N-2 1 v306493_n2.htm N-2

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 28, 2012

Securities Act File No. 333-

 

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM N-2

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933  þ
(Check appropriate box or boxes)
Pre-Effective Amendment No.  
Post-Effective Amendment No.

GSV CAPITAL CORP.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in charter)

2965 Woodside Road
Woodside, CA 94062

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

Registrant’s telephone number, including Area Code: (650) 206-2965

Michael T. Moe
Chief Executive Officer
GSV Capital Corp.
2965 Woodside Road
Woodside, CA 94062

(Name and address of agent for service)

COPIES TO:

Steven B. Boehm
John J. Mahon
Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP
1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20004
(202) 383-0100

Approximate date of proposed public offering: From time to time after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any securities being registered on this form will be offered on a delayed or continuous basis in reliance on Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, other than securities offered in connection with a dividend reinvestment plan, check the following box. x

It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box):

o when declared effective pursuant to section 8(c).

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

   
Title of Securities Being Registered   Proposed Maximum Aggregate
Offering Price(1)
  Amount of
Registration Fee
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share(2)                  
Total   $ 250,000,000 (3)    $ 28,650  

(1) Estimated pursuant to Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933 solely for the purpose of determining the registration fee. The proposed maximum offering price per security will be determined from time to time, by the Registrant in connection with the sale by the Registrant of the securities registered under this Registration Statement.
(2) Subject to Note 3 below, there is being registered hereunder an indeterminate number of shares of common stock, as may be sold from time to time.
(3) In no event will the aggregate offering price of all securities issued from time to time pursuant to this Registration Statement exceed $250,000,000.

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 


 
 

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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED MARCH 28, 2012

PROSPECTUS

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

$    

GSV Capital Corp.

Common Stock



 

We are an externally managed non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has elected to be treated as a business development company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, or the “1940 Act.” Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity investments. We invest principally in the equity securities of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. We may also invest on an opportunistic basis in select publicly-traded equity securities of rapidly growing companies that otherwise meet our investment criteria. In addition, while we invest primarily in U.S. companies, we may invest on an opportunistic basis in certain non-U.S. companies that otherwise meet out investment criteria, although in no event will the aggregate value of our non-U.S. investments exceed 30% of the aggregate value of our total investment portfolio. We acquire our investments through secondary marketplaces for private companies, negotiations with selling stockholders and direct investments with prospective portfolio companies. Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, LLC. GSV Capital Service Company, LLC provides the administrative services necessary for us to operate.

We seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of equity and equity-related investments, including common stock, warrants, preferred stock and similar forms of senior equity, which may or may not be convertible into a portfolio company’s common equity, and convertible debt securities with a high equity component. Our investments generally do not produce current income. We will seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of non-controlling investments in our portfolio companies.

We may offer, from time to time, in one or more offerings, up to $250,000,000 of our common stock. Our common stock may be offered at prices and on terms to be described in one or more supplements to this prospectus.

The offering price per share of our common stock less any underwriting commissions or discounts will generally not be less than the net asset value per share of our common stock at the time we make the offering. However, we may in the future seek to issue shares of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus at a price per share that is less than our net asset value per share (i) with the prior approval of the majority of our common stockholders or (ii) under such other circumstances as the SEC may permit. In addition, even if we seek and obtain shareholder approval to sell our common stock at a price below our net asset value per share, we cannot do so unless our board of directors determines that it would be in our and our stockholders' best interests to do so.

Our common stock may be offered directly to one or more purchasers, or through agents designated from time to time by us, or to or through underwriters or dealers. The prospectus supplement relating to an offering will identify any agents or underwriters involved in the sale of our common stock, and will disclose any applicable purchase price, fee, commission or discount arrangement between us and our agents or underwriters or among our underwriters or the basis upon which such amount may be calculated. See “Plan of Distribution.” We may not sell any of our common stock through agents, underwriters or dealers without delivery of this prospectus and a prospectus supplement describing the method and terms of the offering of our common stock.

Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GSVC.” On March 27, 2012, the last reported sales price on the NASDAQ Capital Market for our common stock was $20.18 per share.

This prospectus, and any accompanying prospectus supplement, contains important information about us that a prospective investor should know before investing in our common stock. Please read this prospectus, and any accompanying prospectus supplement, before investing and keep it for future reference. We will file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information about us with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the “SEC.” This information will be available free of charge by contacting us by mail at 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062, by telephone at (650) 206-2965 or on our website at http://www.gsvcap.com. The SEC also maintains a website at http://www.sec.gov that contains such information. Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus, and you should not consider that information to be part of this prospectus.

An investment in our common stock is subject to risks and involves a heightened risk of total loss of investment. In particular, shares of closed-end investment companies, including business development companies, such as our company, frequently trade at a discount to their net asset value. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18 to read about factors you should consider, including the risk of leverage, before investing in our common stock.

Neither the SEC nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

This prospectus may not be used to consummate sales of shares of common stock unless accompanied by a prospectus supplement.

The date of this prospectus is       , 2012.


 
 

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You should rely on the information contained in this prospectus. We have not authorized any dealer, salesman or other person to provide you with different information or to make representations as to matters not stated in this prospectus or any accompanying prospectus supplement. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. This prospectus, and any accompanying prospectus supplement, does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy any security other than the registered securities to which they relate, nor do they constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities in any jurisdiction to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation in such jurisdiction. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of this prospectus or any accompanying prospectus supplement. We will amend or supplement this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement in the event of any material change to the information contained herein or therein during any applicable distribution period.



 

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  Page
Summary     1  
Fees and Expenses     15  
Selected Financial and Other Data     17  
Selected Quarterly Financial Data     17  
Risk Factors     18  
Forward-Looking Statements and Projections     34  
Use of Proceeds     35  
Price Range of Common Stock and Distributions     36  
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     38  
Business     46  
Portfolio Companies     57  
Management     60  
Portfolio Management     67  
Investment Advisory Agreement     70  
Administration Agreement     76  
License Agreement     76  
Related Party Transactions and Certain Relationships     77  
Control Persons and Principal Stockholders     79  
Regulation as a Business Development Company     80  
Determination of Net Asset Value     85  
Dividend Reinvestment Plan     87  
Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations     88  
Description of Securities     95  
Plan of Distribution     101  
Custodian, Transfer and Distribution Paying Agent and Registrar     102  
Brokerage Allocation and Other Practices     103  
Legal Matters     103  
Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm     103  
Available Information     103  
Index to Financial Statements     F-1  

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

This prospectus is part of a registration statement that we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, using the “shelf” registration process. Under the shelf registration process, which constitutes a delayed offering in reliance on Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, we may offer, from time to time, in one or more offerings, up to $250,000,000 of our common stock on such terms to be determined at the time of the offering. Our common stock may be offered at prices and on terms described in one or more supplements to this prospectus. This prospectus provides you with a general description of our common stock. Each time we use this prospectus to offer our common stock, we will provide a prospectus supplement that will contain specific information about the terms of such offering. A prospectus supplement may also add, update or change information contained in this prospectus. If there is any inconsistency between information in this prospectus and the accompanying prospectus supplement, you should rely only on the information contained in the accompanying prospectus supplement. Please carefully read this prospectus and the accompanying prospectus supplement together with any exhibits and the additional information described under the headings “Summary,” “Risk Factors” and “Available Information” before you make an investment decision.

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SUMMARY

This summary, including, beginning on page 9, the Risk Factors summary, highlights some of the information in this prospectus. This summary is not complete and may not contain all of the information that you may want to consider. You should read carefully the more detailed information set forth under “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18 and the other information included in this prospectus.

Except where the context suggests otherwise, the terms “we,” “us,” “our” and “GSV Capital” refer to GSV Capital Corp. In addition, the terms “GSV Asset Management” or “investment adviser” refer to GSV Asset Management, LLC, and “GSV Capital Service Company” or the “administrator” refer to GSV Capital Service Company, LLC.

In May 2011 we completed our initial public offering of 3,335,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp of approximately $46.5 million.

In September 2011 we completed our first follow-on public offering of 2,185,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $14.15 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp. of approximately $29.6 million. We used the proceeds of our follow-on offering to increase our holdings in Facebook, Inc., Kno, Inc., and Twitter, Inc., as well as to make new investments in eight private companies, Control 4, Inc., DreamBox Learning, Inc., Dropbox, Inc., Grockit, Inc., StormWind, LLC, The Echo System Corp., The rSmart Group, Inc. and ZocDoc, Inc.

In February 2012 we completed our second follow-on public offering of 6,900,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp. of approximately $96.2 million. We used the proceeds of our second follow-on offering to increase our holdings in Chegg, Inc., StormWind, LLC and The Echo System Corp., as well as to make new investments in three private companies, AltEgo, LLC, AlwaysOn Network, LLC, and Maven Research, Inc.

As of March 27, 2012, we have invested approximately 41.2% of the combined net proceeds from our public offerings.

GSV Capital

We are an externally managed, non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has elected to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity and equity-related investments. We invest principally in the equity securities of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. We acquire our investments through secondary marketplaces for private companies, negotiations with selling stockholders and direct investments with prospective portfolio companies. We may also invest on an opportunistic basis in select publicly-traded equity securities or certain non-U.S. companies that otherwise meet our investment criteria. Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, and GSV Capital Service Company provides the administrative services necessary for us to operate.

Our investment philosophy is premised on a disciplined approach of identifying high-growth emerging companies across several key industry themes which may include, among others, social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology. Our investment adviser’s investment decisions are based on a disciplined analysis of available information regarding each potential portfolio company’s business operations, focusing on the company’s growth potential, the quality of recurring revenues and cash flow and cost structures, as well as an understanding of key market fundamentals. Top tier venture capital funds or other financial or strategic sponsors have invested in many of the companies that our investment adviser evaluates.

We seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of non-controlling equity and equity-related investments, including common stock, warrants, preferred stock and similar forms of senior equity, which may or may not be convertible into a portfolio company’s common equity, and convertible debt securities with a significant equity component.

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We seek to create a low-turnover portfolio that we expect will initially include diversified investments in 25 to 35 companies. As of March 27, 2012, we have completed investments in 24 companies for aggregate consideration of $71,100,579 (exclusive of transaction fees and costs), or 41.2% of the combined net proceeds from our public offerings. We expect that the total number of portfolio companies in which we are invested will increase as our equity capital base grows.

Two of the companies in our portfolio, Groupon, Inc. and Zynga, Inc., completed their initial public offerings in the fourth quarter of 2011. We own 80,000 shares of Groupon, Inc., which are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that expires on May 1, 2012. With respect to Zynga, we hold a $4,000,000 unsecured promissory note issued by PJB Fund LLC that we expect to mature on June 27, 2012, the repayment amount of which includes a return based on the relative value of the common stock of Zynga, Inc. As of December 31, 2011, these investments collectively comprised approximately 7.3% of our net asset value. The market trading levels for these companies were taken into consideration when calculating the fair value of such investments as of December 31, 2011. In addition, on February 1, 2012, Facebook, Inc. filed a registration statement with the SEC in connection with its proposed initial public offering. We own 350,000 shares of Class B common stock of Facebook, Inc., which are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that will expire 181 days after the date of the final prospectus relating to Facebook, Inc.’s initial public offering, if consummated. While there can be no assurance that it will do so, if Facebook, Inc. completes its initial public offering, its market trading levels will be taken into consideration when calculating the fair value of our investment. For a more detailed discussion of these investments and developments that may impact their fair market value as determined by our board of directors, see “Investments” and “Net Decreases in Net Assets” in “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Current Portfolio

We have limited information about the financial performance and profitability of our portfolio companies. While according to public filings with the SEC, certain of our portfolio companies have earned net income in recent periods, we believe that substantially all of our portfolio companies are currently experiencing operating losses. There can be no assurance when or if such companies will operate at a profit. In addition, our current portfolio company investments are also concentrated in a limited number of companies. As of March 27, 2012, over half of our portfolio company investments was comprised of investments in four companies.

As of March 27, 2012, we have completed investments in the companies identified below. For those investments held as of December 31, 2011, amounts include transaction fees and costs. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, amounts are exclusive of transaction fees and costs as those have not yet been finally determined. Fair value was determined in good faith by our board of directors as of December 31, 2011 for those investments held as of December 31, 2011. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined their fair value and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.

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Investment(1)   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)   Source(s)   Description
AltEgo, LLC   $500,000   $500,000(4)   Direct from issuer   Avatar technology and games developer
AlwaysOn Network, LLC(5)   $250,000   $250,000(4)   Direct from issuer   Internet media company
Bloom Energy Corporation   $1,815,818   $1,771,335     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Provider of solid oxide fuel cell technology that generates power onsite from a wide variety of fuel sources
Chegg, Inc.   $10,003,694   $9,999,996(6)   Direct from issuer and secondary marketplace   Online textbook rental company serving students nationwide
Control 4 Inc.   $1,034,827   $1,000,000   Direct from stockholder   Smart home automation company
DreamBox Learning, Inc.   $757,955   $750,000   Direct from issuer   Education technology company
Dropbox, Inc.   $5,015,333   $4,999,998   Direct from stockholder   Online storage service
Facebook, Inc.   $10,465,981   $10,462,500   Secondary marketplace   Leading online social network
Gilt Groupe, Inc.   $5,576,979   $5,499,250     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Online shopping destination offering its members access to discounted prices on merchandise, restaurants and vacations
Grockit Inc.   $2,005,945   $2,000,000   Direct from issuer   Online test preparation company
Groupon, Inc.   $2,128,585   $1,188,288     Secondary marketplace   Online provider of daily coupons for various consumer products
Kno, Inc.   $2,476,309   $2,455,000   Direct from issuer and direct from stockholder   Provider of education software, digital textbooks and social engagement tools for students
Maven Research, Inc.   $200,000   $200,000(4)   Direct from issuer   A global knowledge marketplace
PJB Fund LLC(7)   $4,029,259   $4,000,000     Direct from borrower   Debt investment linked until maturity to the value of Zynga, Inc., a developer of online social games
Serious Energy, Inc.   $739,130   $712,380     Secondary marketplace   Products and services to make buildings more energy-efficient
SharesPost, Inc.   $2,281,112   $2,274,483     Direct from issuer   Online marketplace for the exchange of private company equity

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Investment(1)   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)   Source(s)   Description
Silver Spring Networks, Inc.   $1,153,381   $1,101,430     Secondary marketplace   Hardware, software and services that connect devices on the smart grid
StormWind, LLC   $2,012,874   $2,000,000(8)   Direct from issuer   Online technology courses
The Echo System Corp.(9)   $755,823   $750,000     Direct from issuer   Social analytics
The rSmart Group, Inc.   $513,311   $500,000     Direct from issuer   Higher education learning platform
TrueCar, Inc.   $2,014,551   $1,999,997     Direct from issuer   Online automotive research destination
Twitter, Inc.   $12,304,345   $12,113,493     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Short messaging platform
ZocDoc Inc.   $3,563,178   $3,500,000     Direct from stockholder   Online booking for doctor and dentist appointments
ZoomSystems   $260,476   $250,000     Direct from stockholder   Automated retail vending machines
Total   $71,858,866   $70,278,150(10)          

(1) Unless otherwise noted, each investment represents an equity investment in the listed issuer.
(2) For those investments held as of December 31, 2011, amounts include transaction fees and costs. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, amounts are exclusive of transaction fees and costs as those have not yet been finally determined.
(3) Fair value was determined in good faith by our board of directors as of December 31, 2011 for those investments held as of December 31, 2011. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined their fair value and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(4) Reflects cost of the investment, exclusive of transaction fees and costs. Since we acquired the investment subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of such investment.
(5) Represents a $250,000 unsecured convertible promissory note issued by AlwaysOn, LLC, that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock, as well as warrants to purchase an additional number of shares of the issuer’s preferred stock equal to 35% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the principal amount of the note at the price per share at which such shares are next issued in a qualified equity financing, or if certain corporate events occur prior to the earlier of the maturity date of the note and the date of the next qualified equity financing, 50% of the price per share offered for shares of common stock in connection with such corporate event.
(6) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $6,003,694 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in equity securities of Chegg, Inc. that had a fair value of $5,999,996 as of December 31, 2011. In addition, we invested an additional $4,000,000 in equity securities of Chegg, Inc., exclusive of transaction fees and costs, subsequent to December 31, 2011. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional equity securities we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(7) Represents a $4 million unsecured promissory note issued by PJB Fund LLC that may be repaid, at PJB Fund LLC’s election, either by transfer of a certain number of shares of common stock of Zynga, Inc. or with a cash amount of equivalent value. To the extent the borrower repays the note in cash, we would

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have no further direct or indirect interest in Zynga, Inc. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Investments” for additional information regarding this investment.
(8) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $1,012,874 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in equity securities of StormWind, LLC that had a fair value of $1,000,000 as of December 31, 2011. In addition, we invested an additional $1,000,000, pursuant to the exercise of a warrant to purchase Series B Preferred Units, in StormWind, LLC, exclusive of transaction fees and costs, subsequent to December 31, 2011. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional Series B Preferred Units we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(9) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $505,823 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in a $500,000 unsecured convertible promissory note issued by The Echo System Corp., that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock, as well as warrants to purchase an additional number of shares of preferred stock equal to 35% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the principal amount of the note at the price per share at which such shares are next issued in a qualified equity financing, or common stock at a price of $0.20 per share if there is no qualified equity financing prior to the maturity date of the note or expiration of the warrant. In addition, subsequent to December 31, 2011 we invested an additional $250,000 in an unsecured convertible promissory note issued by The Echo System Corp., that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional unsecured promissory note we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investment is included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(10) Since we acquired some of these investments subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined the total fair value of our portfolio.

Our investment advisers track a broad list of potential investment opportunities based on fit with our key investment themes and financial characteristics. We currently have over 100 companies under consideration, which we regularly monitor to determine near- and long-term opportunities. At present, our broad list includes companies representing the following investment themes: social-mobile (41.7%), education technology (19.6%), green technology (5.5%), internet commerce (25.5%) and cloud computing (7.7%). The size of companies that we track varies significantly, from technology start-ups to well established near-term IPO candidates.

Within our broad list, we identify a subset of the opportunities that we believe provide the most attractive prospects for future investment. We generally have approximately 30 investments actively under evaluation at any given time. We devote most of our research efforts on understanding, analyzing and valuing these top 30 companies. Our investment adviser actively seeks opportunities to invest in these potential portfolio companies at pre-determined target prices. At any time, we may be in negotiations or in a pre-closing escrow period with several of the companies in our pipeline.

About GSV Asset Management

Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, or the “Advisers Act.” GSV Asset Management is led by Michael T. Moe, our president, chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors. Mr. Moe is assisted by Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary, whom we refer to collectively as GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals. Mr. Moe co-founded and previously served as chairman and chief executive officer of ThinkEquity Partners, an asset management and investment banking firm focusing on venture capital, entrepreneurial and emerging growth companies. Prior to founding ThinkEquity, Mr. Moe served as Head of Global Growth Research at Merrill Lynch and before that served as Head of Growth Research and Strategy at Montgomery Securities. Mr. Moe has written extensively about investing in the emerging growth equity markets. His critically-acclaimed book, “Finding the Next Starbucks,” articulates Mr. Moe’s investment process and philosophy which have been refined over more than two decades in the investment community.

We believe we benefit from the proven ability of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals and board of advisers (the “Advisory Board”) to identify attractive investment opportunities, conduct

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diligence on and value prospective investments, negotiate terms, and manage and monitor a diversified portfolio of those investments. See “Portfolio Management — Advisory Board to GSV Asset Management.” Our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals and Advisory Board members have broad investment backgrounds, with prior experience at investment banks, commercial banks, unregistered investment funds and other financial services companies, and have collectively developed a broad network of contacts that provides us with an important source of investment opportunities.

We pay GSV Asset Management a fee for its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee. The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets, which includes any borrowings for investment purposes. The incentive fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing on December 31, 2011, and will equal the lesser of (i) 20% of our realized capital gains during such calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and (ii) 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” Although we do not currently have any specific plans to incur debt or use leverage, the terms for calculating the management fee create an incentive for our investment adviser to utilize leverage in the future because our management fee is based on our gross assets, including issuances of preferred stock and borrowings for investment purposes, rather than our net assets. We will be required, however, to obtain the approval of our board of directors before we incur any future indebtedness.

Investment Opportunity

The technology industry is experiencing a convergence of numerous disruptive trends, producing new high-growth markets. The growth of both social networking and connected mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, has opened up new channels for communication and real-time collaboration. The number of devices and people that regularly connect to the Internet has increased dramatically in recent years, generating significant demand for always accessible, personalized and localized content and real-time online interactivity. These factors are creating opportunities for new market participants and significant growth for established companies with leading positions capitalizing on these trends.

At the same time, the initial public offering, or “IPO,” markets have experienced substantial structural changes which have made it significantly more challenging for private companies to go public. Volatile equity markets, a lack of investment research coverage for smaller companies and investor demand for a longer history of earnings growth have resulted in companies staying private significantly longer than in the past. In addition, increased public company compliance obligations such as those imposed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 have made it more costly and less attractive to become a public company. As a result, there are significantly fewer IPOs today than there were a decade ago, with prospective public companies taking longer to come to market. For example, from 1991 – 2000, there were 4,361 IPOs in the United States, of which 1,701 were venture-capital backed. From 2001 – 2010, there were 1,016 IPOs, of which 369 were venture-capital backed.

Because private companies are staying private longer, private investment in late stage companies has increased. Private secondary marketplaces, such as SharesPost and SecondMarket, have emerged as an alternative to traditional public equity exchanges to provide liquidity to private company stockholders, including employees, particularly within the technology sector. While such private secondary marketplaces generally have more limited transaction volume than public exchanges, they do provide accredited investors, such as ourselves, with access to equity investments in private companies. Such markets also provide a source for exiting private company investments, as well as price visibility from trading on a marketplace.

Investment Strategy

We seek to create a portfolio of high-growth emerging private companies via a repeatable and disciplined investment approach, as well as to provide investors with access to such companies through our publicly traded common stock.

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Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity investments. We have adopted the following business strategies to achieve our investment objective:

Identify high quality growth companies.  Based on our extensive experience in analyzing technology trends and markets, we have identified the technology sub-sectors of social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology, as opportunities where we believe companies are capable of producing substantial growth. We rely on our collective industry knowledge as well as an understanding of where leading venture capitalists are investing.

We leverage a combination of our relationships throughout Silicon Valley and our independent research to identify leaders in our targeted sub-sectors that we believe are differentiated and best positioned for sustained growth. Our evaluation process is based on what we refer to as “the four Ps”:

People — Organizations led by strong management teams with in-depth operational focus
Product — Differentiated and disruptive products with leading market positioning
Potential — Large addressable markets
Predictability — Ability to forecast and drive predictable and sustainable growth

We consider these to be the core elements for identifying rapidly growing emerging companies.

Acquire positions in targeted investments.  We seek to build our portfolio by sourcing investments at an acceptable price through our disciplined investing strategy. To this end, we utilize multiple methods to acquire equity stakes in private companies that are not available to many individual investors.

Private secondary marketplaces and direct share purchases.  We utilize private secondary marketplaces as a means to acquire equity investments in privately-held companies that meet our investment criteria and that we believe are attractive candidates for investment. We believe that such markets offer efficient execution versus alternative methods and provide a potential source of liquidity should we decide to exit an investment. In addition, we also purchase shares directly from stockholders, including current or former employees. As certain companies grow and experience significant increased value while remaining private, employees and other stockholders may seek liquidity by selling shares directly to a third party. Sales of shares in private companies are typically restricted by contractual transfer restrictions and company employment policies, which may impose strict limits on transfer. We believe that our investment professionals’ reputation within the industry and history of investing affords us a favorable position when seeking approval for a purchase of shares subject to such limitations.

Direct equity investments.  We also seek direct investments in private companies. There is a large market among emerging private companies for equity capital investments. Many of these companies, particularly within the technology sector, lack the necessary cash flows to sustain substantial amounts of debt, and therefore have viewed equity capital as a more attractive long-term financing tool. We seek to be a source of such equity capital as a means of investing in these companies and look for opportunities to invest alongside other private equity and venture capital investors with whom we have established relationships.

Create access to a diverse investment portfolio.   We seek to hold a diverse portfolio of non-controlling equity investments, which we believe will minimize the impact on our portfolio of a negative downturn at any one specific company. We believe that our relatively diversified portfolio will provide a convenient means for accredited and non-accredited individual investors to obtain access to an asset class that has generally been limited to venture capital, private equity and similar large institutional investors.

We are primarily focused on investing in private companies. From time to time, certain of our portfolio companies may list on public exchanges. It is our intent to liquidate our position in public companies when

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we determine the timing is appropriate, taking into consideration our investment objectives, market dynamics and lock up agreements to which we may be subject.

