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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 30, 2013

Registration Statement No. 333-187579

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Amendment No. 3

to

Form F-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

QIWI plc

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Cyprus   7389   Not Applicable
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

12-14 Kennedy Ave.

Kennedy Business Centre, 2nd Floor, Office 203

1087 Nicosia Cyprus

Telephone: +357-22-653390

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

Law Debenture Corporate Services Inc.

400 Madison Avenue, 4th Floor

New York, New York 10017

Tel: +1-212-750-6474

(Name and address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

 

    Copies to:

 

Pranav L. Trivedi

Michael Zeidel

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom (UK) LLP

40 Bank Street

London E14 5DS

Telephone: +44 20 7519 7000

Facsimile: +44 20 7519 7070

 

Joshua G. Kiernan

Colin J. Diamond

White & Case LLP

5 Old Broad Street

London EC2N 1DW

Telephone: +44 20 7532 1000

Facsimile: +44 20 7532 1001

 

Darina Lozovsky

White & Case LLC

4 Romanov Pereulok

125009 Moscow

Telephone: +7 495 787 3000

Facsimile: +7 495 787 3001

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”), check the following box.  ¨

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ¨

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of

Securities to be Registered

  Amount to be
Registered(1)
 

Proposed

Maximum

Offering Price

Per Share

 

Proposed

Maximum

Aggregate

Offering Price(2)

 

Amount of

Registration Fee(4)

Class B Shares of €0.0005 par value per share(3)

  13,800,000   U.S.$18   U.S.$248,400,000   U.S.$33,882

 

 

(1) Includes 1,800,000 class B shares represented by 1,800,000 ADSs that may be sold upon exercise of an over-allotment option to be granted to the underwriters.
(2) Estimated solely for the purposes of calculating the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o).
(3) American depositary shares issuable upon deposit of class B shares registered hereby will be registered under a separate registration statement on Form F-6 (Registration No. 333-188006). Each American depositary share represents one class B share.
(4) The Issuer previously paid filing fees of U.S.$33,882 in connection with the filing of this Registration Statement.

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. The selling shareholders may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS    SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED APRIL 30, 2013

12,000,000 American Depositary Shares

 

LOGO

Representing 12,000,000 Class B Shares

 

 

This is an initial public offering of American depositary shares, or ADSs. Each ADS represents one class B share of QIWI plc and is evidenced by American depositary receipts, or ADRs. The selling shareholders identified in this prospectus are offering 12,000,000 ADSs. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the ADSs sold by the selling shareholders.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our ADSs. We expect the initial public offering price to be between U.S.$16.00 and U.S.$18.00 per ADS. Our ADSs have been approved for listing on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “QIWI.” We also intend to file applications for the admission of the ADSs to trading on Closed Joint-Stock Company “MICEX Stock Exchange” (“MICEX”) that, if approved, is expected to take place at the earliest on the date of the listing of the ADSs on Nasdaq.

 

 

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined under Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933.

 

 

Investing in our ADSs involves risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 17.

 

 

 

     Price to Public      Underwriting
Discounts and
Commissions(1)
     Proceeds to the
Selling
Shareholders
 

Per ADS

   U.S.$                    U.S.$                    U.S.$                

Total

   U.S.$         U.S.$         U.S.$     

 

 

(1) See “Underwriting” for a description of the compensation payable to the underwriters.

The underwriters have an option to purchase up to an additional 1,800,000 ADSs from the selling shareholders at the initial public offering price, less the underwriting discount, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus to cover over-allotments, if any.

The underwriters expect to deliver the ADSs to purchasers on or about                    , 2013.

Neither the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

J.P. Morgan       Credit Suisse

 

 

 

Baird    RenCap    William Blair

Prospectus dated                    , 2013


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Summary

     1   

The offering

     10   

Risk factors

     17   

Special note regarding forward-looking statements

     50   

Use of proceeds

     51   

Dividend policy

     52   

Capitalization

     53   

Dilution

     54   

Exchange rates

     55   

Selected consolidated financial and other data

     56   

Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations

     61   

The payment services market in Russia and Kazakhstan

     89   

Business

     93   

Regulation

     107   

Management

     117   

Principal and selling shareholders

     126   

Related party transactions

     128   

Description of share capital

     131   

Description of American depositary shares

     141   

Shares eligible for future sale

     148   

Taxation

     149   

Underwriting

     161   

Expenses of the offering

     169   

Legal matters

     170   

Experts

     171   

Enforceability of civil liabilities

     172   

Where you can find more information

     173   

Index to financial statements

     F-1   

 

 

Neither we, nor the selling shareholders nor the underwriters (nor any of our or their respective affiliates) have authorized anyone to provide any information other than that contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we may have referred you. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. Neither we, nor the selling shareholders nor the underwriters (nor any of our or their respective affiliates) are making an offer to sell the ADSs or the underlying class B shares in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front cover of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or any sale of the ADSs or the underlying class B shares. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since the date on the front cover of this prospectus.

Neither we, nor the selling shareholders nor any of the underwriters have taken any action to permit a public offering of the ADSs outside the United States or to permit the possession or distribution of this prospectus outside the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about and observe any restrictions relating to the offering of the ADSs and the distribution of this prospectus outside the United States.

We present our consolidated financial statements in Russian rubles. All references in this prospectus to “rubles” or “RUB” are to Russian rubles unless otherwise noted. Solely for convenience and unless otherwise indicated, certain Russian ruble amounts have been translated into U.S. dollars at a rate of RUB 30.37 to U.S.$1.00, the official exchange rate quoted as of December 31, 2012 by the Central Bank of Russia, or the CBR.


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Such U.S. dollar amounts are not necessarily indicative of the amount of U.S. dollars that could actually have been purchased upon exchange of Russian rubles at the dates indicated and have been provided solely for the convenience of the reader.

This prospectus includes data, forecasts and information obtained from industry publications and surveys and other information available to us. Forecasts and other metrics included in this prospectus to describe our industry are inherently uncertain and speculative in nature, and actual results for any period may materially differ. We have not independently verified any of the data from third-party sources, nor have we ascertained the underlying assumptions relied upon therein. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding the industry data presented herein, estimates and forecasts involve uncertainties and risks and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors.”


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SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that you should consider in making your investment decision. Before deciding whether to invest in our ADSs, you should carefully read this entire prospectus, especially the risks of investing in our ADSs discussed under the heading “Risk Factors.” In this prospectus, the terms “Qiwi”, “we”, “us”, “our” and “company” refer to QIWI plc and, unless the context requires otherwise, its subsidiaries.

Overview

We are a leading provider of next generation payment services in Russia and the CIS. We have an integrated proprietary network that enables payment services across physical, online and mobile channels. We have deployed over 11 million virtual wallets, over 169,000 kiosks and terminals, and enabled over 40,000 merchants to accept over RUB 39 billion cash and electronic payments monthly from over 65 million consumers using our network at least once a month. Our consumers can use cash, stored value and other electronic payment methods to order and pay for goods and services across physical or online environments interchangeably. We believe the complementary combination of our physical and virtual payment services provides differentiated convenience to our consumers and creates a strong network effect that drives payment volume across our business. Our extensive network of interactive Qiwi kiosks also enables us to provide advertising services, and the billions of transactions we process annually allow us to collect and analyze valuable data, which we monetize by providing value added services. We believe that our leading market position, proprietary network and complementary services provide us with competitive advantages that have enabled us to generate strong growth and profitability.

We operate in and target markets and consumer segments that are largely cash-based and lack convenient alternatives for consumers to pay for goods and services in physical, online and mobile environments. For example, according to a report from Edgar, Dunn & Company, Russia remains a cash-dominated society for retail consumer payments with approximately 94% of the value of payments exchanged in cash in 2011, while the penetration of electronic payment services, such as credit and debit cards and point of sale terminals, significantly lags behind more developed economies. We help consumers and merchants connect more efficiently in these markets by providing an integrated network of kiosks and terminals, virtual wallets and payment services that enable consumers to deposit cash, convert it into a digital form and remit the funds to a virtual wallet, a variety of Visa-branded prepaid cards or any merchant in our network quickly and securely – for example, to pay bills, add minutes to their mobile phones, purchase transportation and tickets, shop online or at a retail store, buy digital services or send money to a friend or relative.

Our platform provides simple and intuitive user interfaces, convenient access and best-in-class services combined with the reputation and trust associated with the Qiwi brand. The payments processed on our network are typically very small with a limit of RUB 15,000 per transaction and, since they are primarily funded with cash, consumers do not have to undergo a lengthy registration process to execute most transactions. Alternatively, consumers can create an online account, or virtual wallet, with Qiwi where they can store money, deposited from cash or funded from a variety of other sources, such as a bank account, credit card, direct payroll deposit or money transfer, that can be used to make payments and purchases at any time. Our services also allow over 40,000 merchants in Russia and other markets, including leading mobile network operators, or MNOs, online retailers, financial institutions and utilities, to accept payments via our network, enabling them to attract more consumers, generate more sales and get paid faster and more easily.

We have deployed our network of kiosks and terminals using a proprietary agent model. Under this model, our kiosks are assembled by third party manufacturers using our proprietary specifications and are then purchased by over 9,300 agents who are responsible for placing, operating and servicing the kiosks in high-traffic, convenient retail locations and setting the fee rates paid by consumers. In addition, an agent-owned point

 

 

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of sale terminal, computer, laptop or mobile phone can serve as a Qiwi terminal once our proprietary software is installed on it, which allows the agent to process consumer payments to merchants through our system. In Russia and Kazakhstan, our brand is very well-known and our kiosks and terminals provide unique physical access for approximately 159 million consumers. They can be found next to convenience stores, in train stations, post offices, retail stores or airport terminals in all of the major urban centers, as well as many small and rural towns that lack large bank branches and infrastructure. In addition, we distribute our payment services through our virtual Visa Qiwi Wallet product, which enables consumers to access and make payments through their computers or mobile devices. While at an early stage, we have also begun to expand our operations into Moldova, Romania, Belarus, Brazil and the United States.

We run our network and process our transactions using a proprietary, advanced technology platform that leverages the latest virtualization, analytics and security technologies to create a fast, highly reliable, secure and redundant system. We believe that the breadth and reach of our network, along with the proprietary nature of our technology platform, differentiate us from our competitors and allow us to effectively manage and update our services and realize significant operating leverage with growth in volumes.

Our Revenue Model

We have two principal operating segments: Qiwi Distribution, which primarily generates revenue from our payment systems offered through our kiosks and terminals, and Visa Qiwi Wallet, which generates revenue from payments processed through virtual electronic accounts and bank prepaid products, including our prepaid card business. Our primary source of revenue in each of these segments is fees we receive for processing payments made by consumers to merchants, which we refer to as payment processing fees, based on a percentage of the value of the transactions that we process, which we refer to as payment volume. We refer to payment processing fees that are paid to us by merchants for collecting payments on their behalf as merchant fees, and to payment processing fees that are paid by our consumers and transmitted to us by our agents (in case of Qiwi Distribution) or paid by our consumers directly to us (in case of Visa Qiwi Wallet) as consumer fees. We typically pass on a portion of the merchant fees to our agents. We generate additional revenue from advertising and other high margin non-payment services.

For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our revenue was RUB 6,158 million, RUB 8,158 million and RUB 8,911 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our adjusted net revenue was RUB 2,799 million, RUB 3,254 million and RUB 4,169 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our net profit from continuing operations was RUB 617 million, RUB 586 million and RUB 1,048 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our adjusted net profit was RUB 768 million, RUB 721 million and RUB 1,306 million, respectively. See “Summary Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for how we define and calculate adjusted net revenue and adjusted net profit as non-IFRS financial measures and reconciliations of these measures to revenue and net profit, respectively.

Our Services

Our Qiwi Distribution segment comprises approximately 120,000 kiosks and 49,000 terminals that we operate through a proprietary payment processing platform. In cash-dominated economies with significant under-penetration of banking and online payment services, our platform serves as a link between merchants and consumers. Each of our kiosks is effectively a retail outlet that offers products and services from over 40,000 merchants and allows consumers to use cash, or a Visa Qiwi Wallet account, to make online purchases and payments. For example, to make a payment through a kiosk, a consumer selects a particular merchant on the kiosk screen, inserts money into a cash acceptor or enters credentials to access funds in his or her Visa Qiwi Wallet, and confirms that he or she wishes to complete the transaction. Our kiosk software then sends an

 

 

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instruction to our processing system to transmit a corresponding amount to the merchant and confirms that payment has been made. According to Edgar, Dunn & Company, as of November 1, 2012, Qiwi Distribution had the largest number of kiosks in Russia based on the total number of kiosks in the market excluding ATMs.

Visa Qiwi Wallet is an online and mobile payment processing and money transfer system that we offer in Russia that allows accountholders to pay for the products and services of over 40,000 merchants, and to perform peer-to-peer money transfers using a virtual wallet, which effectively replaces a physical wallet in the online and mobile environment. With Visa Qiwi Wallet, consumers can create an online account, or a virtual wallet, in which they can store money deposited from cash or funded from a variety of other sources such as a bank account, credit or debit card, direct payroll deposit or money transfer, that can be used to make payments, purchases and peer-to-peer transfers. Currently, any Visa Qiwi Wallet account can be linked to a Visa prepaid card allowing the accountholder to make purchases at any merchant that accepts Visa worldwide. According to Edgar, Dunn & Company, Visa Qiwi Wallet is one of the leading virtual wallet providers in Russia based on the number of active users in 2011. Prior to November 2012, Visa Qiwi Wallet was branded as Qiwi Wallet. Throughout this prospectus, we refer to our online and mobile payment processing and money transfer business as Qiwi Wallet for historical information prior to November 2012, and as Visa Qiwi Wallet for information following November 2012.

Competitive Strengths

We believe that our combination of a proprietary network and integrated technology platform, a comprehensive suite of differentiated products and services, extensive retail distribution capabilities and a leading brand identity help differentiate us from our competitors and create significant barriers to entry. Our strengths include:

 

   

Market Leadership in Next-Generation Payment Services. We are a pioneer in the large and fast-growing market for next-generation payment services and hold a leading market position in Russia and Kazakhstan, which we have established through our broad retail distribution, large agent and customer base and significant payment volume processed.

 

   

Comprehensive Suite of Differentiated Payment Services. We enable our users to make payments to a large and diversified group of over 40,000 merchants in multiple environments. The breadth of our payment services provides significant convenience to our consumers and utility to our merchants.

 

   

Advanced, Proprietary Technology Platform. We have designed and built an advanced, proprietary technology platform that is versatile and highly scalable, which enables us to connect consumers and merchants seamlessly across our network and provide differentiated capabilities, such as cloud based push payments and targeted marketing services.

 

   

Integrated Physical and Virtual Payment Capabilities. Our large network of over 169,000 kiosks and terminals, and over 11 million virtual wallets and mobile devices, allows us to seamlessly provide complementary payment services in both physical and virtual environments, allowing consumers to pay for goods and services across brick and mortar or online environments interchangeably.

 

   

Agent Model and Diverse Distribution Channels. We have built our extensive physical distribution using a proprietary agent model and a virtual network through online channels; the combination of these integrated physical and virtual distribution capabilities is difficult to replicate and represents a significant competitive advantage and barrier to entry for potential competitors.

 

   

Powerful Media and Targeted Marketing Services. We are an innovator in using our kiosks and virtual wallet as a powerful advertising medium and a rich source of user transaction data that are valuable to merchants looking to increase loyalty and influence buying decisions at customer touch points.

 

 

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Strong Compliance and Security Infrastructure. We have built a strong regulatory compliance and security infrastructure that enables us to adapt to legislative and regulatory changes in the emerging markets that we operate in, and is trusted by our consumers, merchants, agents and partners.

Our Growth Strategies

We plan to grow our business by continuing to execute on the following key strategies:

 

   

Increasing the Number of Network Participants. We intend to grow our business by expanding the number of participants in our network and increasing the utilization of our payment services. We intend to do this by enhancing the value of our core payment services, adding new payment services, adding new merchants and introducing new value added services.

 

   

Leverage Scale in Physical Distribution to Expand Adoption and Use of Virtual Services. We intend to leverage our large, active base of consumers that use our kiosks and terminals to drive the adoption and usage of our other payment offerings, such as our virtual Visa Qiwi Wallet and companion Visa prepaid cards.

 

   

Expand Portfolio of Higher Yielding Products and Services. We intend to leverage our existing infrastructure to introduce new, value added, high-margin products and services to address evolving customer demands, to provide cross-selling opportunities and to expand existing value added services, such as targeted marketing and remote banking.

 

   

Enter into New Geographies. We plan to expand our operations into other countries by investing directly in markets where we can leverage our operational experience, franchising our operations, or licensing our technology to selected payment service providers and networks.

 

   

Transition Visa Qiwi Wallet to Multi-Bank Open Model in Russia and Expand Internationally. We intend to make Visa Qiwi Wallet a global online and mobile payment processing and money transfer system through which any Visa member bank will be able to offer a Visa Qiwi Wallet account to its customers.

Risk Factors

Investing in our ADSs involves risks. You should carefully consider the risks described in “Risk Factors” before making a decision to invest in our ADSs. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations would likely be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our ADSs would likely decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. The following is a summary of some of the principal risks we face:

 

   

The payment services industry is highly competitive, and we have a number of competitors that are larger and have greater financial resources;

 

   

We have experienced a decline in our average net revenue yield and our continued growth will depend on being able to continue to increase our payment volume and to introduce new fees and value added services.

 

   

We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from a few large merchants, in particular Russia’s three biggest mobile network operators;

 

   

We do not control the rates of the fees levied by our agents on consumers;

 

   

Our independent public registered accounting firm identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting during our 2011 audit, and we can provide no assurance that additional material weaknesses will not be identified in the future;

 

 

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If consumer confidence in our business deteriorates, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected;

 

   

A decline in the use of cash as a means of payment may result in a decline in the use of our kiosks and terminals;

 

   

We may not be able to expand into new geographical markets, which could limit our ability to grow and increase our profitability;

 

   

We are subject to extensive government regulation; and

 

   

We are subject to economic risk and business cycles of our merchants and agents and the overall level of consumer spending.

In addition, we expect to face risks and uncertainties related to our corporate structure and doing business in Russia and other emerging markets, including:

 

   

Our dual share capital structure, combined with the concentration of voting power, will result in substantial control over us by our class A shareholders, including our founding shareholders as well as Palmway Holdings Limited, Mail.ru Group Limited and Mitsui & Co., Ltd., and will limit your ability to influence corporate matters;

 

   

You will have limited rights in relation to the appointment of our directors, including our independent directors;

 

   

The rights of our shareholders are governed by Cyprus law and our articles of association, and differ in some important respects from the typical rights of shareholders under U.S. state laws;

 

   

Some of our corporate actions require either a simple majority or a 75% shareholder vote, and following this offering, one of our founding shareholders, Saldivar Investments Limited, will alone control in excess of 25% of the voting power of our company and together with other founding shareholders will control in excess of 50% of the voting power of our company;

 

   

Our class A shareholders may have interests and positions that could present potential conflicts with our interests;

 

   

Emerging markets, such as Russia and Kazakhstan, are subject to greater risks than more developed markets, including significant legal, economic and political risks;

 

   

Political and governmental instability could adversely affect the value of investments in Russia; and

 

   

The reversal of reform policies or the implementation of government policies in Russia targeted at specific individuals or companies could harm our business as well as investments in Russia more generally.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

As a company with less than U.S.$1.0 billion in revenue during our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” pursuant to the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. An emerging growth company may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other burdens that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of the emerging growth company’s internal control over financial reporting. The JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company need not comply with any new or revised financial accounting standard until such date that a non-reporting company is required to comply with such new or revised accounting standard. However, we have irrevocably elected not to avail ourselves of this

 

 

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exemption. Furthermore, we are not required to present selected financial information or any management’s discussion herein for any period prior to the earliest audited period presented in connection with this prospectus.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of (1) the last day of our fiscal year during which we have total annual gross revenues of at least U.S.$1.0 billion; (2) the last day of our fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering; (3) the date on which we have, during the previous 3-year period, issued more than U.S.$1.0 billion in non-convertible debt; or (4) the date on which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act. When we are no longer deemed to be an emerging growth company, we will not be entitled to the exemptions provided in the JOBS Act discussed above. If we choose to take advantage of any of these reduced reporting burdens, the information that we provide shareholders may be different than you might get from other public companies.

Admission to Trading in Russia

We intend to file an application for the admission of the ADSs to trading on Closed Joint Stock Company “MICEX Stock Exchange,” or MICEX that, if approved, is expected to take place at the earliest on the date of the listing of the ADSs on Nasdaq contemplated in connection with the offering.

For the purposes of the admission to trading on MICEX, this prospectus will be translated into Russian. Therefore, this prospectus prepared in the English language does not constitute an offer of, or the solicitation of an offer to buy ADSs to any resident of the Russian Federation. The Russian public offering, if made, will be made pursuant to Federal Law No. 39-FZ “On Securities Market” dated 22 April 1996, as amended, Order of the Federal Service for Financial Markets No. 10-78/pz-n “On Approval of Regulations on Organised Trading Activity on the Securities Market” dated 28 December 2010, as amended, and listing rules of MICEX registered with the FSFM on 14 February 2013.

Given that the relevant Russian rules governing admission to trading of securities of foreign issuers on Russian stock exchanges, including inclusion of such securities into quotation lists, are relatively new and largely untested in practice, we cannot assure you that our application to MICEX for the admission of the ADSs to trading or the inclusion of the ADSs into a quotation list will be approved, or that the trading of the ADSs will commence, or, even if commenced, that we will be able to maintain such admission to trading or inclusion into the quotation list.

Preliminary First Quarter Results

Although our consolidated financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2013 are not yet available, we believe that the preliminary operating segment data presented below provides an understanding of the trends that we experienced during this quarter. The following expectations regarding our results for this period are solely management estimates based on currently available information. The payment volume information presented below is not final because we are still in the process of verifying our internally collected data through the review of transaction data from third parties, including from agents, merchants and banks. The financial information relating to segment net revenue and segment profit before tax presented below is not final because we are still in the process of closing our accounts. We are unable to determine what the impact of various items subject to management judgment, such as the impact of impairment testing of investments in associates and allowance for doubtful accounts, will be on such financial information. Our independent registered public accounting firm has not audited, reviewed or performed any procedures with respect to these preliminary financial data and, accordingly, does not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect to these data.

We only disclose herein ranges for our preliminary operating segment results. Certain information that will appear in our financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2013, including our revenue, cost of

 

 

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revenue, profit from operations and net profit, is not presented herein and is necessary for readers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of our financial position and results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2013. As a result, readers should not place undue weight on the preliminary operating segment data presented below.

Based on preliminary operating segment results for the first quarter that have been reviewed by management, we expect that for the three months ended March 31, 2013:

 

   

payment volume in Qiwi Distribution will be between RUB 116 billion and RUB 117.5 billion;

 

   

payment volume in Qiwi Wallet will be between RUB 53 billion and RUB 54 billion;

 

   

direct segment costs will be between RUB 1,230 million and RUB 1,300 million;

 

   

segment net revenue will be between RUB 1,220 million and RUB 1,290 million;

 

   

depreciation and amortization will be between RUB 18 million and RUB 21 million;

 

   

segment profit before tax will be between RUB 430 million and RUB 620 million.

Although we are unable at this time to provide any additional estimates with respect to our financial position, we have not identified any unusual or unique events or trends that occurred during the three months ended March 31, 2013 which might materially affect our results of operations.

Payment volume

We expect payment volume in Qiwi Distribution for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 116 billion and RUB 117.5 billion, an increase of between 13% and 14% from RUB 103 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2012. We expect payment volumes in Qiwi Wallet of between RUB 53 billion and RUB 54 billion, an increase of between 104% and 108% from RUB 26 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2012. The increase in payment volumes in Qiwi Wallet resulted from two major factors, the effects of which on Qiwi Wallet volume were approximately equal: the continued increase in the number of active users and the increase in the average volume per Qiwi Wallet account. The increase in payment volume in Qiwi Distribution was primarily driven by an increase in Visa Qiwi Wallet users reloading their wallets through the Qiwi Distribution network.

Segment net revenue

We expect our segment net revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 1,220 million and RUB 1,290 million, an increase of between 44% and 52% from our segment net revenue of RUB 847 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payment volume and an increase in value added services in Qiwi Distribution.

Segment net revenue is the total net revenue of our reportable segments and is presented for historical periods in note 9 of our financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Segment net revenue differs from adjusted net revenue as presented in this prospectus as it is derived from subtracting direct segment costs form segment revenue and reflects immaterial differences related to the timing of expense recognition. Please refer to note 9 of our financial statements and “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures—Adjusted Net Revenue.”

Segment profit before tax

We expect our segment profit before tax for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 430 million and RUB 620 million, an increase of 93% to 178% from our segment profit before tax of RUB

 

 

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223 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012. This increase was primarily due to the continuing impact of scale on our operations as the growth of our segment net revenue continued to outpace the growth of our expenses.

Segment profit before tax is the total profit before tax of our reportable segments and is presented in note 9 to our financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Segment profit before tax differs from adjusted net profit as presented in this prospectus as it does not reflect, among other things, income taxes and effects of software development cost not capitalized in segment presentation, and gains / (losses) on loans issued at rates different than market rates and reflects immaterial differences related to the timing of expense recognition. Segment profit before tax differs from net income as it excludes income tax, amortization of fair value adjustments to intangible assets recorded on acquisitions and related impairments, corporate costs allocated to discontinued international operations, the effects of software development cost not capitalized in segment presentation, offering expenses, share-based payments, gain / (loss) on loans issued at rates different than market rates, gains / (losses) from discontinued operations and other immaterial items. The aggregate results of the above listed items may have a material impact on the difference between segment profit before tax and net income. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, the aggregate difference between segment profit before tax and consolidated net income was RUB 254 million, RUB 628 million, and RUB 897 million, respectively. Please refer to note 9 of our financial statements and “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures—Adjusted Net Profit.”

The foregoing preliminary first quarter results constitute forward looking statements and our actual results may differ from these expectations. Our estimates of payment volumes, segment net revenue and segment profit before tax for the three months ended March 31, 2013 are subject to completion of our interim financial statements for this period and may change as a result of, among other things, closing adjustments, finalization of fair value estimates and impairment tests or continuing monitoring of the event after the balance sheet date. Please refer to the section entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in this prospectus for additional information.

