S-1 1 d652688ds1.htm FORM S-1 Form S-1
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As filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on January 21, 2014

Registration No. 333-            

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

SABRE CORPORATION

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   7370   20-8647322

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

  (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

3150 Sabre Drive

Southlake, TX 76092

Telephone: (682) 605-1000

(Address including zip code, telephone number, including area code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

 

 

Sterling L. Miller, Esq.

General Counsel & Corporate Secretary

Sabre Corporation

3150 Sabre Drive

Southlake, TX 76092

Telephone: (682) 605-1000

Telecopy: (682) 605-7523

(Name, address including zip code, telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

 

Copies To:

 

David Lopez, Esq.

Pamela L. Marcogliese, Esq.

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP

One Liberty Plaza

New York, NY 10006

(212) 225-2000

 

Julie H. Jones, Esq.

Craig E. Marcus, Esq.

Ropes & Gray LLP

Prudential Tower, 800 Boylston Street

Boston, MA 02199

(617) 951-7000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date hereof.

 

 

If any of the securities being registered on this form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act, check the following box.  ¨

If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer  ¨   Accelerated filer  ¨   Non-accelerated filer  x   Smaller reporting company  ¨
    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)  

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of each class of
securities to be registered
 

Amount to be

registered(1)(2)

  Amount of
registration fee
Common stock, $0.01 par value per share   $100,000,000   $12,880

 

 

(1) Includes              shares that the underwriters have an option to purchase from the registrant and the selling stockholders.
(2) Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o) promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 


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The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Prospectus (Subject to Completion)

Dated January 21, 2014

 

             Shares

 

LOGO

Sabre Corporation

Common Stock

 

 

This is our initial public offering, and no public market currently exists for our common stock. Sabre Corporation is offering              shares of common stock. The selling stockholders identified in this prospectus are selling an additional              shares of our common stock. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling stockholders.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our common stock. The initial public offering price of the common stock is expected to be between $         and $         per share. We will apply to list our common stock on the              under the symbol “        ”.

 

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18.

 

 

Price $             A Share

 

 

 

      

Per Share

      

Total

 

Initial public offering price

       $                       $               

Underwriting discounts

       $                       $               

Proceeds to us (before expenses)

       $                       $               

Proceeds to selling stockholders (before expenses)

       $                       $               

We have granted the underwriters an option to purchase up to an additional              shares of common stock and the selling stockholders have granted the underwriters an option to purchase up to an additional              shares of common stock, in each case at the offering price less the underwriting discount. The underwriters can exercise this right at any time and from time to time, in whole or in part, within 30 days after the offering.

Delivery of the shares of common stock will be made on or about                     , 2014.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

MORGAN STANLEY   GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO.   BofA MERRILL LYNCH   DEUTSCHE BANK SECURITIES

The date of this prospectus is                     , 2014.


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We are responsible for the information contained in this prospectus and in any related free-writing prospectus we may prepare or authorize to be delivered to you. We have not authorized anyone to give you any other information, and we take no responsibility for any other information that others may give you. We and the selling stockholders are not, and the underwriters are not, making an offer of these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or any sale of our common stock.

The information contained on our website or that can be accessed through our website will not be deemed to be incorporated into this prospectus or the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part, and investors should not rely on any such information in deciding whether to purchase our common stock.

 

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NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

We have included both financial measures compiled in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and certain non-GAAP financial measures in this registration statement, of which this prospectus forms a part, including Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Capital Expenditures and ratios based on these financial measures.

We define Adjusted Net Income as income (loss) from continuing operations adjusted for impairment, acquisition related amortization expense, loss (gain) on sale of business and assets, loss on extinguishment of debt, other, restructuring and other costs, litigation and taxes, including penalties, stock-based compensation, management fees and tax impact of net income adjustments.

We define Adjusted EBITDA as Adjusted Net Income adjusted for depreciation and amortization of property and equipment, amortization of capitalized implementation costs, amortization of upfront incentive payments, interest expense, and remaining (benefit) provision for income taxes.

We define Adjusted Capital Expenditures as additions to property and equipment and capitalized implementation costs during the period presented.

Adjusted EBITDA is a key metric used by management and our board of directors to monitor our ongoing core operations because historical results have been significantly impacted by events that are unrelated to our core operations as a result of changes to our business and the regulatory environment. We believe that Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted Capital Expenditures are used by investors, analysts and other interested parties as a measure of financial performance and to evaluate our ability to service debt obligations, fund capital expenditures and meet working capital requirements. Adjusted Capital Expenditures includes cash flows used in investing activities, for property and equipment, and cash flows used in operating activities, for capitalized implementation costs. Our management uses this combined metric in making product investment decisions and determining development resource requirements. We also believe that Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted Capital Expenditures assist investors in company-to-company and period-to-period comparisons by excluding differences caused by variations in capital structures (affecting interest expense), tax positions and the impact of depreciation and amortization expense. In addition, amounts derived from Adjusted EBITDA are a primary component of certain covenants under our senior secured credit facility.

Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Capital Expenditures and ratios based on these financial measures are not recognized terms under GAAP. Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Capital Expenditures and ratios based on these financial measures have important limitations as analytical tools, and should not be viewed in isolation and do not purport to be alternatives to net income as indicators of operating performance or cash flows from operating activities as measures of liquidity. Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA and ratios based on these financial measures exclude some, but not all, items that affect net income and these measures may vary among companies. Our use of Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

 

    although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect cash requirements for such replacements;

 

    Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs;

 

    Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect the interest expense or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments on our indebtedness;

 

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    Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us; and

 

    other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate Adjusted Net Income or Adjusted EBITDA differently, which reduces its usefulness as a comparative measure.

Due to these limitations, Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EBITDA should not be considered in isolation from financial measures prepared in accordance with GAAP. Our management believes these non-GAAP financial measures provide useful information about our operating performance. However, these measures should not be considered as alternatives to net income or cash flows from operating activities as indicators of operating performance or liquidity. Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Capital Expenditures and the ratios related thereto exclude some, but not all, items that affect net income or cash flows from operating activities, and these measures may vary among companies. See “Summary Consolidated Financial Data,” “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for definitions of non-GAAP financial measures used in this prospectus and reconciliations thereof to the most directly comparable GAAP measures.

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA AND FORECASTS

This prospectus includes industry data and forecasts that we obtained from industry publications and surveys, public filings and internal company sources. Industry publications, surveys and forecasts generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but there can be no assurance as to the accuracy or completeness of the included information. Statements as to our ranking, market position and market estimates are based on independent industry publications, government publications, third-party forecasts and management’s estimates and assumptions about our markets and our internal research. We have included explanations of certain internal estimates and related methods provided in this prospectus along with these estimates. See “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” We have not independently verified such third-party information nor have we ascertained the underlying economic assumptions relied upon in those sources, and neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters can assure you of the accuracy or completeness of such information contained in this prospectus. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding our market, industry or similar data presented herein, such data involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed in “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors” in this prospectus.

The Gartner material quoted or cited herein, (the “Gartner Material”) represent(s) data, research opinion or viewpoints published, as part of a syndicated subscription service, by Gartner, Inc. (“Gartner”), and are not representations of fact. The Gartner Material speaks as of its original publication date (and not as of the date of this filing) and the opinions expressed in the Gartner Material are subject to change without notice.

Certain Market and Industry Terms

“Airbus” means Airbus Global Market Forecast 2013-2032.

“Customer Retention” means the aggregate of prior year revenue associated with customers that did not terminate their contract in the given year, as a percentage of the prior year revenue. Customer Retention for Travel Network is calculated based on travel agency contracts, and is measured based on revenue we earn from bookings made by those travel agencies. Customer Retention for Airline Solutions is calculated based on PB fee-based revenue for our reservation contracts, our principal Airline Solutions offering. Customer Retention for Hospitality Solutions is based on central reservation system, digital marketing services and call center revenues, which represent over 90% of revenues of our Hospitality Solutions business in each period from 2010 through

 

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September 30, 2013. Customer Retention does not measure whether the revenue from any travel agency or reservations customer has increased in the given year compared to the prior year. For example, if ten travel agencies terminated their Travel Network contracts in 2012, and those travel agencies represented a combined 5% of Travel Network revenue in 2011, the Customer Retention for Travel Network in 2012 would be 95%.

“Direct Billable Transactions” are all transactions that generate a fee directly to Travel Network. These transactions include bookings made through our GDS (e.g., air, car and hotel bookings), bookings made through our joint venture partners for which we are paid directly by the travel supplier, as well as GetThere corporate tool transactions, for which we are paid directly for the use of the tool.

“Euromonitor Database” means Euromonitor International Passport Travel and Tourism Database.

“Euromonitor Report” means International World Travel Market Global Trends Report 2013.

“Gartner Enterprise” means Gartner Enterprise IT Spending by Vertical Industry Market, Worldwide, 2011-2017.

“GDS-processed air bookings” is defined in “Method of Calculation.”

“IATA Traffic” means IATA Monthly Traffic Analysis Archives.

“IATA Briefing” means Economic Briefing Financial Forecast September 2013.

“IdeaWorks” means CarTrawler Worldwide Estimate of Ancillary Revenue.

“Indirect Billable Transactions” are transactions that generate a fee indirectly to Travel Network. Currently, the only Indirect Billable Transactions are Abacus and Infini bookings (e.g., air, car and hotel), for which we receive a data processing fee from Abacus rather than being paid directly by the travel supplier.

“PhoCusWright” means PhoCusWright December 2013.

“Recurring Revenue” for our:

 

  (i) Travel Network business is comprised of transaction, subscription and other revenue that is of a recurring nature from travel suppliers and travel buyers, and excludes revenue of a non-recurring nature, such as set-up fees and shortfall payments;

 

  (ii) Airline Solutions business is comprised of volume-based and subscription fees and other revenue that is of a recurring nature associated with various solutions, and excludes revenue of a non-recurring nature, such as license fees and consulting fees; and

 

  (iii) Hospitality Solutions business is comprised of volume-based and subscription fees and other revenue that is of a recurring nature associated with various solutions, and excludes revenue of a non-recurring nature, such as set-up fees and website development fees.

Revenues in each of (i), (ii) and (iii) are tied to a travel supplier’s transaction volumes rather than to its unit pricing for an airplane ticket, hotel room or other travel product. However, this revenue is not generally contractually committed to recur annually under our agreements with our travel suppliers. As a result, our Recurring Revenue is highly dependent on the global travel industry and directly correlates with global travel, tourism and transportation transaction volumes.

“Representative Airlines” means all IATA member airlines as of September 16, 2013, as well as Air Asia, Allegiant, Lion Air, Ryanair, Tiger Airways and Wizz Air, which, based on T2RL, collectively carried approximately three-quarters of passengers boarded (“PBs”) globally in 2012.

 

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“SITA” means 2013 Air Transport Industry Insights: The Airline IT Trends Survey.

“T2RL” means www.t2rl.net copyright all rights reserved.

“T2RL PSS” means The Market for Airline Passenger Services Systems—2013.

“Total Billable Transactions” are all transactions that generate a fee either directly or indirectly to Travel Network, including both Direct Billable Transactions and Indirect Billable Transactions.

“WTTC” means World Travel & Tourism Council’s Economic Impact of Travel & Tourism 2013.

METHOD OF CALCULATION

The “GDS-processed air bookings” share figures in this prospectus are calculated based on the total number of air bookings processed through the three global distribution systems (“GDSs”), specifically Sabre, Amadeus, and Travelport (including both Worldspan and Galileo). Measurements of such GDS-processed air bookings are based primarily on Marketing Information Data Tapes (“MIDT”) and are supplemented with other transaction data and estimates that we believe provide a more accurate measure of GDS-processed air bookings. Because GDSs generally process air bookings for their joint venture partners and/or share in the economics of their joint venture partners’ travel transactions, we include the GDS-processed air booking volumes of each GDS’s joint venture partners in the GDS-processed air bookings share calculations. For example, GDS-processed air bookings from Abacus International PTE Ltd. (“Abacus”) and INFINI Travel Information, Inc. (“Infini”) are included in our GDS-processed air bookings volume and our estimate of GDS-processed air bookings from Topas, Amadeus’ Korean joint venture partner, is included in the Amadeus GDS-processed air bookings volume.

Based on our internal estimates, we believe GDS-processed air bookings comprise approximately 75% of total air bookings processed through a distribution system in 2012, with the remainder comprised of air bookings processed through regional distribution systems that are not joint venture partners of one of the three GDSs. Due to the lack of available industry information on the number of air bookings processed by such regional distribution systems, we use the number of GDS-processed air bookings as a proxy for the number of overall industry air bookings. Similarly, we believe industry air bookings share is a good proxy for overall GDS share in our Travel Network business because air bookings comprise the vast majority of the total bookings of the three GDSs.

The GDS-processed air bookings used for GDS-processed air bookings share calculations do not necessarily correspond to the number of bookings billed by each GDS provider because not all processed bookings are billed due to the fact that each GDS provider has a different policy (often varying by region and supplier) as to which transactions processed through its GDS platform are billed. See “Market and Industry Data and Forecasts—Certain Market and Industry Terms” for a description of the types of billable and non-billable transactions included in the definition of “GDS-processed air bookings.”

The regional air bookings share figures in this prospectus are calculated based on the total number of GDS-processed air bookings in each of the following four regions, with key countries or sub-regions identified:

 

    North America: United States and Canada;

 

    Latin America: Mexico, South America, Central America and the Caribbean;

 

    Asia Pacific (“APAC”): India, Australia, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, and New Zealand; and

 

    Europe, the Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”): Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Spain, Saudi Arabia, Russian Federation, Sweden, Norway, United Arab Emirates, Netherlands, Greece, Switzerland, South Africa, Denmark, Israel, Finland, Ukraine, and Belgium (a subgroup of which is defined as the Middle East and Africa (“MEA”): Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa and Israel).

 

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The hospitality Central Reservation System (“CRS”) room share figures in this prospectus are calculated based on data for hotel rooms serviced by third-party CRS providers and processed through our GDS. We estimate that approximately one-third of global hotel properties are available through our GDS and believe this data to be the best available representation of the hotel market due to the lack of comprehensive industry data. Using this data, we compute CRS room share based on total room capacity hosted by the various third-party hospitality CRS providers. We believe this to be the most reliable measure of market share available to us. However, this metric is one we have only recently begun to measure and represents a snapshot in time, which prevents it from being able to convey a trend in market share over time. Therefore, we also include information in this prospectus regarding third-party hospitality CRS bookings share of our GDS because that data is more consistently available for historical periods. Using our GDS data, we compute third-party CRS bookings share based on total bookings by the various third-party hospitality CRS providers over time. Though we believe CRS room share to be a more accurate representation of market share, we believe CRS bookings share is a reasonable proxy to convey changes in third-party CRS market share over time.

TRADEMARKS AND TRADE NAMES

We own or have rights to various trademarks, service marks and trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business. This prospectus may also contain trademarks, service marks and trade names of third parties, which are the property of their respective owners. Our use or display of third parties’ trademarks, service marks, trade names or products in this prospectus is not intended to, and does not, imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship by, us. Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this prospectus may appear without the ®, TM or SM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the right of the applicable licensor to these trademarks, service marks and trade names.

ClientBase, GetThere, lastminute.com, Sabre, Sabre Holdings, the Sabre logo, Sabre AirCentre, Sabre Airline Solutions, Sabre AirVision, Sabre Hospitality Solutions, Sabre Red, Sabre Travel Network, SabreSonic, Travelocity, Travelocity Partner Network, TripCase, TruTrip and our other registered or common law trademarks, service marks or trade names appearing in this prospectus are the property of Sabre.

 

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SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. It may not contain all the information that may be important to you. You should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the section entitled “Risk Factors” and our financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus before making an investment decision to purchase shares of our common stock.

In this prospectus, unless we indicate otherwise or the context requires, references to the “company,” “Sabre,” “we,” “our,” “ours” and “us” refer to Sabre Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries, references to “Sabre GLBL” refer to Sabre GLBL Inc., formerly known as Sabre Inc., references to “TPG” refer to TPG Global, LLC and its affiliates, references to the “TPG Funds” refer to one or more of TPG Partners IV, L.P. (“TPG Partners IV”), TPG Partners V, L.P. (“TPG Partners V”), TPG FOF V-A, L.P. (“TPG FOF V-A”) and TPG FOF V-B, L.P. (“TPG FOF V-B”), references to “Silver Lake” refer to Silver Lake Management Company, L.L.C. and its affiliates and references to “Silver Lake Funds” refer to either or both of Silver Lake Partners II, L.P. and Silver Lake Technology Investors II, L.P. In the context of our Travel Network business, references to “travel buyers” refer to buyers of travel, such as online and offline travel agencies, travel management companies (“TMCs”) and corporate travel departments, and references to “travel suppliers” refer to suppliers of travel services such as airlines, hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines and tour operators. The following summary is qualified in its entirety by the more detailed information and consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Our Company

We are a leading technology solutions provider to the global travel and tourism industry. We span the breadth of a highly complex, $6.6 trillion global travel ecosystem providing key software and services to a broad range of travel suppliers and travel buyers. Through our Travel Network business, we process hundreds of millions of transactions annually, connecting the world’s leading travel suppliers, including airlines, hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines and tour operators, with travel buyers in a comprehensive travel marketplace. We offer efficient, global distribution of travel content from approximately 125,000 travel suppliers to approximately 400,000 online and offline travel agents. To those agents, we offer a platform to shop, price, book and ticket comprehensive travel content in a transparent and efficient workflow. We also offer value-added solutions that enable our customers to better manage and analyze their businesses. Through our airline solutions business (“Airline Solutions”) and hospitality solutions business (“Hospitality Solutions” and, together with Airline Solutions, “Airline and Hospitality Solutions”), we offer travel suppliers an extensive suite of leading software solutions, ranging from airline and hotel reservations systems to high-value marketing and operations solutions, such as planning airline crew schedules, re-accommodating passengers during irregular flight operations and managing day-to-day hotel operations. These solutions allow our customers to market, distribute and sell their products more efficiently, manage their core operations, and deliver an enhanced travel experience. Through our complementary Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions businesses, we believe we offer the broadest, end-to-end portfolio of technology solutions to the travel industry.

Our portfolio of technology solutions has enabled us to become the leading end-to-end technology provider in the travel industry. For example, we are one of the largest GDS providers in the world, with a 37% share of GDS-processed air bookings in 2012. More specifically, we are the #1 GDS provider in North America and also in higher growth markets such as APAC and Latin America, in each case based on GDS-processed air bookings in 2012. In those three markets, our GDS-processed air bookings share was approximately 50% on a combined basis in 2012. In our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business, we believe we have the most comprehensive portfolio of solutions. In 2012, we had the largest hospitality Central Reservation System (“CRS”) room share based on our approximately 26% share of third-party CRS hotel rooms distributed through our GDS, and, according to T2RL PSS, we had the second largest airline reservations system globally. We also believe that we

 

 

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have the leading portfolio of airline marketing and operations products across the solutions that we provide. In addition, we operate Travelocity, one of the world’s most recognizable brands in the online consumer travel e-commerce industry, which provides us with business insights into our broader customer base.

Through our solutions, which span the breadth of the travel ecosystem, we have developed deep domain expertise, and our success is built on this expertise, combined with our significant technology investment and focus on innovation. This foundation has enabled us to develop highly scalable and technology-rich solutions that directly address the key opportunities and challenges facing our customers. For example, we have invested to scale our GDS platform to meet massive transaction processing requirements. In 2013, our systems processed over $100 billion of estimated travel spending and more than 1.1 trillion system messages, with nearly 100,000 system messages per second at peak times. Our investment in innovation has enabled our Travel Network business to evolve into a dynamic marketplace providing a broad range of highly scalable solutions from distribution to workflow to business intelligence. Our investment in our Airline and Hospitality Solutions offerings has allowed us to create a broad portfolio of value-added products for our travel supplier customers, ranging from reservations platforms to operations solutions typically delivered via highly scalable and flexible software-as-a-service (“SaaS”) and hosted platforms. We have a long history of engineering innovative travel technology solutions. For example, we were the first GDS to enable airlines to sell ancillary products like premium seats through the GDS, one of the first third-party reservations systems to enable mobile check-in and the first GDS provider to launch a business-to-business (“B2B”) app marketplace for our travel agency customers that allows them to customize and augment our Travel Network platform. Our innovation has been consistently recognized in the market, with awards including the Business Traveler Innovation Award from the Global Business Travel Association in 2011 and 2012 and recognition by Information Week in 2013 as one of the Most Innovative Users of Business Technology for the eleventh consecutive year.

Our SaaS and hosted technology platforms allow us to serve our customers primarily through an attractive, recurring, transaction-based revenue model based primarily on travel events such as air segments booked, passengers boarded (“PBs”) or other relevant metrics. For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, 92% of our Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenue, on a weighted average basis, was Recurring Revenue. See “Market and Industry Data and Forecasts—Certain Market and Industry Terms” for a description of Recurring Revenue. This model has benefits for both our customers and for us. For our customers, our delivery model allows otherwise fixed technology investments to be variable, providing flexibility in their cost base and smoothing investment cycles as they grow, while enabling them to benefit from the continuous evolution of our platform. For us, this recurring, transaction-based revenue model allows us to expand with our customers in the travel industry, a segment of the economy which has grown significantly faster than global GDP over the last 40 years. Since our revenues are primarily linked to our customers’ transaction volumes rather than to volatile airline budget cycles or cyclical end-customer pricing, this model facilitates greater stability in our business, particularly during negative economic cycles. In addition, as a technology solutions and transaction processing company, we do not take airline, hotel or other inventory risk, nor are we directly exposed to fuel price volatility or labor unions.

Our predictable, transaction-based revenue model, combined with our high-quality products, reinvestment in our technology, multi-year customer contracts and disciplined operational management, has contributed to our strong growth profile, as demonstrated by our Adjusted EBITDA having increased each year since 2008 despite the global economic downturn and resulting travel slowdown. From 2009 through 2012, we grew our revenue and Adjusted EBITDA at 7.6% and 12.5% compound annual growth rates (“CAGRs”), respectively, and increased Adjusted EBITDA margins by 377 basis points (“bps”), in each case, excluding Travelocity and eliminations. See “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” and “—Summary Consolidated Financial Data” for additional information regarding Adjusted EBITDA, including a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation.

 

 

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Our Business

We operate through three business segments: (i) Travel Network, (ii) Airline and Hospitality Solutions, and (iii) Travelocity. Our segments operate with shared infrastructure and technology capabilities, and provide key solutions to our customers. Collectively, our integrated business enables the entire travel lifecycle, from route planning to post-trip business intelligence and analysis. The graphic below provides illustrative examples of the points where Sabre enables the travel lifecycle:

LOGO

Travel Network is our global B2B travel marketplace and consists primarily of our GDS and a broad set of capabilities that integrate with our GDS to add value for travel suppliers and travel buyers. Our GDS offers content from a broad array of travel suppliers, including approximately 400 airlines, 125,000 hotel properties, 27 car rental brands, 50 rail carriers, 16 cruise lines and 200 tour vendors, to tens of thousands of travel buyers, including online and offline travel agencies, TMCs and corporate travel departments. Our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business offers a broad portfolio of software technology products and solutions, primarily through SaaS and hosted models, to approximately 225 airlines, 4,800 hospitality providers and 700 other travel suppliers. Our flexible software and systems applications help automate and optimize our customers’ business processes, including reservations systems, marketing tools, commercial planning solutions and enterprise operations tools. Travelocity is our family of online consumer travel e-commerce businesses through which we provide travel content and booking functionality primarily for leisure travelers. Recently, Travelocity entered into an exclusive, long-term strategic marketing agreement with Expedia (the “Expedia SMA”). Under the Expedia SMA, Expedia will power the technology platforms of Travelocity’s existing U.S. and Canadian websites, as well as provide access to Expedia’s supply and customer service platforms.

For the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded revenue of $2.3 billion and $3.0 billion, gross margin of $1.1 billion and $1.4 billion, net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation of $127 million and $611 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $577 million and $785 million, respectively, reflecting a 25% and 26% Adjusted EBITDA margin, respectively. For additional information regarding Adjusted EBITDA, including a reconciliation of Non-GAAP to GAAP measures, see “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” and “—Summary Consolidated Financial Data.” For the nine months ended September 30, 2013, Travel Network contributed 57%, Airline and Hospitality Solutions contributed 22%, and Travelocity contributed 21% of our revenue (excluding intersegment eliminations). During this period, shares of Adjusted

 

 

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EBITDA for Travel Network, Airline and Hospitality Solutions, and Travelocity were approximately 80%, 20% and less than 1%, respectively (excluding corporate overhead allocations such as finance, legal, human resources and certain information technology shared services).

Our Industry

The travel and tourism industry is one of the world’s largest industry segments, contributing $6.6 trillion to global GDP in 2012, according to the WTTC. The industry encompasses travel suppliers, including airlines, hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines and tour operators around the world, as well as travel buyers, including online and offline travel agencies, TMCs and corporate travel departments.

The travel and tourism industry has been a growing area of the broader economy. For example, based on 40 years of IATA Traffic data, air traffic has historically grown at an average rate of approximately 1.5x the rate of global GDP growth. Going forward, Euromonitor expects a 5% CAGR in air travel and hotel spending from 2013 to 2017, with air traffic in developing markets such as APAC, Latin America and the Middle East expected to grow at even faster rates of 6%, 6% and 7%, respectively, from 2012 to 2032, according to Airbus. In addition to growth in emerging geographies, hybrid carriers and low cost carriers (“LCCs”, and collectively, “LCC/hybrids”) have continued to grow, with LCCs’ share of global air travel volume expected to increase from 17% of revenue passenger kilometers (“RPKs”) in 2012 to 21% of RPKs by 2032, according to Airbus.

Technology is integral to that growth, enabling the operation of the modern travel ecosystem by powering the industry lifecycle from distribution to operations. With the increasing complexity created by the large, fragmented and global nature of the travel industry, reliance on technology will only increase. That reliance drove technology spending by the air transportation and hospitality industries to $60 billion in 2013 with expenditures expected to exceed $70 billion in 2017, according to Gartner. Some recent trends in the travel industry which we expect to further technology innovation and spending include:

Outsourcing: Historically, technology solutions were built in-house by travel suppliers and travel buyers. As complexity and the pace of innovation have increased, third-party providers have emerged to offer more cost effective and advanced solutions. Additionally, the travel technology industry has shifted to a more flexible and scalable technology delivery model including SaaS and hosted implementations that allow for shared development, reduced deployment costs, increased scalability and a “pay-as-you-go” cost model.

Airline Ancillary Revenue: The sale of ancillary products is now a major source of revenue for many airlines worldwide, and has grown to comprise as much as 20% of total revenues for some carriers, and more than $36 billion in the aggregate across the travel industry in 2012, according to IdeaWorks. Enabling the sale of ancillary products is technologically complex and requires coordinated changes to multiple interdependent systems including reservations platforms, inventory systems, point of sale locations, revenue accounting, merchandising, shopping, analytics and other systems. Technology providers such as Sabre have already significantly enhanced their systems to provide these capabilities and we expect these providers to take further advantage of this significant opportunity going forward.

Mobile: Mobile platforms have created new ways for customers to research, book and experience travel, and are expected to account for over 30% of online travel sales by 2017, according to Euromonitor. Accordingly, travel suppliers, including airlines and hospitality providers, are upgrading their systems to allow for delivery of services via mobile platforms from booking to check-in to travel management. A recent SITA survey found that 97% of airlines are investing in mobile channels with the intention of increasing mobile access across the entire travel experience. This mobile trend also extends to the use of tablets and wireless connectivity by the airline workforce, for example automating cabin crew services and providing flight crews with electronic flight bags. Travel technology companies like Sabre are enabling and benefitting from this trend as travel suppliers upgrade their systems and travel buyers look for new sources of client connectivity.

 

 

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Personalization: Concurrently with the rise of ancillary products and mobile devices as a customer service tool, travel suppliers have an opportunity to provide increased personalization across the customer travel experience, from seat selection and on-board entertainment to loyalty program management and mobile concierge services. Data-driven business intelligence products can help travel companies use available customer data to identify the types of products, add-ons and upgrades customers are more likely to purchase and market these products effectively to various customer segments according to their needs and preferences. In addition to providing the technology platform to facilitate these services, we believe technology providers like Sabre can leverage their data-rich platforms and travel technology domain expertise to offer analytics and business intelligence to support travel suppliers in delivering more personalized service offerings.

Increasing Use of Data and Analytics: The use of data has always been an asset in the travel industry. Airlines were pioneers in the use of data to optimize seat pricing, crew scheduling and flight routing. Similarly, hotels employed data to manage room inventory and optimize pricing. The travel industry was also one of the first to capitalize on the value of customer data by developing products such as customer loyalty programs. Historically, this data has largely been transaction-based, such as booking reservations, recording account balances, tracking points in loyalty programs. Today, analytics-driven business intelligence products are evolving to further and better utilize available data to help travel companies make decisions, serve customers, optimize their operations and analyze their competitive landscape. Technology providers like Sabre have developed and continue to develop large-scale, data-rich platforms that include business intelligence and data analytics tools that can identify new business opportunities and global, integrated and high-value solutions for travel suppliers.

Our Competitive Strengths

We believe the following attributes differentiate us from our competitors and have enabled us to become a leading technology solutions provider to the global travel industry.