Competitive Advantages

We believe that we will benefit from the following competitive advantages in executing our investment strategy:

Highly experienced team of investment professionals.   Our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, its Advisory Board and our board of directors have significant experience researching and investing in the types of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies we are targeting for investment. Through our proprietary company evaluation process, including our identification of technology trends and themes and company research, we believe we have developed important insight into identifying and valuing emerging private companies.
Disciplined and repeatable investment process.   We have established a disciplined process to locate and acquire available shares at attractive valuations by utilizing multiple sources. In contrast to industry “aggregators” that accumulate stock at market prices, we conduct valuation analyses and make acquisitions only when we can invest at valuations that we believe are attractive to our investors. Following this process, we have completed investments in the 21 companies in our portfolio as of December 31, 2011.
Deep relationships with significant credibility to source and complete transactions.  GSV Asset Management and its senior investment professionals are strategically located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Woodside, California. During the course of over two decades of researching and investing in emerging private companies, our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals have developed strong reputations within the investing community, particularly within technology-related sectors. Our investment adviser’s Advisory Board members and our board of directors have also developed strong relationships in the financial, investing and technology-related sectors.
Source of permanent investing capital.   As a publicly-traded corporation, we have access to a source of permanent equity capital which we can use to invest in portfolio companies. This permanent equity capital is a significant differentiator from other potential financial sponsor investors that may be required to return capital to stockholders on a defined schedule. We believe that our ability to invest on a long-term time horizon makes us attractive to companies looking for strong, stable owners of their equity.
Early mover advantage.   We believe we are one of the few publicly traded business development company with a specific focus on investing in rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. Moreover, we believe we are the only one to focus on acquiring secondary shares as a key component of our strategy. Despite our limited track record, the transactions that we have executed to date since our IPO have helped to establish our reputation with the types of secondary sellers and emerging companies that we target for investment. We have leveraged multiple relationships and channels to acquire the equity of private companies. As we continue to grow our portfolio with attractive investments, we believe that our reputation as a committed partner will be further enhanced, allowing us to source and close investments that would otherwise be unavailable. We believe that these factors collectively differentiate us from other potential investors in private company securities and will potentially enable us to complete equity transactions in top tier private companies at attractive valuations.

Operating and Regulatory Structure

GSV Capital was formed as a Maryland corporation that is an externally managed, non-diversified closed-end management investment company. We completed our initial public offering in April 2011 and have elected to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. As a business development company, we are required to meet regulatory tests, including the requirement to invest at least 70% of our gross assets in “qualifying assets.” Qualifying assets generally include, among other things, securities of “eligible portfolio companies.” “Eligible portfolio companies” generally include U.S. companies that are not

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investment companies and that do not have securities listed on a national exchange. If at any time less than 70% of our gross assets are comprised of qualifying assets, including as a result of an increase in the value of any non-qualifying assets or decrease in the value of any qualifying assets, we would generally not be permitted to acquire any additional non-qualifying assets until such time as 70% of our then current gross assets were comprised of qualifying assets. We would not be required, however, to dispose of any non-qualifying assets in such circumstances. See “Regulation as a Business Development Company.” In addition, we intend to elect to be treated for federal income tax purposes, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management and supervised by our board of directors. GSV Asset Management is an investment adviser registered under the Advisers Act. Under our investment advisory agreement, which we refer to as the Investment Advisory Agreement, we have agreed to pay GSV Asset Management an annual base management fee based on our gross assets as well as an incentive fee based on our performance. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” We have also entered into an administration agreement, which we refer to as the Administration Agreement, under which we have agreed to reimburse GSV Capital Service Company for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred.

Our Corporate Information

Our offices are located at 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062, and our telephone number is (650) 206-2965.

Risk Factors

The value of our assets, as well as the market price of our shares, will fluctuate. Our investments may be risky, and you may lose all or part of your investment in us. Investing in GSV Capital involves other risks, including the following:

Our investments in the rapidly growing venture capital backed emerging companies that we are targeting may be extremely risky and we could lose all or part of our investments;
Because our investments are generally not in publicly traded securities, there will be uncertainty regarding the value of our portfolio investments;
We may not realize gains from our equity investments and, because certain of our portfolio companies may incur substantial debt to finance their operations, we may experience a complete loss on our equity investment in the event of a bankruptcy or liquidation of any of our portfolio companies;
Substantially all of our portfolio companies are currently experiencing operating losses, which may be substantial, and there can be no assurance when or if such companies will operate at a profit;
The lack of liquidity in, and potentially extended duration of, many of our investments may adversely affect our business and will delay any distributions of gains, if any;
Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of portfolio companies or market sectors, which will subject us to a risk of significant loss if the business or market position of these companies deteriorates or market sectors experience a market downturn;
Technology-related sectors in which we invest are subject to many risks, including volatility, intense competition, decreasing life cycles, product obsolescence, changing consumer preferences and periodic downturns;
We may be limited in our ability to make follow-on investments, for a number of reasons, including financial or regulatory restrictions, and our failure to make follow-on investments in our portfolio companies could impair the value of our portfolio.
We have only a limited operating history;
Our inability to maintain our status as a business development company;

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We are dependent upon GSV Asset Management’s senior investment personnel for our future success;
We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly results and we may be unable to replicate past investment opportunities or make the types of investments we have made to date in future periods;
Risk associated with transacting on secondary marketplaces, including the limited availability and reliability of information relating to prospective investments and legal and regulatory risks;
We operate in a highly competitive market for direct equity investment opportunities;
We will generally make non-controlling investments and are subject to the risks that other significant shareholders may have interests that differ from those of the portfolio company or minority investors.
There are significant potential conflicts of interest, which could impact our investment returns and limit the flexibility of our investment policies;
Regulations governing our operation as a business development company affect our ability to and the way in which we raise additional capital, which may expose us to risks;
We will be subject to corporate-level income tax if we are unable to qualify as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial performance;
Our common stock price may be volatile and may decrease substantially;
Our common stock has recently traded, and may in the future trade, at premiums that may prove to be unsustainable or at discounts from net asset value; and
There is a risk that you may not receive dividends or that our dividends may not grow over time, particularly since we invest primarily in securities that do not produce current income.

See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 18 and the other information included in this prospectus for additional discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in shares of our common stock.

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OFFERINGS

We may offer, from time to time, up to $250,000,000 of our common stock on terms to be determined at the time of the offering and set forth in one or more supplements to this prospectus. The offering price per share of our common stock, less any underwriting commissions or discounts, generally will not be less than the net asset value per share of our common stock at the time of an offering. However, we may in the future seek to issue shares of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus at a price per share that is less than our net asset value per share (i) with the prior approval of the majority of our common stockholders or (ii) under such other circumstances as the SEC may permit. In addition, even if we seek and obtain shareholder approval to sell our common stock at a price below our net asset value per share, we cannot do so unless our board of directors determines that it would be in our and our stockholders' best interests to do so.

Our common stock may be offered directly to one or more purchasers, or through agents designated from time to time by us, or to or through underwriters or dealers. The prospectus supplement relating to an offering will identify any agents or underwriters involved in the sale of our common stock, and will disclose any applicable purchase price, fee, commission or discount arrangement between us and our agents or underwriters or among our underwriters or the basis upon which such amount may be calculated. See “Plan of Distribution.” We may not sell our common stock through agents, underwriters or dealers without delivery of this prospectus and a prospectus supplement describing the method and terms of the offering of our common stock.

Set forth below is additional information regarding offerings of our common stock:

Use of Proceeds    
    Unless otherwise specified in a prospectus supplement, we plan to invest the net proceeds from the sale of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement in portfolio companies in accordance with our investment objective and strategies described in this prospectus. We will also use a portion of any such net proceeds to pay operating expenses, and other expenses such as due diligence expenses relating to potential new investments. We anticipate that substantially all of the net proceeds of any such offering will be used for the above purposes within six to 12 months, depending on the availability of investment opportunities that are consistent with our investment objectives and market conditions, except for such amounts as may be retained for purposes of funding our ongoing operations subsequent to the completion of such offering. Each supplement to this prospectus relating to an offering will more fully identify the use of the proceeds from such offering. See “Use of Proceeds.”
NASDAQ Capital Market symbol    
    Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GSVC.”
Distributions    
    The timing and amount of our dividends, if any, will be determined by our board of directors. Any dividends to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. As we focus on making primarily capital gains-based investments in equity securities, we do not anticipate that we will pay dividends on a quarterly basis or become a predictable distributor of dividends, and we expect that our dividends, if any, will be less consistent than the dividends of other business development companies that primarily make debt investments.

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Taxation    
    We intend to elect to be treated for federal income tax purposes, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As a RIC, we generally will not be required to pay corporate-level federal income taxes on any ordinary income or capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders as dividends. To obtain and maintain our RIC tax treatment, we must meet specified source-of-income and asset diversification requirements and distribute annually at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. See “Distributions” and “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”
Investment Advisory Fees    
    We pay GSV Asset Management a fee for its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee. The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets, which includes any borrowings for investment purposes. The incentive fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing on December 31, 2011, and will equal the lesser of (i) 20% of our realized capital gains during such calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and (ii) 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” Although we do not currently have any specific plans to incur debt or use leverage, the terms for calculating the management fee create an incentive for our investment adviser to utilize leverage in the future because our management fee is based on our gross assets, including borrowings for investment purposes, rather than our net assets. We will be required, however, to obtain the approval of our board of directors before we incur any future indebtedness.
Administration Agreement    
    We reimburse GSV Capital Service Company for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses it incurs in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including furnishing us with office facilities, equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities, as well as providing us with other administrative services. In addition, we reimburse GSV Capital Service Company for the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions, and our allocable portion of the compensation of our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer and any

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    administrative support staff. Additionally, GSV Capital Service Company may outsource some of its duties. While there is no limit on the total amount of expenses we may be required to reimburse to GSV Capital Service Company, our administrator will only charge us for the actual expenses it incurs on our behalf, or our allocable portion thereof, without any profit to GSV Capital Service Company. See “Administration Agreement.”
Leverage    
    We do not currently have any specific plans to incur debt or use leverage. However, if we borrow for investment purposes in the future, we will be exposed to the risks of leverage, which may be considered a speculative investment technique. The use of leverage magnifies the potential for gain and loss on amounts invested and therefore increases the risks associated with investing in our securities. In addition, the costs associated with our borrowings, including any increase in the management fee payable to our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, will be borne by our common stockholders.
Trading    
    Shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount to their net asset value. The risk that our shares may trade at a discount to our net asset value is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. We cannot predict whether our shares will trade above, at or below net asset value.
License Agreement    
    We have entered into a license agreement with GSV Asset Management, pursuant to which GSV Asset Management has agreed to grant us a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to use the name “GSV.” See “License Agreement.”
Dividend Reinvestment Plan    
    We have adopted an “opt out” dividend reinvestment plan. If your shares of common stock are registered in your own name, your distributions will automatically be reinvested under our dividend reinvestment plan in additional whole and fractional shares of common stock, unless you “opt out” of our dividend reinvestment plan so as to receive cash dividends by delivering a written notice to our dividend paying agent. If your shares are held in the name of a broker or other nominee, you should contact the broker or nominee for details regarding opting out of our dividend reinvestment plan. Stockholders who receive distributions in the form of stock will be subject to the same federal, state and local tax consequences as stockholders who elect to receive their distributions in cash. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.”
Certain Anti-Takeover Measures    
    Our charter and bylaws, as well as certain statutory and regulatory requirements, contain certain provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a third party from making an acquisition proposal for us. These anti-takeover provisions may inhibit a change in control in circumstances

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    that could give the holders of our common stock the opportunity to realize a premium over the market price for our common stock. See “Description of Securities.”
Risk Factors    
    Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should consider carefully the information found under the heading “Risk Factors.” We have only a limited operating history as a business development company and as a regulated investment company. If we fail to qualify as a regulated investment company, we could become subject to federal income tax on all of our income, which would have a material adverse effect on our financial performance. We invest in rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. These activities may involve a high degree of business and financial risk. We are also subject to risks associated with access to additional capital, fluctuating quarterly results and variation in our portfolio value.
Available Information    
    We have filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form N-2 together with all amendments and related exhibits under the Securities Act. The registration statement contains additional information about us and the securities being offered by this prospectus.
    We are required to file periodic reports, current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. This information is available at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549 and on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. The public may obtain information on the operation of the SEC’s public reference room by calling the SEC at (202) 551-8090. This information is also available free of charge by contacting us at GSV Capital Corp., 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062, by telephone at (650) 206-2965, or on our website at http://www.gsvcap.com.

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FEES AND EXPENSES

The following table is intended to assist you in understanding the costs and expenses that you will bear directly or indirectly. We caution you that some of the percentages indicated in the table below are estimates and may vary. Except where the context suggests otherwise, whenever this prospectus contains a reference to fees or expenses paid by “us” or “GSV Capital,” or that “we” will pay fees or expenses, you will indirectly bear such fees or expenses as an investor in GSV Capital Corp.

 
Stockholder transaction expenses:
        
Sales load (as a percentage of offering price)        %(1) 
Offering expenses borne by common stockholders (as a percentage of offering price)        %(2) 
Dividend reinvestment plan expenses     None  
Total stockholder transaction expenses (as a percentage of offering price)        %(2) 
Annual expenses (as a percentage of net assets attributable to common stock):
        
Base management fee     2.00 %(3) 
Incentive fees payable under our investment advisory agreement (20%)     0.00 %(4) 
Interest payments on borrowed funds     0.00 %(5) 
Other expenses     0.38 %(6) 
Acquired fund fees and expenses     0.01 %(7) 
Total annual expenses     2.39 % 

Example

The following example demonstrates the projected dollar amount of total cumulative expenses that would be incurred over various periods with respect to a hypothetical investment in our common stock. In calculating the following expense amounts, we have assumed that our annual operating expenses would remain at the levels set forth in the table above. See Note 5 below for additional information regarding certain assumptions regarding our level of leverage subsequent to this offering.

       
  1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   10 Years
You would pay the following expenses on a $1,000 investment, assuming a 5% annual return   $ 34     $ 103     $ 175     $ 364  

(1) In the event that the shares of common stock to which this prospectus relates are sold to or through underwriters, a corresponding prospectus supplement will disclose the applicable sales load and the “Example” will be updated accordingly.
(2) The prospectus supplement corresponding to each offering will disclose the applicable offering expenses and total stockholder transaction expenses.
(3) Reflects our base management fee as a percentage of our net assets. Our base management fee under the Investment Advisory Agreement is based on our gross assets, which is defined as all the assets of GSV Capital, including those acquired using borrowings for investment purposes. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” As a result, although we do not currently have any specific plans to use leverage, to the extent we elect to utilize leverage in the future, our base management fee as a percentage of our net assets would increase.
(4) The incentive fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing on December 31, 2011, and will equal the lesser of (i) 20% of our realized capital gains during such calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and (ii) 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees. For a more detailed discussion of the calculation of this fee, see “Investment Advisory Agreement.” For accounting purposes, in order to reflect the theoretical capital gains incentive fee that would be payable for a given period as if all unrealized gains were realized, we are required to accrue a capital gains incentive fee based upon realized capital gains and losses during the

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current calendar year through the end of the period, plus any unrealized capital appreciation and depreciation as of the end of the period. It should be noted that a fee so calculated and accrued would not necessarily be payable under the Investment Advisory Agreement, and may never be paid based upon the computation of capital gains incentive fees in subsequent periods. Amounts paid under the Investment Advisory Agreement will be consistent with the formula reflected in the Investment Advisory Agreement.
(5) We do not currently have any specific plans to incur debt or use leverage. However, if we borrow for investment purposes in the future, we will be exposed to the risks of leverage, which may be considered a speculative investment technique. The use of leverage magnifies the potential for gain and loss on amounts invested and therefore increases the risks associated with investing in our securities. In addition, the costs associated with our borrowings, including any increase in the management fee payable to our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, will be borne by our common stockholders. We will not issue any preferred stock during the 12 months following the date of this prospectus.
(6) Assumes that the amount of our operating expenses remains consistent with the operating expenses incurred by us during the fiscal ended December 31, 2011.

The example and the expenses in the tables above should not be considered a representation of our future expenses, and actual expenses may be greater or less than those shown. While the example assumes, as required by the SEC, a 5.0% annual return, our performance will vary and may result in a return greater or less than 5.0%. As the incentive fee under the Investment Advisory Agreement is payable only on realized capital gains, this illustration assumes that the entire 5.0% annual return is in the form of realized capital gains (computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation) in each of the indicated time periods, and that we will be required to pay an incentive fee on the full amount of the annual return. If we achieve a greater realization of realized capital gains than the assumed 5.0% annual return, our expenses and returns to our investors would be higher. In addition, the example assumes inclusion of the sales load of   %. Also, while the example assumes reinvestment of all dividends at net asset value, participants in our dividend reinvestment plan will receive a number of shares of our common stock, determined by dividing the total dollar amount of the dividend payable to a participant by the market price per share of our common stock at the close of trading on the dividend payment date, which may be at, above or below net asset value. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan” for additional information regarding our dividend reinvestment plan.

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SELECTED FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

The selected financial and other data below should be read in conjunction with our “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements and notes thereto. Quarterly financial information is derived from unaudited financial data, but in the opinion of management, reflects all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) which are necessary to present fairly the results for such interim periods. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” below for more information.

 
(in thousands, except per share data)   At and For the
Fiscal Year
Ended December 31,
2011(1)
     (unaudited)
Income Statement Data:
        
Total operating expenses   $ 2,196,192  
Net investment loss     (2,033,864 ) 
Net decrease in net assets resulting from operations     (3,613,664 ) 
Balance Sheet Data:
        
Total assets   $ 91,798,242  
Total net assets     71,503,248  
Per Common Share Data:
        
Net decrease in net assets resulting from operations per average share(2)   $ (1.07 ) 
Net asset value per share     12.95  

(1) Includes the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011.
(2) Weighted average common shares for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011 was calculated starting from the issuance of 100 shares as of February 28, 2011. Weighted average common shares were 3,377,429 for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011.

SELECTED QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth certain quarterly financial information for each quarter in the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011. This information was derived from our unaudited financial statements. Results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for the full year or for any future quarter.

       
  At and For the
Three months ended
(in thousands, except per share data)   December 31,
2011
  September 30, 2011   June 30,
2011
  March 31,
2011(1)
Total operating expenses     787     $ 733     $ 565     $ 111  
Net investment loss     (678 )      (680 )      (565 )      (111 ) 
Net decrease in net assets resulting from operations     (1,704 )      (1,174 )      (625 )      (111 ) 
Net decrease in net assets resulting from operations per
average share(2)
    (0.31 )      (0.34 )      (0.27 )      (1,108.08 ) 
Net asset value per share     12.95       13.26       13.57       (1,093.08 ) 

(1) Includes the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) through March 31, 2011, which preceded the completion of our initial public offering in May 2011.
(2) Weighted average common shares were 100, 2,345,595, 3,430,100 and 5,520,100 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, June 30, 2011, September 30, 2011 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a number of significant risks. In addition to the other information contained in this prospectus, you should consider carefully the following information before making an investment in our common stock. Although the risks described below represent our material risks, they are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us might also impair our operations and performance. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In such case, our net asset value and the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related To Our Investments

Our investments in the rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies that we are targeting may be extremely risky and we could lose all or part of our investments.

Investment in the rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies that we are targeting involves a number of significant risks, including:

these companies may have limited financial resources and may be unable to meet their obligations under their existing debt, which may lead to equity financings, possibly at discounted valuations, in which we could be substantially diluted if we do not or cannot participate, bankruptcy or liquidation and the reduction or loss of our equity investment;
they typically have limited operating histories, narrower, less established product lines and smaller market shares than larger businesses, which tend to render them more vulnerable to competitors’ actions, market conditions and consumer sentiment in respect of their products or services, as well as general economic downturns;
because they are privately owned, there is generally little publicly available information about these businesses; therefore, although our investment adviser’s agents will perform due diligence investigations on these portfolio companies, their operations and their prospects, we may not learn all of the material information we need to know regarding these businesses and, in the case of investments we acquire on private secondary transactions, we may be unable to obtain financial or other information regarding the companies with respect to which we invest. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the information that we do obtain with respect to any investment is reliable;
they are more likely to depend on the management talents and efforts of a small group of persons; therefore, the death, disability, resignation or termination of one or more of these persons could have a material adverse impact on our portfolio company and, in turn, on us; and
they generally have less predictable operating results, may from time to time be parties to litigation, may be engaged in rapidly changing businesses with products subject to a substantial risk of obsolescence, and may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, finance expansion or maintain their competitive position.

A portfolio company’s failure to satisfy financial or operating covenants imposed by its lenders could lead to defaults and, potentially, termination of its loans and foreclosure on its assets, which could trigger cross-defaults under other agreements and jeopardize our equity investment in such portfolio company. We may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery of our equity investment or to negotiate new terms with a financially distressed portfolio company.

Because our investments are generally not in publicly traded securities, there will be uncertainty regarding the value of our investments, which could adversely affect the determination of our net asset value.

Our portfolio investments will generally not be in publicly traded securities. As a result, although we expect that some of our equity investments may trade on private secondary marketplaces, the fair value of our direct investments in portfolio companies will often not be readily determinable. Under the 1940 Act, for our investments for which there are no readily available market quotations, including securities that while listed on a private securities exchange, have not actively traded, we will value such securities at fair value quarterly as determined in good faith by our board of directors based upon the recommendation of the Board of

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Director’s Valuation Committee in accordance with our written valuation policy. In connection with that determination, members of our investment adviser’s portfolio management team will prepare portfolio company valuations using the most recent portfolio company financial statements and forecasts. The Valuation Committee intends to utilize the services of an independent valuation firm, which will prepare valuations for each of our portfolio investments that are not publicly traded or for which we do not have readily available market quotations, including securities that while listed on a private securities exchange, have not actively traded. However, the board of directors will retain ultimate authority as to the appropriate valuation of each such investment. The types of factors that the Valuation Committee will take into account in providing its fair value recommendation to the board of directors with respect to such non-traded investments will include, as relevant and, to the extent available, the portfolio company’s earnings, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparison to valuations of publicly traded companies, comparisons to recent sales of comparable companies, the discounted value of the cash flows of the portfolio company and other relevant factors. This information may not be available because it is difficult to obtain financial and other information with respect to private companies, and even where we are able to obtain such information, there can be no assurance that it is complete or accurate. Because such valuations are inherently uncertain and may be based on estimates, our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would be assessed if a readily available market for these securities existed. Due to this uncertainty, our fair value determinations with respect to any non-traded investments we hold may cause our net asset value on a given date to materially understate or overstate the value that we may ultimately realize on one or more of our investments. As a result, investors purchasing our common stock based on an overstated net asset value would pay a higher price than the value of our investments might warrant. Conversely, investors selling shares during a period in which the net asset value understates the value of our investments will receive a lower price for their shares than the value of our investments might warrant.

We may not realize gains from our equity investments and, because certain of our portfolio companies may incur substantial debt to finance their operations, we may experience a complete loss on our equity investment in the event of a bankruptcy or liquidation of any of our portfolio companies.

We invest principally in the equity and equity-related securities of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. However, the equity interests we acquire may not appreciate in value and, in fact, may decline in value. In addition, the private company securities we acquire are often subject to drag-along rights, which could permit other stockholders, under certain circumstances, to force us to liquidate our position in a subject company at a specified price, which could be, in our opinion, inadequate or undesirable or even below our cost basis. In this event, we could realize a loss or fail to realize gain in an amount that we deem appropriate on our investment. Further, capital market volatility and the overall market environment may preclude our portfolio companies from realizing liquidity events and impede our exit from these investments. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our equity interests, and any gains that we do realize on the disposition of any equity interests may not be sufficient to offset any other losses we experience. We will generally have little, if any, control over the timing of any gains we may realize from our equity investments. In addition, the companies in which we invest may have substantial debt loads. In such cases, we would typically be last in line behind any creditors in a bankruptcy or liquidation, and would likely experience a complete loss on our investment.

Substantially all of our portfolio companies are currently experiencing operating losses, which may be substantial, and there can be no assurance when or if such companies will operate at a profit.

We have limited information about the financial performance and profitability of our portfolio companies. While according to public filings with the SEC, certain of our portfolio companies have earned net income in recent periods, we believe that substantially all of our portfolio companies are currently experiencing operating losses. There can be no assurance when or if such companies will operate at a profit.

The lack of liquidity in, and potentially extended holding period of, our many investments may adversely affect our business, and will delay any distributions of gains, if any.

Our investments will generally not be in publicly traded securities. Although we expect that some of our equity investments will trade on private secondary marketplaces, certain of the securities we hold will be subject to legal and other restrictions on resale or will otherwise be less liquid than publicly traded securities. In addition, while some portfolio companies may trade on private secondary marketplaces, we can provide no

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assurance that such a trading market will continue or remain active, or that we will be able to sell our position in any portfolio company at the time we desire to do so and at the price we anticipate. The illiquidity of our investments, including those that are traded on private secondary marketplaces, may make it difficult for us to sell such investments if the need arises. Also, if we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we have previously recorded our investments. We will have no limitation on the portion of our portfolio that may be invested in illiquid securities, and a substantial portion or all of our portfolio may be invested in such illiquid securities from time to time.

In addition, because we will generally invest in equity and equity-related securities, with respect to the majority of our portfolio companies, we do not expect realization events, if any, to occur in the near term. We expect that our holdings of equity securities may require several years to appreciate in value, and we can offer no assurance that such appreciation will occur. Even if such appreciation does occur, it is likely that initial purchasers of our shares could wait for an extended period of time before any appreciation or sale of our investments, and any attendant distributions of gains, may be realized.

Our portfolio may be concentrated in a limited number of portfolio companies or market sectors, which will subject us to a risk of significant loss if the business or market position of these companies deteriorates or market sectors experiences a market downturn.

A consequence of our limited number of investments is that the aggregate returns we realize may be significantly adversely affected if a small number of investments perform poorly or if we need to write down the value of any one investment. For example, as of December 31, 2011, over half of our portfolio company investments was comprised of investments in four portfolio companies. Beyond our income tax asset diversification requirements, we do not have fixed guidelines for diversification, and our investments could be concentrated in relatively few issuers. In addition, our investments may be concentrated in a limited number of market sectors, including in technology-related sectors. As a result, a downturn in any market sector in which a significant number of our portfolio companies operate could materially adversely affect us.

Technology-related sectors in which we invest are subject to many risks, including volatility, intense competition, decreasing life cycles, product obsolescence, changing consumer preferences and periodic downturns.

