal purchased for Indiana is primarily produced in Indiana and Illinois. Regulated Utilities has an adequate supply of coal under contract to fuel its projected 2014 operations and a significant portion of supply to fuel its projected 2015 operations. Coal inventory levels have begun to normalize during the past year as weather patterns have trended closer to historical averages, combined with improving economic indicators and higher natural gas prices, which are resulting in higher coal-fired generation. Significantly colder than normal temperatures in December 2013 and January 2014 continued the trend of higher natural gas prices and increased coal-fired generation.

11 

 


 

PART I

The current average sulfur content of coal purchased by Regulated Utilities is between 1.5 percent and 2 percent for Duke Energy Carolinas, between 1.5 percent and 2 percent for Duke Energy Progress, between 1 percent and 2.5 percent for Duke Energy Florida, and between 2 percent and 3 percent for Duke Energy Indiana. Regulated Utilities’ environmental controls, in combination with the use of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission allowances, enable Regulated Utilities to satisfy current SO2 emission limitations for its existing facilities.

Nuclear

The industrial processes for producing nuclear generating fuel generally involve the mining and milling of uranium ore to produce uranium concentrates, and services to convert, enrich, and fabricate fuel assemblies.

Regulated Utilities has contracted for uranium materials and services to fuel its nuclear reactors. Uranium concentrates, conversion services and enrichment services are primarily met through a diversified portfolio of long-term supply contracts. The contracts are diversified by supplier, country of origin and pricing. Regulated Utilities staggers its contracting so that its portfolio of long-term contracts covers the majority of its fuel requirements in the near-term and decreasing portions of its fuel requirements over time thereafter. Near-term requirements not met by long-term supply contracts have been and are expected to be fulfilled with spot market purchases. Due to the technical complexities of changing suppliers of fuel fabrication services, Regulated Utilities generally sources these services to a single domestic supplier on a plant-by-plant basis using multi-year contracts.

Regulated Utilities has entered into fuel contracts that cover 100 percent of its uranium concentrates, conversion services, and enrichment services requirements through at least 2014 and cover fabrication services requirements for these plants through at least 2018. For future requirements not already covered under long-term contracts, Regulated Utilities believes it will be able to renew contracts as they expire, or enter into similar contractual arrangements with other suppliers of nuclear fuel materials and services.

Oil and Gas

Oil and natural gas supply for Regulated Utilities’ generation fleet is purchased under term and spot contracts from various suppliers. Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida and Duke Energy Indiana use derivative instruments to limit a portion of their exposure to price fluctuations for natural gas. Regulated Utilities has dual-fuel generating facilities that can operate with both fuel oil and natural gas. The cost of Regulated Utilities’ oil and natural gas is either at a fixed price or determined by market prices as reported in certain industry publications. Regulated Utilities believes it has access to an adequate supply of oil and gas for the reasonably foreseeable future. Regulated Utilities’ natural gas transportation for its gas generation is purchased under term firm transportation contracts with interstate and intrastate pipelines. Regulated Utilities may also purchase additional shorter-term transportation for its load requirements during peak periods. The Regulated Utilities natural gas plants are served by several supply zones and multiple pipelines.

Purchased Power

Regulated Utilities purchased approximately 11.7 million megawatt-hours (MWh), 19.8 million MWh and 19.0 million MWh of its system energy requirements during 2013, 2012, and 2011, respectively, under purchase obligations and leases and had 3,800 and 4,500 MW of firm purchased capacity under contract during 2013 and 2012, respectively. These amounts include MWh for Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida for all periods presented. These agreements include approximately 398 MW of firm capacity under contract by Duke Energy Florida with certain QFs. Regulated Utilities may need to acquire additional purchased power capacity in the future to accommodate a portion of its system load needs. Regulated Utilities believes that it can obtain adequate purchased power to meet these needs. However, during periods of high demand, the price and availability of purchased power may be significantly affected.

Gas for Retail Distribution

Regulated Utilities is responsible for the purchase and the subsequent delivery of natural gas to retail customers in its Ohio and Kentucky service territories. Regulated Utilities’ natural gas procurement strategy is to buy firm natural gas supplies and firm interstate pipeline transportation capacity during the winter season and during the non-heating season through a combination of firm supply and transportation capacity along with spot supply and interruptible transportation capacity. This strategy allows Regulated Utilities to assure reliable natural gas supply for its non-curtailable customers during peak winter conditions and provides Regulated Utilities the flexibility to reduce its contract commitments if firm customers choose alternate gas. In 2013, firm supply purchase commitment agreements provided approximately 100 percent of the natural gas supply.

Inventory

Generation of electricity is capital intensive. Regulated Utilities must maintain an adequate stock of fuel and materials and supplies in order to ensure continuous operation of generating facilities and reliable delivery to customers. As of December 31, 2013, the inventory balance for Regulated Utilities was $3,043 million. See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” for additional information.

Dan River Ash Basin Release

On February 2, 2014, a break in a stormwater pipe beneath an ash basin at Duke Energy Carolinas’ retired Dan River steam station caused a release of ash basin water and ash into the Dan River. On February 8, 2014, a permanent plug was installed in the stormwater pipe stopping the release of materials into the river. Duke Energy Carolinas estimates 30,000 to 39,000 tons of ash and 24 million to 27 million gallons of basin water were released into the river.

Duke Energy cannot reasonably estimate the cost associated with remediation of this release at this time. Other costs related to the Dan River release and other ash basins, including regulatory directives, natural resources damages, future lawsuits, future claims, long-term environmental impact costs, long-term operational changes, and costs associated with new laws and regulations cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

12 

 


 

PART I

Nuclear Matters

Regulated Utilities owns, wholly or partially, 12 nuclear reactors located at seven stations. Nuclear insurance includes: nuclear liability coverage; property, decontamination and premature decommissioning coverage; and replacement power expense coverage. Joint owners reimburse Regulated Utilities for certain expenses associated with nuclear insurance in accordance with joint owner agreements. The Price-Anderson Act requires plant owners to provide for public nuclear liability claims resulting from nuclear incidents to the maximum total financial protection liability, which currently is $13.6 billion. See Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Commitments and Contingencies — Nuclear Insurance,” for more information.

Regulated Utilities has a significant future financial commitment to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and decommission and decontaminate each plant safely. The NCUC, FPSC and PSCSC require Regulated Utilities to update their cost estimates for decommissioning their nuclear plants every five years.

The following table summarizes the fair value of nuclear decommissioning trust fund (NDTF) balances and cost study results for Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, and Duke Energy Florida.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

NDTF

  

  

  

  

  

  

December 31, 2013

  

December 31, 2012

  

  

Decommissioning Costs(a) (b)

  

Year of Cost Study

Duke Energy Carolinas  

$

 2,840 

  

$

 2,354 

  

  

$

 3,420  

  

2013

Duke Energy Progress  

  

 1,539 

  

  

 1,259 

  

  

  

 3,000  

  

2009

Duke Energy Florida  

  

 753 

  

  

 629 

  

  

  

 1,083  

  

2013

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

(a)

Represents cost per the most recent site-specific nuclear decommissioning cost studies, including costs to decommission plant components not subject to radioactive contamination.

(b)

Includes the Subsidiary Registrants' ownership interest in jointly owned reactors. Other joint owners are responsible for decommissioning costs related to their interest in the reactors.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

The NCUC, FPSC and PSCSC have allowed Regulated Utilities’ to recover estimated decommissioning costs through retail rates over the expected remaining service periods of their nuclear stations. Regulated Utilities believes the decommissioning costs being recovered through rates, when coupled with the existing fund balance and expected fund earnings, will be sufficient to provide for the cost of future decommissioning. See Note 9 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Asset Retirement Obligations,” for more information.

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended) (NWPA) provides the framework for development by the federal government of interim storage and permanent disposal facilities for high-level radioactive waste materials. The NWPA promotes increased usage of interim storage of spent nuclear fuel at existing nuclear plants. Regulated Utilities will continue to maximize the use of spent fuel storage capability within its own facilities for as long as feasible.

Under federal law, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the selection and construction of a facility for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Delays have occurred in the DOE’s proposed permanent repository to be located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Until the DOE begins to accept the spent nuclear fuel, Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida will continue to safely manage their spent nuclear fuel. With certain modifications and additional approvals by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), including the expansion of on-site dry cask storage facilities, spent nuclear fuel storage facilities will be sufficient to provide storage space for spent fuel through the expiration of the operating licenses, including any license renewals, for all sites except Shearon Harris Nuclear Station (Harris) and Crystal River Unit 3. Under current regulatory guidelines, Harris has sufficient storage capacity in its spent fuel pools through the expiration of its renewed operating license. Crystal River Unit 3 was retired in 2013, with plans to place the facility in SAFSTOR (extended storage) prior to final decommissioning. An on-site dry cask storage facility will be installed to accommodate storage of all spent nuclear fuel until the DOE accepts the spent nuclear fuel.