Our Principal Shareholders

Following the completion of this offering, our officers and directors will beneficially own in the aggregate 47.1% of our total issued share capital and 58.9% of the voting power of our issued share capital. In addition, our shareholders, Mail.ru Group Ltd., or Mail.ru, and Mitsui & Co. Ltd, or Mitsui, will beneficially own, respectively, 16.3% and 11.5% of our total issued share capital and 20.6% and 14.5% of the voting power of our issued share capital. See “Principal and Selling Shareholders” for information regarding beneficial share ownership and voting power of each of our shareholders.

Corporate Information

We were incorporated in Cyprus under the name of OE Investments Limited on February 26, 2007 as a new holding company for CJSC Unified Instant Payments System, or OSMP, which was established in 2004. In 2007, we acquired, among other entities, CJSC e-port and LLC Qiwi Wallet (now QIWI International Payment Services (QIPS) LLC) in exchange for newly issued shares, which represented 35% of our outstanding share capital following the acquisitions. In April 2008, we launched the Qiwi brand, which gradually became the marketing name for our businesses. We changed our name to Qiwi Limited on September 13, 2010, and subsequently to Qiwi plc upon converting to a public limited company on February 25, 2013.

Our primary subsidiaries are CJSC Qiwi Bank, or Qiwi Bank, QIPS LLC and OSMP. We acquired Qiwi Bank in September from a group of our shareholders. QIPS LLC was incorporated in Russia in December 2006,

 

 

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and OSMP was incorporated in Russia in January 2004. Qiwi Bank and QIPS LLC are the primary operating subsidiaries for our Visa Qiwi Wallet business. OSMP is the primary operating subsidiary for our Qiwi Distribution business.

Our principal executive offices are located at Varshavskoe Highway 125, Building 18A, Moscow, 117587, the Russian Federation. Our telephone number at this address is +7 (495) 783 59 59. Our registered office in Cyprus is located at 12-14 Kennedy Ave., Kennedy Business Centre, 2nd Floor, Office 203, 1087, Nicosia, Cyprus. Our telephone number at this address is +357-22-653390. We also have offices in several major cities in Russia and Kazakhstan. Our agent for service of process is Law Debenture Corporate Services Inc.

 

 

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THE OFFERING

 

Public offering price   We currently expect that the initial public offering price will be between U.S.$16.00 and U.S.$18.00 per ADS.
ADSs offered by us   We are not selling any ADSs in this offering.
ADSs offered by the selling shareholders   12,000,000 ADSs.
The ADSs   Each ADS represents one class B share. The depositary will hold the class B shares underlying your ADSs and you will have rights as provided in the deposit agreement. You may turn in your ADSs to the depositary in exchange for class B shares. The depositary will charge you fees for any exchange. We may amend or terminate the deposit agreement without your consent. If you continue to hold your ADSs, you agree to be bound by the deposit agreement. To better understand the terms of the ADSs, you should carefully read the “Description of American Depositary Shares” section of this prospectus. You should also read the deposit agreement, which is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement that includes this prospectus.
ADSs outstanding immediately after this offering   12,000,000 ADSs
Ordinary shares outstanding immediately after this offering  

 

52,000,000 ordinary shares comprised of (i) 40,000,000 class A shares, and (ii) 12,000,000 class B shares.

Over-allotment option   The selling shareholders have granted the underwriters the right to purchase up to an additional 1,800,000 ADSs within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.
Ordinary shares   Holders of class A shares and class B shares have the same rights, including dividend rights, except for voting and conversion rights. In respect of matters requiring shareholder approval, each class B share is entitled to one vote and each class A share is entitled to ten votes. Each class A share is convertible into one class B share at any time by the holder thereof. Class B shares are not convertible into class A shares under any circumstance. Class A shares will automatically convert into the same number of class B shares under certain circumstances including when the aggregate number of class A shares constitutes less than 10% of the aggregate number of class A and class B shares outstanding. For a description of class A shares and class B shares, see “Description of Share Capital.”
Depositary   The Bank of New York Mellon
Use of proceeds   The selling shareholders will receive all of the net proceeds from the sale of the ADSs offered hereby.

 

 

 

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Dividend policy

  

We have historically paid dividends and, while we have not adopted a formal dividend policy, we currently expect that we will continue to do so from time to time in the future. Any future determination regarding the payment of a dividend will depend on a range of factors, including the availability of distributable profits, our liquidity and financial position, our future growth initiatives and strategic plans, including possible acquisitions, restrictions imposed by our financing arrangements, tax considerations and other relevant factors. If we declare dividends on our ordinary shares, the depositary will pay you the cash dividend and other distributions it receives on our ordinary shares, after deducting its fees and expenses.

 

In connection with our results of operations for the first quarter of 2013 and consistent with past practice, we expect to pay a dividend during the period following the closing of this offering, the exact amount and date of which will be determined by our board of directors.

Listing

   Our ADSs have been approved for listing on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “QIWI.” We also intend to file an application for the admission of the ADSs to trading on MICEX that, if approved, is expected to take place at the earliest on the date of the listing of the ADSs on Nasdaq.

Lock-up

   We, each of our directors and officers, and all of our existing shareholders have agreed with the underwriters, subject to certain exceptions, not to sell, transfer or dispose of any ADSs, ordinary shares or similar securities for a period of 180 days after the date of this prospectus. In addition, we have instructed the Bank of New York Mellon, as depositary, not to accept any deposit of ordinary shares or issue any ADSs for 180 days after the date of this prospectus (other than in connection with this offering and certain other exceptions), unless we otherwise instruct the depositary with the prior written consent of the representatives of the underwriters. See “Underwriting.”

We base the number of class A and class B shares outstanding after this offering on 40,000,000 class A shares outstanding as of the date of this prospectus and 12,000,000 class B shares outstanding as of the date of this prospectus, which amount excludes 3,640,000 class B shares reserved for future issuance under our employee stock option plan.

Unless otherwise indicated, the information in this prospectus assumes:

 

   

no exercise of underwriters’ over-allotment option to purchase additional ADSs from the selling shareholders; and

 

   

an initial public offering price of U.S.$17.00 per ADS, the midpoint of the estimated initial public offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus.

 

 

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Summary Consolidated Financial Data

The following tables set forth our summary consolidated financial and other data. You should read the following summary consolidated financial and other data together with the information in “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Risk Factors,” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. Historical results are not indicative of the results to be expected in the future. Our financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, or IFRS, as published by the International Accounting Standards Board, or the IASB.

The following tables also contain translations of ruble amounts into U.S. dollars for amounts presented as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012. These translations are solely for convenience of the reader and were calculated at the rate of RUB 30.37 per U.S.$1.00, which equals to official exchange rate quoted by the CBR on December 31, 2012.

The summary consolidated financial data as of and for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements for those periods, which are included in this prospectus.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions, except per share data)  

Consolidated Income Statement Data:

  

Revenue

     6,158        8,158        8,911        293   

Cost of revenue

     (3,751     (5,573     (5,454     (180

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (1,420     (1,543     (1,838     (60

Depreciation and amortization

     (171     (141     (129     (4

Impairment of intangible assets

                   (4       

Profit from operations

     816        901        1,486        49   

Gain on bargain purchase

            15            

Gain/(loss) from disposal of subsidiaries

     7        7        (1       

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

     9                        

Other income

     21        10        17        1   

Other expenses

     (34     (73     (29     (1

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

            (12     (21     (1

Share of loss of associates

            (23     (13     (1

Interest income

     5        6        26        1   

Interest expense

     (3     (4     (9       

Profit before tax from continuing operations

     821        827        1,456        48   

Income tax expense

     (204     (241     (408     (13

Net profit from continuing operations

     617        586        1,048        35   

Gain (loss) from discontinued operations

     138        (156     (240     (8

Net profit

     755        430        808        27   

Attributable to:

        

Equity holders of the parent

     693        520        910        30   

Non-controlling interests

     62        (90     (102     (3

Weighted average number of shares

        

Basic

     52        52        52        n/a   

Diluted

     52        52        52        n/a   

Earnings per share

        

Basic

     13.33        10.00        17.50        0.57   

Diluted

     13.17        10.00        17.50        0.57   

Dividends declared per share

        

RUB

     7.19        8.01        16.67        n/a   

U.S.$

     0.24        0.26        0.55        n/a   

 

 

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     As of December 31,  
     2010      2011      2012  
     RUB      RUB      RUB      U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

           

Cash and cash equivalents

     6,892         8,810         9,943         327   

Total current assets

     10,410         12,112         15,607         514   

Total assets

     13,516         15,306         18,709         616   

Total equity

     2,348         2,355         2,499         82   

Total debt

     67         190         65         2   

Total liabilities

     11,168         12,951         16,210         534   

Total equity and liabilities

     13,516         15,306         18,709         616   

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions, except as otherwise indicated)  

Other Financial and Operating Data:

        

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Distribution(1)

     2,476        2,494        2,845        93   

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Wallet(1)

     296        690        1,241        40   

Other(1)(2)

     27        70        83        3   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted net revenue(3)

     2,799        3,254        4,169        136   

Adjusted EBITDA(3)

     1,067        1,183        1,851        61   

Adjusted net profit(3)

     768        721        1,306        43   

Qiwi Distribution

        

Active kiosks and terminals (units)(4)

     158,867        170,384        169,102        n/a   

Payment volume

     360,683        408,254        464,806        15,303   

Average net revenue yield(5)

     0.69     0.61     0.61     n/a   

Qiwi Wallet

        

Active Qiwi Wallet accounts (number at period end)(6)

     5,979,057        8,147,376        11,425,813        n/a   

Payment volume

     26,669        65,409        151,508        4,988   

Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account(7)

     4,460        8,028        13,260        431   

Average net revenue yield(5)

     1.11     1.05     0.82     n/a   

 

 

(1) See note 9 of our annual consolidated financial statements.
(2) Other includes our corporate and other segment, intercompany eliminations, and timing of expense recognition.
(3) See “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for how we define and calculate adjusted net revenue, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted net profit as non-IFRS financial measures and reconciliations of these measures to revenue, in the case of adjusted net revenue, and net profit, in the case of adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit.
(4) We measure the numbers of our kiosks and terminals on a daily basis, with only those kiosks and terminals being taken into calculation through which at least one payment has been processed during the day, which we refer to as active kiosks and terminals. The period end numbers of our kiosks and terminals are calculated as an average of the amount of active kiosks and terminals for the last 30 days of the respective reporting period.
(5) Average net revenue yield is defined as segment net revenue divided by total payment volume per segment.
(6) Number of active Qiwi Wallet accounts is defined as the number of wallets through which at least one payment has been made or that have been loaded or reloaded in the 12 months preceding the end of the relevant reporting period.
(7) Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account is defined as total payment volumes in our Qiwi Wallet segment divided by the number of active wallets at the end of the relevant reporting period.

Non-IFRS Financial Measures

We present adjusted net revenue, adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit, each of which are non-IFRS financial measures. You should not consider these non-IFRS financial measures as substitutes for or superior to revenue, in the case of adjusted net revenue, or net profit, in the case of adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit,

 

 

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each prepared in accordance with IFRS. Furthermore, because these non-IFRS financial measures are not determined in accordance with IFRS, they are susceptible to varying calculations and may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures presented by other companies. We encourage investors and others to review our financial information in its entirety and not rely on a single financial measure.

Adjusted net revenue

Adjusted net revenue is calculated by subtracting cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) from revenue and adding back payroll and related taxes. Adjusted net revenue is a key measure used by management to observe our operational profitability since it reflects our portion of the revenue net of fees that we pass through primarily to our agents. In addition, under IFRS, consumer fees are recorded as net revenue whereas merchant fees are recorded as gross revenue. Therefore, in order to analyze our two sources of payment processing fees on a comparative basis, management reviews adjusted net revenue in addition to gross revenue. We add back payroll and related taxes because, although they are an essential part of our distribution network, these expenses are not directly linked to payment volume. Nevertheless, payroll and related taxes represent an important portion of our operating costs and affect liquidity and financial performance.

The following table reconciles adjusted net revenue to revenue.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Revenue

     6,158        8,158        8,911        293   

Minus: Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (3,751     (5,573     (5,454     (180

Plus: Payroll and related taxes

     392        669        712        23   

Adjusted net revenue

     2,799        3,254        4,169        136   

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is defined as net profit before income tax expense, interest expense, interest income and depreciation and amortization, as further adjusted for (loss) gain from discontinued operations, share of loss of an associate, foreign exchange (loss) gain, net, change in fair value of derivative financial assets, other expenses, other income, gain from disposal of subsidiaries, corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations and gain from bargain purchase. We present adjusted EBITDA as a supplemental performance measure because we believe that it facilitates operating performance comparisons from period to period and company to company by backing out potential differences caused by variations in capital structures (affecting interest expenses, net), changes in foreign exchange rates that impact financial asset and liabilities denominated in currencies other than our functional currency (affecting foreign exchange (loss) gain, net), tax positions (such as the impact on periods or companies of changes in effective tax rates), reversal of impairments (affecting other income), the age and book depreciation of fixed assets (affecting relative depreciation expense), non-cash charges (affecting share-based payments expenses), and certain one-time expenses (affecting offering expenses). Adjusted EBITDA also excludes other expenses and share in losses of associates because we believe it is helpful to view the performance of our business excluding the impact of entities that we do not control, and because our share of the net income (loss) of associates and other expenses includes items that have other been excluded from adjusted EBITDA (such as finance expenses, net, tax on income and depreciation and amortization). In addition, adjusted EBITDA excludes the non-cash impact of changes in the fair value of derivate financial assets and of discontinued operations that we do not believe reflect the underlying performance of our business. Because adjusted EBITDA facilitates internal comparisons of operating performance on a more consistent basis, we also use adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net income in measuring our performance relative to that of our competitors.

 

 

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Some limitations of adjusted EBITDA are:

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not reflect income tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us;

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not include other income, other expense and foreign exchange gains and losses;

 

   

adjusted EBITDA excludes depreciation and amortization and although these are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future; and

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not include gains and losses from discontinued operations.

The following table reconciles adjusted EBITDA to net profit.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Net Profit

     755        430        808        27   

plus:

        

Depreciation and amortization

     171        141        129        4   

Gain on bargain purchase

            (15              

Gains on disposals

     (7     (7     1          

Other income

     (21     (10     (17     (1

Other expenses

     34        73        29        1   

Change in fair value of derivative financial instruments

     (9                     

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

            12        21        1   

Share of loss of associates

            23        13        1   

Interest income

     (5     (6     (26     (1

Interest expenses

     3        4        9          

Income tax expenses

     204        241        408        13   

Corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations

     80        141        61        2   

Offering expenses

                   109        4   

Share-based payments expenses

                   66        2   

Gain/ (loss) from discontinued operations

     (138     156        240        8   

Adjusted EBITDA

     1,067        1,183        1,851        61   

Adjusted net profit

Adjusted net profit is defined as net profit excluding loss on discontinued operations (net of tax), corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, amortization of fair value adjustments, gain on bargain purchase, gains on disposals, and the effects of deferred taxation on those excluded items. Adjusted net profit is a key measure used by management to observe the operational profitability of the company. We believe adjusted net profit is useful to an investor in evaluating our operating performance because it is widely used by investors, securities analysts and other interested parties to measure a company’s operating performance without the effect of non-recurring items or items that are not core to our operations. For example, loss on discontinued operations, corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, gain on bargain purchase, gains on disposals, the effects of deferred taxation on excluded items and offering expenses do not represent the core operations of the business, and amortization of fair value adjustments and share-based payments expenses do not have a substantial cash effect. Nevertheless, such gains and losses can affect our financial performance.

 

 

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The following table reconciles adjusted net profit to net profit.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Net profit

     755        430        808        27   

Gain/(loss) from discontinued operations

     (138     156        240        8   

Corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations

     80        141        61        2   

Amortization of fair value adjustments

     118        51        42        1   

Gain on bargain purchase

            (15              

Gains on disposals

     (7     (7     1          

Offering expenses

                   109        4   

Share-based payments expenses

                   66        2   

Effect of deferred taxation of the above items

     (40     (35     (21     (1

Adjusted net profit

     768        721        1,306        43   

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in the ADSs offered by this prospectus involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below with all of the other information included in this prospectus before making a decision whether to invest in the ADSs. If any of the following risks actually occurs, it may materially harm our business, results of operations or financial condition. In this event, the market price of the ADSs could decline and you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

The payment services industry is highly competitive, and we have a number of competitors that are larger and have greater financial resources.

The payment services industry is highly competitive, and our continued growth depends on our ability to compete effectively. In the countries in which we operate, we face competition from a variety of financial and non-financial business groups. These competitors include retail banks, non-traditional payment service providers (such as retailers and MNOs), traditional kiosk and terminal operators and electronic payment system operators, as well as other companies which provide various forms of payment services, including electronic payment and payment processing services. Competitors in our industry seek to differentiate themselves by features and functionalities such as speed, convenience, network size, accessibility, hours of operation, reliability and price. A significant number of our competitors have greater financial, technological and marketing resources than we have, operate robust networks and are highly regarded by consumers.

In Russia, we face significant competition from major retail banks for our services, including those provided by both our Qiwi Distribution and Visa Qiwi Wallet businesses. Our primary competitors include Sberbank, Russia’s largest retail bank that is majority-owned by the Russian state, and Alfa-Bank, one of the leading privately owned Russian retail banks, both of which have electronic banking systems and large retail networks. Some retail banks are currently developing their own networks of kiosks and terminals and various electronic payment products. Sberbank, for example, has stated that its strategic goals include the promotion of alternative banking channels, such as kiosks, internet banking and mobile banking, and has recently acquired a majority stake in Yandex.Money, a major electronic payment system operator in Russia, to further develop its online payment services capabilities. Sberbank has access to significant financial resources and an extensive nationwide network of branches that can serve as a platform for the expansion of its kiosk business. Sberbank is the largest processor of utility bill payments, which constitute a very significant portion of overall consumer spending in our industry. These factors may give Sberbank a substantial competitive advantage over us if it pursues its strategy of establishing a broad kiosk network, internet banking and mobile banking businesses.

Our competitors also include the Russian Federal State Unitary Enterprise Postal Service, or Russian Post, which offers certain payment services. Russian Post’s geographical penetration is more dispersed than our Qiwi Distribution network. As a state-sponsored institution, we believe that it is able to provide payment services at significantly lower prices than we are able to match profitably. If any of our competitors with a broad network of branches, including Sberbank, Alfa-Bank or Russian Post, were to establish or actively pursue a kiosk and terminal business, we would lose many of our consumers and the margins in our Qiwi Distribution business could be harmed. We also face competition from non-traditional payment service providers that have substantial financial resources, such as major telecommunication and media devices retailers, including Euroset and Svyaznoy, as well as MNOs, in particular the Russian “Big Three” MNOs, MegaFon, VimpelCom and MTS. We also compete against some directly comparable businesses, such as traditional kiosk and terminal operators, including OJSC Cyberplat, and OJSC Elecsnet, and electronic payment system operators (primarily Yandex.Money and WebMoney). Sberbank’s recent acquisition of a majority interest in Yandex.Money may provide substantial benefits for both parties and increase their combined market share. New competitors may penetrate the Russian electronic payment market as well, including established international players such as PayPal, Western Union and Moneygram. In March 2013, eBay Inc. announced that its subsidiary PayPal applied

 

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for a Non-Banking Credit Institution license from the CBR in order to conduct business in Russia. Additionally, some of our competitors are currently our major merchants (the Big Three MNOs) or our agents (for example, Svyaznoy), and are responsible for a substantial amount of our business. If we are unable to compete successfully for consumers, agents and merchants, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

We have experienced a decline in our average net revenue yield and our continued growth will depend on being able to continue to increase our payment volume and to introduce new fees and value added services.

One of the key measures we use to assess our financial performance is our average net revenue yield, which we calculate by dividing segment net revenue by the total size, or payment volume, of the transactions we process on a per segment basis. Our average net revenue yield has declined in our Qiwi Wallet operating segment and in our Qiwi Distribution operating segment over the three-year period ended December 31, 2012. The decline in our average net revenue yields has been driven by a decline in merchant fees from our larger retail merchants, in particular the Big Three MNOs, who are seeking to reduce costs. Additionally, in our Qiwi Wallet segment, the decline in average net revenue yield over the three-year period ended December 31, 2012 has been driven by increased costs that we bear when Qiwi Wallet consumers reload their wallets. In response to the decline in merchant fees we introduced consumer fees that are collected by our agents. The shift from merchant-paid processing fees to consumer-paid processing fees, however, presents us with a number of challenges. Since consumers, and not merchants, increasingly bear additional cost of using our network, we must continue to ensure that our payment processing system provides a more convenient and attractive option than alternative systems that may not require payment by the consumer of a processing fee. Retail banks and various payment service providers are constantly developing low to zero-commission payment channels for their consumers. To attract consumers, we also offer certain services on a commission-free basis, such as peer-to-peer transfers within Visa Qiwi Wallet. Despite our efforts, consumers may still choose to use other payment systems, even if those systems do not offer the convenience that we do, because they charge lower fees. In addition, because agents are able to switch between different payment processing systems, we may face additional pressure to reduce the fees we receive from consumers due to increased competition from other payment service providers. We may not be able to continue to offset the decline in merchant fees or maintain current levels of profitability by introducing new consumer fees or increasing existing fees. As a result, in order to continue to stabilize our average net revenue yield and drive our profitability, we must increase our payment volume at a rate faster than the decline in average net payment processing fees. Our ability to maintain and grow our profitability also depends in part on the development and enhancement of our services offering through the addition of new value added services, which we view as another means to offset the decline in merchant fees. We cannot assure you that we will be able to increase our payment volumes or that any value added services we introduce will be profitable. Continued decline in our average net revenue yield as a result of these or other factors would cause our financial condition and results of operations to deteriorate.

We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from a few large merchants, in particular the Big Three MNOs.

Our merchant base is significantly concentrated, with the Big Three MNOs, MegaFon, VimpelCom and MTS, which together accounted for 19% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012 and historically accounted for a higher percentage. Our operating results will continue to depend on the Big Three MNOs’ continued use of our services for the foreseeable future. While we believe that we have generally enjoyed good commercial relations with each of these companies, there can be no assurance that the Big Three MNOs will renew their contracts with us on terms as favorable as those we currently have. In addition, the Big Three MNOs may seek to reduce costs by decreasing their dependence on us as a payment acceptance channel and to drive their consumers to other channels that may offer more competitive pricing terms or increased convenience. In particular, the Big Three MNOs promote post-payment tariff plans and payments through automatic withdrawal of funds from a consumer’s bank account when the mobile phone account needs to be reloaded. They are also actively developing their own alternative payment methods, such as mobile banking and acceptance of payments through their retail networks. As

 

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a result of increased bargaining power due to these factors, the Big Three MNOs have been able to negotiate the reduction, and in some cases virtual elimination, of the merchant fees that they pay us, which has resulted in us moving to a consumer fee and value added services driven revenue model. All of these factors could contribute to a deterioration in, or termination of, our relationships with one or all of the Big Three MNOs. If we lose any of our key merchants, including the Big Three MNOs, and are unable to replace this business, or if our current terms of doing business with any of these merchants becomes significantly less favorable, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

We do not control the rates of the fees levied by our agents on consumers.

Our agents pay us an agreed fee using a portion of the fees levied by them on consumers. The fee paid to us by the agent is based on a percentage of the value of each transaction that we process. However, in most cases the amount of fees levied by an agent on a consumer for each particular transaction is determined by such agent at its own discretion. We usually do not cap the amount of such fees or otherwise control it. We believe that the fees set by our agents are market-driven, and that our interests and our agents’ interests are aligned with a view to maintaining fees at a level that would simultaneously result in our agents’ profitability and customer satisfaction. However, we can provide no assurance that our agents will not raise fees to a level that will adversely affect the popularity of our products among consumers. At the same time, if we are forced to cap customer fees to protect the strength of our brand or otherwise, we may lose a significant number of agents, which would reduce the penetration of our Qiwi Distribution network. In limited instances, we have introduced such caps at the request of our merchants. No assurance can be made that this trend will not increase. Material increases in customer fees by our agents or the imposition of caps on the rates of such fees by us could have an adverse effect on the business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our independent public registered accounting firm identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting during our 2011 audit, and we can provide no assurance that additional material weaknesses will not be identified in the future.

Our internal controls relating to preparation of our financial statements have not kept pace with the changes in and increasing scope and volume of our business. Our financial reporting function and system of internal controls is less developed in certain respects than those of payment service providers that operate in more developed markets and may not provide our management with as much or as accurate or timely information. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB, has defined a material weakness as “a significant deficiency, or combination of significant deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim statements will not be prevented or detected.” In connection with their audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011, our independent registered public accounting firm identified a material weakness in our internal controls with respect to our financial statement closing process. The material weakness related primarily to the number of dedicated IFRS-qualified personnel and controls over accounting for non-routine transactions and complex estimates. This material weakness was considered in determining the nature, timing and extent of the procedures performed by our independent registered public accounting firm in their audit of our annual consolidated financial statements, and did not affect the report of our independent registered public accounting firm on our annual consolidated financial statements included herein.

To address the material weakness that our independent registered accountants identified, we developed and implemented a plan that included implementing greater controls over communication, approval and accounting for non-routine transactions and complex estimates, as well as additional management review controls. We also hired an external consultant to advise us on introducing changes to our internal control over financial reporting and to participate in management review of the financial statements and related supporting financial information. In the future, we plan to recruit additional qualified personnel or an external consultant with relevant experience in IFRS accounting, reporting and auditing.

 

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As a result of our efforts we remediated the related material weakness as of December 31, 2012. No other material weaknesses were identified by our independent registered public accounting firm as a result of their audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012. Nevertheless, we can give no assurance that additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting will not be identified in the future. Our failure to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could result in errors in our financial statements that could result in a restatement of our financial statements, cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations and cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which may result in a decline in the market price of our ADSs.

If consumer confidence in our business deteriorates, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our business is built on consumers’ confidence in our brands, as well as our ability to provide fast, reliable payment services, including electronic payment and payment processing services. As a consumer business, the strength of our brand and reputation are of paramount importance to us. A number of factors could adversely affect consumer confidence in our brand, many of which are beyond our control, and could have an adverse impact on our results of operations. These factors include:

 

   

any regulatory action or investigation against us;

 

   

any significant interruption to our systems and operations; and

 

   

any breach of our security system or any compromises of consumer data.

In addition, we are largely dependent on our agents and franchisees to which we license our products to maintain the reputation of our brand. Despite the measures that we put in place to ensure their compliance with our performance standards, our lack of control over their operations may result in the low quality of service of a particular agent or franchisee being attributed to our brand, negatively affecting our overall reputation. Furthermore, negative publicity surrounding any assertion that our agents and/or merchants are implicated in fraudulent transactions, irrespective of the accuracy of such publicity or its connection with our current operations or business, could harm our reputation.