Broadest Portfolio of Leading Technology Solutions in the Travel Industry

We offer the broadest, most comprehensive technology solutions portfolio available to the travel industry from a single provider, and our solutions are key to the operations of many of our travel supplier and travel agency customers. Travel Network, for example, provides a key technology platform that enables efficient shopping, booking and management of travel itineraries for online and offline travel agencies, TMCs and corporate travel departments. In addition to offering these and other advanced functionalities, it is a valuable distribution and merchandising channel for travel suppliers to market to a broad array of customers, particularly outside their home countries and regions. Additionally, we provide SaaS and hosted solutions that run many of the most important operations systems for our travel supplier customers, such as airline and hotel reservations systems, revenue management, crew scheduling and flight operations. We believe our Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions offerings address customer needs across the entire travel lifecycle, and that we are the only company that provides such a broad portfolio of technology solutions to the travel industry. This breadth affords us significant competitive advantages including the ability to leverage shared infrastructure, a common technology organization and product development. Beyond scale and efficiency, our position spanning the breadth of the travel ecosystem helps us to develop deep domain expertise and to anticipate the needs of our customers. Taken together, the value, quality, and breadth of our technology, software and related customer services contribute to our strong competitive position.

Global Leadership Across Growing End Markets

We operate in areas of the global travel industry that have large and growing addressable customer bases. Each of our businesses is a leader in its respective area. Sabre is the leading GDS provider in North America,

 

 

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Latin America, and APAC, with 58%, 58%, and 40% share of GDS-processed air bookings, respectively, in 2012. Additionally, Airline Solutions is the second largest provider of reservations systems, with an 18% global share of 2012 PBs, according to T2RL. We believe that we have the leading portfolio of airline marketing and operations products across the solutions that we provide. We also believe our Hospitality Solutions business is the leader in hotel reservations, handling 26% of third-party CRS hotel rooms through our GDS in 2012. See “Method of Calculation” for an explanation of the methodology underlying our GDS-processed air bookings share and third-party hotel CRS room share calculations.

Looking forward, we expect to benefit from attractive growth in our end markets. Euromonitor expects a 5% CAGR in air travel and hotel spending from 2013 to 2017. Gartner expects technology spending by the air transportation and hospitality sectors to grow significantly from $60 billion in 2013 to over $70 billion in 2017. Within our Travel Network business, we also expect our presence in economies with strong GDP growth and regions with faster air traffic growth, such as Latin America, MEA and APAC, will further contribute to the growth of our businesses. Similarly, our Airline Solutions reservations products customers are weighted toward faster-growing LCC/hybrids, which represented approximately 45% of our 2012 PBs.

Innovative and Scalable Technology

Two pillars underpin our technology strategy: innovation and scalability. To drive innovation in our travel marketplace business, we make significant investments in technology to develop new products and add incremental features and functionality, including advanced algorithms, decision support, data analysis and other valuable intellectual property. This investment is supported by our global technology teams comprising approximately 4,000 employees and contractors. This scale and cross-business technology organization creates efficiency and a flexible environment that allows us to apply knowledge and resources across our broad product portfolio, which in turn fuels innovation. In addition, our investments in technology have created a highly scalable set of solutions across our businesses. For example, we believe our GDS is one of the most heavily utilized Service Oriented Architecture (“SOA”) environments in the world, processing more than 1.1 trillion system messages in 2013, with nearly 100,000 system messages per second at peak times. Our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business employs highly reliable software technology products and SaaS and hosted infrastructure. Compared to traditional in-house software installations, SaaS and hosted technology offers our customers advantages in terms of cost savings, more robust functionality, increased flexibility and scale, and faster upgrades. As an example of the SaaS and hosted scalability benefit, our delivery model has facilitated an increase in the number of PBs in our Airline Solutions business from 392 million to 513 million from 2009 to 2012. Our investments in technology maintain and extend our best-in-class technology platform which has supported our industry-leading product innovation. On the scale at which we operate, we believe that the combination of an expanding network and technology investments continues to create a significant competitive advantage for us.

Stable, Resilient, and Diversified Business Models

Travel Network and much of Airline and Hospitality Solutions operate with a transaction-based business model that ties our revenue to a travel supplier’s transaction volumes rather than to its unit pricing for an airplane ticket, hotel room or other travel product. Travel-related businesses with volume-based revenue models have generally shown strong visibility, predictability and resilience across economic cycles because travel suppliers have historically sought to maintain traveler volumes by reducing prices in an economic downturn.

Our resilience is also partially attributable to our non-exclusive, multi-year, travel supplier contracts in our Travel Network business, which typically have terms of three to five years. Similarly, our Airline Solutions business has contracts that typically range from three to seven years in length, and our Hospitality Solutions business has contracts that typically range from one to five years in length. Our Travel Network and Airline and

 

 

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Hospitality Solutions businesses also deliver solutions that are integral components of our customers’ businesses and have historically remained in place once implemented. In our Travel Network business and our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business, 94% and 85% of our revenue was Recurring Revenue, respectively, in 2012.

In addition to being stable, our businesses are also diversified. Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions generate a broad geographic revenue mix, with a combined 41% of revenue generated outside the United States in 2012. None of our travel buyers or travel supplier customers accounted for more than 10% of our revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 or the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012.

Strong, Long-Standing Customer Relationships

We have strong, long-standing customer relationships with both travel suppliers and travel buyers. These relationships have allowed us to gain a deep understanding of our customers’ needs, which positions us well to continue introducing new products and services that add value by helping our customers improve their business performance. In our Travel Network business, for example, by providing efficient and quality services, we have developed and maintained customer relationships with TMCs, major corporate travel departments and most of our top travel suppliers for at least 20 years. Through our Travelocity business, we have gained important insights into what online travel companies need in order to best serve their customers, and we are able to leverage that knowledge to develop products and services to address those needs.

We believe that our strong value proposition is demonstrated by our ability to retain customers in a highly competitive marketplace. For each of the fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010, our Customer Retention rate for Travel Network was 99%. For our Airline Solutions business, our Customer Retention rate was 100%, 99% and 81%, respectively, for the fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010 and our Customer Retention rate for our Hospitality Solutions business was 96%, 98% and 96%, respectively, for the same periods. See “Market and Industry Data and Forecasts—Certain Market and Industry Terms” for a description of Customer Retention.

Deep and Experienced Leadership Team with Informed Insight into the Travel Industry

Our management team is highly experienced, with comprehensive expertise in the travel and technology industries. Many of our leaders have more than 20 years of experience in multiple segments of the travel industry and have held positions in more than one of our businesses, which provides them with a holistic and interdisciplinary perspective on our company and the travel industry.

By investing in training, skills development and rotation programs, we seek to develop leaders with broad knowledge of our company, the industry, technology, and specific customer needs. We also hire externally as needed to bring in new expertise. Our blend of experience and new hires across our team provides a solid foundation on which we develop new capabilities, new business models and new solutions to complex industry problems.

Our Growth Strategy

We believe we are well-positioned for future growth. First, we expect the continued macroeconomic recovery to generate strong travel growth, compounded by the continuing trend towards the outsourcing of travel technology. In addition, we are well-positioned in market segments which are growing faster than the overall travel industry, with leading market positions in our Travel Network business in Latin America and APAC. In our Airline Solutions reservations systems, LCC/hybrids accounted for approximately 45% of our PBs in 2012 and are growing traffic faster than traditional airlines. Supported by these industry trends, both our Travel Network and our Airline and Hospitality Solutions businesses have significant opportunities to expand their customer bases, further penetrate existing customers, extend their geographic footprint and develop new products. We intend to capitalize on these positive trends by executing on the following strategies:

 

 

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Leverage our Industry-Leading Technology Platforms

We have made significant investments in our technology platforms and infrastructure to develop robust, scalable software as well as SaaS and hosted solutions. We plan to continue leveraging these investments across our organization, particularly in our Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions businesses, to catalyze product innovation and speed-to-market. We will also continue to shift toward SaaS and hosted infrastructure and solutions as we further develop our product portfolio.

Expand our Global Travel Marketplace Leadership

Travel Network intends to remain the global B2B travel marketplace of choice for travel suppliers and travel buyers by executing on the following initiatives:

 

    Targeting Geographic Expansion: From 2009 to 2012, we increased our GDS-processed air bookings share in Brazil, the Middle East and Russia by 525 bps, 523 bps and 240 bps, respectively. We currently have initiatives in place across Europe, APAC and Latin America to further expand in those regions.

 

    Attracting and Enabling New Content in the Travel Marketplace: We are actively adding new travel supplier content to reinforce the virtuous cycle of our Travel Network business as well as generate revenue directly through incremental booking volumes associated with the new content. We have been successful in converting notable carriers that previously only used direct distribution such as JetBlue to join our GDS, and we believe there is a similar opportunity to increase participation of less-penetrated content types like hotel properties, where we estimate that only one-third participate in a GDS. In addition to attracting new supplier content, we aim to expand the content available for sale from existing travel suppliers, including ancillary revenue—a category of airline revenue that is projected to increase 18% from 2012 to 2013 according to IdeaWorks. We see additional opportunities to capitalize on this trend, including support of our airline customers’ branded fare initiatives.

 

    Continuing to Invest in Innovative Products and Capabilities: The development of cutting-edge products and capabilities has been critical to our success. We plan to continue to invest significant resources in solutions that address key customer needs, including data analytics and business intelligence (e.g., Sabre Dev Studio, Hotel Heatmaps, Contract Optimization Services), mobility (e.g., TripCase) and workflow optimization (e.g., Sabre Red App Centre, TruTrip).

Drive Continued Airline and Hospitality Solutions Growth and Innovation

Our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business has been a key growth engine for us, increasing revenue by 44% and Adjusted EBITDA by 34% from 2009 to 2012. We believe Airline and Hospitality Solutions will continue to drive company growth through a combination of underlying customer and market growth, as well as through the following strategic growth initiatives:

 

    Invest in Innovative Airline Products and Capabilities: We have a long history of innovation. For example, we were the first technology solutions provider to use predictive analytics to help airlines maximize revenue per seat (e.g., revenue integrity) and we were one of the first third-party reservations systems to enable mobile check-in. We see a continued opportunity to innovate in areas such as retailing solutions, data analytics and business intelligence offerings and mobile capabilities.

 

    Continue to Add New Airline Reservations Customers: Over the last four years, we have added airline customers representing over 110 million annual PBs from many innovative, fast-growing airlines such as Etihad Airways, Virgin Australia, JetBlue and LAN. Although the number of new reservations opportunities varies materially by year, T2RL expects that contracts representing over 1.3 billion PBs will come up for renewal between 2014 to 2017, of which over 75% are non-Sabre customers.

 

 

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    Further Penetrate Existing Airline Solutions Customers: We believe there is an opportunity to sell more of our extensive solution set to our existing customers. Of our 2012 customers in T2RL’s top 100 passenger airlines, 35% used one or two non-reservations solution sets, 35% had three to five and 31% had more than five. Historically, the average revenue would approximately triple if a customer moved from the first category to the second, and nearly triple again if a customer moved to the third category. Leveraging our brand, we intend to continue to increase adoption of our products within and across our existing customers.

 

    Invest Behind Rapidly Growing Hospitality Solutions Business: Our Hospitality Solutions business has grown rapidly, with 21% revenue CAGR from 2009 to 2012, and we are focused on continuing that growth going forward. We currently have initiatives to grow in our existing footprint and expand our presence in APAC and EMEA, which collectively accounted for only 30% of our Hospitality Solutions business revenue in 2012. We plan to accomplish this through a combination of cross-selling additional products to our existing customers, expanding our global reseller network and enhancing our product offering.

Continue to Focus on Operational Efficiency Supported by Leading Technology

As an organization, we have a track record of improving operational efficiency and capitalizing on our scalable technology platform and operating leverage in our business model. We have expanded Adjusted EBITDA margins by over 595 bps since 2009 in our Travel Network business while growing the business and introducing new products. We intend to continue to increase our operational efficiency, by following a shared capabilities, technology and insights approach across our businesses. For example, through the Expedia SMA, we intend to reduce direct costs associated with Travelocity and expect to improve our Adjusted EBITDA by leveraging Expedia’s long-term investment in its technology platform to increase conversion, improve operational efficiency, and shift our focus to Travelocity’s strengths in marketing and retailing. We will continue to work toward identifying operational and technological efficiencies while continuing to support our investments and strategic priorities to maintain our leadership position in the travel industry.

Corporate and Other Information

Sabre Corporation is a Delaware corporation formed in December 2006. We are headquartered in Southlake, Texas, and employ approximately 10,000 people in approximately 60 countries around the world. We serve our customers through cutting-edge technology developed in six facilities located across four continents.

Our principal executive offices are located at 3150 Sabre Drive, Southlake, TX 76092, and our telephone number is (682) 605-1000. Our corporate website address is www.sabre.com. The information contained on our website or that can be accessed through our website will not be deemed to be incorporated into this prospectus or the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part, and investors should not rely on any such information in deciding whether to purchase our common stock.

Principal Stockholders

Our Relationship with the TPG Funds and Silver Lake Funds

We are currently privately held as a result of our acquisition in 2007 by the TPG Funds and the Silver Lake Funds (collectively, the “Principal Stockholders”). On March 30, 2007, we entered into a Stockholders’ Agreement by and among the TPG Funds, the Silver Lake Funds, Sovereign Co-Invest, LLC (an entity co-managed by TPG and Silver Lake), and Sabre Corporation (formerly known as Sovereign Holdings, Inc.) (the “Stockholders’ Agreement”). See “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Stockholders’ Agreement.”

 

 

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Following the completion of this offering, the Principal Stockholders will own approximately     % of our common stock, or     % if the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares is fully exercised. The TPG Funds will own approximately     % of our common stock, or     % if the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares is fully exercised, and the Silver Lake Funds will own approximately     % of our common stock, or     % if the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares is fully exercised.

TPG

TPG is a leading global private investment firm founded in 1992 with $55.7 billion of assets under management as of September 30, 2013 and offices in San Francisco, Fort Worth, Austin, Beijing, Chongqing, Hong Kong, London, Luxembourg, Melbourne, Moscow, Mumbai, New York, Paris, São Paulo, Shanghai, Singapore and Tokyo. TPG has extensive experience with global public and private investments executed through leveraged buyouts, recapitalizations, spinouts, growth investments, joint ventures and restructurings. The firm’s investments span a variety of industries, including financial services, travel and entertainment, technology, energy, industrials, retail, consumer, real estate, media and communications, and healthcare. For more information please visit www.tpg.com.

Silver Lake

Silver Lake is a global investment firm focused on the technology, technology-enabled and related growth industries with offices in Silicon Valley, New York, London, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo. Silver Lake was founded in 1999 and has over $20 billion in combined assets under management and committed capital across its large-cap private equity, middle-market private equity, growth equity and credit investment strategies.

 

 

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Summary of Corporate Structure

LOGO

 

 

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THE OFFERING

 

Common stock we are offering

             shares

 

Common stock offered by the selling stockholders

             shares

 

Common stock to be outstanding after this offering

             shares

 

Underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares

We may sell up to              additional shares and the selling stockholders may sell up to              additional shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares.

 

Use of proceeds

We estimate that our net proceeds from this offering will be approximately $         million at an assumed initial public offering price of $         per share, the midpoint of the range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, after deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling stockholders identified in this prospectus.

 

  We expect to use the net proceeds of this offering to repay approximately $         million of outstanding indebtedness, and the remainder for general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds.”

 

Dividend policy

We generally have not declared or paid any dividends or distributions on our common stock. We currently expect to retain future earnings, if any, for use in the operation and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

 

  The ability of our subsidiaries to pay cash dividends, which could then be further distributed to holders of our common stock is currently restricted by the covenants in our Credit Facility and the indenture governing our 2019 Notes (each as defined in “Description of Certain Indebtedness”) and may be further restricted by the terms of future debt or preferred securities. No dividend can be declared or paid with respect of our common stock unless and until the full amount of unpaid dividends accrued on our Series A Preferred Stock (the “Series A Preferred Stock”), if any, has been paid. See “Dividend Policy.”

 

Risk Factors

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18 for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common stock.

 

Proposed stock exchange symbol

“            ”

 

 

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The number of shares of common stock to be outstanding after this offering is based on                      shares of common stock outstanding and             shares to be sold in this offering.

The number of shares of common stock to be outstanding after this offering does not take into account an aggregate of             shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under the Sabre Corporation 2014 Omnibus Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2014 Omnibus Plan”).

In addition, except as otherwise noted, all information in this prospectus assumes the underwriters do not exercise their option to purchase additional shares.

 

 

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SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables present summary consolidated financial data for our business. You should read these tables along with “Risk Factors,” “Use of Proceeds,” “Capitalization,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Business” and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The consolidated statements of operations data, consolidated statements of cash flow data and consolidated balance sheet data as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 are derived from our interim unaudited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of our management, reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of this data. The consolidated statements of operations data and consolidated statements of cash flow data for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2012 and 2011 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus. The consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2010 is derived from our unaudited annual consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto not included in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated balance sheet has been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of our management, reflects all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of this data.

The summary consolidated financial data presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period, and results for any interim period presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

 

    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
    (Amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

         

Revenue

  $ 2,345,295      $ 2,327,480      $ 3,039,060      $ 2,931,727      $ 2,832,393   

Gross margin

    1,058,317        1,117,095        1,401,576        1,350,202        1,334,820   

Selling, general and administrative

    559,591        846,442        1,118,248        740,911        714,330   

Impairment

    138,435        76,829        584,430        185,240        401,400   

Depreciation and amortization

    231,743        233,198        317,683        295,540        281,624   

Restructuring charges

    15,889                               

Operating income (loss)

    112,659        (39,374     (618,785     128,511        (62,534

Net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation

    (127,254     (105,744     (611,356     (66,074     (268,852

Net loss attributable to common shareholders

    (154,473     (131,389     (645,939     (98,653     (299,649

Basic and diluted loss per share attributable to common shareholders

    (0.87     (0.74     (3.65     (0.56     (1.71

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

         

Basic and diluted

    178,051        177,130        177,206        176,703        175,655   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Data:

         

Cash provided by operating activities

  $ 270,123      $ 422,899      $ 304,729      $ 355,025      $ 381,296   

Additions to property and equipment

    168,750        139,659        193,262        164,900        130,457   

Cash payments for interest

    193,440        160,660        264,990        184,449        195,550   

Other Financial Data:

         

Adjusted Net Income

  $ 136,715      $ 231,211      $ 154,756      $ 232,661      $ 198,511   

Adjusted EBITDA

    577,402        629,720        784,583        724,722        697,610   

Adjusted Capital Expenditures

    216,698        196,907        270,515        224,009        164,945   

 

 

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     As of September 30,     As of December 31,  
     2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
     (Amounts in thousands)  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

          

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 491,588      $ 302,383      $ 126,695      $ 58,350      $ 176,521   

Total assets

     4,941,476        5,539,103        4,711,245        5,252,778        5,524,279   

Long-term debt

     3,664,942        3,418,987        3,420,927        3,307,905        3,350,860   

Working capital (deficit)

     (266,996     (279,282     (458,985     (460,353     (540,965

Redeemable preferred stock

     625,358        589,203        598,139        563,556        530,975   

Noncontrolling interest

     (221     8,002        88        (18,693     19,831   

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

     (1,012,355     (289,474     (876,875     (196,919     (34,738

Non-GAAP Measurements

The following tables set forth the reconciliation of net loss attributable to common shareholders in our statement of operations to Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EBITDA.

For Adjusted EBITDA by segment, see Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

 

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    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted Net Income and to Adjusted EBITDA:

         

Net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation

  $ (127,254   $ (105,744   $ (611,356   $ (66,074   $ (268,852

Net loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

    10,683        (2,887     26,752        20,003        17,395   

Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests(1)

    2,135        (9,475     (59,317     (36,681     (64,382
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

    (114,436     (118,106     (643,921     (82,752     (315,839

Adjustments:

         

Impairment(2)

    138,435        76,829        608,230        185,240        401,400   

Acquisition related amortization expense(3a)

    105,944        120,768        162,517        162,312        163,213   

Loss (gain) on sale of business and assets

    16,880        (25,850     (25,850              

Loss on extinguishment of debt

    12,181                               

Other, net(4)

    5,299        8,343        7,808        (2,953     (3,150

Restructuring and other costs(5)

    30,854        3,712        6,862        14,708        15,672   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

    11,856        294,963        415,672        21,601        1,601   

Stock-based compensation

    5,446        8,621        9,834        7,334        5,302   

Management fees(7)

    7,347        6,257        7,769        7,191        6,730   

Tax impact of net income adjustments

    (83,091     (144,326     (394,165     (80,020     (76,418
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted Net Income

    136,715        231,211        154,756        232,661        198,511   

Adjustments:

         

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment(3b)

    101,163        100,513        137,511        125,063        113,449   

Amortization of capitalized implementation costs(3c)

    27,039        14,317        20,855        11,365        8,162   

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

    28,736        27,432        36,527        37,748        26,571   

Interest expense, net

    208,364        179,359        242,948        181,292        204,348   

Remaining (benefit) provision for income taxes

    75,385        76,888        191,986        136,593        146,569   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 577,402      $ 629,720      $ 784,583      $ 724,722      $ 697,610   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted Capital Expenditures

The components of Adjusted Capital Expenditures is presented in the following table:

 

    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Additions to property and equipment

  $ 168,750      $ 139,659        193,262      $ 164,900      $ 130,457   

Capitalized implementation costs

    47,948        57,248        77,253        59,109        34,488   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted Capital Expenditures

  $ 216,698      $ 196,907      $ 270,515      $ 224,009      $ 164,945   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

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(1) Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests represents an adjustment to include earnings allocated to noncontrolling interest held in (i) Sabre Travel Network Middle East of 40% for all periods presented, (ii) Sabre Pacific of 49% through February 24, 2012, the date we sold this business and (iii) Travelocity.com LLC of approximately 9.5% through December 31, 2012, the date we merged this minority interest back into our capital structure. See Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
(2) Represents impairment charges to assets (see Note 7, Goodwill and Intangible Assets, to our September 30, 2013 unaudited consolidated financial statements and Note 8, Goodwill and Intangible Assets, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus) as well as $24 million in 2012, representing our share of impairment charges recorded by one of our equity method investments, Abacus.
(3) Depreciation and amortization expenses (see Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for associated asset lives):
  a. Acquisition related amortization represents amortization of intangible assets from the take-private transaction in 2007 as well as intangibles associated with acquisitions since that date and amortization of the excess basis in our underlying equity in joint ventures.
  b. Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment represents depreciation of property and equipment, including internally developed software.
  c. Amortization of capitalized implementation costs represents amortization of up-front costs to implement new customer contracts under our SaaS and hosted revenue model.
(4) Other, net primarily represents foreign exchange gains and losses related to the remeasurement of foreign currency denominated balances included in our consolidated balance sheets into the relevant functional currency.
(5) Restructuring and other costs represents charges associated with business restructuring and associated changes implemented which resulted in severance benefits related to employee terminations, integration and facility opening or closing costs and other business reorganization costs.
(6) Litigation and taxes, including penalties, represents charges or settlements associated with airline antitrust litigation as well as payments or reserves taken in relation to certain retroactive hotel occupancy and excise tax disputes (see Note 19, Commitments and Contingencies, to our September 30, 2013 unaudited consolidated financial statements and Note 21, Commitments and Contingencies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus).
(7) We have been paying an annual management fee to TPG and Silver Lake in an amount equal to the lesser of (i) 1% of our Adjusted EBITDA and (ii) $7 million. This also includes reimbursement of certain costs incurred by TPG and Silver Lake.
(8) Our Travel Network business at times makes upfront cash payments to travel agency subscribers at inception or modification of a service contract which are capitalized and amortized over an average expected life of the service contract to cost of revenue, generally over three to five years. Such payments are made with the objective of increasing the number of clients, or to ensure or improve customer loyalty. Our service contract terms are established such that the supplier and other fees generated over the life of the contract will exceed the cost of the incentives provided. The service contracts with travel agency subscribers require that the customer commit to achieving certain economic objectives and generally have repayment terms if those objectives are not met.

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Risks associated with an investment in our common stock include, but are not limited to, the risk factors described below. If any of the risks described below actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you may lose all or part of your investment. There may be additional risks currently deemed immaterial that may also impair our business, financial condition and results of operations. You should carefully consider all the information in this prospectus, including the risks and uncertainties described below, before making an investment decision.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Our revenue is highly dependent on transaction volumes in the global travel industry, particularly air travel transaction volumes.

Although for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, 94% and 85% of our Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenue, respectively, was Recurring Revenue in that it is tied to travel suppliers’ transaction volumes rather than to their unit pricing for an airplane ticket, hotel room or other travel product (see “Method of Calculation”), this revenue is generally not contractually committed to recur annually under our agreements with our travel suppliers. As a result, our revenue is highly dependent on the global travel industry, particularly air travel from which we derive a substantial amount of our revenue, and directly correlates with global travel, tourism and transportation transaction volumes. For example, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the most recent global economic downturn and the U.S. government sequestration that began in 2013 significantly affected and may continue to affect travel volumes worldwide and had a significant impact on our business during the relevant reporting periods. Our revenue is therefore highly susceptible to declines in or disruptions to leisure and business travel that may be caused by factors entirely out of our control, and therefore may not recur if these declines or disruptions occur.

Various factors may cause temporary or sustained disruption to leisure and business travel. The impact such disruptions would have on our business depends on the magnitude and duration of such disruption. These factors include, among others:

 

    financial instability of travel suppliers and the impact of any fundamental corporate changes to such travel suppliers, such as airline bankruptcies or consolidations, on the cost and availability of travel content;

 

    factors that affect demand for travel such as increases in fuel prices, changing attitudes towards the environmental costs of travel, safety concerns and outbreaks of contagious diseases;

 

    inclement weather, natural or man-made disasters or political events like acts or threats of terrorism, hostilities and war;

 

    factors that affect supply of travel such as changes to regulations governing airlines and the travel industry, like government sanctions that do or would prohibit doing business with certain state-owned travel suppliers, work stoppages or labor unrest at any of the major airlines, hotels or airports; and

 

    general economic conditions.

Our Travel Network business and our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business depend on maintaining and renewing contracts with their customers and other counterparties.

In our Travel Network business, we enter into participating carrier distribution and services agreements with airlines. Our contracts with major carriers typically last for three to five year terms and are generally subject to automatic renewal at the end of the term, unless terminated by either party with the required advance notice. Our contracts with smaller airlines generally last for one year and are also subject to automatic renewal at the end of

 

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the term, unless terminated by either party with the required advance notice. Airlines are not contractually obligated to distribute exclusively through our GDS during the contract term and may terminate their agreements with us upon providing the required advance notice. We have 28 planned renewals in 2014 (representing approximately 28% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013) and 24 planned renewals in 2015 (representing approximately 4% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013), assuming we reach multi-year agreements for the contracts expected to be renewed in 2014. Although we renewed 24 out of 24 planned renewals in 2013 (representing approximately 32% of Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013), we cannot guarantee that we will be able to renew our airline contracts in the future on favorable economic terms or at all.

We also enter into contracts with travel buyers. We typically have non-exclusive, three to five year contracts with our major travel agency customers, most of which can terminate their contracts anytime without cause, with the required advance notice. We also typically have three to five year contracts with corporate travel departments, which generally renew automatically unless terminated with the required advance notice. A meaningful portion of our travel buyer agreements, typically representing approximately 15% to 20% of our bookings, are up for renewal in any given year. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to renew our travel buyer agreements in the future on favorable economic terms or at all.

Similarly, our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business is based on contracts with travel suppliers for a typical duration of three to seven years for airlines and one to five years for hotels. As of September 30, 2013, we had contracts with approximately 225 airlines for the provision of one or more of our airline solutions. Although airline reservations contracts representing less than 5% of Airline Solutions’ 2012 revenue are scheduled for renewal in each of 2014 and 2015, airline reservations contracts representing approximately 10% of Airline Solutions’ 2012 revenue are scheduled for renewal in each of 2016 and 2017. Hospitality Solutions contract renewals are relatively evenly spaced, with approximately one-third of contracts representing approximately one quarter of Hospitality Solutions’ 2012 revenue coming up for renewal in any given year. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to renew our solutions contracts in the future on favorable economic terms or at all.

Additionally, we use several third-party distributor partners and four joint ventures to extend our GDS services in the APAC and EMEA regions. The termination of our contractual arrangements with any such third-party distributor partners and joint ventures could adversely impact our Travel Network business in the relevant markets. See “Business—Our Businesses—Travel Network—Geographic Scope” and “—We rely on third-party distributor partners and joint ventures to extend our GDS services to certain regions, which exposes us to risks associated with lack of direct management control and potential conflicts of interest.” For more information on our relationships with our third-party distributor partners and joint ventures.

Our failure to renew some or all of these agreements on economically favorable terms or at all, or the early termination of these existing contracts, could cause some of our subscribers to move to a competing GDS or use other travel technology providers for the solutions we provide and would materially harm our business, reputation and brand. Our business therefore relies on our ability to renew our agreements with our travel buyers, travel suppliers, third-party distributor partners and joint ventures or developing relationships with new travel buyers and travel suppliers to offset any customer losses.

We are subject to a certain degree of revenue concentration among a portion of our customer base. Our top five Travel Network customers were responsible for 34% and 35% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. Over the same period, our top five Airline and Hospitality Solutions customers represented 22% and 20% of our Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenues, respectively. Because of this concentration among a small number of customers, if an event were to adversely affect one of these customers, it would have a material impact on our business.

 

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Our Travel Network business is exposed to pricing pressure from travel suppliers.