The nuclear power industry faces uncertainties with respect to the cost and long-term availability of disposal sites for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste, compliance with changing regulatory requirements, capital outlays for modifications and new plant construction, the technological and financial aspects of decommissioning plants at the end of their licensed lives, and requirements relating to nuclear insurance. Nuclear units are periodically removed from service to accommodate normal refueling and maintenance outages, repairs, uprates and certain other modifications.

Regulated Utilities is subject to the jurisdiction of the NRC for the design, construction and operation of its nuclear generating facilities. The following table includes the current expiration of nuclear operating licenses.

  

  

  

  

Unit  

  

Year of Expiration

Duke Energy Carolinas  

  

  

Catawba Unit 1  

  

2043 

Catawba Unit 2  

  

2043 

McGuire Unit 1  

  

2041 

McGuire Unit 2  

  

2043 

Oconee Unit 1  

  

2033 

Oconee Unit 2  

  

2033 

Oconee Unit 3  

  

2034 

Duke Energy Progress  

  

  

Brunswick Unit 1  

  

2036 

Brunswick Unit 2  

  

2034 

Harris  

  

2046 

Robinson  

  

2030 

Duke Energy Florida  

  

  

Crystal River Unit 3(a)

  

2016 

  

  

  

  

(a)

Duke Energy Florida has requested the NRC terminate the Crystal River Unit 3 operating license as a result of the retirement of the unit.

  

  

  

  

13 

 


 

PART I

The NRC issues orders with regard to security at nuclear plants in response to new or emerging threats. The most recent orders include additional restrictions on nuclear plant access, increased security measures at nuclear facilities and closer coordination with intelligence, military, law enforcement and emergency response functions at the federal, state and local levels. As the NRC, other governmental entities and the industry continue to consider security issues, it is possible that more extensive security plans could be required.

Regulation

State

The NCUC, PSCSC, FPSC, PUCO, IURC and KPSC (collectively, the state utility commissions) approve rates for retail electric and gas service within their respective states. The state utility commissions, except for the PUCO, also have authority over the construction and operation of Regulated Utilities’ generating facilities. Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) issued by the state utility commissions, as applicable, authorize Regulated Utilities to construct and operate its electric facilities, and to sell electricity to retail and wholesale customers. Prior approval from the relevant state utility commission is required for Regulated Utilities to issue securities. The underlying concept of utility ratemaking is to set rates at a level that allows the utility to collect revenues equal to its cost of providing service plus earn a reasonable rate of return on its invested capital, including equity.

Each of the state utility commissions allows recovery of certain costs through various cost-recovery clauses, to the extent the respective commission determines in periodic hearings that such costs, including any past over or under-recovered costs, are prudent. The clauses are in addition to approved base rates.

Fuel, fuel-related costs and certain purchased power costs are eligible for recovery by Regulated Utilities. Regulated Utilities uses coal, oil, hydroelectric, natural gas and nuclear fuel to generate electricity, thereby maintaining a diverse fuel mix that helps mitigate the impact of cost increases in any one fuel. Due to the associated regulatory treatment and the method allowed for recovery, changes in fuel costs from year to year have no material impact on operating results of Regulated Utilities, unless a commission finds a portion of such costs to have been imprudent. However, delays between the expenditure for fuel costs and recovery from ratepayers can adversely impact the timing of cash flows of Regulated Utilities.

The following table summarizes base rate cases approved and effective in the past three years.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Annual Increase

  

Return on Equity

  

Equity Component of Capital Structure

  

Effective Date

  

Other

Duke Energy Carolinas 2013 North Carolina Rate Case(a)

$

 234 

  

 10.2 

%

  

53 

%

  

September 2013

  

(b)

Duke Energy Carolinas 2013 South Carolina Rate Case(a)

  

 118 

  

 10.2 

%

  

53 

%

  

September 2013

  

(c)

Duke Energy Carolinas 2011 North Carolina Rate Case  

  

 309 

  

 10.5 

%

  

53 

%

  

February 2012

  

  

Duke Energy Carolinas 2011 South Carolina Rate Case  

  

 93 

  

 10.5 

%

  

53 

%

  

February 2012

  

  

Duke Energy Progress 2012 North Carolina Rate Case(a)

  

 178 

  

 10.2 

%

  

53 

%

  

June 2013

  

(d)

Duke Energy Ohio 2012 Electric Rate Case  

  

 49 

  

 9.84 

%

  

53 

%

  

May 2013

  

  

Duke Energy Ohio 2012 Natural Gas Rate Case  

  

 -   

  

 9.84 

%

  

53 

%

  

December 2013

  

(e)

Duke Energy Florida 2013 FPSC Settlement  

  

 -   

  

 10.5 

%

  

49 

%

  

October 2013

  

(f)(h)

Duke Energy Florida 2012 FPSC Settlement  

  

 150 

  

 10.5 

%

  

49 

%

  

January 2013

  

(g)(h)

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

(a)

Rates will increase over a two or three year period as approved by the NCUC and PSCSC. Annual increase amounts represent the total increase once effective.

(b)

Terms of this rate case include (i) recognition of nuclear outage expenses over the refueling cycle rather than when the outage occurs, (ii) a $10 million shareholder contribution to agencies providing energy assistance to low-income customers, (iii) an annual reduction in the regulatory liability for costs of removal of $30 million for each of the first two years, and (iv) no additional base rate increases to be effective before September 2015.

(c)

Terms of this rate case include (i) recognition of nuclear outage expenses over the refueling cycle rather than when the outage occurs, (ii) an approximate $4 million shareholder contribution to agencies providing energy assistance to low-income customers and for economic development, (iii) a reduction in the regulatory liability for costs of removal of $45 million for the first year, and (iv) no additional base rate increases to be effective before September 2015.

(d)

Terms of this rate case include (i) recognition of nuclear outage expenses over the refueling cycle rather than when the outage occurs, (ii) a $20 million shareholder contribution to agencies providing energy assistance to low-income customers, and (iii) a reduction in the regulatory liability for costs of removal of $20 million for the first year.

(e)

Although the PUCO approved no increase in base rates, more than half of the revenue request was approved to be recovered in various riders, including recovery of costs related to former manufactured gas plants (MGP). Recovery of $56 million of MGP costs via a rider was approved in November 2013. The rider is effective in March 2014.

(f)

Terms of this settlement include (i) no additional base rate increases until 2019, (ii) partial recovery of Crystal River Unit 3 beginning in 2014, and (iii) full recovery of Crystal River Unit 3, not to exceed $1,466 million, plus the cost to build a dry cask storage facility, beginning no later than 2017.

(g)

Terms of this settlement include the removal of Crystal River Unit 3 assets from rate base.

(h)

Capital structure includes deferred income tax, customer deposits and investment tax credits.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

For more information on rate matters and other regulatory proceedings, see Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Regulatory Matters — Rate Related Information.”

14 

 


 

PART I

Federal

The FERC approves Regulated Utilities’ cost-based rates for electric sales to certain wholesale customers, as well as sales of transmission service. Regulations of FERC and the state utility commissions govern access to regulated electric and gas customers and other data by nonregulated entities and services provided between regulated and nonregulated energy affiliates. These regulations affect the activities of nonregulated affiliates with Regulated Utilities.

Regional Transmission Organizations (RTO). PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM) and Midcontinent Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc. (MISO) are the Independent System Operators (ISO) and FERC-approved RTOs for the regions in which Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana operate. PJM and MISO operate energy, capacity and other markets, and, through central dispatch, control the day-to-day operations of bulk power systems.

Duke Energy Ohio is a member of PJM and Duke Energy Indiana is a member of MISO. Transmission owners in these RTOs have turned over control of their transmission facilities, and their transmission systems are currently under the dispatch control of the RTOs. Transmission service is provided on a region-wide, open-access basis using the transmission facilities of the RTO members at rates based on the costs of transmission service.

Environmental. Regulated Utilities is subject to the jurisdiction of the EPA and state and local environmental agencies. For a discussion of environmental regulation, see “Environmental Matters” in this section.

See “Other Issues” section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for a discussion about potential Global Climate Change legislation and other EPA regulations under development and the potential impacts such legislation and regulation could have on Duke Energy’s operations.