Any event that hurts our brand and reputation among consumers as a reliable payment services provider could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A decline in the use of cash as a means of payment may result in a decline in the use of our kiosks and terminals.

Substantially all of our business is in emerging markets, including Russia and Kazakhstan, where a substantial part of the population relies on cash payments, rather than credit and debit card payments or electronic banking. For example, according to Edgar, Dunn & Company, Russia remains a cash dominated society for retail consumer payments with approximately 94% of the value of these payments exchanged in cash in 2011. We believe that consumers making cash payments are more likely to use our kiosks and terminals than where alternative payment methods are available. As a result, we believe that our profitability depends on the use of cash as a means of payment. There can be no assurance that over time, the prevalence of cash payments will not decline as a greater percentage of the population in emerging markets adopts credit and debit card payments and electronic banking. The shift from cash payments to credit and debit card payments and electronic banking could reduce our market share and payment volumes and may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to expand into new geographical markets, which could limit our ability to grow and increase our profitability.

Our long-term strategy includes entering into new geographical markets. Our expansion into new geographical markets depends on our ability to apply our existing technology or to develop new applications to

 

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meet the particular needs of each new market or country. We may not have adequate financial, technological or personnel and management resources to develop effective and secure services or distribution channels that will satisfy the demands of these new markets. We may not be able to establish partnerships with merchants or to attract agents to invest in new geographical markets. If we fail to enter new markets or countries, we may not be able to continue to grow our revenues and earnings. Furthermore, we may expand into new geographical markets in which we may not have any previous operating experience. We operate in an industry that is often subject to significant regulation, and our lack of familiarity with the regulatory landscape in new markets may result in our running into unanticipated problems or delays in obtaining the requisite regulatory approvals and licenses. We may not be able to successfully expand in such markets due to our lack of experience. In addition, expanding internationally subjects us to a number of risks, including:

 

   

greater difficulty in managing foreign operations;

 

   

expenses associated with localizing our products, including offering consumers the ability to transact in major currencies;

 

   

higher labor costs and problems integrating employees that we hire in different countries into our existing corporate culture;

 

   

laws and business practices that favor local competitors;

 

   

multiple and changing laws, tax regimes and government regulations;

 

   

foreign currency restrictions and exchange rate fluctuations;

 

   

changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic conditions; and

 

   

differing intellectual property laws.

In addition, our global operations expose us to numerous and sometimes conflicting legal and regulatory requirements, and violations or unfavorable interpretation by authorities of these regulations could harm our business. In particular, we are exposed to the risk of being deemed to have permanent establishment in a specific country and transfer pricing risks which could result in additional tax liability.

If we are not able to manage these and multiple other risks associated with global operations successfully, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

We are subject to extensive government regulation.

Our business is impacted by laws and regulations that affect our industry, the number of which has increased significantly in recent years. We are subject to a variety of regulations aimed at preventing money laundering and financing criminal activity and terrorism, financial services regulations, payment services regulations, consumer protection laws, currency control regulations, and privacy and data protection laws. Further, these laws and regulations vary significantly from country to country. Many of these laws and regulations are constantly evolving, and are often unclear and inconsistent with other applicable laws and regulations, including across various jurisdictions, making compliance challenging and increasing our related operating costs and legal risks. In particular, there has been increased public attention and heightened legislation and regulations regarding money laundering and terrorist financing. We sometimes have to make significant judgment calls in applying anti-money laundering legislation and risk being found in non-compliance with it. For example, Russian anti-money laundering legislation prescribes mandatory identification of a client for any transaction that exceeds RUB 15,000. We sometimes process payments made by our consumers from their Visa Qiwi Wallet accounts for an aggregate total amount in excess of that threshold. Such payments are processed by our software as several simultaneous transfers, which allows us to effect them without formal identification of the payer and, accordingly, be in technical compliance with applicable laws. There can be no assurance, however, that such practices will not be expressly prohibited in the future. In January 2013 the head of the Russian drug enforcement agency requested that the Central Bank of Russia and the Ministry of Finance introduce legislation

 

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that would prescribe mandatory identification of a client for any transaction, including those that do not exceed RUB 15,000. Although this regulation has not yet been introduced or implemented, if it does eventually go into effect, it could affect our ability to process such payments in an efficient manner or increase our costs related to such payments. In addition, there can be no assurance that our subsidiary in Kazakhstan will not be deemed subject to regulation under Kazakh banking laws and law on payments and money transfers and, as a result, required to hold a special banking license and perform required financial monitoring of all the effected transactions. If local authorities in Russia, Kazakhstan or other countries choose to enforce specific interpretations of the applicable legislation that differ from ours, we may be found to be in violation and subject to penalties or other liabilities. This could also limit our ability in effecting such payments going forward and may increase our cost of doing business.

In some jurisdictions where we operate, there is currently little or virtually no legislation addressing electronic payments, and no assurance can be made that if such legislation is adopted it will be beneficial to our business. For instance, if a statutory cap is imposed on the fees that can be charged to the consumers using our kiosks and terminals, it could significantly reduce the margins in our Qiwi Distribution business. In November 2012, a proposal was submitted to the Russian State Duma to cap the amount of such fees at 1% for payments not exceeding RUB 1,000. This proposal has not been officially considered yet, but if it eventually becomes law, our Qiwi Distribution business in Russia could experience a decline in revenue. In addition, there is significant uncertainty regarding future legislation on taxation of electronic payments in most of the countries in which we operate, including in respect of the place of taxation. Subsequent legislation and regulation and interpretations thereof, litigation, court rulings, or other events could expose us to increased costs, liability and reputational damage that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to economic risk and business cycles of our merchants and agents and the overall level of consumer spending.

The payment services industry depends heavily on the overall level of consumer spending. We are exposed to general economic conditions that affect consumer confidence, consumer spending, consumer discretionary income or changes in consumer purchasing habits. A reduction in the amount of consumer spending could result in a decrease in our revenue and profits. If our merchants make fewer sales of their products and services using our services or consumers spend less money per transaction, we will have fewer transactions to process at lower amounts, resulting in lower revenue. A further weakening in the economy could have a negative impact on our merchants, as well as consumers who purchase products and services using our payment processing systems, which could, in turn, negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations, particularly if the recessionary environment disproportionately affects some of the market segments that represent a larger portion of our payment processing volume. In addition, a further weakening in the economy could force some of our merchants and/or agents to close or go bankrupt, or could cause our agents to reduce the number of their locations or hours of operation, resulting in future transaction declines. We also have a certain amount of fixed costs, including salaries and rent, which could limit our ability to adjust costs and respond quickly to changes in our business and the economy. Changes in economic conditions could adversely impact our future revenues and profits and cause a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have grown rapidly in recent years and need to implement enhanced compliance processes, procedures and controls with respect to the rules and regulations that apply to our business.

Our business has grown rapidly in recent years and we need to realign our compliance function with the size of our business. In light of the fact that we are a highly regulated business that processes large volumes of payments, we need to implement enhanced processes, procedures and controls in order to provide reasonable assurance that we are operating in compliance with applicable regulatory requirements. In particular, the Russian anti-money laundering laws to which we and Qiwi Bank are subject contain numerous requirements with respect to identification of clients, and documentation and reporting of transactions subject to mandatory control and other suspicious transactions to the relevant authorities.

 

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Following this offering we will also be subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or the FCPA, which prohibits U.S. companies and their intermediaries from bribing foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or keeping business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment, and other laws concerning our international operations. Similar legislation in other jurisdictions contains similar prohibitions, although varying in both scope and jurisdiction. We do not have a fully developed FCPA compliance program and will need to implement such a program, including measures that require our agents to comply with the FCPA.

We have neither an established operating history nor proven management experience in establishing and maintaining, over the long term, the required compliance processes, procedures and controls. Our success requires significant public confidence in our ability to handle large and growing payment volumes and amounts of consumer funds, as well as comply with applicable regulatory requirements. Any failure to manage consumer funds or to comply with applicable regulatory requirements could result in the imposition of fines, harm our reputation and significantly diminish use of our products.

If we cannot keep pace with rapid developments and change in our industry and provide new services to our clients, the use of our services could decline, reducing our revenues.

The payment services industry in which we operate is characterized by rapid technological change, new product and service introductions, evolving industry standards, changing customer needs and the entrance of more established market players seeking to expand into these businesses. In order to remain competitive, we continually seek to expand the services we offer and to develop new projects, including, for example, the development of remote banking and loyalty programs. These projects carry risks, such as delays in delivery, performance problems and lack of customer acceptance. In our industry, these risks are acute. Any delay in the delivery of new services or the failure to differentiate our services or to accurately predict and address market demand could render our services less desirable, or even obsolete, to consumers. In addition, if alternative payment mechanisms become widely available, substituting our current products and services, and we do not develop and offer similar alternative payment mechanisms successfully and on a timely basis, our business and prospects could be adversely affected. Furthermore, we may be unable to recover the costs we have incurred in developing new services. Our development efforts could result in increased costs and we could also experience a loss in business that could reduce our earnings or could cause a loss of revenue if promised new services are not timely delivered to our clients, are not able to compete effectively with our competitors’ or do not perform as anticipated. In order to remain competitive in an innovative industry such as ours, we have to make investments in start-up companies or undertake large research and development initiatives. In January 2013, we launched Qiwi Venture, an internal department of our company responsible for identifying start-ups which offer innovative solutions complementary to our business and making investments into them, with the threshold for such investments initially set at U.S.$1 million per project and no overall maximum for total investments. If our investments in start-up companies or research and development initiatives do not yield the expected results, we may lose money, time and effort invested. If we are unable to develop, adapt to or access technological changes or evolving industry standards on a timely and cost effective basis, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Our systems and our third party providers’ systems may fail due to factors beyond our control, which could interrupt our service, cause us to lose business and increase our costs.

We depend on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of numerous systems, including our computer systems, software and telecommunications networks, as well as the data centers that we lease from third parties. Our systems and operations, or those of our third party providers, could be exposed to damage or interruption from, among other things, fire, flood, natural disaster, power loss, telecommunications failure, vendor failure, unauthorized entry, improper operation and computer viruses. In addition, because both of our data centers used for processing payments are located in the city of Moscow, a catastrophic event affecting the city of Moscow may result in the loss of both data centers. Substantial property and equipment loss, and disruption in operations as well as any defects in our systems or those of third parties or other difficulties could expose us to liability and

 

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materially adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any outage or disruptive efforts could adversely impact our reputation, brand and future prospects.

Unauthorized disclosure of data, whether through cybersecurity breaches, computer viruses or otherwise, could expose us to liability, protracted and costly litigation and damage our reputation.

We store and/or transmit sensitive data, such as credit or debit card numbers and mobile phone numbers, and we have ultimate liability to our consumers for our failure to protect this data. We have experienced breaches of our security by hackers in the past, and breaches could occur in the future. In such circumstances, our encryption of data and other protective measures have not prevented unauthorized access and may not be sufficient to prevent future unauthorized access. We have not incurred material losses or liabilities as a result of breaches that have happened to date. However, any future breach of our system, including through employee fraud, may subject us to material losses or liability, including fines and claims for unauthorized purchases with misappropriated credit or debit card information, identity theft, impersonation or other similar fraud claims. A misuse of such data or a cybersecurity breach could harm our reputation and deter clients from using electronic payments as well as kiosks and terminals generally and our services specifically, increase our operating expenses in order to correct the breaches or failures, expose us to uninsured liability, increase our risk of regulatory scrutiny, subject us to lawsuits, result in the imposition of material penalties and fines by state authorities and otherwise materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to comply with the applicable requirements of our agreements with Visa Inc., Visa could seek to fine us, suspend us or terminate our registrations.

Under our agreements with Visa, we are required to comply with both the terms of those agreements and the terms of Visa’s International Operating Regulations. If we do not comply with the agreements or these regulations, Visa could seek to fine us, suspend us or terminate the registrations that allow us to process transactions on its network. In addition, under our agreements with Visa, Visa is entitled to terminate the agreements in case of a material breach by us or if it determines the agreements are contrary to its interests. If we are in breach of the agreements or Visa otherwise terminates its agreements with us, we may be unable to issue Visa-branded prepaid cards or continue to operate under the “Visa Qiwi Wallet” brand, which could have a material adverse effect on our Visa Qiwi Wallet business and our business as a whole. The termination of our registration, or any changes in the payment network rules that would impair our registration, could prevent us from issuing Visa-branded prepaid cards or operating under the “Visa Qiwi Wallet” brand, thereby reducing the number of transactions made though Visa Qiwi Wallet. Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, as well as on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The cost to us of consumers reloading their Visa Qiwi Wallet accounts may increase.

We make available to our consumers a large variety of methods to reload the Visa Qiwi Wallet accounts, including, among others, bank cards, kiosks and terminals, ATMs and mobile payments. The reload methods have different cost implications for us. For example, on payments made through the kiosks and terminals owned by our agents, we pay lower fees for reloading the Visa Qiwi Wallet than on payments made from bank cards. We currently do not attempt to direct consumer preferences towards particular reload methods. If their preferences shift towards reload methods that come at a higher cost to us, the margins of our Visa Qiwi Wallet segment could be adversely affected, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Qiwi Bank is subject to supervision and examination by Russian banking regulators.

In September 2010, we acquired Qiwi Bank from certain of our shareholders. Qiwi Bank provides issuing, acquiring and deposit settlement functions within our group. All banks operating in Russia are subject to extensive regulation and supervision. Requirements imposed by regulators, including capital adequacy, liquidity

 

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reserves, prudential ratios, loss provisions and other regulatory requirements are designed to ensure the integrity of the financial markets and to protect consumers and other third parties with whom a bank deals. These regulations may limit our activities, and may increase our costs of doing business, or require us to seek additional capital in order to comply with applicable capital adequacy or liquidity requirements. Existing laws and regulations could be amended, the manner in which laws and regulations are enforced or interpreted could change and new laws or regulations could be adopted. Any breach of applicable regulations could expose us to potential liability and other sanctions, including in the extreme case the revocation of the general banking license. Revocation of our banking license could significantly hinder our ability to process payments, and would result in a decrease of our profitability, damage our reputation and could cause other regulators to increase their scrutiny of our activities. Furthermore, under our individual agreement with Visa and under its regulations, Qiwi Bank represents, among other things, that it is in good standing and has been granted all necessary authorizations from applicable governmental and regulatory authorities to operate a Visa card program. If Qiwi Bank’s license is revoked or it loses its authorization to operate a Visa card program, Visa could terminate its agreement with us. For these reasons, any breach of laws and regulations by Qiwi Bank or the revocation of its banking license could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Customer complaints or negative publicity about our customer service could affect attractiveness of our product adversely and, as a result, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Customer complaints or negative publicity about our customer service could diminish consumer confidence in, and the attractiveness of, our services. Breaches of our consumers’ privacy and our security systems could have the same effect. We sometimes take measures to combat risks of fraud and breaches of privacy and security, such as freezing consumer funds, which could damage relations with our consumers. These measures heighten the need for prompt and attentive customer service to resolve irregularities and disputes. In addition we have previously received negative media coverage regarding customer disputes. Effective customer service requires significant personnel expense, and this expense, if not managed properly, could impact our profitability significantly. Any inability by us to manage or train our customer service representatives properly could compromise our ability to handle customer complaints effectively. If we do not handle customer complaints effectively, our reputation may suffer and we may lose our customers’ confidence, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our agreements with our agents and our merchants do not include exclusivity clauses and may be terminated unilaterally at any time or at short notice.

We normally do not include exclusivity clauses in our agreements with agents or merchants. Accordingly, our merchants and agents do not have any restrictions on dealings with other providers and can switch from our payment processing system to another without significant investment. Additionally, due to mandatory provisions of Russian civil law, our agreements with agents may be unilaterally terminated by the agents at any time, and our agreements with merchants may be unilaterally terminated by the merchants upon one month’s prior notice. The termination of our contracts with existing agents or merchants or a significant decline in the amount of business we do with them as a result of our contracts not having exclusivity clauses could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our payment system might be used for fraudulent, illegal or improper purposes, which could expose us to additional liability and harm our business.

Despite measures we have taken and continue to take, our payment system remains susceptible to potentially illegal or improper uses. These may include use of our payment services in connection with fraudulent sales of goods or services, illicit sales of prescription medications or controlled substances, software and other intellectual property piracy, money laundering, bank fraud and prohibited sales of restricted products. In the past there have been news articles on how organized crime groups have used our payment services to

 

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transfer money in the course of illegal transactions. In particular, in February 2013 it was reported by the media that the Moscow Arbitration Court upheld a RUB 289 million tax claim against LLC Rusal Folga, a subsidiary of the major Russian aluminum producer Rusal, confirming that in 2008-2009 LLC Rusal Folga used shell firms for tax evasion. Some of these shell firms acted as our agents and cashed out money via Qiwi kiosks. Criminals are using increasingly sophisticated methods to engage in illegal activities such as counterfeiting and fraud. It is possible that incidents of fraud could increase in the future. Our risk management policies and procedures may not be fully effective to identify, monitor and manage these risks. We are not able to monitor in each case the sources for our counterparties’ funds or the ways in which they use them. Increases in chargebacks or other liability could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, an increase in fraudulent transactions or publicity regarding chargeback disputes could harm our reputation and reduce consumer confidence in the use of our kiosks and terminals and virtual wallets.

Our business is exposed to counterparty and credit risks.

We seek to sell services on a prepayment basis or to ensure that our counterparties have low credit risk profiles, such as large merchants and agents. Nevertheless, we are exposed to the risk of non-payment or other default under our contracts with our agents and merchants. If we provide trade credit to an agent and we are unable to collect proceeds paid to the agent by its consumers due to the agent’s insolvency, fraud or otherwise, we must nonetheless complete the payment to the merchant on behalf of the consumer. As a result, our losses would not be limited to a loss of revenue in the form of fees due to us from the agent, but could amount to the entire amount of consumer payments accepted by such agent for a certain period of time.

We also have significant receivables due from some of our merchants, and may not recover these receivables in the event of such merchants’ bankruptcy or otherwise. As of December 31, 2012, we had credit exposure to our agents of RUB 1,130 million and to our merchants of RUB 2,161 million. While our receivables from merchants are unsecured and non-interest bearing, our receivables from agents are generally interest-bearing and are secured by collateral. Although we monitor the creditworthiness of our counterparties on an ongoing basis, there can be no assurance that the models and approaches we use to assess and monitor their creditworthiness will be sufficiently predictive, and we may be unable to detect and take steps to timely mitigate an increased credit risk. If we experience material defaults by our agents and/or merchants, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

Regulatory authorities in Russia and Kazakhstan could determine that we hold a dominant position in our markets, and could impose limitations on our operational flexibility which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Russian anti-monopoly authorities impose various requirements on companies that occupy a dominant position in their markets. We believe that to date the anti-monopoly authorities have neither assessed the Russian payment services industry as a whole nor, more specifically, the kiosk and terminal market or the electronic payment market. If they do so, they may conclude that we hold a dominant position in one or more of the markets in which we operate. If they were to do so, this could result in limitations on our future acquisitions and a requirement that we pre-clear with the authorities any changes to our standard agreements with merchants and agents, as well as any specially negotiated agreements with business partners. In addition, if we were to decline to conclude a contract with a third party this could, in certain circumstances, be regarded as abuse of a dominant market position. Russian anti-monopoly authorities have also been known to determine that a market player has been in violation of anti-trust laws solely on the basis of circumstantial evidence pointing to its anti-competitive behavior without any written or oral evidence to support this. Any abuse of a dominant market position could lead to administrative penalties and the imposition of a fine of up to 15% of our annual revenue for the previous year. In addition, in April 2012 the Competition Protection Agency of the Republic of Kazakhstan, or the Competition Protection Agency, included our subsidiary in Kazakhstan in the state register of market participants with dominant or monopoly position in Kazakhstan. Entities included in this register are prohibited from performing actions that may have a detrimental effect on competition, restrict access to the market or infringe the rights of consumers, including predatory or

 

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discriminatory pricing, unjustified resale restrictions, imposing unreasonable terms, or refusing to supply or halting supplies for unjustified reasons. Status as a dominant market participant also puts an entity under much more stringent scrutiny from the Competition Protection Agency, therefore increasing the probability of being investigated and penalized if a violation occurs. As a result, the Competition Protection Agency may impose restrictions on our operations, or take other measures that may be inconsistent with our strategy. The maximum liability to which we can be exposed is a penalty equal to 10% of the revenue earned as a result of market abuse, plus confiscation of the full amount of such revenue. The maximum liability is determined in reference to not more than one year of such revenues. Recently, our subsidiary in Kazakhstan became subject to an investigation conducted by the Competition Protection Agency concerning alleged abuse of its dominant position in Kazakhstan’s electronic payments market. No fine has been levied as a result of the investigation, but the Competition Protection Agency ordered us to rectify certain violations of the anti-trust legislation. We have complied with the orders and have taken actions to remedy these violations. However, we expect similar investigations by the Competition Protection Agency to recur in the future, and we cannot reliably estimate the amounts of claims that can be brought against us in connection with these investigations. These limitations may reduce our operational and commercial flexibility and responsiveness, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to successfully protect our intellectual property and may be subject to infringement claims.

We rely on a combination of contractual rights, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws to establish and protect our proprietary technology. We also maintain patents for certain of our technologies. We customarily require our employees and independent contractors to execute confidentiality agreements or otherwise to agree to keep our proprietary information confidential when their relationship with us begins. Typically, our employment contracts also include clauses requiring our employees to assign to us all of the inventions and intellectual property rights they develop in the course of their employment and to agree not to disclose our confidential information. Nevertheless, others, including our competitors, may independently develop similar technology, duplicate our services or design around our intellectual property. Further, contractual arrangements may not prevent unauthorized disclosure of our confidential information or ensure an adequate remedy in the event of any unauthorized disclosure of our confidential information. Because of the limited protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights in certain jurisdictions in which we operate, such as Russia and Kazakhstan, as well as in certain jurisdictions in which we have started expanding our operations, such as Moldova, Romania and Belarus, our intellectual property rights may not be as protected as they may be in more developed markets such as the United States. We may have to litigate to enforce or determine the scope or enforceability of our intellectual property rights (including trade secrets and know-how), which could be expensive, could cause a diversion of resources and may not prove successful. The loss of intellectual property protection could harm our business and ability to compete and could result in costly redesign efforts, discontinuance of certain service offerings or other competitive harm. Additionally, we do not hold any patents for our business model or our business processes, in part because our ability to obtain them in Russia is subject to legislative constraints, and we do not currently intend to obtain any such patents in Russia, the U.S. or elsewhere.

We may also be subject to costly litigation in the event our services or technology are claimed to infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate a third party’s intellectual property or proprietary rights. Such claims could include patent infringement, copyright infringement, trademark infringement, trade secret misappropriation or breach of licenses. In addition, while we seek to obtain copyright registration certificates for the critical software we develop, our rights to software obtained as works for hire might be potentially challenged by the employees and former employees or developers of such software. We may not be able to successfully defend against such claims, which may result in a limitation on our ability to use the intellectual property subject to these claims and also might require us to redesign affected services, enter into costly settlement or license agreements, pay costly damage awards, or face a temporary or permanent injunction prohibiting us from marketing or selling certain of our services. In such circumstances, if we cannot or do not license the infringed technology on reasonable terms or substitute similar technology from another source, our revenue and earnings could be adversely impacted. Additionally, in recent years, non-practicing entities have been acquiring patents, making claims of patent

 

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infringement and attempting to extract settlements from companies in our industry. Even if we believe that such claims are without merit and successfully defend these claims, defending against such claims is time consuming and expensive and could result in the diversion of the time and attention of our management and employees.

We may use open source software in a manner that could be harmful to our business.

We use open source software in connection with our technology and services. The original developers of the open source code provide no warranties on such code. Moreover, some open source software licenses require users who distribute open source software as part of their software to publicly disclose all or part of the source code to such software and/or make available any derivative works of the open source code on unfavorable terms or at no cost. The use of such open source code may ultimately require us to replace certain code used in our products, pay a royalty to use some open source code or discontinue certain products. Any of the above requirements could be harmful to our business, financial condition and operations.

We do not have and may be unable to obtain sufficient insurance to protect ourselves from business risks.

The insurance industry in Russia is not yet fully developed, and many forms of insurance protection common in more developed countries are not yet fully available or are not available on comparable or commercially acceptable terms. Accordingly, while we hold certain mandatory types of insurance policies in Russia, we do not currently maintain insurance coverage for business interruption, property damage or loss of key management personnel as we have been unable to obtain these on commercially acceptable terms. We do not hold insurance policies to cover for any losses resulting from counterparty and credit risks or fraudulent transactions. We also do not generally maintain separate funds or otherwise set aside reserves for most types of business-related risks. Accordingly, our lack of insurance coverage or reserves with respect to business-related risks may expose us to substantial losses, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may need to raise additional funds to finance our future capital needs, which may dilute the value of our outstanding ADSs or prevent us from growing our business.

We may need to raise additional funds to finance our future capital needs, including developing new services and technologies, and to fund ongoing operating expenses. If we raise additional funds through the sale of equity securities, these transactions may dilute the value of our outstanding ADSs. We may also decide to issue securities, including debt securities that have rights, preferences and privileges senior to our ADSs. Any debt financing would increase our level of indebtedness and could negatively affect our liquidity and restrict our operations. We may be unable to raise additional funds on terms favorable to us or at all. If financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to fund our future needs. This may prevent us from increasing our market share, capitalizing on new business opportunities or remaining competitive in our industry.

In a dynamic industry like ours, the ability to attract, recruit, retain and develop qualified personnel is critical to our success and growth.

Our business functions at the intersection of rapidly changing technological, social, economic and regulatory developments that require a wide ranging set of expertise and intellectual capital. In order for us to compete and grow successfully, we must attract, recruit, retain and develop the necessary personnel who can provide the needed expertise across the entire spectrum of our intellectual capital needs. This is particularly true with respect to qualified and experienced software engineers and IT staff, who are highly sought after and are not in sufficient supply in Russia and in most other markets in which we operate. The market for such personnel is highly competitive, and we may not succeed in recruiting additional personnel or may fail to replace effectively current personnel who depart with qualified or effective successors. It may also be difficult for us to obtain necessary qualified personnel with local experience to support our international growth, which may jeopardize

 

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our ongoing and planned expansion into new geographies. Our efforts to retain and develop personnel may result in significant additional expenses, which could adversely affect our profitability. We cannot assure you that we will be able to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future. Failure to retain or attract key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Relating to Corporate Governance Matters and Organizational Structure

Our dual share capital structure, combined with the concentration of voting power, will result in substantial control over us by our class A shareholders, including our founding shareholders as well as Palmway Holdings Limited, Mail.ru Group Limited and Mitsui & Co., Ltd., and will limit your ability to influence corporate matters.