Travel suppliers continue to look for ways to decrease their costs and to increase their control over distribution. For example, the consolidation in the airline industry and the recent economic downturn, among other factors, have driven some airlines to negotiate for lower fees during contract renegotiations, thereby exerting increased pricing pressure on our Travel Network business, which, in turn, negatively affects our revenues and margins. In addition, travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution channels, such as direct distribution through supplier-operated websites, may also adversely affect our contract renegotiations with these suppliers and negatively impact our transaction fee revenue. For example, as we attempt to renegotiate new agreements with our travel suppliers, they may withhold some or all of their content (fares and associated economic terms) for distribution exclusively through their direct distribution channels (for example, the relevant airline’s website) or offer travelers more attractive terms for content available through those direct channels after their contracts expire. As a result of these sources of negotiating pressure, we may have to decrease our prices to retain their business. If we are unable to renew our contracts with these travel suppliers on similar economic terms or at all, or if our ability to provide such content is similarly impeded, this would adversely affect the value of our Travel Network business as a marketplace due to our more limited content. See “—Travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution models, such as direct distribution models, could adversely affect our Travel Network and Travelocity businesses.”

Our Travel Network business depends on relationships with travel buyers.

Our Travel Network business relies on relationships with several large travel buyers, including TMCs and OTAs, to generate a large portion of its revenue through bookings made by these travel companies. Although no individual travel buyer accounts for more than 10% of our revenue, the five largest travel buyers of our Travel Network business were responsible for bookings that represented approximately 34% and 35% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. Such revenue concentration in a relatively small number of travel buyers makes us particularly dependent on factors affecting those companies. For example, if demand for their services decreases, or if a key supplier pulls its content from us, travel buyers may stop utilizing our services or move all or some of their business to competitors or competing channels.

Although our contracts with larger travel agencies often increase the incentives when the travel agency processes a certain volume or percentage of its bookings through our GDS, travel buyers are not contractually required to book exclusively through our GDS during the contract term. Travel buyers may shift bookings to other distribution intermediaries for many reasons, including to avoid becoming overly dependent on a single source of travel content or to increase their bargaining power with GDS providers. For example, Expedia shifted a significant portion of its business from Travel Network to a competitor GDS in late 2012, resulting in a year-over-year decline in our transaction volumes in 2013. Additionally, there may be regulations that allow travel buyers to terminate their contracts earlier. For example, according to European GDS regulations, small travel buyers may terminate a contract with a GDS vendor on three months’ notice after the first year of the contract.

These risks are exacerbated by increased consolidation among travel agencies and TMCs, which may ultimately reduce the pool of travel agencies that subscribe to GDSs. We must compete with other GDSs and other competitors for their business by offering or pre-paying competitive incentive payments, which, due to the strong bargaining power of these large travel buyers, tend to increase in each round of contract renewals. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting our Results—Increasing travel agency incentive fees” for more information about our incentive fees. However, any reduction in transaction fees from travel suppliers due to supplier consolidation or other market forces could limit our ability to increase incentives to travel agencies in a cost-effective manner or otherwise affect our margins.

 

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Our travel supplier customers may experience financial instability or consolidation, pursue cost reductions, change their distribution model or undergo other changes.

We generate the majority of our revenue and accounts receivable from airlines, with approximately 65% and 64%, respectively, of our revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, and 59% and 58%, respectively, of our trade accounts receivable attributable to these customers as of September 30, 2013 and December 31, 2012. We also derive revenue from hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines, tour operators and other suppliers in the travel and tourism industries. Adverse changes in any of these relationships or the inability to enter into new relationships could negatively impact the demand for and competitiveness of our travel products and services. For example, a lack of liquidity in the capital markets or weak economic performance may cause our travel suppliers to increase the time they take to pay or to default on their payment obligations, which could lead to a higher level of bad debt expense and negatively affect our results. We regularly monitor the financial condition of the air transportation industry and have noted the financial difficulties faced by several air carriers. Any large-scale bankruptcy or other insolvency proceeding of an airline or hospitality supplier could subject our agreements with that customer to rejection or early termination. Because we generally do not require security or collateral from our customers as a condition of sale, our revenues may be subject to credit risk more generally.

Furthermore, supplier consolidation, particularly in the airline industry, could harm our business. Our Travel Network business depends on a relatively small number of U.S. based airlines for a substantial portion of its revenue, and all of our businesses are highly dependent on airline ticket volumes. Consolidation among airlines, including the recent consolidation of Southwest Airlines with AirTran Airways and American Airlines with US Airways, could result in the loss of an existing customer and the related fee revenue, decreased airline ticket volumes due to capacity restrictions implemented concurrently with the consolidation, and increased airline concentration and bargaining power to negotiate lower transaction fees. For example, the consolidation of American Airlines with US Airways could adversely affect our business if future contract negotiations with the merged entity result in adverse changes compared to our existing relationships with these two airlines. These adverse changes may include, but are not limited to, renegotiated distribution or solutions contracts that contain less favorable terms to us or the loss of such contracts entirely. In addition, consolidation among travel suppliers may result in one or more suppliers refusing to provide certain content to Sabre but rather making it exclusively available on the suppliers’ proprietary websites, hurting the competitive position of our GDS relative to those websites. See “—Travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution models, such as direct distribution models, could adversely affect our Travel Network and Travelocity businesses.”

Travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution models, such as direct distribution models, could adversely affect our Travel Network and Travelocity businesses.

Some travel suppliers that provide content to Travel Network and Travelocity, including some of Travel Network’s largest airline customers, have sought to increase usage of direct distribution channels. For example, these travel suppliers are trying to move more consumer traffic to their proprietary websites, and some travel suppliers have explored direct connect initiatives linking their internal reservations systems directly with travel agencies, thereby bypassing the GDSs. By enabling the shifting of costs onto travel agencies and travelers, this direct distribution trend enables them to apply pricing pressure and negotiate travel distribution arrangements that are less favorable to intermediaries. In the future, airlines may increase their use of direct distribution, which may cause a material decrease in their use of our GDS. Travel suppliers may also offer travelers advantages such as special fares and bonus miles, which could make their offerings more attractive than those available through our GDS platform. For example, in 2010 American Airlines announced its “Boarding and Flexibility” package which, according to American Airlines, provided additional benefits to travelers who book their airline tickets directly through their website.

In addition, in respect of ancillary products, travel suppliers may choose not to comply with the technical standards that allow ancillary products to be immediately distributed via intermediaries, thus resulting in a delay before these products become available through our GDS relative to availability through direct distribution. For

 

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example, airlines have been “unbundling” from base airfares various ancillary products such as food and beverage, checked baggage and pre-reserved seats, and a recent survey by SITA shows that the vast majority of ancillary revenues are earned through direct sales channels, such as the airline website. Similarly, some airlines have also further limited the type of fare content information that is distributed through OTAs, including Travelocity.

Companies with close relationships with end consumers, like Facebook, as well as new entrants introducing new paradigms into the travel industry, such as metasearch engines, may promote alternative distribution channels to our GDS by diverting consumer traffic away from intermediaries. For example, Google acquired ITA Software, a flight information software company that provides air shopping capabilities, and launched Google Flights and Google Hotel Finder in 2011. If Google Hotel Finder changes its model to bypass GDS and OTA intermediaries by referring consumers to direct hotel distribution channels or if Google Flights, which already refers customers directly to airline websites, becomes a more popular way to shop and book travel, our GDS and OTA businesses may be adversely affected.

Additionally, technological advancements may allow airlines and hotels to facilitate broader connectivity to and integration with large travel buyers, such that certain airline and hotel offerings could be made available directly to such travel buyers without the involvement of intermediaries such as Travel Network and its competitors.

We rely on third-party distributor partners and joint ventures to extend our GDS services to certain regions, which exposes us to risks associated with lack of direct management control and potential conflicts of interest.

Our Travel Network business utilizes third-party distributor partners and joint ventures to extend our GDS services in the APAC and EMEA regions. We work with these partners to establish and maintain commercial and customer service relationships with both travel suppliers and travel buyers. Since we do not exercise management control over their day-to-day operations, the success of their marketing efforts and the quality of the services they provide is beyond our control. If they do not meet our standards for distribution, our reputation may suffer materially, and sales in those regions could decline significantly. Any interruption in these third-party services, deterioration in their performance or termination of our contractual arrangements with them could negatively impact our ability to extend our GDS services in the relevant markets.

In addition, our business may be harmed due to potential conflicts of interest with our joint venture partners. Large regional airlines collectively control a majority of the outstanding equity interests in our Abacus joint venture, a Singapore-based distribution provider that serves the APAC region. As travel suppliers, these airlines’ interests differ from our Travel Network business’ interests as a distribution intermediary. For example, the airline owners may not agree to pay travel agent incentives at the same rate as our GDS competitors. Subject to some exceptions, we are also prohibited from competing with Abacus by directly or indirectly engaging in the GDS business in Asia, Australia, New Zealand and certain Pacific islands.

The travel distribution market is highly competitive, and we are subject to competition from other GDS providers, direct distribution by travel suppliers and new entrants or technologies that may challenge the GDS business model.

The evolution of the global travel and tourism industry, the introduction of new technologies and standards and the expansion of existing technologies in key markets could, among other factors, contribute to an intensification of competition in the business areas and regions in which we operate. Increased competition could require us to increase spending on marketing activities or product development, to decrease our booking or transaction fees and other charges (or defer planned increases in such fees and charges), to increase incentive or full content payments or take other actions that could harm our business. A GDS has two broad categories of customers: (i) travel suppliers, such as airlines, hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines and tour

 

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operators, and (ii) travel buyers, such as online and offline travel agencies, TMCs and corporate travel departments. The competitive positioning of a GDS depends on the success it achieves with both customer categories. Other factors that may affect the competitive success of a GDS include the timeliness and accuracy of the travel content offered, the reliability and ease of use of the technology, the incentives paid to travel agencies, the transaction fees charged to travel suppliers and the range of products and services available to travel suppliers and travel buyers. Our GDS competitors could seek to capture market share by offering more differentiated content, products or services, increasing the incentive fees paid to travel agencies, or decreasing the transaction fees charged to travel suppliers, which would harm our business to the extent they gain market share from us or force us to respond by lowering our prices or increasing the incentives we pay.

Our Travel Network business principally faces competition from:

 

    other GDSs, principally Amadeus, which operates the Amadeus GDS, and Travelport, which owns the Galileo, Apollo and Worldspan GDS platforms;

 

    a number of local distribution systems and travel marketplace providers that are primarily owned by airlines or government entities and operate primarily in their home countries, including TravelSky in China and Sirena in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States;

 

    direct distribution and other alternative forms of distribution by travel suppliers (see “—Travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution models, such as direct distribution models, could adversely affect our Travel Network and Travelocity businesses”);

 

    corporate travel booking tools; and

 

    new entrants or technologies such as third-party aggregators or metasearch sites.

We cannot guarantee that we will be able to compete successfully against our current and future competitors in the travel distribution market, some of which may achieve greater brand recognition than us, have greater financial, marketing, personnel and other resources or be able to secure services and products from travel suppliers on more favorable terms. If we fail to overcome these competitive pressures, we may lose market share and our business may otherwise be negatively affected.

Our ability to maintain and grow our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business may be negatively affected by competition from other third-party solutions providers and new participants that seek to enter the solutions market.

Our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business principally faces competition from existing third-party solutions providers. For our Airline Solutions business, these competitors include (i) Amadeus, our closest competitor in terms of size and breadth, (ii) traditional technology companies, such as Hewlett-Packard (“HP”), Unisys and Navitaire (a division of Accenture), and (iii) airline industry participants, such as Jeppesen (a division of Boeing), Lufthansa Systems, and SITA. We also compete with various point solutions providers, such as PROS, ITA Software, Datalex and Travelport, on a more limited basis in several discrete functional areas. For our Hospitality Solutions business, we face competition across many aspects of our business but our primary competitors are in the hospitality CRS and PMS fields, including MICROS, TravelClick, Pegasus and Trust, among others. Although new entrants specializing in a particular type of software occasionally enter the solutions market, they typically focus on emerging or evolving business problems, niche solutions or small regional customers.

Factors that may affect the competitive success of our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business include our pricing structure, our ability to keep pace with technological developments, the effectiveness and reliability of our implementation and system migration processes, our ability to meet a variety of customer specifications, the effectiveness and reliability of our systems, the cost and efficiency of our system upgrades and our customer support services. Our failure to compete effectively on these and other factors could decrease our market share and negatively affect our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business.

 

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The recently signed strategic marketing agreement with Expedia may not be successfully implemented or may not result in the benefits anticipated by the parties.

In August 2013, Travelocity entered into an exclusive, long-term strategic marketing agreement with Expedia in which Expedia will power the technology platforms of Travelocity’s U.S. and Canadian websites as well as provide Travelocity with access to Expedia’s supply and customer service platforms. Both parties began development and implementation of this arrangement after signing. By December 31, 2013, the majority of the online hotel and air offering had been migrated to the Expedia platform, and a launch of the majority of the remainder is expected in early 2014. See “Business—Our Businesses—Travelocity.” If we do not implement the Expedia SMA on the expected schedule, we are subject to a number of risks:

 

    our financial performance could be negatively affected;

 

    we may lose customers and revenue if there are implementation problems that cause website errors, outages or other malfunctions or if the expected improvements in customer conversion rates do not materialize; and

 

    if we fail to successfully implement the Expedia SMA, our ability to negotiate a similar arrangement with another party in which bookings are processed through the Travel Network will be severely curtailed.

Moreover, we are still subject to a number of post-implementation risks. Our success is dependent on many factors including:

 

    improved conversion through better site performance and user experience using the Expedia platform and technology;

 

    reliability and availability of Expedia’s platform and technology;

 

    Expedia’s ability to provide attractive content through its platform;

 

    improved cost structure by reducing operational complexity; and

 

    profitable results from our marketing efforts.

The Expedia SMA requires us to guarantee Travelocity’s indemnification obligations for liabilities that may arise out of certain litigation matters, which may materially adversely affect our cash flows. Our financial condition may also be harmed if Expedia does not pay us in a timely manner for our share of the performance-based marketing fee.

Expedia will use our GDS for shopping and booking of the air travel booked through Travelocity.com and Travelocity.ca until 2019, at which time it may choose to use another intermediary for a portion or all of such air travel, subject to earlier termination under certain circumstances. We do not expect that Expedia will use Travel Network for shopping and booking of a portion of non-air travel for Travelocity.com and Travelocity.ca after the launch of the Expedia SMA.

Although the term of the agreement is eight years and automatically renews under certain conditions, the agreement may be terminated by Expedia upon the occurrence of certain events, some of which are outside our control, including, among others, (i) failure to meet minimum revenue amounts, (ii) the occurrence of a material adverse effect, and (iii) force majeure. The early termination of this agreement may result in a significant impact on our earnings.

We also agreed to a put/call arrangement with Expedia (“Expedia Put/Call”) whereby Expedia may acquire, or we may sell to Expedia, certain assets relating to the Travelocity business. Our put right may be exercised during the first 24 months of the Expedia SMA only upon the occurrence of certain triggering events primarily relating to implementation, which are outside of our control. The occurrence of such events is not considered probable. During this period, the amount of the put right is fixed. After the 24 month period, the put right is only

 

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exercisable for a limited period of time in 2016 at a discount to fair market value. The call right held by Expedia is exercisable at any time during the term of the Expedia SMA. If the call right is exercised, although we expect the amount paid will be fair value, the call right provides for a floor for a limited time that may be higher than fair value and a ceiling for the duration of the agreement that may be lower than fair value. In any case, we would no longer benefit from the financial performance of Travelocity in future periods.

Implementation of software solutions often involves a significant commitment of resources, and any failure to deliver as promised on a significant implementation could adversely affect our business.

In our Travel Network business and our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business, the implementation of software solutions often involves a significant commitment of resources and is subject to a number of significant risks over which we may or may not have control. These risks include:

 

    the features of the implemented software may not meet the expectations or fit the business model of the customer;

 

    our limited pool of trained experts for implementations cannot quickly and easily be augmented for complex implementation projects, such that resources issues, if not planned and managed effectively, could lead to costly project delays;

 

    customer-specific factors, such as the stability, functionality, interconnection and scalability of the customer’s pre-existing information technology infrastructure, as well as financial or other circumstances could destabilize, delay or prevent the completion of the implementation process, which, for airline reservations systems, typically takes 12 to 18 months; and

 

    customers and their partners may not fully or timely perform the actions required to be performed by them to ensure successful implementation, including measures we recommend to safeguard against technical and business risks.

As a result of these and other risks, some of our customers may incur large, unplanned costs in connection with the purchase and installation of our software products. Also, implementation projects could take longer than planned or fail. We may not be able to reduce or eliminate protracted installation or significant additional costs. Significant delays or unsuccessful customer implementation projects could result in claims from customers, harm our reputation and negatively impact our operating results.

We use open source software in our solutions that may subject our software solutions to general release or require us to re-engineer our solutions.

We use open source software in our solutions and may use more open source software in the future. From time to time, there have been claims by companies claiming ownership of software that was previously thought to be open source and that was incorporated by other companies into their products. As a result, we could be subject to suits by parties claiming ownership of what we believe to be open source software. Some open source licenses contain requirements that we make available source code for modifications or derivative works we create based upon the open source software and that we license such modifications or derivative works under the terms of a particular open source license or other license granting third parties certain rights of further use. If we combine or, in some cases, link our proprietary software solutions with or to open source software in a certain manner, we could, under certain of the open source licenses, be required to release the source code of our proprietary software solutions or license such proprietary solutions under the terms of a particular open source license or other license granting third parties certain rights of further use. In addition to risks related to license requirements, usage of open source software can lead to greater risks than use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or controls on origin of the software. In addition, open source license terms may be ambiguous and many of the risks associated with usage of open source cannot be eliminated, and could, if not properly addressed, negatively affect our business. If we were found to have inappropriately used open source software, we may be required to seek licenses from third parties

 

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in order to continue offering our software, to re-engineer our solutions, to discontinue the sale of our solutions in the event re-engineering cannot be accomplished on a timely basis or take other remedial action that may divert resources away from our development efforts, any of which could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

We rely on the availability and performance of information technology services provided by third parties, including HP, which manages a significant portion of our systems.

Our businesses are largely dependent on the computer data centers and network systems operated for us by HP. We also rely on other developers and service providers to maintain and support our global telecommunications infrastructure, including to connect our computer data center and call centers to end-users.

Our success is dependent on our ability to maintain effective relationships with these third-party technology and service providers. Some of our agreements with third-party technology and service providers are terminable for cause on short notice and often provide limited recourse for service interruptions. For example, our agreement with HP provides us with limited indemnification rights. We could face significant additional cost or business disruption if:

 

    Any such providers fail to enable us to provide our customers and suppliers with reliable, real-time access to our systems. For example, in August 2013, we experienced a significant outage of the Sabre platform due to a failure on the part of one of our service providers. This outage, which affected both our Travel Network business and our Airline Solutions business, lasted a number of hours and caused significant problems for our customers. Any such future outages could cause damage to our reputation, customer loss and require us to pay compensation to affected customers.

 

    Our arrangements with such providers are terminated or impaired and we cannot find alternative sources of technology or systems support on commercially reasonable terms or on a timely basis. For example, our substantial dependence on HP for many of our systems makes it difficult for us to switch vendors and makes us more sensitive to changes in HP’s pricing for its services.

Our business could be harmed by adverse global and regional economic and political conditions.

Travel expenditures are sensitive to personal and business discretionary spending levels and grow more slowly or decline during economic downturns. We derive the majority of our revenue from the United States and Europe, approximately 62% and 17%, respectively, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, and 62% and 18%, respectively, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012. Our geographic concentration in the United States and Europe makes our business particularly vulnerable to economic and political conditions that adversely affect business and leisure travel originating in or traveling to these countries.

For example, beginning in December 2007, there was a rapid deterioration of the U.S. economy and several countries in Europe began experiencing worsening credit and economic conditions. The U.S. and certain European governments are still operating at large financial deficits, which has contributed to the challenging macroeconomic conditions and the struggling economic recovery. This resulted in a significant decline in travel to the extent that these challenging macroeconomic conditions affect personal and business discretionary spending on travel. Most recently, the shutdown of the U.S. government and the continued U.S. government sequestration affected, and in the case of the U.S. governmental sequestration continues to affect, government and government-related travel throughout the United States. Because a large number of our travel buyer subscribers book travel on behalf of the U.S. government, our Travel Network business has been more negatively impacted than that of our competitors. Moreover, the increase in the Transportation Security Agency security charge in the recent U.S. federal budget deal will likely increase airline ticket prices, which may result in decreased travel volumes and may negatively affect our business.

Despite signs of gradual recovery, there is still weakness in parts of the global economy, including increased unemployment, reduced financial capacity of both business and leisure travelers, diminished liquidity and credit

 

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availability, declines in consumer confidence and discretionary income and general uncertainty about economic stability. We cannot predict the magnitude, length or recurrence of recessionary economic patterns, which have impacted, and may continue to impact, demand for travel and lead to reduced spending on the services we provide.

We derive the remainder of our revenues primarily from APAC, Latin America and MEA, where political instability and regulatory uncertainty is significantly higher than in Europe and the United States. Any unfavorable economic, political or regulatory developments in those regions could negatively affect our business, such as delays in payment or non-payment of contracts, delays in contract implementation or signing, carrier control issues and increased costs from regulatory changes.

Our OTAs are subject to a number of risks specific to their activities.

Our OTAs are subject to certain risks inherent in the consumer-facing OTA industry. Notwithstanding the Expedia SMA, Travelocity will continue to be exposed to these risks because its revenue stream is largely dependent upon Expedia’s performance. These risks include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

    Competition. The OTA industry is an increasingly competitive global environment with a number of established and emerging online and traditional sellers of travel-related services, including other OTAs, offline travel agents, travel suppliers, large online portal and search companies, travel metasearch engines and increasingly, mobile platform travel apps and social apps. Recently, we have seen increasing consolidation among our competitors, including Priceline’s acquisition of Kayak in November 2012 and Expedia’s acquisition of trivago in March 2013. These players compete on price, travel inventory availability and breadth, technological sophistication, ability to meet rapidly evolving consumer trends and demands, brand recognition, search engine rankings, ease of use and accessibility, customer service and reliability. If we cannot adequately address these trends and provide travelers with the content they seek at acceptable prices, our OTAs may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors.

 

    Content. OTAs use their website content and ability to comparison shop to attract and convert visitors into booking customers and repeat users. The success of our OTAs in attracting users depends, in part, upon our continued ability to collect, create and distribute high-quality, commercially valuable content that meets customers’ specific needs in a cost-effective manner. For Travelocity.com and Travelocity.ca, we are dependent on Expedia to make relevant travel content available to customers. Failing to meet the specific needs of consumers could make our OTAs less competitive. Changes in the cost structure by which our OTAs currently obtain their content, or changes in travelers’ relative appreciation of that content, could negatively impact our OTAs’ business and financial performance.

 

    Relationships with travel suppliers and travel distribution partners. OTAs such as ours depend on travel suppliers and distribution partners for access to inventory and derive a substantial portion of their revenue from these suppliers and distribution partners in the form of compensation for bookings. Many travel suppliers have reduced or eliminated and may continue to reduce or eliminate, commissions and fees paid to travel agencies, and our OTA business could be harmed if this trend continues. Also, if travel suppliers or GDSs attempt to implement multiple costly direct connections or charge travel agencies for or otherwise restrict access to content, our OTAs’ ability to offer competitive inventory and pricing may be adversely affected, leading to decreased revenues and margins.

 

    Changes in search engine algorithms and other traffic sources. We increasingly utilize internet search engines to generate traffic to our OTAs, principally through the purchase of travel-related keywords. Search engines, including Google, frequently update and change the algorithm that determines the placement and display of search results such that our links could be placed lower on the page or displayed less prominently. We also depend on pay-per-click and display advertising campaigns on search and shopping providers like Google, Kayak, and TripAdvisor to direct a significant amount of traffic to our OTAs. Our business may be harmed if we cannot keep pace with the rapidly changing pricing and operating dynamics for these traffic sources.

 

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    Media. Our OTAs receive fees from companies and organizations, such as those in the travel industry, for display and referral advertising products. If a significant portion of our advertisers feel that our OTAs are no longer attracting or referring relevant customers, and, as a result, reduce their advertising with our OTAs, our revenues could decline.

 

    License requirements. In some of the jurisdictions where we provide travel services through our OTAs, we are required to obtain certain licenses and approvals from the relevant regulatory authorities. These regulatory authorities generally have broad discretion to grant, renew and revoke such licenses and approvals. Any of these regulatory authorities could permanently or temporarily suspend the necessary licenses and approvals in respect of some or all of our travel agency and related activities in such jurisdictions, which would adversely impact the activities of the affected OTA.

We rely on the value of our brands, which may be damaged by a number of factors, some of which are out of our control.

We believe that maintaining and expanding our portfolio of product and service brands are important aspects of our efforts to attract and expand our customer base, particularly for our OTA business. Our brands may be negatively impacted by, among other things, unreliable service levels from third-party providers, customers’ inability to properly interface their applications with our technology, the loss or unauthorized disclosure of personal data or other bad publicity due to litigation, regulatory concerns or otherwise relating to our business. Any inability to maintain or enhance awareness of our brands among our existing and target customers could negatively affect our current and future business prospects.

For example, awareness, perceived quality and perceived differentiated attributes of our OTA brands, especially Travelocity, are important aspects of our efforts to attract and expand the number of travelers who use our OTA websites and mobile apps. We are responsible for marketing and retailing capabilities for our OTAs, such as building brand awareness and customer relationships and working on customer acquisition and customer analytics. There is an inherent level of risk associated with our marketing investments such that we could fail to attract new or repeat travelers to our websites or mobile apps in a cost-effective manner and may not result in conversion of a sufficient portion of these visitors into booking customers.

Any inability or failure to adapt to technological developments or the evolving competitive landscape could harm our business operations and competitiveness.

We depend upon the use of sophisticated information technology and systems. See “Business—Research, Development and Technology.” Our competitiveness and future results depend on our ability to maintain and make timely and cost-effective enhancements, upgrades and additions to our products, services, technologies and systems in response to new technological developments, industry standards and trends and customer demands. For example, we currently utilize mainframe infrastructure technology for certain of our enterprise applications and platforms due to its ability to provide the reliability and scalability we require for our complex technological operations. Although we believe that IBM, currently the only provider of this technology, is committed to investing in mainframes, the number of users and programmers able to service this technology is decreasing. We may eventually have to migrate to another business environment, which could cause us to incur substantial costs, result in instability and business interruptions and materially harm our business.

Adapting to new technological and marketplace developments, such as IATA’s proposed new distribution capability (“NDC”), may require substantial expenditures and lead time and we cannot guarantee that projected future increases in business volume will actually materialize. We may experience difficulties that could delay or prevent the successful development, marketing and implementation of enhancements, upgrades and additions. Moreover, we may fail to maintain, upgrade or introduce, new products, services, technologies and systems as quickly as our competitors or in a cost-effective manner. Those that we do develop may not achieve acceptance in the marketplace sufficient to generate material revenue or may be rendered obsolete or non-competitive by our

 

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competitors’ offerings. For example, Microsoft is currently developing Travel 2015, a trip-planning tool that uses predictive modeling to anticipate travelers’ preferred flight options, which may become a significant competitor to our TripCase mobile app. Also, Concur Technologies’ TripLink, which captures travel reservations information regardless of the channel on which bookings were made, has the potential to evolve and pose a significant risk to our Travel Network business.

In addition, our competitors are constantly increasing their product and service offerings through organic research and development or through strategic acquisitions. For example, Amadeus recently acquired Hitit Computer Services, an airline customer relationship management (“CRM”) and loyalty solutions provider. This allows Amadeus to maintain a relationship with Etihad Airways and Virgin Australia, customers that have recently migrated to our Sabre reservations platform. More recently, Amadeus also acquired Newmarket International, a hotel IT solutions provider, which will allow Amadeus to broaden its portfolio of supplier solutions. As a result, we must continue to invest significant resources in research and development in order to continually improve the speed, accuracy and comprehensiveness of our services and we may be required to make changes to our technology platforms or increase our investment in technology, increase marketing, adjust prices or business models and take other actions, which could affect our financial performance and liquidity.

Our success depends on maintaining the integrity of our systems and infrastructure, which may suffer from failures, capacity constraints, business interruptions and forces outside of our control.

We may be unable to maintain and improve the efficiency, reliability and integrity of our systems. Unexpected increases in the volume of our business could exceed system capacity, resulting in service interruptions, outages and delays. Such constraints can also lead to the deterioration of our services or impair our ability to process transactions. We occasionally experience system interruptions that make certain of our systems unavailable including, but not limited to, our GDS and the services that our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business provides to airlines and hotels. For example, in August 2013, we experienced a significant outage of the Sabre platform due to a failure on the part of one of our service providers. This outage lasted a number of hours and caused significant problems for our customers. System interruptions may prevent us from efficiently providing services to customers or other third parties, which could cause damage to our reputation and result in our losing customers and revenues or cause us to incur litigation and liabilities. Although we have contractually limited our liability for damages caused by outages of our GDS (other than damages caused by our gross negligence or willful misconduct), we cannot guarantee that we will not be subject to lawsuits or other claims for compensation from our customers in connection with such outages.

Our systems may also be susceptible to external damage or disruption. Much of the computer and communications hardware upon which we depend is located across multiple data center facilities in a single geographic region. Our systems could be damaged or disrupted by power, hardware, software or telecommunication failures, human errors, natural events including floods, hurricanes, fires, winter storms, earthquakes and tornadoes, terrorism, break-ins, hostilities, war or similar events. Computer viruses, denial of service attacks, physical or electronic break-ins and similar disruptions affecting the Internet, telecommunication services or our systems could cause service interruptions or the loss of critical data, and could prevent us from providing timely services. We could be harmed by outages in, or unreliability of, our data center facilities or infrastructure components and such outages or unreliability may prevent us from efficiently providing services to customers or other third parties. Failure to efficiently provide services to customers or other third parties could cause damage to our reputation and result in the loss of customers and revenues, significant recovery costs or litigation and liabilities. Moreover, such risks are likely to increase as we expand our business and as the tools and techniques involved become more sophisticated.