INTERNATIONAL ENERGY

International Energy principally operates and manages power generation facilities and engages in sales and marketing of electric power, natural gas, and natural gas liquids outside the U.S. Its activities principally target power generation in Latin America. Additionally, International Energy owns a 25 percent interest in National Methanol Company (NMC), a large regional producer of methanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) located in Saudi Arabia. International Energy’s ownership interest will decrease to 17.5 percent by the end of 2016. The investment in NMC is accounted for under the equity method of accounting.

International Energy’s customers include retail distributors, electric utilities, independent power producers, marketers, and industrial and commercial companies. International Energy’s current strategy is focused on optimizing the value of its current Latin American portfolio and expanding the portfolio through investment in generation opportunities in Latin America.

For information on International Energy’s generation facilities, see Item 2, “Properties.”

Competition and Regulation

International Energy’s sales and marketing of electric power and natural gas competes directly with other generators and marketers serving its market areas. Competitors are country and region-specific but include government-owned electric generating companies, local distribution companies with self-generation capability and other privately owned electric generating and marketing companies. The principal elements of competition are price and availability, terms of service, flexibility and reliability of service.

A high percentage of International Energy’s portfolio consists of baseload hydroelectric generation facilities, which compete with other forms of electric generation available to International Energy’s customers and end-users, including natural gas and fuel oils. Economic activity, conservation, legislation, governmental regulations, weather, additional generation capacities and other factors affect the supply and demand for electricity in the regions served by International Energy.

International Energy’s operations are subject to both country-specific and international laws and regulations. (See “Environmental Matters” in this section.)

COMMERCIAL POWER

Commercial Power owns, operates and manages power plants and engages in the wholesale marketing and procurement of electric power, fuel and emission allowances related to these plants as well as other contractual positions. Commercial Power’s generation operations consist primarily of Duke Energy Ohio’s coal-fired and gas-fired nonregulated generation assets located in the Midwest region of the United States and wind and solar generation located throughout the United States. The asset portfolio has a diversified fuel mix with baseload and mid-merit coal-fired units as well as combined cycle and peaking natural gas-fired units.

Generation from the coal-fired and gas-fired assets is dispatched into the PJM wholesale market. These assets earn energy and capacity revenue at market prices. Duke Energy Ohio is a PJM Fixed Resource Requirement (FRR) entity through May 31, 2015. As an FRR entity, Duke Energy Ohio is obligated to self-supply capacity for the Duke Energy Ohio load zone. Commercial Power has economically hedged its forecasted coal-fired generation and a significant portion of its forecasted gas-fired generation for 2014. Commercial Power also has long-term economic hedges in place for a portion of expected coal and gas generation through 2017 and 2018, respectively. Capacity revenues are 100 percent fixed in PJM through May 2017.

Energy and renewable energy credits generated by wind and solar projects are generally sold at contractual prices. Contracts are executed with load serving entities, which, in most instances, have obligations under state-mandated renewable energy portfolio standards or similar state or local renewable energy goals. Most contracts have a term which approximates the estimated useful life of the underlying generation project. In addition, Commercial Power operates and develops transmission projects.

For information on Commercial Power’s generation facilities, see Item 2, “Properties.”

15 

 


 

PART I

Commercial Power also has a retail sales subsidiary, Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC (Duke Energy Retail), which is certified by the PUCO as a Competitive Retail Electric Supplier (CRES) provider in Ohio. Duke Energy Retail serves retail electric and gas customers in Ohio with energy and other energy services at competitive rates.

Capacity Rider Filing

On August 29, 2012, Duke Energy Ohio applied to the PUCO for the establishment of a charge for capacity provided pursuant to its obligations as an FRR entity. The charge, which is consistent with Ohio’s state compensation mechanism, is estimated to be approximately $729 million, and reflects Duke Energy Ohio’s embedded cost of capacity. On February 13, 2013, the PUCO denied Duke Energy Ohio’s request.

Midwest Generation Exit

On February 17, 2014, Duke Energy Ohio announced that it had initiated a process to exit its nonregulated Midwest generation business. Considering a marketing period of several months and potential regulatory approvals, Duke Energy Ohio expects to dispose of the nonregulated Midwest generation business by early to mid-2015. In the first quarter of 2014, Duke Energy Ohio will reclassify approximately $3.5 billion carrying value of its Midwest generation business to assets held for sale and expects to record an estimated pretax impairment charge of $1 billion to $2 billion to reduce the carrying value to estimated sales proceeds less cost to sell.

Other Matters

Commercial Power is subject to regulation at the federal level, primarily from the FERC. Regulations of the FERC govern access to regulated electric customer and other data by nonregulated entities, services provided between regulated and nonregulated energy affiliates, and Commercial Power’s investments in transmission projects. These regulations affect the activities of Commercial Power.

For more information on rate matters, see Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Regulatory Matters — Rate Related Information.”

Commercial Power is subject to the jurisdiction of the EPA and state and local environmental agencies. (For a discussion of environmental regulation, see “Environmental Matters” in this section.)

See “Other Issues” section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for a discussion about potential Global Climate Change legislation and other EPA regulations under development, and the potential impacts such legislation could have on Duke Energy’s operations.

Market Environment and Competition

The market price of commodities and services, along with the quality and reliability of services provided, drive competition in the wholesale energy business. Commercial Power’s main competitors include other nonregulated generators and wholesale power providers.

Sources of Electricity

Commercial Power relies on coal and natural gas for its generation of electric energy.

Coal

Commercial Power meets its coal demand through a portfolio of purchase supply contracts and spot agreements. Large amounts of coal are purchased under supply contracts with mining operators who mine both underground and at the surface. Commercial Power uses spot-market purchases to meet coal requirements not met by supply contracts. Expiration dates for its supply contracts, which have various price adjustment provisions and market re-openers, range through 2018. Commercial Power expects to renew these contracts or enter into similar contracts with other suppliers for the quantities and quality of coal required as existing contracts expire, though prices will fluctuate over time as coal markets change. The majority of Commercial Power’s coal is sourced from mines in the Northern Appalachian and Illinois basins. Commercial Power has an adequate supply of coal to fuel its projected 2014 operations. The majority of Commercial Power’s coal-fired generation is equipped with environmental controls. As a result, Commercial Power is able to satisfy the current emission limitations for SO2 for existing facilities.

Gas

Commercial Power is responsible for the purchase of natural gas to its gas turbine generators. In general Commercial Power hedges its natural gas requirements using physical and financial contracts. Physical gas is purchased in the spot market and under long-term contracts to meet generation needs.

OTHER

The remainder of Duke Energy’s operations is presented as Other. While it is not an operating segment, Other primarily includes unallocated corporate interest expense, certain unallocated corporate costs, Bison Insurance Company Limited (Bison), Duke Energy’s wholly owned, captive insurance subsidiary, contributions to the Duke Energy Foundation, and other investments in businesses the Company is in various stages of exiting or winding down. On December 31, 2013, Duke Energy sold its interest in DukeNet Communications Holdings, LLC (DukeNet) to Time Warner Cable, Inc. Following the repayment of existing DukeNet indebtedness at closing, transaction expenses and other purchase price adjustments, Duke Energy received cash proceeds of approximately $215 million.

Bison’s principal activities as a captive insurance entity include the indemnification of various business risks and losses, such as property, business interruption, workers’ compensation and general liability of subsidiaries and affiliates of Duke Energy.

Regulation

Certain entities within Other are subject to the jurisdiction of state and local agencies.

16 

 


 

PART I

Geographic Regions

For a discussion of Duke Energy’s foreign operations see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations” and Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

Employees

On December 31, 2013, Duke Energy had 27,948 employees. A total of 5,548 operating and maintenance employees were represented by unions.

Executive Officers

Lynn J. Good

54

Vice Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. Ms. Good assumed her current position in July 2013. Prior to that, she served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since 2009. Prior to that, she served as President, Commercial Businesses since November 2007. Prior to that, she served as Senior Vice President and Treasurer since December 2006; prior to that she served as Treasurer and Vice President, Financial Planning since October 2006; and prior to that she served as Vice President and Treasurer since April 2006, upon the merger of Duke Energy and Cinergy.

Dhiaa M. Jamil

57

Executive Vice President and President, Duke Energy Nuclear. Mr. Jamil assumed his current position in March 2013. Prior to that, he served as Chief Nuclear Officer since February 2008. He also served as Chief Generation Officer for Duke Energy from July 2009 to June 2012. Prior to that he served as Senior Vice President, Nuclear Support, Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC since January 2007.

Julia S. Janson

49

Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary. Ms. Janson assumed her current position in December 2012. Prior to that she had held the position of President of Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Kentucky since 2008. She also held the position of Senior Vice President of Ethics and Compliance and Corporate Secretary for Duke Energy after its merger with Cinergy.