Given the experience of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals and its Advisory Board members within the technology space, we expect that a number of the companies with respect to which we invest will operate in technology-related sectors. The revenues, income (or losses) and valuations of technology-related companies can and often do fluctuate suddenly and dramatically. In addition, because of rapid technological change, the average selling prices of products and some services provided by technology-related sectors have historically decreased over their productive lives. As a result, the average selling prices of products and services offered by our portfolio companies that operated in technology-related sectors may decrease over time, which could adversely affect their operating results and, correspondingly, the value of any equity securities that we may hold. This could, in turn, materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be limited in our ability to make follow-on investments, and our failure to make follow-on investments in our portfolio companies could impair the value of our portfolio.

Following an initial investment in a portfolio company, we may make additional investments in that portfolio company as “follow-on” investments, in order to: (1) increase or maintain in whole or in part our equity ownership percentage; (2) exercise warrants, options or convertible securities that were acquired in the original or subsequent financing; or (3) attempt to preserve or enhance the value of our investment.

We may elect not to make follow-on investments, or may otherwise lack sufficient funds to make those investments or lack access to desired follow-on investment opportunities. We have the discretion to make any follow-on investments, subject to the availability of capital resources and of the investment opportunity. The failure to make follow-on investments may, in some circumstances, jeopardize the continued viability of a portfolio company and our initial investment, or may result in a missed opportunity for us to increase our participation in a successful operation. Even if we have sufficient capital to make a desired follow-on investment, we may elect not to make a follow-on investment because we may not want to increase our

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concentration of risk, because we prefer other opportunities, or because we are inhibited by compliance with business development company requirements or the desire to maintain our tax status or lack access to the desired follow-on investment opportunity.

In addition, we may be unable to complete follow-on investments in our portfolio companies that have conducted an initial public offering as a result of regulatory or financial restrictions.

Because we will generally not hold controlling equity interests in our portfolio companies, we will likely not be in a position to exercise control over our portfolio companies or to prevent decisions by substantial shareholders or management of our portfolio companies that could decrease the value of our investments.

Generally, we will not take controlling equity positions in our portfolio companies. As a result, we will be subject to the risk that a portfolio company may make business decisions with which we disagree, and the stockholders and management of a portfolio company may take risks or otherwise act in ways that are adverse to our interests. In addition, other shareholders, such as venture capital and private equity sponsors, that have substantial investments in our portfolio companies may have interests that differ from that of the portfolio company or its minority shareholders, which may lead them to take actions that could materially and adversely affect the value of our investment in the portfolio company. Due to the lack of liquidity for the equity and equity-related investments that we will typically hold in our portfolio companies, we may not be able to dispose of our investments in the event we disagree with the actions of a portfolio company or its substantial shareholders, and may therefore suffer a decrease in the value of our investments.

Investments in foreign companies may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.

While we invest primarily in U.S. companies, we may invest on an opportunistic basis in certain non-U.S. companies, including those located in emerging markets, that otherwise meet our investment criteria, although in no event will the aggregate value of our non-U.S. investments exceed 30% of the aggregate value of our total investment portfolio. Investing in foreign companies, and particularly those in emerging markets, may expose us to additional risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. issues. These risks include changes in exchange control regulations, political and social instability, expropriation, imposition of foreign taxes, less liquid markets and less available information than is generally the case in the United States, higher transaction costs, less government supervision of exchanges, brokers and issuers, less developed bankruptcy laws, difficulty in enforcing contractual obligations, lack of uniform accounting and auditing standards and greater price volatility. Further, we may have difficulty enforcing our rights as equity holders in foreign jurisdictions. In addition, to the extent we invest in non-U.S. companies, we may face greater exposure to foreign economic developments.

Although we expect that most of our investments will be U.S. dollar-denominated, any investments denominated in a foreign currency will be subject to the risk that the value of a particular currency will change in relation to one or more other currencies. Among the factors that may affect currency values are trade balances, the level of short-term interest rates, differences in relative values of similar assets in different currencies, long-term opportunities for investment and capital appreciation, and political developments.

We may expose ourselves to risks if we engage in hedging transactions.

If we engage in hedging transactions, we may expose ourselves to risks associated with such transactions. We may utilize instruments such as forward contracts, currency options and interest rate swaps, caps, collars and floors to seek to hedge against fluctuations in the relative values of our portfolio positions from changes in currency exchange rates and market interest rates. Hedging against a decline in the values of our portfolio positions does not eliminate the possibility of fluctuations in the values of such positions or prevent losses if the values of such positions decline. However, such hedging can establish other positions designed to gain from those same developments, thereby offsetting the decline in the value of such portfolio positions. Such hedging transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the values of the underlying portfolio positions should increase. It may not be possible to hedge against an exchange rate or interest rate fluctuation that is so generally anticipated that we are not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an acceptable price. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Any such imperfect correlation may prevent us from achieving the

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intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss. In addition, it may not be possible to hedge fully or perfectly against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies because the value of those securities is likely to fluctuate as a result of factors not related to currency fluctuations.

Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure

We are a new company with little operating history, and our investment adviser has only a limited history of investing experience.

We were initially formed in September 2010 and completed our initial public offering on April 28, 2011. As a result, we have limited financial information on which you can evaluate an investment in our company or our prior performance. In addition, our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, was formed in November 2009, and has only a limited history of investing experience managing a pool of assets substantially smaller in size than the net proceeds that were received in the initial public offering. We are subject to all of the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business, including the risk that we will not achieve our investment objective and that the value of your investment could decline substantially or fall to zero.

Any failure on our part to maintain our status as a business development company would reduce our operating flexibility.

We intend to continue to qualify as a business development company under the 1940 Act. The 1940 Act imposes numerous constraints on the operations of business development companies. For example, business development companies are required to invest at least 70% of their gross assets in specified types of securities, primarily in private companies or thinly-traded U.S. public companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high quality debt investments that mature in one year or less. Furthermore, any failure to comply with the requirements imposed on business development companies by the 1940 Act could cause the SEC to bring an enforcement action against us and/or expose us to claims of private litigants. In addition, upon approval of a majority of our stockholders, we may elect to withdraw our status as a business development company. If we decide to withdraw our election, or if we otherwise fail to qualify, or maintain our qualification, as a business development company, we may be subject to the substantially greater regulation under the 1940 Act as a closed-end investment company. Compliance with such regulations would significantly decrease our operating flexibility, and could significantly increase our costs of doing business. If we do not remain a business development company, we might be regulated as a closed-end investment company under the 1940 Act, which would subject us to substantially more regulatory restrictions under the 1940 Act and correspondingly decrease our operating flexibility.

We are dependent upon GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals for our future success, particularly Michael T. Moe, Stephen D. Bard, Luben Pampoulov and Matthew Hanson. If we lose any of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, our ability to implement our business strategy could be significantly harmed.

We depend on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of the GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals. These senior investment professionals, together with other investment professionals employed by GSV Asset Management, evaluate, negotiate, structure, close, monitor and service our investments. Our future success will depend to a significant extent on the continued service and coordination of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, particularly Michael T. Moe, Stephen D. Bard, Luben Pampoulov and Matthew Hanson. None of Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov or Hanson is subject to an employment contract, and none receive any compensation from us. None of Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov or Hanson devote all of their business time to our operations, and each have other demands on their time as a result of their other activities. The departure of any of these individuals could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective.

None of the GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals or Advisory Board members, including Michael T. Moe, Stephen D. Bard, Luben Pampoulov and Matthew Hanson, are subject to employment agreements, and there can be no assurance that our investment adviser will be successful in retaining its senior investment professionals.

None of the members of GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals or its Advisory Board members, including Michael T. Moe, Stephen D. Bard, Luben Pampoulov and Matthew Hanson, are subject to

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employment agreements. As a result, although Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson comprise the principals of GSV Asset Management, they are free to terminate their employment with GSV Asset Management at any time. In addition, none of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals or the Advisory Board members, including Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson, are subject to any non-compete agreements that would restrict their ability to provide investment advisory services to an entity with an investment objective similar to our own in the event they were to terminate their employment with GSV Asset Management, or if GSV Asset Management were to no longer serve as our investment adviser. There can be no assurance that our investment adviser will be successful in retaining its senior investment professionals or the Advisory Board members, including Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson. The departure of any of Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov or Hanson could have a material adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective.

Our growth will require that GSV Asset Management retain and attract new investment and administrative personnel in a competitive market. Its ability to attract and retain personnel with the requisite credentials, experience and skills will depend on several factors including, but not limited to, its ability to offer competitive wages, benefits and professional growth opportunities. Many of the entities with which GSV Asset Management will compete for experienced personnel, including investment funds (such as private equity funds and mezzanine funds) and traditional financial services companies, will have greater resources than it.

Our financial condition and results of operations will depend on our ability to achieve our investment objective.

We are a newly organized company. As such, we are subject to the business risks and uncertainties associated with any new business enterprise. Our ability to achieve our investment objective will depend on our investment adviser’s ability to identify, analyze and invest in companies that meet our investment criteria. Accomplishing this result on a cost-effective basis is largely a function of our investment adviser’s structuring of the investment process and its ability to provide competent, attentive and efficient services to us. We seek a specified number of investments in rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies, which may be extremely risky. There can be no assurance that GSV Asset Management will be successful in identifying and investing in companies that meet our investment criteria, or that we will achieve our investment objective.

In addition to monitoring the performance of our existing investments, GSV Asset Management is required to offer, and may be called upon, to provide, managerial assistance to some of our portfolio companies. GSV Asset Management also currently manages GSV X Fund, LP (“GSV X Fund”), a global long/short absolute return fund, in which we have no economic interest. These demands on their time may distract them or slow the rate of investment. Even if we are able to grow and build upon our investment operations, any failure to manage our growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The results of our operations will depend on many factors, including the availability of opportunities for investment, readily accessible short and long-term funding alternatives in the financial markets and economic conditions. Furthermore, if we cannot successfully operate our business or implement our investment policies and strategies as described herein, it could negatively impact our ability to pay dividends.

We will likely experience fluctuations in our quarterly results and we may be unable to replicate past investment opportunities or make the types of investments we have made to date in future periods.

We will likely experience fluctuations in our quarterly operating results due to a number of factors, including the rate at which we make new investments, the level of our expenses, variations in and the timing of the recognition of realized and unrealized gains or losses, the degree to which we encounter competition in our markets and general economic conditions. These fluctuations may in certain cases be exaggerated as a result of our focus on realizing capital gains rather than current income from our investments. In addition, there can be no assurance that we will be able to locate or acquire investments that are of a similar nature to those currently in our portfolio. As a result of these factors, results for any period should not be relied upon as being indicative of performance in future periods.

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Our business model depends upon the development and maintenance of strong referral relationships with private equity and venture capital funds and investment banking firms.

We are substantially dependent on our informal relationships, which we use to help identify and gain access to investment opportunities. If we fail to maintain our relationships with key firms, or if we fail to establish strong referral relationships with other firms or other sources of investment opportunities, we will not be able to grow our portfolio of equity investments and achieve our investment objective. In addition, persons with whom we have informal relationships are not obligated to inform us of investment opportunities, and therefore such relationships may not lead to the origination of equity or other investments. Any loss or diminishment of such relationships could effectively reduce our ability to identify attractive portfolio companies that meet our investment criteria, either for direct equity investments or for investments through private secondary market transactions.

There are significant potential risks relating to investing in securities traded on private secondary marketplaces.

We have and expect to continue to utilize private secondary marketplaces, such as SharesPost and SecondMarket, to acquire investments in our portfolio. We generally have little or no direct access to financial or other information from the portfolio companies with respect to which we invest through such private secondary marketplaces. As a result, we are dependent upon the relationships and contacts of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, its Advisory Board members and our board of directors to obtain the information for our investment adviser to perform research and due diligence, and to monitor our investments after they are made. There can be no assurance that our investment adviser will be able to acquire adequate information on which to make its investment decision with respect to any private secondary marketplace purchases, or that the information it is able to obtain is accurate or complete. Any failure to obtain full and complete information regarding the portfolio companies with respect to which we invest through private secondary marketplaces could cause us to lose part or all of our investment in such companies, which would have a material and adverse effect on our net asset value and results of operations.

In addition, while we believe the ability to trade on private secondary marketplaces provides valuable opportunities for liquidity, there can be no assurance that the portfolio companies with respect to which we invest through private secondary marketplaces will have or maintain active trading markets, and the prices of those securities may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods, which may cause an inability for us to realize full value on our investment. In addition, wide swings in market prices, which are typical of irregularly traded securities, could cause significant and unexpected declines in the value of our portfolio investments. Further, prices in private secondary marketplaces, where limited information is available, may not accurately reflect the true value of a portfolio company, and may in certain cases overstate a portfolio company’s actual value, which may cause us to realize future capital losses on our investment in that portfolio company. If any of the foregoing were to occur, it would likely have a material and adverse effect on our net asset value and results of operations.

Investments in private companies, including through private secondary marketplaces, also entail additional legal and regulatory risks which expose participants to the risk of liability due to the imbalance of information among participants and participant qualification and other transactional requirements applicable to private securities transactions, the non-compliance with which could result in rescission rights and monetary and other sanctions. The application of these laws within the context of private secondary marketplaces and related market practices are still evolving, and, despite our efforts to comply with applicable laws, we could be exposed to liability. The regulation of private secondary marketplaces is also evolving. Additional state or federal regulation of these markets could result in limits on the operation of or activity on those markets. Conversely, deregulation of these markets could make it easier for investors to invest directly in private companies and affect the attractiveness of our company as an access vehicle for investment in private shares. Private companies may also increasingly seek to limit secondary trading in their stock, such as through contractual transfer restrictions and employment policies. To the extent that these or other developments result in reduced trading activity and/or availability of private company shares, our ability to find investment opportunities and to liquidate our investments could be adversely affected.

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Due to transfer restrictions and the illiquid nature of our investments, we may not be able to purchase or sell our investments when we wish to do so.

Most of our investments are or will be in equity or equity-linked securities of privately-held companies. The securities we acquire in private companies are typically subject to contractual transfer limitations, which may include prohibitions on transfer without the company’s consent and may require that shares owned by us are held in escrow. In order to complete a purchase of shares we may need to, among other things, give the issuer or its stockholders a particular period of time, often 30 days, in which to exercise a veto right, or a right of first refusal over, the sale of such securities. We may be unable to complete a purchase transaction if the subject company or its stockholders chooses to exercise a veto right or right of first refusal. When we complete an investment, we generally become bound to the contractual transfer limitations imposed on the subject company's stockholders as well as other contractual obligations, such as tag-along rights. These obligations generally expire only upon an IPO by the subject company. As a result, prior to an IPO, our ability to liquidate may be constrained. Transfer restrictions could limit our ability to liquidate our positions in these securities if we are unable to find buyers acceptable to our portfolio companies, or where applicable, their stockholders. Such buyers may not be willing to purchase our investments at adequate prices or in volumes sufficient to liquidate our position, and even where they are willing, other stockholders could exercise their tag-along rights to participate in the sale, thereby reducing the number of shares sellable by us. Furthermore, prospective buyers may be deterred from entering into purchase transactions with us due to the delay and uncertainty that these transfer and other limitations create.

Although we believe that secondary marketplaces may offer an opportunity to liquidate our private company investments, there can be no assurance that a trading market will develop for the securities that we wish to liquidate or that the subject companies will permit their shares to be sold through such marketplaces. Even if some of our portfolio companies complete IPOs, we are typically subject to lock-up provisions that prohibit us from selling our investments into the public market for specified periods of time after IPOs. As a result, the market price of securities that we hold may decline substantially before we are able to sell these securities following an IPO.

Due to the illiquid nature of most of our investments, we may not be able to sell these securities at times when we deem it advantageous to do so, or at all. Because our net asset value is only determined on a quarterly basis and due to the difficulty in assessing this value, our net asset value may not fully reflect the illiquidity of our portfolio, which may change on daily basis, depending on many factors, including the status of the private secondary markets and our particular portfolio at any given time.

There are significant potential risks associated with investing in venture capital and private equity-backed companies with complex capital structures.

We invest primarily in rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies, either through private secondary transactions or direct investments in companies. Such private companies frequently have much more complex capital structures than traditional publicly-traded companies, and may have multiple classes of equity securities with differing rights, including with respect to voting and distributions. In addition, it is often difficult to obtain financial and other information with respect to private companies, and even where we are able to obtain such information, there can be no assurance that it is complete or accurate. In certain cases, such private companies may also have preferred stock or senior debt outstanding, which may heighten the risk of investing in the underlying equity of such private companies, particularly in circumstances when we have limited information with respect to such capital structures. Although we believe that our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, our Advisory Board members and our board of directors have extensive experience evaluating and investing in private companies with such complex capital structures, there can be no assurance that we will be able to adequately evaluate the relative risks and benefits of investing in a particular class of a portfolio company’s equity securities. Any failure on our part to properly evaluate the relative rights and value of a class of securities in which we invest could cause us to lose part or all of our investment, which in turn could have a material and adverse effect on our net asset value and results of operations.

A disruption in the capital markets or the credit markets could negatively affect our business.

As a business development company, we need the ability to raise additional capital for investment purposes. Without sufficient access to the capital markets, we may be forced to curtail our business operations

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or we may not be able to pursue new business opportunities. Disruptive conditions in the financial industry and any new legislation in response to those conditions could restrict our business operations and could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition.

Although we do not anticipate borrowing funds for investment purposes, to the extent we do utilize leverage and the fair value of our assets declines substantially, we may fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios imposed upon us by the 1940 Act. Any such failure would affect our ability to issue senior securities, including borrowings, and pay dividends, which could materially impair our business operations. Our liquidity could be impaired further by an inability to access the capital markets. For example, we cannot be certain that we will be able to raise additional equity capital to provide funding for normal operations, including new investments. Reflecting concern about the stability of the financial markets, many institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to certain borrowers. This market turmoil has led to increased market volatility and widespread reduction of business activity generally.

We operate in a highly competitive market for direct equity investment opportunities.

A large number of entities compete with us to make the types of direct equity investments that we target as part of our business strategy. We compete for such investments with a large number of private equity and venture capital funds, other equity and non-equity based investment funds, investment banks and other sources of financing, including traditional financial services companies such as commercial banks and specialty finance companies. Many of our competitors are substantially larger than us and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. For example, some competitors may have a lower cost of funds and access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish more relationships than us. Furthermore, many of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a business development company. There can be no assurance that the competitive pressures we face will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Also, as a result of this competition, we may not be able to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities from time to time, and we can offer no assurance that we will be able to identify and make direct equity investments that are consistent with our investment objective.

The incentive fee may induce GSV Asset Management to make speculative investments.

The incentive fee payable by us to GSV Asset Management may create an incentive for GSV Asset Management to make investments on our behalf that are risky or more speculative than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangement. Although no leverage is currently contemplated, the way in which the incentive fee payable to GSV Asset Management is determined, which is calculated as a percentage of the return on invested capital, may encourage GSV Asset Management to use leverage to increase the return on our investments. In addition, while we currently do not use borrowings or other leverage for investment purposes, the fact that our base management fee is payable based upon our gross assets, which would include any borrowings for investment purposes, may encourage GSV Asset Management to use leverage to make additional investments. We will be required, however, to obtain the approval of our board of directors before we incur any future indebtedness. Under certain circumstances, the use of leverage may increase the likelihood of default, which would disfavor holders of our common stock. Such a practice could result in our investing in more speculative securities than would otherwise be the case, which could result in higher investment losses, particularly during cyclical economic downturns.

In addition, our investment adviser has control over the timing of the acquisition and dispositions of our investments, and therefore over when we realize gains and losses on our investments. As a result, our investment adviser may face a conflict of interest in determining when it is appropriate to dispose of a specific investment to the extent doing so may serve to maximize its incentive fee at a point where disposing of such investment may not necessarily be in the best interests of our stockholders. Our board of directors monitors such conflicts of interest in connection with its review of the performance of our investment adviser under our Investment Advisory Agreement, as well as during its quarterly review of our financial performance and results of operations.

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We may borrow money, which would magnify the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and may increase the risk of investing in us.

Borrowings, also known as leverage, magnify the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and, therefore, increase the risks associated with investing in our securities. Although we do not currently anticipate incurring leverage, if we do so we may borrow from and issue senior debt securities to banks, insurance companies and other lenders. Lenders of such senior securities would have fixed dollar claims on our assets that are superior to the claims of our common stockholders. If the value of our assets increases, then leveraging would cause the net asset value attributable to our common stock to increase more sharply than it would have had we not leveraged. Conversely, if the value of our assets decreases, leveraging would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have had we not leveraged. Similarly, any increase in our income in excess of interest payable on the borrowed funds would cause our net income to increase more than it would without the leverage, while any decrease in our income would cause net income to decline more sharply than it would have had we not borrowed. Leverage is generally considered a speculative investment technique. Our ability to service any debt that we incur will depend largely on our financial performance and will be subject to prevailing economic conditions and competitive pressures. Moreover, as the management fee payable to GSV Asset Management will be payable on our gross assets, including those assets acquired through the use of leverage, GSV Asset Management may have a financial incentive to incur leverage which may not be consistent with our stockholders’ interests. In addition, our common stockholders will bear the burden of any increase in our expenses as a result of leverage, including any increase in the management fee payable to GSV Asset Management.

There are significant potential conflicts of interest, which could impact our investment returns and limit the flexibility of our investment policies.

We have entered into an Investment Advisory Agreement with GSV Asset Management. GSV Asset Management is controlled by Michael T. Moe, our president, chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors and Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary. Messrs. Moe and Bard, as principals of GSV Asset Management, collectively manage the business and internal affairs of GSV Asset Management. In addition, GSV Capital Service Company provides us with office facilities and administrative services pursuant to an Administration Agreement. Mr. Moe is the managing member of and controls GSV Capital Service Company. While there is no limit on the total amount of expenses we may be required to reimburse to GSV Capital Service Company, our administrator will only charge us for the actual expenses it incurs on our behalf, or our allocable portion thereof, without any profit to GSV Capital Service Company.

In addition, our executive officers and directors, and the principals of our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, serve or may serve as officers and directors of entities that operate in a line of business similar to our own, including new entities that may be formed in the future. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders, such as, for example, the management of GSV X Fund by GSV Asset Management.

While the investment focus of each of these entities tends to be different from our investment objective, it is possible that new investment opportunities that meet our investment objective may come to the attention of one of these entities, or new entities that may be formed in the future in connection with another investment advisory client or program, and, if so, such opportunity might not be offered, or otherwise made available, to us. However, our executive officers, directors and investment adviser intend to treat us in a fair and equitable manner consistent with their applicable duties under law so that we will not be disadvantaged in relation to any other particular client. In addition, GSV Asset Management does not anticipate that it will ordinarily identify investment opportunities that are appropriate for both GSV Capital and the other funds that are currently or in the future may be managed by GSV Asset Management. However, to the extent it does identify such opportunities, GSV Asset Management will establish a procedure to ensure that such opportunities are allocated between GSV Capital and such other funds in a fair and equitable manner. Our board of directors will monitor on a quarterly basis any such allocation of investment opportunities between GSV Capital and any such other funds.

GSV Asset Management is the owner of the “GSV” name and marks, which we are permitted to use pursuant to a non-exclusive license agreement between us and GSV Asset Management. GSV Asset

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Management and its principals also use and may permit other entities to use the “GSV” name and marks in connection with businesses and activities unrelated to our operations. The use of the “GSV” name and marks in connection with businesses and activities unrelated to our operations may not be in the best interest of us or our stockholder and may result in actual or perceived conflicts of interest.

In the ordinary course of business, we may enter into transactions with portfolio companies that may be considered related party transactions. In order to ensure that we do not engage in any prohibited transactions with any persons affiliated with us, we have implemented certain written policies and procedures whereby our executive officers screen each of our transactions for any possible affiliations between the proposed portfolio investment, us, companies controlled by us and our executive officers and directors. We will not enter into any agreements unless and until we are satisfied that doing so will not raise concerns under the 1940 Act or, if such concerns exist, we have taken appropriate actions to seek board review and approval or exemptive relief for such transaction. Our board of directors will review these procedures on an annual basis.

We have also adopted a Code of Ethics which applies to, among others, our senior officers, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as well as all of our officers, directors and employees. Our officers and directors also remain subject to the fiduciary obligations imposed by both the 1940 Act and applicable state corporate law. Our Code of Ethics requires that all employees and directors avoid any conflict, or the appearance of a conflict, between an individual’s personal interests and our interests. Pursuant to our Code of Ethics, each employee and director must disclose any conflicts of interest, or actions or relationships that might give rise to a conflict, to our chief compliance officer. Our board of directors is charged with approving any waivers under our Code of Ethics. As required by the NASDAQ corporate governance listing standards, the Audit Committee of our board of directors is also required to review and approve any transactions with related parties, as such term is defined in Item 404 of Regulation S-K. In accordance with Item 404, related parties generally include our directors and executive officers, any nominees for director, any immediate family member of a director or executive officer or nominee for director, and any other person sharing the household of such director, executive officer or nominee for director.

Finally, we pay GSV Capital Service Company our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by GSV Capital Service Company in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including a portion of the rent and the compensation of our chief financial officer and chief compliance officer and any administrative support personnel, which creates conflicts of interest that our board of directors must monitor.

Our investment adviser has the right to resign on 60 days’ notice, and we may not be able to find a suitable replacement within that time, resulting in a disruption in our operations that could adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations.