Each class B share underlying our ADSs is entitled to one vote per share at shareholders’ meetings, while each class A share is entitled to 10 votes per share at shareholders’ meetings. Each class A share is convertible into one class B share at any time by the holder of the class A share, while class B shares are not convertible into class A shares under any circumstances. Upon any transfer of class A shares by a holder to any person or entity that is not a wholly-owned (direct or indirect) affiliate of such holder, such class A shares will be automatically and immediately converted into equal number of class B shares unless such transfer is in respect of 10% or more of the total number of class A shares in issue, has been approved by holders of at least 75% of class A shares in issue, or meets certain other conditions. After completion of this offering, we anticipate that our class A shareholders, including our founding shareholders (Antana International Corporation, Saldivar Investments Limited, Dargle International Limited, E1 Limited and Bralvo Limited) as well as Palmway, Mail.ru and Mitsui and entities they control will together beneficially own and control all of the class A shares, together representing in aggregate approximately 97.1% of the voting power of our issued share capital. Any transfer of class A shares that results in a conversion to class B shares will have, among other things, the effect of further concentrating voting power in us in the hands of non-transferring holders of class A shares. As a result, holders of our class A shares will control the outcome of any shareholders’ meeting for the foreseeable future, including having the power to determine the composition of our board of directors and control the outcome of the voting on any significant corporate transactions or other matters submitted to our shareholders for approval. The voting power of the holders of class A shares will be substantially greater than their economic interest in us, and the ability of holders of our ADSs to influence corporate matters will be limited. The interests of our class A shareholders, including our founding shareholders as well as Palmway, Mail.ru and Mitsui, may not be aligned with or be in the best interests of holders of our ADSs. This concentration of voting power could also have the effect of delaying, deterring or preventing a change of control or other business combination that might otherwise be beneficial to the holders of our ADSs.

You will have limited rights in relation to the appointment of our directors, including our independent directors.

Other than in certain limited cases provided for in our articles of association, our directors are elected by shareholder weighted voting, sometimes referred to as cumulative voting, under which each shareholder has the right to cast as many votes as the voting rights attached to its shares multiplied by a number equal to the number of board seats to be filled by shareholders. As a result, our class A shareholders, including our founding shareholders as well as Palmway, Mail.ru and Mitsui, will have the ability to appoint, through the weighted voting set forth in our articles of association, at least a majority of the board of directors for the foreseeable future. The interests of our directors may therefore not be aligned with or be in the best interests of the holders of our ADSs.

The rights of our shareholders are governed by Cyprus law and our articles of association, and differ in some important respects from the typical rights of shareholders under U.S. state laws.

Our corporate affairs are governed by our articles of association and by the laws governing companies incorporated in Cyprus. The rights of our shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of

 

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directors under Cyprus law and our articles of association are different than under the laws of some U.S. state laws. For example, by law existing holders of shares in a Cypriot public company are entitled to pre-emptive rights on the issue of new shares in that company (provided such shares are paid in cash and the pre-emption rights have not been disapplied). In addition, our articles of association include other provisions, which differ from provisions typically included in the governing documents of most companies organized in the U.S.:

 

   

our board of directors can only take certain actions by means of a supermajority vote of 75% of its members, including approving our annual budget and business plan, disposing of our interest in a subsidiary if such disposal results in a change of control over such subsidiary, issuing shares for consideration other than cash and other actions;

 

   

our shareholders are able to convene an extraordinary general meeting; and

 

   

if our board of directors exercises its right to appoint a director to fill a vacancy on the board created during the term of a director’s appointment, shareholders holding 10.01% of the voting rights of the company may terminate the appointment of all of the directors and initiate reelection of the entire board of directors.

As a result of the differences described above, our shareholders may have rights different to those generally available to shareholders of companies organized under U.S. state laws and our board of directors may find it more difficult to approve certain actions.

Some of our corporate actions require either a simple majority or a 75% shareholder vote, and following this offering, one of our founding shareholders, Saldivar Investments Limited, will alone control in excess of 25% of the voting power of our company and together with other founding shareholders will control in excess of 50% of the voting power of our company.

Our articles of association require the approval of no less than 75% of present and voting shareholders for certain matters, including, among other matters, amendments to the constitutional documents of our company, dissolution or liquidation of our company, reducing the share capital, buying back shares and approving the total number of shares and classes of shares to be reserved for issuance under any employee stock option plan or any other equity-based incentive compensation program of our group. One of our founding shareholders, Saldivar, which is controlled by Mr. Sergey Solonin, our chief executive officer, will control more than 25% of the voting power of our company following this offering, and accordingly will have the ability to veto any resolution requiring a 75% shareholder vote. In addition, our founding shareholders will together control in excess of 50% of the voting power of our company following this offering, which will allow them together to control the outcome of voting on matters requiring a simple majority shareholder vote, including, among other matters, increasing our authorized capital, removing a director, final dividend declaration, approving the annual audited accounts and appointing auditors.

Our class A shareholders may have interests and positions that could present potential conflicts with our interests.

Mail.ru and Mitsui make investments in companies and may, from time to time, acquire and hold interests in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. They may also pursue, for their own accounts, acquisition opportunities that may be complementary to our business, and as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us. In particular, Mail.ru operates an electronic payment business, Money@Mail.ru, a direct competitor of Visa Qiwi Wallet, which may result in them being provided with business opportunities instead of us. Accordingly, the interests of these shareholders and our directors associated with them may conflict with our interests, and they may compete with us, pursue opportunities instead of us, or focus more on other businesses rather than on ours for which we have no recourse. Such actions on their part could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Acquisitions of credit institutions in Russia are subject to pre-closing approval by multiple government authorities which exercise significant discretion as to whether a consent should be granted or not, and are regulated by a significant body of law which is often ambiguous and open to varying interpretations.

Due to our ownership of Qiwi Bank, any transactions resulting in the acquisition of more than 50% of our voting power or the right to otherwise direct our business activities would become subject to preliminary approval by the CBR. In order to obtain such approval, the acquirer would need to meet certain eligibility criteria established by the CBR. In addition, any acquisition of more than 50% of our voting power may also be subject to a preliminary approval by the Russian Federal Antimonopoly Service, or the FAS. Furthermore, Qiwi Bank holds an encryption license which is necessary to conduct its operations, and by virtue of this may be deemed to be a “strategic enterprise” for the purposes of the Federal Law of the Russian Federation No. 57-FZ “On the Procedure for Foreign Investments in Enterprises which are Strategically Important for the State Defense and National Security”, dated April 29, 2008, as amended. In this case, any acquisition of control over our company would require an approval of a specialized government commission, which is a relatively lengthy process that typically takes between three and six months in practice. See “Regulation—Regulation of Strategic Investments.” These regulatory approval requirements may have the effect of making a takeover of our company more difficult or less attractive, and may prevent or delay a change of control, which could have a negative impact on the liquidity of, and investor interest in, our ADSs.

Additionally, under Russian law, the depositary may be treated as the owner of the class B shares underlying the ADSs, and therefore, could be deemed a beneficial shareholder of Qiwi Bank. This is different from the way other jurisdictions treat ADSs. As a result, the depositary may be subject to the approval requirements of the CBR, the FAS and the government commission described above in the event an amount of our shares representing over 50% of our voting power is deposited in the ADS program. Accordingly, our ADS program may be subject to an effective limit of 50% of our voting power, unless the depositary obtains FAS, CBR and potentially additional government commission approvals to increase its ownership in excess of 50% of our voting power. This could limit our ability to raise capital in the future and the ability of our existing shareholders to sell their ADSs in the public markets, which in turn may impact the liquidity of share capital.

If the Russian government exercises its right to impose a quota on foreign ownership of Russian banks, a takeover of our company may be impossible.

Under current Russian law, the Russian government is entitled, upon consultation with the CBR, to propose legislation imposing a quota on foreign ownership in the Russian banking industry, covering both Russian branches of international banks and foreign participation in the charter capital of Russian banks, such as Qiwi Bank. Such legislation would need to be approved by the Russian Parliament in order to become law; however, in practice, due to a lack of separation of powers between the Russian Parliament and the Russian government, any bill proposed by the government is likely to be enacted. In the past, Russia law contained such a quota on foreign ownership of Russian banks. Such quotas were repealed in 2002, and to our knowledge, there currently is no intention to reinstate such quotas. However, if the Russian government exercises its right to impose limits on foreign ownership of Russian banks, a takeover of our company by a foreign purchaser may become impossible, which could limit, prevent or delay a change of control of our company and in turn could negatively impact the liquidity of our ADSs.

As a foreign private issuer whose ADSs are listed on Nasdaq, we have elected to follow certain home country corporate governance practices instead of certain Nasdaq requirements.

As a foreign private issuer whose ADSs are listed on Nasdaq, we are permitted in certain cases, and intend, to follow Cyprus corporate governance practices instead of the corresponding requirements of Nasdaq. A foreign private issuer that elects to follow a home country practice instead of Nasdaq requirements must submit to Nasdaq in advance a written statement from an independent counsel in such issuer’s home country certifying that the issuer’s practices are not prohibited by the home country’s laws. In addition, a foreign private issuer must

 

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disclose in its annual reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission any significant requirement that it does not follow and describe the home country practice followed instead of any such requirement. We intend to follow Cyprus corporate governance practices with regard to the composition of our board of directors which, unlike the applicable Nasdaq rule for U.S. corporations, do not require that a majority of our directors be independent. As a result, we cannot assure you that we will have a board with a majority of independent directors. We intend to follow Cyprus corporate governance practices with regard to the quorum requirements applicable to meetings of shareholders, rather than the corresponding domestic U.S. corporate governance practices. Accordingly, our shareholders may not be afforded the same protection as provided under Nasdaq corporate governance rules.

You may not have the same voting rights as the holders of our class A shares and class B shares and may not receive voting materials in time to be able to exercise your right to vote. Your right to receive certain distributions may be limited in certain respects by the deposit agreement.

Except as described in this prospectus and in the deposit agreement, holders of our ADSs will not be able to exercise voting rights attaching to the class B shares represented by our ADSs on an individual basis. Holders of our ADSs will appoint the depositary or its nominee as their representative to exercise the voting rights attaching to the class B shares represented by the ADSs. Upon receipt of your voting instructions, the depositary will vote the underlying class B shares in accordance with these instructions. Pursuant to our articles of association, we may convene an annual shareholders’ meeting or a shareholders’ meeting called for approval of matters requiring a 75% shareholder vote upon at least 45 days’ notice and upon at least 30 days’ notice for all other shareholders’ meetings. If we give timely notice to the depositary under the terms of the deposit agreement, the depositary will notify you of the upcoming vote and arrange to deliver our voting materials to you. We cannot assure you that you will receive the voting materials in time to instruct the depositary to vote the class B shares underlying your ADSs, and it is possible that you, or persons who hold their ADSs through brokers, dealers or other third parties, will not have the opportunity to exercise a right to vote. In addition, the depositary and its agents are not responsible for failing to carry out voting instructions or for the manner of carrying out voting instructions. This means that you may not be able to exercise your right to vote and there may be nothing you can do if the class B shares underlying your ADSs are not voted as you requested. In addition, although you may directly exercise your right to vote by withdrawing the class B shares underlying your ADSs, you may not receive sufficient advance notice of an upcoming shareholders’ meeting to withdraw the class B shares underlying your ADSs to allow you to vote with respect to any specific matter. Furthermore, under the deposit agreement, the depositary has the right to restrict distributions to holders of the ADSs in the event that it is unlawful or impractical to make such distributions. We have no obligation to take any action to permit distributions to holders of our ADSs. As a result, holders of ADSs may not receive distributions made by us.

You will not be able to benefit from certain anti-takeover protections.

As we are incorporated in Cyprus, we are subject to Cypriot law. As of the date of this prospectus, Cypriot law does not contain any requirement for a mandatory offer to be made by a person acquiring shares or depositary receipts of a Cypriot company even if such an acquisition confers on such person control over us if neither such company’s shares nor depositary receipts are listed on a regulated market in the European Economic Area. Neither our shares nor our ADSs are listed on a regulated market. Consequently, a prospective bidder acquiring ADSs may gain control over us in circumstances in which there is no requirement to conduct a mandatory offer under an applicable takeover protection regime. As a result, holders of ADSs may not be given the opportunity to receive treatment equal to what may be received, in the event of an offer made by a potential bidder with a view to gaining control over us or by certain other holders of ADSs or, as the case may be, shares at the relevant time. As a result, a bid for, or creeping acquisition of control over, us is currently not regulated by Cyprus law.

 

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You may not be able to exercise your pre-emptive rights in relation to future issuances of class B shares.

In order to raise funding in the future, we may issue additional class B shares, including in the form of ADSs. Generally, existing holders of shares in Cypriot public companies are entitled by law to pre-emptive rights on the issue of new shares in that company (provided that such shares are paid in cash and the pre-emption rights have not been disapplied). You may not be able to exercise pre-emptive rights for class B shares represented by ADSs unless applicable securities law requirements are adhered to or an exemption from such requirements is available. In the United States, we may be required to file a registration statement under the Securities Act to implement pre-emptive rights. We can give no assurance that an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act would be available to enable U.S. holders of ADSs to exercise such pre-emptive rights and, if such exemption is available, we may not take the steps necessary to enable U.S. holders of ADSs to rely on it. Accordingly, you may not be able to exercise your pre-emptive rights on future issuances of shares, and, as a result, your percentage ownership interest in us would be reduced. In April 2013, our shareholders authorized the disapplication of pre-emptive rights for a period of five years from the date of the consummation of this offering in connection with the issue of up to an additional 52,000,000 class B shares, including in the form of ADSs. Any issuances of class B shares for cash exceeding this amount during this five-year period would require disapplication of pre-emptive rights by the class B shareholders at such time. The enforceability of the disapplication of pre-emptive rights in this manner, however, is not clear as a matter of Cyprus law. If for any reason the disapplication of these rights proves to be ineffective or class B shareholders do not approve any further disapplication of pre-emptive rights that may be required, your ability to participate in future issuances of class B shares, including in the form of ADSs, may be limited to the extent that class B shareholders at the time of such issuances elect to exercise their pre-emptive rights. Furthermore, rights offerings are difficult to implement effectively under the current U.S. securities laws and our ability to raise capital in the future may be compromised if we need to do so via a rights offering in the United States.

Risks Related To The Russian Federation and Other Markets in Which We Operate

Emerging markets, such as Russia and Kazakhstan, are subject to greater risks than more developed markets, including significant legal, economic and political risks.

Investors in emerging markets, such as Russia and Kazakhstan, should be aware that these markets are subject to greater risk than more developed markets, including in some cases significant legal, economic and political risks. Investors should also note that emerging economies are subject to rapid change and that the information set out herein may become outdated relatively quickly. Accordingly, investors should exercise particular care in evaluating the risks involved and must decide for themselves whether, in light of those risks, their investment is appropriate. Generally, investment in emerging markets is only suitable for sophisticated investors who fully appreciate the significance of the risks involved, and investors are urged to consult with their own legal and financial advisors before making an investment in our ADSs.

Political and governmental instability could adversely affect the value of investments in Russia.

Political conditions in the Russian Federation were highly volatile in the 1990s, as evidenced by the frequent conflicts amongst executive, legislative and judicial authorities, which negatively impacted the business and investment climate in the Russian Federation. Over the past two decades the course of political and other reforms has in some respects been uneven and the composition of the Russian Government has at times been unstable. The Russian political system continues to be vulnerable to popular dissatisfaction, including dissatisfaction with the results of the privatizations of the 1990s, as well as to demands for autonomy from certain religious, ethnic and regional groups.

Mr. Vladimir Putin who was President of the Russian Federation from 2000 until 2008 re-occupied this post in April 2012 following the Presidential election in March 2012. In 2008, he stood down as President and Mr. Dmitry Medvedev was elected as the new President of the Russian Federation. In May 2008, Mr. Dmitry Medvedev appointed Mr. Vladimir Putin to the position of Prime Minister of the Russian Federation. In 2011,

 

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Mr. Vladimir Putin indicated his intention to stand for re-election as President in the elections for the President of the Russian Federation which took place in March 2012. In May 2012, Mr. Vladimir Putin appointed Mr. Dmitry Medvedev to the position of Prime Minister of the Russian Federation. During Mr. Putin’s and Mr. Medvedev’s tenure as President, the Russian political system and the relationship between the President, the Russian Government and the Russian Parliament were generally stable. There have been, however, public protests in Moscow and other urban areas following the recent elections for the State Duma in December 2011 alleging that the elections were subject to substantial electoral fraud, as well as opposing a public “transfer” of power authorization by Mr. Dmitry Medvedev in favor of Mr. Vladimir Putin which occurred at the United Russia party congress on September 24, 2011 where Mr. Dmitry Medvedev proposed that the congress support the candidacy of Prime Minister Mr. Vladimir Putin for President. The Prime Minister at that time, Mr. Vladimir Putin has rejected calls by opposition leaders that the elections for the State Duma be annulled and re-run, but has instituted limited political reforms. Similar protests took place following the presidential elections in March 2012 which resulted in re-election of Mr. Vladimir Putin.

Additionally, the potential for political instability resulting from the global financial and economic crisis and any associated worsening of the economic situation in Russia and deteriorating standards of living should not be underestimated. Any such instability could negatively affect the economic and political environment in Russia, particularly in the short term. Shifts in governmental policy and regulation in the Russian Federation are less predictable than in many Western democracies and could disrupt or reverse political, economic and regulatory reforms. Any significant change in the Russian Government’s program of reform in Russia could lead to the deterioration of Russia’s investment climate that might limit our ability to obtain financing in the international capital markets or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The reversal of reform policies or the implementation of government policies in Russia targeted at specific individuals or companies could harm our business as well as investments in Russia more generally.

In recent years, the political and economic situation in Russia has generally become more stable and conducive to investment. However, major policy shifts, government reshuffles and a lack of consensus among key political groups could hinder or reverse political, economic and regulatory reforms. Reform may also suffer if key government officials engage in private business while in office, particularly when these business interests are in the industry that such officials regulate. Any such deterioration of Russia’s investment climate might constrain our ability to obtain financing, limit our sales in Russia and otherwise materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the use of governmental power against particular companies or persons, for example, through the tax, environmental or prosecutorial authorities, could adversely affect the Russian economic climate and, if directed against us, our senior management or our major shareholders, could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Russian authorities have recently challenged some Russian companies and prosecuted their executive officers and shareholders on the grounds of tax evasion and related charges. In some cases, the results of such prosecutions and challenges have been significant claims against companies for unpaid taxes and the imposition of prison sentences on individuals. There has been speculation that in certain cases these challenges and prosecutions were intended to punish, and deter, opposition to the government or the pursuit of disfavored political or economic agendas. There has also been speculation that certain environmental challenges brought recently by Russian authorities in the oil and gas as well as mining sectors have been targeted at specific Russian businesses under non-Russian control, with a view to bringing them under state control. More generally, some observers have noted that takeovers in recent years of major private sector companies in the oil and gas, metals and manufacturing sectors by state-controlled companies following tax, environmental and other challenges may reflect a shift in official policy in favor of state control at the expense of individual or private ownership, at least where large and important enterprises are concerned.

 

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Political and other conflicts create an uncertain operating environment that hinders our long-term planning ability and could adversely affect the value of our investments in Russia.

Russia is a federation of 83 sub-federal political units, consisting of republics, territories, regions, cities of federal importance and autonomous regions and districts. The delineation of authority and jurisdiction among the members of the federation and the federal government is, in many instances, unclear and remains contested. Lack of consensus between the federal government and local or regional authorities often results in the enactment of conflicting legislation at various levels and may lead to further political instability. In particular, in the past, conflicting laws have been enacted in the areas of privatization, securities, corporate legislation, regulation of land use and licensing. Some of these laws and governmental and administrative decisions implementing them, as well as certain transactions consummated pursuant to them, have in the past been challenged in the courts in Russia and such challenges may occur in the future.

Ethnic, religious, historical and other divisions have on occasion given rise to tensions and, in certain cases, military conflict and terrorist attacks in certain regions of Russia. For example, a military conflict in August 2008 between Russia and Georgia involving South Ossetia and Abkhazia resulted in significant overall price declines in the Russian stock exchanges and capital outflow from Russia. Such tensions, military conflict or terrorist activities (such as the bombing of Domededovo airport in Moscow in January 2011 and the bombing of the Moscow metro in 2010) could have significant political consequences, including the imposition of a state of emergency in some or all of Russia or heightened security measures, which could cause disruption to domestic commerce and exports from Russia, disrupt normal economic activity in Russia and materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Deterioration of Russia’s relations with other countries could negatively affect the Russian economy and those of the nearby regions.

Over the past several years, Russia has been involved in conflicts, both economic and military, involving other members of the CIS. On several occasions, this has resulted in the deterioration of Russia’s relations with other members of the international community, including the United States and various countries in Europe. Many of these jurisdictions are home to financial institutions and corporations that are significant investors in Russia and whose investment strategies and decisions may be affected by such conflicts and by worsening relations between Russia and its immediate neighbors.

For example, relations between Ukraine and Russia, as well as Georgia and Russia, have recently been strained over a variety of issues. The emergence of new or escalated tensions between Russia and other CIS countries or other countries, including any escalation of the conflict or renewed fighting between Russia and Georgia, or the imposition of international sanctions in response to these tensions, could negatively affect economies in the region, including the Russian economy. This, in turn, may result in a general lack of confidence among international investors in the region’s economic and political stability and in Russian investments generally. Such lack of confidence may result in reduced liquidity, trading volatility and significant declines in the price of listed securities of companies with significant operations in Russia, including our ADSs, and in our inability to raise debt or equity capital in the international capital markets, which may affect our ability to achieve the level of growth to which we aspire. Additionally, the relationship between the U.S. and Russia is subject to fluctuation and periodic tension. Changes in political conditions in Russia and changes in the state of Russian-U.S. relations are difficult to predict and could adversely affect our operations in the U.S. or cause our company to become less attractive for U.S. investors.

Crime and corruption could create a difficult business climate in Russia.

The political and economic changes in Russia since the early 1990s have led, amongst other things, to reduced policing of society and increased lawlessness. In September 2006, the Deputy Chairman of the CBR was assassinated in what was allegedly a contract killing tied to his enforcement actions against corrupt Russian

 

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banking organizations. Organized crime, particularly property crimes in large metropolitan centers, has reportedly increased significantly since the dissolution of the Soviet Union. In addition, the Russian and international media have reported high levels of corruption in Russia. Press reports have also described instances in which government officials have engaged in selective investigations and prosecutions to further the interest of the government and individual officials or business groups. Although we adhere to a business ethics policy and internal compliance procedures to counteract the effects of crime and corruption, instances of illegal activities, demands of corrupt officials, allegations that we or our management have been involved in corruption or illegal activities or biased articles and negative publicity could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Economic instability in Russia could have an adverse effect on our business.

The Russian economy has been adversely affected by the recent global financial and economic crisis. A continuation of the economic crisis could have a negative effect on the scale and profitability of our business. Any of the following risks, which the Russian economy has experienced at various points in the past, may have or have already had a significant adverse effect on the economic climate in Russia and may burden or have already burdened our operations:

 

   

significant declines in gross domestic product, or GDP;

 

   

high levels of inflation;

 

   

sudden price declines in the natural resource sector;

 

   

high state debt/GDP ratio;

 

   

instability in the local currency market;

 

   

lack of reform in the banking sector and a weak banking system providing limited liquidity to Russian enterprises;

 

   

pervasive capital flight;

 

   

corruption and the penetration of organized crime into the economy;

 

   

significant increases in unemployment and underemployment;

 

   

the impoverishment of a large portion of the Russian population;

 

   

large number of unprofitable enterprises which continue to operate due to deficiency in the existing bankruptcy procedure;

 

   

prevalent practice of tax evasion; and

 

   

growth of the black-market economy.

The Russian economy has been subject to abrupt downturns in the past. For example, on August 17, 1998, in the face of a rapidly deteriorating economic situation, the Russian Government defaulted on its ruble-denominated securities, the CBR stopped its support of the ruble and a temporary moratorium was imposed on certain hard currency payments. These actions resulted in an immediate and severe devaluation of the ruble and a sharp increase in the rate of inflation, a dramatic decline in the prices of Russian debt and equity securities and the inability of Russian issuers to raise funds in the international capital markets. These problems were aggravated by the near collapse of the Russian banking sector in connection with the same events. This further impaired the ability of the banking sector to act as a reliable source of liquidity to Russian companies and resulted in the widespread loss of bank deposits. In response to the global economic crisis in 2008 and 2009, the Russian government implemented a range of anti-crisis measures, however, there can be no assurance that if another crisis were to occur, the Russian government could do so again, or that any response would adequately ameliorate the situation and prevent a decline in the Russian economy. A decline in the Russian economy would have a material adverse effect on our business,

 

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financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, the global financial and economic crisis led to high volatility in debt and equity markets, reductions in foreign investment and sharp decreases in GDP around the world. Any decreases or fluctuations in world commodity prices, or, more generally, any deterioration of general economic conditions in Russia could adversely influence the economic stability and demand for various products and services, including those sold by us, and therefore could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The banking system in Russia remains underdeveloped.

The banking and other financial systems in Russia are not well-developed or regulated, and Russian legislation relating to banks and bank accounts is subject to varying interpretation and inconsistent application. The 1998 financial crisis resulted in the bankruptcy and liquidation of many Russian banks and almost entirely eliminated the developing market for commercial bank loans at that time. From April to July 2004, the Russian banking sector experienced further serious turmoil. As a result of various market rumors and certain regulatory and liquidity problems, several privately owned Russian banks experienced liquidity problems and were unable to attract funds on the inter-bank market or from their client base. Simultaneously, they faced large withdrawals of deposits by both retail and corporate customers. Several of these privately owned Russian banks collapsed or ceased or severely limited their operations. Russian banks owned or controlled by the government and foreign owned banks generally were not adversely affected by the turmoil.