Marc E. Manly

61

Executive Vice President and President, Commercial Businesses. Mr. Manly assumed his current position in December 2012. Prior to that he had held the positions of Chief Legal Officer since April 2006, upon the merger of Duke Energy and Cinergy. He also held the position of Corporate Secretary from December 2008 until December 2012.

Brian D. Savoy

38

Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer. Mr. Savoy assumed his current position in September 2013. Prior to that he held the position of Director, Forecasting and Analysis since 2009. He held the position of Vice President and Controller of the Commercial Power segment from 2006-2009.

B. Keith Trent

54

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Regulated Utilities. Mr. Trent assumed his current position in December 2012. He previously held the position of Executive Vice President, Regulated Utilities upon the merger with Progress Energy in July 2012 and prior to that, President, Commercial Businesses from July 2009 until July 2012. Prior to that he served as Group Executive and Chief Strategy, Policy and Regulatory Officer since May 2007. Prior to that he served as Group Executive and Chief Strategy and Policy Officer since October 2006 and prior to that he served as Group Executive and Chief Development Officer since April 2006, upon the merger of Duke Energy and Cinergy.

Jennifer L. Weber

47

Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer. Ms. Weber assumed her current position in January 2011. Prior to that she served as Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer since November 2008. Prior to that she served as Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Scripps Networks Interactive from 2005 to 2008.

Lloyd M. Yates

53

Executive Vice President, Regulated Utilities. Mr. Yates assumed his current position in November 2012. Prior to that, he was named Executive Vice President, Customer Operations in July 2012, upon the merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy. Mr. Yates served as Chief Executive Officer, Duke Energy Progress, Inc. from July 2007 until June 2012.

Steven K. Young

55

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Young assumed his current position in August 2013. Prior to that, he served as Vice President, Chief Accounting Officer and Controller. He assumed the role of Chief Accounting Officer in July 2012. He assumed the role of Controller in December 2006. Prior to that he served as Vice President and Controller since April 2006, upon the merger of Duke Energy and Cinergy.

Executive officers serve until their successors are duly elected or appointed.

There are no family relationships between any of the executive officers, nor any arrangement or understanding between any executive officer and any other person involved in officer selection.

17 

 


 

PART I

Environmental Matters

The Duke Energy Registrants are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations with regard to air and water quality, hazardous and solid waste disposal and other environmental matters. Duke Energy is also subject to international laws and regulations with regard to air and water quality, hazardous and solid waste disposal and other environmental matters. Environmental laws and regulations affecting the Duke Energy Registrants include, but are not limited to:

·          The Clean Air Act (CAA), as well as state laws and regulations impacting air emissions, including State Implementation Plans related to existing and new national ambient air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter. Owners and/or operators of air emission sources are responsible for obtaining permits and for annual compliance and reporting.

·          The Clean Water Act which requires permits for facilities that discharge wastewaters into the environment.

·          The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which can require any individual or entity that currently owns or in the past may have owned or operated a disposal site, as well as transporters or generators of hazardous substances sent to a disposal site, to share in remediation costs.

·          The Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which requires certain solid wastes, including hazardous wastes, to be managed pursuant to a comprehensive regulatory regime.

·          The National Environmental Policy Act, which requires federal agencies to consider potential environmental impacts in their decisions, including siting approvals.

See “Other Issues” section of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for a discussion about potential Global Climate Change legislation and the potential impacts such legislation could have on the Duke Energy Registrants’ operations. Additionally, other recently passed and potential future environmental laws and regulations could have a significant impact on the Duke Energy Registrants’ results of operations, cash flows or financial position. However, if and when such laws and regulations become effective, the Duke Energy Registrants will seek appropriate regulatory recovery of costs to comply within its regulated operations.

For more information on environmental matters involving the Duke Energy Registrants, including possible liability and capital costs, see Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Commitments and Contingencies—Environmental.” Except to the extent discussed in Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Commitments and Contingencies,” compliance with current international, federal, state and local provisions regulating the discharge of materials into the environment, or otherwise protecting the environment, is incorporated into the routine cost structure of our various business segments and is not expected to have a material adverse effect on the competitive position, consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position of the Duke Energy Registrants.

Duke Energy Carolinas

Duke Energy Carolinas generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in portions of North Carolina and South Carolina. Duke Energy Carolinas’ service area covers approximately 24,000 square miles and supplies electric service to 2.4 million residential, commercial and industrial customers. For information about Duke Energy Carolinas’ generating plants, see Item 2, “Properties.” Duke Energy Carolinas is subject to the regulatory provisions of the NCUC, PSCSC, NRC and FERC.

Substantially all of Duke Energy Carolinas operations are regulated and qualify for regulatory accounting. Duke Energy Carolinas operates one reportable business segment, Regulated Utility. For additional information regarding this business segment, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

Progress Energy

Progress Energy, Inc. is a public utility holding company primarily engaged in the regulated electric utility business. Headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, and subject to regulation by the FERC, it owns Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida. When discussing Progress Energy’s financial information, it necessarily includes the results of Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida.

Substantially all of Progress Energy’s operations are regulated and qualify for regulatory accounting. Progress Energy operates one reportable business segment, Regulated Utilities. For additional information regarding this business segment, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

Duke Energy Progress

Duke Energy Progress generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in portions of North Carolina and South Carolina. Duke Energy Progress’ service area covers approximately 34,000 square miles, and supplies electric service to approximately 1.5 million residential, commercial and industrial customers. For information about Duke Energy Progress’ generating plants, see Item 2, “Properties.” Duke Energy Progress is subject to the regulatory provisions of the NCUC, PSCSC, NRC and FERC.

Substantially all of Duke Energy Progress’ operations are regulated and qualify for regulatory accounting. Duke Energy Progress operates one reportable business segment, Regulated Utility. For additional information regarding this business segment, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

Duke Energy Florida

Duke Energy Florida generates, transmits, distributes, and sells electricity in portions of Florida. Duke Energy Florida’s service area covers approximately 20,000 square miles and supplies electric service to approximately 1.7 million residential, commercial and industrial customers. For information about Duke Energy Florida’s generating plants, see Item 2, “Properties.” Duke Energy Florida is subject to the regulatory provisions of the FPSC, NRC and FERC.

18 

 


 

PART I

Substantially all of Duke Energy Florida’s operations are regulated and qualify for regulatory accounting. Duke Energy Florida operates one reportable business segment, Regulated Utility. For additional information regarding this business segment, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

Duke Energy Ohio

Duke Energy Ohio is a public utility that provides service in portions of Ohio and Kentucky. References herein to Duke Energy Ohio include Duke Energy Ohio and its subsidiaries. Duke Energy Ohio is subject to the regulatory provisions of the PUCO, KPSC and FERC.

Business Segments

Duke Energy Ohio operates two business segments: Regulated Utilities and Commercial Power. For additional information on each of these business segments, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

The following is a brief description of the nature of operations of each of Duke Energy Ohio’s reportable business segments.

REGULATED UTILITIES

Regulated Utilities transmits and distributes electricity in Ohio. Regulated Utilities also generates, transmits and distributes electricity in Kentucky. Regulated Utilities also transports and sells natural gas in Ohio and Kentucky. Duke Energy Ohio applies regulatory accounting to substantially all of the operations in its Regulated Utilities operating segment.

Duke Energy Ohio’s Regulated Utilities service area covers 3,000 square miles and supplies electric service to 830,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers and provides regulated transmission and distribution services for natural gas to 500,000 customers. See Item 2, “Properties” for further discussion of Duke Energy Ohio’s Regulated Utilities generating facilities.

COMMERCIAL POWER

Commercial Power owns, operates and manages power plants and engages in the wholesale marketing and procurement of electric power, fuel and emission allowances related to these plants, as well as other contractual positions. Commercial Power’s generation operations consist primarily of coal-fired and gas-fired nonregulated generation assets located in the Midwest region of the United States. The asset portfolio has a diversified fuel mix with baseload and mid-merit coal-fired units as well as combined cycle and peaking natural gas-fired units. Generation from the coal-fired and gas-fired assets is dispatched into the PJM wholesale market. These assets earn energy and capacity revenue at market prices. See Item 2, “Properties”, for further discussion of Duke Energy Ohio’s Commercial Power generating facilities.

On February 17, 2014, Duke Energy Ohio announced that it had initiated a process to exit its nonregulated Midwest generation business. Considering a marketing period of several months and potential regulatory approvals, Duke Energy Ohio expects to dispose of the nonregulated Midwest generation business by early to mid-2015. In the first quarter of 2014, Duke Energy Ohio will reclassify approximately $3.5 billion carrying value of its Midwest generation business to assets held for sale and expects to record an estimated pretax impairment charge of $1 billion to $2 billion to reduce the carrying value to estimated sales proceeds less cost to sell.