Our investment adviser has the right, under the Investment Advisory Agreement, to resign at any time upon not more than 60 days’ written notice, whether we have found a replacement or not. If our investment adviser resigns, we may not be able to find a new investment adviser or hire internal management with similar expertise and ability to provide the same or equivalent services on acceptable terms within 60 days, or at all. If we are unable to do so quickly, our operations are likely to experience a disruption, our financial condition, business and results of operations as well as our ability to pay distributions are likely to be adversely affected and the market price of our shares may decline. In addition, the coordination of our internal management and investment activities is likely to suffer if we are unable to identify and reach an agreement with a single institution or group of executives having the expertise possessed by our investment adviser and its affiliates. Even if we are able to retain comparable management, whether internal or external, the integration of such management and their lack of familiarity with our investment objective may result in additional costs and time delays that may adversely affect our financial condition, business and results of operations.

The lack of experience of our investment adviser and its management in operating under the constraints imposed on us as a business development company may hinder the achievement of our investment objectives.

The 1940 Act imposes numerous constraints on the operations of business development companies. For example, business development companies are required to invest at least 70% of their total assets primarily in securities of U.S.-based private companies or public companies with market capitalizations of less than

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$250 million, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high quality debt instruments that mature in one year or less. In addition, qualification for taxation as a RIC requires satisfaction of source-of-income, diversification and distribution requirements. GSV Asset Management does not have experience investing under these constraints. These constraints, among others, may hinder GSV Asset Management’s ability to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities and to achieve our investment objective.

We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income.

Although we focus on achieving capital gains from our investments, in certain cases we may receive current income, such as interest or dividends, on our investments. Because in certain cases we may recognize such current income before or without receiving cash representing such income, we may have difficulty satisfying the annual distribution requirement applicable to RICs. Accordingly, we may have to sell some of our investments at times we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or reduce new investments to meet these distribution requirements. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and thus be subject to corporate-level income tax.

Regulations governing our operation as a business development company affect our ability to, and the way in which we raise additional capital, which may expose us to risks, including the typical risks associated with leverage.

Although we have not used leverage and have no present intent to issue preferred stock, we may in the future issue debt securities or preferred stock and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we will be permitted, as a business development company, to issue senior securities in amounts such that our asset coverage ratio, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% of gross assets less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities, after each issuance of senior securities. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test. If that happens, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments and, depending on the nature of our leverage, repay a portion of our indebtedness at a time when such sales may be disadvantageous. Furthermore, any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness would not be available for distributions to our common stockholders.

If in the future we issue debt or preferred stock, all of the costs of offering and servicing such debt or preferred stock, including interest or preferential dividend payments thereon, will be borne by our common stockholders. The interests of the holders of any debt or preferred stock we may issue will not necessarily be aligned with the interests of our common stockholders. In particular, the rights of holders of our debt or preferred stock to receive interest, dividends or principal repayment will be senior to those of our common stockholders. Also, in the event we issue preferred stock, the holders of such preferred stock will have the ability to elect two members of our board of directors. In addition, we may grant a lender a security interest in a significant portion or all of our assets, even if the total amount we may borrow from such lender is less than the amount of such lender’s security interest in our assets. In no event, however, will any lender to us have any veto power over, or any vote with respect to, any change in our, or approval of any new, investment objective or investment policies or strategies described in this prospectus.

We are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the then-current net asset value of our common stock if our board of directors determines that such sale is in the best interests of GSV Capital and its stockholders, and our stockholders approve such sale. In any such case, the price at which our securities are to be issued and sold may not be less than a price which, in the determination of our board of directors, closely approximates the market value of such securities (less any distributing commission or discount). We are also generally prohibited under the 1940 Act from issuing securities convertible into voting securities without obtaining the approval of our existing stockholders.

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We will be subject to corporate-level income tax if we are unable to qualify as a regulated investment company, or RIC.

Although we intend to elect to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code beginning in 2011 and to continue to qualify as a RIC in succeeding taxable years, no assurance can be given that we will be able to qualify for and maintain RIC status. In order to qualify for the special treatment accorded to RICs, we must meet certain income source, asset diversification and annual distribution requirements. In order to satisfy the income source requirement, we must derive in each taxable year at least 90% of our gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to certain securities loans, gains from the sale of stock or other securities or foreign currencies, income from “qualified publicly traded partnerships” or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such stock or securities. To qualify as a RIC, we must also meet certain asset diversification requirements at the end of each quarter of our taxable year. Failure to meet these tests may result in our having to dispose of certain investments quickly in order to prevent the loss of RIC status. Because most of our investments will be in private companies, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and may result in substantial losses. In order to satisfy the annual distribution requirement for a RIC, we must distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any, to our stockholders on an annual basis. Although no leverage is currently contemplated, because we may use additional debt financing in the future, we may be subject to certain asset coverage ratio requirements under the 1940 Act and financial covenants under loan and credit agreements that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to satisfy the annual distribution requirement. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for special tax treatment as a RIC and, thus, may be subject to corporate-level income tax on all our income. If we fail to qualify as a RIC for any reason and become subject to corporate income tax, the resulting corporate-level federal taxes could substantially reduce our net assets, the amount of income available for distribution and the amount of our distributions. Such a failure would have a material adverse effect on us and our stockholders.

Even in the event the value of your investment declines, the base management fee will still be payable.

The base management fee will be calculated at an annual rate of 2.0% of the value of our gross assets, which we pay monthly in arrears. The base management fee is payable regardless of whether the value of our gross assets or your investment declines. As a result, we will owe GSV Asset Management a base management fee regardless of whether we incurred significant realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation (losses) during the period for which the base management fee is paid.

We incur significant costs as a result of being a publicly traded company.

As a publicly traded company, we incur legal, accounting and other expenses, including costs associated with the periodic reporting requirements applicable to a company whose securities are registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as well as additional corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and other rules implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Our board of directors is authorized to reclassify any unissued shares of stock into one or more classes of preferred stock, which could convey special rights and privileges to its owners.

Our charter permits our board of directors to reclassify any authorized but unissued shares of stock into one or more classes of preferred stock. Our board of directors will generally have broad discretion over the size and timing of any such reclassification, subject to a finding that the reclassification and issuance of such preferred stock is in the best interests of GSV Capital and our existing common stockholders. Any issuance of preferred stock would be subject to certain limitations imposed under the 1940 Act, including the requirement that such preferred stock have equal voting rights with our outstanding common stock. See “Description of Securities — Preferred Stock.” We are authorized to issue up to 100,000,000 shares of common stock. In the event our board of directors opts to reclassify a portion of our unissued shares of common stock into a class of preferred stock, those preferred shares would have a preference over our common stock with respect to dividends and liquidation. The cost of any such reclassification would be borne by our existing common stockholders. In addition, the 1940 Act provides that holders of preferred stock are entitled to vote separately from holders of common stock to elect two directors. As a result, our preferred stockholders will have the

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ability to reject a director that would otherwise be elected by our common stockholders. In addition, while Maryland law generally requires directors to act in the best interests of all of a corporation’s stockholders, there can be no assurance that a director elected by our preferred stockholders will not chose to act in a manner that tends to favors our preferred stockholders, particularly where there is a conflict between the interests of our preferred stockholders and our common stockholders. The class voting rights of any preferred shares we may issue could make it more difficult for us to take some actions that may, in the future, be proposed by the board of directors and/or the holders of our common stock, such as a merger, exchange of securities, liquidation, or alteration of the rights of a class of our securities, if these actions were perceived by the holders of preferred shares as not in their best interests. The issuance of preferred shares convertible into shares of common stock might also reduce the net income and net asset value per share of our common stock upon conversion. These effects, among others, could have an adverse effect on your investment in our common stock.

Our board of directors may change our investment objective, operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse.

Our board of directors has the authority to modify or waive our investment objective, current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies without prior notice and without stockholder approval. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies, investment criteria and strategies would have on our business, net asset value, operating results and value of our stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to pay you dividends and cause you to lose all or part of your investment.

Changes in laws or regulations governing our operations may adversely affect our business.

We and our portfolio companies are subject to regulation by laws at the local, state and federal levels. These laws and regulations, as well as their interpretation, may be changed from time to time. Any change in these laws or regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business and the value of your investment.

Provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law and of our charter and bylaws could deter takeover attempts and have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.

Our charter and bylaws, as well as certain statutory and regulatory requirements, contain certain provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a third party from making an acquisition proposal for us. Our bylaws contain a provision exempting any and all acquisitions by any person of our shares of stock from the Control Share Act under the Maryland General Corporation Law. If our board of directors does not otherwise approve a business combination, the Control Share Act (if we amend our bylaws to be subject to that Act) may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating any offer. Additionally, under our charter, our board of directors is divided into three classes serving staggered terms; our board of directors may, without stockholder action, authorize the issuance of shares of stock in one or more classes or series, including preferred stock; and our board of directors may, without stockholder action, amend our charter to increase the number of shares of stock of any class or series that we have authority to issue. These antitakeover provisions may inhibit a change of control in circumstances that could give the holders of our common stock the opportunity to realize a premium over the market price for our common stock.

Risks Related to Offerings Pursuant to this Prospectus and Our Common Stock

Our common stock price may be volatile and may decrease substantially.

The trading price of our common stock may fluctuate substantially. The price of the common stock that will prevail in the market after any future offering pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement may be higher or lower than the price you pay, depending on many factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be directly related to our operating performance. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:

price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market from time to time;
investor demand for our shares;
significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of securities of regulated investment companies, business development companies or other financial services companies;

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changes in regulatory policies or tax guidelines with respect to regulated investment companies or business development companies;
failure to qualify as a RIC for a particular taxable year, or the loss of RIC status;
actual or anticipated changes in our earnings or fluctuations in our operating results or changes in the expectations of securities analysts;
general economic conditions and trends;
fluctuations in the valuation of our portfolio investments;
operating performance of companies comparable to us;
market sentiment against technology-related companies; and
departures of any of the senior investment professionals or Advisory Board members of GSV Asset Management.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. Due to the potential volatility of our stock price, we may therefore be the target of securities litigation in the future. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources from our business.

Our shares have recently traded, and may in the future trade at premiums that may prove to be unsustainable or at discounts from net asset value.

Shares of business development companies like us may, during some periods, trade at prices higher than their net asset value per share and, during other periods, as frequently occurs with closed-end investment companies, trade at prices lower than their net asset value per share. Our shares have recently traded at a significant premium to our net asset value per share, which premium may be reduced or eliminated if and when certain of our portfolio companies complete initial public offerings. In addition, the perceived value of our investment portfolio may be affected by a number of factors including perceived prospects for individual companies we invest in, market conditions for common stock generally, for initial public offerings and other exit events for venture capital backed companies, and the mix of companies in our investment portfolio over time. Negative or unforeseen developments affecting the perceived value of companies in our investment portfolio could result in a decline in the trading price of our common stock relative to our net asset value per share.

The possibility that our shares will trade at a discount from net asset value or at premiums that are unsustainable are risks separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share will decrease. The risk of purchasing shares of a business development company that might trade at a discount or unsustainable premium is more pronounced for investors who wish to sell their shares in a relatively short period of time because, for those investors, realization of a gain or loss on their investments is likely to be more dependent upon changes in premium or discount levels than upon increases or decreases in net asset value per share.

There is a risk that you may not receive dividends or that our dividends may not grow over time, particularly since we invest primarily in securities that do not produce current income.

We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results or maintain a tax status that will allow or require any specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. As we intend to focus on making primarily capital gains-based investments in equity securities, which generally will not be income producing, we do not anticipate that we will pay dividends on a quarterly basis or become a predictable issuer of dividends, and we expect that our dividends, if any, will be less consistent than other business development companies that primarily make debt investments.

We will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from any future offering pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement, to the extent any such offering is successful, and will use proceeds in part to satisfy operating expenses.

We will have significant flexibility in applying the proceeds of this offering and may use the net proceeds from any future offering pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement in ways with which you may not agree, or for purposes other than those contemplated at the time of any such offering. We can not assure you that we will be able to successfully utilize the proceeds within the timeframe contemplated. We will also pay operating expenses, and may pay other expenses such as due diligence expenses of potential new investments, from the net proceeds of any such offering. Our ability to achieve our

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investment objective may be limited to the extent that the net proceeds of any such offering, pending full investment, are used to pay operating expenses. In addition, we can provide you no assurance that any future offering will be successful, or that by increasing the size of our available equity capital our aggregate expenses, and correspondingly, our expense ratio, will be lowered.

Investors in any future offering pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement may incur immediate and substantial dilution.

Commissions and discounts payable to any underwriters, together with our organizational expense and other expenses of any future offering, will reduce the net proceeds of any such offering available for us to invest. As of December 31, 2011 our net asset value was $71,503,248, or $12.95 per share. Depending upon the public offering price, and after deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and the related offering expenses payable by us, in connection with any offering pursuant to this prospectus, investors in any such offering may be subject to an immediate and substantial dilution.

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND PROJECTIONS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about GSV Capital, our current and prospective portfolio investments, our industry, our beliefs, and our assumptions. Words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “will,” “may,” “continue,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “targets,” “projects,” and variations of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties, and other factors, some of which are beyond our control and difficult to predict and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or forecasted in the forward-looking statements, including without limitation:

an economic downturn could impair our portfolio companies’ ability to continue to operate, which could lead to the loss of some or all of our equity investments in such portfolio companies,
an economic downturn could disproportionately impact the market sectors in which a significant portion of our portfolio is concentrated, causing us to suffer losses in our portfolio,
an inability to access the equity markets could impair our investment activities,
interest rate volatility could adversely affect our results, particularly if we opt to use leverage as part of our investment strategy, and
the risks, uncertainties and other factors we identify in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus and in our filings with the SEC.

Although we believe that the assumptions on which these forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, any of those assumptions could prove to be inaccurate, and as a result, the forward-looking statements based on those assumptions also could be inaccurate. In light of these and other uncertainties, the inclusion of a projection or forward-looking statement in this prospectus should not be regarded as a representation by us that our plans and objectives will be achieved. These risks and uncertainties include those described or identified in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which apply only as of the date of this prospectus. The forward-looking statements and projections contained in this prospectus are excluded from the safe harbor protection provided by Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the “Securities Act.” In addition, the forward-looking statements and projections contained in any reports we may file under the Exchange Act are likewise excluded from the safe harbor protection provided by Section 21E of the Exchange Act.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We plan to invest the net proceeds from the sale of our common stock pursuant to this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement in portfolio companies in accordance with our investment objective and strategies described in this prospectus. We will also use a portion of any such proceeds to pay operating expenses, and other expenses such as due diligence expenses relating to potential new investments. We anticipate that substantially all of the net proceeds of any such offering will be used for the above purposes within six to 12 months, depending on the availability of investment opportunities that are consistent with our investment objectives and market conditions, except for such amounts as may be retained for purposes of funding our ongoing operations subsequent to the completion of any such offering. We cannot assure you we will achieve our targeted investment pace. Pending such investments, we will invest the net proceeds of any such offering primarily in cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and other high-quality debt investments that mature in one year or less from the date of investment. The management fee payable by us will not be reduced while our assets are invested in such securities. See “Regulation as a Business Development Company — Temporary Investments” for additional information about temporary investments we may make while waiting to make longer-term investments in pursuit of our investment objective.

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PRICE RANGE OF COMMON STOCK AND DISTRIBUTIONS

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GSVC”. The following table sets forth, for each fiscal quarter since our initial public offering on April 28, 2011, the net asset value, or “NAV,” per share of our common stock, the high and low sales prices for our common stock, and such sales prices as a percentage of NAV per share.

         
  NAV(1)     
Price Range
  High Sales
Price as a
Premium (Discount)
to NAV(2)
  Low Sales
Price as a
Premium (Discount)
to NAV(2)
     High   Low
Fiscal 2012
                                            
First Quarter (through March 27, 2012)      *     $ 20.89     $ 13.03        *        *  
Fiscal 2011
                                            
Fourth Quarter   $ 12.95     $ 17.23     $ 12.10       33.1 %      (6.6 )% 
Third Quarter   $ 13.26     $ 19.97     $ 12.09       50.6 %      (8.8 )% 
Second Quarter (from April 28, 2011 through June 30, 2011)   $ 13.57     $ 15.35     $ 9.75       13.1 %      (28.2 )% 

(1) NAV per share is determined as of the last day in the relevant quarter and therefore may not reflect the NAV per share on the date of the high and low sales prices. The NAV per share figures shown are based on outstanding shares at the end of each period.
(2) Calculated as the respective high or low sales price divided by NAV per share.
* Not determinable as of the date of this prospectus.

On March 27, 2012, the last reported sales price of our common stock was $20.18 per share.

Shares of business development companies may trade at a market price that is less than the value of the net assets attributable to those shares. The possibility that our shares of common stock will trade at premiums that are unsustainable over the long term or at a discount from net asset value are separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value will decrease. Since our initial public offering on April 28, 2011, our shares of common stock have traded at both a discount and a premium to the net assets attributable to those shares. As of March 27, 2012, our shares of common stock traded at a premium equal to approximately 55.8% of the net assets attributable to those shares based upon our $12.95 NAV per share as of December 31, 2011. It is not possible to predict whether the shares offered hereby will trade at, above, or below net asset value.

The timing and amount of our dividends, if any, will be determined by our board of directors. Any dividends to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. We intend to focus on making capital gains-based investments. As a consequence, we do not anticipate that we will pay dividends on a quarterly basis or become a predictable issuer of dividends, and we expect that our dividends, if any, will be much less consistent than other business development companies that primarily make debt investments. However, to the extent there are earnings or realized capital gains to be distributed, we intend to declare and pay a dividend at least annually.

We intend to elect to be treated, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, beginning with our 2011 taxable year. To obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any, for each taxable year. In addition, in order to avoid certain excise taxes imposed on RICs, we currently intend to distribute during each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of our ordinary income for the calendar year, (2) 98.2% of our capital gains in excess of capital losses for the one-year period ending on October 31 of the calendar year and (3) any ordinary income and net capital gains for preceding years that were not distributed during such years. Although we currently intend to distribute realized net capital gains (i.e., net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses), if any, at least annually, we may in the future decide to retain such capital gains for investment. If this happens, you will be treated as if you received an actual distribution of the capital gains we retain and reinvested the net after-tax proceeds in us. You also may be eligible to claim a tax credit

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(or, in certain circumstances, a tax refund) equal to your allocable share of the tax we paid on the capital gains deemed distributed to you. See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.” We can offer no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and, to the extent that we issue senior securities, we will be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.

Our current intention is to make any distributions out of assets legally available therefrom in additional shares of our common stock under our dividend reinvestment plan, unless you elect to receive your dividends and/or long-term capital gains distributions in cash. Under the dividend reinvestment plan, if a stockholder owns shares of common stock registered in its own name, the stockholder will have all cash distributions (net of any withholding) automatically reinvested in additional shares of common stock unless the stockholder opts out of our dividend reinvestment plan by delivering a written notice to our dividend paying agent prior to the record date of the next dividend or distribution. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.” Any distributions reinvested under the plan will nevertheless remain taxable to the U.S. stockholder, although no cash distribution has been made. As a result, if you do not elect to opt out of the dividend reinvestment plan, you will be required to pay applicable federal, state and local taxes on any reinvested dividends even though you will not receive a corresponding cash distribution. In addition, reinvested dividends have the effect of increasing our gross assets, which may correspondingly increase the management fee payable to our investment adviser. If you hold shares in the name of a broker or financial intermediary, you should contact the broker or financial intermediary regarding your election to receive distributions in cash.

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF
FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Overview

We are an externally managed, non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has elected to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity and equity-related investments. We invest principally in the equity securities of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. We acquire our investments through secondary marketplaces for private companies, negotiations with selling stockholders and direct investments with prospective portfolio companies. We may also invest on an opportunistic basis in select publicly-traded equity securities or certain non-U.S. companies that otherwise meet our investment criteria. Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, and GSV Capital Service Company provides the administrative services necessary for us to operate.

Our investment philosophy is premised on a disciplined approach of identifying high-growth emerging companies across several key industry themes which may include, among others, social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology. Our investment adviser’s investment decisions are based on a disciplined analysis of available information regarding each potential portfolio company’s business operations, focusing on the company’s growth potential, the quality of recurring revenues and cash flow and cost structures, as well as an understanding of key market fundamentals. Many of the companies that our investment adviser evaluates have financial backing from top tier venture capital funds or other financial or strategic sponsors.

We seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of non-controlling equity and equity-related investments, including common stock, warrants, preferred stock and similar forms of senior equity, which may or may not be convertible into a portfolio company’s common equity, and convertible debt securities with a significant equity component.

We seek to create a low-turnover portfolio that we expect will initially include diversified investments in 25 to 35 companies. As of March 27, 2012, we have completed investments in 24 companies for aggregate consideration of $71,100,579 (exclusive of transaction fees and costs), or 41.2% of the combined net proceeds from our public offerings. We expect that the total number of portfolio companies in which we are invested will increase as our equity capital base grows.

In May 2011 we completed our initial public offering of 3,335,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp of approximately $46.5 million.

In September 2011 we completed our first follow-on public offering of 2,185,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $14.15 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp. of approximately $29.6 million. We used the proceeds of our follow-on offering to increase our holdings in Facebook, Inc., Kno, Inc., and Twitter, Inc., as well as to make new investments in eight private companies, Control 4, Inc., DreamBox Learning, Inc., Dropbox, Inc., Grockit, Inc., StormWind, LLC, The Echo System Corp., The rSmart Group, Inc. and ZocDoc, Inc.

In February 2012 we completed our second follow-on public offering of 6,900,000 shares of our common stock at an offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital Corp. of approximately $96.2 million. We used the proceeds of our second follow-on offering to increase our holdings in Chegg, Inc., StormWind, LLC and The Echo System Corp., as well as to make new investments in three private companies, AltEgo, LLC, AlwaysOn Network, LLC, and Maven Research, Inc.

Effective May 26, 2011, we changed our name from NeXt Innovation Corp. to GSV Capital Corp.

Investments

During the period from April 28, 2011 to December 31, 2011, we closed on investments of $64,900,579, plus transaction costs, in 21 portfolio companies.

We closed on an investment of $2,250,000 in Kno, Inc., an education software company, on May 16, 2011.

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We closed on an investment of $712,380, plus transaction costs, in Serious Energy, Inc., a green technology company, on June 6, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $280,000, plus transaction costs, in Gilt Groupe, Inc., an eCommerce platform, on June 17, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $6,587,500, plus transaction costs, in Facebook, Inc., a social-networking company, on June 23, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $5,999,996, plus transaction costs, in Chegg, Inc., an online textbook rental company, on June 29, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $414,827, plus transaction costs, in Bloom Energy Corporation, a green technology company, on June 30, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $166,500, plus transaction costs, in Bloom Energy Corporation on July 8, 2011. This transaction was included in Escrow deposits in the statement of assets and liabilities at June 30, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $200,000, plus transaction costs, in Silver Spring Networks, Inc., a green technology company, on July 11, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $2,250,000, plus transaction costs, in SharesPost, Inc., a secondary marketplace for private equity investments, on July 19, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $1,968,000, plus transaction costs, in Gilt Groupe, Inc., an eCommerce platform, on July 25, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $190,000, plus transaction costs, in Bloom Energy Corporation, on August 9, 2011.

On August 15, 2011, we acquired a $4 million unsecured promissory note (“Zynga Note”) issued by PJB Fund LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Borrower”), which note is personally guaranteed by its members on a limited basis. Because Zynga, Inc. completed its initial public offering on December 20, 2011, the Zynga Note is now expected to mature on June 27, 2012, and to be settled, at the Borrower’s election, in shares of common stock of Zynga, subject to a cap, or in cash in an amount of equivalent value. The amount payable under the Zynga Note (the “Repayment Amount”) will be equal to the face amount, plus the greater of accrued interest (at a rate of 10%) or a return based on the relative value of Zynga. To the extent that the average closing price of Zynga’s common stock for the 20 day-period immediately prior to the maturity date (the “Average Closing Price”) ranges between $8.25 to $16.50 per share, the Repayment Amount will provide a return of 10%. At Average Closing Prices between $16.51 to $18.00, the Repayment Amount will provide a return in excess of 10% up to 20%. At an Average Closing Price in excess of $18.00 per share, the Repayment Amount also will include a return equal to 50% of such incremental share price appreciation. At an Average Closing Price below $7.50 per share, the cap applicable to settlement in shares will effectively allow Borrower to settle the Zynga Note for less than the face amount of the loan. To the extent the Borrower elects to repay the Zynga Note in cash, we will have no further direct or indirect interest in Zynga, Inc.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $1,000,008, plus transaction costs, in Bloom Energy Corporation, on August 17, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $3,251,250, plus transaction costs, in Gilt Group, Inc. on August 22, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $2,035,200, plus transaction costs, in Groupon, Inc., an online provider of daily coupons for various consumer products, on August 22, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $6,932,493, plus transaction costs, in Twitter, Inc., an online short messaging platform, on August 22, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $901,430, plus transaction costs, in Silver Spring Networks, Inc., on August 30, 2011.

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We closed on investment of $1,999,997, plus transaction costs, in TrueCar, Inc., an online automotive research destination, on August 30, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $250,000, plus transaction costs in ZoomSystems, a producer of automated retail vending machines, on August 31, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $1,000,000, plus transaction costs, in Control 4 Inc., a smart home automation company, on October 4, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $2,000,000, plus transaction costs in Grockit Inc., an online test preparation company, on October 7, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $1,593,000, plus transaction costs, in Twitter, Inc. on October 21, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $3,875,000, plus transaction costs, in Facebook, Inc., on November 8, 2011.

On November 14, 2011, we acquired a $500,000 unsecured convertible promissory note issued by The Echo System Corp., that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock, as well as warrants to purchase an additional number of shares of preferred stock equal to 35% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the principal amount of the note at the price per share at which such shares are next issued in a qualified equity financing, or common stock at a price of $0.20 per share if there is no qualified equity financing prior to the maturity date of the note or expiration of the warrant.