Although we have implemented measures intended to protect certain systems and critical data and provide comprehensive disaster recovery and contingency plans for certain customers that purchase this additional protection, these protections and plans are not in place for all systems and several of our existing critical backup systems are located in the same metropolitan area as our primary systems and we may not have sufficient disaster

 

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recovery tools or resources available depending on the type or size of the disruption. Disasters affecting our facilities, systems or personnel might be expensive to remedy and could significantly diminish our reputation and our brands, and we may not have adequate insurance to cover such costs.

The occurrence of any of these events could result in a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Customers and other end-users who rely on our software products and services, including our SaaS and hosted offerings, for applications that are integral to their businesses may have a greater sensitivity to product errors and security vulnerabilities than customers for software products generally. Additionally, security breaches that affect third parties upon which we rely, such as travel suppliers, may further expose us to negative publicity, possible liability or regulatory penalties. Events outside our control could cause interruptions in our IT systems, which could have a material adverse effect on our business operations and harm our reputation.

Security breaches could expose us to liability and damage our reputation and our business.

We process, store, and transmit large amounts of data, including personal information of our customers, and it is critical to our business strategy that our facilities and infrastructure, including those provided by HP or other vendors, remain secure and are perceived by the marketplace to be secure. Our infrastructure may be vulnerable to physical break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers or nefarious actors or similar disruptive problems. Any physical or electronic break-in or other security breach or compromise of the information handled by us or our service provider may jeopardize the security or integrity of information in our computer systems and networks or those of our customers and cause significant interruptions in our and our customers’ operations. Consumer-facing e-commerce websites are frequently subject to cybersecurity attacks due to the public nature of such websites and the personal information they collect and store. From time to time, we have experienced certain immaterial security breaches relating to our Travelocity business.

Although we have developed systems and processes that are designed to protect customer information and prevent data loss and other security breaches, such measures cannot provide absolute security. In addition, we may not successfully implement remediation plans to address all potential exposures. It is possible that we may have to expend additional financial and other resources to address such problems. Failure to prevent or mitigate data loss or other security breaches could expose us or our customers to a risk of loss or misuse of such information, cause customers to lose confidence in our data protection measures, damage our reputation, adversely affect our operating results or result in litigation or potential liability for us. While we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions, cover certain aspects of cyber risks, such insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover all our losses.

Our ability to recruit, train and retain technical employees is critical to our results of operations and future growth.

Our continued ability to compete effectively depends on our ability to recruit new employees and retain and motivate existing employees, particularly professionals with experience in our industry, information technology and systems. The specialized skills we require can be difficult and time-consuming to acquire and are often in short supply. There is high demand and competition for well-qualified employees, such as software engineers, developers and other technology professionals with specialized knowledge in software development, especially expertise in certain programming languages. This competition affects both our ability to retain key employees and to hire new ones. Any of our employees may choose to terminate their employment with us at any time, and a lengthy period of time is required to hire and train replacement employees when such skilled individuals leave the company. If we fail to attract well-qualified employees or to retain or motivate existing employees, our business could be materially hindered by, for example, a delay in our ability to deliver products and services under contract, bring new products and services to market or respond swiftly to customer demands. Even if we are able to maintain our employee base, the resources needed to recruit and retain such employees may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We operate a global business that exposes us to risks associated with international activities.

Our international operations involve risks that are not generally encountered when doing business in the United States. These risks include, but are not limited to:

 

    changes in foreign currency exchange rates and financial risk arising from transactions in multiple currencies;

 

    difficulty in developing, managing and staffing international operations because of distance, language and cultural differences;

 

    disruptions to or delays in the development of communication and transportation services and infrastructure;

 

    consumer attitudes, including the preference of customers for local providers;

 

    increasing labor costs due to high wage inflation in foreign locations, differences in general employment conditions and the degree of employee unionization and activism;

 

    business, political and economic instability in foreign locations, including actual or threatened terrorist activities, and military action;

 

    adverse laws and regulatory requirements, including more comprehensive regulation in the European Union (“EU”);

 

    export or trade restrictions;

 

    more restrictive data privacy requirements;

 

    governmental policies or actions, such as consumer, labor and trade protection measures;

 

    taxes, restrictions on foreign investment and limits on the repatriation of funds;

 

    diminished ability to legally enforce our contractual rights; and

 

    decreased protection for intellectual property.

Any of the foregoing risks may adversely affect our ability to conduct and grow our business internationally.

We are exposed to risks associated with acquiring or divesting businesses or business operations.

We have acquired or divested, and may in the future acquire or divest, businesses or business operations. Since 2010, we have acquired FlightLine Data Services, Inc. (“FlightLine”), Calidris ehf (“Calidris”), f:wz, PRISM Group Inc. and PRISM Technologies LLC (collectively “PRISM”), SoftHotel and Zenon N.D.C., Limited. We may not be able to identify suitable candidates for additional business combinations and strategic investments, obtain financing on acceptable terms for such transactions, obtain necessary regulatory approvals or otherwise consummate such transactions on acceptable terms, or at all. Any acquisitions that we are able to identify and complete may also involve a number of risks, including our inability to successfully or profitably integrate, operate, maintain and manage our newly acquired operations or employees; the diversion of our management’s attention from our existing business to integrate operations and personnel; possible material adverse effects on our results of operations during the integration process; becoming subject to contingent or other liabilities, including liabilities arising from events or conduct predating the acquisition that were not known to us at the time of the acquisition; and our possible inability to achieve the intended objectives of the transaction, including the inability to achieve cost savings and synergies. Acquisitions may also have unanticipated tax and accounting ramifications. To consummate any such transactions, we may need to raise external funds through the sale of equity or debt in the capital markets or through private placements, which may affect our liquidity and may dilute the value of our common stock.

Since 2012, we have divested D.V. Travels Guru Pvt. Ltd. and Desiya Online Distribution Pvt. Ltd. (collectively “TravelGuru”), Zuji Properties A.V.V. and Zuji Pte Ltd along with its operating subsidiaries

 

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(collectively “Zuji”), Travelocity Business (“TBiz”), Travelocity Nordics, Holiday Autos, Sabre Pacific and other businesses. Any divestitures may involve a number of risks, including the diversion of management’s attention, significant costs and expenses, the loss of customer relationships and cash flow, and the disruption of the affected business or business operations. Failure to timely complete or to consummate a divestiture may negatively affect the valuation of the affected business or business operations or result in restructuring charges.

Regulatory and Other Legal Risks

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property effectively, which may allow competitors to duplicate our products and services.

Our success and competitiveness depend, in part, upon our technologies and other intellectual property, including our brands. Among our significant assets are our proprietary and licensed software and other proprietary information and intellectual property rights. We rely on a combination of copyright, trademark and patent laws, laws protecting trade secrets, confidentiality procedures and contractual provisions to protect these assets both in the United States and in foreign countries. The laws of some jurisdictions may provide less protection for our technologies and other intellectual property assets than the laws of the United States.

There is no certainty that our intellectual property rights will provide us with substantial protection or commercial benefit. Despite our efforts to protect our intellectual property, some of our innovations may not be protectable, and our intellectual property rights may offer insufficient protection from competition or unauthorized use, lapse or expire, be challenged, narrowed, invalidated, or misappropriated by third parties, or be deemed unenforceable or abandoned, which, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and the legal remedies available to us may not adequately compensate us. We cannot be certain that others will not independently develop, design around, or otherwise acquire equivalent or superior technology or intellectual property rights.

 

    While we take reasonable steps to protect our brands and trademarks, we may not be successful in maintaining or defending our brands or preventing third parties from adopting similar brands. If our competitors infringe our principal trademarks, our brands may become diluted or if our competitors introduce brands or products that cause confusion with our brands or products in the marketplace, the value that our consumers associate with our brands may become diminished, which could negatively impact sales.

 

    Our patent applications may not be granted, and the patents we own could be challenged, invalidated, narrowed or circumvented by others and may not be of sufficient scope or strength to provide us with any meaningful protection or commercial advantage. Once our patents expire, or if they are invalidated, narrowed or circumvented, our competitors may be able to utilize the technology protected by our patents which may adversely affect our business.

 

    Although we rely on copyright laws to protect the works of authorship created by us, we do not generally register the copyrights in our copyrightable works where such registration is permitted. Copyrights of U.S. origin must be registered before the copyright owner may bring an infringement suit in the United States. Accordingly, if one of our unregistered copyrights of U.S. origin is infringed by a third-party, we will need to register the copyright before we can file an infringement suit in the United States, and our remedies in any such infringement suit may be limited.

 

    We use reasonable efforts to protect our trade secrets. However, protecting trade secrets can be difficult and our efforts may provide inadequate protection to prevent unauthorized use, misappropriation, or disclosure of our trade secrets, know how, or other proprietary information.

 

    We also rely on our domain names to conduct our online businesses. While we use reasonable efforts to protect and maintain our domain names, if we fail to do so the domain names may become available to others. Further, the regulatory bodies that oversee domain name registration may change their regulations in a way that adversely affects our ability to register and use certain domain names.

 

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We license software and other intellectual property from third parties. Such licensors may breach or otherwise fail to perform their obligations, or claim that we have breached or otherwise attempt to terminate their license agreements with us. We also rely on license agreements to allow third parties to use our intellectual property rights, including our software, but there is no guarantee that our licensees will abide by the terms of our license agreements or that the terms of our agreements will always be enforceable.

In addition, policing unauthorized use of and enforcing intellectual property can be difficult and expensive. The fact that we have intellectual property rights, including registered intellectual property rights, may not guarantee success in our attempts to enforce these rights against third parties. Besides general litigation risks, changes in, or interpretations of, intellectual property laws may compromise our ability to enforce our rights. We may not be aware of infringement or misappropriation, or elect not to seek to prevent it. Our decisions may be based on a variety of factors, such as costs and benefits of taking action, and contextual business, legal, and other issues. Any inability to adequately protect our intellectual property on a cost-effective basis could harm our business.

Intellectual property infringement actions against us could be costly and time consuming to defend and may result in business harm if we are unsuccessful in our defense.

Third parties may assert, including by means of counterclaims against us as a result of the assertion of our intellectual property rights, that our products, services or technology, or the operation of our business, violate their intellectual property rights. We are currently subject to such assertions, including patent infringement claims, and may be subject to such assertions in the future. Such assertions may also be made against our customers who may seek indemnification from us. In the ordinary course of business, we enter into agreements that contain indemnity obligations whereby we are required to indemnify our customers against such assertions arising from our customers’ usage of our products, services or technology. As the competition in our industry increases and the functionality of technology offerings further overlaps, such claims and counterclaims could become more common. We cannot be certain that we do not or will not infringe third parties’ intellectual property rights.

Legal proceedings involving intellectual property rights are highly uncertain, and can involve complex legal and scientific questions. Any intellectual property claim against us, regardless of its merit, could result in significant liabilities to our business, and can be expensive and time consuming to defend. Depending on the nature of such claims, our businesses may be disrupted, our management’s attention and other company resources may be diverted and we may be required to redesign, reengineer or rebrand our products and services, if feasible, to stop offering certain products and services or to enter into royalty or licensing agreements in order to obtain the rights to use necessary technologies, which may not be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all, and may result in a decrease of our competitive advantage. Our failure to prevail in such matters could result in loss of intellectual property rights, judgments awarding substantial damages, including possible treble damages and attorneys’ fees, and injunctive or other equitable relief against us. If we are held liable, we may be unable to exploit some or all of our intellectual property rights or technology. Even if we are not held liable, we may choose to settle claims by making a monetary payment or by granting a license to intellectual property rights that we otherwise would not license. Further, judgments may result in loss of reputation, may force us to take costly remediation actions, delay selling our products and offering our services, reduce features or functionality in our services or products, or cease such activities altogether. Insurance may not cover or be insufficient for any such claim.

Defects in our products may subject us to significant warranty liabilities or product liability claims and we may have insufficient product liability insurance to pay material uninsured claims.

Our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business exposes us to the risk of product liability claims that are inherent in software development. We may inadvertently create defective software, or supply our customers with defective software or software components that we acquire from third parties, which could result in personal injury or property damage, and may result in warranty or product liability claims brought against us, our travel supplier customers or third parties.

 

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Under our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business’ agreements, we generally must indemnify our customers for liability arising from intellectual property infringement claims with respect to our software. These indemnification obligations could be significant and we may not have adequate insurance coverage to protect us against all claims. We currently rely on a combination of self-insurance and third-party insurance to cover potential product liability exposure. The combination of our insurance coverage, cash flows and reserves may not be adequate to satisfy product liabilities we may incur in the future. Even meritless claims could subject us to adverse publicity, hinder us from securing insurance coverage in the future, require us to incur significant legal fees, decrease demand for any products that we successfully develop, divert management’s attention, and force us to limit or forgo further development and commercialization of these products. The cost of any product liability litigation or other proceedings, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial.

We are involved in various legal proceedings which may cause us to incur significant fees, costs and expenses and may result in unfavorable outcomes.

We are involved in various legal proceedings that involve claims for substantial amounts of money or which involve how we conduct our business. See “Business—Legal Proceedings.” For example, a number of state and local governments have filed lawsuits against us pertaining to sales or occupancy taxes they claim are due on some or all of our fees relating to hotel content distributed and sold via the merchant revenue model. In the merchant revenue model, the customer pays us an amount at the time of booking that includes (i) service fees, which we collect, and (ii) the price of the hotel room and amounts for occupancy or other local taxes, which we pass along to the hotel supplier. Pursuant to the Expedia SMA, we will continue to be liable for fees, charges, costs and settlements relating to litigation arising from hotels booked on the Travelocity platform prior to the Expedia SMA. However, fees, charges, costs and settlements relating to litigation from hotels booked subsequent to the Expedia SMA will be shared with Expedia according to the terms of the Expedia SMA. Under the Expedia SMA, we are also required to guarantee Travelocity’s indemnification obligations to Expedia for any liabilities arising out of historical claims with respect to this type of litigation. Even if we are successful in defending these types of lawsuits, state and local governments could adopt new ordinances directly taxing hotel booking fees and we may not be able to successfully challenge such ordinances.

Additionally, we are involved in antitrust litigation with US Airways. If we cannot resolve such matter favorably, we could be subject to (i) monetary damages, including treble damages under the antitrust laws and, depending on the amount of any such judgment, if we do not have sufficient cash on hand, we may be required to seek financing through the issuance of additional equity or from private or public financing or (ii) injunctive relief. Other airlines might likewise seek to benefit from any unfavorable outcome, by bringing their own claims against us on the same or similar grounds. We are also subject to a U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) antitrust investigation relating to the pricing and conduct of the airline distribution industry. We received a civil investigative demand (“CID”) from the DOJ and we are fully cooperating. The DOJ has also sent CIDs to other companies in the travel industry. Based on its findings in the investigation, the DOJ may (i) close the file, (ii) seek a consent decree to remedy issues it believes violate the antitrust laws, or (iii) file suit against us for violating the antitrust laws, seeking injunctive relief. With respect to both of these proceedings, if injunctive relief were to be granted, depending on its scope, it could affect the manner in which our airline distribution business is operated and potentially force changes to the existing airline distribution business model.

In addition, we are involved in a number of antitrust class action lawsuits alleging a conspiracy among OTAs and hotels to fix hotel prices. We are also involved from time-to-time with patent litigation with non-practicing entities or “patent trolls” that seek quick settlement payments that are often far less than the cost of mounting a defense, regardless of the merits of the patent or whether or not we have actually infringed.

The defense of these actions, as well as any of the other actions described under “Business—Legal Proceedings” and any other actions brought against us in the future, is time consuming and diverts management’s attention. Even if we are ultimately successful in defending ourselves in such matters, we are likely to incur significant fees, costs and expenses as long as they are ongoing. Any of these consequences could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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We may not have sufficient insurance to cover our liability in pending litigation claims and future claims either due to coverage limits or as a result of insurance carriers seeking to deny coverage of such claims, which in either case could expose us to significant liabilities.

We maintain third-party insurance coverage against various liability risks, including securities, shareholder derivative, ERISA, and product liability claims, as well as other claims that form the basis of litigation matters pending against us. We believe these insurance programs are an effective way to protect our assets against liability risks. However, the potential liabilities associated with litigation matters pending against us, or that could arise in the future, could exceed the coverage provided by such programs. In addition, our insurance carriers have sought or may seek to rescind or deny coverage with respect to pending claims or lawsuits, completed investigations or pending or future investigations and other legal actions against us. See “Business—Legal Proceedings—Insurance Carriers” for more information on our current litigation with our insurance carriers. If we do not have sufficient coverage under our policies, or if the insurance companies are successful in rescinding or denying coverage, we may be required to make material payments in connection with third-party claims.

Any failure to comply with regulations or any changes in such regulations governing our businesses could adversely affect us.

Parts of our business operate in regulated industries and could be adversely affected by unfavorable changes in or the enactment of new laws, rules or regulations applicable to us, which could decrease demand for our products and services, increase costs or subject us to additional liabilities. Moreover, regulatory authorities have relatively broad discretion to grant, renew and revoke licenses and approvals and to implement regulations. Accordingly, such regulatory authorities could prevent or temporarily suspend us from carrying on some or all of our activities or otherwise penalize us if our practices were found not to comply with the applicable regulatory or licensing requirements or any interpretation of such requirements by the regulatory authority. Our failure to comply with any of these requirements or interpretations could have a material adverse effect on our operations. In particular, after a voluntary disclosure, we received a warning letter from the Bureau of Industry and Security regarding our failure to comply fully with the Export Administration Regulations as to software updates for a few travel agency customers located outside the United States. Although the Bureau of Industry and Security declined to prosecute or sanction us, if we were to violate the Export Administration Regulations again, the matter could be reopened or taken into consideration when investigating future matters and we may be subject to criminal prosecution or administrative sanctions.

In Europe, GDS regulations or interpretations thereof may increase our cost of doing business or lower our revenues, limit our ability to sell marketing data, impact relationships with travel buyers, airlines, rail carriers or others, impair the enforceability of existing agreements with travel buyers and other users of our system, prohibit or limit us from offering services or products, or limit our ability to establish or change fees. Although regulations specifically governing GDSs have been lifted in the United States, they remain subject to general regulation regarding unfair trade practices by the U.S. Department of Transportation (“DOT”). In addition, continued regulation of GDSs in the EU and elsewhere could also create the operational challenge of supporting different products, services and business practices to conform to the different regulatory regimes. See “Business—Government Regulation—Computer Reservations System Industry Regulation” for additional information. We do not currently maintain a central database of all regulatory requirements affecting our worldwide operations and, as a result, the risk of non-compliance with the laws and regulations described above is heightened. Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations may subject us to fines, penalties and potential criminal violations. Any changes to these laws or regulations or any new laws or regulations may make it more difficult for us to operate our business.

 

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Our collection, processing, storage, use and transmission of personal data could give rise to liabilities as a result of governmental regulation, conflicting legal requirements, differing views on data privacy or security breaches.

In our processing of travel transactions, we collect, process, store, use and transmit large amounts of sensitive personal data. This information is increasingly subject to legal restrictions around the world, which may result in conflicting legal requirements in the United States and other jurisdictions. For example, the U.S. Congress and federal agencies, including the Federal Trade Commission, have started to take a more aggressive stance in drafting and enforcing privacy and data protection laws. The EU is also in the process of proposing reforms to its existing data protection legal framework. These legal restrictions are generally intended to protect the privacy and security of personal information, including credit card information that is collected, processed and transmitted in or from the governing jurisdiction. Companies that handle this type of data have also been subject to investigations, lawsuits and adverse publicity due to allegedly improper disclosure or use of sensitive personal information. As privacy and data protection becomes an increasingly politicized issue, we may also become exposed to potential liabilities as a result of conflicting legal requirements, differing views on the privacy of travel data or failure to comply with applicable requirements. Our business could be materially adversely affected if we are unable to comply with legal restrictions on the use of sensitive personal information or if such restrictions are expanded to require changes in our current business practices or are interpreted in ways that conflict with or negatively impact our present or future business practices.

We are exposed to risks associated with payment card industry (“PCI”) compliance.

The PCI Data Security Standard (“PCI DSS”) is a set of comprehensive requirements endorsed by credit card issuers for enhancing payment account data security that includes requirements for security management, policies, procedures, network architecture, software design and other critical protective measures. PCI DSS compliance is required in order to maintain credit card processing facilities. The cost of compliance with the PCI DSS is significant and may increase. Although we are currently in compliance with the PCI DSS, compliance does not guarantee a completely secure environment. Moreover, compliance is an ongoing activity, since the formal requirements evolve as new threats and protective measures are identified. In the event that we were to lose PCI DSS compliance (or fail to achieve compliance with a future version of the PCI DSS), we could be exposed to fines and penalties and, in extreme circumstances, may have our credit card processing privileges revoked, which would have a material adverse effect on our business.

We may have higher than anticipated tax liabilities.

We are subject to a variety of taxes in many jurisdictions globally, including income taxes in the United States at the federal, state and local levels, and in many other countries. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of our business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. We operate in numerous countries where our income tax returns are subject to audit and adjustment by local tax authorities. Because we operate globally, the nature of the uncertain tax positions is often very complex and subject to change, and the amounts at issue can be substantial. It is inherently difficult and subjective to estimate such amounts, as we have to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. We re-evaluate uncertain tax positions on a quarterly basis. This evaluation is based on factors including, but not limited to, changes in facts or circumstances, changes in tax law, effectively settled issues under audit and new audit activity. Although we believe our tax estimates are reasonable, the final determination of tax audits could be materially different from our historical income tax provisions and accruals. Our effective tax rate may change from year to year based on changes in the mix of activities and income allocated or earned among various jurisdictions, tax laws in these jurisdictions, tax treaties between countries, our eligibility for benefits under those tax treaties, and the estimated values of deferred tax assets and liabilities. Such changes could result in an increase in the effective tax rate applicable to all or a portion of our income which would reduce our profitability.

 

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We establish reserves for our potential liability for U.S. and non-U.S. taxes, including sales, occupancy and value-added taxes, consistent with applicable accounting principles and in light of all current facts and circumstances. We have also established reserves relating to the collection of refunds related to value-added taxes, which are subject to audit and collection risks in various regions of Europe. Recently our right to recover certain value-added tax receivables associated with our European businesses has been questioned by tax authorities. These reserves represent our best estimate of our contingent liability for taxes. The interpretation of tax laws and the determination of any potential liability under those laws are complex, and the amount of our liability may exceed our established reserves.

We consider the undistributed earnings of our foreign subsidiaries as of December 31, 2012 to be indefinitely reinvested and, accordingly, no U.S. income taxes have been provided thereon. As of December 31, 2012, the amount of indefinitely reinvested foreign earnings was approximately $181 million. We have not, nor do we anticipate the need to, repatriate funds to the United States to satisfy domestic liquidity needs arising in the ordinary course of business, including liquidity needs associated with our domestic debt service requirements. In the event funds from foreign operations are needed to fund operations in the United States or if we elect to repatriate these funds, we would be required to accrue and pay additional U.S. taxes.

New tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations or ordinances could be enacted at any time and existing tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations and ordinances could be interpreted, changed, modified or applied adversely to us. These events could require us to pay additional tax amounts on a prospective or retroactive basis, as well as require us to pay fees, penalties or interest for past amounts deemed to be due. For example, there have been proposals to amend U.S. tax laws that would significantly impact how U.S. companies are taxed on foreign earnings. New, changed, modified or newly interpreted or applied laws could also increase our compliance, operating and other costs, as well as the costs of our products and services.

Usage of our net operating losses may be subject to limitations in the future.

As of December 31, 2012, we had approximately $1.6 billion of net operating loss carryforwards (“NOLs”) for U.S. federal income tax purposes, approximately $42 million of which are subject to an annual limitation on their ability to be utilized under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. As of December 31, 2013, due in large part to the reversal of a significant timing difference of approximately $1.3 billion in the fourth quarter of 2013, we estimate our NOLs to be in the range of $550 million to $650 million. If we generate taxable income in the future, we may be able to utilize these net operating losses to offset future federal income tax liabilities. Although we currently expect that Section 382 will not limit our ability to fully realize this benefit, our future financial performance, which may differ from our current expectations, will determine our ability to utilize this benefit. In addition, while this offering will not result in a change of control under Section 382, any subsequent changes in our common stock ownership, including through sales of stock by large stockholders after this offering or other transactions that are not within our control, may lead to a change of control under Section 382. Any such change could further limit our ability to utilize our NOLs to offset future federal income tax liabilities. Currently, our Principal Stockholders own more than 94% of our common stock. See “Principal and Selling Stockholders.”

Our pension plan obligations are currently unfunded, and we may have to make significant cash contributions to our plans, which could reduce the cash available for our business.

Our pension plans in the aggregate are underfunded by approximately $109 million as of December 31, 2012. With approximately 5,300 participants in our pension plans, we incur substantial costs relating to pension benefits, which can vary substantially as a result of changes in healthcare laws and costs, volatility in investment returns on pension plan assets and changes in discount rates used to calculate related liabilities. Our estimates of liabilities and expenses for pensions and other post-retirement healthcare benefits require the use of assumptions, including assumptions relating to the rate used to discount the future estimated liability, the rate of return on plan assets, inflation and several assumptions relating to the employee workforce (medical costs, retirement age and

 

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mortality). Actual results may differ, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition or results of operations. Future volatility and disruption in the stock markets could cause a decline in the asset values of our pension plans. In addition, a decrease in the discount rate used to determine minimum funding requirements could result in increased future contributions. If either occurs, we may need to make additional pension contributions above what is currently estimated, which could reduce the cash available for our businesses.

Risks Related to Our Indebtedness and Liquidity

We may require more cash than we generate in our operating activities, and additional funding on reasonable terms or at all may not be available.

We cannot guarantee that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations to fund our capital investment requirements or other liquidity needs. For example, with the migration of our U.S. and Canadian Travelocity businesses to the Expedia platform, our working capital will decrease as we pay travel suppliers for travel booked on our platform, without being offset by new bookings. Moreover, because we are a holding company with no material direct operations, we depend on loans, dividends and other payments from our subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet our financial obligations. Our subsidiaries are legally distinct from us and may be prohibited or restricted from paying dividends or otherwise making funds available to us under certain conditions.

As a result, we may be required to finance our cash needs through public or private equity offerings, bank loans, additional debt financing or otherwise. Our ability to arrange financing and the cost of such financing are dependent on numerous factors, including but not limited to:

 

    general economic and capital market conditions;

 

    the availability of credit from banks or other lenders;

 

    investor confidence in us; and

 

    our results of operations.

There can be no assurance that financing will be available on terms favorable to us or at all, which could force us to delay, reduce or abandon our growth strategy, increase our financing costs, or both. Additional funding from debt financings may make it more difficult for us to operate our business because a portion of our cash generated from internal operations would be used to make principal and interest payments on the indebtedness and we may be obligated to abide by restrictive covenants contained in the debt financing agreements, which may, among other things, limit our ability to make business decisions and further limit our ability to pay dividends.

In addition, any downgrade of our debt ratings by Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s Investor Service or similar ratings agencies, increases in general interest rate levels and credit spreads or overall weakening in the credit markets could increase our cost of capital. Furthermore, raising capital through public or private sales of equity to finance acquisitions or expansion could cause earnings or ownership dilution to your shareholding interests in our company.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness, which could adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to operate our business and to fulfill our obligations under our indebtedness.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness. As of September 30, 2013, on an as adjusted basis after giving effect to this offering and the application of the net proceeds from this offering as described under “Use of Proceeds,” we would have had $         of indebtedness outstanding in addition to $         of availability under the revolving portion of our Credit Facility (as defined in “Description of Certain Indebtedness”), after taking into

 

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account the availability reduction of $         for letters of credit issued under the revolving portion. Of this indebtedness, none will be due on or before the end of 2014. Our substantial level of indebtedness will increase the possibility that we may not generate enough cash flow from operations to pay, when due, the principal of, interest on or other amounts due in respect of these obligations. Other risks relating to our long-term indebtedness include:

 

    increased vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

    higher interest expense if interest rates increase on our floating rate borrowings and our hedging strategies do not effectively mitigate the effects of these increases;

 

    need to divert a significant portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of cash to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, investments and other general corporate purposes;

 

    limited ability to obtain additional financing, on terms we find acceptable, if needed, for working capital, capital expenditures, expansion plans and other investments, which may adversely affect our ability to implement our business strategy;

 

    limited flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our businesses and the markets in which we operate or to take advantage of market opportunities; and

 

    a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt.

In addition, it is possible that we may need to incur additional indebtedness in the future in the ordinary course of business. The terms of our Credit Facility, the indentures governing our 2016 Notes and the indentures governing our 2019 Notes (each as defined in “Description of Certain Indebtedness”) allow us to incur additional debt subject to certain limitations. If new debt is added to current debt levels, the risks described above could intensify. In addition, our inability to maintain certain leverage ratios could result in acceleration of a portion of our debt obligations and could cause us to be in default if we are unable to repay the accelerated obligations.

The terms of our debt covenants could limit our discretion in operating our business and any failure to comply with such covenants could result in the default of all of our debt.