Many Russian banks also do not meet international banking standards, and the transparency of the Russian banking sector in some respects still lags behind internationally accepted norms. Banking supervision is also often inadequate, as a result of which many banks do not follow existing CBR regulations with respect to lending criteria, credit quality, loan loss reserves, diversification of exposure or other requirements. The imposition of more stringent regulations or interpretations could lead to weakened capital adequacy and the insolvency of some banks. Prior to the onset of the current global economic crisis, there had been a rapid increase in lending by Russian banks, which many believe had been accompanied by a deterioration in the credit quality of the loan portfolio of those banks. In addition, a robust domestic corporate debt market was leading Russian banks to hold increasingly large amounts of Russian corporate ruble bonds in their portfolios, which further deteriorated the risk profile of the assets of Russian banks. The current global financial crisis has led to the collapse or bailout of some Russian banks and to significant liquidity constraints for others. Profitability levels of most Russian banks have been adversely affected. Indeed, the global crisis has prompted the government to inject substantial funds into the banking system amid reports of difficulties among Russian banks and other financial institutions. We periodically hold funds in a number of Russian banks, including VTB Bank and Russian Agricultural Bank. The bankruptcy or insolvency of one or more of these banks could adversely affect our business. The continuation or worsening of the banking crisis, or the bankruptcy or insolvency of any of the banks which hold our funds, could prevent us from accessing our funds for several days, result in the loss of our income or affect our ability to complete banking transactions in Russia, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Russia has experienced high levels of inflation in the past.

As a substantial portion of our expenses (including operating costs and capital expenditures) are denominated in rubles, the relative movement of inflation and exchange rates significantly affects our results of operations. The effects of inflation could cause some of our costs to rise. Russia has experienced high levels of inflation since the early 1990s. For example, inflation increased dramatically after the 1998 financial crisis, reaching a rate of 84.4% in that year. According to the Russian federal state statistics service, or Rosstat, inflation in the Russian Federation was 8.8% in 2010, 6.1% in 2011 and 6.6% in 2012. Certain of our costs, such as salaries and rent, are affected by inflation in Russia. To the extent the inflation causes these costs to increase, such inflation may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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The immaturity of legal systems, processes and practices in the Russian Federation may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks associated with the legal systems of the Russian Federation include, to varying degrees, inconsistencies between and among laws, presidential decrees, edicts and governmental and ministerial orders and resolutions; conflicting local, regional, and federal rules and regulations; the lack of judicial or administrative guidance regarding the interpretation of the applicable rules; the untested nature of the independence of the judiciary and its immunity from political, social and commercial influences; the relative inexperience of jurists, judges and courts in interpreting recently enacted legislation and complex commercial arrangements; a high degree of unchecked discretion on the part of governmental authorities; alleged corruption within the judiciary and governmental authorities; substantial gaps in the regulatory structure due to delays in or absence of implementing regulations; bankruptcy procedures that are not well-developed and are subject to abuse; and a lack of binding judicial precedent. All of these weaknesses affect our ability to protect and enforce our legal rights, including rights under contracts, and to defend against claims by others.

The relatively recent enactment of many laws, the lack of consensus about the scope, content and pace of political and economic reform and the rapid evolution of legal systems in ways that may not always coincide with market developments have resulted in legal ambiguities, inconsistencies and anomalies and, in certain cases, the enactment of laws without a clear constitutional or legislative basis. Legal and bureaucratic obstacles and corruption exist to varying degrees in each of the regions in which we operate, and these factors are likely to hinder our further development. These characteristics give rise to investment risks that do not exist in countries with more developed legal systems. The developing nature of the legal systems in Russia could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Unlawful, selective or arbitrary government action may have an adverse effect on our business.

Governmental authorities have a high degree of discretion in Russia and at times appear to act selectively or arbitrarily, without hearing or prior notice, and in a manner that is contrary to law or influenced by political or commercial considerations. Moreover, the Russian Government also has the power in certain circumstances, by regulation or government act, to interfere with the performance of, nullify or terminate contracts. Unlawful, selective or arbitrary governmental actions have reportedly included denial or withdrawal of licenses, sudden and unexpected tax audits, criminal prosecutions and civil actions. Federal and local government entities also appear to have used common defects in matters surrounding share issuances and registration as pretexts for court claims and other demands to invalidate the issuances or registrations or to void transactions, seemingly for political purposes. Moreover, selective, public criticism by Russian Government officials of Russian companies has in the past caused the price of publicly traded securities in such Russian companies to sharply decline, and there is no assurance that any such public criticism by Russian Government officials in the future will not have the same negative affect. Standard & Poors has expressed concerns that “Russian companies and their investors can be subjected to government pressure through selective implementation of regulations and legislation that is either politically motivated or triggered by competing business groups”. In this environment, our competitors could receive preferential treatment from the government, potentially giving them a competitive advantage. Unlawful, selective or arbitrary governmental action, if directed at our operations in Russia, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Russian companies can be forced into liquidation on the basis of formal non-compliance with certain requirements of Russian law.

Certain provisions of Russian law may allow a court to order the liquidation of a Russian legal entity on the basis of its formal non-compliance with certain requirements during formation, reorganization or during its operation. There have been cases in the past in which formal deficiencies in the establishment process of a Russian legal entity or non-compliance with provisions of Russian law have been used by Russian courts as a basis for the liquidation of a legal entity. Weaknesses in the Russian legal system create an uncertain legal environment, which

 

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makes the decisions of a Russian court or a governmental authority difficult, if not impossible, to predict. If any of our operating subsidiaries incorporated in Russia were subject to involuntary liquidation, such liquidation could lead to significant negative consequences for our business, financial condition and results of operations.

For example, under Russian corporate law, negative net assets calculated on the basis of the Russian accounting standards as of the end of the year following the second or any subsequent year of a company’s existence can serve as a basis for creditors to accelerate their claims and to demand payment of damages, as well as for a court to order the liquidation of the company upon a claim by governmental authorities. Many Russian companies have negative net assets due to very low historical value of property, plant and equipment reflected on their Russian accounting standards balance sheets. However, their solvency (defined as their ability to pay debts as they come due) is not otherwise adversely affected by such negative net assets. There are cases when courts have ordered mandatory liquidation of a company based on its negative net assets, though such company had continued to fulfill its obligations and had net assets in excess of the required minimum at the time of liquidation.

Shareholder liability under Russian corporate law could cause us to become liable for the obligations of our subsidiaries.

Russian law generally provides that shareholders in a Russian joint-stock company or participants in a limited liability company are not liable for that company’s obligations and risk only the loss of their investment. This may not be the case, however, when one legal entity is capable of determining decisions made by another entity. The legal entity capable of determining such decisions is called the effective parent entity (osnovnoye obshchestvo in Russian). The legal entity whose decisions are capable of being so determined is called the effective subsidiary entity (docherneye obshchestvo in Russian). The effective parent bears joint and several liability for transactions concluded by the effective subsidiary in carrying out business decisions if:

 

   

the effective parent gives binding directions to the effective subsidiary; and

 

   

the right of the effective parent to give binding instructions is set out in the charter of the effective subsidiary or in a contract between such entities.

In addition, under Russian law, an effective parent is secondarily liable for an effective subsidiary’s debts if an effective subsidiary becomes insolvent or bankrupt as a result of the action of an effective parent. In these instances, the other shareholders of the effective subsidiary may claim compensation for the effective subsidiary’s losses from the effective parent that causes the effective subsidiary to take action or fail to take action knowing that such action or failure to take action would result in losses. We could be found to be the effective parent of our subsidiaries, in which case we would become liable for their debts, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Investors in our ADSs may have limited recourse against us, our directors and executive officers because we conduct our operations outside the United States and all of our current directors and executive officers reside outside the United States.

Our presence outside the United States may limit investors’ legal recourse against us. We are incorporated under the laws of the Republic of Cyprus. All of our current directors and senior officers reside outside the United States, principally in the Russian Federation. Substantially all of our assets and the assets of our current directors and executive officers are located outside the United States, principally in the Russian Federation. As a result, investors may not be able to effect service of process within the United States upon our company or its directors and executive officers or to enforce U.S. court judgments obtained against our company or its directors and executive officers in Russia, Cyprus or other jurisdictions outside the United States, including actions under the civil liability provisions of U.S. securities laws. In addition, it may be difficult for investors to enforce, in original actions brought in courts in jurisdictions outside the United States, liabilities predicated upon US securities laws. There is no treaty between the United States and the Russian Federation providing for reciprocal

 

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recognition and enforcement of foreign court judgments in civil and commercial matters. These limitations may deprive investors of effective legal recourse for claims related to their investment in our ADSs.

Risks Relating to Taxation

Weaknesses and changes in the Russian tax system could materially and adversely affect our business and the value of investments in Russia.

We are subject to a broad range of taxes and other compulsory payments imposed at federal, regional and local levels, including, but not limited to, profits tax, VAT, corporate property tax and social contributions (effective since January 1, 2010, when the unified social tax was abolished). Tax laws, such as the Russian Tax Code, have been in force for a short period relative to tax laws in more developed market economies, and the implementation of these tax laws is often unclear or inconsistent. Historically, the system of tax collection has been relatively ineffective, resulting in continual changes to the interpretation of existing laws. Although the quality of Russian tax legislation has generally improved with the introduction of the first and second parts of the Russian Tax Code, the possibility exists that Russia may impose arbitrary or onerous taxes and penalties in the future, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. A large number of changes have been made to various chapters of the Russian Tax Code since their introduction. Since Russian federal, regional and local tax laws and regulations are subject to changes and some of the sections of the Russian Tax Code relating to the aforementioned taxes are comparatively new, interpretation of these regulations is often unclear or non-existent. Also, different interpretations of tax regulations exist both among and within government bodies at the federal, regional and local levels which creates uncertainties and inconsistent enforcement. The current practice is that private clarifications to specific taxpayers’ queries with respect to particular situations issued by the Russian Ministry of Finance are not binding on the Russian tax authorities and there can be no assurance that the Russian tax authorities will not take positions contrary to those set out in such clarifications. During the past several years the Russian tax authorities have shown a tendency to take more assertive positions in their interpretation of the tax legislation which has led to an increased number of material tax assessments issued by them as a result of tax audits. In practice, the Russian tax authorities generally interpret the tax laws in ways that do not favor taxpayers, who often have to resort to court proceedings against the Russian tax authorities to defend their position. In some instances Russian tax authorities have applied new interpretations of tax laws retroactively. There is no established precedent or consistent court practice in respect of these issues. Furthermore, in the absence of binding precedent, court rulings on tax or other related matters by different courts relating to the same or similar circumstances may also be inconsistent or contradictory. Taxpayers often have to resort to court proceedings to defend their position against the tax authorities.

The Russian tax authorities are increasingly taking a “substance over form” approach. While certain reductions in the rates, such as for profits tax, have been effected, it is expected that Russian tax legislation will become more sophisticated. The possibility exists that the Government may introduce additional revenue-raising measures. Although it is unclear how such measures would operate, the introduction of any such measures may affect the Group’s overall tax efficiency and may result in significant additional taxes becoming payable. There can be no assurance that the Russian Tax Code will not be changed in the future in a manner adverse to the stability and predictability of the tax system. These factors, together with the potential for state budget deficits, raise the risk of the imposition of additional taxes on us. The introduction of new taxes or amendments to current taxation rules may have a substantial impact on the overall amount of our tax liabilities. There is no assurance that we would not be required to make substantially larger tax payments in the future, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business may be deemed to receive unjustified tax benefits.

In its decision dated July 26, 2001, the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation, or the Constitutional Court, introduced the concept of “a taxpayer acting in a bad faith” without clearly stipulating the criteria for it. Similarly, this concept is not defined in Russian tax law. Nonetheless, this concept has been used by the tax

 

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authorities to deny, for instance, the taxpayer’s right to rely on the provisions of the tax law. The tax authorities and courts often exercise significant discretion in interpreting this concept in a manner that is unfavorable to taxpayers. On October 12, 2006, the Plenum of the Higher Arbitrazh Court of the Russian Federation, or the Higher Arbitrazh Court, issued Ruling No. 53, formulating the concept of an “unjustified tax benefit” which is defined in the ruling mainly by reference to specific examples of such tax benefits (e.g., tax benefits obtained as a result of a transaction that has no reasonable business purpose) which may lead to disallowance of their application. There is growing practice of the interpretation of this concept by the tax authorities or the courts and it is apparent that the tax authorities actively seek to apply this concept when challenging tax positions taken by taxpayers. Although the intention of Ruling No. 53 was to combat the abuse of tax law, based on cases brought to courts to date relating to Ruling No. 53, the tax authorities have started applying the “unjustified tax benefit” concept in a broader sense than may have been intended by the Higher Arbitrazh Court. In particular, we are aware of cases when this concept has been applied by the tax authorities in order to disallow benefits granted by double tax treaties. To date, in the majority of cases where this concept has been applied, the courts have ruled in favor of taxpayers, but it is not possible to determine whether the courts will follow these precedents in the future. In addition to the usual tax burden imposed on Russian tax payers, these conditions complicate tax planning and related business decisions. This uncertainty could possibly expose our group to significant fines and penalties and to enforcement measures, despite our best efforts at compliance, and could result in a greater than expected tax burden.

Our Russian subsidiaries are subject to tax audits by Russian tax authorities which may result in additional tax liabilities.

Tax declarations together with related documentation are subject to review and investigation by a number of authorities, which are enabled by Russian law to impose substantial fines and interest charges. Generally, taxpayers are subject to tax audits for a period of three calendar years immediately preceding the year in which the decision to conduct the audit is taken. Nevertheless in some cases the fact that a tax period has been reviewed by the tax authorities does not prevent further review of that tax period, or any tax declaration applicable to that tax period. In addition, on July 14, 2005, the Constitutional Court issued a decision that allows the statute of limitations for tax penalties to be extended beyond the three-year term set forth in the Tax Code if a court determines that a taxpayer has obstructed or hindered a field tax audit. Moreover, amendments introduced to the first part of the Russian Tax Code which came into effect on January 1, 2007 provide for the extension of the three year statute of limitations for tax liabilities if the actions of the taxpayer create insurmountable obstacles for the tax audit. Because none of the relevant terms is defined in Russian law, the tax authorities may have broad discretion to argue that a taxpayer has “obstructed” or “hindered” or “created insurmountable obstacles” in respect of an audit, effectively linking any difficulty experienced in the course of their tax audit with obstruction by the taxpayer and use that as a basis to seek tax adjustments and penalties beyond the three-year term. Therefore, the statute of limitations is not entirely effective. Tax audits may result in additional costs to our group if the relevant tax authorities conclude that our Russian entities did not satisfy their tax obligations in any given year. Such audits may also impose additional burdens on our group by diverting the attention of management resources. The outcome of these audits could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our companies established outside of Russia may be exposed to taxation in Russia.

The Russian Tax Code contains the concept of a permanent establishment in Russia as means for taxing foreign legal entities which carry on regular entrepreneurial activities in Russia beyond preparatory and auxiliary activities. The Russian double tax treaties with other countries also contain a similar concept. If a foreign company is treated as having a permanent establishment in Russia, it would be subject to Russian taxation in a manner broadly similar to the taxation of a Russian legal entity, but only to the extent of the amount of the foreign company’s income that is attributable to the permanent establishment in Russia. However, the practical application of the concept of a permanent establishment under Russian domestic law is not well developed and so foreign companies having even limited operations in Russia, which would not normally satisfy the conditions for

 

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creating a permanent establishment under international norms, may be at risk of being treated as having a permanent establishment in Russia and hence being exposed to Russian taxation. Furthermore, the Russian Tax Code contains attribution rules which are not sufficiently developed and there is a risk that the tax authorities might seek to assess Russian tax on the global income of a foreign company. Having a permanent establishment in Russia may also lead to other adverse tax implications, including challenging a reduced withholding tax rate on dividends under an applicable double tax treaty, potential effect on VAT and property tax obligations. There is also a risk that penalties could be imposed by the tax authorities for failure to register a permanent establishment with the Russian tax authorities. Recent events in Russia suggest that the tax authorities may more actively be seeking to investigate and assert whether foreign entities of our group operate through a permanent establishment in Russia. Any such taxes or penalties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Russian tax legislation in effect as of the date of this offering does not contain a concept of corporate tax residency. Russian companies are taxed on their worldwide income while foreign entities are taxed in Russia on income attributable to a permanent establishment and on Russian source income. The Russian government in its Main Directions of Russian Tax Policy for 2013 and the planned period of 2014-2015 has proposed the introduction of the concept of tax residency for legal entities to the domestic tax law. According to the proposals, a legal entity would be deemed a Russian tax resident based on a few criteria that would be in line with international tax treaties of the Russian Federation. No assurance can be currently given as to whether and when these amendments will be enacted, their exact nature, their potential interpretation by the tax authorities and the possible impact on us. We cannot rule out the possibility that, as a result of the introduction of changes to Russian tax legislation, certain of our companies established outside Russia might be deemed to be Russian tax residents, subject to all applicable Russian taxes.

We may encounter difficulties in obtaining lower rates of Russian withholding income tax envisaged by the Russia-Cyprus double tax treaty for dividends distributed from Russia.

Dividends paid by a Russian legal entity to a foreign legal entity are generally subject to Russian withholding income tax at a rate of 15%, although this tax rate may be reduced under an applicable double tax treaty. We intend to rely on the Russia-Cyprus double tax treaty. The tax treaty allows reduction of withholding income tax on dividends paid by a Russian company to a Cypriot company to 10% provided that the following conditions are met: (i) the Cypriot company is a tax resident of Cyprus within the meaning of the tax treaty; (ii) the Cypriot company is the beneficial owner of the dividends; (iii) the dividends are not attributable to a permanent establishment of the Cypriot company in Russia; and (iv) the treaty clearance procedures are duly performed. This rate may be further reduced to 5% if the direct investment of the Cypriot company in a Russian subsidiary paying the dividends is at least €100,000. Although we will seek to claim treaty protection, there is a risk that the applicability of the reduced rate of 5% or 10% may be challenged by Russian tax authorities. As a result, there can be no assurance that we would be able to avail ourselves of the reduced withholding income tax rate in practice. Specifically, our Cypriot holding company may incur a 15% withholding income tax at source on dividend payments from Russian subsidiaries if the treaty clearance procedures are not duly performed at the date when the dividend payment is made. In this case we may seek to claim as a refund the difference between the 15% tax withheld and the reduced rate of 10% or 5% as appropriate. However, there can be no assurance that such taxes would be refunded in practice.

Russian withholding tax may also be applied when dividends are received from Russian subsidiaries by the company’s non-Russian subsidiaries. Although we intend to rely on an applicable double tax treaty between Russia and the country where the relevant non-Russian subsidiary is resident, no assurance can be given that the reduced withholding tax rate would apply. In this respect it should be noted that in May 2009 the President of the Russian Federation included in his Budget Message regarding the Budget Policy for 2010-2012 a proposal to introduce an anti-avoidance mechanism with respect to double tax treaty benefits in cases where the ultimate beneficiaries of income do not reside in the relevant tax treaty jurisdiction. Furthermore, the Russian Ministry of Finance has issued a number of clarifications with respect to the tax treaty concept of “beneficial ownership”.

 

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Although the clarifications up to the date of this prospectus have been of limited use, they demonstrate an attempt by the Russian tax authorities to address the question of beneficial ownership of income in international financial transactions and holding structures. Due to the fact that some of our companies are located outside Russia, the future development and application of the “beneficial ownership” concept to those companies may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In August 2011 the Russian government proposed in its Main Directions of Russian Tax Policy for 2012 and the planned period of 2013-2014, or the Directions, legislative changes concerning an anti-avoidance mechanism with respect to double tax treaty benefits in cases where ultimate beneficiaries of income do not reside in the relevant double tax treaty country. Moreover, in the Directions the Russian government has stated publicly that it plans to amend the Russian Tax Code and establish the rules on controlled foreign companies. It is currently uncertain whether and when these initiatives may be introduced, as well as how they would be interpreted and applied by the tax authorities and/ or courts in practice and what effect it may have on taxpayers. The imposition of additional tax liabilities as a result of the application of this rule to transactions carried out by us may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Russian transfer pricing legislation may require pricing adjustments and impose additional tax liabilities with respect to all controlled transactions.

Russian transfer pricing legislation became effective in the Russian Federation on January 1, 1999. This legislation allowed the tax authorities to make transfer-pricing adjustments and impose additional tax liabilities in respect of certain types of transactions (“controlled” transactions). Special transfer pricing provisions were established for operations with securities and derivatives. However, Russian transfer pricing rules were vaguely drafted, generally leaving wide scope for interpretation by Russian tax authorities and courts. There was little guidance (although some court decisions are available) as to how these rules should be applied. Following the adoption of Federal Law No. 227-FZ “On amendments to certain legislative acts of the Russian Federation in connection with the improvement of pricing principles” dated July 18, 2011, the new transfer pricing rules became effective from January 1, 2012. Compared to the previous Russian transfer pricing rules, the new rules are more technically elaborate and, to a certain extent, better aligned with the international transfer pricing principles developed by the OECD. The list of the “controlled” transactions under the new transfer pricing legislation includes transactions with related parties and certain types of cross border transactions. The amendments have toughened considerably the previous transfer pricing rules, by, among other things, effectively shifting the burden of proving market prices from the tax authorities to the taxpayer and obliging the taxpayer to keep specific documentation. The new rules also permit taxpayers to enter into advance pricing agreements with the tax authorities; however, it is unclear how such agreements will operate in practice. Special transfer pricing rules continue to apply to transactions with securities and derivatives. It is currently difficult to evaluate what effect these new provisions may have on us. Accordingly, due to the uncertainties in the interpretation of transfer pricing legislation, no assurance can be given that the tax authorities will not challenge the level of prices applied by us and make adjustments, which could affect our tax position. Unless such tax adjustments are successfully contested in court, the resulting increase in tax due could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The above factors increase the risk of the imposition of additional taxes on us. The introduction of new taxes or amendments to current taxation rules may have a substantial impact on the overall amount of our tax liabilities, representing cash outflows and a decrease in the amount of net income earned by us.

ADS holders outside of Russia may be subject to Russian tax for income earned upon a sale, exchange or disposal of our ADSs.

In the event that the proceeds from a sale, exchange or disposal of ADSs are deemed to be received from a source within Russia, a non-resident holder that is an individual may be subject to Russian tax in respect of such proceeds at a rate of 30% of the gain (such gain being computed as the sales price less any available documented cost deduction, including the acquisition price of the ADSs and other documented expenses, such as depositary expenses and brokers’ fees), subject to any available double tax treaty relief, provided that the necessary

 

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requirements to qualify for the treaty relief and the appropriate administrative requirements under the Russian tax legislation have been met. For example, holders of ADSs that are eligible for the benefits of the United States-Russia double tax treaty should generally not be subject to tax in Russia on any gain arising from the disposal of ADSs, provided that the gain is not attributable to a permanent establishment or a fixed base that is or was located in Russia and/or provided that less than 50% of our fixed assets consist of immovable property situated in Russia (as defined in the treaty). Because the determination of whether 50% or more of our fixed assets consist of immovable property situated in Russia is inherently factual and is made on an on-going basis, and because the relevant Russian legislation and regulations are not entirely clear, there can be no assurance that immovable property situated in Russia does not currently, or will not, constitute 50% or more of our assets. If 50% or more of our assets were to consist of immovable property situated in Russia, the benefits of the United States-Russia double tax treaty may not be available to an ADS holder.

Changes in the double tax treaty between Russia and Cyprus may significantly increase our tax burden.

A company that is tax resident in Cyprus is subject to Cypriot taxation and qualifies for benefits available under the Cypriot tax treaty network, including the Russia-Cyprus double tax treaty. We can provide no assurance that the double tax treaty will not be renegotiated or revoked. Adverse changes in, or the cancellation of, the Russia-Cyprus double tax treaty may significantly increase our tax burden and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be deemed to be a tax resident outside of Cyprus.

According to the provisions of the Cyprus Income Tax Law, a company is considered to be a resident of Cyprus for tax purposes if its management and control are exercised in Cyprus. The concept of “management and control” is not defined in the Cypriot tax legislation, however, it is generally considered that a company is managed and controlled in Cyprus through the decision making power of its board of directors being exercised in Cyprus. Where, as with our company, the majority of the board of directors is comprised of tax residents of Russia, there may be increased risk that the company is not managed and controlled in Cyprus and, therefore, not a tax resident in Cyprus. If we are deemed not to be a tax resident in Cyprus, we may not be subject to the Cypriot tax regime other than in respect of Cyprus sourced income and we may be subject to the tax regime of the country in which we are deemed to be a tax resident. Further, we would not be eligible for benefits under the tax treaties entered into between Cyprus and other countries. A company incorporated and currently a tax resident in Cyprus cannot be considered by the Russian tax authorities to be a tax resident in Russia. However, if applicable Russian law is amended so that a company that is a tax resident in Cyprus can also be considered a tax resident of Russia, the tax treaty in force between Cyprus and Russia provides that such a company shall be deemed to be a tax resident of the state in which the place of effective management of the company is situated. A protocol to this treaty was signed in October 2010 and ratified by Cyprus in September 2011 and the Russian Duma in February 2012. This protocol provides that the process of determining the effective management in this case will be achieved through the two states endeavoring to determine the place of effective management by mutual agreement having regard to all relevant factors. Where the majority of our board of directors comprises tax residents or citizens of Russia, this may pose a risk that we, even if we are managed and controlled in Cyprus and therefore a tax resident in Cyprus, may be deemed to have a permanent establishment in Russia or elsewhere. Such a permanent establishment could be subject to taxation of the jurisdiction of the permanent establishment on the profits allocable to the permanent establishment. If we are tax resident in a jurisdiction outside of Cyprus or are deemed to have a permanent establishment in Russia or elsewhere, our tax burden may increase significantly, which, in turn, may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be subject to defense tax in Cyprus.

Cypriot companies must pay a Special Contribution for the Defense Fund of the Republic of Cyprus, or the defense tax, at a rate of 20% on deemed dividend distributions to the extent that their ultimate beneficial owners are Cypriot tax residents. A Cypriot company that does not distribute at least 70% of its after tax profits within two

 

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years from the end of the year in which the profits arose, is deemed to have distributed this amount as a dividend two years after that year end. The amount of this deemed dividend distribution, subject to the defense tax, is reduced by any actual dividend paid out of the profits of the relevant year at any time up to the date of the deemed distribution and the resulting balance of profits will be subject to the defense tax to the extent of the appropriation of shares held in the company at that time by Cyprus tax residents. The profits to be taken into account in determining the deemed dividend do not include fair value adjustments to any movable or immovable property.

The defense tax payable as a result of a deemed dividend distribution is paid in the first instance by the company which may recover such payment from its Cypriot shareholders by deducting the amount from an actual dividend paid to such shareholders from the relevant profits. To the extent that we are unable to recover this amount due to a change in shareholders or no actual dividend is ever paid out of the relevant profits, we will suffer the cost of this defense tax. Imposition of this tax could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition if we are unable to recover the tax from shareholders as described above.