We closed on an investment of $3,500,000, plus transaction costs, in ZocDoc Inc., a company that provides online booking for doctor and dentist appointments, on November 15, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $4,999,998, plus transaction costs, in Dropbox, an online storage service, on November 15, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $3,588,000, plus transaction costs, in Twitter, Inc., on November 18, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $750,000, plus transaction costs, in DreamBox Learning, Inc., an education technology company, on December 6, 2011.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $205,000, plus transaction costs, in Kno, Inc., on December 15, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $1,000,000, plus transaction costs in StormWind, LLC, a developer of online technology courses, on December 15, 2011.

We closed on an investment of $500,000, plus transaction costs in The rSmart Group, Inc., a higher education learning platform provider, on December 19, 2011.

The fair value, as of December 31, 2011, of these investments was $64,078,150. In addition, we held $20,000,044 in one United States Treasury Bill and $7,000,000 in two money market funds as of December 31, 2011. We also held $385,995 in unrestricted cash on December 31, 2011.

Results of Operations

As January 6, 2011 is our date of inception, there is no comparable period to compare results for the period from January 6, 2011 to December 31, 2011.

Investment Income

For the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011, we had investment income of $162,328, or $0.05 per share, which consisted of $158,389 of interest income and $3,939 of dividend income.

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Operating Expenses

For the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011, we had $2,196,192 in total operating expenses consisting primarily of legal, audit and consulting fees, in addition to organizational expenses, investment management fees and administration fees. The investment advisory fee for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011, was $618,865, representing the base fee as provided for in our investment advisory agreement. Costs incurred under our administration agreement for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011, were $554,232. Professional fees, consisting of legal, valuation, audit and consulting fees, were approximately $409,983 for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

Net Decrease in Net Assets

For the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011, we had a net change in unrealized depreciation of $1,579,800, or $0.47 per share. Net investment loss was $2,033,864, or $0.60 per share, for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011. Net decrease in net assets resulting from operations was $3,613,664, or $1.07 per share, for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

The per share figures noted above are based on a weighted-average of 3,377,429 shares outstanding for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

At December 31, 2011, we had investments in 21 portfolio companies with costs totaling $65,658,866, two money market funds totaling $7,000,000 and cash in the amount of $385,995.

On April 28, 2011, we priced our initial public offering of 3,335,000 shares of our common stock at the offering price of $15.00 per share. The initial public offering closed on May 3, 2011, resulting in net proceeds to GSV Capital of approximately $46.5 million. Our shares are currently listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GSVC”.

On September 26, 2011, we priced a secondary offering, selling 2,185,000 shares at a price of $14.15 per share, including an exercise in full by the underwriters of their option to purchase an additional 285,000 shares of common stock to cover overallotments. The follow-on offering resulted in net proceeds to us of approximately $29.6 million.

Our primary use of cash is to make investments and to pay our operating expenses. We used substantially all of the proceeds of the offerings to invest in portfolio companies as of December 31, 2011, except for amounts retained for purposes of funding our ongoing expenses.

Our current policy is to maintain cash reserves in an amount sufficient to pay our operating expenses, including investment management fees and costs incurred under the administration agreement, for approximately two years. For a description of the investment advisory and administration services we receive, see “Related Party Transactions and Certain Relationships”. We incurred approximately $618,865 in investment management fees and $554,232 in costs incurred under the administration agreement for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

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As of December 31, 2011, the fair value of our portfolio investments was equal to the cost of the investments, net of unrealized depreciation representing transaction costs and any fair value adjustments. Two of our investments, Groupon and SharesPost, had fair value adjustments. Groupon conducted an IPO on November 4, 2011. Our shares in Groupon are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that expires on May 1, 2012. The fair value for Groupon was estimated using the close price on a public exchange as of the valuation date, adjusted for a discount due to lack of marketability of 28% that was primarily based on the market price of publicly traded put options with a similar term as the lock-up as of December 31, 2011. Our investment in SharesPost includes Series B preferred shares and warrants. After our investment in SharesPost in July 2011, SharesPost held a subsequent financing for Series B preferred shares, which did not include warrants. Accordingly, only our investment in preferred shares was adjusted due to the subsequent financing. The fair value of our investments can be expected to fluctuate in future periods due to changes in our investments and changes in the fair value of the investments.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of December 31, 2011, we had no off-balance sheet arrangements, including any risk management of commodity pricing or other hedging practices. However, we may employ hedging and other risk management techniques in the future.

Distribution Policy

The timing and amount of our dividends, if any, will be determined by our board of directors. Any dividends to our stockholders will be declared out of assets legally available for distribution. We intend to focus on making capital gains-based investments from which we will derive primarily capital gains. As a consequence, we do not anticipate that we will pay dividends on a quarterly basis or become a predictable issuer of dividends, and we expect that our dividends, if any, will be much less consistent than other business development companies that primarily make debt investments. However, if there are earnings or realized capital gains to be distributed, we intend to declare and pay a dividend at least annually.

We intend to elect to be treated, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, beginning with our 2011 taxable year. To obtain and maintain RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any. In order to avoid certain excise taxes imposed on RICs, we currently intend to distribute during each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of our ordinary income for the calendar year, (2) 98.2% of our capital gains in excess of capital losses for the one-year period ending on October 31 of the calendar year and (3) any ordinary income and net capital gains for preceding years that were not distributed during such years. In addition, although we currently intend to distribute realized net capital gains (i.e., net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses), if any, at least annually, we may in the future decide to retain such capital gains for investment. If this happens, you will be treated as if you received an actual distribution of the capital gains we retain and reinvested the net after-tax proceeds in us. You also may be eligible to claim a tax credit (or, in certain circumstances, a tax refund) equal to your allocable share of the tax we paid on the capital gains deemed distributed to you. See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.” There is no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and, to the extent that we issue senior securities, we will be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.

Our current intention is to make any distributions out of assets legally available therefrom in additional shares of our common stock under our dividend reinvestment plan, unless you elect to receive your dividends and/or long-term capital gains distributions in cash. Under the dividend reinvestment plan, if a stockholder owns shares of common stock registered in its own name, the stockholder will have all cash distributions (net of any withholding) automatically reinvested in additional shares of common stock unless the stockholder opts out of our dividend reinvestment plan by delivering a written notice to our dividend paying agent prior to the record date of the next dividend or distribution. See “Dividend Reinvestment Plan.” Any distributions reinvested under the plan will nevertheless remain taxable to the U.S. stockholder, although no cash distribution has been made. If you hold shares in the name of a broker or financial intermediary, you should contact the broker or financial intermediary regarding your election to receive distributions in cash.

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Borrowings

We had no borrowings outstanding as of December 31, 2011.

Related Party Transactions

Investment Advisory Agreement

We entered into an investment advisory agreement with GSV Asset Management (the “Advisory Agreement”) in connection with our initial public offering. Pursuant to the Advisory Agreement, GSV Asset Management will be paid a base annual fee of 2.00% of gross assets, and an annual incentive fee equal to the lesser of (i) 20% of the GSV Capital’s realized capital gains during each calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and (ii) 20% of the GSV Capital’s realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees. GSV Asset Management earned $618,865 in base fees and $0 in incentive fees for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

As of December 31, 2011, we were owed $13,470 from GSV Asset Management for reimbursement of travel-related expenses paid for by us that were the responsibility of GSV Asset Management.

In addition as of December 31, 2011, we owed GSV Asset Management $78,427 for management fees and reimbursement of other expenses. We owed certain officers and directors $10,782 in reimbursements for travel-related and other expenses.

Administration Agreement

We entered into an Administration Agreement with GSV Capital Service Company (the “Administration Agreement”) to provide administrative services, including furnishing us with office facilities, equipment, clerical, bookkeeping services and other administrative services, in connection with our initial public offering. We reimburse GSV Capital Service Company an allocable portion of overhead and other expenses in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement. There were $554,232 in such costs incurred under the Administration Agreement for the period from January 6, 2011 (date of inception) to December 31, 2011.

We also adopted a Code of Ethics which applies to, among others, our senior officers, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as well as all of our officers, directors and employees. Our Code of Ethics requires that all employees and directors avoid any conflict, or the appearance of a conflict, between an individual’s personal interests and our interests. Pursuant to our Code of Ethics, each employee and director must disclose any conflicts of interest, or actions or relationships that might give rise to a conflict, to our Chief Compliance Officer. Our board of directors is charged with approving any waivers under our Code of Ethics. As required by the NASDAQ corporate governance listing standards, the Audit Committee of our board of directors is also required to review and approve any transactions with related parties (as such term is defined in Item 404 of Regulation S-K).

Critical Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The financial statements included herein are expressed in United States dollars and have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).

In accordance with Regulation S-X under the Securities Act of 1933 and Securities Exchange Act of 1934, we do not consolidate portfolio company investments.

Valuation of Investments at Fair Value

We carry our investments at fair value, as determined in good faith by our board of directors, in accordance with GAAP. Fair value is the price that one would receive upon selling an investment or pay to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date in the

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principal or most advantageous market for the investment or liability. GAAP emphasizes that valuation techniques should maximize the use of observable market inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Observable inputs are based on market data obtained from sources independent of the entity and should not be limited to information that is only available to the entity making the fair value determination, or to a small group of users. Observable market inputs should be readily available to participants in that market. In addition, observable market inputs should include a level of transparency that is reliable and verifiable.

GAAP fair value measurement guidance classifies the inputs used to measure these fair values into the following hierarchy:

Level 1. Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market that we have the ability to access.

Level 2. Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. Level 2 inputs include the following:

a) Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets;

b) Quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in non-active markets;

c) Pricing models whose inputs are observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability; and

d) Pricing models whose inputs are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data through correlation or other means for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.

Level 3. Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. These inputs reflect management’s own assumptions about the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset or liability.

An asset’s categorization within the valuation hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

Securities that are publicly traded are generally valued at the close price on the valuation date; however, if they remain subject to lock-up restrictions they are discounted accordingly. Securities that are not publicly traded or for which there are no readily available market quotations are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by our board of directors.

In connection with that determination, portfolio company valuations are prepared using the most currently available data. As appropriate, we obtain updates on each portfolio company’s financial performance, including information such as economic and industry trends, new product development, and other operational issues.

In making our good faith determination of the fair value of investments, we consider valuation methodologies consistent with industry practice, including but not limited to (i) publicly available information regarding the valuation of the securities based on recent sales in comparable transactions of private companies, (ii) when management believes there are comparable companies that are publicly traded, a review of these publicly traded companies and applicable market multiples of their equity securities and, (iii) an income approach that estimates value based on the expectation of future cash flows that an asset or business will generate.

We engage independent valuation firms to perform valuations of our investments that are not publicly traded or for which there are no readily available market quotations. We also engage independent valuation firms to perform valuations of any securities that trade on private secondary markets, but are not otherwise publicly traded, where there is a lack of appreciable trading or a wide disparity in recently reported trades. We consider the independent valuations, among other factors, in making our fair value determinations.

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Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued guidance clarifying how to measure and disclose fair value. This guidance amends the application of the “highest and best use” concept to be used only in the measurement of fair value of nonfinancial assets, clarifies that the measurement of the fair value of equity-classified financial instruments should be performed from the perspective of a market participant who holds the instrument as an asset, clarifies that an entity that manages a group of financial assets and liabilities on the basis of its net risk exposure can measure those financial instruments on the basis of its net exposure to those risks, and clarifies when premiums and discounts should be taken into account when measuring fair value. The fair value disclosure requirements also were amended. This accounting standard is effective prospectively for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2011. At this time management is evaluating the implications of the amendment and the impact to the financial statements of GSV Capital Corp.

Recent Developments

On January 3, 2012, we sold and settled the $20.0 million United States Treasury Bill for a realized loss of $256.

On February 1, 2012, Facebook, Inc. filed a registration statement with the SEC in connection with its proposed initial public offering. We own 350,000 shares of Class B common stock of Facebook, Inc., which are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that will expire 181 days after the date of the final prospectus relating to Facebook, Inc.’s initial public offering, if consummated.

On February 10, 2012, we priced a secondary offering, selling 6,900,000 of common shares at a price of $15.00 per share, including an exercise in full by the underwriters of their option to purchase an additional 900,000 shares of common stock to cover overallotments. The secondary offering resulted in net proceeds to us of approximately $96.2 million.

Subsequent to December 31, 2011, the we closed on investments of $6.2 million, plus transaction costs as follows:

We closed on an investment of $100,000, plus transaction costs, in AlwaysOn Network, LLC, an internet media company headquartered in Woodside, CA, on January 10, 2012.

We closed on an investment of $200,000, plus transaction costs, in Maven Research, Inc., a global knowledge marketplace headquartered in San Francisco, CA, on February 28, 2012.

We closed on an investment of $500,000, plus transaction costs, in AltEgo, LLC, an avatar technology and games developer headquartered in Santa Monica, CA, on February 29, 2012.

We closed on an investment of $4,000,000, plus transaction costs, in Chegg, Inc., an online textbook rental company headquartered in Santa Clara, CA, on March 7, 2012.

We closed on an investment of $150,000, plus transaction costs, in AlwaysOn Network, LLC, an internet media company headquartered in Woodside, CA, on March 9, 2012.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $250,000, plus transaction costs, in The Echo System Corp., a social analytics company headquartered in New York, NY, on March 21, 2012.

We closed on a follow-on investment of $1,000,000, plus transaction costs, in StormWind, LLC, a developer of online technology headquartered in Scottsdale, AZ, on March 23, 2012.

We are presently in the final stages of negotiations with a handful of private company investments that it anticipates entering into within the next 30 to 60 days, subject to applicable closing conditions. These equity investments may be made through the secondary market and involve making deposits in escrow accounts until certain conditions are met. Moreover, each underlying issuer has the right to terminate the deal before such conditions are satisfied. Pursuant to the terms of our agreements with each of these prospective issuers, at such time that these conditions are satisfied, the escrow accounts will close, and our equity investments will be effectuated. Subsequent to December 31, 2011, the Company made $4.9 million in such escrow deposits of which $0.9 million are currently outstanding and subject to applicable closing conditions.

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BUSINESS

GSV Capital

We are an externally managed, non-diversified closed-end management investment company that has elected to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity and equity-related investments. We invest principally in the equity securities of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. We acquire our investments through secondary marketplaces for private companies, negotiations with selling stockholders and direct investments with prospective portfolio companies. We may also invest on an opportunistic basis in select publicly-traded equity securities or certain non-U.S. companies that otherwise meet our investment criteria. Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, and GSV Capital Service Company provides the administrative services necessary for us to operate.

Our investment philosophy is premised on a disciplined approach of identifying high-growth emerging companies across several key industry themes which may include, among others, social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology. Our investment adviser’s investment decisions are based on a disciplined analysis of available information regarding each potential portfolio company’s business operations, focusing on the company’s growth potential, the quality of recurring revenues and cash flow and cost structures, as well as an understanding of key market fundamentals. Top tier venture capital funds or other financial or strategic sponsors have invested in many of the companies that our investment adviser evaluates.

We seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of non-controlling equity and equity-related investments, including common stock, warrants, preferred stock and similar forms of senior equity, which may or may not be convertible into a portfolio company’s common equity, and convertible debt securities with a significant equity component.

We seek to create a low-turnover portfolio that we expect will initially include diversified investments in 25 to 35 companies. As of March 27, 2012, we have completed investments in 24 companies for aggregate consideration of $71,100,579 (exclusive of transaction fees and costs), or 41.2% of the combined net proceeds from our public offerings. We expect that the total number of portfolio companies in which we are invested will increase as our equity capital base grows.

Two of the companies in our portfolio, Groupon, Inc. and Zynga, Inc., completed their initial public offerings in the fourth quarter of 2011. We own 80,000 shares of Groupon, Inc., which are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that expires on May 1, 2012. With respect to Zynga, we hold a $4,000,000 unsecured promissory note issued by PJB Fund LLC that we expect to mature on June 27, 2012, the repayment amount of which includes a return based on the relative value of the common stock of Zynga, Inc. As of December 31, 2011, these investments collectively comprised approximately 7.3% of our net asset value. The fair value for Groupon was estimated using the close price on a public exchange as of the valuation date, adjusted for a discount due to lack of marketability of 28% that was primarily based on the market price of publicly traded put options with a similar term as the lock-up as of December 31, 2011. The fair value of PJB Fund LLC was equal to the cost of the investment, net of unrealized depreciation representing transaction costs. In addition, on February 1, 2012, Facebook, Inc. filed a registration statement with the SEC in connection with its proposed initial public offering. We own 350,000 shares of Class B common stock of Facebook, Inc., which are presently subject to a lock-up agreement that will expire 181 days after the date of the final prospectus relating to Facebook, Inc.’s initial public offering, if consummated. While there can be no assurance that it will do so, if Facebook, Inc. completes its initial public offering, its market trading levels will be taken into consideration when calculating the fair value of our investment. For a more detailed discussion of these investments and developments that may impact their fair market value as determined by our board of directors, see “Investments” and “Net Decreases in Net Assets” in “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

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Current Portfolio

We have limited information about the financial performance and profitability of our portfolio companies. While according to public filings with the SEC, certain of our portfolio companies have earned net income in recent periods, we believe that substantially all of our portfolio companies are currently experiencing operating losses. There can be no assurance when or if such companies will operate at a profit. In addition, our current portfolio company investments are also concentrated in a limited number of companies. As of March 2012, over half of our portfolio company investments was comprised of investments in four companies.

As of March 27, 2012, we have completed investments in the companies identified below. For those investments held as of December 31, 2011, amounts include transaction fees and costs. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, amounts are exclusive of transaction fees and costs as those have not yet been finally determined. Fair value was determined in good faith by our board of directors as of December 31, 2011 for those investments held as of December 31, 2011. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined their fair value and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.

       
Investment(1)   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)   Source(s)   Description
AltEgo, LLC   $500,000   $500,000(4)   Direct from issuer   Avatar technology and games developer
AlwaysOn Network, LLC(5)   $250,000   $250,000(4)   Direct from issuer   Internet media company
Bloom Energy Corporation   $1,815,818   $1,771,335     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Provider of solid oxide fuel cell technology that generates power onsite from a wide variety of fuel sources
Chegg, Inc.   $10,003,694   $9,999,996(6)   Direct from issuer and secondary marketplace   Online textbook rental company serving students nationwide
Control 4 Inc.   $1,034,827   $1,000,000     Direct from stockholder   Smart home automation company
DreamBox Learning, Inc.   $757,955   $750,000     Direct from issuer   Education technology company
Dropbox, Inc.   $5,015,333   $4,999,998     Direct from stockholder   Online storage service
Facebook, Inc.   $10,465,981   $10,462,500     Secondary marketplace   Leading online social network
Gilt Groupe, Inc.   $5,576,979   $5,499,250     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Online shopping destination offering its members access to discounted prices on merchandise, restaurants and vacations
Grockit Inc.   $2,005,945   $2,000,000     Direct from issuer   Online test preparation company
Groupon, Inc.   $2,128,585   $1,188,288     Secondary marketplace   Online provider of daily coupons for various consumer products
Kno, Inc.   $2,476,309   $2,455,000     Direct from issuer and direct from stockholder   Provider of education software, digital textbooks and social engagement tools for students
Maven Research, Inc.   $200,000   $200,000(4)   Direct from issuer   A global knowledge marketplace

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Investment(1)   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)   Source(s)   Description
PJB Fund LLC(7)   $4,029,259   $4,000,000     Direct from borrower   Debt investment linked until maturity to the value of Zynga, Inc., a developer of online social games
Serious Energy, Inc.   $739,130   $712,380     Secondary marketplace   Products and services to make buildings more energy-efficient
SharesPost, Inc.   $2,281,112   $2,274,483     Direct from issuer   Online marketplace for the exchange of private company equity
Silver Spring Networks, Inc.   $1,153,381   $1,101,430     Secondary marketplace   Hardware, software and services that connect devices on the smart grid
StormWind, LLC   $2,012,874   $2,000,000(8)   Direct from issuer   Online technology courses
The Echo System Corp.(9)   $755,823   $750,000     Direct from issuer   Social analytics
The rSmart Group, Inc.   $513,311   $500,000     Direct from issuer   Higher education learning platform
TrueCar, Inc.   $2,014,551   $1,999,997     Direct from issuer   Online automotive research destination
Twitter, Inc.   $12,304,345   $12,113,493     Secondary marketplace and direct from stockholder   Short messaging platform
ZocDoc Inc.   $3,563,178   $3,500,000     Direct from stockholder   Online booking for doctor and dentist appointments
ZoomSystems   $260,476   $250,000     Direct from stockholder   Automated retail vending machines
Total   $71,858,866   $70,278,150(10)          

(1) Unless otherwise noted, each investment represents an equity investment in the listed issuer.
(2) For those investments held as of December 31, 2011, amounts include transaction fees and costs. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, amounts are exclusive of transaction fees and costs as those have not yet been finally determined.
(3) Fair value was determined in good faith by our board of directors as of December 31, 2011 for those investments held as of December 31, 2011. For those investments acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined their fair value and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(4) Reflects cost of the investment, exclusive of transaction fees and costs. Since we acquired the investment subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of such investment.
(5) Represents a $250,000 unsecured convertible promissory note issued by AlwaysOn, LLC, that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock, as well as warrants to purchase an additional number of shares of the issuer’s preferred stock equal to 35% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the principal amount of the note at the price per share at which such shares are next issued in a qualified equity financing, or if certain corporate events occur prior to the earlier of the maturity date of the note and the date of the next qualified equity financing, 50% of the price per share offered for shares of common stock in connection with such corporate event.
(6) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $6,003,694 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in equity securities of Chegg, Inc. that had a fair value of $5,999,996 as of December 31, 2011. In

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addition, we invested an additional $4,000,000 in equity securities of Chegg, Inc., exclusive of transaction fees and costs, subsequent to December 31, 2011. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional equity securities we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(7) Represents a $4 million unsecured promissory note issued by PJB Fund LLC that may be repaid, at PJB Fund LLC’s election, either by transfer of a certain number of shares of common stock of Zynga, Inc. or with a cash amount of equivalent value. To the extent the borrower repays the note in cash, we would have no further direct or indirect interest in Zynga, Inc. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Investments” for additional information regarding this investment.
(8) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $1,012,874 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in equity securities of StormWind, LLC that had a fair value of $1,000,000 as of December 31, 2011. In addition, we invested an additional $1,000,000, pursuant to the exercise of a warrant to purchase Series B Preferred Units, in StormWind, LLC, exclusive of transaction fees and costs, subsequent to December 31, 2011. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional Series B Preferred Units we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investments are included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(9) As of December 31, 2011, we had invested approximately $505,823 (inclusive of transaction fees and costs) in a $500,000 unsecured convertible promissory note issued by The Echo System Corp., that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock, as well as warrants to purchase an additional number of shares of preferred stock equal to 35% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the principal amount of the note at the price per share at which such shares are next issued in a qualified equity financing, or common stock at a price of $0.20 per share if there is no qualified equity financing prior to the maturity date of the note or expiration of the warrant. In addition, we invested an additional $250,000 in an unsecured convertible promissory note issued by The Echo System Corp., that may be repaid in cash, or upon certain corporate events, converted into shares of the issuer's common stock. Our board of directors has not yet determined the fair value of the additional unsecured promissory note we acquired subsequent to December 31, 2011 and such investment is included at purchase cost on the acquisition date exclusive of transaction fees and costs.
(10) Since we acquired some of these investments subsequent to December 31, 2011, our board of directors has not yet determined the total fair value of our portfolio.

Our investment advisers track a broad list of potential investment opportunities based on fit with our key investment themes and financial characteristics. We currently have over 100 companies under consideration, which we regularly monitor to determine near- and long-term opportunities. At present, our broad list includes companies representing the following investment themes: social-mobile (41.7%), education technology (19.6%), green technology (5.5%), internet commerce (25.5%) and cloud computing (7.7%). The size of companies that we track varies significantly, from technology start-ups to well established near-term IPO candidates.

Within our broad list, we identify a subset of the opportunities that we believe provide the most attractive prospects for future investment. We generally have approximately 30 investments actively under evaluation at any given time. We devote most of our research efforts on understanding, analyzing and valuing these top 30 companies. Our investment adviser actively seeks opportunities to invest in these potential portfolio companies at pre-determined target prices. At any time, we may be in negotiations or in a pre-closing escrow period with several of the companies in our pipeline.

About GSV Asset Management

Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management, an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, or the “Advisers Act.” GSV Asset Management is led by Michael T. Moe, our president, chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors. Mr. Moe is assisted by Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary, whom we refer to collectively as GSV Asset Management’s senior investment professionals. Mr. Moe co-founded and previously served as chairman and chief executive officer of ThinkEquity Partners, an asset management and investment banking firm focusing on venture capital, entrepreneurial and emerging

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growth companies. Prior to founding ThinkEquity, Mr. Moe served as Head of Global Growth Research at Merrill Lynch and before that served as Head of Growth Research and Strategy at Montgomery Securities. Mr. Moe has written extensively about investing in the emerging growth equity markets. His critically-acclaimed book, “Finding the Next Starbucks,” articulates Mr. Moe’s investment process and philosophy which have been refined over more than two decades in the investment community.

We believe we benefit from the proven ability of our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals and board of advisers (the “Advisory Board”) to identify attractive investment opportunities, conduct diligence on and value prospective investments, negotiate terms, and manage and monitor a diversified portfolio of those investments. See “Portfolio Management — Advisory Board to GSV Asset Management.” Our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals and Advisory Board members have broad investment backgrounds, with prior experience at investment banks, commercial banks, unregistered investment funds and other financial services companies, and have collectively developed a broad network of contacts that provides us with an important source of investment opportunities.