Duke Energy Ohio is a PJM FRR entity through May 31, 2015. As an FRR entity, Duke Energy Ohio is required to self-supply capacity for the Duke Energy Ohio load zone.

See Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Regulatory Matters,” for further discussion related to regulatory filings.

In 2013, 2012, and 2011 Duke Energy Ohio earned approximately 37 percent, 36 percent, and 24 percent, respectively, of its consolidated operating revenues from PJM. These revenues relate to the sale of capacity and electricity from all of Duke Energy Ohio’s nonregulated generation assets in 2013 and 2012 and its gas-fired nonregulated generation assets in 2011.

Duke Energy Indiana

Duke Energy Indiana generates, transmits and distributes electricity in portions of Indiana. Duke Energy Indiana’s service area covers 23,000 square miles and supplies electric service to 800,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers. See Item 2, “Properties” for further discussion of Duke Energy Indiana’s generating facilities, transmission and distribution. Duke Energy Indiana is subject to the regulatory provisions of the IURC and FERC.

Substantially all of Duke Energy Indiana’s operations are regulated and qualify for regulatory accounting. Duke Energy Indiana operates one reportable business segment, Regulated Utility. For additional information regarding this business segment, including financial information, see Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Segments.”

19 

 


 

PART I

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

In addition to other disclosures within this Form 10-K, including Management’s Discussion and Analysis – Matters Impacting Future Results for each registrant in Item 7, and other documents filed with the SEC from time to time, the following factors should be considered in evaluating Duke Energy and its subsidiaries. Such factors could affect actual results of operations and cause results to differ substantially from those currently expected or sought. Unless otherwise indicated, risk factors discussed below generally relate to risks associated with all of the Duke Energy Registrants. Risks identified at the Subsidiary Registrant level are generally applicable to Duke Energy.

Regulatory, Legislative and Legal Risks

The Duke Energy Registrants’ regulated electric revenues, earnings and results are dependent on state legislation and regulation that affect electric generation, transmission, distribution and related activities, which may limit their ability to recover costs.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ regulated utility businesses are regulated on a cost-of-service/rate-of-return basis subject to statutes and regulatory commission rules and procedures of North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. If the Duke Energy Registrants’ regulated utility earnings exceed the returns established by the state utility commissions, retail electric rates may be subject to review and possible reduction by the commissions, which may decrease the Duke Energy Registrants’ future earnings. Additionally, if regulatory bodies do not allow recovery of costs incurred in providing service on a timely basis, the Duke Energy Registrants’ future earnings could be negatively impacted.

If legislative and regulatory structures were to evolve in such a way that the Duke Energy Registrants’ exclusive rights to serve their regulated customers were eroded, their future earnings could be negatively impacted.

Deregulation or restructuring in the electric industry may result in increased competition and unrecovered costs that could adversely affect the Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations or cash flows and their utility businesses.

Increased competition resulting from deregulation or restructuring legislation could have a significant adverse impact on the Duke Energy Registrants’ results of operations, financial position, or cash flows. Retail competition and the unbundling of regulated electric service could have a significant adverse financial impact on the Duke Energy Registrants due to an impairment of assets, a loss of retail customers, lower profit margins or increased costs of capital. The Duke Energy Registrants cannot predict the extent and timing of entry by additional competitors into the electric markets. The Duke Energy Registrants cannot predict if or when they will be subject to changes in legislation or regulation, nor can they predict the impact of these changes on their financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ businesses are subject to extensive federal regulation that will affect their operations and costs.

The Duke Energy Registrants are subject to regulation by FERC, NRC, EPA and various other federal agencies. Regulation affects almost every aspect of the Duke Energy Registrants’ businesses, including, among other things, their ability to: take fundamental business management actions; determine the terms and rates of transmission and distribution services; make acquisitions; issue equity or debt securities; engage in transactions with other subsidiaries and affiliates; and pay dividends upstream to the Duke Energy Registrants. Changes to federal regulations are continuous and ongoing. The Duke Energy Registrants cannot predict the future course of regulatory changes or the ultimate effect those changes will have on their businesses. However, changes in regulation can cause delays in or affect business planning and transactions and can substantially increase the Duke Energy Registrants’ costs.

The Dan River ash basin release could impact the financial condition of the Duke Energy Registrants.

There is uncertainty regarding the extent and timing of the costs and liabilities relating to the Dan River ash basin release, including the amount and extent of any civil or criminal penalties, and resulting litigation. These uncertainties are likely to continue for an extended period and may cause costs to increase. Thus, the Dan River ash basin release could have a material adverse impact on the Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Furthermore, releases of a similar nature at any of the Duke Energy Registrants’ other ash basins could also result in a material adverse impact to their financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

The Duke Energy Registrants are subject to numerous environmental laws and regulations requiring significant capital expenditures that can increase the cost of operations, and which may impact or limit business plans, or cause exposure to environmental liabilities.

The Duke Energy Registrants are subject to numerous environmental laws and regulations affecting many aspects of their present and future operations, including air emissions, water quality, wastewater discharges, solid waste and hazardous waste. These laws and regulations can result in increased capital, operating, and other costs. These laws and regulations generally require the Duke Energy Registrants to obtain and comply with a wide variety of environmental licenses, permits, inspections and other approvals. Compliance with environmental laws and regulations can require significant expenditures, including expenditures for cleanup costs and damages arising from contaminated properties. Failure to comply with environmental regulations may result in the imposition of fines, penalties and injunctive measures affecting operating assets. The steps the Duke Energy Registrants could be required to take to ensure their facilities are in compliance could be prohibitively expensive. As a result, the Duke Energy Registrants may be required to shut down or alter the operation of their facilities, which may cause the Duke Energy Registrants to incur losses. Further, the Duke Energy Registrants’ regulatory rate structure and their contracts with customers may not necessarily allow for the recovery of capital costs incurred to comply with new environmental regulations. Also, the Duke Energy Registrants may not be able to obtain or maintain from time to time all required environmental regulatory approvals for their operating assets or development projects. Delays in obtaining any required environmental regulatory approvals, failure to obtain and comply with them or changes in environmental laws or regulations to more stringent compliance levels could result in additional costs of operation for existing facilities or development of new facilities being prevented, delayed or subject to additional costs. Although it is not expected that the costs of complying with current environmental regulations will have a material adverse effect on the Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations or cash flows due to regulatory cost recovery, no assurance can be made that the costs of complying with environmental regulations in the future will not have such an effect.

The EPA has proposed new federal regulations governing the management of coal combustion by-products, cooling water intake structures, wastewater and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. These regulations, as well as new regulations or legislative actions resulting from the Dan

20 

 


 

PART I

River ash basis release, may require the Duke Energy Registrants to make additional capital expenditures and increase operating and maintenance costs.

Duke Energy’s investments and projects located outside of the U.S. expose it to risks related to the laws, taxes, economic and political conditions, and policies of foreign governments. These risks may delay or reduce Duke Energy’s realization of value from its international projects.

Duke Energy currently owns and may acquire and/or dispose of material energy-related investments and projects outside the U.S. The economic, regulatory, market and political conditions in some of the countries where Duke Energy has interests may impact its ability to obtain financing on suitable terms. Other risks relate to its customers’ ability to honor their obligations with respect to projects and investments, delays in construction, limitations on its ability to enforce legal rights, and interruption of business, as well as risks of war, expropriation, nationalization, renegotiation, trade sanctions or nullification of existing contracts and changes in law, regulations, market rules or tax policy.

Operational Risks

The Duke Energy Registrants’ results of operations may be negatively affected by overall market, economic and other conditions that are beyond their control.

Sustained downturns or sluggishness in the economy generally affect the markets in which the Duke Energy Registrants operate and negatively influence electricity operations. Declines in demand for electricity as a result of economic downturns in the Duke Energy Registrants’ regulated electric service territories will reduce overall sales and lessen cash flows, especially as industrial customers reduce production and, therefore, consumption of electricity. Although the Duke Energy Registrants’ regulated electric business is subject to regulated allowable rates of return and recovery of certain costs, such as fuel, under periodic adjustment clauses, overall declines in electricity sold as a result of economic downturn or recession could reduce revenues and cash flows, thereby diminishing results of operations. Additionally, prolonged economic downturns that negatively impact the Duke Energy Registrants’ results of operations and cash flows could result in future material impairment charges to write-down the carrying value of certain assets, including goodwill, to their respective fair values.