In September 2011, the Commissioner of the Inland Revenue Department of Cyprus issued Circular 2011/10, which exempted from the defense tax any profits of a company that is tax resident in Cyprus imputed indirectly to shareholders that are themselves tax resident in Cyprus to the extent that these profits are indirectly apportioned to shareholders who are ultimately not Cyprus tax residents.

Depending upon the value and the nature of our assets and the amount and nature of our income over time, we could be classified as a passive foreign investment company or PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

We will be classified as a PFIC in any taxable year if either: (a) 50% or more of the fair market value of our gross assets (determined on the basis of a quarterly average) for the taxable year produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income, or (b) 75% or more of our gross income for the taxable year is passive income. As a publicly traded foreign corporation we intend for this purpose to treat the aggregate fair market value of our gross assets as being equal to the aggregate value of our outstanding stock (“market capitalization”) plus the total amount of our liabilities and to treat the excess of the fair market value of our assets over their book value as a nonpassive asset to the extent attributable to our nonpassive income. Because we currently hold, and expect to continue to hold, a substantial amount of cash and cash equivalents and other passive assets used in our business, and because the value of our gross assets is likely to be determined in large part by reference to our market capitalization securities, we would likely become a PFIC for a given taxable year if the market price of our ADSs were to decrease significantly. The application of the PFIC rules is subject to uncertainty in several respects, and we must make a separate determination after the close of each taxable year as to whether we were a PFIC for such year. If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. investor held our ADSs, the U.S. investor might be subject to increased U.S. federal income tax liability and to additional reporting obligations. We do not intend to provide the information necessary for the U.S. investor to make a qualified electing fund election with respect to our ADSs. See “Taxation – United States Federal Income Tax Considerations – Passive Foreign Investment Companies.”

Our interest expenses may not be deductible.

In May 2012, the House of Representatives of Cyprus enacted laws, effective as of January 1, 2012, which provide that if a Cyprus parent company incurs an interest expense on the acquisition of shares of a company that is a wholly-owned subsidiary (whether directly or indirectly and irrespective of whether the subsidiary is a Cyprus or foreign company), the interest expense will now be deductible for tax purposes by the parent company. This deduction will only be available provided the subsidiary owns assets that are used in its business and the amount of interest deducted is limited and proportionate to the amount and value of assets used in the business. If we are unable to deduct our interest expenses for tax purposes, our results of operations and financial conditions may be materially adversely affected.

 

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Adverse financial measures may be adopted in Cyprus in connection with its bailout.

In June 2012, the government of Cyprus applied for financial assistance from the European Central Bank, the EU and the IMF, referred to together as the Troika. As economic conditions in Cyprus deteriorated, the government of Cyprus ordered all banking institutions in Cyprus to temporarily close from and including March 15, 2013 to March 27, 2013, to avoid a run on deposits held in the country’s banks, and entered into intensive negotiations with the Troika. On March 24, 2013, the government of Cyprus and the Troika reached a provisional agreement regarding the provision of a €10 billion loan and related finance package to Cyprus, such loan and finance package being conditional on Cyprus implementing a comprehensive economic adjustment program, or the Cyprus Economic Adjustment Program. The Cyprus Economic Adjustment Program will include a scheme for the reorganization of the Cypriot banking system which will result in the Cyprus Popular Bank Public Co Ltd, or the Cyprus Popular Bank, Cyprus’ second largest bank, being absorbed into Bank of Cyprus plc and in deposit holders with credit balances in excess of €100,000 held with Cyprus Popular Bank or Bank of Cyprus plc suffering significant or total losses. As a part of the implementation of the Cyprus Economic Adjustment Program, temporary restrictions on bank transfers and withdrawals from banking institutions in Cyprus have been imposed. In addition, the government of Cyprus and the Troika have reached an agreement on a Memorandum of Understanding, which is subject to ratification by the national parliaments of the member states of the Eurogroup, pursuant to which the government of Cyprus has passed legislation for the increase of the income tax rate from 10% to 12.5% and an increase of the rate of the special defence contribution tax from 15% to 30%. These changes to the income tax rate and the special defense contribution tax rate would currently only impact those of our shareholders that are residents of Cyprus under certain circumstances. The measures implemented to date have not had, and are not expected to have, a material impact on holding companies, such as us, that do not have significant deposits in Cyprus banks or operations in Cyprus. However, further disruption to the Cyprus banking system, or additional changes to implement the Cyprus Economic Adjustment Program, are possible and we cannot be certain that such disruptions or changes will not adversely affect our financial condition or our shareholders who are not residents of Cyprus.

Risks Relating to the Offering

We expect that our ADSs’ price will fluctuate significantly, which could cause the value of your investment to decline, and you may not be able to resell your ADSs at or above the initial public offering price.

Securities markets worldwide have experienced, and are likely to continue to experience, significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market or political conditions, could reduce the market price of our ADSs regardless of our results of operations. The trading price of our ADSs is likely to be volatile and subject to wide price fluctuations in response to various factors, including:

 

   

market conditions in the broader stock market;

 

   

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly financial and operating results;

 

   

introduction of new services by us, our competitors or our clients;

 

   

issuance of new or changed securities analysts’ reports or recommendations;

 

   

investor perceptions of us and the industries in which we or our clients operate;

 

   

sales, or anticipated sales, of large blocks of our ADSs or class B shares, including those by our existing investors;

 

   

additions or departures of key personnel;

 

   

regulatory or political developments;

 

   

litigation and governmental investigations; and

 

   

changing economic conditions.

 

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These and other factors may cause the market price and demand for our ADSs to fluctuate substantially, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their ADSs and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our ADSs. In addition, in the past, when the market price for a security has been volatile, holders of that security have sometimes instituted class action litigation against the company that issued the security. If any of our shareholders or the holders of our ADSs brought a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management from our business, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

There has been no prior public market for our ADSs and an active trading market may not develop.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our ADSs or class B shares. An active trading market may not develop following completion of this offering or, if developed, may not be sustained. The lack of an active market may impair your ability to sell your ADSs at the time you wish to sell them or at a price that you consider reasonable. The lack of an active market may also reduce the fair market value of your ADSs. An inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital by selling ADSs or other securities and may impair our ability to acquire other companies by using our securities as consideration.

If we do not meet the expectations of equity research analysts, if they do not publish research reports about our business or if they issue unfavorable commentary or downgrade our ADSs, the price of our ADSs could decline.

The trading market for our ADSs will rely in part on the research and reports that equity research analysts publish about us and our business. The analysts’ estimates are based upon their own opinions and are often different from our estimates or expectations. If our results of operations are below the estimates or expectations of public market analysts and investors, the price of our ADSs could decline. Moreover, the price of our ADSs could decline if one or more securities analysts downgrade our ADSs or if those analysts issue other unfavorable commentary or cease publishing reports about us or our business.

We are an “emerging growth company” and we cannot be certain whether the reduced requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our ADSs less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 effective on April 5, 2012, or the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies.” Most of such requirements relate to disclosures that we would only be required to make if we cease to be a foreign private issuer in the future. Nevertheless, as a foreign private issuer that is an emerging growth company, we will not be required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act for up to five fiscal years after the date of this offering. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of (a) the last day of our fiscal year during which we have total annual gross revenues of at least U.S.$1.0 billion; (b) the last day of our fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering; (c) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than U.S.$1.0 billion in non-convertible debt; or (d) the date on which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the Exchange Act. When we are no longer deemed to be an emerging growth company, we will not be entitled to the exemptions provided in the JOBS Act discussed above. We cannot predict if investors will find our ADSs less attractive as a result of our reliance on exemptions under the JOBS Act. If some investors find our ADSs less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our ADSs and our ADSs’ price may be more volatile.

We have not yet assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

We will be required to comply with the internal control, evaluation and certification requirements of Section 404(a) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 in our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ending December 31,

 

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2014. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm will be required to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 beginning with our annual report on Form 20-F following the date on which we cease to qualify as an “emerging growth company,” which may be up to five full fiscal years following the date of this offering. We have not yet commenced the process of assessing the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. This process will require the investment of substantial time and resources, including by our chief financial officer and other members of our senior management. As a result, this process may divert internal resources and take a significant amount of time and effort to complete. In addition, we cannot predict the outcome of this determination and whether we will need to implement remedial actions in order to implement effective control over financial reporting. In connection with the audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011, our independent public registered accounting firm identified a material weakness in our internal controls with respect to our financial statements closing process for which we have developed and implemented a remedial plan. Although no material weaknesses were identified by our independent registered public accounting firm in connection with their audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012, any failure of our internal controls could result in us not being able to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective. If in subsequent years we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or if our auditors express an opinion that our internal control over financial reporting is ineffective, we could lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.

Investors in our ADSs will experience immediate and substantial book value dilution after this offering.

The initial public offering price of our ADSs will be substantially higher than the net tangible book value per ADS as of December 31, 2012. Based on our net tangible book value as of December 31, 2012, if you purchase our ADSs in this offering, you will suffer immediate dilution of approximately U.S.$16.67 per ADS, calculated by subtracting the net tangible book value per ordinary share immediately upon the completion of this offering from the assumed initial offering price per ADS.

The class B shares underlying the ADSs are not listed and may be illiquid.

The class B shares underlying the ADSs are neither listed nor traded on any stock exchange, and we do not intend to apply for the listing or admission to trading of the class B shares on any stock exchange. As a result, a withdrawal of class B shares by a holder of ADSs, whether by election or due to certain other events will result in that holder obtaining securities that are significantly less liquid than the ADSs and the price of those class B shares may be discounted as a result of such withdrawal.

Our ADSs may be traded on more than one market and this may result in increased volatility and price variations between such markets.

We intend to file an application for the admission of the ADSs to trading on, and the inclusion of the ADSs into a quotation list of, MICEX that, if approved, is expected to take place at the earliest on the date of the listing of the ADSs on Nasdaq. Trading in our ADSs on these markets could be made in different currencies (U.S. dollars on the Nasdaq Global Select Market and Russian rubles on MICEX) and at different times (due to different time zones, trading days and public holidays in the United States and Russia). The trading prices of our ADSs on these two markets may differ due to these and other factors. The liquidity of trading in our ADSs on MICEX will likely initially be limited. Trading of a small number of ADSs on that market could adversely impact the price of our ADSs significantly and could, in turn, impact the price in the United States. ADSs will be completely fungible between both markets. Any decrease in the trading price of our ADSs on one of these markets could cause a decrease in the trading price of our ordinary ADSs on the other market.

 

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Future sales of ADSs or ordinary shares by existing shareholders could cause the price of our ADSs to decline.

If our existing shareholders sell, or indicate an intent to sell, substantial amounts of our ADSs or ordinary shares, including both class A shares and class B shares, in the market after the 180-day contractual lock-up and other legal restrictions on resale discussed in this prospectus lapse, the trading price of our ADSs could decline significantly and could decline below the initial public offering price. We cannot predict the effect, if any, that future sales of these ADSs or ordinary shares or the availability of these ADSs or ordinary shares for sale will have on the market price of our ADSs. Upon the completion of this offering, we will have outstanding 52,000,000 ordinary shares, including those represented by ADSs. Of these, 12,000,000 ADSs, plus any ADSs sold pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional ADSs, will be immediately freely tradable, without restriction, in the public market. Our officers, directors and our existing shareholders have executed lock-up agreements preventing them from selling any ADSs or ordinary shares held by them prior to this offering that they hold for a period of 180 days from the date of this prospectus, subject to certain limited exceptions and extensions described under the section titled “Underwriting.” J.P. Morgan Securities, LLC and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC may, in their sole discretion, permit our officers, directors and current shareholders to sell shares prior to the expiration of these lock-up agreements.

In addition, 3,640,000 class B shares reserved for future issuance under our employee stock option plan and 40,000,000 class B shares issuable upon the exchange by holders of our class A shares could become eligible for sale in the market in the future, subject to certain legal and contractual limitations including expiration of the lock-up agreements pertaining to this offering. If our existing shareholders sell substantial amounts of our ADSs or ordinary shares in the market, or if the public perceives that such sales could occur, this could significantly harm the market price of our ADSs, even if there is no relationship between such sales and the performance of our business, which could also affect our ability to raise additional capital through a further offering of equity securities.

In addition, we have granted registration rights to Saldivar Investments Limited, Sergey A. Solonin, Palmway Holdings Limited, Antana International Corporation, Andrey N. Romanenko, Dargle International Limited, Igor N. Mikhailov, Bralvo Limited, E1 Limited, Mail.ru Group Limited and Mitsui & Co., Ltd., who collectively own 100% of our issued and outstanding shares as of the date of this prospectus. To the extent these shares are sold into the market, the market price of our ADSs could decline.

You have no legal interest in the underlying class B shares.

ADS holders acquire the beneficial, and not the legal, interest in the underlying class B shares, which the depositary holds on trust for them, under the terms of the deposit agreement. The intended effect of the trust is to ring-fence the class B shares in the hands of the depositary by conferring a property interest on ADS holders as beneficiaries. The interest of the ADS holders as beneficiaries in trust assets, which are the class B shares, is indirect, in the sense that in the normal course they do not have any direct recourse to the class B shares nor do they have any direct right of action against us.

You may be subject to limitations on transfer of your ADSs.

Your ADSs are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its transfer books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. In addition, the depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of ADSs generally when our books or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary deems it advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason in accordance with the terms of the deposit agreement.

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and views of future events. The forward looking statements are contained principally in the sections titled “Prospectus Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business.” Some of these forward looking statements can be identified by terms and phrases such as “anticipate”, “should”, “likely”, “foresee”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “intend”, “continue”, “could”, “may”, “plan”, “project”, “predict”, “will”, and similar expressions. These forward-looking statements include statements relating to:

 

   

our goals and strategies;

 

   

our ability to grow our payment volumes;

 

   

our ability to maintain the size of our distribution network;

 

   

our ability to maintain our relationships with our merchants and agents;

 

   

the expected growth of Visa Qiwi Wallet and alternative methods of payment;

 

   

our ability to continue to develop new and attractive products and services;

 

   

our future business development, results of operations and financial condition;

 

   

our ability to continue to develop new technologies and upgrade our existing technologies;

 

   

our ability to grow our advertising revenue and other value added services;

 

   

competition in our industry;

 

   

projected revenue, profits, earnings and other estimated financial information; and

 

   

developments in, or changes, to the laws, regulation and governmental policies governing our business and industry.

The preceding list is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all of our forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of future performance, taking into account the information currently available to us. These statements are only predictions based upon our current expectations and projections about future events. There are important factors that could cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from the results, level of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In particular, you should consider the numerous risks provided under “Risk Factors” in this prospectus.

These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this prospectus. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. The foregoing factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those contemplated in any forward-looking statement included in this prospectus should not be construed as exhaustive. You should read this prospectus and the documents filed as exhibits to the registration statement, of which this prospectus is a part, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

The selling shareholders will receive all of the net proceeds from the sale of 12,000,000 ADSs offered under this prospectus. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the ADSs in this offering.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have historically paid dividends and, while we have not adopted a formal dividend policy, we currently expect that we will continue to do so from time to time in the future. Any future determination regarding the payment of a dividend will depend on a range of factors, including the availability of distributable profits, our liquidity and financial position, our future growth initiatives and strategic plans, including possible acquisitions, restrictions imposed by our financing arrangements, tax considerations and other relevant factors. The payment of all future dividends, if any, must be recommended by our board of directors, at its sole discretion, and, in relation to year-end dividends, may be subject to shareholder approval in accordance with our articles of association. Under Cyprus law, we are not allowed to make distributions if the distribution would reduce our shareholders’ equity below the sum of the issued share capital, including any share premium, and the reserves which we must maintain under Cyprus law and our articles of association.

In connection with our results of operations for the first quarter of 2013 and consistent with past practice, we expect to pay a dividend during the period following the closing of this offering, the exact amount and date of which will be determined by our board of directors.

As a holding company, the level of our income and our ability to pay dividends depend primarily upon the receipt of dividends and other distributions from our subsidiaries. The payment of dividends by our subsidiaries is contingent upon the sufficiency of their earnings, cash flows, regulatory capital requirements, and distributable profits.

To the extent that we declare and pay dividends, holders of ADSs on the relevant record date will be entitled to receive dividends payable in respect of class B shares underlying the ADSs, subject to the deposit agreement. Cash dividends may be paid to the depositary in any currency and, except as otherwise described under “Description of American Depositary Shares”, will be converted into U.S. dollars by the depositary and paid to holders of ADSs net of applicable fees and charges of, and expenses incurred by, the depositary and net of taxes withheld.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our capitalization as of December 31, 2012 on an actual basis derived from our consolidated financial statements.

You should read this table together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto and information contained elsewhere in this prospectus, including information in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

     Actual as of
December 31, 2012
 
       RUB         U.S.$    
     (in millions)  

Borrowings (long-term and short-term)

     65        2   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Equity:

    

Share capital

     1          

Additional paid-in capital

     1,876        62   

Other reserve

     101        3   

Accumulated profit

     569        19   

Translation reserve

     1          
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total equity attributable to equity holders of
QIWI plc

     2,548        84   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-controlling interests

     (49     (2

Total equity

     2,499        82   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total capitalization

     2,564        84   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in the ADSs, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per ADS and our net tangible book value per ADS after this offering. Dilution results from the fact that the initial public offering price per class B share underlying our ADSs is substantially in excess of the net tangible book value per ordinary share. Our net tangible book value as of December 31, 2012 was approximately RUB 523 million (U.S.$17 million), or RUB 10.06 per ordinary share (U.S.$0.33). Net tangible book value per ordinary share represents the amount of total assets, excluding intangible assets and goodwill, minus the amount of total liabilities, divided by the total number of ordinary shares outstanding at the end of the period.

Without taking into account any other changes in such net tangible book value after December 31, 2012, based upon an assumed initial public offering price of U.S.$17.00 per ADS, which is the midpoint of the range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, new investors of ADSs in this offering would be diluted by U.S.$16.67 or 98%. Dilution is determined by subtracting net tangible book value per ordinary share immediately upon the completion of this offering from the assumed initial public offering price per ADS.

 

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EXCHANGE RATES

The following tables show, for the periods indicated, certain information regarding the exchange rates between the Russian ruble and the U.S. dollar, based on the official exchange rate quoted by the CBR.

 

Period

   Period End      Period  average(1)      High      Low  

Year ended December 31, 2008

     29.38         24.87         29.38         23.13   

Year ended December 31, 2009

     30.24         31.77         36.43         28.67   

Year ended December 31, 2010

     30.48         30.38         31.78         28.93   

Year ended December 31, 2011

     32.20         29.39         32.68         27.26   

Year ended December 31, 2012

     30.37         31.07         34.04         28.95   

January 2013

     30.03         30.23         30.42         30.03   

February 2013

     30.62         30.16        
30.62
  
     29.93   

March 2013

     31.08         30.80         31.08         30.51   

April 2013 (through April 27)

     31.22         31.35         31.72         30.88   

 

(1) The period average in respect of a year is calculated as the average of the exchange rates on the last business day of each month for the relevant annual period. The period average in respect of a month is calculated as the average of the exchange rates for each business day in the relevant month.

 

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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

The following tables set forth our selected consolidated financial and other data. You should read the following selected consolidated financial and other data together with the information in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Risk Factors,” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. Historical results are not indicative of the results to be expected in the future. Our financial statements have been prepared in accordance with IFRS as published by the IASB.

The following tables also contain translations of ruble amounts into U.S. dollars for amounts presented as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012. These translations are solely for convenience of the reader and were calculated at the rate of RUB 30.37 per U.S.$ 1.00, which equals to official exchange rate quoted by the CBR on December 31, 2012.

The summary consolidated financial data as of and for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements for those periods, which are included in this prospectus.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions, except per share data)  

Consolidated Income Statement Data:

  

Revenue

     6,158        8,158        8,911        293   

Cost of revenue

     (3,751     (5,573     (5,454     (180

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (1,420     (1,543     (1,838     (60

Depreciation and amortization

     (171     (141     (129     (4

Impairment of intangible assets

                   (4     0   

Profit from operations

     816        901        1,486        49   

Gain on bargain purchase

            15                 

Gain from disposal of subsidiaries

     7        7        (1       

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

     9                        

Other income

     21        10        17        1   

Other expenses

     (34     (73     (29     (1

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

            (12     (21     (1

Share of loss of associates

            (23     (13     (1

Interest income

     5        6        26        1   

Interest expense

     (3     (4     (9       

Profit before tax from continuing operations

     821        827        1,456        48   

Income tax expense

     (204     (241     (408     (13

Net profit from continuing operations

     617        586        1,048        35   

Gain (loss) from discontinued operations

     138        (156     (240     (8

Net profit

     755        430        808        27   

Attributable to:

        

Equity holders of the parent

     693        520        910        30   

Non-controlling interests

     62        (90     (102     (3

Weighted average number of shares

        

Basic

     52        52        52        n/a   

Diluted

     52        52        52        n/a   

Earnings per share

        

Basic

     13.33        10.00        17.50        0.57   

Diluted

     13.17        10.00        17.50        0.57   

Dividends declared per share

        

RUB

     7.19        8.01        16.67        n/a   

U.S.$

     0.24        0.26        0.55        n/a   

 

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     As of December 31,  
     2010      2011      2012  
     RUB      RUB      RUB      U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

           

Cash and cash equivalents

     6,892         8,810         9,943         327   

Total current assets

     10,410         12,112         15,607         514   

Total assets

     13,516         15,306         18,709         616   

Total equity

     2,348         2,355         2,499         82   

Total debt

     67         190         65         2   

Total liabilities

     11,168         12,951         16,210         534   

Total equity and liabilities

     13,516         15,306         18,709         616   

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions, except as otherwise indicated)  

Other Financial and Operating Data:

        

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Distribution(1)

     2,476        2,494        2,845        93   

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Wallet(1)

     296        690        1,241        40   

Other(1)(2)

     27        70        83        3   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted net revenue(3)

     2,799        3,254        4,169        136   

Adjusted EBITDA(3)

     1,067        1,183        1,851        61   

Adjusted net profit(3)

     768        721        1,306        43   

Qiwi Distribution

        

Active kiosks and terminals (units)(4)

     158,867        170,384        169,102        n/a   

Payment volume

     360,683        408,254        464,806        15,303   

Average net revenue yield(5)

     0.69     0.61     0.61     n/a   

Qiwi Wallet

        

Active Qiwi Wallet accounts (number at period end)(6)

     5,979,057        8,147,376        11,425,813        n/a   

Payment volume

     26,669        65,409        151,508        4,988   

Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account(7)

     4,460        8,028        13,260        431   

Average net revenue yield(5)

     1.11     1.05     0.82     n/a   

 

 

(1) See note 9 of our annual consolidated financial statements.
(2) Other includes our corporate and other segment, intercompany eliminations, and timing of expense recognition.
(3) See “—Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for how we define and calculate adjusted net revenue, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted net profit as non-IFRS financial measures and reconciliations of these measures to revenue, in the case of adjusted net revenue, and net profit, in the case of adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit.
(4) We measure the numbers of our kiosks and terminals on a daily basis, with only those kiosks and terminals being taken into calculation through which at least one payment has been processed during the day, which we refer to as active kiosks and terminals. The period end numbers of our kiosks and terminals are calculated as an average of the amount of active kiosks and terminals for the last 30 days of the respective reporting period.
(5) Average net revenue yield is defined as segment net revenue divided by total payment volume per segment.
(6) Number of active Qiwi Wallet accounts is defined as the number of wallets through which at least one payment has been made or that have been loaded or reloaded in the 12 months preceding the end of the relevant reporting period.
(7) Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account is defined as total payment volumes in our Qiwi Wallet segment divided by the number of active wallets at the end of the relevant reporting period.

Non-IFRS Financial Measures

We present adjusted net revenue, adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit, each of which are non-IFRS financial measures. You should not consider these non-IFRS financial measures as substitutes for or superior to revenue, in the case of adjusted net revenue, or net profit, in the case of adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit, each prepared in accordance with IFRS. Furthermore, because these non-IFRS financial measures are not

 

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determined in accordance with IFRS, they are susceptible to varying calculations and may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures presented by other companies. We encourage investors and others to review our financial information in its entirety and not rely on a single financial measure.

Adjusted net revenue

Adjusted net revenue is calculated by subtracting cost of revenue from revenue and adding back payroll and related taxes. Adjusted net revenue is a key measure used by management to observe our operational profitability since it reflects our portion of the revenue net of fees that we pass through, primarily to our agents. In addition, under IFRS, consumer fees are recorded as net revenue whereas merchant fees are recorded as gross revenue. Therefore, in order to analyze our two sources of payment processing fees on a comparative basis, management reviews adjusted net revenue in addition to gross revenue. We add back payroll and related taxes because, although they are an essential part of our distribution network, these expenses are not directly linked to payment volume. Nevertheless, payroll and related taxes represents an important portion of our operating costs and affect liquidity and financial performance.

The following table reconciles adjusted net revenue to revenue.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Revenue

     6,158        8,158        8,911        293   

Minus: Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (3,751     (5,573     (5,454     (180

Plus: Payroll and related taxes

     392        669        712        23   

Adjusted net revenue

     2,799        3,254        4,169        136   

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is defined as net profit before income tax expense, interest expense, interest income and depreciation and amortization, as further adjusted for (loss) gain from discontinued operations, share of loss of an associate, foreign exchange (loss) gain, net, change in fair value of derivative financial assets, other expenses, other income, gain from disposal of subsidiaries, corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations and gain from bargain purchase. We present adjusted EBITDA as a supplemental performance measure because we believe that it facilitates operating performance comparisons from period to period and company to company by backing out potential differences caused by variations in capital structures (affecting interest expenses, net), changes in foreign exchange rates that impact financial asset and liabilities denominated in currencies other than our functional currency (affecting foreign exchange (loss) gain, net), tax positions (such as the impact on periods or companies of changes in effective tax rates), reversal of impairments (affecting other income), the age and book depreciation of fixed assets (affecting relative depreciation expense), non-cash charges (affecting share-based payments expenses), and certain one-time expenses (affecting offering expenses). Adjusted EBITDA also excludes other expenses and share in losses of associates because we believe it is helpful to view the performance of our business excluding the impact of entities that we do not control, and because our share of the net income (loss) of the associate and other expenses includes items that have other been excluded from adjusted EBITDA (such as finance expenses, net, tax on income and depreciation and amortization). In addition, adjusted EBITDA excludes the non-cash impact of changes in the fair value of derivate financial assets and of discontinued operations that we do not believe reflect the underlying performance of our business. Because adjusted EBITDA facilitates internal comparisons of operating performance on a more consistent basis, we also use adjusted EBITDA in measuring our performance relative to that of our competitors.