We pay GSV Asset Management a fee for its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee. The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets, which includes any borrowings for investment purposes. The incentive fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing on December 31, 2011, and will equal the lesser of (i) 20% of our realized capital gains during such calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and (ii) 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” Although we do not currently have any specific plans to incur debt or use leverage, the terms for calculating the management fee create an incentive for our investment adviser to utilize leverage in the future because our management fee is based on our gross assets, including issuances of preferred stock and borrowings for investment purposes, rather than our net assets. We will be required, however, to obtain the approval of our board of directors before we incur any future indebtedness.

Investment Opportunity

The technology industry is experiencing a convergence of numerous disruptive trends, producing new high-growth markets. The growth of both social networking and connected mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, has opened up new channels for communication and real-time collaboration. The number of devices and people that regularly connect to the Internet has increased dramatically in recent years, generating significant demand for always accessible, personalized and localized content and real-time online interactivity. These factors are creating opportunities for new market participants and significant growth for established companies with leading positions capitalizing on these trends.

At the same time, the initial public offering, or “IPO,” markets have experienced substantial structural changes which have made it significantly more challenging for private companies to go public. Volatile equity markets, a lack of investment research coverage for smaller companies and investor demand for a longer history of earnings growth have resulted in companies staying private significantly longer than in the past. In addition, increased public company compliance obligations such as those imposed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 have made it more costly and less attractive to become a public company. As a result, there are significantly fewer IPOs today than there were a decade ago, with prospective public companies taking longer to come to market. For example, from 1991 – 2000, there were 4,361 IPOs in the United States, of which 1,701 were venture-capital backed. From 2001 – 2010, there were 1,016 IPOs, of which 369 were venture-capital backed.

Because private companies are staying private longer, private investment in late stage companies has increased. Private secondary marketplaces, such as SharesPost and SecondMarket, have emerged as an alternative to traditional public equity exchanges to provide liquidity to private company stockholders, including employees, particularly within the technology sector. While such private secondary marketplaces generally have more limited transaction volume than public exchanges, they do provide accredited investors,

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such as ourselves, with access to equity investments in private companies. Such markets also provide a source for exiting private company investments, as well as price visibility from trading on a marketplace.

Investment Strategy

We seek to create a portfolio of high-growth emerging private companies via a repeatable and disciplined investment approach, as well as to provide investors with access to such companies through our publicly traded common stock.

Our investment objective is to maximize our portfolio’s total return, principally by seeking capital gains on our equity investments. We have adopted the following business strategies to achieve our investment objective:

Identify high quality growth companies.  Based on our extensive experience in analyzing technology trends and markets, we have identified the technology sub-sectors of social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology, as opportunities where we believe companies are capable of producing substantial growth. We rely on our collective industry knowledge as well as an understanding of where leading venture capitalists are investing.

We leverage a combination of our relationships throughout Silicon Valley and our independent research to identify leaders in our targeted sub-sectors that we believe are differentiated and best positioned for sustained growth. Our evaluation process is based on what we refer to as “the four Ps”:

People — Organizations led by strong management teams with in-depth operational focus
Product — Differentiated and disruptive products with leading market positioning
Potential — Large addressable markets
Predictability — Ability to forecast and drive predictable and sustainable growth

We consider these to be the core elements for identifying rapidly growing emerging companies.

Acquire positions in targeted investments.  We seek to build our portfolio by sourcing investments at an acceptable price through our disciplined investing strategy. To this end, we utilize multiple methods to acquire equity stakes in private companies that are not available to many individual investors.

Private secondary marketplaces and direct share purchases.  We utilize private secondary marketplaces as a means to acquire equity investments in privately-held companies that meet our investment criteria and that we believe are attractive candidates for investment. We believe that such markets offer efficient execution versus alternative methods and provide a potential source of liquidity should we decide to exit an investment. In addition, we also purchase shares directly from stockholders, including current or former employees. As certain companies grow and experience significant increased value while remaining private, employees and other stockholders may seek liquidity by selling shares directly to a third party. Sales of shares in private companies are typically restricted by contractual transfer restrictions and company employment policies, which may impose strict limits on transfer. We believe that our investment professionals’ reputation within the industry and history of investing affords us a favorable position when seeking approval for a purchase of shares subject to such limitations.

Direct equity investments.  We also seek direct investments in private companies. There is a large market among emerging private companies for equity capital investments. Many of these companies, particularly within the technology sector, lack the necessary cash flows to sustain substantial amounts of debt, and therefore have viewed equity capital as a more attractive long-term financing tool. We seek to be a source of such equity capital as a means of investing in these companies and look for opportunities to invest alongside other private equity and venture capital investors with whom we have established relationships.

Create access to a diverse investment portfolio.  We seek to hold a diverse portfolio of non-controlling equity investments, which we believe will minimize the impact on our portfolio of a negative downturn at any one specific company. We believe that our relatively diversified portfolio will provide a convenient means for accredited and non-accredited individual investors to obtain access to an asset class that has generally been limited to venture capital, private equity and similar large institutional investors.

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Competitive Advantages

We believe that we will benefit from the following competitive advantages in executing our investment strategy:

Highly experienced team of investment professionals.  Our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals, its Advisory Board and our board of directors have significant experience researching and investing in the types of rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies we are targeting for investment. Michael T. Moe, our president, chief executive officer, chairman of our board of directors and the chief investment officer of GSV Asset Management, co-founded and previously served as chairman and chief executive officer of ThinkEquity Partners, an asset management and investment banking firm focusing on venture capital, entrepreneurial and emerging growth companies. Prior to founding ThinkEquity, Mr. Moe served as Head of Global Growth Research at Merrill Lynch and before that served as Head of Growth Research and Strategy at Montgomery Securities. Since 2006, our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals have managed private funds that have invested in, and have published research on, the types of privately-held companies we intend to target for investment. Through our proprietary company evaluation process, including our identification of technology trends and themes and company research, we believe we have developed important insight into identifying and valuing emerging private companies.
Disciplined and repeatable investment process.  We have established a disciplined process to locate and acquire available shares at attractive valuations by utilizing multiple sources. In contrast to industry “aggregators” that accumulate stock at market prices, we conduct valuation analyses and make acquisitions only when we can invest at valuations that we believe are attractive to our investors. Following this process, we have completed investments in the 21 companies in our portfolio as of December 31, 2011.
Deep relationships with significant credibility to source and complete transactions.  GSV Asset Management and its senior investment professionals are strategically located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Woodside, California. During the course of over two decades of researching and investing in emerging private companies, our investment adviser’s senior investment professionals have developed strong reputations within the investing community, particularly within technology-related sectors. Our investment adviser’s Advisory Board members and our board of directors have also developed strong relationships in the financial, investing and technology-related sectors.
Source of permanent investing capital.  As a publicly-traded corporation, we have access to a source of permanent equity capital which we can use to invest in portfolio companies. This permanent equity capital is a significant differentiator from other potential financial sponsor investors that may be required to return capital to stockholders on a defined schedule. We believe that our ability to invest on a long-term time horizon makes us attractive to companies looking for strong, stable owners of their equity.
Early mover advantage.  We believe we are one of the few publicly traded business development company with a specific focus on investing in rapidly growing venture capital-backed emerging companies. Moreover, we believe we are the only one to focus on acquiring secondary shares as a key component of our strategy. Despite our limited track record, the transactions that we have executed to date since our IPO have helped to establish our reputation with the types of secondary sellers and emerging companies that we target for investment. We have leveraged multiple relationships and channels to acquire the equity of private companies. As we continue to grow our portfolio with attractive investments, we believe that our reputation as a committed partner will be further enhanced, allowing us to source and close investments that would otherwise be unavailable. We believe that these factors collectively differentiate us from other potential investors in private company securities and will potentially enable us to complete equity transactions in top tier private companies at attractive valuations.

Operating and Regulatory Structure

GSV Capital was formed in September 2010 as a Maryland corporation that is an externally managed, non-diversified closed-end management investment company. We completed our initial public offering in April 2011 and have elected to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. As a

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business development company, we are required to meet regulatory tests, including the requirement to invest at least 70% of our gross assets in “qualifying assets.” Qualifying assets generally include, among other things, securities of “eligible portfolio companies.” “Eligible portfolio companies” generally include U.S. companies that are not investment companies and that do not have securities listed on a national exchange. If at any time less than 70% of our gross assets are comprised of qualifying assets, including as a result of an increase in the value of any non-qualifying assets or decrease in the value of any qualifying assets, we would generally not be permitted to acquire any additional non-qualifying assets until such time as 70% of our then current gross assets were comprised of qualifying assets. We would not be required, however, to dispose of any non-qualifying assets in such circumstances. See “Regulation as a Business Development Company.” In addition, we intend to elect to be treated for federal income tax purposes, and intend to qualify annually thereafter, as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under Subchapter M of the Code. See “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

Our investment activities are managed by GSV Asset Management and supervised by our board of directors. GSV Asset Management is an investment adviser registered under the Advisers Act. Under our investment advisory agreement, which we refer to as the Investment Advisory Agreement, we have agreed to pay GSV Asset Management an annual base management fee based on our gross assets as well as an incentive fee based on our performance. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.” We have also entered into an administration agreement, which we refer to as the Administration Agreement, under which we have agreed to reimburse GSV Capital Service Company for our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred.

Investment Process

Concentrated Technology-related Focus

During the course of over two decades of researching and investing in non-public companies, we have identified five areas from which we expect to see significant numbers of high-growth companies emerge: new media, communication, alternative energy, education technology, and the consumerization of information technology. These broad markets produce disruptive technologies, reach a large addressable market and provide significant commercial opportunities. Within these areas we have identified broad trends that could create significant positive effects on growth such as globalization, consolidation, branding, convergence and network effects. From within these broad technology themes, we have selected five sub-segments in which we target companies for investment: social-mobile, cloud computing, internet commerce, green technology and education technology. We remain focused on selecting market leaders within the sub-segments we have identified, while continuing to review our pipeline to ensure we are tracking the next phase of leaders.

Investment Targeting and Screening

We identify prospective portfolio companies through an extensive network of relationships developed by our investment professionals, supplemented by the knowledge and relationships of our investment adviser’s Advisory Board and our board of directors. Investment opportunities that fall within our identified themes are validated against the observed behavior of leading venture capitalists and through our own internal and external research. We evaluate potential portfolio companies across a spectrum of criteria, including “the four Ps”, industry positioning and leadership, stage of growth, and several other factors that collectively characterize our proprietary investment process. We typically seek to invest approximately 90% of our portfolio in well-established, late stage companies and the remaining approximately 10% in emerging companies that fit within our targeted areas, where we see the potential for higher returns from early investment. Based on our initial screening, we identify a select set of companies which we evaluate in greater depth.

Research and Due Diligence Process

Once we identify those companies that we believe warrant more in-depth analysis, we focus on their revenue growth, revenue quality and sustainability and earnings growth, as well as other metrics that may be strongly correlated with higher valuations. We also focus on the company’s management team and any significant financial sponsor, the current business model, competitive positioning, regulatory and legal issues, and the quality of any intellectual property. Each prospective portfolio company that passes our initial due diligence review is given a qualitative ranking to allow us to evaluate it against others in our pipeline, and we review and update these companies on a regular basis.

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Our due diligence process will vary depending on whether we are investing through a private secondary transaction on a marketplace or with a selling stockholder or by direct equity investment. We access information on our potential investments through a variety of sources, including information made available on secondary marketplaces, publications by private company research firms, industry publications, commissioned analysis by third-party research firms, and, to a limited extent, directly from the company or financial sponsor. We utilize a combination of each of these sources to help us set a target value for the companies we ultimately select for investment.

Portfolio Construction and Sourcing

Upon completion of our research and due diligence process, we select investments for inclusion in our portfolio based on their relative qualitative ranking, fundamentals and valuation. We seek to create a relatively diversified portfolio that we expect will initially include investments in 15 to 30 private companies. We generally choose to pursue specific investments based on the availability of shares and valuation expectations. We utilize a combination of secondary marketplaces, direct purchases from stockholders and direct equity investments in order to make investments in our portfolio companies. Once we have established an initial position in a portfolio company, we may choose to increase our stake through subsequent purchases. Maintaining a balanced portfolio is a key to our success, and as a result we constantly evaluate the composition of our investments and our pipeline to ensure we are exposed to a diverse set of companies within our target segments.

Transaction Execution

We negotiate purchase agreements for each of our private company portfolio investments. Private company securities are typically subject to contractual transfer limitations, which may, among other things, give the issuer or its stockholders a particular period of time, often 30 days, in which to exercise a veto right, or a right of first refusal over, the sale of such securities. Accordingly, the purchase agreements we enter into for secondary transactions typically require the lapse or satisfaction of these rights as a condition to closing. Under these circumstances, we are generally required to deposit the purchase price into escrow upon signing with the funds released to the seller at closing or returned to us if the closing conditions are not met.

Risk Management and Monitoring

We monitor the financial trends of each portfolio company to assess our exposure to individual companies as well as to evaluate overall portfolio quality. We establish valuation targets at the portfolio level and for gross and net exposures with respect to specific companies and industries within our overall portfolio. In cases where we make a direct investment in a portfolio company, we may also obtain board positions or board observation rights from that portfolio company in connection with our equity investment. We regularly monitor our portfolio for compliance with the diversification requirements for purposes of maintaining our status as a 1940 Act business development company and a RIC for tax purposes.

Portfolio Overview

At December 31, 2011, our portfolio was invested approximately 65.7% in common shares, 27.2% in preferred shares, 7.0% in structured notes and 0.1% in equity warrants. Such percentages are not inclusive of our holdings in a United States Treasury bill and money market funds.

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Our ten largest portfolio company investments as of December 31, 2011, based on the combined fair value of the equity and debt securities we hold in each portfolio company, were as follows:

       
    At December 31, 2011
Portfolio Company   Industry   Cost   Fair Value   % of Net Asset Value
Twitter, Inc.     Social
Communication
    $ 12,304,345     $ 12,113,493       16.94 % 
Facebook, Inc.     Social
Networking
      10,465,981       10,462,500       14.63  
Chegg, Inc.     Textbook
Rental
      6,003,694       5,999,996       8.39  
Gilt Groupe, Inc.     e-Commerce
Flash Sales
      5,576,979       5,499,250       7.69  
Dropbox, Inc.     Online
Storage
      5,015,333       4,999,998       6.99  
PJB Fund LLC     Social
Gaming
      4,029,259       4,000,000       5.59  
ZocDoc, Inc.     Online
Medical
Scheduling
      3,563,178       3,500,000       4.89  
Kno, Inc.     Digital
Textbooks
      2,476,309       2,455,000       3.44  
SharesPost, Inc.     Online
Marketplace
(Finance)
      2,281,112       2,274,483       3.18  
Grockit, Inc.     Online
Test
Preparation
      2,005,945       2,000,000       2.80  
Total         $ 53,722,135     $ 53,304,720       74.54 % 

Set forth below are descriptions of the ten largest portfolio investments as of December 31, 2011:

Twitter, Inc.

Twitter is a social networking company. Twitter is a real-time information network that allows users to send and receive information.

Facebook, Inc.

Facebook is a leading social-networking company. Facebook’s social networking website allows users to create a personal profile, add other users to the network, and exchange messages, photographs and other information that can be shared across a network.

Chegg, Inc.

Chegg is an online textbook rental company with a leading market presence in the online education industry. Chegg has built a social education learning platform that assists students by providing course planning and selection services, textbooks, study materials and homework assistance.

Gilt Groupe, Inc.

Gilt Groupe is an online shopping destination that offers its members access to discounted prices on merchandise, restaurants and vacations.

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Dropbox, Inc.

Dropbox is a provider of cloud storage that enables users to store and share files across the internet.

PJB Fund LLC

PJB Fund is a special purpose investment vehicle in which we have made a debt investment that is linked until maturity to the value of Zynga, Inc., a developer of online social games.

ZocDoc, Inc.

ZocDoc is a free online service for patients to find and schedule doctor and dentist appointments.

Kno, Inc.

Kno is a provider of education software, digital textbooks and social engagement tools for students.

SharesPost, Inc.

SharesPost connects venture-backed private companies and their shareholders with the investment community and provides an online marketplace for such private companies.

Grockit, Inc.

Grockit is an online test preparation company.

Managerial Assistance

As a business development company, we are required to offer, and in some cases may provide and be paid for, significant managerial assistance to portfolio companies. This assistance typically involves monitoring the operations of portfolio companies, participating in their board and management meetings, consulting with and advising their officers and providing other organizational and financial guidance.

Competition

Our primary competitors include specialty finance companies including other crossover funds, public funds investing in private companies and business development companies. Many of these entities have greater financial and managerial resources than we will have. For additional information concerning the competitive risks we face, see “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Our Business and Structure.”

Employees

While we have executive officers, they receive no direct compensation from us, and we have no direct employees. Our day-to-day investment operations are managed by our investment adviser. In addition, we reimburse GSV Capital Service Company for an allocable portion of expenses incurred by it in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including a portion of the rent and the compensation of our chief financial officer and chief compliance officer and any administrative support personnel. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

Properties

Our corporate headquarters are located at 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, California, in the offices of GSV Capital Service Company. We do not own or lease any office space directly; however, we will pay a portion of the rent as allocated to us by GSV Capital Service Company. Our office facilities are suitable and adequate for our business as it is presently conducted.

Legal Proceedings

We are not currently subject to any material legal proceedings, nor, to our knowledge, is any material legal proceeding threatened against us. From time to time, we may be a party to certain legal proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including proceedings relating to the enforcement of our rights under contracts with our portfolio companies. While the outcome of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty, we do not expect that these proceedings will have a material effect upon our financial condition or results of operations.

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PORTFOLIO COMPANIES

The following table sets forth certain information as of December 31, 2011 for each portfolio company in which we had an equity investment. The general terms of our equity investments are described in “Business — Investment Process.” Other than these investments, our only formal relationships with our portfolio companies are the managerial assistance we may provide upon request and the board observer or participation rights we may receive in connection with our investment. We do not “control” and are not an “affiliate” of any of our portfolio companies, each as defined in the 1940 Act, other than as indicated in the table below. In general, under the 1940 Act, we would “control” a portfolio company if we owned more than 25% of its voting securities and would be an “affiliate” of a portfolio company if we owned more than 5% of its voting securities.

           
Name and Address of Portfolio Company   Industry   Investment   Percentage of Class Held(1)   Number of Shares Held   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)
Bloom Energy Corporation 1299 Orleans Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
    Green
Technology
      Common
Stock
      *       96,389     $ 1,815,818     $ 1,771,335  
Chegg, Inc.
4655 Old Ironsides Road
Suite 100
Santa Clara, CA 95054
    Education
Technology
      Common
Stock
      4.81       774,193       6,003,694       5,999,996  
Control 4 Inc.
11734 South Election Road
Salt Lake City, UT 84020
    Home
Automation
      Common
Stock
      5.90       666,667       1,034,827       1,000,000  
DreamBox Learning, Inc.
305 108th Ave NE
Second floor
Bellevue, WA 98004
    Education
Technology
      Preferred
shares,
Series A-1
      6.82       3,579,610       757,955       750,000  
Dropbox, Inc.
760 Market Street #1150
San Francisco, CA 94102
    Education
Technology
      Preferred
shares,
Series A
      *       552,486       5,015,333       4,999,998  
Facebook, Inc.
1601 S. California Ave.
Palo Alto, CA 94304
    Social-mobile       Common
Stock,
Class B
      *       350,000       10,465,981       10,462,500  
Gilt Groupe, Inc.
40 West 20th Street
7th Floor
New York, NY 10011
    eCommerce       Common
Stock
      *       203,100       5,576,979       5,499,250  
Grockit, Inc.
500 Third Street
Suite 260
San Francisco, CA 94107
    Online Test
Preparation
      Preferred shares,
Series A
      7.76       2,728,252       2,005,945       2,000,000  
Groupon
600 W Chicago Ave.
Suite 620
Chicago, IL 60654
    eCommerce       Common
Stock
      *       80,000       2,128,585       1,188,288  
Kno, Inc.
5155 Old Ironsides Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95054
    Education
Technology
      Preferred
shares,
Series C
      1.25       440,313       2,262,006       2,250,000  
             Common
Stock
      3.75       50,000       214,303       205,000  
                                           2,476,309       2,455,000  
PJB Fund LLC
615 South
Dupont Hwy
Dover, DE 19901
    Special
Purpose
Investment
Vehicle
      Unsecured
Promissory
Note
      n/a       n/a       4,029,259       4,000,000  
Serious Energy, Inc.
1250 Elko Drive
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
    Green
Technology
      Common
Stock
      1.45       178,095       739,130       712,380  

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Name and Address of Portfolio Company   Industry   Investment   Percentage of Class Held(1)   Number of Shares Held   Cost(2)   Fair Value(3)
SharesPost, Inc.
1250 Bayhill Drive
Suite 380
San Bruno, CA 94066
    Financial
Services
      Series B
Preferred
Stock
Common
Warrants
      4.78
32.74
      1,776,970
770,934
    $ 2,257,984
23,128
    $ 2,256,752
17,731
 
                                           2,281,112       2,274,483  
Silver Spring Networks, Inc.
555 Broadway Street
Redwood City, CA 94063
    Green
Technology
      Common
Stock
      *       110,143       1,153,381       1,101,430  
StormWind, LLC
16624 North 90th Street
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
    Electronic
Marketing
and
Business
Services
      Preferred shares,
Series B
Preferred
warrants
      10.0
  
100.0
      1,711,111
  
1,568,518
      959,209
  
53,665
      946,335
  
53,665
 
                                           1,012,874       1,000,000  
The Echo System Corp.
1133 Broadway
Suite 1420
New York, NY 10010
    Social
Analytics
      Structured
Note
      *       n/a       505,823       500,000  
The rSmart Group, Inc.
1375 N. Scottsdale Rd.
Suite 480
Scottsdale, AZ 85257
    Higher
Education
Learning
Platform
      Preferred shares,
Series B
      6.64       480,769       513,311       500,000  
TrueCar, Inc.
225 Santa Monica Blvd,
12th Floor
Santa Monica, CA 90401
    eCommerce       Common
Stock
      *       377,358       2,014,551       1,999,997  
Twitter, Inc.
795 Folsom Street,
Suite 600
San Francisco, CA 94107
    Social-mobile       Common
Stock
      *       735,600       12,304,345       12,113,493  
ZocDoc Inc.
70 Lafayette Street
3rd floor
New York, NY 10013
    Electronic
Marketing
and
Business
Services
      Preferred shares       *       200,000       3,563,178       3,500,000  
ZoomSystems
22 Fourth Street,
Suite 1600
San Francisco, CA 94133
    Automated
Retail
      Series A
Preferred
Stock
      *       1,250,000       260,476       250,000  
Total                           $ 65,658,866     $ 64,078,150  

* Represents less than 1% of the class held.
(1) Information regarding percentage of class held is based on information available to us with respect to the capitalization and capital structure of the company. There can be no assurance that such information is complete or accurate.
(2) Amounts include transaction fees and costs.
(3) Fair value was determined in good faith by our board of directors as of December 31, 2011.

From January 1, 2012 through March 27, 2012, we closed on investments of $6,200,000, plus transaction costs, to increase our holdings in Chegg, Inc., StormWind, LLC and The Echo System Corp., as well as to make new investments in three private companies, AltEgo, LLC, AlwaysOn Network, LLC and Maven Research, Inc.

Set forth below is a brief description of each portfolio company in which we have made an investment that represents greater than 5% of the fair value of our investment portfolio as of December 31, 2011.

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Chegg, Inc.

Chegg is an online textbook rental company with a leading market presence in the online education industry. Chegg has built a social education learning platform that assists students by providing course planning and selection services, textbooks, study materials and homework assistance.

Dropbox, Inc.

Dropbox is a provider of cloud storage that enables users to store and share files across the internet.

Facebook, Inc.

Facebook is a leading social-networking company. Facebook’s social networking website allows users to create a personal profile, add other users to the network, and exchange messages, photographs and other information that can be shared across a network.

Gilt Groupe, Inc.

Gilt Groupe is an online shopping destination that offers its members access to discounted prices on merchandise, restaurants and vacations.

PJB Fund LLC

PJB Fund is a special purpose investment vehicle in which we have made a debt investment that is linked until maturity to the value of Zynga, Inc., a developer of online social games.

Twitter, Inc.

Twitter is a social networking company. Twitter is a real-time information network that allows users to send and receive information.

ZocDoc, Inc.

ZocDoc is a free online service for patients to find and schedule doctor and dentist appointments.

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MANAGEMENT

Our board of directors oversees our management. The board of directors currently consists of five members, three of whom are not “interested persons” of GSV Capital as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. We refer to these individuals as our independent directors. Our board of directors elects our officers, who serve at the discretion of the board of directors. The responsibilities of each director will include, among other things, the oversight of our investment activity, the quarterly valuation of our assets, and oversight of our financing arrangements. The board of directors has also established an audit committee, a nominating and corporate governance committee and a valuation committee, and may establish additional committees in the future.

Board of Directors and Executive Officers

Directors

Information regarding the board of directors is as follows:

       
Name   Age   Position   Director Since   Expiration of Term
Interested Directors                    
Michael T. Moe   49   President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of   Directors   2010   2012
Mark D. Klein   50   Director   2011   2014
Independent Directors                    
Leonard A. Potter   50   Director   2011   2013
Mark W. Flynn   55   Director   2011   2012
R. David Spreng   50   Director   2011   2014

The address for each of our directors is 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, California 94062.