The Duke Energy Registrants also sell electricity into the spot market or other competitive power markets on a contractual basis. With respect to such transactions, the Duke Energy Registrants are not guaranteed any rate of return on their capital investments through mandated rates, and revenues and results of operations are likely to depend, in large part, upon prevailing market prices. These market prices may fluctuate substantially over relatively short periods of time and could reduce the Duke Energy Registrants’ revenues and margins, thereby diminishing results of operations.

Factors that could impact sales volumes, generation of electricity and market prices at which the Duke Energy Registrants are able to sell electricity are as follows:

·          weather conditions, including abnormally mild winter or summer weather that cause lower energy usage for heating or cooling purposes, respectively, and periods of low rainfall that decrease the ability to operate facilities in an economical manner;

·          supply of and demand for energy commodities;

·          transmission or transportation constraints or inefficiencies that impact nonregulated energy operations;

·          availability of competitively priced alternative energy sources, which are preferred by some customers over electricity produced from coal, nuclear or gas plants, and customer usage of energy-efficient equipment that reduces energy demand;

·          natural gas, crude oil and refined products production levels and prices;

·          ability to procure satisfactory levels of inventory, such as coal, gas and uranium; and

·          capacity and transmission service into, or out of, the Duke Energy Registrants’ markets.

Natural disasters or operational accidents may adversely affect the Duke Energy Registrants’ operating results.

Natural disasters (such as electromagnetic events or the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan) or other operational accidents within the industry (such as the San Bruno, California natural gas transmission pipeline failure) could have direct significant impacts on the Duke Energy Registrants as well as on key contractors and suppliers. Such events could indirectly impact the Duke Energy Registrants through changes to policies, laws and regulations whose compliance costs have a significant impact on the Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations and cash flows may be negatively affected by a lack of growth or slower growth in the number of customers, or decline in customer demand or number of customers.

Growth in customer accounts and growth of customer usage each directly influence demand for electricity and the need for additional power generation and delivery facilities. Customer growth and customer usage are affected by a number of factors outside the control of the Duke Energy Registrants, such as mandated energy-efficiency measures, demand-side management goals, distributed generation resources and economic and demographic conditions, such as population changes, job and income growth, housing starts, new business formation and the overall level of economic activity.

Certain regulatory and legislative bodies have introduced or are considering requirements and/or incentives to reduce energy consumption by certain dates. Additionally, technological advances driven by federal laws mandating new levels of energy efficiency in end-use electric devices or other improvements in or applications of technology could lead to declines in per capita energy consumption.

Advances in distributed generation technologies that produce power, including fuel cells, micro-turbines, wind turbines, and solar cells, may reduce the cost of alternative methods of producing power to a level competitive with central power station electric production utilized by the Duke Energy Registrants.

21 

 


 

PART I

Some or all of these factors, could result in a lack of growth or decline in customer demand for electricity or number of customers, and may cause the failure of the Duke Energy Registrants to fully realize anticipated benefits from significant capital investments and expenditures which could have a material adverse effect on their financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Furthermore, the Duke Energy Registrants currently have energy-efficiency riders in place to recover the cost of energy-efficiency programs in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Ohio and Kentucky. Should the Duke Energy Registrants be required to invest in conservation measures that result in reduced sales from effective conservation, regulatory lag in adjusting rates for the impact of these measures could have a negative financial impact.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ operating results may fluctuate on a seasonal and quarterly basis and can be negatively affected by changes in weather conditions and severe weather.

Electric power generation is generally a seasonal business. In most parts of the U.S., and other markets in which Duke Energy operates, demand for power peaks during the warmer summer months, with market prices typically peaking at that time. In other areas, demand for power peaks during the winter. Further, extreme weather conditions such as heat waves or winter storms could cause these seasonal fluctuations to be more pronounced. As a result, in the future, the overall operating results of the Duke Energy Registrants’ businesses may fluctuate substantially on a seasonal and quarterly basis and thus make period-to-period comparison less relevant.

Sustained severe drought conditions could impact generation by hydroelectric plants, as well as fossil and nuclear plant operations, as these facilities use water for cooling purposes and for the operation of environmental compliance equipment. Furthermore, destruction caused by severe weather events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, snow and ice storms, can result in lost operating revenues due to outages; property damage, including downed transmission and distribution lines; and additional and unexpected expenses to mitigate storm damage. The cost of storm restoration efforts may not be fully recoverable through the regulatory process.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ sales may decrease if they are unable to gain adequate, reliable and affordable access to transmission assets.

The Duke Energy Registrants depend on transmission and distribution facilities owned and operated by utilities and other energy companies to deliver electricity sold to the wholesale market. FERC’s power transmission regulations, as well as those of Duke Energy’s international markets, require wholesale electric transmission services to be offered on an open-access, non-discriminatory basis. If transmission is disrupted, or if transmission capacity is inadequate, the Duke Energy Registrants’ ability to sell and deliver products may be hindered.

The different regional power markets have changing regulatory structures, which could affect growth and performance in these regions. In addition, the ISOs who oversee the transmission systems in regional power markets have imposed in the past, and may impose in the future, price limitations and other mechanisms to address volatility in the power markets. These types of price limitations and other mechanisms may adversely impact the profitability of the Duke Energy Registrants’ wholesale power marketing business.

Fluctuations in commodity prices or availability may adversely affect various aspects of the Duke Energy Registrants’ operations as well as their financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

The Duke Energy Registrants are exposed to the effects of market fluctuations in the price of natural gas, coal, fuel oil, nuclear fuel, electricity and other energy-related commodities as a result of their ownership of energy-related assets. Fuel costs are recovered primarily through cost-recovery clauses, subject to the approval of state utility commissions.

Additionally, the Duke Energy Registrants are exposed to risk that counterparties will not be able to fulfill their obligations. Disruption in the delivery of fuel, including disruptions as a result of, among other things, transportation delays, weather, labor relations, force majeure events, or environmental regulations affecting any of these fuel suppliers, could limit the Duke Energy Registrants to operate their facilities. Should counterparties fail to perform, the Duke Energy Registrants might be forced to replace the underlying commitment at prevailing market prices possibly resulting in losses in addition to the amounts, if any, already paid to the counterparties.

Certain of the Duke Energy Registrants’ hedge agreements may result in the receipt of, or posting of, derivative collateral with counterparties, depending on the daily derivative position. Fluctuations in commodity prices that lead to the return of collateral received and/or the posting of collateral with counterparties negatively impact liquidity. Downgrades in the Duke Energy Registrants’ credit ratings could lead to additional collateral posting requirements. The Duke Energy Registrants continually monitor derivative positions in relation to market price activity.

Potential terrorist activities or military or other actions, including cyber attacks and data security breaches, could adversely affect the Duke Energy Registrants’ businesses.

The continued threat of terrorism and the impact of retaliatory military and other action by the U.S. and its allies may lead to increased political, economic and financial market instability and volatility in prices for natural gas and oil, which may have material adverse effects in ways the Duke Energy Registrants cannot predict at this time. In addition, future acts of terrorism and possible reprisals as a consequence of action by the U.S. and its allies could be directed against companies operating in the U.S. or their international affiliates. Information technology systems, infrastructure and generation facilities such as nuclear plants could be potential targets of terrorist activities or harmful activities by individuals or groups. The potential for terrorism has subjected the Duke Energy Registrants’ operations to increased risks and could have a material adverse effect on their businesses. In particular, the Duke Energy Registrants may experience increased capital and operating costs to implement increased security for their cyber systems and plants, including nuclear power plants under the NRC’s design basis threat requirements. These increased costs could include additional physical plant security and security personnel or additional capability following a terrorist incident.

Information security risks have generally increased in recent years as a result of the proliferation of new technologies and the increased sophistication and frequency of cyber attacks and data security breaches. The utility industry requires the continued operation of sophisticated information technology systems and network infrastructure, which are part of an interconnected regional grid. Additionally, connectivity to the Internet continues to increase through smart grid and other initiatives. Because of the critical nature of the infrastructure, increased connectivity to the Internet and technology systems’ inherent vulnerability to disability or failures due to hacking, viruses, acts of war or terrorism or other types of data security breaches, the Duke Energy Registrants face a heightened risk of cyber attack. In the event of such an attack, the Duke Energy Registrants could (i) have business operations disrupted, property damaged, customer information stolen and other

22 

 


 

PART I

private information accessed (ii) experience substantial loss of revenues, repair and restoration costs, implementation costs for additional security measures to avert future cyber attacks and other financial loss, and (iii) be subject to increased regulation, litigation and reputational damage.

Failure to attract and retain an appropriately qualified workforce could unfavorably impact the Duke Energy Registrants’ results of operations.