 

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Some limitations of adjusted EBITDA are:

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not reflect income tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us;

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not include other income, other expense and foreign exchange gains and losses;

 

   

adjusted EBITDA excludes depreciation and amortization and although these are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future; and

 

   

adjusted EBITDA does not include gains and losses from discontinued operations.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Net Profit

     755        430        808        27   

plus:

        

Depreciation and amortization

     171        141        129        4   

Gain on bargain purchase

            (15              

Gains on disposals

     (7     (7     1          

Other income

     (21     (10     (17     (1

Other expenses

     34        73        29        1   

Change in fair value of derivative financial instruments

     (9                     

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

            12        21        1   

Share of loss of associates

            23        13        1   

Interest income

     (5     (6     (26     (1

Interest expenses

     3        4        9          

Income tax expenses

     204        241        408        13   

Corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations

     80        141        61        2   

Offering expenses

                   109        4   

Share-based payments expenses

                   66        2   

Gain/ (loss) from discontinued operations

     (138     156        240        8   

Adjusted EBITDA

     1,067        1,183        1,851        61   

Adjusted net profit

Adjusted net profit is defined as net profit excluding loss on discontinued operations (net of tax), corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, amortization of fair value adjustments, gain on bargain purchase, gains on disposals, and the effects of deferred taxation on those excluded items. Adjusted net profit is a key measure used by management to observe the operational profitability of the company. We believe adjusted net profit is useful to an investor in evaluating our operating performance because it is widely used by investors, securities analysts and other interested parties to measure a company’s operating performance without the effect of non-recurring items or items that are not core to our operations. For example, loss on discontinued operations, corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, gain on bargain purchase, gains on disposals, the effects of deferred taxation on excluded items and offering expenses do not represent the core operations of the business, and amortization of fair value adjustments and share-based payments expenses do not have a substantial cash effect. Nevertheless, such gains and losses can affect our financial performance.

 

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The following table reconciles adjusted net profit to net profit.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     RUB     RUB     RUB     U.S.$  
     (in millions)  

Net profit

     755        430        808        27   

Gain/(loss) from discontinued operations

     (138     156        240        8   

Corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations

     80        141        61        2   

Amortization of fair value adjustments

     118        51        42        1   

Gain on bargain purchase

            (15         

Gains on disposals

     (7     (7     1          

Offering expenses

                   109        4   

Share-based compensation expenses

                   66        2   

Effect of deferred taxation of the above items

     (40     (35     (21     (1

Adjusted net profit

     768        721        1,306        43   

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL

CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following operating and financial review together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. Certain statements in this section are “forward-looking statements” and are subject to risks and uncertainties, which may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Please see “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors” for more information.

Overview

We are a leading provider of next generation payment services in Russia and the CIS. We have an integrated proprietary network that enables payment services across physical, online and mobile channels. We operate in and target markets and customer segments that are largely cash-based and lack convenient alternatives for consumers to pay for goods and services in physical, online and mobile environments.

We have built a physical network of over 169,000 kiosks and terminals using a proprietary agent model. Under this model, our kiosks and terminals are built with our proprietary specifications and technology by third party manufacturers and then purchased and managed by over 9,300 agents responsible for placing, operating and servicing the kiosks in high-traffic, convenient retail locations. We also distribute our payment services online through our virtual Visa Qiwi Wallet product, which enables consumers to access and make payments through their computers or mobile devices. The payments processed through our network are typically very small with a limit of RUB 15,000 per transaction, and since they are primarily funded with cash, consumers do not have to go through a lengthy registration process to execute most transactions.

We have two principal operating segments: Qiwi Distribution, which primarily generates revenue from our payment services offered through our kiosks and terminals, and Qiwi Wallet, which generates revenue from payments processed through online electronic user accounts and bank prepaid products, including our prepaid card business. Since November 19, 2012, our Qiwi Wallet business has been rebranded as Visa Qiwi Wallet. Our primary source of revenue in each of these segments are fees we receive for processing payments made by consumers to merchants, which we refer to as payment processing fees, based on a percentage of the size of the transactions that we process, which we refer to as payment volume. We refer to payment processing fees that are paid to us by merchants for collecting payments on their behalf as merchant fees and to payment processing fees that are paid by our consumers and transmitted to us by our agents (in case of Qiwi Distribution) or paid by our consumers directly to us (in case of Visa Qiwi Wallet) as consumer fees. We typically pass on a portion of the merchants fees to our agents.

In September 2010, we acquired Qiwi Bank, which provides the issuing, acquiring and deposit settlement functions of our group. In addition, at the end of the second quarter of 2012, our board of directors approved a plan to dispose of certain non-core subsidiaries and associates in order to focus on our core payment systems business, which occurred by the end of the third quarter. The assets disposed of include primarily non-CIS international early-stage businesses, a business that manufactured certain parts of our kiosks, and our lottery business. The results of operations of these entities are presented as discontinued operations in our statements of comprehensive income.

For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our revenue was RUB 6,158 million, RUB 8,158 million and RUB 8,911 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our adjusted net revenue was RUB 2,799 million, RUB 3,254 million and RUB 4,169 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our net profit from continuing operations was RUB 617 million, RUB 586 million and RUB 1,048 million, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our adjusted net profit was RUB 768 million, RUB 721 million and RUB 1,306 million, respectively.

 

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Segments

For management purposes, we are organized into three operating segments. In addition to our two principal operating segments — Qiwi Distribution and Qiwi Wallet — we have a segment related to our corporate activities. Our segments are:

 

   

Qiwi Distribution, which includes revenue and expenses derived from payment services offered through our kiosks and terminals in Russia and internationally;

 

   

Qiwi Wallet, which includes revenue and expenses derived from payments processed through online electronic user accounts and bank prepayment products, including our prepaid card business, and revenue and expenses derived from Qiwi Bank; and

 

   

Corporate and other, which includes expenses related to corporate back-office operations, and revenue associated with licensing of software and trademarks and the sales of lotteries through kiosks and terminals. We disposed of our lottery sales business in August 2012.

Key Measures of Financial and Operational Performance

Our management monitors our financial and operational performance on the basis of the following measures.

Financial Measures

The following table presents our key financial measures for the year ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
         2010              2011              2012      
     (in RUB millions)   

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Distribution(1)

     2,476         2,494         2,845   

Segment net revenue–Qiwi Wallet(1)

     296         690         1,241   

Other(1) (2)

     27         70         83   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted net revenue(3)

     2,799         3,254         4,169   

Adjusted EBITDA(3)

     1,067         1,183         1,851   

Adjusted net profit(3)

     768         721         1,306   

 

(1) See note 9 of our annual consolidated financial statements.
(2) Other includes our corporate and other segment, intercompany eliminations, and timing of expense recognition.
(3) See “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data — Non-IFRS Financial Measures” for how we define and calculate adjusted net revenue, adjusted EBITDA, and adjusted net profit as non-IFRS financial measures and reconciliations of these measures to revenue, in the case of adjusted net revenue, and net profit, in the case of adjusted EBITDA and adjusted net profit.

Adjusted net revenue and segment net revenue. Adjusted net revenue is a non-IFRS measure calculated by subtracting cost of revenue from revenue and adding back payroll and related taxes. Adjusted net revenue is a key measure used by management to observe our operational profitability since it reflects our portion of the revenue net of fees that we pass through, primarily to our agents. In addition, under IFRS, consumer fees are recorded as net revenue whereas merchant fees are recorded as gross revenue. Therefore, in order to analyze our two sources of payment processing fees on a comparative basis, management reviews net revenue in addition to gross revenue. We add back payroll and related taxes because, although they are an essential part of our distribution network, these expenses are not directly linked to payment volume. Management reviews adjusted net revenue both on a per segment and consolidated basis.

Adjusted EBITDA. Adjusted EBITDA is defined as profit from operations before loss from discontinued operations, corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, income tax expense, interest expense, interest

 

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income, share of loss of an associate, foreign exchange (loss) gain, net, change in fair value of derivative financial assets, other expenses, other income, gain from disposal of subsidiaries, gain from bargain purchase and depreciation and amortization. We present adjusted EBITDA as a supplemental performance measure because we believe that it facilitates investors in comparing our financial performance with other payment service providers.

Adjusted net profit. Adjusted net profit is a non-IFRS measure defined as net profit excluding loss on discontinued operations (net of tax), corporate costs allocated to discontinued operations, amortization of fair value adjustments, gain on bargain purchase, gains on disposals, and the effects of deferred taxation on those excluded items. Adjusted net profit is a key measure used by management to observe the profitability of the continuing operations of the company.

For a reconciliation of these non-IFRS financial measures, please see “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures.”

Operating Measures

The following table presents our key operative measures in both our Qiwi Distribution and Qiwi Wallet segments for the year ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011             2012          
     (in RUB millions, unless otherwise indicated)  

Qiwi Distribution

      

Active kiosks and terminals (units)(1)

     158,867        170,384        169,102   

Payment volume

     360,683        408,254        464,806   

Average net revenue yield(2)

     0.69     0.61     0.61

Qiwi Wallet

      

Active Qiwi Wallet accounts (number as of period end)(3)

     5,979,057        8,147,376        11,425,813   

Payment volume

     26,669        65,409        151,508   

Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account (in rubles)(4)

     4,460        8,028        13,260   

Average net revenue yield(2)

     1.11     1.05     0.82

 

(1) We measure the numbers of our kiosks and terminals on a daily basis, with only those kiosks and terminals being taken into calculation through which at least one payment has been processed during the day, which we refer to as active kiosks and terminals. The period end numbers of our kiosks and terminals are calculated as an average of the amount of active kiosks and terminals for the last 30 days of the respective reporting period.
(2) Average net revenue yield is defined as segment net revenue divided by total payment volume per segment.
(3) Number of active Qiwi Wallet accounts is defined as the number of wallets through which at least one payment has been made or that have been loaded or reloaded in the 12 months preceding the end of the relevant reporting period.
(4) Average volume per Qiwi Wallet account is defined as total payment volumes in our Qiwi Wallet segment divided by the number of active wallets at the end of the relevant reporting period.

Number of active kiosks and terminals in Qiwi Distribution. We measure the numbers of our kiosks and terminals on a daily basis, with only those kiosks and terminals being taken into calculation through which at least one payment has been processed during the day, which we refer to as active kiosks and terminals. The period end numbers of our kiosks and terminals are calculated as an average of the amount of active kiosks and terminals for the last 30 days of the respective reporting period. From December 31, 2010 to December 31, 2012, we increased the number of our kiosks and terminals by 6.4%. Our kiosks and terminals can be found next to convenience stores, in train stations, retail stores and airport terminals in all major urban cities as well as many small and rural towns. While we project modest growth in our kiosk and terminal network, we believe that our total payment volume growth in our Qiwi Distribution segment will be primarily driven by increased user adoption, the addition of new payment services, the implementation of higher yielding value added services, and higher average payment amounts.

 

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Number of active Visa Qiwi Wallet accounts and average payments per Visa Qiwi Wallet account. Number of active wallets represents the number of wallets through which at least one payment has been made or which has been loaded or reloaded in the 12 months preceding the end of the relevant reporting period. Number of active wallets is a measure of our success in penetrating the market and expanding our Visa Qiwi Wallet segment. We define average payments per Visa Qiwi Wallet account as total payment volumes divided by the number of active wallets at the end of the relevant reporting period. Between December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2012, average payments per wallet almost tripled while the number of active wallet accounts has almost doubled. We are focused on growing our Visa Qiwi Wallet business, and we believe we are able to leverage our large, active base of over 65 million consumers who use our kiosks and terminals at least once a month and our brand recognition and presence on social media platforms to drive the adoption and use of the Visa Qiwi Wallet.

Qiwi Wallet was launched as a product in 2007. By 2011, Qiwi Wallet became a separate operating unit with a distinct management team, operating infrastructure and strategy. As a result, management believes financial and operating information for Qiwi Wallet on a stand alone basis are most relevant from 2011 onwards. In November 2012 our Qiwi Wallet business was rebranded as Visa Qiwi Wallet.

Payment volume. Total volume provides a measure of the overall size and growth of our business, and increasing our payment volumes is essential to growing our profitability. Payment volumes have consistently increased since 2010. Total payment volumes in our Qiwi Distribution segment have grown at a CAGR of 13.5% from 2010 through 2012, with total payment volumes of RUB 465 billion for the year ended 2012. Total payment volumes in our Qiwi Wallet segment have grown at a CAGR of 138.3% from 2010 through 2012, with total payment volumes of RUB 152 billion for the year ended December 31, 2011. The following factors may have a significant impact on the growth of payment volume:

 

   

Macroeconomic factors

 

   

Russian economy. We carry out our operations primarily in Russia. Macroeconomic conditions in Russia significantly impact the volume of payments made by our consumers. During periods of economic growth, overall consumer spending tends to increase along with rises in wealth, and during economic downturns, consumer spending tends to correspondingly decline. These fluctuations can have a significant impact on the volume of payments we process; and

 

   

Factors concerning methods of payment

 

   

Use of cash as a means of payment. Changes in the aggregate use of cash as a means of payment is an important variable affecting our revenues. Cash payments are the principal form of payment in Russia, and, as a result, a majority of our payment volumes are cash-based. According to publicly available information, cash payments are expected to continue to be the principal means of payment in Russia and will sustain demand for use of our kiosks and terminals. As cash payments in Russia grow in absolute terms, we expect payment volumes from our kiosks and terminals to correspondingly increase. If the use of cash as a means of payment declines in Russia, it would negatively impact our financial results.

 

   

Increase in the volume of online transactions and the use of alternative payment methods. The volume of online transactions has grown considerably and continues to grow. Similarly, the use of alternative payment methods in Russia, such as smartphones, although lagging behind other emerging markets, is expected to grow considerably as prices per smartphone decline, according to a 2011 report by HSBC. We believe that growth in online transactions and alternative payment methods will be an important driver in increasing the number of potential merchants for which we can offer payment services and in increasing the potential number of users of Visa Qiwi Wallet. We expect payment volumes from online transactions and alternative payment methods to increase significantly in the coming years.

 

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Factors concerning our business

 

   

Consumer adoption. We have actively sought new merchants to offer consumers more payment choices when using our products. We believe that merchant growth will lead to more consumers using our payment systems more frequently.

 

   

Addition of new payment services. We have added new payment services as a part of our products. For example, consumers with accounts at certain banks may now perform online banking services at our kiosks and terminals.

 

   

Implementation of value added services. We have increased the advertising services we offer, leveraging our extensive distribution network for our advertising clients. We believe that value added services will result in more consumers to use our payment systems.

 

   

Higher average payment amounts. In addition to adding more merchants, we have added higher value products available for purchase through our network, such as airline tickets. With more choice and high value products, we believe that consumers will increase their payment amount per transaction.

Average net revenue yield. We calculate average net revenue yield by dividing segment net revenue by total payment volume per segment. Average net revenue yield provides a measure of our ability to generate net revenue per unit of volume we process. The average net revenue yield in our Qiwi Distribution segment exhibited a generally stable trend in 2011 and 2012, after having decreased in 2011 by 8 basis points, or bps, in comparison to 2010, primarily as a result of a decline in merchant fees. Qiwi Wallet experienced a decline in average net revenue yield of 29 bps from the twelve months ended December 31, 2010 to the twelve months ended December 31, 2012. We will seek to increase the average net revenue yield in Qiwi Wallet by leveraging our strong market position with merchants.

 

   

Negative trends impacting average net revenue yield

 

   

In our Qiwi Distribution segment, we have experienced a decline in our average net revenue yield primarily due to a decline in merchant fees from our larger retail merchants, in particular the Big Three MNOs.

 

   

In our Qiwi Wallet segment, the decline in average net revenue yield over the three-year period ended December 31, 2012 is attributable primarily to a similar decline in merchant fees and consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume.

 

   

Positive trends impacting average net revenue yield

 

   

In our Qiwi Distribution segment, we have introduced additional consumer fees, which have had a positive impact on our net revenue yield. For the twelve months ended December 31, 2012, consumer fees represented 21% of our Qiwi Distribution segment net revenue. In addition, we have also increased the number of value added services we offer. For example, we have successfully used our distribution network to help our customers launch advertising campaigns and sales promotions, and we have introduced additional fees for cash and settlements services to our agents. We believe that these services will continue to have a positive impact on our profitability in the future.

 

   

In our Qiwi Wallet segment, the merchants that we serve are typically smaller retailers with less bargaining power. As a result, we are able to charge these merchants higher payment processing fees than the merchants in our Qiwi Distribution segment. We expect that, as our merchant base in Visa Qiwi Wallet continues to grow, these merchants will have a larger effect on payment volume and, consequently, on average net revenue yield. Moreover, because our Visa Qiwi Wallet segment does not have an agent-based structure like our Qiwi Distribution segment, we have significantly more control over the balance between merchant and consumer fees.

 

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Recent Developments

Preliminary First Quarter Results

Although our consolidated financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2013 are not yet available, we believe that the preliminary operating segment data presented below provides an understanding of the trends that we experienced during this quarter. The following expectations regarding our results for this period are solely management estimates based on currently available information. The payment volume information presented below is not final because we are still in the process of verifying our internally collected data through the review of transaction data from third parties, including from agents, merchants and banks. The financial information relating to segment net revenue and segment profit before tax presented below is not final because we are still in the process of closing our accounts. We are unable to determine what the impact of various items subject to management judgment, such as the impact of impairment testing of investments in associates and allowance for doubtful accounts will be on such financial information. Our independent registered public accounting firm has not audited, reviewed or performed any procedures with respect to these preliminary financial data and, accordingly, does not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect to these data.

We only disclose herein ranges for our preliminary operating segment results. Certain information that will appear in our financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2013, including our revenue, cost of revenue, profit from operations and net profit, is not presented herein and is necessary for readers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of our financial position and results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2013. As a result, readers should not place undue weight on the preliminary operating segment data presented below.

Based on preliminary operating segment results for the first quarter that have been reviewed by management, we expect that for the three months ended March 31, 2013:

 

   

payment volume in Qiwi Distribution will be between RUB 116 billion and RUB 117.5 billion;

 

   

payment volume in Qiwi Wallet will be between RUB 53 billion and RUB 54 billion;

 

   

direct segment costs will be between RUB 1,230 million and RUB 1,300 million;

 

   

segment net revenue will be between RUB 1,220 million and RUB 1,290 million;

 

   

depreciation and amortization will be between RUB 18 million and RUB 21 million;

 

   

segment profit before tax will be between RUB 430 million and RUB 620 million.

Although we are unable at this time to provide any additional estimates with respect to our financial position, we have not identified any unusual or unique events or trends that occurred during the three months ended March 31, 2013 which might materially affect our results of operations.

Payment volume

We expect payment volume in Qiwi Distribution for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 116 billion and RUB 117.5 billion, an increase of between 13% and 14% from RUB 103 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2012. We expect payment volume in Qiwi Wallet of between RUB 53 billion and RUB 54 billion, an increase of between 104% and 108% from RUB 26 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2012. The increase in payment volume in Qiwi Wallet resulted from two major factors, the effects of which on Qiwi Wallet volume were approximately equal: the continued increase in the number of active users and the increase in the average volume per Qiwi Wallet account. The increase in payment volume in Qiwi Distribution was primarily driven by an increase in Visa Qiwi Wallet users reloading their wallets through the Qiwi Distribution network.

 

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Segment net revenue

We expect our segment net revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 1,220 million and RUB 1,290 million, an increase of between 44% and 52% from our segment net revenue of RUB 847 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payment volume and an increase in value added services in Qiwi Distribution.

Segment net revenue is the total net revenue of our reportable segments and is presented for historical periods in note 9 of our financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Segment net revenue differs from adjusted net revenue as presented in this prospectus as it is derived from subtracting direct segment costs form segment revenue and reflects immaterial differences related to the timing of expense recognition. Please refer to note 9 of our financial statements and “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures—Adjusted Net Revenue.”

Segment profit before tax

We expect our segment profit before tax for the three months ended March 31, 2013 will be between RUB 430 million and RUB 620 million, an increase of 93% to 178% from our segment profit before tax of RUB 223 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012. This increase was primarily due to the continuing impact of scale on our operations as the growth of our segment net revenue continued to outpace the growth of our expenses.

Segment profit before tax is the total profit before tax of our reportable segments and is presented in note 9 to our financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Segment profit before tax differs from adjusted net profit as presented in this prospectus as it does not reflect, among other things, income taxes and effects of software development cost not capitalized in segment presentation, and gains / (losses) on loans issued at rates different than market rates, and reflects immaterial differences related to the timing of expense recognition. Segment profit before tax differs from net income as it excludes income tax, amortization of fair value adjustments to intangible assets recorded on acquisitions and related impairments, corporate costs allocated to discontinued international operations, the effects of software development cost not capitalized in segment presentation, offering expenses, share-based payments, gain / (loss) on loans issued at rates different than market rates, gains / (losses) from discontinued operations and other immaterial items. The aggregate results of the above listed items may have a material impact on the difference between segment profit before tax and net income. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, the aggregate difference between segment profit before tax and consolidated net income was RUB 254 million, RUB 628 million, and RUB 897 million, respectively. Please refer to note 9 of our financial statements and “Selected Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Non-IFRS Financial Measures—Adjusted Net Profit.”

The foregoing preliminary first quarter results constitute forward looking statements and our actual results may differ from these expectations. Our estimates of payment volumes, segment net revenue and segment profit before tax for the three months ended March 31, 2013 are subject to completion of our interim financial statements for this period and may change as a result of, among other things, closing adjustments, finalization of fair value estimates and impairment tests or continuing monitoring of the event after the balance sheet date. Please refer to the section entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in this prospectus for additional information.

Agreement with VTB

On April 16, 2013, we pledged to Bank VTB sovereign bonds issued by the Russian Ministry of Finance with a value of approximately RUB 1 billion as collateral for the U.S.$20 million bank guarantee expiring on February 13, 2014 which was provided by Bank VTB to secure our performance under our agreement with Visa.

 

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Sources of Revenue

Our primary source of revenue is payments processing fees. In addition, we derive revenue from advertising, interest revenue from agent’s overdrafts, interest income and other revenue.

Payments processing fees. Payments processing fees constitute the substantial majority of our revenue and consists of fees, charged for processing payments based on a percentage of the total volume of each payment. A majority of our payment processing fees are paid to us by merchants for collecting payments on their behalf, which we refer to as merchant fees, and the fees paid by consumers and transmitted to us by agents, which we refer to as consumer fees. We typically pass on a portion of the merchants fees to our agents (in case of Qiwi Distribution). In certain situations, we may not receive any merchant fees, for example, where a specific merchant is added to our base at the request of an agent who believes that inclusion of such merchant would attract consumers in a particular region or neighborhood. We generally recognize payment processing fees gross at the point when merchants accept payments from the consumer. In Qiwi Distribution, we recognize revenues from consumer fees net of transaction costs, as we receive such fees through our agents, and we do not control the ultimate consumer fees set by our agents.

Advertising revenue. We generate advertising revenue through Qiwi Distribution by displaying advertising on our kiosks and through short message service, or SMS, messaging. We calculate advertising revenue on the basis of the contracts with our advertising customers and advertising agencies, which vary, and recognize revenue once the advertising is displayed or transmitted.

Ancillary revenue. In addition to payments processing revenue and advertising revenue, we generate revenue from various other sources including interest revenue on agent’s overdrafts (representing revenue from our Qiwi Distribution segment for interest earned on amounts of credit that we provide to our agents for them to be able to operate within our network), interest revenue (representing revenue from our Qiwi Wallet segment for interest earned on cash deposits with financial institutions, and short- and long-term investments performed as a part of our treasury operations and bank loans provided by Qiwi Bank), revenue from rent of space for terminals (representing revenue from our Qiwi Distribution segment for rent obtained for subleasing retail space for terminals to our agents) and other revenue (representing revenue primarily generated from such operations as cash and settlement services of Qiwi Distribution and Qiwi Bank, promotional campaign fees from generated from software licensing for our processing system in countries where we operate through our franchisees), which we refer to in this prospectus as ancillary revenue.

Operating Expenses

Costs of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

Transaction costs. When payments are made through our network, we incur transaction costs to our agents, which represent the amount of fees we pass through to agents for use of their kiosks and terminals. Additionally, we incur transaction costs when Visa Qiwi Wallet consumers reload their wallets.

Payroll and related taxes. Payroll and related taxes represents salaries and benefits paid to employees, primarily IT and operating services employees, and related taxes, where such payroll and related taxed are associated with payment processing and other revenue-generating activities.

Ancillary expenses. We incur other expenses in addition to transaction costs and payroll and related taxes, including advertising commission (primarily representing commission we pay, through Qiwi Distribution, to SMS operators and our agents for displaying the advertising), cost of rent of space for terminals (representing the rental payments we make, through Qiwi Distribution, to retail shop owners to allow agents to install kiosks on their premises under lease arrangements) and other expenses (including call center expenses), which we refer to in this prospectus as ancillary expenses.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses consists primarily of payroll and related taxes for our senior executives, finance, legal and other administrative staff, advertising and related expenses, bank services, rent of premises and related utility expenses, office maintenance expenses, telecommunication and internet expenses, bad debt expense, traveling expenses, taxes other than income taxes and professional fees.

 

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Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation is calculated on property and equipment on a straight-line basis from the time the assets are available for use, over their estimated useful lives. Intangible assets are amortized on a straight-line basis over their useful economic lives, unless the useful life is indefinite. We do not amortize intangible assets with indefinite useful lives, but we test these assets for impairment annually, either individually or at the cash-generating unit level.

Other Income and Expense Items

Gain on bargain purchase

A gain on bargain purchase is recognized in a business combination or acquisition of associates in the event the total fair value of the identifiable net assets acquired on the date of acquisition exceeds the fair value of the consideration transferred. We recognized a gain on bargain purchase upon our purchase of Instant Payments LLP in 2011.

Gain/(loss) from disposal of subsidiaries

We recognize a gain/(loss) on disposal of subsidiaries in the event that the consideration we receive for the sale or disposal of a subsidiary exceeds the total carrying value of the subsidiary sold. The gain from disposal of subsidiaries that we recognized in 2010 was due to disposal of our subsidiary in Georgia. The gain recognized in 2011 was due to disposal of our subsidiaries in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, and the loss recognized in 2012 was due to disposal of Instant Payments LLP (Kazakhstan), OOO Management Company QIWI (Russia), Master Loto Ltd and its subsidiaries.

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

We classify certain of our derivative assets at fair value through profit or loss, in accordance with IAS 39. This classification applies primarily to certain options over shares of subsidiaries and associates we hold. We state our financial assets at fair value through profit or loss.

Other income

Other income includes gain on interest on loans issued to agents at a higher-than-market interest rate, income from penalties charged to agents for violation of our payment system terms and conditions, and other items not directly related to operations.