Executive Officers Who Are Not Directors

     
Name   Age   Position   Executive Officer Since
Paul D. Lapping   49   Chief Operating Officer   2011
Stephen D. Bard   52   Chief Financial Officer, Chief Compliance Officer,   Treasurer and Corporate Secretary   2011

Biographical Information

Directors

Our directors have been divided into two groups — interested directors and independent directors. An interested director is an “interested person” as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act.

Interested Directors

Mr. Moe is an “interested person” of GSV Capital as defined in the 1940 Act due to his positions as president, chief executive officer and chairman of the board of directors of GSV Capital and as a principal and chief investment officer of GSV Asset Management, GSV Capital’s investment adviser. Mr. Klein is an interested person due to his financial relationship as a consultant with GSV Capital’s investment adviser, GSV Asset Management.

Michael T. Moe has served as our president and chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors since 2010 and is primarily responsible for overall investment strategies and portfolio management. In addition, Mr. Moe has served as co-founder, chief executive officer and chief investment officer of GSV Asset Management since 2010. Mr. Moe also co-founded GSV Media, a research firm focused on non-public rapidly-growing companies, in 2009. Mr. Moe previously co-founded and served as chairman and chief executive officer of ThinkEquity Partners, an investment banking firm focusing on venture capital,

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entrepreneurial and emerging growth companies, from 2001 to 2008. Prior to founding ThinkEquity, Mr. Moe served as head of Global Growth Research at Merrill Lynch from 1998 to 2001, and before that served as head of Growth Research and Strategy at Montgomery Securities from 1995 to 1998. In 2006, Mr. Moe published his critically acclaimed book Finding the Next Starbucks: How to Identify and Invest in the Hot Stocks of Tomorrow (Penguin/Portfolio Books, 2006). Mr. Moe is currently a member of the board of directors of SharesPost, a private secondary market, and ePals, the worlds largest K-12 social learning network. He is also a member of the Advisory Board of Institutional Venture Partners (IVP). Mr. Moe earned his BA in Political Science and Economics at the University of Minnesota and is a CFA charter holder. Our board of directors has concluded that Mr. Moe’s depth of experience in managerial positions in investment management, securities research and financial services, as well as his intimate knowledge of our business and operations, gives the board of directors valuable industry-specific knowledge and expertise on these and other matters, and that therefore he is qualified to serve as a member of our board of directors.

Mark D. Klein has served as a member of our board of directors since 2011. Mr. Klein also served as a director of New University Holdings Corp., a capital pool company listed on the TSX Venture Exchange, since its inception in 2010 through August 2011, when NUH merged with ePals, Inc., the world’s largest K-12 learning network provider. In addition, from April 2010 until May 2011, Mr. Klein served as the Chief Executive Officer, President and a Director of 57th Street General Acquisition Corp, a special purpose acquisition company, until it completed a merger with Crumbs Bake Shop. Mr. Klein continues to serve as a Director of Crumbs. Between 2007 and 2009, Mr. Klein served as the Chief Executive Officer, President and a Director of Alternative Asset Management Acquisition Corporation, a special purpose acquisition company he helped form in 2007, and which completed a merger with Great American Group LLC. Mr. Klein continues to serve on the Board of Directors of Great American Group. From 2007 until 2008, Mr. Klein served as the Chief Executive Officer of Hanover Group US LLC, an indirect US subsidiary of the Hanover Group. Prior to joining Hanover in 2007, Mr. Klein served as Chairman of Ladenburg Thalmann & Co. Inc. From March 2005 to September 2006, he was Chief Executive Officer and President of Ladenburg Thalmann Financial Services, Inc., the parent of Ladenburg Thalmann & Co. Inc., and Chief Executive Officer of Ladenburg Thalmann Asset Management Inc., a subsidiary of Ladenburg Financial Services, Inc. Prior to joining Ladenburg Thalmann, from June 2000 to March 2005, Mr. Klein served as the Chief Executive Officer and President of NBGI Asset Management, Inc. and NBGI Securities, which were the US subsidiaries of the National Bank of Greece. Mr. Klein has been a registered representative at Ladenburg Thalmann & Co. Inc. since 2005, and a portfolio manager of the LTAM Titan Fund, a fund of funds hedge fund, since 2004. Mr. Klein is also a Managing Member and Majority Partner of M. Klein & Company, LLC, which owns the Klein Group, LLC, a registered broker dealer. Mr. Klein also maintains registration with the Klein Group, LLC as a registered representative and Principal. Mr. Klein is a graduate of the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University, with a Masters of Management Degree, and also received a Bachelors of Business Administration Degree with high distinction from Emory University. Our board of directors has concluded that Mr. Klein’s extensive familiarity with the financial and investment banking industries and experience as a director of other publicly-traded companies provides our board of directors with valuable insight and perspective, and that therefore he is qualified to serve as a member of our board of directors.

Independent Directors

The following directors are not “interested persons” of GSV Capital, as defined in the 1940 Act.

Leonard A. Potter has served as a member of our board of directors since 2011. Mr. Potter is currently the President of a private family investment office. From August 2009 through August 2011, Mr. Potter served as the Chief Investment Officer of Salt Creek Hospitality, a private acquirer and owner of hospitality related assets. From December 2002 through July 2009, Mr. Potter was a Managing Director — Soros Private Equity at Soros Fund Management LLC (“SFM”) where, from May 2005 through July 2009, Mr. Potter served as co-head of the Private Equity group and a member of the Private Equity Investment Committee. From September 1998 until joining SFM in 2002, Mr. Potter was a Managing Director of Alpine Consolidated LLC, a private merchant bank, and from April 1996 through September 1998, Mr. Potter founded and served as a Managing Director of Capstone Partners LLC, a private merchant bank. Prior to founding Capstone Partners, Mr. Potter was an attorney specializing in mergers, acquisitions and corporate finance at Morgan, Lewis &

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Bockius and Willkie Farr & Gallagher. Mr. Potter is currently a member of the board of directors of Solar Senior Capital, Ltd. (“SUNS”), Solar Capital Ltd. (“SLRC”) and GSV Capital, each a business development company, and 57th Street General Acquisition Corp., the owner of Crumbs Holdings LLC (“CRMB”), and has previously served as a board member of several other public companies. He also serves on the boards of three private companies, including Hilton Worldwide. Mr. Potter has a B.A. from Brandeis University and a J.D. from the Fordham University School of Law. Our board of directors has concluded that Mr. Potter’s experience practicing as a corporate lawyer provides valuable insight to the board of directors on regulatory and risk management issues, and that his tenure in private equity investments and service as a director of both public and private companies provides industry-specific knowledge and expertise to our board of directors, and that therefore he is qualified to serve as a member of our board of directors.

Mark W. Flynn has served as a member of our board of directors since 2011. Mr. Flynn has managed Trilogy Capital Partners, a Menlo Park California based private investment firm, since its formation in 1997. Prior to forming Trilogy, Mr. Flynn worked in various capacities in the investment banking groups at Salomon Brothers and Volpe, Brown & Whelan. During his investment-banking career Mr. Flynn primarily worked with technology and health care companies. At Salomon Brothers, he was responsible for the Global Software and Internet investment banking activities. Previously Mr. Flynn worked for Arthur Young and Company in the High Technology practice. Mr. Flynn previously served as a regent at St. John’s University and as chairman of The Preserve Company. He is also a member of the board of directors of the DAPER Fund at Stanford University as well as a number of privately held companies. He is a graduate of Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota and received an MBA from Harvard Business School. Our board of directors has concluded that Mr. Flynn’s extensive familiarity with the financial and investment management industries and experience evaluating technology-related companies provides our board of directors with valuable insight and perspective, and that therefore he is qualified to serve as a member of our board of directors.

R. David Spreng has served as a member of our board of directors since 2011. Mr. Spreng is the founder and has served as managing general partner of Crescendo Ventures, a venture capital firm, since its formation in 1998. Mr. Spreng has been active in the formation and development of nearly 50 technology companies, 17 of which have completed initial public offerings. Mr. Spreng has been a participant and a panelist at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, and is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Technology Pioneers selection committee and on the World Economic Forum’s Steering Committee for Entrepreneurship and Successful Growth Strategies. Mr. Spreng also presently sits on the Advisory Board of the Silicon Valley Executive Network, is a member of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and previously served as a member of the board of, and chairman of the Government Affairs Committee of, the National Venture Capital Association (NVCA). Mr. Spreng currently serves on the board of directors of a number of private technology-focused companies. In addition, Mr. Spreng previously served on the board of directors of Compellent Technologies, a publicly-traded provider of enterprise-class network solutions, from 2006 to 2011, prior to its acquisition by Dell. Mr. Spreng has previously been named as a defendant in several cases arising out of his service as a member of the board of directors of three public companies. Mr. Spreng is a graduate, with distinction, of the University of Minnesota. Our board of directors has concluded that Mr. Spreng’s extensive familiarity with the venture capital industry and experience as a director of other publicly traded companies, provides our board of directors with valuable insight and perspective, and that therefore he is qualified to serve as a member of our board of directors.

Executive Officers Who Are Not Directors

Paul D. Lapping has served as our chief operating officer since 2011. Mr. Lapping served as a director and chief financial officer of New University Holdings Corp., a capital pool company listed on the TSX Venture Exchange, from its inception in 2010 through its merger with ePals, Inc., the world’s largest K-12 learning network provider, in August 2011. Mr. Lapping also served as the chief financial officer, treasurer, secretary and a director of 57th Street General Acquisition Corp., a special purpose acquisition company, from its inception in 2009 through its merger with Crumbs Holdings LLC, the largest US-based retailer of cupcakes, in May 2011. Between 2007 and 2009, Mr. Lapping served as the chief financial officer, treasurer and secretary of Alternative Asset Management Acquisition Corp., a special purpose acquisition company which completed a merger with Great American Group LLC. From 2003 to 2006, Mr. Lapping served as the president of Lapping Investments, LLC, a personal investment fund. From 2000 to 2003, Mr. Lapping served

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as a general partner of Minotaur Partners II, L.P., a private investment partnership Mr. Lapping formed to invest equity in small and middle-market companies. From 1995 to 2002, Mr. Lapping was a general partner of Merchant Partners, LP, a private investment partnership focused on direct marketing, business and consumer services companies. Prior to forming Merchant Partners, Mr. Lapping served in various corporate development roles with Montgomery Ward Holding Corp., a retail, catalog, direct marketing and home shopping company, from 1991 to 1995 and Farley Industries, Inc., a management company providing services to Farley Inc., a private investment fund holding company, and its related entities including Fruit of the Loom, Inc., Farley Metals, Inc., Acme Boot Company and West Point-Pepperell, Inc., from 1988 to 1991. Mr. Lapping also served in various positions with Golder, Thoma and Cressey, a private equity firm and with the merger and acquisition group of Salomon Brothers Inc. Mr. Lapping received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Illinois and a Masters of Management Degree from the Kellogg School of Business at Northwestern University.

Stephen D. Bard has served as our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary since 2011. In addition, Mr. Bard has served as a principal and managing member of GSV Asset Management since 2010. Mr. Bard co-founded GSV Asset Management in 2010, and he is the firm’s chief operating officer. From 2001 to 2009, Mr. Bard served as chief operating officer and a member of the board of directors of Fuller & Thaler Asset Management (“Fuller & Thaler”), an institutional investment firm. As chief operating officer of Fuller & Thaler, Mr. Bard built out and managed the firm’s non-investment team and infrastructure. From 1998 to 2001, Mr. Bard managed the West Coast for Fidelity Management Trust Company (now Pyramis Global Advisors). Mr. Bard has also held senior consultant and business development roles at Hewitt Associates from 1988 to 1996 and New York Life Investment Management from 1996 to 1998. Mr. Bard is currently a trustee of the Crystal Springs Uplands School and a board member of the CFA Society of San Francisco, where he chairs the Investment Committee. Mr. Bard’s other board and committee service includes work with Purisima West Funds, the Hillsborough Schools Foundation, The Olympic Club Investment & Endowment Committee and Blue Chip Exec. Mr. Bard earned his BS from Duke University and his MBA from the University of California, Berkeley. Mr. Bard is also a CFA charter holder.

Board Leadership Structure

Our board of directors monitors and performs an oversight role with respect to the business and affairs of GSV Capital, including with respect to investment practices and performance, compliance with regulatory requirements and the services, expenses and performance of service providers to GSV Capital. Among other things, our board of directors approves the appointment of our investment adviser and officers, reviews and monitors the services and activities performed by our investment adviser and executive officers and approves the engagement, and reviews the performance of, our independent public accounting firm.

Under GSV Capital’s bylaws, our board of directors may designate a chairman to preside over the meetings of the board of directors and meetings of the stockholders and to perform such other duties as may be assigned to him by the board. We do not have a fixed policy as to whether the chairman of the board should be an independent director and believe that we should maintain the flexibility to select the chairman and reorganize the leadership structure, from time to time, based on the criteria that is in the best interests of GSV Capital and its stockholders at such times.

Presently, Mr. Moe serves as the chairman of our board of directors. Mr. Moe is an “interested person” of GSV Capital as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act because he is on the investment committee of our investment adviser and is co-founder, chief executive officer and chief investment officer of our investment adviser and the managing member of our administrator. Mr. Moe’s history with the GSV Asset Management, familiarity with GSV Asset Management’s investment platform, and extensive knowledge of the financial services industry and the investment valuation process in particular qualify him to serve as the chairman of our board of directors. Our view is that GSV Capital is best served through this existing leadership structure, as Mr. Moe’s relationship with GSV Capital’s investment adviser provides an effective bridge and encourages an open dialogue between management and the board of directors, ensuring that both groups act with a common purpose.

Our board of directors does not currently have a designated lead independent director. We are aware of the potential conflicts that may arise when a non-independent director is chairman of the board, but believe

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these potential conflicts are offset by our strong corporate governance policies. Our corporate governance policies include regular meetings of the independent directors in executive session without the presence of interested directors and management, the establishment of audit, valuation and nominating and corporate governance committees comprised solely of independent directors and the appointment of a chief compliance officer, with whom the independent directors meet regularly without the presence of interested directors and other members of management, for administering our compliance policies and procedures.

We recognize that different board leadership structures are appropriate for companies in different situations. We intend to re-examine our corporate governance policies on an ongoing basis to ensure that they continue to meet GSV Capital’s needs.

Board’s Role In Risk Oversight

Our board of directors performs its risk oversight function primarily through (a) its three standing committees, which report to the entire board of directors and are comprised solely of independent directors, and (b) active monitoring of our chief compliance officer and our compliance policies and procedures.

As described below in more detail under “Committees of the Board of Directors,” the audit committee, nominating and corporate governance committee and valuation committee assist the board of directors in fulfilling its risk oversight responsibilities. The audit committee’s risk oversight responsibilities include overseeing GSV Capital’s accounting and financial reporting processes, GSV Capital’s systems of internal controls regarding finance and accounting, and audits of GSV Capital’s financial statements. The nominating and corporate governance committee’s risk oversight responsibilities include selecting, researching and nominating directors for election by our stockholders, developing and recommending to the board a set of corporate governance principles and overseeing the evaluation of the board and our management. The valuation committee’s risk oversight responsibilities include establishing guidelines and making recommendations to our board of directors regarding the valuation of our investments.

Our board of directors also performs its risk oversight responsibilities with the assistance of the chief compliance officer. The board of directors will annually review a written report from the chief compliance officer discussing the adequacy and effectiveness of the compliance policies and procedures of GSV Capital and its service providers. The chief compliance officer’s annual report will address, at a minimum, (a) the operation of the compliance policies and procedures of GSV Capital and its service providers since the last report; (b) any material changes to such policies and procedures since the last report; (c) any recommendations for material changes to such policies and procedures as a result of the chief compliance officer’s annual review; and (d) any compliance matter that has occurred since the date of the last report about which the board of directors would reasonably need to know to oversee our compliance activities and risks. In addition, the chief compliance officer will meet separately in executive session with the independent directors at least once each year.

Our board’s role in risk oversight is effective, and appropriate given the extensive regulation to which we are already subject as a business development company. As a business development company, we are required to comply with certain regulatory requirements that control the levels of risk in our business and operations. For example, our ability to incur indebtedness is limited such that our asset coverage must equal at least 200% immediately after each time we incur indebtedness, we generally have to invest at least 70% of our gross assets in “qualifying assets” and we are not generally permitted to invest in any portfolio company in which one of our affiliates currently has an investment.

We recognize that different board roles in risk oversight are appropriate for companies in different situations. We intend to re-examine the manners in which the board administers its oversight function on an ongoing basis to ensure that they continue to meet GSV Capital’s needs.

Committees of the Board of Directors

An audit committee, a nominating and corporate governance committee and a valuation committee have been established by our board of directors. All directors are expected to attend at least 75% of the aggregate number of meetings of the board of directors and of the respective committees on which they serve. We require each director to make a diligent effort to attend all board and committee meetings as well as each annual meeting of our stockholders.

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Audit Committee

The audit committee operates pursuant to a charter approved by our board of directors, which sets forth the responsibilities of the audit committee. The audit committee’s responsibilities include selecting the independent registered public accounting firm for GSV Capital, reviewing with such independent registered public accounting firm the planning, scope and results of their audit of GSV Capital’s financial statements, pre-approving the fees for services performed, reviewing with the independent registered public accounting firm the adequacy of internal control systems, reviewing GSV Capital’s annual financial statements and periodic filings and receiving GSV Capital’s audit reports and financial statements. The audit committee is currently composed of Messrs. Potter, Flynn and Spreng, all of whom are considered independent under the rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market and are not “interested persons” of GSV Capital as that term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. Mr. Flynn serves as chairman of the audit committee. Our board of directors has determined that Mr. Flynn is an “audit committee financial expert” as that term is defined under Item 407 of Regulation S-K, as promulgated under the Exchange Act. Mr. Flynn meets the current independence and experience requirements of Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act.

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

The nominating and corporate governance committee operates pursuant to a charter approved by our board of directors. The members of the nominating and corporate governance committee are Messrs. Potter, Flynn and Spreng, all of whom are considered independent under the rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market and are not “interested persons” of GSV Capital as that term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. Mr. Potter serves as chairman of the nominating and corporate governance committee. The nominating and corporate governance committee is responsible for selecting, researching and nominating directors for election by our stockholders, selecting nominees to fill vacancies on the board of directors or a committee thereof, developing and recommending to the board of directors a set of corporate governance principles and overseeing the evaluation of the board of directors and our management. The nominating and corporate governance committee currently does not consider nominees recommended by our stockholders.

The nominating and corporate governance committee seeks candidates who possess the background, skills and expertise to make a significant contribution to the board of directors, GSV Capital and its stockholders. In considering possible candidates for election as a director, the nominating committee takes into account, in addition to such other factors as it deems relevant, the desirability of selecting directors who:

are of high character and integrity;
are accomplished in their respective fields, with superior credentials and recognition;
have relevant expertise and experience upon which to be able to offer advice and guidance to management;
have sufficient time available to devote to the affairs of GSV Capital;
are able to work with the other members of the board of directors and contribute to the success of GSV Capital;
can represent the long-term interests of GSV Capital’s stockholders as a whole; and
are selected such that the board of directors represents a range of backgrounds and experience.

The nominating and corporate governance committee has not adopted a formal policy with regard to the consideration of diversity in identifying director nominees. In determining whether to recommend a director nominee, the nominating and corporate governance committee considers and discusses diversity, among other factors, with a view toward the needs of the board of directors as a whole. The nominating and corporate governance committee generally conceptualizes diversity expansively to include, without limitation, concepts such as race, gender, national origin, differences of viewpoint, professional experience, education, skill and other qualities that contribute to the board of directors, when identifying and recommending director nominees. The nominating and corporate governance committee believes that the inclusion of diversity as one of many factors considered in selecting director nominees is consistent with the nominating and corporate governance committee’s goal of creating a board of directors that best serves the needs of GSV Capital and the interests of its shareholders.

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Valuation Committee

The valuation committee establishes guidelines and makes recommendations to our board of directors regarding the valuation of our investments. The board of directors and valuation committee utilize the services of nationally recognized third-party valuation firms to help determine the fair value of our securities that are not publicly traded and for which there are no readily available market quotations including securities, that while listed on a private securities exchange, have not actively traded. The valuation committee is presently composed of Messrs. Potter, Flynn and Spreng, all of whom are considered independent under the rules of the NASDAQ Capital Market and are not “interested persons” of GSV Capital as that term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. Mr. Spreng serves as chairman of the valuation committee.

Compensation Committee

We do not have a compensation committee because our executive officers do not receive any direct compensation from us.

Compensation of Directors

Our independent directors receive an annual fee of $80,000. They also receive reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attending each board and committee meeting attended in person. In addition, the chairman of the audit committee receives an annual fee of $10,000 and each chairman of any other committee receives an annual fee of $5,000 for their additional services, if any, in these capacities. No compensation is paid to directors who are “interested persons” of GSV Capital, as such term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act.

Compensation of Executive Officers

None of our officers receives direct compensation from GSV Capital. However, Messrs. Moe and Bard, through their financial interests in GSV Asset Management, are entitled to a portion of any investment advisory fees paid by GSV Capital to GSV Asset Management under the Investment Advisory Agreement. Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary, is paid by GSV Capital Service Company, subject to reimbursement by us of our allocable portion of such compensation for services rendered by such persons to GSV Capital under the Administration Agreement. To the extent that GSV Capital Service Company outsources any of its functions we will pay the fees associated with such functions on a direct basis without profit to GSV Capital Service Company. The Investment Advisory Agreement is required to be reapproved within two years of its effective date, and thereafter on an annual basis, by our board of directors, including a majority of our directors who are not parties to such agreement or who are not “interested persons” of any such party, as such term is defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act. Under Section 2(a)(19), interested persons generally include, among others, our investment adviser, any principal underwriter to us, and any affiliates thereof, as well as any partner or employee of our legal counsel, and any person who has engaged in portfolio transactions for us, or who has loaned us money or property within the previous six months. See “Investment Advisory Agreement.”

Indemnification Agreements

We have entered into indemnification agreements with our directors. The indemnification agreements are intended to provide our directors the maximum indemnification permitted under Maryland law and the 1940 Act. Each indemnification agreement provides that GSV Capital shall indemnify the director who is a party to the agreement (an “Indemnitee”), including the advancement of legal expenses, if, by reason of his or her corporate status, the Indemnitee is, or is threatened to be, made a party to or a witness in any threatened, pending, or completed proceeding, to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law and the 1940 Act.

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PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

The management of our investment portfolio is the responsibility of our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, and its investment committee, composed of Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson. For more information regarding the business experience of Messrs. Moe and Bard, see “Management — Board of Directors and Executive Officers.” Biographical information for Messrs. Pampoulov and Hanson are set forth below. GSV Asset Management’s investment committee must approve each new investment that we make. Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson are not employed by us, and receive no compensation from us in connection with their portfolio management activities. However, Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson, through their financial interests in GSV Asset Management, are entitled to a portion of any investment advisory fees paid by GSV Capital to GSV Asset Management.

Investment Personnel

Our investment adviser is led by Michael T. Moe, our president and chief executive officer, chairman of our board of directors and co-founder, chief executive officer and chief investment officer of GSV Asset Management, Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary and co-founder and chief operating officer of GSV Asset Management, Luben Pampoulov, co-founder, co-portfolio manager and managing director of GSV Asset Management and Matthew Hanson, managing director of GSV Asset Management. Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson are assisted by Paul Lapping, our chief operating officer. We consider Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson, who are the members of our investment adviser’s investment committee, to be our portfolio managers.

Our portfolio managers are currently providing management and advisory services to the following other entities:

     
Name   Entity   Investment Focus   Total Assets(1)
GSV X Fund     private fund       global long/short absolute return fund     $ 423,583  

(1) Total assets are calculated as of September 30, 2011. GSV X Fund, which was founded in September 2009, currently remains in its incubation stage.

The table below shows the dollar range of shares of our common stock beneficially owned by each of our portfolio managers as of March 27, 2012.

 
Name of Portfolio Manager   Dollar Range of Equity Securities in GSV Capital(1)(2)
Michael T. Moe   $ 1 – $10,000  
Stephen D. Bard     Over $1,000,000  
Luben Pampoulov     None  
Matthew Hanson     None  

(1) The dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned in us is based on a price per share of our common stock of $20.39, the highest reported sale price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Capital Market on March 27, 2012.
(2) The dollar ranges are: None, $1 – $10,000, $10,001 – $50,000, $50,001 – $100,000, $100,001 – $500,000, $500,001 – $1,000,000, or Over $1,000,000.

The following information pertains to the members of GSV Asset Management’s investment team who are not executive officers of GSV Capital Corp.:

Luben Pampoulov was as co-founder and has served as co-portfolio manager of GSV Asset Management since 2010. Mr. Pampoulov also co-founded GSV Media, a research firm focused on private rapidly-growing companies, in 2009. Prior to joining GSV Asset Management, Mr. Pampoulov served as an analyst and co-portfolio manager at ThinkEquity Partners from 2006 to 2008. Mr. Pampoulov earned his BA from UCLA in 2006.

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Matthew Hanson joined GSV Asset Management as a New York-based Partner in 2012. Prior to joining GSV Asset Management, Mr. Hanson served as Head of Corporate Finance for ThinkEquity Partners, where he worked from 2005 to 2011. From 2003 to 2004, Mr. Hanson was an investment banker in the Global Corporate & Investment Banking Division at Banc of America Securities, LLC, and was a financial analyst at Goldman, Sachs & Co., from 2001 to 2003. Mr. Hanson earned his BA in Economics (General Honors) from the University of Chicago in 2001. Mr. Hanson is a CFA charterholder, holds FINRA Series 24, 79, 7 and 66 licenses, and is a member of the New York Society of Securities Analysts and the Manhattan Institute Young Leaders Circle.