The agreements governing our indebtedness contain and the agreements governing our future indebtedness will likely contain various covenants, including those that restrict our or our subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things:

 

    incur liens on our property, assets and revenue;

 

    borrow money, and guarantee or provide other support for the indebtedness of third parties;

 

    redeem or repurchase our capital stock;

 

    prepay, redeem or repurchase certain of our indebtedness;

 

    enter into certain change of control transactions;

 

    make investments in entities that we do not control, including joint ventures;

 

    enter into certain asset sale transactions, including divestiture of certain company assets and divestiture of capital stock of wholly-owned subsidiaries;

 

    enter into certain transactions with affiliates;

 

    enter into secured financing arrangements;

 

    enter into sale and leaseback transactions;

 

    change our fiscal year; and

 

    enter into substantially different lines of business.

 

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These covenants may limit our ability to effectively operate our businesses or maximize stockholder value. In addition, our Credit Facility requires that we meet certain financial tests, including the maintenance of a leverage ratio and a minimum net worth. Our ability to satisfy these tests may be affected by factors and events beyond our control, and we may be unable to meet such tests in the future.

Any failure to comply with the restrictions of our Credit Facility, the indentures governing our 2016 Notes and our 2019 Notes or any agreement governing our other indebtedness may result in an event of default under those agreements. Such default may allow the creditors to accelerate the related debt, which may trigger cross-acceleration or cross-default provisions in other debt. In addition, lenders may be able to terminate any commitments they had made to supply us with further funds.

We are exposed to interest rate fluctuations.

Our floating rate indebtedness exposes us to fluctuations in prevailing interest rates. To reduce the impact of large fluctuations in interest rates, we typically hedge a portion of our interest rate risk by entering into derivative agreements with financial institutions. Our exposure to interest rates relates primarily to our borrowings under the Credit Facility. See “Description of Certain Indebtedness.”

The derivative agreements that we use to manage the risk associated with fluctuations in interest rates may not be able to eliminate the exposure to these changes. Interest rates are sensitive to numerous factors outside of our control, such as government and central bank monetary policy in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Depending on the size of the exposures and the relative movements of interest rates, if we choose not to hedge or fail to effectively hedge our exposure, we could experience a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. As of September 30, 2013, we have entered into floating-to-fixed interest rate swaps that effectively convert $750 million of floating interest rate senior secured debt into a fixed rate obligation. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Interest Rate Risk.”

We are exposed to exchange rate fluctuations.

We conduct various operations outside the United States, primarily in Canada, South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. For the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, we recognized $523 million and $708 million in foreign currency operating expenses, representing approximately 25% and 23% of our total operating expenses, respectively. Our most significant foreign currency operating expenses are in the Euro, representing approximately 9% and 7% of our operating expenses for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. As a result, we face exposure to movements in currency exchange rates. These exposures include but are not limited to:

 

    re-measurement gains and losses from changes in the value of foreign denominated assets and liabilities;

 

    translation gains and losses on foreign subsidiary financial results that are translated into U.S. dollars, our functional currency, upon consolidation;

 

    planning risk related to changes in exchange rates between the time we prepare our annual and quarterly forecasts and when actual results occur; and

 

    the impact of relative exchange rate movements on cross-border travel, principally travel between Europe and the United States.

Depending on the size of the exposures and the relative movements of exchange rates, if we choose not to hedge or fail to hedge effectively our exposure, we could experience a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. As we have seen in some recent periods, in the event of severe volatility in exchange rates, these exposures can increase, and the impact on our results of operations and financial condition can be more pronounced. In addition, the current environment and the increasingly global nature of our business have made hedging these exposures more complex and costly.

 

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To reduce the impact of this earnings volatility, we hedge approximately 44% of our foreign currency exposure by entering into foreign currency forward contracts on several of our largest foreign currency exposures, including the Euro, the British Pound Sterling, the Polish Zloty and the Indian Rupee. The notional amounts of these forward contracts, totaling $133 million at September 30, 2013, represent obligations to purchase foreign currencies at a predetermined exchange rate to fund a portion of our expenses that are denominated in foreign currencies. Such derivative instruments are short-term in nature and not designed to hedge against currency fluctuation that could impact our foreign currency denominated revenue or gross profit. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk—Foreign Currency Risk” and Note 12, Derivatives, to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Although we have increased and may continue to increase the scope, complexity and duration of our foreign exchange risk management strategy, our current or future hedging activities may not sufficiently protect us from the adverse effects of currency exchange rate movements. Moreover, we make a number of estimates in conducting hedging activities, including in some cases the level of future bookings, cancellations, refunds, customer stay patterns and payments in foreign currencies. In the event those estimates differ significantly from actual results, we could experience greater volatility as a result of our hedging activities.

Risks Related to the Offering and Our Common Stock

An active trading market may not develop or be sustained.

Although we intend to list our common stock on the                     , it is possible that, after this offering, an active trading market will not develop or continue. As a result, shareholders may have difficulty selling their shares or selling their shares at a certain price. In addition, the initial public offering price or future price of our common stock may not reflect our actual financial performance.

The initial public offering price per share of our common stock will be determined by negotiation among us and the representatives of the underwriters and may not be indicative of the price at which the shares of our common stock will trade in the public market after this offering.

The market price and trading volume of our common stock may be volatile, which could result in rapid and substantial losses for our stockholders.

Even if an active trading market develops, the market price of our common stock may be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations. In addition, the trading volume in our common stock may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. If the market price of our common stock declines significantly, you may be unable to resell your shares at or above the price at which you purchased them, if at all. The market price of our common stock may fluctuate or decline significantly in the future. Factors that could negatively affect our share price or result in fluctuations in the price or trading volume of our common stock include, but are not limited to, those listed elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section and the following, some of which are beyond our control regardless of our actual operating performance:

 

    actual or anticipated quarterly variations in operational results and reactions to earning releases or other presentations by company executives;

 

    failure to meet the expectations of securities analysts and investors;

 

    rating agency credit rating actions;

 

    the contents of published research reports about us or our industry or the failure of securities analysts to cover our common stock after this offering;

 

    any increased indebtedness we may incur in the future;

 

    actions by institutional stockholders;

 

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    speculation or reports by the press or the investment community with respect to us or our industry in general;

 

    increases in market interest rates that may lead purchasers of our shares to demand a higher yield;

 

    changes in our capital structure;

 

    announcements of dividends;

 

    future sales of our common stock by us, the Principal Stockholders or members of our management;

 

    announcements of technological innovations or new services by us or our competitors or new entrants into the industry;

 

    announcements by us, our competitors or vendors of significant contracts, acquisitions, joint marketing relationships, joint ventures or capital commitments;

 

    loss of a major travel supplier or global travel agency subscriber;

 

    changes in the status of intellectual property rights;

 

    third-party claims or proceedings against us or adverse developments in pending proceedings;

 

    additions or departures of key personnel;

 

    changes in applicable laws and regulations;

 

    negative publicity for us, our business or our industry;

 

    changes in expectations or estimates as to our future financial performance or market valuations of competitors, customers or travel suppliers;

 

    results of operations of our competitors; and

 

    general market, political and economic conditions, including any such conditions and local conditions in the markets in which our customers are located.

Volatility in our stock price could also make us less attractive to certain investors, and/or invite speculative trading in our common stock or debt instruments.

In addition, securities exchanges, and in particular                 , have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many online companies. In the past, stockholders have instituted securities class action litigation following periods of market volatility. If we were involved in securities litigation, we could incur substantial costs and our resources and the attention of management could be diverted from our business.

Maintaining and improving our financial controls and the requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management’s attention and affect our ability to attract and retain qualified board members.

As a public company, we will be subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 and                  rules. The requirements of these rules and regulations will significantly increase our legal and financial compliance costs, including costs associated with the hiring of additional personnel, making some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly, and may also place undue strain on our personnel, systems and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we file annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. Ensuring that we have adequate internal financial and

 

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accounting controls and procedures in place is a costly and time-consuming effort that needs to be re-evaluated frequently. We are in the initial stage of documenting our internal control procedures and have not begun testing these procedures in order to comply with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“Section 404”). Section 404 requires annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and a report by our independent registered public accounting firm auditing our effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting beginning with fiscal year 2015. Both we and our independent registered public accounting firm will be testing our internal controls in connection with the Section 404 requirements and could, as part of that documentation and testing, identify material weaknesses, significant deficiencies or other areas for further attention or improvement. Implementing any appropriate changes to our internal controls may require specific compliance training for our directors, officers and employees, require the hiring of additional finance, accounting and other personnel, entail substantial costs to modify our existing accounting systems, and take a significant period of time to complete. Such changes may not, however, be effective in maintaining the adequacy of our internal controls, and any failure to maintain that adequacy, or consequent inability to produce accurate financial statements on a timely basis, could increase our operating costs and could materially impair our ability to operate our business. Moreover, effective internal controls are necessary for us to produce reliable financial reports and are important to help prevent fraud. As a result, our failure to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 on a timely basis could result in the loss of investor confidence in the reliability of our financial statements, which in turn could cause the market value of our common stock to decline.

Various rules and regulations applicable to public companies make it more difficult and more expensive for us to maintain directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to maintain coverage. If we are unable to maintain adequate directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, our ability to recruit and retain qualified officers and directors, especially those directors who may be deemed independent for purposes of                  rules, will be significantly curtailed.

If you invest in this offering, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution.

We expect that the initial public offering price of our common stock will be substantially higher than the pro forma net tangible book value per share issued and outstanding immediately after this offering. Our pro forma net tangible book value per share as of September 30, 2013 was approximately $             and represents the amount of book value of our total tangible assets minus the book value of our total liabilities, divided by the number of our shares of common stock then issued and outstanding. Investors who purchase common stock in this offering will pay a price per share that substantially exceeds the net tangible book value per share of common stock. If you purchase shares of our common stock in this offering, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution of $         in the pro forma net tangible book value per share, based upon the initial public offering price of $         per share (the midpoint of the estimated initial public offering price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus). Investors that purchase common stock in this offering will have purchased     % of the shares issued and outstanding immediately after the offering, but will have paid     % of the total consideration for those shares. See “Dilution.”

Concentration of ownership among our Principal Stockholders may prevent new investors from influencing significant corporate decisions and may result in conflicts of interest.

Upon consummation of this offering our Principal Stockholders will own, in the aggregate, approximately     % of our outstanding common stock and will own, in the aggregate, approximately     % of our outstanding common stock assuming no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares. As a result, the Principal Stockholders will be able to exercise significant influence over all matters requiring stockholder approval, including: the election of directors; approval of mergers or a sale of all or substantially all of our assets and other significant corporate transactions; and the amendment of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws. This concentration of influence may delay, deter or prevent acts that would be favored by our other stockholders, who may have interests different from

 

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those of our Principal Stockholders. For example, our Principal Stockholders could delay or prevent an acquisition or merger deemed beneficial to other stockholders, or seek to cause us to take courses of action that, in their judgment, could enhance their investment in us, but which might involve risks to our other stockholders or adversely affect us or our other stockholders, including investors in this offering. Our Principal Stockholders may be able to cause or prevent a change in control of us or a change in the composition of our board of directors and could preclude any unsolicited acquisition of us. This may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change in control. In addition, this significant concentration of share ownership may adversely affect the trading price of our common stock because investors often perceive disadvantages in owning common stock in companies with Principal Stockholders.

We expect to be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the              rules and, as a result, we will qualify for exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements. You may not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to such requirements.

Because the Principal Stockholders will own a majority of our outstanding common stock following the completion of this offering, we will be considered a “controlled company” as that term is set forth in the stock exchange rules. Under these rules, a company of which more than 50% of the voting power is held by another person or group of persons acting together is a “controlled company” and may elect not to comply with certain stock exchange rules regarding corporate governance, including:

 

    the requirement that a majority of our board of directors consist of independent directors;

 

    the requirement that our nominating and corporate governance committee be composed entirely of independent directors with a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities;

 

    the requirement that our compensation committee be composed entirely of independent directors with a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities; and

 

    the requirement for an annual performance evaluation of the nominating and corporate governance and compensation committees.

Following this offering, we intend to utilize these exemptions. As a result, we may not have a majority of independent directors, our nominating and corporate governance committee and compensation committee will not consist entirely of independent directors and such committees may not be subject to annual performance evaluations. As a result, you may not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to all of the              rules regarding corporate governance. Our status as a controlled company could make our common stock less attractive to some investors or otherwise harm our stock price.

Future issuances of debt or equity securities by us may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

After this offering, assuming the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, we will have an aggregate of              shares of common stock authorized but unissued and not reserved for issuance under our incentive plans. We may issue all of these shares of common stock without any action or approval by our stockholders, subject to certain exceptions.

In the future, we may attempt to obtain financing or to increase further our capital resources by issuing additional shares of our common stock or offering debt or other equity securities, including commercial paper, medium-term notes, senior or subordinated notes, debt securities convertible into equity or shares of preferred stock. Future acquisitions could require substantial additional capital in excess of cash from operations. We would expect to finance the capital required for acquisitions through a combination of additional issuances of equity, corporate indebtedness, asset-backed acquisition financing and/or cash from operations. In addition, we also expect to issue additional shares in connection with exercise of our stock options under our incentive plans.

 

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Issuing additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities or securities convertible into equity for financing or in connection with our incentive plans, acquisitions or otherwise may dilute the economic and voting rights of our existing stockholders or reduce the market price of our common stock or both. Upon liquidation, holders of our debt securities and preferred shares, if issued, and lenders with respect to other borrowings would receive a distribution of our available assets prior to the holders of our common stock. Debt securities convertible into equity could be subject to adjustments in the conversion ratio pursuant to which certain events may increase the number of equity securities issuable upon conversion. Preferred shares, if issued, could have a preference with respect to liquidating distributions or a preference with respect to dividend payments that could limit our ability to pay dividends to the holders of our common stock. Our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, which may adversely affect the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Thus, holders of our common stock bear the risk that our future offerings may reduce the market price of our common stock and dilute their stockholdings in us. See “Description of Capital Stock.”

Future sales of our common stock, or the perception in the public markets that these sales may occur, may depress our stock price.

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market after this offering, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional shares. Upon completion of this offering, we will have              shares of common stock outstanding.

All of the              shares of common stock (or              shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full) sold in this offering will be, freely tradable without restrictions or further registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (“Securities Act”), except for any shares of our common stock that may be held or acquired by our directors, executive officers and other affiliates, as that term is defined in the Securities Act, which will be restricted securities under the Securities Act. Restricted securities may not be sold in the public market unless the sale is registered under the Securities Act or an exemption from registration is available.

We, each of our executive officers, directors, the Principal Stockholders and the selling stockholders have agreed with the underwriters not to transfer or dispose of, directly or indirectly, any shares of common stock or any securities convertible into or exercisable or exchangeable for shares of common stock, for a period of      days after the date of this prospectus, except for certain limited exceptions. See “Underwriting.”

After the expiration of the lock-up period, these shares may be sold in the public market, subject to prior registration or qualification for an exemption from registration, including, in the case of shares held by affiliates, compliance with the volume restrictions and other securities laws. See “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” for a more detailed description of the restrictions on selling shares of our common stock after this offering. To the extent that any of these stockholders sell, or indicate an intent to sell, substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market after the contractual lock-ups and other legal restrictions on resale discussed in this prospectus lapse, the trading price of our common stock could decline significantly.

Representatives of the underwriters may, in their sole discretion, release all or some portion of the shares subject to the 180-day lock-up agreements prior to expiration of such period.

 

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Certain provisions of our Stockholders’ Agreement, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, our amended and restated bylaws and Delaware law could hinder, delay or prevent a change in control of us that you might consider favorable, which could also adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Certain provisions under our Stockholders’ Agreement, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, our amended and restated bylaws and Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. These provisions include:

 

    customary anti-takeover provisions;

 

    certain rights of our Principal Stockholders with respect to the designation of directors for nomination and election to our board of directors, including the ability to appoint members to each board committee;

 

    provisions regarding cumulative voting; and

 

    provisions regarding issuance of preferred stock.

Anti-takeover provisions could substantially impede the ability of public stockholders to benefit from a change in control or change of our management and board of directors and, as a result, may adversely affect the market price of our common stock and your ability to realize any potential change of control premium. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

We do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future.

The continued operation and expansion of our business will require substantial funding. Accordingly, we do not anticipate that we will pay any cash dividends on shares of our common stock for the foreseeable future. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon results of operations, financial condition, contractual restrictions, including our Credit Facility, the indentures governing our 2019 Notes and other indebtedness we may incur, restrictions imposed by applicable law and other factors our board of directors deems relevant. In addition, no dividend or distribution can be declared or paid with respect of the common stock until the full amount of any unpaid dividends accrued on the Series A Preferred Stock has been paid.

Because we are a holding company with no material direct operations, we are dependent on loans, dividends and other payments from our operating subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to pay dividends on our common stock. Our subsidiaries are legally distinct from us and may be prohibited or restricted from paying dividends or otherwise making funds available to us under certain conditions. Our subsidiaries are currently restricted from paying cash dividends on our common stock by the covenants in our Credit Facility and in the indenture governing our 2019 Notes and may be further restricted by the terms of future debt or preferred securities. In addition, no dividend or distribution can be declared or paid with respect of the common stock, and we cannot redeem, purchase, acquire, or retire for value the common stock, unless and until the full amount of any unpaid dividends accrued on the Series A Preferred Stock has been paid. If we are unable to obtain funds from our subsidiaries, we may be unable to, or our board of directors may exercise its discretion not to, pay dividends.

Accordingly, if you purchase shares in this offering, realization of a gain on your investment will depend on the appreciation of the price of our common stock, which may never occur. Investors seeking cash dividends in the foreseeable future should not purchase our common stock.

 

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Certain of our stockholders have the right to engage or invest in the same or similar businesses as us.

Our Principal Stockholders have other investments and business activities in addition to their ownership of us. Under our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, the Principal Stockholders have the right, and have no duty to abstain from exercising such right, to engage or invest in the same or similar businesses as us, do business with any of our clients, customers or vendors or employ or otherwise engage any of our officers, directors or employees. If the Principal Stockholders or any of their officers, directors or employees acquire knowledge of a potential transaction that could be a corporate opportunity, they have no duty, to the fullest extent permitted by law, to offer such corporate opportunity to us, our stockholders or our affiliates. This may cause the strategic interests of our Principal Stockholders to differ from, and conflict with, the interests of our company and of our other shareholders in material respects.

Conflicts of interest may exist with respect to certain underwriters of this offering.

Affiliates of Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Goldman, Sachs & Co., Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., each an underwriter of this offering, are lenders under our $352 million Revolving Facility and our $1,775 million Term B Facility (each as defined in “Description of Certain Indebtedness”). In addition, affiliates of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. are lenders under our $425 million Term C Facility (as defined in “Description of Certain Indebtedness”). Therefore, conflicts of interest could exist because underwriters or their affiliates could receive proceeds in this offering in addition to the underwriting discounts and commissions described in this prospectus.

We will have broad discretion in the use of a significant part of the net proceeds from this offering and may not use them effectively.

Our management intends to use the net proceeds from this offering in the manner described in “Use of Proceeds”, which includes approximately $     million for general corporate purposes. Therefore, our management will have broad discretion in the application of a significant portion of the net proceeds from this offering. The failure by our management to apply the funds that are designated for general corporate purposes effectively could affect our ability to operate and grow our business.

 

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Some of the statements contained in this prospectus constitute forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements relate to expectations, beliefs, projections, future plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts, such as statements regarding our future financial condition or results of operations, our prospects and strategies for future growth, the development and introduction of new products, and the implementation of our marketing and branding strategies. In many cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.

The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are based on our current expectations and assumptions regarding our business, the economy and other future conditions and are subject to risks, uncertainties and changes in circumstances that may cause events or our actual activities or results to differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statement. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future events, results, actions, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. A number of important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, those factors described in “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” These factors include, without limitation, economic, business, competitive, market and regulatory conditions and the following:

 

    factors affecting transaction volumes in the global travel industry, particularly air travel transactions volumes, including global and regional economic and political conditions, financial instability or fundamental corporate changes to travel suppliers, natural or man-made disasters, safety concerns or changes to regulations governing the travel industry;

 

    our ability to renew existing contracts or to enter into new contracts with travel supplier and buyer customers, third-party distributor partners and joint ventures on economically favorable terms or at all;

 

    our Travel Network business’ exposure to pricing pressures from travel suppliers and its dependence on relationships with several large travel buyers;

 

    the fact that travel supplier customers may experience financial instability, consolidate with one another, pursue cost reductions, change their distribution model or experience other changes adverse to us;

 

    travel suppliers’ use of alternative distribution models, such as direct distribution channels, achievement of technological advancements or the occurrence of incompatibilities, and the diversion of consumer traffic to other channels;

 

    our reliance on third-party distributors and joint ventures to extend GDS services to certain regions, which exposes us to risks associated with lack of direct management control and potential conflicts of interest;

 

    competition in the travel distribution market from other GDS providers, direct distribution by travel suppliers and new entrants or technologies that could challenge the existing GDS business model;

 

    maintaining and growing our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business could be negatively impacted by competition from other third-party solutions providers and from new participants entering the solutions market;

 

    risks associated with implementing the Expedia SMA and the fact that the benefits anticipated by the parties to the Expedia SMA may not materialize;

 

    potential failure to successfully implement software solutions, which could result in damage to our reputation;

 

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    risks associated with our use of open source software, including the possible future need to acquire licenses from third parties or re-engineer our solutions;

 

    availability and performance of information technology services provided by third parties, such as HP, which manages a significant portion of our systems;

 

    our business being harmed by adverse global and regional economic and political conditions, particularly, given our geographic concentration, those that may adversely affect business and leisure travel originating in, or travel to, the United States and Europe;

 

    risks specific to the operations of our OTAs, including, but not limited to, competition, content, relationships with travel suppliers and travel distributor partners and changes in search engine algorithms and other traffic sources;

 

    risks associated with the value of our brand, some of which are out of our control;

 

    our ability to adapt to technological developments or the evolving competitive landscape by introducing relevant new technologies, products and services;

 

    systems and infrastructure failures or other unscheduled shutdowns or disruptions, including those due to natural disasters or cybersecurity attacks;

 

    security breaches occurring at our facilities or with respect to our infrastructure, resulting from physical break-ins; computer viruses, attacks by hackers or similar distributive problems;

 

    the potential failure to recruit, train and retain key technical employees and senior management;

 

    risks associated with operating as a global business in multiple countries and in multiple currencies;

 

    risks associated with acquisitions, divestitures, investments and strategic alliances;

 

    our ability to protect and maintain our information technology and intellectual property rights, as well as defend against potential infringement claims against us, and the associated costs;

 

    defects in our products resulting in significant warranty liabilities or product liability claims, for which we may have insufficient product liability insurance to pay material uninsured claims;

 

    adverse outcomes in our legal proceedings, including our litigation with US Airways or the antitrust investigation by the U.S. DOJ, whether in the form of money damages or injunctive relief that could force changes to the way we operate our GDS;

 

    the potential that we may have insufficient insurance to cover our liability for pending litigation claims or future claims, which could expose us to significant liabilities;

 

    our failure to comply with regulations that are applicable to us or any unfavorable changes in, or the enactment of, laws, rules or regulations applicable to us;

 

    liabilities arising from our collection, processing, storage, use and transmission of personal data resulting from conflicting legal requirements, governmental regulation or security breaches, and from the risks associated with payment card industry compliance;

 

    the fact that we may have higher than anticipated tax liabilities and our use of NOLs may be subject to limitations on their use in the future;

 

    the fact that our pension plan is currently underfunded and we may need to make significant cash contributions to our pension plan in the future, which would reduce the cash available for our business;

 

    our significant amount of our long-term indebtedness and the related restrictive covenants in the agreements governing our indebtedness;

 

    risks associated with maintaining and improving our financial controls and the requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management attention and affect our ability to attract qualified board members;

 

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    the fact that our Principal Stockholders will, following the completion of the offering, retain significant influence over us and key decisions about our business, which may prevent new investors from influencing significant corporate decisions and result in conflicts of interest;

 

    we qualify as a “controlled company” within the meaning of              rules and, therefore we also qualify to be exempt from certain corporate governance requirements; and

 

    other risks and uncertainties, including those listed under the caption “Risk Factors”.

These statements are based on current plans, estimates and projections, and therefore you should not place undue reliance on them. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we undertake no obligation to update them publicly in light of new information or future events.

You should carefully consider the risks specified in the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus and subsequent public statements or reports filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission, before making any investment decision with respect to our common stock. If any of these trends, risks or uncertainties actually occurs or continues, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected, the trading prices of our common stock could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment. All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that our net proceeds from the sale of              shares of common stock offered by us will be approximately $         million or approximately $         million if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full (in each case, at an assumed initial public offering price of $         per share of common stock, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us of approximately $         million.

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common stock by the selling stockholders, including any shares sold by the selling stockholders pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares. The selling stockholders will receive approximately $         million of proceeds from this offering or approximately $         million, if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, assuming an initial public offering price of $         per share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the front cover page of this prospectus) and after deducting the underwriting discount.

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering to repay approximately $         million of outstanding indebtedness, and the remainder for general corporate purposes.

By establishing a public market for our common stock, this offering is also intended to facilitate our future access to public markets.

A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $         (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) our estimated net proceeds to us from this offering by $         million, assuming the number of shares of common stock offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Similarly, a change in the number of shares of common stock we sell would increase or decrease our net proceeds. We believe that our intended use of proceeds would not be affected by changes in either our initial public offering price or the number of shares of common stock we sell.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We do not expect to pay dividends on our common stock for the foreseeable future. Instead, we anticipate that all of our earnings in the foreseeable future will be used for the operation and expansion of our business.

Future cash dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon, among other things, our future operations and earnings, capital requirements and surplus, general financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors the board of directors may deem relevant. The timing and amount of future dividend payments will be at the discretion of our board of directors. See “Risk Factors—We do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future.”

Our subsidiaries are currently restricted from paying cash dividends on our common stock by the covenants in our Credit Facility and in the indentures governing our 2019 Notes and may be further restricted by the terms of future debt or preferred securities. In addition, no dividend or distribution can be declared or paid with respect of the common stock, and we cannot redeem, purchase, acquire, or retire for value the common stock, unless and until the full amount of any unpaid dividends accrued on the Series A Preferred Stock has been paid.

For a discussion of the application of withholding taxes on dividends, see “Material U.S. Federal Income and Estate Tax Considerations to Non-U.S. Holders.”

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents and our capitalization as of September 30, 2013:

 

  1.   on an actual basis; and

 

  2.   on an as adjusted basis to reflect:

 

    the sale of              shares of our common stock by us offered in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $         per share (the midpoint of the price range on the cover of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses; and

 

    the application of the net proceeds from this offering as otherwise described under the heading “Use of Proceeds”.

You should read the following table in conjunction with the sections titled “Summary Consolidated Financial Data,” “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Description of Certain Indebtedness” and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     As of September 30,
2013 (in thousands)
 
     Actual      As
Adjusted
 
     (unaudited)      (unaudited)  

Cash and cash equivalents

   $                    $                
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Long-term debt, including current portion:

     

2019 Notes

   $         $     

2016 Notes

     

Credit Facility(1)

     

Mortgage Facility

     

Total Long-term debt

   $        
  

 

 

    

Equity:

     

Sabre Corporation Common Stock, $0.01 par value; 450,000,000 shares authorized;              shares issued and outstanding on an actual basis and              shares issued and outstanding on an as adjusted basis(2),(3)

     

Additional paid in capital

     

Retained deficit

     

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     

Noncontrolling interest

     

Total equity

     

Temporary Equity:

     

Series A redeemable preferred stock: $0.01 par value; 225,000,000 shares authorized and              shares issued and outstanding on an actual basis and              shares issued and outstanding on an as adjusted basis

   $         $     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total capitalization

   $         $     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) As of September 30, 2013, we had approximately $1,751 million, $376 million and $350 million outstanding under the Term B Facility, Term C Facility and Incremental Term Facility, respectively. As of September 30, 2013, we had no drawn amounts outstanding under the Revolving Facility and $67 million outstanding under the letter of credit sub-facility, all of which directly reduce the amounts available to be drawn under the Revolving Facility.

 

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(2) The outstanding share information set forth above excludes:
                 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of stock options outstanding as of September 30, 2013 at a weighted average exercise price of $         per share on an as adjusted basis; and
    an aggregate of              shares of common stock reserved for issuance under our 2014 Omnibus Plan.
(3) The outstanding share information set forth above assumes no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase up to an additional              shares of common stock from us and up to an additional              shares of common stock from the selling stockholders.

A $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of $         per share of our common stock in this offering would increase cash and cash equivalents and decrease long-term debt by $         million, assuming we use     % of the additional net proceeds to repay debt and assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses. Similarly, an increase or decrease in the number of shares we sell in the offering will increase or decrease our net proceeds by an amount equal to such number of shares multiplied by the public offering price, less underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses.

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock, your ownership interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per share of our common stock in this offering and the pro forma net tangible book value per share of our common stock after this offering. Dilution results from the fact that the per share offering price of our common stock is substantially in excess of the net tangible book value per share attributable to the existing equity holders. Net tangible book value per share represents the amount of temporary equity and stockholders’ equity excluding intangible assets, divided by the number of shares of common stock outstanding at that date.

Our historical net tangible book value as of September 30, 2013 was $             million, or approximately $             per share of common stock (assuming                      shares of common stock outstanding).

Net tangible book value dilution per share to new investors represents the difference between the amount per share paid by purchasers of common stock in this offering and the pro forma net tangible book value per share of common stock immediately after completion of this offering. Investors participating in this offering will incur immediate and substantial dilution. After giving effect to our sale of              shares of common stock in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $         per share, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus, and after deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses, our pro forma net tangible book value as of September 30, 2013 would have been approximately $         million or approximately $         per share. This amount represents an immediate increase in pro forma net tangible book value of $         per share to existing stockholders and an immediate dilution in pro forma net tangible book value of $         per share to purchasers of common stock in this offering, as illustrated in the following table.