Other expenses

Other expenses principally include losses resulting from the discount on a low-interest loan issued to Blestgroup in 2011 to facilitate our rent of terminal spaces operations, and share of profit for the period attributable to non-controlling interest and accounted for as a liability, which relates to the profit and loss of subsidiaries in which we hold an interest.

Foreign exchange gain/(loss), net

Foreign exchange gain/(loss) is comprised of net results from the re-measurement of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency using the exchange rates valid at the reporting period end or upon the realization of related assets and liabilities. As of December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012, our net monetary assets denominated in foreign currencies were not significant.

Share of loss of associates

We account for our interest in associates under the equity method. An associate is generally an entity in which we own 20% to 50% of its voting power. We carry our investment in associates at cost less any

 

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impairment and recognize any changes in our share of the net assets of the associate through profit or loss, except for changes in equity that do not result from operations.

Interest income

Interest income represents primarily interest on non-banking loans issued to related parties.

Interest expense

Interest expense primarily represents interest expense accrued by our international subsidiaries on loans received from their non-controlling shareholders.

Income tax expense

Income tax expense represents current and deferred income taxes with respect to our earning in countries in which we operate. Deferred tax also includes taxes on earnings of our foreign subsidiaries that have not been remitted to us to the extent applicable and will be taxed in Cyprus once remitted.

Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Prior to this offering, we were a private company with limited accounting personnel and other resources focused on our internal control over financial reporting. In connection with their audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 our independent registered public accounting firm identified a material weakness in our internal controls with respect to our financial statement closing process. The material weakness related to, primarily, the number of dedicated IFRS-qualified personnel and controls over accounting for non-routine transactions and complex estimates.

This material weakness was considered in determining the nature, timing and extent of the procedures performed by our independent registered public accounting firm in their audit of our annual consolidated financial statements, and did not affect the report of our independent registered public accounting firm on our annual consolidated financial statements included herein.

To address the material weakness that our independent registered accountants identified, we developed and implemented a plan that included implementing greater controls over communication, approval and accounting for non-routine transactions and complex estimates, as well as additional management review controls. We also hired an external consultant to advise us on introducing changes to our internal control over financial reporting and to participate in management review of the financial statements and related supporting financial information. In the future, we plan to recruit additional qualified personnel or an external consultant with relevant experience in IFRS accounting, reporting and auditing. As a result of these various measures, we expect the accounting and finance personnel costs to increase significantly.

As a result of our efforts we remediated the related material weakness as of December 31, 2012. No other material weaknesses were identified by our independent registered public accounting firm as a result of their audit of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012.

Designing and implementing an effective financial reporting system is a continuous effort that requires us to anticipate and react to changes in our business and the economic and regulatory environments and to devote significant resources to maintain a financial reporting system that adequately satisfies our reporting obligations. The remedial measures that we intend to take may not fully address the material weakness that we and our independent registered accounting firm have identified, and other material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting may be identified in the future. See “Risk Factors—Risk Related to our Business and Industry—Our independent public registered accounting firm identified a material weakness

 

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in our internal control over financial reporting during our 2011 audit, and we can provide no assurance that additional material weaknesses will not be identified in the future.

Results of Operations

Set out below are our consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 and as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     (in RUB millions)  

Revenue

     6,158        8,158        8,911   

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (3,751     (5,573     (5,454

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (1,420     (1,543     (1,838

Depreciation and amortization

     (171     (141     (129

Impairment of intangible assets

                   (4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit from operations

     816        901        1,486   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gain on bargain purchase

            15          

Gain (loss) from disposal of subsidiaries

     7        7        (1

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

     9                 

Other income

     21        10        17   

Other expenses

     (34     (73     (29

Foreign exchange loss, net

            (12     (21

Share of loss of associates

            (23     (13

Interest income

     5        6        26   

Interest expense

     (3     (4     (9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit before tax from continuing operations

     821        827        1,456   

Income tax expense

     (204     (241     (408
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net profit from continuing operations

     617        586        1,048   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gain (loss) from discontinued operations

     138        (156     (240
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net profit

     755        430        808   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Attributable to:

      

Equity holders of the parent

     693        520        910   

Non-controlling interests

     62        (90     (102

 

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Set out below are our consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2011 and 2012 as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
         2010             2011             2012      
     (as a percentage of revenue)  

Revenue

     100.0        100.0        100.0   

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (60.9     (68.3     (61.2

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (23.1     (18.9     (20.7

Depreciation and amortization

     (2.7     (1.7     (1.4

Impairment of intangible assets

                     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit from operations

     13.3        11.1        16.7   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gain on bargain purchase

            0.2          

Gain (loss) from disposal of subsidiaries

     0.1        0.1        (0.1

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

     0.1                 

Other income

     0.2               0.2   

Other expenses

     (0.6     (0.9     (0.3

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

            (0.1     (0.3

Share of loss of an associates

            (0.3     (0.1

Interest income

     0.1               0.3   

Interest expense

                   (0.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit before tax from continuing operations

     13.3        10.1        16.3   

Income tax expense

     (3.3     (2.9     (4.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net profit from continuing operations

     10.0        7.2        11.8   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gain (Loss) from discontinued operations

     2.3        (1.9     (2.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net profit

     12.3        5.3        9.1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Attributable to:

      

Equity holders of the parent

     11.3        6.4        10.2   

Non-controlling interests

     1.0        (1.1     (1.1

Year ended December 31, 2012 compared to year ended December 31, 2011

Revenue

Set out below are our revenues, by source, for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2012, and as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
     2011      2011      2012      2012  
     (in RUB
millions)
     (% of
revenue)
     (in RUB
millions)
     (% of
revenue)
 

Revenue

     8,158         100.0         8,911         100.0   

Payment processing fees

     7,121         87.3         7,624         85.6   

Revenue from advertising

     262         3.2         454         5.1   

Ancillary revenue

     775         9.5         833         9.3   

Revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 8,911 million, an increase of 9%, or RUB 753 million, compared to the same period in 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payment processing fees, in particular for payments made through Qiwi Wallet. Payment processing fees for the year ended December 31, 2012 were RUB 7,624 million, an increase of 7%, or RUB 503 million, compared to the

 

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same period in 2011. The increase in payment processing fees resulted from an increase in payment volumes in Qiwi Wallet by 132%, from RUB 65 billion to RUB 152 billion.

The number of active Qiwi Wallet consumers increased from 8.1 million in the year ended December 31, 2011 to 11.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Average annual payment volume per Qiwi Wallet account increased from RUB 8,028 to RUB 13,260. In Qiwi Distribution, payment volume increased by 14%, from RUB 408 billion to RUB 465 billion, primarily driven by an increase in Visa Qiwi Wallet users reloading their wallets as well as an increase in loan repayments through our kiosks and terminals. The size of our Qiwi Distribution network remained largely unchanged, with 169,102 active kiosks and terminals as of December 31, 2012, compared to 170,384 as of December 31, 2011.

Advertising revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 454 million, an increase of 73%, or RUB 192 million, compared to the same period in 2011. This increase primarily resulted from a significant increase in the number of customers to whom we offered SMS advertising services in 2012.

Ancillary revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 833 million, an increase of 7%, or RUB 58 million, compared to the same period in 2011, primarily due to an increase in interest revenue by 71%, or RUB 97 million, as a result of a greater amount invested in debt instruments and increased cash deposits in interest-bearing accounts as well as increased revenue from cash and settlement services, due to the introduction of additional fees charged for deposits of our agents. These increases were partially offset by a decline in revenue from rent of space for kiosks by 67%, or RUB 180 million, due to the transfer of a significant portion of this business to our associate.

Operating expenses

Set out below are the primary components of our operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2012, and as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
     2011     2011     2012     2012  
     (in RUB
millions)
    (% of
revenue)
    (in RUB
millions)
    (% of
revenue)
 

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (5,573     (68.3     (5,454     (61.2

Transaction costs

     (4,447     (54.5     (4,420     (49.6

Payroll and related taxes

     (669     (8.2     (712     (8.0

Ancillary expenses

     (457     (5.6     (322     (3.6

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (1,543     (18.9     (1,839     (20.6

Depreciation and amortization

     (141     (1.7     (129     (1.4

Impairment of Intangible Assets

                   (4       

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 5,454 million, a decrease of 2%, or RUB 119 million, compared to the same period in 2011. Transaction costs decreased by 1%, or RUB 27 million, in the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the same period in 2011, from RUB 4,447 million to RUB 4,420 million. We attribute this decrease in transaction costs primarily to a decrease in merchant fees from MNO, which resulted in lower commission fees payable to agents by Qiwi Distribution in 2012. The decrease in transaction costs was partially offset by an increase in total payment volume.

Payroll and related taxes for the year ended December 31, 2012 were RUB 712 million, an increase of 6%, or RUB 43 million, compared to the same period in 2011, primarily due to higher statutory tax rates in Russia and an increase in salaries in line with inflation in Russia over this period.

 

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Ancillary expenses for the year ended December 31, 2012 were RUB 322 million, a decrease of 30%, or RUB 135 million compared to the same period in 2011. The decrease in ancillary expenses primarily resulted from a decrease in the cost of rent of space for kiosks from RUB 238 million to RUB 95 million, due to the transfer of a significant portion of this business to our associate.

Adjusted net revenue and segment net revenue

Adjusted net revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 4,169 million, an increase of 28%, or RUB 915 million, compared to the same period in 2011. The increase in adjusted net revenue is primarily due to a 19% increase in net payment volume, particularly with respect to Qiwi Wallet.

Segment net revenue for Qiwi Distribution for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 2,845 million an increase of 14.1%, or RUB 351 million, compared to the same period in 2011. The increase in segment net revenue was driven by an increase in volume for Qiwi Distribution, while average net revenue yield for Qiwi Distribution remained unchanged at 0.61% for the year ended December 31, 2012, as the increase in net revenue from consumer fees as a percentage of volume of 5 bps and net revenue from value added services as a percentage of volume of 6 bps was offset by a decline in net revenue from merchant fees as a percentage of volume of 11 bps.

Segment net revenue for Qiwi Wallet for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 1,241 million, an increase of 79.9%, or RUB 551 million, compared to the same period in 2011. The increase in segment net revenue was driven by an increase in volume, partially offset by a decrease of 23 bps in average net revenue yield for Qiwi Wallet, from 1.05% for the year ended December 31, 2011 to 0.82% for the year ended December 31, 2012. The decrease in average net revenue yield in Qiwi Wallet resulted primarily from a decline in revenue from consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume partially offset by a decline in direct cost associated with Qiwi Wallet as a percentage of payment volume. Revenue from consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume decreased by 32 bps, while direct costs as a percentage of payment volume decreased by 13 bps.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2012 were RUB 1,839 million, an increase of 19%, or RUB 296 million, from the same period in 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase in bad debt expense from RUB 54 million in 2011 to RUB 202 million in 2012 resulting from additional allowances for five of our agents, an increase in payroll and related taxes by 16%, or RUB 141 million, from RUB 889 million in 2011 to RUB 1,030 million in 2012, resulting from an increase in compensation to management in 2012, and recognition of expenses relating to our initial public offering in the amount of RUB 109 million, which were not incurred in 2011. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in advertising and related expenses of RUB 107 million, due to reduced advertising, a decrease in rent of premises and related utility expenses of RUB 21 million and a decrease in professional fees of RUB 20 million. For the year ended December 31, 2012, selling, general and administrative expenses included RUB 61 million of expenses allocated to discontinued operations compared to RUB 141 million in the same period of 2011.

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation and amortization for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 129 million, a decrease of 9%, or RUB 12 million compared to the same period in 2011. This decrease resulted primarily from the full amortization of acquired customer relationship intangibles in 2011.

Impairment of intangible assets

Impairment of intangible assets for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 4 million, resulting from the write-off of obsolete computer software, compared to nil in 2011.

 

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Other non-operating gains and losses

Gain on bargain purchase

Gain on bargain purchase for the year ended December 31, 2012 was nil compared to a gain of RUB 15 million in 2011 as no material acquisitions were made in 2012 other than investment in associates.

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

There was a decrease in fair value of derivative financial assets for the year ended December 31, 2012, of RUB 0.3 million compared to no change in the same period in 2011. This decrease was due to the disposal in 2012 of certain put and call options we held over shares of subsidiaries and associates.

Other income

Other income for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 17 million, an increase of 70%, or RUB 7 million, compared to the same period in 2011. This increase was primarily due to a gain on the issuance on loans to agents at a higher-than-market interest rates of RUB 8 million.

Other expenses

Other expenses for the year ended December 31, 2012 were RUB 29 million, a decrease of 60%, or RUB 44 million, compared to the same period in 2011. This decrease was primarily due to no recognition of loss related to a discount on loans issued to related parties in 2012, which was partially offset by an increase in share of loss/(profit) for the period attributable to non-controlling interest and accounted for as a liability of RUB 24 million in 2012 as compared to RUB 17 million in 2011.

Foreign exchange gain/(loss), net

Foreign exchange loss, net for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 21 million, an increase of 75%, or RUB 9 million, compared to the same period in 2011. The increase is a result of an increased number of transactions in foreign currencies by our subsidiaries in line with the increase in our operations. Foreign exchange gain/(loss) as a percentage of profit before tax remained stable at approximately 1.4% in 2011 and 2012.

Share of loss of associates

Share of loss of associates for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 13 million, a decrease of 43%, or RUB 10 million, compared to the same period in 2011. This decrease was due to a decrease in the amount of losses of Blestgroup Enterprises Ltd (Cyprus) by RUB 13 million compared to the same period in 2011 which was partially offset by losses incurred by the associated companies acquired in 2012 totalling RUB 3 million.

Income tax

Income tax for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 408 million, an increase of 69%, or RUB 167 million, compared to the same period in 2011, primarily due to the increase in pre-tax income. Our effective tax rate remained relatively constant, decreasing by approximately 1.1%

Gain / (loss) from discontinued operations

Loss from discontinued operations for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 240 million, an increase of 54%, or RUB 84 million, compared to 2011. This increase resulted from certain of our international operations being discontinued during the year ended December 31, 2012, which resulted in a loss from discontinued

 

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operations. In addition, we recognized impairment charges and loss on revaluation of held for sale assets to fair value upon their disposal in the amount of RUB 167 million in relation to the discontinuation of operations in the Ukraine, in certain early stage international businesses and in the Diomachin group, which manufactured parts for our kiosks. This was partially offset by the actual disposal of discontinued operations in 2012 resulting in gain of RUB 46 million. Our disposition of Master Loto was not included in discontinued operations as its operations were insignificant.

Non-controlling interests

Net loss attributable to non-controlling interests for the year ended December 31, 2012 was RUB 102 million, an increase of 13%, or RUB 12 million, compared to the same period in 2011, primarily as a result of an increase in losses of certain of our international early-stage businesses.

Year ended December 31, 2011 compared to year ended December 31, 2010

Revenue

Set out below are our revenues, by source, for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2011, and as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
     2010      2010      2011      2011  
     (in RUB
millions)
     (% of
revenue)
     (in RUB
millions)
     (% of
revenue)
 

Revenue

     6,158         100.0         8,158         100.0   

Payment processing fees

     5,561         90.3         7,121         87.3   

Revenue from advertising

     278         4.5         262         3.2   

Ancillary revenue

     319         5.2         775         9.5   

Revenue for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 8,158 million, an increase of 32%, or RUB 2,000 million, compared to the same period in 2010. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payment processing fees, in particular for payments made through Qiwi Wallet, and the full year consolidation of Qiwi Bank in 2011, which we acquired in September 2010. Payment processing fees for the year ended December 31, 2011 were RUB 7,121 million, an increase of 28%, or RUB 1,560 million, compared to the same period in 2010. The increase in payment processing fees resulted from an increase in payment volumes in Qiwi Distribution by 13% from RUB 361 billion to RUB 408 billion. We increased the size of our Qiwi Distribution network, with 170,384 active kiosks and terminals as of December 31, 2011, compared to 158,867 as of December 31, 2010. In Qiwi Wallet, we increased our payment volume by 145%, from RUB 27 billion to RUB 65 billion. The number of active Qiwi Wallet consumers increased from 6 million in the year ended December 31, 2010 to 8.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. Average annual payment volume per Qiwi Wallet account increased from RUB 4,460 to RUB 8,028.

Advertising revenue for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 262 million, a decrease of 6%, or RUB 16 million, compared to the same period in 2010. This decrease resulted from a reduction of advertising revenue from the Big Three MNOs, partially offset by the introduction of SMS advertising services and the growth in the number of our advertising customers.

Ancillary revenue for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 775 million, an increase of 143%, or RUB 456 million, compared to the same period in 2010, due primarily to increased interest revenue from investments as a result of the acquisition of Qiwi Bank in September 2010, revenue from rent of space for terminals and interest revenue on agent’s overdrafts.

 

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Operating expenses

Set out below are the primary components of our operating expenses for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2011, and as a percentage of total revenue:

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2010     2011     2011  
     (in RUB
millions)
    (% of
revenue)
    (in RUB
millions)
    (% of
revenue)
 

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

     (3,751     (60.9     (5,573     (68.3

Transaction costs

     (3,156     (51.3     (4,447     (54.5

Payroll and related taxes

     (392     (6.4     (669     (8.2

Ancillary expenses

     (203     (3.2     (457     (5.6

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     (1,420     (23.1     (1,543     (18.9

Depreciation and amortization

     (171     (2.7     (141     (1.7

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)

Cost of revenue (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 5,573 million, an increase of 49%, or RUB 1,822 million, compared to the same period in 2010. This increase was primarily due to an increase in transaction costs of 41%, or RUB 1,291 million, in the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010, from RUB 3,156 million to RUB 4,447 million. We attribute this increase in transaction costs primarily to the increase in payment volumes in 2011, in part resulting from a promotional campaign run with MegaFon, which eliminated certain fees charged to consumers and compensated agents for their lost revenue from that elimination by increasing the merchant fee payable by MegaFon. This resulted in a significantly higher portion of transaction costs, as we passed these fees through to our agents.

Payroll and related taxes for the year ended December 31, 2011 were RUB 669 million, an increase of 71%, or RUB 277 million, compared to the same period in 2010, primarily as a result of payroll increases of RUB 84 million related to the full consolidation of Qiwi Bank in October 2010, increases in the average compensation of IT and other operational staff, and, to a lesser extent, in headcount.

Ancillary expenses for the year ended December 31, 2011 were RUB 457 million, an increase of 125%, or RUB 254 million compared to the same period in 2010. The increase in ancillary expenses primarily resulted from the introduction of subleasing terminal and kiosk spaces to agents in 2011.

Adjusted net revenue and segment net revenue

Adjusted net revenue for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 3,254 million, an increase of 16%, or RUB 455 million, compared the same period in 2010. The increase in adjusted net revenue is primarily due to an increase in net payment volumes of 15%, particularly with respect to Qiwi Wallet.

Segment net revenue for Qiwi Distribution for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 2,494 million an increase of RUB 18 million, compared to the same period in the prior year. The increase in segment net revenue was driven by an increase in payment volume for Qiwi Distribution, partially offset by a decrease in average net revenue yield for Qiwi Distribution by 8 bps from 0.69% for the year ended December 31, 2010 to 0.61% for the year ended December 31, 2011. The decrease in average net revenue yield in Qiwi Distribution resulted primarily from a decline in net revenue from merchant fees as a percentage of volume by 13 bps partially offset by an increase of the consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume by 5 bps.

Segment net revenue for Qiwi Wallet for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 690 million, an increase of 133%, or RUB 394 million, compared to the same period in 2010. The increase in segment net

 

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revenue was driven by an increase in payment volume, partially offset by a decrease of 6 bps in average net revenue yield for Qiwi Wallet, from 1.11% for the year ended December 31, 2010 to 1.05% for the year ended December 31, 2011. The decrease in average net revenue yield in Qiwi Wallet primarily resulted from an increase in costs associated with Qiwi Wallet consumers reloading their wallets partially offset by an increase in revenue from consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume. Specifically, the consumer fees as a percentage of payment volume increased by 113 bps, the merchant fees as a percentage of payment volume decreased by 54 bps while the reload costs as a percentage of payment volume increased by 40 bps.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2011 were RUB 1,543 million, an increase of 8%, or RUB 123 million, from the same period in 2010. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payroll and related taxes by 15%, or RUB 117 million, from RUB 772 million in the year ended December 31, 2010 to RUB 889 million in the year ended December 31, 2011, resulting from the full consolidation of Qiwi Bank in October 2010 and an increase in rent of premises and related utility expenses of 50%. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in bank service expense of RUB 68 million due to the acquisition of Qiwi Bank, and a decrease in advertising and related expenses of RUB 58 million due to a large-scale TV advertising campaign conducted in 2010. For the year ended December 31, 2011, selling, general and administrative expenses included RUB 141 million of expenses allocated to discontinued operations. For the year ended December 31, 2010, selling, general and administrative expenses included RUB 80 million of expenses allocated to discontinued operations.

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation and amortization for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 141 million, a decrease of 18%, or RUB 30 million compared to the same period in 2010. This decrease resulted from certain intangible assets that became fully amortized in 2011, which was partially offset by additional depreciation and amortization in connection with additions to property and equipment and intangible assets in 2011.

Other non-operating gains and losses

Gain on bargain purchase

Gain on bargain purchase for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 15 million, compared to no gain or loss in 2010. This increase was due to the acquisition of Instant Payments LLP in December 2011.

Change in fair value of derivative financial assets

There was no change in fair value of derivative financial assets for the year ended December 31, 2011, a decrease from a change of RUB 9 million in the same period in 2010. This decrease was due to the re-measurement to fair value call options over the shares of a subsidiary and an associate in 2011 after entering into the respective call option agreements for no consideration subsequently to and separately from the acquisition of such subsidiary.

Other income

Other income for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 10 million, a decrease of 52%, or RUB 11 million, compared to the same period in 2010. This decrease was primarily due to a decrease in the income from penalties for the year ended December 31, 2011 of 82%, or RUB 9 million, compared to the same period in 2010.

 

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Other expenses

Other expenses for the year ended December 31, 2011 were RUB 73 million, an increase of 115%, or RUB 39 million, compared to the same period in 2010. This increase was primarily due to recognition of loss related to a discount on loans issued to related parties of RUB 31 million resulting from the remeasurement of a loan to fair value to adjust the discount granted to the market rate of interest. The loan arose in connection with the assignment of a lease deposit to our associate entity, Blestgroup Enterprises Ltd. as part of the transfer of our leasing operations to it.

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

Foreign exchange loss, net for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 12 million, an increase of RUB 12 million compared to the same period in 2010. This increase was due to the exchange rate losses recognized between the dates dividends were declared and paid to our shareholders and, to a lesser extent, the effect of devaluation of the Belarusian ruble and the Kazakh tenge against the ruble, in which intercompany loans payable to the Company were denominated.

Share of loss of associates

Share in loss of associates for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 23 million, compared to no loss in the same period in 2010. This increase was due to losses incurred by our associate, Blestgroup Enterprises Ltd.

Income tax

Income tax in for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 241 million, an increase of 18%, or RUB 37 million, compared to the same period in 2010, primarily due to an increase in profits before taxes. Our effective tax rate increased from 25% in the year ended December 31, 2010 to 29% in 2011. This increase resulted primarily from higher non-deductible expenses in 2011 and, to a lesser extent, higher tax effect of foreign earnings arising from higher amount of earnings taxed in Russia in 2011.

Gain / (loss) from discontinued operations

Loss from discontinued operations for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 156 million, an increase of 213%, or RUB 294 million, compared to a gain from discontinued operations during the same period in 2010. This loss was due to certain discontinued operations, following our international expansion in 2011, which resulted in significant losses in discontinued operations. In addition, the loss in 2011 was the result of a decline in revenues from Pay Kiosk of its sales of transaction recording devices for kiosks to agents after the completion of a transitional period upon introduction of the new law on electronic payment systems in Russia in 2010.

Non-controlling interests

Net loss attributable to non-controlling interests for the year ended December 31, 2011 was RUB 90 million, a decrease of RUB 152 million compared to the same period in 2010, primarily as a result of an increase in losses of certain of our international early-stage businesses.

Seasonality

Our Qiwi Distribution segment, which accounted for 68.2% of our adjusted net revenues and 76.4% of our total revenues in 2012 has experienced in the past, and is expected to continue to experience, seasonal fluctuations in revenue as a result of consumer spending patterns. Historically our revenues have been strongest in our third (representing 26% of our revenue in 2012) and fourth quarters (representing 28% of our revenue in 2012), and weakest in our first quarter (representing 22% of our revenue in 2012). This is due to the increase in

 

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payment volumes leading up to the Russian Christmas and New Year holidays. Given the significant growth in Qiwi Wallet, we are unable to determine yet whether it exhibits any seasonality.

Quarterly financial information

The following tables present our unaudited consolidated quarterly results of operations for the eight consecutive quarters ended December 31, 2012. You should read the following tables together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes contained elsewhere in this prospectus. We have prepared the unaudited quarterly information on the same basis as our audited consolidated financial statements.

Our operating results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for any future quarters or for a full year.

Consolidated Statement of Operations

 

    Three months ended  

(in RUB millions)

  March 31,
2011
    June 30,
2011
    September 30,
2011
    December 31,
2011
    March 31,
2012
    June 30,
2012
    September 30,
2012
    December 31,
2012
 

Revenue

    1,620        1,835        2,384        2,319        1,913        2,113        2,293        2,592   

Cost of revenue

    1,055        1,197        1,698        1,623        1,245        1,328        1,368        1,513   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

    372        341        370        460        414        353        413        658   

Depreciation and amortization

    43        32        33        33        39        34        24        32   

Impairment of intangible assets

                                                     4   

Profit from operations

    150        265        283        203        215        398        488        385   

Gain on bargain purchase

                         15                               

Gain from disposal of subsidiaries

           5               2                      (1       

Other income

    2        6        1        1        2        2        1        12   

Other expenses

    (9     (10     (10     (44     (27     (1     (1       

Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net

    (5     (11     7        (3     (27     34        (15     (13

Share of loss of associates

           (6     (8     (9     (1     (6     (13     7   

Interest income

    1               1        4        9        4        9        4   

Interest expense

                  (1     (3            (3     (3     (3

Profit before tax from continuing operations

    139        249        273        166        171        428        465        392   

Income tax expense

    (41     (51     (96     (53     (50     (121     (108     (129

Net profit from continuing operations

    98        198        177        113        121        307        357        263   

Loss from discontinued operations

    (23     (25     (67     (41     (50     (236     46          

Net profit

    75        173        110        72        71        71        403        263   

Attributable to:

               

Equity holders of the parent