Certain events, such as an aging workforce, mismatch of skill set or complement to future needs, or unavailability of contract resources may lead to operating challenges and increased costs. The challenges include lack of resources, loss of knowledge base and the lengthy time required for skill development. In this case, costs, including costs for contractors to replace employees, productivity costs and safety costs, may rise. Failure to hire and adequately train replacement employees, including the transfer of significant internal historical knowledge and expertise to new employees, or future availability and cost of contract labor may adversely affect the ability to manage and operate the business, especially considering the workforce needs associated with nuclear generation facilities. If the Duke Energy Registrants are unable to successfully attract and retain an appropriately qualified workforce, their financial position or results of operations could be negatively affected.

Duke Energy’s investments and projects located outside of the U.S. expose it to risks related to fluctuations in currency rates. These risks, and Duke Energy’s activities to mitigate such risks, may adversely affect its cash flows and results of operations.

Duke Energy’s operations and investments outside the U.S. expose it to risks related to fluctuations in currency rates. As each local currency’s value changes relative to the U.S. dollar, the value in U.S. dollars of Duke Energy’s assets and liabilities in such locality and the cash flows generated in such locality, expressed in U.S. dollars, also change. Duke Energy’s primary foreign currency rate exposure is to the Brazilian Real.

Duke Energy selectively mitigates some risks associated with foreign currency fluctuations by, among other things, indexing contracts to the U.S. dollar and/or local inflation rates, hedging through debt denominated or issued in the foreign currency and hedging through foreign currency derivatives. These efforts, however, may not be effective and, in some cases, may expose Duke Energy to other risks that could negatively affect its cash flows and results of operations.

The costs of retiring Duke Energy Florida’s Crystal River Unit 3 could prove to be more extensive than is currently identified.

Exit costs to wind down operations and ultimately to retire and decommission the plant could exceed estimates and, if not recoverable through the regulatory process, could adversely affect Duke Energy’s, Progress Energy’s and Duke Energy Florida’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Duke Energy Ohio’s and Duke Energy Indiana’s membership in an RTO presents risks that could have a material adverse effect on their results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

The price at which Duke Energy Ohio can sell its generation capacity and energy is dependent on a number of factors, which include the overall supply and demand of generation and load, other state legislation or regulation, transmission congestion, and its business rules. As a result, the prices in day–ahead and real–time energy markets and RTO capacity markets are subject to price volatility. Administrative costs imposed by RTOs, including the cost of administering energy markets, are also subject to volatility. PJM conducts Reliability Pricing Model (RPM) base residual auctions for capacity on an annual planning year basis. The results of the PJM RPM base residual auction are impacted by the supply and demand of generation and load and also may be impacted by congestion and PJM rules relating to bidding for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency resources. Auction prices could fluctuate substantially over relatively short periods of time. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of future auctions, but if the auction prices are sustained at low levels, its results of operations, financial condition and cash flows could be adversely impacted.

The rules governing the various regional power markets may also change, which could affect Duke Energy Ohio’s and Duke Energy Indiana’s costs and/or revenues. To the degree Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana incur significant additional fees and increased costs to participate in an RTO, their results of operations may be impacted. Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana may be allocated a portion of the cost of transmission facilities built by others due to changes in RTO transmission rate design. Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana may be required to expand their transmission system according to decisions made by an RTO rather than their own internal planning process. While RTO transmission rates were initially designed to be revenue neutral, various proposals and proceedings currently taking place by the FERC may cause transmission rates to change from time to time. In addition, RTOs has been developing rules associated with the allocation and methodology of assigning costs associated with improved transmission reliability, reduced transmission congestion and firm transmission rights that may have a financial impact on Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana.

As a members of an RTO, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana are subject to certain additional risks, including those associated with the allocation among RTO members, of losses caused by unreimbursed defaults of other participants in the RTO markets and those associated with complaint cases filed against an RTO that may seek refunds of revenues previously earned by RTO members.

Nuclear Generation Risks

Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida may incur substantial costs and liabilities due to their ownership and operation of nuclear generating facilities.

Ownership interest in and operation of nuclear stations by Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida subject them to various risks. These risks include, among other things: the potential harmful effects on the environment and human health resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities and the storage, handling and disposal of radioactive materials; limitations on the amounts and types of insurance commercially available to cover losses that might arise in connection with nuclear operations; and uncertainties with respect to the technological and financial aspects of decommissioning nuclear plants at the end of their licensed lives.

Ownership and operation of nuclear generation facilities requires compliance with licensing and safety-related requirements imposed by the NRC. In the event of non-compliance, the NRC may increase regulatory oversight, impose fines, and/or shut down a unit, depending upon its assessment of the severity of the situation. Revised security and safety requirements promulgated by the NRC, which could be prompted by,

23 

 


 

PART I

among other things, events within or outside of the control of Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida, such as a serious nuclear incident at a facility owned by a third party, could necessitate substantial capital and other expenditures, as well as assessments to cover third-party losses. In addition, if a serious nuclear incident were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations and financial condition of Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida.

Liquidity, Capital Requirements and Common Stock Risks

The Duke Energy Registrants rely on access to short-term borrowings and longer-term capital markets to finance their capital requirements and support their liquidity needs. Access to those markets can be adversely affected by a number of conditions, many of which are beyond the Duke Energy Registrants’ control.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ businesses are financed to a large degree through debt. The maturity and repayment profile of debt used to finance investments often does not correlate to cash flows from their assets. Accordingly, as a source of liquidity for capital requirements not satisfied by the cash flow from their operations and to fund investments originally financed through debt instruments with disparate maturities, the Duke Energy Registrants rely on access to short-term money markets as well as longer-term capital markets. The Subsidiary Registrants also rely on access to short-term intercompany borrowings. If the Duke Energy Registrants are not able to access capital at competitive rates or at all, the ability to finance their operations and implement their strategy and business plan as scheduled could be adversely affected. An inability to access capital may limit the Duke Energy Registrants’ ability to pursue improvements or acquisitions that they may otherwise rely on for future growth.

Market disruptions may increase the cost of borrowing or adversely affect the ability to access one or more financial markets. Such disruptions could include: economic downturns, the bankruptcy of an unrelated energy company, capital market conditions generally, market prices for electricity and gas, terrorist attacks or threatened attacks on their facilities or unrelated energy companies, or the overall health of the energy industry. The availability of credit under Duke Energy’s revolving credit facilities depends upon the ability of the banks providing commitments under such facilities to provide funds when their obligations to do so arise. Systematic risk of the banking system and the financial markets could prevent a bank from meeting its obligations under the facility agreement.

Duke Energy maintains a revolving credit facility to provide back-up for its commercial paper program and letters of credit to support variable rate demand tax-exempt bonds that may be put to the Duke Energy Registrant issuer at the option of the holder. The facility includes borrowing sublimits for the Duke Energy Registrants, each of whom is a party to the credit facility, and financial covenants that limit the amount of debt that can be outstanding as a percentage of the total capital for the specific entity. Failure to maintain these covenants at a particular entity could preclude Duke Energy from issuing commercial paper or the Duke Energy Registrants from issuing letters of credit or borrowing under the revolving credit facility.

The Duke Energy Registrants must meet credit quality standards and there is no assurance they will maintain investment grade credit ratings. If the Duke Energy Registrants are unable to maintain investment grade credit ratings, they would be required under credit agreements to provide collateral in the form of letters of credit or cash, which may materially adversely affect their liquidity.

Each of the Duke Energy Registrants’ senior long-term debt issuances is currently rated investment grade by various rating agencies. The Duke Energy Registrants cannot ensure their senior long-term debt will be rated investment grade in the future.

If the rating agencies were to rate the Duke Energy Registrants below investment grade, their borrowing costs would increase, perhaps significantly. In addition, their potential pool of investors and funding sources would likely decrease. Further, if the short-term debt rating were to fall, access to the commercial paper market could be significantly limited. A reduction in liquidity and borrowing availability could ultimately impact the ability to indefinitely reinvest the earnings of Duke Energy’s international operations, which could result in significant income taxes that would have a material effect on its results of operations.

A downgrade below investment grade could also require the posting of additional collateral in the form of letters of credit or cash under various credit, commodity and capacity agreements and trigger termination clauses in some interest rate derivative agreements, which would require cash payments. All of these events would likely reduce the Duke Energy Registrants’ liquidity and profitability and could have a material effect on their financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Non-compliance with debt covenants or conditions could adversely affect the Duke Energy Registrants’ ability to execute future borrowings.

The Duke Energy Registrants’ debt and credit agreements contain various financial and other covenants. Failure to meet those covenants beyond applicable grace periods could result in accelerated due dates and/or termination of the agreements.