 

Assumed initial public offering price per share

      $                

Historical net tangible book value per share as of September 30, 2013

   $                       

Increase per share attributable to new investors

   $        
     

 

 

 

Pro forma net tangible book value per share after giving effect to this offering

      $     
     

 

 

 

Dilution in pro forma net tangible book value per share to new investors

      $     
     

 

 

 

A $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of $         per share would increase or decrease, as applicable, our pro forma net tangible book value by approximately $         million or approximately $         per share, and the dilution in the pro forma net tangible book value per share to investors in this offering by approximately $         per share, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses. This pro forma information is illustrative only, and following the completion of this offering, will be adjusted based on the actual initial public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing.

 

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The following table summarizes, as of September 30, 2013, on the pro forma basis described above, the differences between existing stockholders and new investors with respect to the number of shares of common stock purchased from us, the total consideration paid, and the average price per share of our common stock paid by existing stockholders. The calculation with respect to shares purchased by new investors in this offering reflects the issuance by us of              shares of our common stock in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $         per share, the midpoint of the range set forth on the cover of this prospectus, before deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses.

 

     Shares Purchased     Total Consideration     Average
Price Per

Share
 
     Number    Percent     Amount      Percent    

Existing stockholders

               $                             $                

New investors(1)

               $                  $     

Total

               $                  $     

 

(1) Does not reflect shares purchased by new investors from the selling stockholders.

If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full from us, the number of shares of common stock held by new investors will increase to             , or     % of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering.

The sale of              shares of common stock by the selling stockholders in this offering will reduce the number of shares held by existing stockholders, as of September 30, 2013, to             , or     % of the total shares outstanding as of September 30, 2013, and will increase the number of shares held by new investors to             , or     % of the total shares of common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2013. In addition, if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full from the selling stockholders, the number of shares of common stock held by existing stockholders, as of September 30, 2013, will be further reduced to             , or      % of the total number of shares of common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2013, and the number of shares of common stock held by new investors will be further increased to              shares, or     % of the total shares of common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2013.

The discussion and table above assume no exercise of stock options outstanding and no issuance of shares reserved for issuance under our equity incentive plans. As of                     , 2013, there were an aggregate of              shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under the equity incentive plans. Following the closing of this offering, there will also be              shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under the 2014 Omnibus Plan.

 

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SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables present selected historical consolidated financial data for our business. You should read these tables along with “Risk Factors,” “Use of Proceeds,” “Capitalization,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Business” and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The consolidated statements of operations data, consolidated statements of cash flows data and consolidated balance sheet data as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 are derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of our management, reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of this data. The consolidated statements of operations data and consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2012 and 2011 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus. The consolidated statements of operations data and consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 are derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto not included in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of our management, reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of this data.

The historical consolidated results presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period, and results for any interim period presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

 

    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
    (Amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

             

Revenue

  $ 2,345,295      $ 2,327,480      $ 3,039,060      $ 2,931,727      $ 2,832,393      $ 2,781,039      $ 2,903,306   

Gross margin

    1,058,317        1,117,095        1,401,576        1,350,202        1,334,820        1,275,884        1,348,003   

Selling, general and administrative

    559,591        846,442        1,118,248        740,911        714,330        766,132        832,560   

Impairment

    138,435        76,829        584,430        185,240        401,400        211,612        300,556   

Depreciation and amortization

    231,743        233,198        317,683        295,540        281,624        285,615        270,918   

Restructuring charges

    15,889                                             

Operating income (loss)

    112,659        (39,374     (618,785     128,511        (62,534     12,525        (56,032

Net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation

    (127,254     (105,744     (611,356     (66,074     (268,852     (158,737     (305,108

Net loss attributable to common shareholders

    (154,473     (131,389     (645,939     (98,653     (299,649     (102,444     (337,281

Basic and diluted loss per share attributable to common shareholders

    (0.87     (0.74     (3.65     (0.56     (1.71     (0.59     (1.93

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

             

Basic and diluted

    178,051        177,130        177,206        176,703        175,655        174,535        174,488   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Data:

             

Cash provided by operating activities

    270,123        422,899        304,729        355,025        381,296        290,465        189,056   

Additions to property and equipment

    168,750        139,659        193,262        164,900        130,457        109,890        139,498   

Cash payments for interest

    193,440        160,660        264,990        184,449        195,550        251,812        295,669   

 

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    As of September 30,     As of December 31,  
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
                (Amounts in thousands)              

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

             

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 491,588      $ 302,383      $ 126,695      $ 58,350      $ 176,521      $ 61,206      $ 213,753   

Total assets

    4,941,476        5,539,103        4,711,245        5,252,778        5,524,279        5,878,388        6,472,757   

Long-term debt

    3,664,942        3,418,987        3,420,927        3,307,905        3,350,860        3,696,378        3,795,318   

Working capital (deficit)

    (266,996     (279,282     (458,985     (460,353     (540,965     (317,288     (353,834

Redeemable preferred stock

    625,358        589,203        598,139        563,556        530,975        500,178        556,471   

Noncontrolling interest

    (221     8,002        88        (18,693     19,831        88,429        5,997   

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

    (1,012,355     (289,474     (876,875     (196,919     (34,738     298,251        365,740   

 

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UNAUDITED PRO FORMA FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables present our unaudited pro forma financial data and reflect adjustments to our historical consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus to give effect to the acquisition of PRISM and the disposition of Sabre Pacific. The acquisition of PRISM and the disposition of Sabre Pacific are fully reflected in the unaudited consolidated financial statements as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The unaudited pro forma statement of operations data for the year ended December 31, 2012 has been prepared to give effect to the acquisition of PRISM and the disposition of Sabre Pacific as if they had been completed on January 1, 2012.

The unaudited pro forma financial data were prepared utilizing our historical financial data in accordance with GAAP. The pro forma adjustments are described in the notes to the pro forma statements of operations and pro forma balance sheet and are based upon available information and assumptions that we believe are reasonable.

The unaudited pro forma financial data are for informational purposes only and are not necessarily indicative of what our financial performance would have been had the transaction been completed on the dates assumed nor is such unaudited pro forma financial data necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in any future period. A number of factors may affect our results. See “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” The unaudited information was prepared on a basis consistent with that used in preparing our audited consolidated financial statements.

The following unaudited pro forma financial statements should be read in conjunction with “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our historical audited and unaudited consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

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SABRE CORPORATION

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012

 

     Historical      Pro Forma Adjustments        
     Sabre
Corporation
    PRISM          PRISM         Sabre
    Pacific    
    Pro Forma  
     (Amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Revenue

   $ 3,039,060      $ 18,130         $ (8,778 )(c)    $ 3,048,412   

Cost of revenue

     1,637,484        4,159         2,625 (a)      (9,387 )(c)      1,634,881   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross margin

     1,401,576        13,971         (2,625     609        1,413,531   

Selling, general and administrative

     1,118,248        734                (1,026 )(c)      1,117,956   

Impairment

     584,430                              584,430   

Depreciation and amortization

     317,683        866         3,569 (b)      (157 )(c)      321,961   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

     (618,785     12,371         (6,194     1,792        (610,816

Other income (expense):

           

Interest expense, net

     (242,948                           (242,948

Gain on sale of business

     25,850                       (25,065 )(d)      785   

Joint venture equity income

     24,591                       (627 )(e)      23,964   

Joint venture goodwill impairment and intangible amortization

     (27,000                           (27,000

Other, net

     (7,808                           (7,808
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense, net

     (227,315                    (25,692     (253,007
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes

     (846,100     12,371         (6,194     (23,900     (863,823

Benefit for income taxes

     (202,179     4,330         (2,168 )(f)      (8,365 )(f)      (208,382
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

     (643,921     8,041         (4,026     (15,535     (655,441

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

     (59,317                           (59,317

Preferred stock dividends

     34,583                              34,583   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations available to common shareholders

   $ (619,187   $ 8,041       $ (4,026   $ (15,535   $ (630,707
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share:

            $ (3.56
           

 

 

 

Basic and diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding:

              177,206   
           

 

 

 

See Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Consolidated Statements of Operations.

 

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SABRE CORPORATION

NOTES TO UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

1. Basis of Presentation

The unaudited pro forma statement of operations data for the year ended December 31, 2012 has been prepared to give effect to the acquisition of PRISM and the disposition of Sabre Pacific, as if they had been completed on January 1, 2012. The historical financial information of Sabre Corporation has been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The historical financial information of PRISM for the period of January 1, 2012 through July 31, 2012 is unaudited and has been derived from PRISM’s underlying books and records.

The unaudited pro forma financial data were prepared utilizing our historical financial data in accordance with GAAP. The pro forma adjustments are described in the notes to the pro forma statements of operations and are based upon available information and assumptions that we believe are reasonable.

2. PRISM

On August 1, 2012, we acquired of all of the outstanding stock and ownership interests of PRISM, a leading provider of end-to-end airline contract business intelligence and decision support software. The acquisition added to our portfolio of products within our Airline Solutions business, allows for new relationships with airlines and added to our existing business intelligence capabilities. The purchase price was approximately $116 million, $66 million of which was paid on August 1, 2012. Contingent consideration of $50 million, based on management’s best estimate of fair value and future performance results on the acquisition date, is to be paid in two equal installments, due 12 and 24 months following the acquisition date. The first installment represents a holdback payment primarily for indemnification purposes and the second payment represents contingent consideration which is based on contractually determined performance measures to be met over the twelve month period following the acquisition.

3. Sabre Pacific

On February 24, 2012, we completed the sale of our 51% stake in Sabre Pacific, an entity jointly owned by a subsidiary of Sabre (51%) and Abacus (49%), to Abacus for $46 million. Of the proceeds received, $9 million was for the sale of stock, $18 million represented the repayment of an intercompany note receivable from Sabre Pacific, which was entered into when the joint venture was originally established, and the remaining $19 million represented the settlement of operational intercompany receivable balances with Sabre Pacific and associated amounts we owed to Abacus.

4. Pro Forma Adjustments

 

  (a)   The increase to cost of revenue reflects compensation expense to be paid to certain key employees based on their continued employment with PRISM subsequent to the acquisition. The retention period is 24 months from the date of acquisition with 50% of the compensation payable upon completion of the first 12 months and the remaining 50% payable upon completion of the entire 24 month period.

 

  (b)   The increase to depreciation and amortization reflects Sabre Corporation’s allocation of purchase price to the fair value of definite-lived intangible assets acquired which included $59 million allocated to patents with a ten year useful life, $11 million allocated to customer and contractual relationships with a ten year useful life and $1 million allocated to trademarks with a five year useful life.

 

  (c)   The decreases to revenue, cost of revenue, selling, general and administrative, and depreciation and amortization reflects the elimination of Sabre Pacific’s results of operations for the period of January 1, 2012 through February 24, 2012, the date of disposition.

 

  (d)   The reduction to gain on sale of business is to eliminate the gain recognized from the sale of Sabre Pacific.

 

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  (e)   The decrease to joint venture equity income reflects our 35% share of the losses that would have been incurred by Abacus for the period of January 1, 2012 through February 24, 2012, the date of disposition.

 

  (f)   The adjustments to the benefit for income taxes were derived by applying the statutory federal income tax rate to the pro forma adjustments.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF

FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements about trends, uncertainties and our plans and expectations of what may happen in the future. Forward-looking statements are based on a number of assumptions and estimates that are inherently subject to significant risks and uncertainties and our results could differ materially from the results anticipated by our forward-looking statements as a result of many known or unknown factors, including, but not limited to, those factors discussed under the captions “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and elsewhere in this prospectus.

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes and the information contained elsewhere in this prospectus under the captions “Risk Factors,” “Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data” and “Business.”

Overview

We are a leading technology solutions provider to the global travel and tourism industry. We span the breadth of a highly complex, $6.6 trillion global travel ecosystem through three business segments: (i) Travel Network, our global B2B travel marketplace for travel suppliers and travel buyers, (ii) Airline and Hospitality Solutions, an extensive suite of leading software solutions primarily for airlines and hotel properties, and (iii) Travelocity, our portfolio of online consumer travel e-commerce businesses through which we provide travel content and booking functionality primarily for leisure travelers. Collectively, these offerings enable travel suppliers to better serve their customers across the entire travel lifecycle, from route planning to post-trip business intelligence and analysis. Items that are not allocated to our business segments are identified as corporate and include primarily certain shared technology costs as well as stock-based compensation expense, litigation costs related to occupancy or other taxes and other items that are not identifiable with one of our segments.

Through our Travel Network business, we process hundreds of millions of transactions annually, connecting the world’s leading travel suppliers, including airlines, hotels, car rental brands, rail carriers, cruise lines and tour operators, with travel buyers in a comprehensive travel marketplace. We offer efficient, global distribution of travel content from approximately 125,000 travel suppliers to approximately 400,000 online and offline travel agents. To those agents, we offer a platform to shop, price, book and ticket comprehensive travel content in a transparent and efficient workflow. We also offer value-added solutions that enable our customers to better manage and analyze their businesses. Through our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business, we offer travel suppliers an extensive suite of leading software solutions, ranging from airline and hotel reservations systems to high-value marketing and operations solutions, such as planning airline crew schedules, re-accommodating passengers during irregular flight operations and managing day-to-day hotel operations. These solutions allow our customers to market, distribute and sell their products more efficiently, manage their core operations, and deliver an enhanced travel experience. Through our complementary Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions businesses, we believe we offer the broadest, end-to-end portfolio of technology solutions to the travel industry.

Our portfolio of technology solutions has enabled us to become the leading end-to-end technology provider in the travel industry. For example, we are one of the largest GDS providers in the world, with a 37% share of GDS-processed air bookings in 2012. More specifically, we are the #1 GDS provider in North America and also in higher growth markets such as Latin America and APAC, in each case based on GDS-processed air bookings in 2012. In those three markets, our GDS-processed air bookings share was approximately 50% on a combined basis in 2012. In Airline and Hospitality Solutions, we believe we have the most comprehensive portfolio of solutions. In 2012, we had the largest hospitality CRS room share based on our approximately 26% share of third-party CRS hotel rooms distributed through our GDS, and, according to T2RL PSS, we had the second largest airline reservations system globally. We also believe that we have the leading portfolio of airline marketing and operations products across the solutions that we provide. In addition, we operate Travelocity, one of the world’s most recognizable brands in the online consumer travel e-commerce industry, which provides us with business insights into our broader customer base.

 

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A significant portion of our revenue is generated through transaction based fees that we charge to our customers. For Travel Network, this fee is in the form of a transaction fee for bookings on our GDS; for Airline and Hospitality Solutions, this fee is a recurring usage-based fee for the use of our SaaS and hosted systems, as well as implementation fees and consulting fees. We recorded revenue of $2.3 billion and $3.0 billion, net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation of $127 million and $611 million and Adjusted EBITDA of $577 million and $785 million, reflecting a 25% and 26% Adjusted EBITDA margin, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. For additional information regarding Adjusted EBITDA, including a reconciliation of Non-GAAP to GAAP measures, see “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” and “Summary—Summary Consolidated Financial Data—Non-GAAP Measurements.” For the nine months ended September 30, 2013, Travel Network contributed 57%, Airline and Hospitality Solutions contributed 22%, and Travelocity contributed 21% of our revenue (excluding intersegment eliminations). During this period, shares of Adjusted EBITDA were approximately 80%, 20% and less than 1% for Travel Network, Airline and Hospitality Solutions and Travelocity, respectively (excluding corporate overhead allocations such as finance, legal, human resources and certain information technology shared services). For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, Travel Network contributed 58% and 77%, Airline and Hospitality Solutions contributed 19% and 17%, and Travelocity contributed 23% and 6% of our revenue (excluding intersegment eliminations) and of our Adjusted EBITDA (excluding corporate overhead allocations), respectively.

Factors Affecting our Results

The following is a discussion of trends that we believe are the most significant opportunities and challenges currently impacting our business and industry. The discussion also includes management’s assessment of the effects these trends have had and are expected to have on our results of operations. This information is not an exhaustive list of all of the factors that could affect our results and should be read in conjunction with the factors referred to under the caption “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Travel volumes and the travel industry

Our business and results of operations are dependent upon travel volumes and the overall health of the travel industry, particularly in North America. The travel industry has shown strong and resilient expansion with growth rates typically outperforming general macroeconomic performance. For example, based on 40 years of IATA Traffic data, air traffic has historically grown at an average rate of approximately 1.5x the rate of global GDP growth. Although the global economic downturn significantly impacted the travel industry, conditions have generally improved in the last several years. For example, although hotel sales are still hampered by an economic environment characterized by austerity and consumer caution, other less expensive suppliers, including LCC/hybrids, are benefiting. Tourism flows and travel spending have returned to growth as developed markets, particularly in the United States, Japan and Europe, recover from the global economic downturn. According to Euromonitor Report, business-related travel by U.S. residents has increased since the global economic downturn, reaching 228 million trips in 2012. According to IATA Traffic, global airline passenger volume has grown at a 6% CAGR from 2009 to 2012. Looking forward, air travel and hotel spending is expected to grow at a 5% CAGR from 2013 to 2017, as growing consumer confidence and increasing connectivity continue to expand the opportunities for travel and tourism, according to Euromonitor Database. However, in recent years, several airlines, especially in the United States, have implemented capacity reductions in response to slowing customer demand following the global economic downturn and in order to improve pricing power. These capacity reductions have resulted in lower inventory and higher ticket prices, amid increased airline industry consolidation.

Geographic mix

We have a leading share of GDS-processed air bookings in the largest travel market, North America (58%), as well as in two large growth markets, Latin America (58%) and APAC (40%) in 2012. See “Method of

 

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Calculation” for an explanation of the methodology underlying our GDS-processed air bookings share calculation. For the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we derived approximately 62% of our revenue from the United States, 17% from Europe and 21% from the rest of the world. For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, we derived approximately 62% of our revenue from the United States, 18% from Europe and 20% from the rest of the world.

There are structural differences between the geographies in which we operate. Due to our geographic concentration, our results of operations are particularly sensitive to factors affecting North America. For example, booking fees per transaction in North America have traditionally been lower than those in Europe. By growing internationally with our TMC and OTA customers and expanding the travel content available on our GDS to target regional traveler preferences, we anticipate that we will maintain share in North America and grow share in Europe, APAC and Latin America.

Continued focus by travel suppliers on cost-cutting and exerting influence over distribution

Travel suppliers continue to look for ways to decrease their costs and to increase their control over distribution. Airline consolidations, pricing pressure during contract renegotiations and the use of direct distribution may continue to subject our business to challenges.

The shift from indirect distribution channels, such as our GDS and third-party travel agencies such as Travelocity, to direct distribution channels, may result from increased content availability on supplier-operated websites or increased participation of meta-search engines, such as Kayak and Google, which direct consumers to supplier-operated websites. This trend may adversely affect our Travel Network contract renegotiations with suppliers that use alternative distribution channels. For example, airlines may withhold part of their content for distribution exclusively through their own direct distribution channels or offer more attractive terms for content available through those direct channels. Similarly, some airlines have also limited what fare content information is distributed through OTAs, including Travelocity.

However, since 2010, we believe the rate at which bookings are shifting from indirect to direct distribution channels has slowed for a number of reasons, including the increased participation of LCC/hybrids in indirect channels. Over the last several years, notable carriers that previously only distributed directly, including JetBlue and Norwegian, have adopted our GDS. Other carriers such as EVA Airways and Virgin Australia have further increased their participation in a GDS. In 2012 and 2013, we believe the rate of shift away from GDSs in the United States stabilized at very low levels, although we cannot predict whether this low rate of shift will continue.

These trends have impacted the revenue of Travel Network, which recognizes revenue for airline ticket sales based on transaction volumes, the revenue of Airline and Hospitality Solutions, which recognizes a portion of its revenue based on the number of PBs, and the results of Travelocity, the profitability of which is based both on volume of sales and the amount spent by the traveler, depending upon the applicable revenue model. Simultaneously, this focus on cost-cutting and direct distribution has also presented opportunities for Airline and Hospitality Solutions. Many airlines have turned to outside providers for key systems, process and industry expertise and other products that assist in their cost cutting initiatives in order to focus on their primary revenue-generating activities.

We have 28 planned Travel Network airline contract renewals in 2014, representing 28% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 24 planned renewals in 2015 (representing 4% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013). Although we renewed 24 out of 24 planned renewals in 2013 (representing approximately 32% of Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013), we cannot guarantee that we will be able to renew our airline contracts in the future on favorable economic terms or at all.

 

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Shift to SaaS and hosted solutions by airlines and hotels to manage their daily operations

Initially, large travel suppliers built custom in-house software and applications for their business process needs. In response to a desire for more flexible systems given increasingly complex and constantly changing technological requirements, reduced IT budgets and increased focus on cost efficiency, many travel suppliers turned to third-party solutions providers for many of their key technologies and began to license software from software providers. We believe that significant revenue opportunity remains in this outsourcing trend, as legacy in-house systems continue to migrate and upgrade to third-party systems. By moving away from one-time license fees to recurring monthly fees associated with our SaaS and hosted solutions, our revenue stream has become more predictable and sustainable. The SaaS and hosted models’ centralized deployment also allows us to save time and money by reducing maintenance and implementation tasks and lowering operating costs.

Increasing importance of LCC/hybrids in Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions

Hybrid and LCCs have become a significant segment of the air travel market, stimulating demand for air travel through low fares. LCC/hybrids have traditionally relied on direct distribution for the majority of their bookings. However, as these LCC/hybrids are evolving, many are increasing their distribution through indirect channels to expand their offering into higher-yield markets and to higher-yield customers, such as business and international travelers. Other LCC/hybrids, especially start-up carriers, may choose not to distribute through the GDS until wider distribution is desired.

Over the last four years, we have added airline customers representing over 110 million PBs, including many innovative fast growing LCC/hybrids. According to Airbus, LCCs’ share of global air travel volume is expected to increase from 17% of RPKs in 2012 to 21% of RPKs by 2032. In our airline reservations products, our travel supplier customer base is weighted towards faster-growing LCC/hybrids, which represented approximately 45% of our 2012 PBs, and we expect to continue to take advantage of this growth opportunity. Furthermore, because of the breadth of our solution set and our proportion of LCC/hybrid customers, we expect to be able to sell more of our solutions to our existing customers as they grow. As our growing LCC/hybrid customers demand additional solutions and capabilities, we expect Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenue to continue benefiting from the higher growth in these types of airlines.

Travel buyers can shift their bookings to or from our Travel Network business

Our Travel Network business relies on relationships with several large travel buyers, including TMCs and OTAs, to drive a large portion of its revenue. Although no individual travel buyer accounts for more than 10% of our revenue, the five largest travel buyers of Travel Network were responsible for bookings that represent approximately 34% and 35% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. Although our contracts with larger travel agencies often increase the incentives when the travel agency processes a certain volume or percentage of its bookings through our GDS, travel buyers are not contractually required to book exclusively through our GDS during the contract term. Travel buyers may shift bookings to other distribution intermediaries for many reasons, including to avoid becoming overly dependent on a single source of travel content and increase their bargaining power with the GDS providers. For example, in late 2012, Expedia adopted a dual GDS provider strategy and shifted a sizeable portion of its business from our GDS to a competitor GDS, resulting in a year-over-year decline in our transaction volumes in 2013. Conversely, certain European OTAs including Unister, Aerticket, eTraveli and Bravofly that did not previously use our GDS shifted a portion of their business to our GDS.

Increasing travel agency incentive fees

Travel agency incentive fees are a large portion of Travel Network expenses. The vast majority of incentive fees are tied to absolute booking volumes based on transactions such as flight segments booked. Incentives are paid out in two ways, according to the terms of the agreement: (i) on a periodic basis over the term of the contract and (ii) in some instances, up front at the inception or modification of contracts, which is capitalized and

 

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amortized over the expected life of the contract. Although these fees have been increasing in real terms, they have been relatively stable as a percentage of Travel Network revenue over the last four years partially due to our focus on managing the incentive fees we pay. We believe we have been effective in mitigating the trend towards increasing incentive fees by offering value-added products and content, such as Sabre Red Workspace, a SaaS product available to our travel buyers that provides an easy to use interface along with many travel agency workflow and productivity tools.

Growing demand for continued technology improvements in the fragmented hotel market

Most of the hotel market is highly fragmented. Independent hotels and small- to medium-sized chains (groups of less than 300 properties) comprise a substantial majority of hotel properties and available hotel rooms, with global and regional chains comprise the balance. Hotels use a number of different technology systems to distribute and market their products and operate efficiently. We are positioned to provide technology solutions to all segments of the hospitality market, particularly independent hotels and small- to medium-sized chains. As these markets continue to grow, we believe independent hotel owners and operators will continue to seek increased connectivity and integrated solutions to ensure access to global travelers. Gartner estimates that technology spending by the hospitality industry is expected to reach $32 billion in 2017 (Gartner Enterprise), and we believe we will be well-positioned to meet this demand as we continue to provide affordable, web-based distribution technology. For example, we believe our innovative PMS, which is used by more than 4,500 properties globally, is one of the leading third-party web-based PMSs. Our PMS platform complements our industry-leading CRS platform and we expect to launch an integrated hospitality management suite, that will centralize all distribution, operations and marketing aspects to facilitate increased accuracy, elimination of redundancies, and increased revenue and cost savings. We anticipate that this will contribute to the continued growth of Airline and Hospitality Solutions, which is ultimately dependent upon these hoteliers accepting and utilizing our products and services.

Travelocity

Travelocity’s results have been adversely impacted by several factors in recent years, including margin pressure from suppliers and reduced bookings on our websites. For the three years ended September 30, 2013, Travelocity experienced an 8% compound annual revenue decline due to intense competition within the travel industry, including from supplier direct websites, online agencies and other suppliers of travel products and services. The increased level of competition has led to declines in fees paid to us pursuant to new long-term supplier agreements with several large North American airlines in 2011 as well as lower transaction volumes. In 2012, transaction revenues were impacted by the loss of a key TPN customer late in the third quarter as a result of this customer’s contract ending without renewal. This loss was partially offset by the addition of a new TPN customer, which signed a multi-year agreement.

Lower transaction volumes on our websites have also impacted our media revenue. Reductions in hotel transaction volumes and the loss of a key TPN customer in 2012 have led to a loss of media relevance. In 2012, these challenges have contributed to a significant decline year over year. For the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we have experienced a slight decline in media revenue compared to the same period in 2012.

Intense competition in the travel industry has historically led OTAs and travel suppliers to spend aggressively on online marketing. The amount we spent on online marketing declined in 2011 and was less effective at driving transaction revenue than it was in 2010. In response, we modified our customer acquisition strategy in 2012, refocusing on more efficient marketing channels and refreshing the approach to the brand, while reducing the amount spent on marketing. If our online marketing strategy is not successful, it could lead to continued declines in Travelocity revenue.

 

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As a result of these and other factors, in the third quarter of 2013, we initiated plans to shift Travelocity in the United States and Canada away from a high fixed-cost model to a lower-cost, performance-based shared structure. On August 22, 2013, Travelocity entered into an exclusive, long-term strategic marketing agreement with Expedia (the “Expedia SMA”) in which Expedia will power the technology platforms for Travelocity’s existing U.S. and Canadian websites, as well as provide Travelocity with access to Expedia’s supply and customer service platforms. This agreement represents a strategic decision to provide our customers with the benefit of Expedia’s long term investment in its technology platform as well as its supply and customer service platforms, which we expect to increase conversion and operational efficiency and allows us to shift our focus to Travelocity’s marketing strengths. Both parties started development and implementation after signing. By December 31, 2013, the majority of the online hotel and air offering had been migrated to the Expedia platform, and a launch of the majority of the remainder is expected in early 2014. See “Business—Our Businesses—Travelocity.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Expedia will pay us a performance-based marketing fee that will vary based on the amount of travel booked through Travelocity-branded websites powered by Expedia. The marketing fee we receive will be recorded as marketing fee revenue and the cost we incur to promote the Travelocity brand and for marketing will be recorded as selling, general and administrative expense in our results of operations. As a result of transactions being processed through Expedia’s platform instead of the Travelocity platform, the revenue we derive from the Merchant, Agency and Media revenue models will decline. In connection with this migration, we will no longer be considered the merchant of record for merchant transactions, and therefore we will no longer collect cash from consumers, receive transaction fees and commissions directly from travel suppliers, receive service fees or insurance related revenue directly from customers or directly market or receive media revenue from advertisers on our websites. We will instead collect the marketing fee revenue from Expedia, which is net of costs incurred by Expedia in connection with these activities. Additionally, Travelocity will no longer receive an incentive fee from Travel Network as intersegment revenue, and we do not expect that Expedia will use Travel Network for shopping and booking of a portion of non-air travel for Travelocity.com and Travelocity.ca after the launch of the Expedia SMA. In addition, Expedia may choose to use another intermediary for shopping and booking of a portion or all of the air travel booked through Travelocity.com and Travelocity.ca beginning in 2019, subject to earlier termination under certain circumstances.

As a result of the factors described above, we expect our revenue to decline in connection with the Expedia SMA; we expect the revenue contribution from Travelocity-branded websites to be in the range of 50% to 60% of current levels. Due to the elimination of the intersegment revenue between Travelocity and Travel Network, we expect intersegment eliminations to substantially decrease in connection with the Expedia SMA. See “—Components of Revenues and Expenses—Intersegment Transactions.”

Correspondingly, we will wind down certain internal processes, including back office functions, as transactions move from our technology platforms to those of Expedia. We therefore expect our costs to significantly decrease and will primarily consist of marketing the Travelocity website, marketing staff and support staff. Under the Expedia SMA, we have committed to continue investing in the marketing of the Travelocity-branded websites in a manner that is consistent with past practice.

As a result, we expect our plan to result in improved margins and profitability for our Travelocity segment.

Our success is dependent on many factors including:

 

    improved conversion through better site performance and user experience using the Expedia platform and technology;

 

    improved cost structure by reducing operational complexity; and

 

    profitable results from our marketing efforts.

We cannot be certain that this plan will be successful.

 

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The implementation of the Expedia SMA will result in various restructuring costs, including asset impairments, exit charges including employee termination benefits and contract termination fees, and other related costs such as consulting and legal fees. During the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we recorded $16 million in restructuring charges in our results of operations, which included $4 million of asset impairments, $9 million of employee termination benefits, and $3 million of other related costs.

We also expect our working capital to be impacted in connection with the Expedia SMA. As of September 30, 2013, we have approximately $163 million recorded as a liability to travel suppliers in the United States and Canada. This liability will decline materially as we pay travel suppliers for travel consumed that originated on our technology platforms; however, we will no longer receive cash directly from consumers and will not incur a payable to travel suppliers for new bookings on our balance sheets. Our Travelocity-related working capital will primarily consist of amounts attributable to lastminute.com and TPN balances as well as amounts due from Expedia offset by payables for marketing and labor related costs, which we expect to reduce the quarterly volatility that exists today.

We also agreed to the Expedia Put/Call whereby Expedia may acquire, or we may sell to Expedia, certain assets relating to the Travelocity business. Our put right may be exercised during the first 24 months of the Expedia SMA only upon the occurrence of certain triggering events primarily relating to implementation, which are outside of our control. The occurrence of such events is not considered probable. During this period, the amount of the put right is fixed. After the 24 month period, the put right is only exercisable for a limited period of time in 2016 at a discount to fair market value. The call right held by Expedia is exercisable at any time during the term of the Expedia SMA. If the call right is exercised, although we expect the amount paid will be fair value, the call right provides for a floor for a limited time that may be higher than fair value and a ceiling for the duration of the agreement that may be lower than fair value.

The term of our agreement with Expedia is eight years and automatically renews under certain conditions.

See “Business—Our Businesses—Travelocity.”

Litigation and related costs

We are involved in various claims, legal proceedings and governmental inquiries related to contract disputes, business practices, intellectual property and other commercial, employment and tax matters. We believe we have adequately accrued for such matters, and for the costs of defending against such matters, which have been and may continue to be expensive. However, litigation is inherently unpredictable and although we believe that our accruals are adequate and we have valid defenses in these matters, unfavorable resolutions could occur, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or cash flows in a particular reporting period. See “Business—Legal Proceedings.”

Pursuant to the Expedia SMA we will continue to be liable for fees, charges, costs and settlements relating to litigation arising from hotels booked on the Travelocity platform prior to the Expedia SMA. However, fees, charges, costs and settlements relating to litigation from hotels booked subsequent to the Expedia SMA will be shared with Expedia according to the terms of the Expedia SMA.

On October 30, 2012, we entered into a settlement agreement to resolve the outstanding state and federal lawsuits with American Airlines filed in 2011 and, as a result of the terms of the settlement, among other things renewed our distribution agreement with American Airlines. The settlement and distribution agreement was approved by the court presiding over the restructuring proceedings for AMR Corporation, American Airlines’ parent company, pursuant to an order made final on December 20, 2012. We expensed $347 million in 2012 related to this settlement agreement. On April 21, 2011, US Airways sued us in federal court in the Southern District of New York alleging federal antitrust claims. We are also involved in an antitrust investigation by the

 

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U.S. Department of Justice relating to pricing and the conduct of our GDS business and in antitrust litigation involving hotel room prices. See Note 19, Commitments and Contingencies—Legal Proceedings—US Airways Antitrust Litigation, Department of Justice Investigation and Hotel Related Antitrust Proceedings, to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Customer Mix

We believe we have a broadly diversified customer mix which supports our stable revenue base. We serve two principal types of customers: travel suppliers, which we serve in both our Travel Network business and Airline and Hospitality Solutions business; and travel buyers, which we serve in our Travel Network business and who purchase wide variety of travel content in our marketplace. Today, our Travel Network marketplace includes a diversified group of travel suppliers, including approximately 400 airlines, 125,000 hotel properties, 27 car rental brands, 50 rail carriers, 16 cruise lines and 200 tour vendors. We connect these travel suppliers via our GDS platform to approximately 400,000 travel agents, spread globally across 145 countries. Importantly, none of our travel buyers or travel suppliers represented more than 10% of our total revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 or the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012. Additionally, our Airline and Hospitality Solutions segment represented approximately 225 airlines, 18,000 hotel properties, and more than 700 other customers, including airports, corporate aviation fleets, governments and tourism boards. Within our Airline and Hospitality Solutions business, no single customer represented more than 10% of total revenues for the nine month period ended September 30, 2013 or the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012.

In addition to the broad diversification within our customer base, due to the quality of our products and services, we have experienced a high level of historical Customer Retention in both our Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions businesses. In general, our business is characterized by non-exclusive multi-year agency and supplier contracts, with durations that typically range from three to five years business, and three to seven years in the Airline and Hospitality Solutions business among our airline customers, and one to five years among our hospitality customers. Furthermore, our airline supplier contracts expire at different times, with 28 and 24 planned renewals for fiscal years 2014 and 2015, respectively. We renewed 24 out of 24 planned renewals in 2013. Similarly, our travel agency customer contracts within our Travel Network business generally have durations of three to ten years. A meaningful portion of our travel buyer agreements, typically representing approximately 15% to 20% of our bookings, are up for renewal in any given year. As a result of the strength of our customer relationships as well as the value our customers realize from our solutions, we have generated very strong Customer Retention rates. For the fiscal year 2012, our agency customer retention rate for Travel Network was approximately 99%. For our Airline Solutions business, our Customer Retention rate was 100% for the fiscal year 2012 and the Customer Retention rate for our Hospitality Solutions business was 96% for the same period. Throughout our history, when we have lost customers, it has generally been as a result of either consolidation or bankruptcy, primarily among our airline partners. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to renew our travel supplier or travel buyer agreements in the future on favorable economic terms or at all.

Our revenue base is broadly diversified, with no single customer comprising more than 10% of our revenues for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 or the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012. We are subject to a certain degree of revenue concentration among a portion of our customer base. Our top five Travel Network customers were responsible for 34% and 35% of our Travel Network revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, respectively. Over the same period, our top five Airline and Hospitality Solutions customers represented 22% and 20% of our Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenues, respectively. Historical consolidation in the global airline industry, including the mergers of American Airlines and US Airways, Delta Air Lines (“Delta”) and Northwest Airlines, United Airlines and Continental Airlines, as well as Southwest Airlines and AirTran, have generally increased our revenue concentration. If additional consolidation in the airline industry were to occur in the future, our levels of revenue concentration may further increase.

 

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Revenue Models

We employ several revenue models across our businesses with some revenue models employed in multiple businesses. Travel Network primarily employs the transaction revenue model. Airline and Hospitality Solutions primarily employs the SaaS and consulting revenue models, as well as the software licensing fee model to a lesser extent. Travelocity primarily employed two revenue models: (i) the merchant revenue model or our “Net Rate Program” (applicable to a majority of our hotel net rate revenues) and (ii) the agency revenue model (applicable to most of our airline, car and cruise commission revenues and a small portion of hotel commission revenues). In connection with the Expedia SMA, Travelocity has begun to employ the marketing fee revenue model (applicable to revenue generated through Travelocity-branded websites operated by Expedia). Travel Network and, historically, Travelocity also, employ the media revenue model (applicable to advertising revenues). We report revenue net of any revenue-based taxes assessed by governmental authorities that are imposed on and concurrent with specific revenue-producing transactions.

Transaction Revenue Model—This model accounts for substantially all of Travel Network’s revenue. We define a “Direct Billable Transaction” as any travel reservation that generates a fee directly to Travel Network. Under this model, a transaction occurs when a travel agency or corporate travel department books, or reserves, a travel supplier’s product on our GDS, for which we receive a fee. Transaction fees include, but are not limited to, transaction fees paid by travel suppliers for selling their inventory through our GDS and transaction fees paid by travel agency subscribers related to their use of our GDS. We receive revenue from the travel supplier and the travel agency according to the commercial arrangement with each.

Transaction revenue for airline travel reservations is recognized at the time of the booking of the reservation, net of transaction fee reserves for estimated future cancellations and bookings that will be rebooked based on historical data. At September 30, 2013, December 31, 2012 and 2011, we recorded transaction fee cancellation reserves of approximately $11 million, $8 million and $7 million, respectively. Transaction revenue for car rental, hotel bookings and other travel services is recognized at the time the reservation is used by the customer.

SaaS and Hosted Revenue Model—The SaaS and Hosted Revenue Model is the primary revenue model employed by Airline and Hospitality Solutions. This revenue model applies to situations where we host software solutions on our own secure platforms or deploy it through our SaaS solutions, and we maintain the software as well as the infrastructure it employs. Our customers pay us an implementation fee and a recurring usage-based fee for the use of such software pursuant to contracts with terms that typically range between three and ten years and generally include minimum annual volume requirements. This usage-based fee arrangement allows our customers to pay for software normally on a monthly basis to the extent that it is used. Similar contracts with the same customer which are entered into at or around the same period are analyzed for revenue recognition purposes on a combined basis. Revenue from implementation fees is generally recognized over the term of the agreement. The amount of periodic usage fees is typically based on a metric relevant to the software purchased. We recognize revenue from recurring usage-based fees in the period earned.

Consulting Revenue Model—Airline and Hospitality Solutions offerings that utilize the SaaS and Hosted Revenue Model are sometimes sold as part of multiple-element agreements for which we also provide consulting services. Our consulting services are primarily focused on helping customers achieve better utilization of and return on their software investment. Often, we provide consulting services during the implementation phase of our SaaS solutions. We account for consulting service revenue separately from implementation and recurring usage-based fees, with value assigned to each element based on its relative selling price to the total selling price. We perform a market analysis on a periodic basis to determine the range of selling prices for each product and service. The revenue for consulting services is generally recognized over the period the consulting services are performed.

Software Licensing Fee Revenue Model—The software licensing fee revenue model is also utilized by Airline and Hospitality Solutions. Under this model, we generate revenue by charging customers for the

 

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installation and use of our software products. Some contracts under this model generate additional revenue for the maintenance of the software product. When software is sold without associated customization or implementation services, revenue from software licensing fees is recognized when all of the following are met: (i) the software is delivered, (ii) fees are fixed or determinable, (iii) no undelivered elements are essential to the functionality of delivered software, and (iv) collection is probable. When software is sold with customization or implementation services, revenue from software licensing fees is recognized based on the percentage of completion of the customization and implementation services. Fees for software maintenance are recognized ratably over the life of the contract. We are unable to determine vendor-specific objective evidence of fair value for software maintenance fees. Therefore, when fees for software maintenance are included in software license agreements, both the revenue from the software license and the maintenance are recognized ratably over the related contract term.

Marketing Fee Revenue Model—With the implementation of Expedia’s technology for our U.S. and Canadian websites beginning late in 2013, Expedia is required to pay us a performance-based marketing fee that will vary based on the amount of travel booked through Travelocity-branded websites powered by Expedia. The marketing fee we receive will be recorded as revenue and the costs we incur for marketing and to promote the Travelocity brand will be recorded as selling, general and administrative expense in our results of operations. See “—Factors Affecting our Results—Travelocity.”

Merchant Revenue Model—The merchant revenue model or the “Net Rate Program” is utilized by Travelocity, except to the extent the marketing fee revenue model applies. We primarily use this model for revenue from hotel reservations and dynamically packaged combinations of travel components. Pursuant to this model, we are the merchant of record for credit card processing for travel accommodations. Even though we are the merchant of record for these transactions, we do not purchase and resell travel accommodations, and we do not have any obligations with respect to the travel accommodations we offer online that we do not sell. Instead, we act as an intermediary by entering into agreements with travel suppliers for the right to market their products, services and other offerings at pre-determined net rates. We market net rate offerings to travelers at prices that include an amount sufficient to pay the travel supplier for providing the travel accommodations and any occupancy and other local taxes, as well as additional amounts representing our service fees, which is how we generate revenue under this model. Under this revenue model, we require prepayment by the traveler at the time of booking.

Travelocity recognizes net rate revenue for stand-alone air travel at the time the travel is booked with a reserve for estimated future canceled bookings. Revenues from vacation packages and car rentals as well as hotel net rate revenues are recognized at the time the reservation is used by the consumer.

For net rate and dynamically packaged combinations sold through Travelocity, we record net rate revenues based on the total amount paid by the customer for products and services, net of our payment to the travel supplier. At the time a customer makes and prepays a reservation, we accrue a supplier liability based on the amount we expect to be billed by our travel suppliers. In some cases, a portion of Travelocity’s prepaid net rate and travel package transactions goes unused by the traveler. In such circumstances, Travelocity may not be billed the full amount of the accrued supplier liability. Therefore, we reduce the accrued supplier liability for amounts aged more than six months after the reservation goes unused and record the aged amount as revenue if certain conditions are met. Our process for determining when aged amounts may be recognized as revenue includes consideration of key factors such as the age of the supplier liability, historical billing and payment information, among others. See “—Factors Affecting our Results—Travelocity.”

Agency Revenue Model—This model is employed by Travelocity, except to the extent the marketing fee revenue model applies, and applies to revenues generated via commissions from travel suppliers for reservations made by travelers through our websites. Under this model, we act as an agent in the transaction by passing reservations booked by travelers to the relevant airline, hotel, car rental company, cruise line or other travel supplier, while the travel supplier serves as merchant of record and processes the payment from the traveler.

 

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Under the agency revenue model, Travelocity recognizes commission revenue for stand-alone air travel at the time the travel is booked with a reserve for estimated canceled bookings. Commissions from car and hotel travel suppliers are recognized upon the scheduled date of travel consumption. We record car and hotel commission revenue net of an estimated reserve for cancellations, no-shows and uncollectable commissions. At each of September 30, 2013, December 31, 2012 and 2011, our reserve was approximately $3 million.

See “—Factors Affecting our Results—Travelocity.”

Media Revenue Model—The media revenue model is used to record advertising revenue from entities that advertise products on Travelocity’s websites, except to the extent the marketing fee revenue model applies, and, to a lesser extent, on our GDS. Advertisers use two types of advertising metrics: (i) display advertising and (ii) action advertising. In display advertising, advertisers usually pay based on the number of customers who view the advertisement, and are charged based on cost per thousand impressions. In action advertising, advertisers usually pay based on the number of customers who perform a specific action, such as click on the advertisement, and are charged based on the cost per action. Advertising revenues are recognized in the period that the advertising impressions are delivered or the click-through or other specific action occurs.

See “—Factors Affecting our Results—Travelocity.”

Components of Revenues and Expenses

Revenues

Travel Network

Travel Network primarily generates revenues from the transaction revenue model, as well as revenue from certain services we provide our joint ventures and the sale of aggregated bookings data to carriers. See “—Revenue Models.”

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

Airline and Hospitality Solutions primarily generates revenue from the SaaS and the consulting revenue models, as well as the software licensing fee model to a lesser extent. Over the last several years, our customers have shifted toward the SaaS model as license fee contracts expire. See “—Revenue Models.”

Travelocity

Travelocity generates transaction revenue through the merchant revenue model and the agency revenue model, and non-transaction revenue, in each case, except to the extent the marketing fee model applies. Transaction revenue is comprised of (i) stand-alone air transaction revenue (i.e., revenue from the sale of air travel without any other products) and (ii) other transaction revenue (i.e., revenue from hotel suppliers, packages which include multiple travel products, lifestyle products such as theatre tickets and services). Both are accounted for under either the merchant or agency revenue models.

Except to the extent the marketing fee model applies, Travelocity also generates revenues from fees from offline (e.g., call center agent transacted) bookings for air and packages and insurance revenues from third-party insurance providers whose air, total trip and cruise insurance we offer on our websites.

Additionally, Travelocity generates intersegment transaction revenue from Travel Network, consisting of incentives earned for Travelocity transactions processed through our GDS and fees paid by Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions for corporate trips booked through the Travelocity online booking technology. We expect intersegment revenue to substantially decrease in connection with the Expedia SMA. Intersegment transaction revenue is eliminated in consolidation.

 

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Non-transaction revenue consists of advertising revenue from the media revenue model, paper ticket fees and services, and change and reissue fees.

Cost of Revenue

Travel Network

Travel Network cost of revenues consists primarily of:

 

    Incentive Fees—fees paid to travel agencies for reservations made on our GDS which have accrued on a monthly basis. Incentives are paid out in two ways, according to the terms of the contract: (i) on a periodic basis over the term of the contract and (ii) in some cases, upfront at the inception or modification of contracts, which is capitalized and amortized over the expected life of the contract. The amortized portion of the upfront incentive fee is recorded to cost of revenue. Travel Network pays incentives to Travelocity for Travelocity transactions processed through our GDS, although we expect intersegment revenue to substantially decrease in connection with the Expedia SMA. Intersegment expense is eliminated in consolidation. See “—Components of Revenues and Expenses—Intersegment Transactions.”

 

    Technology Expenses—data processing, data center management, application hosting, applications development and maintenance and related charges.

 

    Labor Expenses—salaries and benefits paid to employees supporting the operations of the business.

 

    Other Expenses—includes services purchased, facilities and corporate overhead.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

Airline and Hospitality Solutions cost of revenues consists primarily of:

 

    Labor Expenses—salaries and benefits paid to employees for the development, delivery and implementation of software.

 

    Technology Expenses—data processing, data center management, application hosting, applications development and maintenance and related charges resulting from the hosting of our solutions.

 

    Other Expenses—includes services purchased, facilities and other costs.

Travelocity

For the historical periods presented herein, Travelocity cost of revenue has consisted primarily of:

 

    Volume Related Expenses—customer service costs; credit card fees and technology fees; charges related to fraudulent bookings and compensation to customers, i.e., for service related issues.

 

    Technology Expenses—data processing, data center management, applications development, maintenance and related charges.

 

    Labor Expenses—salaries and benefits paid to employees supporting the operations of the business.

 

    Other Expenses—includes services purchased, facilities and other costs.

In connection with the Expedia SMA, Travelocity will not incur significant cost of revenues with respect to Travelocity’s existing websites in the United States and Canada.

Corporate

Corporate cost of revenue includes certain shared technology costs as well as stock-based compensation expense, litigation expenses associated with occupancy or other taxes and other items that are not identifiable with one of our segments.

 

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Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses consist of personnel-related expenses for employees that sell our services to new customers and administratively support the business, commission payments made to travel agency and distribution partners of Travelocity, advertising and promotional costs primarily for Travelocity, certain settlement costs and costs to defend legal disputes, bad debt expense and other costs. In connection with the Expedia SMA, Travelocity will no longer incur non-marketing related expenses; instead, the marketing fee we will receive under the Expedia SMA will be net of costs incurred by Expedia in connection with these activities. However, the marketing costs we incur to promote the Travelocity brand will be recorded as SG&A.

Intersegment Transactions

We account for significant intersegment transactions as if the transactions were with third parties, that is, at estimated current market prices. The majority of the intersegment revenues and cost of revenues are between Travelocity and Travel Network, consisting mainly of incentive fees paid, net of data processing fees incurred, by Travel Network to Travelocity for transactions processed through our GDS, transaction fees paid by Travelocity to Travel Network for transactions facilitated through our GDS in which the travel supplier pays Travelocity directly, and fees paid by Travel Network to Travelocity for corporate trips booked through the Travelocity online booking technology. In addition, Airline and Hospitality Solutions pays fees to Travel Network for airline trips booked through our GDS. Due to the elimination of the intersegment revenue between Travelocity.com and Travel Network with the Expedia SMA, we expect intersegment eliminations to substantially decrease in 2014 from current levels. See Note 22, Segment Information, to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Matters Affecting Comparability

Mergers and Acquisitions

Our results of operations have been affected by mergers and acquisitions as summarized below.

Mergers and Acquisitions in the nine months ended September 30, 2013

We had no acquisitions in the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

Mergers and Acquisitions in 2012

In the third quarter of 2012, we acquired all of the outstanding stock and ownership interests of PRISM, a leading provider of end-to-end airline contract business intelligence and decision support software. The acquisition, which adds to our portfolio of products within the Airline and Hospitality Solutions, allows for new relationships with airlines and adds to our existing business intelligence capabilities.

Mergers and Acquisitions in 2011

In the first quarter of 2011, we completed the acquisition of Zenon N.D.C., Limited, a provider of GDS services to travel agents in Cyprus. This acquisition further expands Travel Network within Europe.

In the second quarter of 2011, we completed the acquisition of SoftHotel, Inc., a provider of web-based property management solutions for the hospitality industry. This acquisition brings Airline and Hospitality Solutions closer to a fully integrated web-based solution that combines distribution, marketing and operations into a single platform for hotel customers.

 

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Mergers and Acquisitions in 2010

In the first quarter of 2010, we completed the acquisition of Iceland-based Calidris, which provides airlines with revenue integrity, business intelligence and data capabilities. Calidris has been integrated with Airline and Hospitality Solutions’ product offerings.

In the second quarter of 2010, we completed the acquisition of FlightLine, a leading provider of vital crew scheduling software and services in North America. This acquisition is part of our continual investment in Airline and Hospitality Solutions’ portfolio of product offerings.

In the third quarter of 2010, we acquired Flugwerkzeuge Aviation Software GmbH (“f:wz”), a leading provider of flight planning products and services in Austria. This acquisition is part of Airline and Hospitality Solutions, and has enhanced our suite of flight planning solutions.

Dispositions

Dispositions in the nine months ended September 30, 2013

Certain Assets of Travelocity—On June 18, 2013, we completed the sale of certain assets of TBiz operations to a third-party. TBiz provides managed corporate travel services for corporate customers. We recorded a loss on the sale of $3 million, net of tax, including the write-off of $9 million of goodwill attributed to TBiz based on the relative fair value of the Travelocity North America reporting unit, in our consolidated statement of operations.

Holiday Autos—On June 25, 2013, we completed the sale of certain assets of our Holiday Autos operations to a third-party. Holiday Autos is a leisure car hire broker that offers prepaid, low-cost car rental in various markets, primarily in Europe. Pursuant to the sale agreement, we will receive two annual earn-out payments, totaling up to $12 million, if the purchaser exceeds certain booking thresholds during the two annual consecutive periods from October 2013 through September 2015, as defined in the sale agreement. We accrued $6 million in connection with these earn-out provisions, which resulted in a net loss on the sale of $11 million, net of tax, in our consolidated statement of operations. This net amount includes the write-off of $39 million of goodwill and intangible assets attributed to Holiday Autos based on the relative fair value of the Travelocity Europe reporting unit in our consolidated statement of operations. The resulting receivable from the earn-out payments will be reviewed for recovery on a periodic basis. We completed the closure of the remainder of the Holiday Autos business in the fourth quarter of 2013. Its results of operations will be reclassified to discontinued operations as of that time.

Dispositions in 2012

Sabre Pacific—On February 24, 2012, we completed the sale of our 51% stake in Sabre Australia Technologies I Pty Ltd (“Sabre Pacific”), an entity jointly owned by a subsidiary of Sabre (51%) and Abacus (49%), to Abacus for $46 million of proceeds. Of the proceeds received, $9 million was for the sale of stock, $18 million represented the repayment of an intercompany note receivable from Sabre Pacific, which was entered into when the joint venture was originally established, and the remaining $19 million represented the settlement of operational intercompany receivable balances with Sabre Pacific and associated amounts we owed to Abacus. We recorded $25 million as gain on sale of business in our consolidated statements of operations. We have also entered into a license and distribution agreement with Sabre Pacific, under which it will market, sub-license, distribute, provide access to and support for our GDS in Australia, New Zealand and surrounding territories. Sabre Pacific is required to pay us an ongoing transaction fee based on booking volumes under this agreement. As of December 31, 2011, the assets and liabilities of Sabre Pacific were classified as held for sale on our consolidated balance sheet. For the year ended December 31, 2012, joint venture equity income included a $24 million impairment of goodwill recorded by Abacus associated with its acquisition of Sabre Pacific.

 

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Dispositions in 2011 & 2010

During 2011 and 2010, we completed no significant dispositions.

Seasonality

The travel industry is seasonal in nature. Travel bookings for Travel Network, and the revenue we derive from those bookings, decrease significantly each year in the fourth quarter, primarily in December. We recognize air-related revenue at the date of booking and, because customers generally book their November and December holiday leisure-related travel earlier in the year, and business-related travel declines during the holiday season, revenue resulting from bookings is typically lower in the fourth quarter. Travelocity revenues are also impacted by the seasonality of travel bookings, but to a lesser extent since commissions from car and hotel travel suppliers and net rate revenue for hotel stays and vacation packages are recognized at the date of travel. There is a slight increase in Travelocity revenues for the second and third quarters compared to the first and fourth quarters due to European travel patterns. Airline and Hospitality Solutions does not experience any significant seasonality patterns in revenue.

Other Items Impacting Comparability

Reduction of insurance sales fees

On January 24, 2012, the U.S. Department of Transportation implemented new regulations that prohibit carriers and ticket agents from including additional optional services in connection with air transportation, a tour or tour component if the optional service is automatically added to the consumer’s purchase if the consumer takes no other action (i.e., if the consumer does not “opt-out”). Prior to the effectiveness of this regulation, we pre-checked the “Yes” box on Travelocity’s websites for certain optional services such as travel insurance, while at the same time providing clear and conspicuous disclosure of the inclusion of such services, itemized pricing thereof and the option to remove such services prior to payment and check-out. The implementation of this regulation resulted in significantly fewer customers electing to purchase such services. For the year ended December 31, 2012, we experienced a $9 million, or 40%, decrease in revenue from insurance sales compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

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Non-GAAP Measurements

The following tables set forth the reconciliation of net loss attributable to common shareholders in our statement of operations to Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EBITDA as well as our segment Adjusted EBITDA to consolidated Adjusted EBITDA.