Market performance and other changes may decrease the value of the NDTF investments of Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida, which then could require significant additional funding.

Ownership and operation of nuclear generation facilities also requires the maintenance of funded trusts that are intended to pay for the decommissioning costs of the respective nuclear power plants. The performance of the capital markets affects the values of the assets held in trust to satisfy these future obligations. Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida have significant obligations in this area and hold significant assets in these trusts. These assets are subject to market fluctuations and will yield uncertain returns, which may fall below projected rates of return. Although a number of factors impact funding requirements, a decline in the market value of the assets may increase the funding requirements of the obligations for decommissioning nuclear plants. If Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida are unable to successfully manage their NDTF assets, their financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be negatively affected.

Poor investment performance of the Duke Energy pension plan holdings and other factors impacting pension plan costs could unfavorably impact the Duke Energy Registrants’ liquidity and results of operations.

The costs of providing non-contributory defined benefit pension plans are dependent upon a number of factors, such as the rates of return on plan assets, discount rates, the level of interest rates used to measure the required minimum funding levels of the plans, future government regulation and required or voluntary contributions made to the plans. The Subsidiary Registrants are allocated their proportionate share of the

24 

 


 

PART I

cost and obligations related to these plans. Without sustained growth in the pension investments over time to increase the value of plan assets and, depending upon the other factors impacting costs as listed above, Duke Energy could be required to fund its plans with significant amounts of cash. Such cash funding obligations, and the Subsidiary Registrants’ proportionate share of such cash funding obligations, could have a material impact on the Duke Energy Registrants’ financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

25 

 


 

PART I

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

REGULATED UTILITIES

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

The following table provides information related to Regulated Utilities' electric generation stations as of December 31, 2013. The MW displayed in the table below are based on summer capacity.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Facility  

Plant Type

  

Primary Fuel

  

Location

  

Total MW Capacity

  

Owned MW Capacity

  

Ownership Interest

Duke Energy Carolinas  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Oconee  

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

SC

  

 2,538 

  

 2,538 

  

 100 

%

Catawba(a)

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

SC

  

 2,258 

  

 435 

  

 19.25 

  

McGuire  

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

NC

  

 2,258 

  

 2,258 

  

 100 

  

Belews Creek  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 2,220 

  

 2,220 

  

 100 

  

Marshall  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 2,078 

  

 2,078 

  

 100 

  

J.E. Rogers   

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 1,377 

  

 1,377 

  

 100 

  

Bad Creek  

Hydro

  

Water

  

SC

  

 1,360 

  

 1,360 

  

 100 

  

Lincoln  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 1,267 

  

 1,267 

  

 100 

  

Allen  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 1,127 

  

 1,127 

  

 100 

  

Rockingham  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 825 

  

 825 

  

 100 

  

Jocassee  

Hydro

  

Water

  

SC

  

 780 

  

 780 

  

 100 

  

Dan River  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas

  

NC

  

 637 

  

 637 

  

 100 

  

Buck  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas

  

NC

  

 631 

  

 631 

  

 100 

  

Mill Creek  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

SC

  

 596 

  

 596 

  

 100 

  

W.S. Lee  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

SC

  

 370 

  

 370 

  

 100 

  

Cowans Ford  

Hydro

  

Water

  

NC

  

 325 

  

 325 

  

 100 

  

Keowee  

Hydro

  

Water

  

SC

  

 152 

  

 152 

  

 100 

  

W.S. Lee  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

SC

  

 82 

  

 82 

  

 100 

  

Distributed generation  

Renewable

  

Solar

  

NC

  

 8 

  

 8 

  

 100 

  

Other small hydro (25 plants)  

Hydro

  

Water

  

NC / SC

  

 663 

  

 663 

  

 100 

  

Total Duke Energy Carolinas  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 21,552 

  

 19,729 

  

  

  

Duke Energy Progress  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Roxboro(b)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 2,432 

  

 2,342 

  

 96.30 

%

Brunswick(b)

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

NC

  

 1,870 

  

 1,527 

  

 81.67 

  

Smith  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 1,102 

  

 1,102 

  

 100 

  

Harris(b)

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

NC

  

 928 

  

 778 

  

 83.83 

  

H.F. Lee  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 920 

  

 920 

  

 100 

  

Wayne County  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 863 

  

 863 

  

 100 

  

Smith  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 813 

  

 813 

  

 100 

  

Darlington  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

SC

  

 789 

  

 789 

  

 100 

  

Robinson  

Nuclear

  

Uranium

  

SC

  

 741 

  

 741 

  

 100 

  

Mayo(b)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 727 

  

 609 

  

 83.83 

  

L.V. Sutton  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 622 

  

 622 

  

 100 

  

Asheville  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

NC

  

 376 

  

 376 

  

 100 

  

Asheville  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 324 

  

 324 

  

 100 

  

Weatherspoon  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 129 

  

 129 

  

 100 

  

Walters  

Hydro

  

Water

  

NC

  

 112 

  

 112 

  

 100 

  

L.V. Sutton  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

NC

  

 61 

  

 61 

  

 100 

  

Blewett  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

NC

  

 52 

  

 52 

  

 100 

  

Other small hydro (3 plants)  

Hydro

  

Water

  

NC

  

 110 

  

 110 

  

 100 

  

Total Duke Energy Progress  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 12,971 

  

 12,270 

  

  

  

Duke Energy Florida  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Crystal River  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

FL

  

 2,291 

  

 2,291 

  

 100 

%

Hines  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 1,912 

  

 1,912 

  

 100 

  

Bartow  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 1,074 

  

 1,074 

  

 100 

  

Anclote  

Fossil Steam

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 1,011 

  

 1,011 

  

 100 

  

Intercession City(c)

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 986 

  

 986 

  

(c)

  

DeBary  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 636 

  

 636 

  

 100 

  

Tiger Bay  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 205 

  

 205 

  

 100 

  

Bartow  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 177 

  

 177 

  

 100 

  

Bayboro  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

FL

  

 174 

  

 174 

  

 100 

  

Suwannee River  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 155 

  

 155 

  

 100 

  

Turner  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

FL

  

 134 

  

 134 

  

 100 

  

Suwannee River  

Fossil Steam

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 129 

  

 129 

  

 100 

  

Higgins  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 105 

  

 105 

  

 100 

  

Avon Park  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

FL

  

 48 

  

 48 

  

 100 

  

University of Florida Cogeneration  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas

  

FL

  

 46 

  

 46 

  

 100 

  

Rio Pinar  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

FL

  

 12 

  

 12 

  

 100 

  

Total Duke Energy Florida  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 9,095 

  

 9,095 

  

  

  

Duke Energy Ohio  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

East Bend(d)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

KY

  

 600 

  

 414 

  

 69 

%

Woodsdale  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Propane

  

OH

  

 462 

  

 462 

  

 100 

  

Miami Fort (Unit 6)  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

OH

  

 163 

  

 163 

  

 100 

  

Total Duke Energy Ohio  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 1,225 

  

 1,039 

  

  

  

Duke Energy Indiana  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Gibson(e)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

IN

  

 3,132 

  

 2,822 

  

 90.10 

%

Cayuga(f)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal / Oil

  

IN

  

 1,005 

  

 1,005 

  

 100 

  

Wabash River(g)

Fossil Steam

  

Coal / Oil

  

IN

  

 676 

  

 676 

  

 100 

  

Edwardsport  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

IN

  

 595 

  

 595 

  

 100 

  

Madison  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas

  

OH

  

 576 

  

 576 

  

 100 

  

Vermillion(h)

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas

  

IN

  

 568 

  

 355 

  

 62.50 

  

Wheatland  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas

  

IN

  

 460 

  

 460 

  

 100 

  

Noblesville  

Combined Cycle

  

Gas / Oil

  

IN

  

 285 

  

 285 

  

 100 

  

Gallagher  

Fossil Steam

  

Coal

  

IN

  

 280 

  

 280 

  

 100 

  

Henry County  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

IN

  

 129 

  

 129 

  

 100 

  

Cayuga  

Combustion Turbine

  

Gas / Oil

  

IN

  

 99 

  

 99 

  

 100 

  

Connersville  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

IN

  

 86 

  

 86 

  

 100 

  

Miami Wabash  

Combustion Turbine

  

Oil

  

IN

  

 80 

  

 80 

  

 100 

  

Markland  

Hydro

  

Water

  

IN

  

 45 

  

 45 

  

 100 

  

Total Duke Energy Indiana  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 8,016 

  

 7,493 

  

  

  

Total Regulated Utilities  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 52,859 

  

 49,626 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Totals By Plant Type