Consolidated Data

 

    Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended
December 31,
 
    2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Reconciliation of net income (loss) to Adjusted Net Income and to Adjusted EBITDA:

         

Net loss attributable to Sabre Corporation

  $ (127,254   $ (105,744   $ (611,356   $ (66,074   $ (268,852

Net loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

    10,683        (2,887     26,752        20,003        17,395   

Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests(1)

    2,135        (9,475     (59,317     (36,681     (64,382
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

    (114,436     (118,106     (643,921     (82,752     (315,839

Adjustments:

         

Impairment(2)

    138,435        76,829        608,230        185,240        401,400   

Acquisition related amortization expense(3a)

    105,944        120,768        162,517        162,312        163,213   

Loss (gain) on sale of business and assets

    16,880        (25,850     (25,850              

Loss on extinguishment of debt

    12,181                               

Other, net(4)

    5,299        8,343        7,808        (2,953     (3,150

Restructuring and other costs(5)

    30,854        3,712        6,862        14,708        15,672   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

    11,856        294,963        415,672        21,601        1,601   

Stock-based compensation

    5,446        8,621        9,834        7,334        5,302   

Management fees(7)

    7,347        6,257        7,769        7,191        6,730   

Tax impact of net income adjustments

    (83,091     (144,326     (394,165     (80,020     (76.418
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted Net Income

    136,715        231,211        154,756        232,661        198,511   

Adjustments:

         

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment(3b)

    101,163        100,513        137,511        125,063        113,449   

Amortization of capitalized implementation costs(3c)

    27,039        14,317        20,855        11,365        8,162   

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

    28,736        27,432        36,527        37,748        26,571   

Interest expense, net

    208,364        179,359        242,948        181,292        204,348   

Remaining (benefit) provision for income taxes

    75,385        76,888        191,986        136,593        146,569   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 577,402      $ 629,720      $ 784,583      $ 724,722      $ 697,610   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Segment Data

 

    Nine Months Ended September 30, 2013  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 651,924      $ 186,917      $ 309,434      $ (514   $ (89,444   $ 1,058,317   

Selling, general and administrative

    (82,875     (41,434     (308,458     514        (127,338     (559,591

Joint venture equity income

    10,277               49                      10,326   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                28,736        28,736   

Stock-based compensation

                                5,446        5,446   

Management fees(7)

                                7,347        7,347   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                11,856        11,856   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                14,965        14,965   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 579,326      $ 145,483      $ 1,025      $      $ (148,432   $ 577,402   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    Nine Months Ended September 30, 2012  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 654,064      $ 154,278      $ 379,202      $ (718   $ (69,731   $ 1,117,095   

Selling, general and administrative

    (87,116     (43,228     (318,863     718        (397,953     (846,442

Joint venture equity income

    18,006               76                      18,082   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                27,432        27,432   

Stock-based compensation

                                8,621        8,621   

Management fees(7)

                                6,257        6,257   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                294,963        294,963   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                3,712        3,712   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 584,954      $ 111,050      $ 60,415      $      $ (126,699   $ 629,720   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2012  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 843,568      $ 218,421      $ 463,041      $ (1,010   $ (122,444   $ 1,401,576   

Selling, general and administrative

    (99,603     (52,139     (401,122     1,010        (566,394     (1,118,248

Joint venture equity income

    24,487               104                      24,591   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                36,527        36,527   

Stock-based compensation

                                9,834        9,834   

Management fees(7)

                                7,769        7,769   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                415,672        415,672   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                6,862        6,862   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 768,452      $ 166,282      $ 62,023      $      $ (212,174   $ 784,583   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
    Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2011  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 772,520      $ 184,928      $ 511,593      $ (1,083   $ (117,756   $ 1,350,202   

Selling, general and administrative

    (106,650     (49,744     (429,470     1,083        (156,130     (740,911

Joint venture equity income

    26,701               148                      26,849   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                37,748        37,748   

Stock-based compensation

                                7,334        7,334   

Management fees(7)

                                7,191        7,191   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                21,601        21,601   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                14,708        14,708   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 692,571      $ 135,184      $ 82,271      $      $ (185,304   $ 724,722   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2010  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 676,235      $ 186,183      $ 547,287      $ (591   $ (74,294   $ 1,334,820   

Selling, general and administrative

    (67,323     (38,967     (448,889     591        (159,742     (714,330

Joint venture equity income

    21,071               173                      21,244   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                26,571        26,571   

Stock-based compensation

                                5,302        5,302   

Management fees(7)

                                6,730        6,730   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                1,601        1,601   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                15,672        15,672   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 629,983      $ 147,216      $ 98,571      $      $ (178,160   $ 697,610   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2009  
    Travel
Network
    Airline and
Hospitality
Solutions
    Travelocity     Eliminations     Corporate     Total  
    (Amounts in thousands)  

Gross Margin

  $ 629,497      $ 165,056      $ 565,101      $ (527   $ (102,259   $ 1,256,868   

Selling, general and administrative

    (84,282     (41,241     (445,696     527        (176,425     (747,117

Joint venture equity income

    11,356               148                      11,504   

Adjustments:

           

Amortization of upfront incentive payments(8)

                                29,554        29,554   

Stock-based compensation

                                4,108        4,108   

Management fees(7)

                                7,260        7,260   

Litigation and taxes, including penalties(6)

                                42,284        42,284   

Restructuring and other costs(5)

                                23,140        23,140   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ 556,571      $ 123,815      $ 119,553      $      $ (172,338   $ 627,601   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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(1) Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests represents an adjustment to include earnings allocated to noncontrolling interest held in (i) Sabre Travel Network Middle East of 40% for all periods presented, (ii) Sabre Pacific of 49% through February 24, 2012, the date we sold this business and (iii) Travelocity.com LLC of approximately 9.5% through December 31, 2012, the date we merged this minority interest back into our capital structure. See Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
(2) Represents impairment charges to assets (see Note 7, Goodwill and Intangible Assets, to our September 30, 2013 unaudited consolidated financial statements and Note 8, Goodwill and Intangible Assets, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus) as well as $24 million in 2012, representing our share of impairment charges recorded by one of our equity method investments, Abacus.
(3) Depreciation and amortization expenses (see Note 2, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for associated asset lives):
  a. Acquisition related amortization represents amortization of intangible assets from the take-private transaction in 2007 as well as intangibles associated with acquisitions since that date and amortization of the excess basis in our underlying equity in joint ventures.
  b. Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment represents depreciation of property and equipment, including internally developed software.
  c. Amortization of capitalized implementation costs represents amortization of up-front costs to implement new customer contracts under our SaaS and hosted revenue model.
(4) Other, net primarily represents foreign exchange gains and losses related to the remeasurement of foreign currency denominated balances included in our consolidated balance sheets into the relevant functional currency.
(5) Restructuring and other costs represents charges associated with business restructuring and associated changes implemented which resulted in severance benefits related to employee terminations, integration and facility opening or closing costs and other business reorganization costs.
(6) Litigation and taxes, including penalties, represents charges or settlements associated with airline antitrust litigation as well as payments or reserves taken in relation to certain retroactive hotel occupancy and excise tax disputes (see Note 19, Commitments and Contingencies, to our September 30, 2013 unaudited consolidated financial statements and Note 21, Commitments and Contingencies, to our annual audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus).
(7) We have been paying an annual management fee to TPG and Silver Lake in an amount equal to the lesser of (i) 1% of our Adjusted EBITDA and (ii) $7 million. This also includes reimbursement of certain costs incurred by TPG and Silver Lake.
(8) Our Travel Network business at times makes upfront cash payments to travel agency subscribers at inception or modification of a service contract which are capitalized and amortized over an average expected life of the service contract to cost of revenue, generally over three to five years. Such payments are made with the objective of increasing the number of clients, or to ensure or improve customer loyalty. Our service contract terms are established such that the supplier and other fees generated over the life of the contract will exceed the cost of the incentives provided. The service contracts with travel agency subscribers require that the customer commit to achieving certain economic objectives and generally have repayment terms if those objectives are not met.

 

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Results of Operations

The following table sets forth our consolidated statement of operations data for each of the periods presented:

 

     Nine Months Ended
September 30,
    Year Ended
December 31,
 
     2013     2012     2012     2011     2010  
     (Amounts in thousands)  

Revenue

   $ 2,345,295      $ 2,327,480      $ 3,039,060      $ 2,931,727      $ 2,832,393   

Cost of revenue

     1,286,978        1,210,385        1,637,484        1,581,525        1,497,573   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross margin

     1,058,317        1,117,095        1,401,576        1,350,202        1,334,820   

Selling, general and administrative

     559,591        846,442        1,118,248        740,911        714,330   

Impairment

     138,435        76,829        584,430        185,240        401,400   

Depreciation and amortization

     231,743        233,198        317,683        295,540        281,624   

Restructuring charges

     15,889                               
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income (loss)

     112,659        (39,374     (618,785     128,511        (62,534

Interest expense, net

     (208,364     (179,359     (242,948     (181,292     (204,348

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     (12,181                            

(Loss) gain on sale of business

     (16,880     25,850        25,850                 

Joint venture equity income

     10,326        18,082        24,591        26,849        21,244   

Joint venture goodwill impairment and intangible amortization

     (2,403     (2,400     (27,000     (3,200     (3,200

Other, net

     (5,299     (8,343     (7,808     2,953        3,150   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes

     (122,142     (185,544     (846,100     (26,179     (245,688

(Benefit) provision for income taxes

     (7,706     (67,438     (202,179     56,573        70,151   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

   $ (114,436   $ (118,106   $ (643,921   $ (82,752   $ (315,839
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012

Revenue

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,     Change  
             2013                     2012             2013 vs. 2012  
     (Amounts in thousands)              

Revenue by Segment

        

Travel Network

   $ 1,381,105      $ 1,382,913      $ (1,808     (0 )% 

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

     522,794        429,916        92,878        22

Travelocity

     499,045        575,879        (76,834     (13 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total segment revenue

     2,402,944        2,388,708        14,236        1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Eliminations

     (58,019     (60,944     2,925        5

Corporate

     370        (284     654          ** 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 2,345,295      $ 2,327,480      $ 17,815        1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

** not meaningful

Revenue increased $18 million, or 1%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

 

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Travel Network—Revenue decreased $2 million, or less than 1%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

This $2 million decrease in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $7 million decrease in transaction revenue; offset by

 

    a $5 million increase in other revenue from payments in connection with certain services provided to our joint ventures.

The reduction in transaction revenue resulted from the loss of a portion of our bookings from a large OTA customer in North America and impacts from the U.S. government sequestration, partially offset by growth in other domestic customers as well as growth in our international regions. Travel Network processed 295 million Direct Billable Transactions during the nine months ended September 30, 2013, representing a decrease of 12 million transactions, or 4%, compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Revenue increased $93 million, or 22%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

This $93 million increase in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $54 million increase in SaaS revenue primarily due to new customers;

 

    $23 million generated from our 2012 acquisition of PRISM; and

 

    $16 million in customer maintenance, consulting, and service fees.

Travelocity—Revenue decreased $77 million, or 13%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

This $77 million decrease in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $58 million decrease driven by a 5% decline in transaction volumes and a 5% decline in average transaction value, primarily driven by the loss of a large TPN customer in 2012 which was partially offset by an increase in transaction volumes across air, car and hotel products;

 

    a $16 million decrease related to the dispositions of TBiz and Holiday Autos in 2013; and

 

    a $2 million decrease in non-transaction revenues due to a reduction in media revenue in North America and Europe.

Gross Margin

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,     Change  
             2013                     2012             2013 vs. 2012  
     (Amounts in thousands)              

Gross Margin by Segment

        

Travel Network

   $ 651,924      $ 654,064      $ (2,140     (0 )% 

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

     186,917        154,278        32,639        21

Travelocity

     309,434        379,202        (69,768     (18 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total segment gross margin

     1,148,275        1,187,544        (39,269     (3 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Eliminations

     (514     (718     204        28

Corporate

     (89,444     (69,731     (19,713     (28 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total gross margin

   $ 1,058,317      $ 1,117,095      $ (58,778     (5 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Travel Network—Gross margin decreased $2 million, or less than 1%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. This decrease is due to a $2 million reduction in revenue. Cost of revenue was flat for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to the same period in the prior year.

The offsetting changes in cost of revenue was primarily the result of:

 

    a $12 million increase in incentive fees, in line with higher Direct Billable Transactions in regions with favorable booking fee rates; partially offset by

 

    a decrease in labor costs of $5 million to $126 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $131 million in the same period of the prior year and a decrease in other expenses of $2 million, both as a result of a resource allocation shift; and

 

    lower data processing expense of $2 million primarily due to credits received from a technology vendor related to certain services that did not meet contractual requirements.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Gross margin increased $33 million, or 21%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. This increase is on account of the net effect of a $93 million increase in revenue, as described above, partially offset by a $60 million increase in cost of revenue.

The $60 million increase in cost of revenue was primarily the result of:

 

    a $43 million increase in labor costs to $207 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $164 million in the same period of the prior year. The increase was attributed to increased headcount to support 2013 implementations, increased customer support and maintenance, and minor enhancements to our SaaS and hosted systems;

 

    an increase of $11 million in technology-related expenses, driven by higher transaction volumes; and

 

    a $6 million increase related to the operations of PRISM which was acquired in August of 2012.

Travelocity—Gross margin decreased $70 million, or 18%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. This decrease is on account of the net effect of a $77 million decrease in revenue, as described above, partially offset by a $7 million decrease in cost of revenue.

The $7 million decrease in cost of revenue was primarily the result of:

 

    a $11 million decline in services purchased due to lower call center costs related to the loss of a large TPN customer; and

 

    a decline of $5 million in transaction-related fees as a result of lower transaction volumes; partially offset by

 

    an $8 million increase in other operating expenses primarily related to other fraud-related expenses and credit card chargebacks.

Labor costs remained flat at $56 million for both nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 resulting from an increase in severance costs related to the sale and closure of Holiday Autos and higher employee costs in North America, offset by savings as a result of our sale of TBiz in 2013.

Corporate—Gross margin decreased $20 million, or 28%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. Corporate revenue was nominal during this period. The increase in cost of revenue was primarily the result of $24 million in back excise taxes, penalties and interest in 2013 mainly in connection with general excise tax litigation with the State of Hawaii and Washington

 

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D.C. See Note 19, Commitment and Contingencies, to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Labor costs also increased by $2 million to $7 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared to $5 million in the same period of the prior year. These increases were offset by a $7 million decrease in corporate costs associated with credits received from our service provider.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
             2013                      2012              2013 vs. 2012  
     (Amounts in thousands)               

Personnel

   $ 224,676       $ 204,696       $ 19,980        10

Advertising and promotion

     130,947         132,839         (1,892     (1 )% 

Commission payments to affiliates

     75,656         89,059         (13,403     (15 )% 

Litigation charges

             260,000         (260,000       ** 

Allowance for bad debt

     7,484         4,727         2,757        58

Other

     120,828         155,121         (34,293     (22 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total selling, general and administrative

   $ 559,591       $ 846,442       $ (286,851     (34 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

** not meaningful

Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased $287 million, or 34%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

This decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily driven by a $260 million litigation charge recorded during the nine months ended September 30, 2012 for the settlement of the state and federal cases with American Airlines, which did not reoccur in the nine months ended September 30, 2013. Additionally, legal fees within other expenses decreased $23 million as a result of the settlement of our dispute with American Airlines in 2012. Other expenses in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 also include a reduction due to a Value Added Tax refund from Spain of $21 million as a result of a ruling in our favor on claims from 2004 through 2009, which had previously been reserved due to uncertainty of collection. These reductions within other expenses are offset by $7 million of costs incurred by Travelocity to enhance its offering and pursue a new TPN customer, which did not materialize.

During the nine months ended September 30, 2013, we also had a decline of $13 million in commission payments to affiliates due to the loss of a large TPN partner in 2012. These declines are offset by increases in personnel-related expenses including $12 million in higher salaries and benefits attributed to increased corporate headcount to support the growth of the business and $7 million in higher salaries and benefits in Travel Network attributed to higher variable compensation awards for employees due to improved overall performance.

Impairment

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
             2013                      2012              2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)                

Impairment

   $ 138,435       $ 76,829       $ 61,606         80

Impairment expense was $138 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013. In the second quarter of 2013, we allocated $9 million and $36 million in goodwill to TBiz and Holiday Autos, which are assets within the Travelocity—North America and Travelocity—Europe reporting units, respectively. We therefore initiated an impairment analysis on the remainder of the goodwill associated with these reporting units. Further declines in our current projections of the discounted future cash flows of these reporting units and current market participant

 

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considerations led to a $96 million impairment in Travelocity—North America and a $40 million impairment in Travelocity—Europe which have been recorded in our results of operations. As of September 30, 2013, Travelocity had no remaining goodwill.

Impairment expense was $77 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012. In the third quarter of 2012, Travelocity goodwill was impaired as a result of expected changes in its competitive business environment and the resulting impact on performance projections of the discounted future cash flows, which led to a $58 million impairment in Travelocity—North America and a $5 million impairment in Travelocity—Europe. During the nine months ended September 30, 2012, we also recorded $20 million of impairment related to leasehold improvements associated with a corporate building that was not occupied and for which we no longer anticipated being able to sublease to a third-party before the end of the lease term.

Depreciation and Amortization

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
           2013                  2012            2013 vs. 2012  
     (Amounts in thousands)               

Property and equipment

   $ 98,956       $ 100,240       $ (1,284     (1 )% 

Intangible assets

     105,554         118,368         (12,814     (11 )% 

Capitalized implementation costs

     27,039         14,317         12,722        89

Other assets

     194         273         (79     (29 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total depreciation and amortization

   $ 231,743       $ 233,198       $ (1,455     (1 )% 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization decreased $1 million, or 1%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. At the end of 2012, we impaired certain property and equipment and intangible assets related to Travelocity. The resulting decreased asset base drove a $38 million reduction in depreciation and amortization during the nine months ended September 30, 2013. Offsetting this decrease was an additional $32 million in depreciation and amortization associated with the completion and amortization of internally developed software as well as capitalized implementation costs for both Travel Network and Airline and Hospitality Solutions. We also had a $4 million increase in scheduled amortization of recently acquired intangible assets related to PRISM.

Restructuring charges

 

    Nine Months Ended September 30,     Change  
    2013     2012     2013 vs. 2012  
    (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)              

Restructuring charges

  $ 15,889      $      $ 15,889        *

 

** not meaningful

Restructuring charges were $16 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, which included $9 million of employee termination benefits, $4 million of asset impairments and $3 million of other related costs relating to Travelocity. See “—Factors Affecting Our Results—Travelocity.”

Interest expense, net

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
     2013      2012      2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)                

Interest expense, net

   $ 208,364       $ 179,359       $ 29,005         16

 

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Interest expense, net, increased $29 million, or 16%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. We entered into multiple debt transactions during 2012 and 2013 that increased our overall effective interest rate and increased our debt levels which resulted in additional interest expense of $40 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2013. See Note 11, Debt—Senior Secured Credit Facility to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Additionally, debt modification expenses and original issue discount amortization increased by $7 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. We also incurred $13 million of imputed interest related to a litigation settlement payable during the nine months ended September 30, 2013. Offsetting these increases was a $16 million reduction associated with accelerating the amortization of our debt issuance cost in 2012 as well as a $9 million increase in interest savings as a result of the maturity of certain of our interest rates swaps in 2012. See Note 12, Derivatives, to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Finally, we recorded $6 million in interest income associated with the Value Added Tax refund from Spain on claims from 2004 through 2009 which we received during 2013.

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
     2013      2012      2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)                

Loss on extinguishment of debt

   $ 12,181       $       $ 12,181         *

 

** not meaningful

Loss on extinguishment of debt was $12 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 as a result of our debt restructuring transaction in the first quarter of 2013.

(Loss) gain on sale of business

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
     2013     2012      2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)               

(Loss) gain on sale of business

   $ (16,880   $ 25,850       $ (42,730       ** 

 

** not meaningful

Loss on sale of business in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 was $17 million, primarily related to the sale of Holiday Autos. During the fourth quarter of 2013, we completed the shutdown of the remainder of the Holiday Autos business and its results will be moved into discontinued operations in that period. Gain on sale of business for the nine months ended September 30, 2012, was $26 million, and primarily related to the sale of our 51% stake in Sabre Pacific to Abacus for $46 million of proceeds.

Joint venture equity income

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,      Change  
     2013      2012      2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)               

Joint venture equity income

   $ 10,326       $ 18,082       $ (7,756     (43 )% 

Joint venture equity income decreased $8 million, or 43%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. This change was driven by decreased performance of our joint ventures in 2013 compared to the same period in 2012. Joint venture intangible amortization remained flat.

 

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Other expenses, net

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,     Change  
     2013     2012     2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)               

Other expenses, net

   $ (5,299   $ (8,343   $ 3,044         36

Other expenses, net decreased $3 million, or 36%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. The decrease is driven by changes in realized and unrealized foreign currency exchange gains and losses.

Benefit for income taxes

 

     Nine Months Ended September 30,     Change  
     2013     2012     2013 vs. 2012  
     (Unaudited, dollar amounts in thousands)               

Benefit for income taxes

   $ (7,706   $ (67,438   $ 59,732         89

Benefit for income taxes decreased by $60 million, or 89%, for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 compared with the nine months ended September 30, 2012. We determine our provision for income taxes for interim periods using an estimate of our annual effective tax rate. We record the impact of changes to the estimated annual effective rate in the interim period in which the change occurs. The impact of discrete items is recognized when they occur. The decrease in benefit for income taxes was primarily due to the decrease in the pre-tax loss, an increase in non-deductible goodwill impairment, an increase in state taxes resulting from state legislation and changes in operations. The decrease in benefit was partially offset by an increase in the reserve for uncertain tax positions in 2012, an increase in non-U.S. taxes relating primarily to changes in foreign currency rates and the sale of Sabre Pacific in the first quarter of 2012. The effective tax rates were 6% and 36% for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Excluding the impact of non-deductible goodwill impairment and the sale of Sabre Pacific, our effective tax rate for the period ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 would have been 29% and 38%, respectively. The remaining increase in the effective tax rate, after excluding the effects of the non- deductible items above, was primarily due to the increases in state and non-U.S. taxes and the impact of non-deductible transaction tax penalties offset by the recording of the tax benefit from the retroactive change in tax law.

Years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010

Revenue

 

    Year Ended December 31,     Change  
    2012     2011     2010     2012 vs. 2011     2011 vs. 2010  
    (Amounts in thousands)                          

Revenue by Segment

         

Travel Network

  $ 1,795,127      $ 1,740,007      $ 1,638,576      $ 55,120        3   $ 101,431        6

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

    597,649        522,692        474,342        74,957        14     48,350        10

Travelocity

    724,422        775,356        818,591        (50,934     (7 )%      (43,235     (5 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total segment revenue

    3,117,198        3,038,055        2,931,509        79,143        3     106,546        4
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Eliminations

    (77,869     (106,320     (107,820     28,451        27     1,500        1

Corporate

    (269     (8     8,704        (261       **      (8,712     (100 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

  $ 3,039,060      $ 2,931,727      $ 2,832,393      $ 107,333        4   $ 99,334        4
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

** not meaningful

 

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2012 compared to 2011

Revenue increased $107 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

Travel Network—Revenue increased $55 million, or 3%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

This $55 million increase in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $41 million increase in revenue for certain services provided to our joint ventures; and

 

    an increase in transaction revenue of $12 million resulting from higher Direct Billable Transaction volumes in regions with higher transaction rates; partially offset by

 

    lower global transaction volumes.

We processed 391 million Direct Billable Transactions in 2012, representing a decrease of 5 million Direct Billable transactions, or 1%, compared to 2011. This decrease is due to the loss of 14 million Direct Billable transactions related to the Sabre Pacific divestiture, partially offset by an increase of 9 million Direct Billable transactions in all other domestic and international regions.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Revenue increased $75 million, or 14%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

This $75 million increase in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $52 million increase in SaaS revenue due to higher volumes from existing and new customers;

 

    $12 million of revenue growth generated from the acquisition of PRISM during the third quarter of 2012; and

 

    a $11 million increase related to consulting and service revenue.

Travelocity—Revenue decreased $51 million, or 7%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

This $51 million decrease in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a decline of $14 million in transaction revenue generated from external customers. This decrease occurred in air transactions as a result of lower contracted rates when compared to the prior year, decreases in packaging volume due to lower conversion of site traffic to sales, the reduction of air insurance revenue as a result of changing the purchase of trip insurance on our website from opt-out to opt-in in early 2012, and a decline in car revenue from our car rental broker business in Europe;

 

    a decline of $11 million in media revenue in North America and Europe; and

 

    a $28 million decline in intersegment revenue associated with incentive fees received from Travel Network due to a loss of a large TPN customer during 2012. Intersegment revenue is eliminated in consolidation.

2011 compared to 2010

Revenue increased $99 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010.

Travel Network—Revenue increased $101 million, or 6%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

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This $101 million increase in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    an $88 million increase in transaction revenue, primarily due to higher volumes and rates; and

 

    a $13 million increase in other revenue derived from certain services provided to our joint ventures.

We processed 394 million Direct Billable Transactions in 2011, representing an increase of 8 million Direct Billable Transactions, or 2%, compared to 2010, primarily in Latin America, Europe and Asia as well as higher hotel, car and leisure bookings, offset by a decrease of 6 million air Direct Billable Transactions in North America.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Revenue increased $48 million, or 10%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010.

This $48 million increase in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    increased SaaS revenue of $31 million from higher volumes from existing and new customers, and

 

    $11 million of additional revenue from growth generated through acquisitions during 2010.

Travelocity—Revenue decreased $43 million, or 5%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010.

This $43 million decrease in revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $26 million decline in transaction revenue due to increased competitive pressure resulting in lower transaction volumes and a decline in rates from new agreements signed with airlines in 2011, as well as

 

    a $24 million decrease in total non-transaction revenues as a result of a reduction in media revenue.

Corporate—Revenue decreased $9 million, or over 100%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. In the year ended December 31, 2010, corporate revenue included $7 million of proceeds from the settlement of a breach of competition lawsuit and $1 million of other revenue not associated with a segment. Neither of these activities reoccurred in the year ended December 31, 2011.

Gross Margin

 

     Year Ended December 31,     Change  
     2012     2011     2010     2012 vs. 2011     2011 vs. 2010  
     (Amounts in thousands)                          

Gross Margin by Segment

              

Travel Network

   $ 843,568      $ 772,520      $ 676,235      $ 71,048        9   $ 96,285        14

Airline and Hospitality Solutions

     218,421        184,928        186,183        33,493        18     (1,255     (1 )% 

Travelocity

     463,041        511,593        547,287        (48,552     (9 )%      (35,694     (7 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total segment gross margin

     1,525,030        1,469,041        1,409,705        55,989        4     59,336        4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Eliminations

     (1,010     (1,083     (591     73        7     (492     (83 )% 

Corporate

     (122,444     (117,756     (74,294     (4,688     (4 )%      (43,462     (59 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total gross margin

   $ 1,401,576      $ 1,350,202      $ 1,334,820      $ 51,374        4   $ 15,382        1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

2012 compared to 2011

The total gross margin increased by $51 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

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Travel Network—Gross margin increased $71 million, or 9%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase reflects a $55 million increase in revenue, as described above, and a $16 million decrease in the cost of revenue.

The $16 million decrease in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $27 million decrease in customer incentive expenses related to the sale of Sabre Pacific;

 

    a decrease in labor costs of $2 million to $175 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $177 million in the prior year; partially offset by

 

    an $11 million increase in forward contract expenses.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Gross margin increased $33 million, or 18%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase is on account of the net effect of a $75 million increase in revenue, as described above, offset by a $45 million increase in cost of revenue.

The $45 million increase in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    an increase in labor costs of $35 million to $226 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $191 million in the prior year, attributable to increased headcount to support 2012 customer implementations, pending 2013 implementations, increased customer support, and labor costs for minor enhancement and maintenance to our SaaS and hosted systems;

 

    technology-related expenses increased $4 million, driven by higher transaction volumes, which were partially offset by lower rates resulting from a renegotiation of our contract with our primary technology provider, and

 

    a $3 million increase in other expenses driven by increased outside services purchased to support new customer implementations.

Travelocity—Gross margin decreased $49 million, or 9%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. This decrease is on account of the net effect of a $51 million decrease in revenue, as described above, partially offset by a $2 million decrease in cost of revenue.

The $2 million decrease in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a decrease of $12 million in labor costs to $81 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $93 million in the prior year, as a result of the completion of a customer implementation in the prior year; and

 

    $13 million of reduced bank service charges, credit card fees, and service compensation expenses due to lower merchant volumes; partially offset by

 

    $20 million in increased call center costs to provide overall customer support for new TPN customers added in 2011; and

 

    $5 million in increased data processing charges during the period.

Corporate—Gross margin for our corporate segment decreased by $5 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. The increase in cost of revenue was primarily the result of $25 million in back excise taxes, penalties and interest in 2013 mainly in connection with general excise tax litigation with the State of Hawaii (see Note 19, Commitment and Contingencies, to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus) and a $10 million increase in technology-related expenses. These increases were offset by a $24 million decrease in labor costs to $13 million compared to $37 million in the prior year. The decrease in labor costs was associated with lower development labor expenses.

 

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2011 compared to 2010

Total gross margin increased by $15 million, or 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010.

Travel Network—Gross margin increased $96 million, or 14%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. This increase is on account of the net effect of a $101 million increase in revenue, as described above, partially offset by a $5 million increase in cost of revenue.

The $5 million increase in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $20 million increase in customer incentive expenses due to higher transaction volumes; and

 

    a $9 million increase in data processing; partially offset by

 

    a decrease of $10 million in forward contract expenses;

 

    a $10 million decrease in labor costs to $177 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the prior year primarily due to lower development-related labor costs; and

 

    a $2 million decrease in maintenance costs.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions—Gross margin decreased $1 million, or 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. This decrease is on account of the net effect of a $48 million increase in the revenue, as described above, more than offset by a $52 million increase in cost of revenue.

The $52 million increase in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a $34 million increase in labor costs to $192 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $158 million in the prior year. This increase is attributable to increased headcount to support pending 2012 customer implementations;

 

    a $9 million increase in technology-related expenses due to growth in the business; and

 

    a $4 million increase in various transaction and service-related fees.

Travelocity—Gross margin decreased by $36 million, or 7%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. The decrease is on account of the net effect of a $43 million decrease in revenue, as described above, partially offset by an $7 million decrease in cost of revenue.

The $7 million decrease in cost of revenue primarily resulted from:

 

    a decrease in labor costs of $14 million to $93 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $107 million in the prior year; offset by

 

    a $5 million increase in services purchased.

Corporate—Gross margin decreased by $43 million, or 59%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. Corporate revenues declined $9 million as described above. Corporate cost of revenue increased by $34 million in the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the prior year. The increase in cost of revenue is primarily related to an $11 million increase in labor costs, an $11 million increase in amortization of upfront incentive payments and a $5 million increase in technology-related expenses. Labor costs increased to $36 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $25 million in the prior year.

 

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Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

    Year Ended December 31,     Change  
    2012     2011     2010     2012 vs. 2011     2011 vs. 2010  
    (Amounts in thousands)                          

Personnel

  $ 272,394      $ 250,208      $ 238,262      $ 22,186        9   $ 11,946        5

Advertising and promotion

    166,305        197,501        214,349        (31,196     (16 )%      (16,848     (8 )% 

Commission payments to affiliates

    109,229        122,284        112,731        (13,055     (11 )%      9,553        8

Litigation charges

    346,515                      346,515        *            *

Allowance for bad debt

    4,786        3,670        2,955        1,116        30     715        24

Other

    219,019        167,248        146,033        51,771        31     21,215        15
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total selling, general and administrative

  $ 1,118,248      $ 740,911      $ 714,330      $ 377,337        51   $ 26,581        4
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

** not meaningful

2012 compared to 2011

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $377 million, or 51%, for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase was primarily driven by $347 million of expenses related to the litigation settlement with American Airlines that occurred during the year ended December 31, 2012. Within other expenses is $44 million of increased legal fees and other costs associated with various legal disputes throughout 2012 and $3 million in increased services purchased to facilitate the move a Travelocity call center to Poland. Personnel-related expenses increased $22 million as a result of $10 million in increased corporate headcount and variable compensation awards as well as $10 million of higher labor costs to support Travelocity. Partially offsetting these increases was a decrease of $13 million in commission payments to affiliates due to the loss of a large TPN partner in 2012 by Travelocity. Advertising and promotional costs declined due to reductions taken by Travelocity. Travelocity had a $17 million reduction in advertising spend driven by fewer purchases of non-brand search engine key words and other promotions as well as a $13 million reduction in media advertising barter transactions.

2011 compared to 2010

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $27 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with the year ended December 31, 2010. The increase primarily resulted from increases of $21 million in legal fees, $10 million in commission payments to affiliates and $8 million related to increased headcount. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $17 million in advertising expenses related to strategy changes in Travelocity.

Impairment

 

     Year Ended December 31,      Change  
     2012      2011      2010      2012 vs. 2011     2011 vs. 2010  
     (Amounts in thousands)                            

Impairment

   $ 584,430       $ 185,240       $ 401,400       $ 399,190         215   $