Compensation

None of the members of GSV Asset Management’s investment team receive any direct compensation from us in connection with the management of our portfolio. Messrs. Moe, Bard, Pampoulov and Hanson, through their financial interests in GSV Asset Management, are entitled to a portion of any profits earned by GSV Asset Management, which includes any fees payable to GSV Asset Management under the terms of our Investment Advisory Agreement, less expenses incurred by GSV Asset Management in performing its services under our Investment Advisory Agreement. The compensation paid by GSV Asset Management to its other investment personnel includes: (i) annual base salary; (ii) annual cash bonus; (iii) portfolio-based performance award; and (iv) individual performance award and/or individual performance bonus.

Advisory Board to GSV Asset Management

GSV Asset Management has access to an Advisory Board that consists of investment professionals with extensive experience within the financial, investing and technology-related sectors. None of the members of the Advisory Board will be compensated by us. Set forth below are the current members of our investment adviser’s Advisory Board.

Scott A. Bedford founded Peninsula Capital Management, Inc. in 1989 and serves as the firm’s President, Chief Investment Officer and the lead Portfolio Manager of Peninsula Master Fund, Ltd. Prior to Peninsula, Mr. Bedford was a General Partner of Volpe Welty & Co. He also was Vice President in Institutional Sales in the investment banking department of L.F. Rothschild, Unterberg, Towbin. Mr. Bedford has a B.S. in Finance from California State University, Chico.

Todd Bradley has been executive vice president of Personal Systems Group worldwide at Hewlett-Packard Co., since June 2005. Mr. Bradley also serves as a member of HP’s Executive Council. He served as Chief Executive Officer of the Solutions Group of Palm Inc., since June 2002. Mr. Bradley served as the Chief Executive Officer of Palm, and also served as its President since April 30, 2004 and its Advisor since 2005. He served as the President and the Chief Operating Officer of the Solutions Group since May 2002. From June 2001 to May 2002, Mr. Bradley served as an Executive Vice President and the Chief Operating Officer of the Solutions Group. From September 1998 to January 2001, Mr. Bradley held an Executive positions at Gateway Corporation, serving most recently as a Senior Vice President of Consumer and Executive Vice President of global operations. From February 1997 to September 1998, he served as the President and the Chief Executive Officer of Transport International Pool, a GE Capital Services company that is a global transportation equipment leasing and rental business. From September 1993 to February 1997, Mr. Bradley was with Dun & Bradstreet, most recently serving as the President of NCH Promotional Services, a Dun & Bradstreet subsidiary. Mr. Bradley previously held various management positions within logistics, production and quality control at Federal Express Corporation and the Miller Brewing Company. He has been Director of LiveOps Inc. since January 30, 2008. He serves as Director of Challenger Capital Group, Ltd. He served as a Director of Palm since July 2002. Mr. Bradley also serves on the Advisory Boards of the Consumer Electronics Association of America and Sonic Wall Corporation. He serves as a Trustee of the American Film Institute. He is a member of the University of Maryland’s Board of Visitors. Mr. Bradley holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Towson State University.

William V. Campbell has been a director of Intuit since 1994 and chairman of its board since 1998. Mr. Campbell served as Intuit’s president and chief executive officer from 1994 to 1998 and was acting chief executive officer from 1999 to 2000. Mr. Campbell has been a member of the board of directors of Apple, Inc., since 1997, where he presently co-chairs the audit committee. For the three years before joining Intuit, Mr. Campbell was the president and chief executive officer of GO Corp., a pen-based computing software

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company. Previously, he founded and served as president and chief executive officer of Claris Corp., which was purchased by Apple Computer Inc. in 1990. Mr. Campbell also serves as an advisor to Google and Twitter and is a past advisor to Amazon. Before entering the technology industry, Campbell was the head football coach at Columbia University for six years, and has been chairman of Columbia University’s board of trustees since 2005. He is also a director of the National Football Foundation / College Football Hall of Fame. Mr. Campbell holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and a Masters of Science from Columbia University.

Robert E. Grady is a managing director and partner at Cheyenne Capital Fund, L.P. He joined the firm in 2009 and has 17 years of experience in private equity. Prior to joining the firm, he was a partner and member of Management Committee of The Carlyle Group for nine years from 2000 through 2009. Mr. Grady joined Carlyle in 2000 as Global Head of Venture Capital and served as a Member of Carlyle’s Management Committee. At Carlyle, Mr. Grady served as the global coordinator of venture and growth capital (which had $5 billion in assets under management), Chairman and Fund Head of Carlyle Venture Partners I, II, and III, and on the investment committees of Carlyle Venture Partners, Carlyle Asia Growth Partners, and Carlyle Europe Technology Partners. He focused on investments in the technology and business services sectors and was based in San Francisco. Mr. Grady was the Managing Partner and Chairman of Carlyle Venture Partners. Mr. Grady is on the Board of Directors of The Carlyle Group’s portfolio companies including: Secure Elements Inc, eScreen, The Health Central Network, Choice Media, Keen.com, Panasas Inc., Verari Systems Inc., USBX Inc., Viator, Inc., Eleutian Technology, Symbio, and Wall Street Institute, as well as Maxim Integrated Products. He has been a Director of The Symbio Group since 19 August, 2008. Mr. Grady serves on the Investment Committees of CVP, Carlyle Asia Growth Partners, and Carlyle Europe Technology Partners. He is the Chairman of Resources for the Future, is a Member of Advisory Board of RBC Venture Partners and Strategic Technology Fund and the National Commission on Energy Policy, and a Trustee of Environmental Defense. He is also a Director of Stifel Financial Corp. since August 3, 2010. Mr. Grady serves on the Boards of Directors of the Environmental Defense Fund, TechNet, Asia America Multi-Industry Association, the Jackson Hole Land Trust, and the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He is a Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Mr. Grady was appointed by President George H.W. Bush to be a Member of Advisory Committee on Trade and Policy Negotiations and by the Administrator of NASA to be a Member of the NASA Advisory Council’s Task Force on the cost and management of the International Space Station. Prior to this, he served in the White House from 1989 to 1993 as a Deputy Assistant to President George H.W. Bush and as an Executive Associate Director of the Office of Management and Budget. Mr. Grady received a B.A. from Harvard College and an M.B.A. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Marc B. Mazur is the Chairman of Elsworthy Capital Management Ltd. a London based European Equity Long/Short hedge fund. Mr. Mazur was previously the CEO of Brevan Howard U.S. Asset Management, the U.S. arm of Europe's largest hedge fund. His experience includes management positions at Salomon Brothers, Swiss Bank Corporation and Goldman Sachs, where he was responsible for businesses in the international fixed income and credit areas. Mr. Mazur has been a Senior Advisor to both Tsinghua Venture Capital Company and Think Equity Partners LLC. In 1998, Mr. Mazur was named Vice President for strategic business development at CareInsite (subsequently acquired by WebMD). He has been an advisor to leading private equity firms and serves on a number of private company boards. He is currently a member of the board of Fibrocell Science Inc (FCSC). He has also been an active angel and venture investor. Mr. Mazur’s non-profit board affiliations include the executive committee of the Columbia College Alumni Association, The Jed Foundation which works to prevent college suicide, East Palo Alto-based College Track which provides educational and mentoring support for economically challenged youth in the San Francisco Bay Area as well as New Orleans and Aurora, CO, and the National Association on Drug Abuse Problems.

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INVESTMENT ADVISORY AGREEMENT

Management Services

GSV Asset Management serves as our investment adviser. GSV Asset Management is registered as an investment adviser under the Advisers Act. Subject to the overall supervision of our board of directors, GSV Asset Management manages the day-to-day operations of, and provide investment advisory services to, GSV Capital. Under the terms of the Investment Advisory Agreement, GSV Asset Management:

determines the composition of our portfolio, the nature and timing of the changes to our portfolio and the manner of implementing such changes;
determines what securities we will purchase, retain or sell;
identifies, evaluates and negotiates the structure of the investments we make; and
closes, monitors and services the investments we make.

GSV Asset Management’s services under the Investment Advisory Agreement are not exclusive, and it is free to furnish similar services to other entities so long as its services to us are not impaired. GSV Asset Management currently serves as the investment adviser for GSV X Fund, a global long/short absolute return fund. GSV Asset Management does not anticipate that it will ordinarily identify investment opportunities that are appropriate for both GSV Capital and the other funds that are currently or in the future may be managed by GSV Asset Management. However, to the extent it does identify such opportunities, GSV Asset Management will allocate such opportunities between GSV Capital and such other funds pursuant to an established procedure that is designed to ensure that such allocation is fair and equitable.

Management Fees

We pay GSV Asset Management a fee for its services under the Investment Advisory Agreement consisting of two components — a base management fee and an incentive fee. The cost of both the base management fee payable to GSV Asset Management, and any incentive fees earned by GSV Asset Management, are ultimately borne by our common stockholders.

The base management fee (the “Base Fee”) is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% of our gross assets. For the period from the close of our initial public offering through and including December 31, 2011, the Base Fee was payable monthly in arrears, and was calculated based on the initial value of our assets upon the closing of our initial public offering. For services rendered after December 31, 2011, the Base Fee will be payable monthly in arrears, and will be calculated based on the average value of our gross assets at the end of the two most recently completed calendar quarters, and appropriately adjusted for any equity or debt capital raises, repurchases or redemptions during the current calendar quarter. The Base Fee for any partial month or quarter will be appropriately pro rated.

The incentive fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing on December 31, 2011, and will equal the lesser of:

20% of our realized capital gains during such calendar year, if any, calculated on an investment-by-investment basis, subject to a non-compounded preferred return, or “hurdle,” and a “catch-up” feature, and
20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees.

Our realized capital gains from each investment, expressed as a non-compounded annual rate of return on the cost of such investment since we initially acquired it, will be compared to a hurdle rate of 8.00% per year. We will only pay an incentive fee on any realized capital gains from an investment that exceeds the hurdle rate. We will pay GSV Asset Management an incentive fee with respect to our realized capital gains from each investment as follows:

No incentive fee will be payable on the amount of any realized capital gains from an investment

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that, when expressed as a non-compounded annual rate of return on the cost of such investment since we initially acquired it, does not exceed the hurdle rate of 8.00% per year.
We will pay as an incentive fee 100% of the amount of any realized capital gains from an investment that, when expressed as a non-compounded annual rate of return on the cost of such investment since we initially acquired it, exceeds the hurdle rate of 8.00% per year but is less than a rate of 10.00% per year. We refer to this portion of our realized capital gains from each investment (which exceeds the hurdle rate but is less than 10.00%) as the “catch-up.” The “catch-up” is meant to provide our investment adviser with 20% of the amount of our realized capital gains from an investment that, when expressed as a non-compounded annual rate of return on the cost of such investment since we initially acquired it, exceeds a rate of 10.00% per year.
We will pay as an incentive fee 20% of the amount of any realized capital gains from an investment that, when expressed as a non-compounded annual rate of return on the cost of such investment since we initially acquired it, exceeds a rate of 10.00% per year.

In no event, however, will we pay an incentive fee for any calendar year that exceeds 20% of our realized capital gains, if any, on a cumulative basis from inception through the end of such calendar year, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid incentive fees.

The following is a graphical representation of the calculation of our incentive fee with respect to a single investment:

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

For accounting purposes, in order to reflect the theoretical capital gains incentive fee that would be payable for a given period as if all unrealized gains were realized, we are required to accrue a capital gains incentive fee based upon realized capital gains and losses during the current calendar year through the end of the period, plus any unrealized capital appreciation and depreciation as of the end of the period. It should be noted that a fee so calculated and accrued would not necessarily be payable under the Investment Advisory Agreement, and may never be paid based upon the computation of capital gains incentive fees in subsequent periods. Amounts paid under the Investment Advisory Agreement will be consistent with the formula reflected in the Investment Advisory Agreement.

Example: Calculation of incentive fee

Alternative 1:

Assumptions

Hurdle rate = 8.00% non-compounded annual rate of return
Hurdle rate = (purchase price) × (8% × (days owned/365))
Catch-up rate = 10.00% non-compounded annual rate of return
Catch-up rate = (purchase price) × (10% × (days owned/365))
Year 1: $20,000,000 investment made on March 15 in Company A (“Investment A”), and $30,000,000 investment made on February 1 in Company B (“Investment B”)

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Year 2: Investment A is sold on September 15 for $25,000,000, and fair market value (“FMV”) of Investment B is determined to be $28,000,000
Year 3: FMV of Investment B is determined to be $28,000,000
Year 4: Investment B is sold on March 1 for $38,000,000

The incentive fee would be calculated as follows:

Year 1: None
Year 2: Incentive fee calculation:
Hurdle rate for Investment A = ($20,000,000) × (8% × (550 days / 365))
Hurdle rate for Investment A = $2,410,959
Catch-up rate for Investment A = ($20,000,000) × (10% × (550 days / 365))
Catch-up rate for Investment A = $3,013,699
Incentive fee on Investment A = 20% × $5,000,000 (since the hurdle rate has been satisfied and the catch up has been fully achieved)
Incentive fee on Investment A = $1,000,000
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × (cumulative realized capital gains – (cumulative realized losses + cumulative net unrealized depreciation)) – (previously paid incentive fees)
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × ($5,000,000 - $2,000,000 (unrealized depreciation on Investment B))
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × $3,000,000
Maximum incentive fee = $600,000
Incentive fee paid = $600,000 (because the incentive fee payable on Investment A exceeds the maximum incentive fee, the maximum incentive fee applies)
Year 3: None
Year 4: Incentive fee calculation:
Hurdle rate for Investment B = ($30,000,000) × (8% × (1,124 days / 365))
Hurdle rate for Investment B = $7,390,685
Catch-up rate for Investment B = ($30,000,000) × (10% × (1,124 days / 365))
Catch-up rate for Investment B = $9,238,356
Incentive fee on Investment B = 100% × ($8,000,000 – $7,390,685 (since the hurdle rate has been satisfied, but the catch up has not been fully achieved)
Incentive fee on Investment B = $609,315
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × (cumulative realized capital gains – (cumulative realized losses + cumulative net unrealized depreciation)) – (previously paid incentive fees)
Maximum incentive fee = (20% × $13,000,000) – ($600,000 (previously paid incentive fees))
Maximum incentive fee = $2,000,000
Incentive fee paid = $609,315 (because the incentive fee payable on Investment B does not exceed the maximum incentive fee)

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Alternative 2:

Assumptions

Hurdle rate = 8.00% non-compounded annual rate of return
Hurdle rate = (purchase price) × (8% × (days owned/365))
Catch-up rate = 10.00% non-compounded annual rate of return
Catch-up rate = (purchase price) × (10% × (days owned/365))
Year 1: $20 million investment made on March 15 in Company A (“Investment A”), $30 million investment made on February 1 in Company B (“Investment B”), and $25 million investment made on September 1 in Company C (“Investment C”)
Year 2: Investment A is sold on September 15 for $50 million, FMV of Investment B is determined to be $25 million, and FMV of Investment C is determined to be $25 million
Year 3: FMV of Investment B is determined to be $27 million and Investment C is sold on December 1 for $30 million
Year 4: FMV of Investment B is determined to be $35 million
Year 5: Investment B is sold on March 1 for $20 million

The incentive fee would be calculated as follows:

Year 1: None
Year 2: Incentive fee calculation:
Hurdle rate for Investment A = ($20,000,000) × (8% × (550 days / 365))
Hurdle rate for Investment A = $2,410,959
Catch-up rate for Investment A = ($20,000,000) × (10% × (550 days / 365))
Catch-up rate for Investment A = $3,013,699
Incentive fee on Investment A = 20% × $30,000,000 (since the hurdle rate has been satisfied and the catch up has been fully achieved)
Incentive fee on Investment A = $6,000,000
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × (cumulative realized capital gains – (cumulative realized losses + cumulative net unrealized depreciation)) – (previously paid incentive fees)
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × ($30,000,000 - $5,000,000 (unrealized depreciation on Investment B))
Maximum incentive fee = $5,000,000
Incentive fee paid = $5,000,000 (because the incentive fee payable on Investment A exceeds the maximum incentive fee, the maximum incentive fee applies)
Year 3: Incentive fee calculation:
Hurdle rate for Investment C = ($25,000,000) × (8% × (822 days / 365))
Hurdle rate for Investment C = $4,504,110
Catch-up rate for Investment C = ($25,000,000) × (10% × (822 days / 365))
Catch-up rate for Investment C = $5,630,137
Incentive fee on Investment C = 100% × ($5,000,000 – $4,504,110 (since the hurdle rate has been satisfied, but the catch up has not been fully achieved))

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Incentive fee on Investment C = $495,890
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × (cumulative realized capital gains – (cumulative realized losses + cumulative net unrealized depreciation)) – (previously paid incentive fees)
Maximum incentive fee = 20% × ($35,000,000 - $3,000,000 (unrealized depreciation on Investment B)) – ($5,000,000 (previously paid incentive fees))
Maximum incentive fee = $1,400,000
Incentive fee paid = $495,890 (because the incentive fee payable on Investment C does not exceed the maximum incentive fee)
Year 4: None
Year 5: None

We seek to deploy capital primarily in the form of non-controlling investments in our portfolio companies. Although we primarily invest through private secondary markets, to the extent we make a direct minority investment in a portfolio company, neither we, nor our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, may have the ability to control the timing of when we realize capital gains or losses with respect to such investment. We expect the timing of such realization events to be determined by our portfolio companies in such cases. To the extent we have non-minority investments, or the securities we hold are traded on a private secondary market or public securities exchange, GSV Asset Management will have greater control over the timing of a realization event. In such cases, our board of directors will monitor such investments in connection with their general oversight of the investment management services provided by GSV Asset Management. In addition, as of the end of each fiscal quarter, we will evaluate whether the cumulative aggregate unrealized appreciation on our portfolio would be sufficient to require us to pay an incentive fee to our investment adviser if such unrealized appreciation were actually realized as of the end of such quarter, and if so, we will accrue an expense equal to the amount of such incentive fee. Any such accrual of incentive fees will be reflected in the calculation of our net asset value.

Payment of our Expenses

All personnel of our investment adviser when and to the extent engaged in providing investment advisory services, and the compensation and expenses of such personnel allocable to such services, are provided and paid for by GSV Asset Management. We are responsible for all other costs and expenses of our operations and transactions, including (without limitation) the cost of calculating our net asset value; the cost of effecting sales and repurchases of shares of our common stock and other securities; investment advisory fees; fees payable to third parties relating to, or associated with, making investments, including fees and expenses associated with performing due diligence reviews of prospective investments (in each case subject to approval of our board of directors); transfer agent and custodial fees; fees and expenses associated with marketing efforts (including attendance at investment conference and similar events); federal and state registration fees; any exchange listing fees; federal, state and local taxes; independent directors’ fees and expenses; brokerage commissions; costs associated with our reporting and compliance obligations under the 1940 Act and applicable federal and state securities laws including costs of proxy statements, stockholders’ reports and notices; fidelity bond, directors and officers/errors and omissions liability insurance and other insurance premiums; direct costs such as printing, mailing, long distance telephone, staff, independent audits and outside legal costs and all other expenses incurred by either GSV Capital Service Company or us in connection with administering our business, including payments under the administration agreement that will be based upon our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by GSV Capital Service Company in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including a portion of the rent and the compensation of our chief financial officer and chief compliance officer and other administrative support personnel. All of these expenses are ultimately borne by our common stockholders.

Duration and Termination

The Investment Advisory Agreement was approved by our board of directors on March 28, 2011. Unless earlier terminated as described below, the Investment Advisory Agreement will remain in effect for a period of two years from the date it was approved by the board of directors and will remain in effect from year to year

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thereafter if approved annually by our board of directors or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities, including, in either case, approval by a majority of our directors who are not interested persons. The Investment Advisory Agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment. The Investment Advisory Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon not more than 60 days’ written notice to the other. The Investment Advisory Agreement may also be terminated, without penalty, upon the vote of a majority of our outstanding voting securities.

Indemnification

The Investment Advisory Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of its duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of its duties and obligations, GSV Asset Management and its officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with it are entitled to indemnification from us for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of GSV Asset Management’s services under the Investment Advisory Agreement or otherwise as our investment adviser.

Organization of the Investment Adviser

GSV Asset Management is a Delaware limited liability company. The principal executive offices of GSV Asset Management are located at 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062.

Board Approval of the Investment Advisory and Management Agreement

A discussion regarding the basis for our board of director’s approval of our Investment Advisory Agreement will be included in our first annual report on Form 10-K filed subsequent to any such board approval, or incorporated by reference therein.

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ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENT

Pursuant to a separate Administration Agreement, GSV Capital Service Company, a Delaware limited liability company, furnishes us with office facilities, together with equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities. The principal executive offices of GSV Capital Service Company are located at 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062. Under the Administration Agreement, GSV Capital Service Company also performs, or oversees the performance of, our required administrative services, which includes being responsible for the financial records which we are required to maintain and preparing reports to our stockholders and reports filed with the SEC. In addition, GSV Capital Service Company assists us in determining and publishing our net asset value, overseeing the preparation and filing of our tax returns and the printing and dissemination of reports to our stockholders, and generally overseeing the payment of our expenses and the performance of administrative and professional services rendered to us by others. Payments under the Administration Agreement are based upon our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by GSV Capital Service Company in performing its obligations under the administration agreement, including a portion of the rent and the compensation of our chief financial officer and chief compliance officer and any administrative support personnel. While there is no limit on the total amount of expenses we may be required to reimburse to GSV Capital Service Company, our administrator will only charge us for the actual expenses it incurs on our behalf, or our allocable portion thereof, without any profit to GSV Capital Service Company. The Administration Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon 60 days’ written notice to the other party.

The Administration Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of their respective duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of their respective duties and obligations, GSV Capital Service Company and its officers, manager, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with it are entitled to indemnification from us for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of GSV Capital Service Company’s services under the Administration Agreement or otherwise as our administrator.

GSV Capital Service Company also provides administrative services to our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management. As a result, GSV Asset Management also reimburses GSV Capital Service Company for its allocable portion of GSV Capital Service Company’s overhead, including rent, the fees and expenses associated with performing compliance functions for GSV Asset Management, and its allocable portion of the compensation of any administrative support staff. We estimate that we will incur approximately $2.5 million in aggregate expenses under our Administration Agreement during the 12 months of operations following completion of this offering.

LICENSE AGREEMENT

We have entered into a license agreement with GSV Asset Management pursuant to which GSV Asset Management has agreed to grant us a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to use the name “GSV.” Under this agreement, we have a right to use the GSV name for so long as the Investment Advisory Agreement with GSV Asset Management is in effect. Other than with respect to this limited license, we will have no legal right to the “GSV” name.

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RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS AND CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS

We have entered into an Investment Advisory Agreement with GSV Asset Management. GSV Asset Management is controlled by Michael T. Moe, our president, chief executive officer and chairman of our board of directors and Stephen D. Bard, our chief financial officer, chief compliance officer, treasurer and corporate secretary. Messrs. Moe and Bard, as principals of GSV Asset Management, collectively manage the business and internal affairs of GSV Asset Management. Mr. Klein or entities he controls may receive fees from GSV Asset Management in connection with this offering and, from time to time, subsequent thereto for non-investment advisory services he may provide. In addition, GSV Capital Service Company provides us with office facilities and administrative services pursuant to an Administration Agreement. Mr. Moe is the managing member of and controls GSV Capital Service Company. While there is no limit on the total amount of expenses we may be required to reimburse to GSV Capital Service Company, our administrator will only charge us for the actual expenses it incurs on our behalf, or our allocable portion thereof, without any profit to GSV Capital Service Company.

In addition, our executive officers and directors, and the principals of our investment adviser, GSV Asset Management, serve or may serve as officers and directors of entities that operate in a line of business similar to our own, including new entities that may be formed in the future. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in the best interests of us or our stockholders. For example, GSV Asset Management currently manages GSV X Fund, a global long/short absolute return fund.

While the investment focus of each of these entities tends to be different from our investment objective, it is possible that new investment opportunities that meet our investment objective may come to the attention of one of these entities, or new entities that may be formed in the future in connection with another investment advisory client or program, and, if so, such opportunity might not be offered, or otherwise made available, to us. However, our executive officers, directors and investment adviser intend to treat us in a fair and equitable manner consistent with their applicable duties under law so that we will not be disadvantaged in relation to any other particular client. In addition, GSV Asset Management does not anticipate that it will ordinarily identify investment opportunities that are appropriate for both GSV Capital and the other funds that are currently or in the future may be managed by GSV Asset Management. However, to the extent it does identify such opportunities, GSV Asset Management will allocate such opportunities between GSV Capital and such other funds pursuant to an established procedure that is designed to ensure that such allocation is fair and equitable. Our board of directors will monitor on a quarterly basis any such allocation of investment opportunities between GSV Capital and any such other funds.

GSV Asset Management is the owner of the “GSV” name and marks, which we are permitted to use pursuant to a non-exclusive license agreement between us and GSV Asset Management. GSV Asset Management and its principals also use and may permit other entities to use the “GSV” name and marks in connection with businesses and activities unrelated to our operations. The use of the “GSV” name and marks in connection with businesses and activities unrelated to our operations may not be in the best interest of us or our stockholder and may result in actual or perceived conflicts of interest.

In the ordinary course of business, we may enter into transactions with portfolio companies that may be considered related party transactions. In order to ensure that we do not engage in any prohibited transactions with any persons affiliated with us, we have implemented certain written policies and procedures whereby our executive officers screen each of our transactions for any possible affiliations between the proposed portfolio investment, us, companies controlled by us and our executive officers and directors. We will not enter into any agreements unless and until we are satisfied that doing so will not raise concerns under the 1940 Act or, if such concerns exist, we have taken appropriate actions to seek board review and approval or exemptive relief for such transaction. Our board of directors will review these procedures on an annual basis.

We have also adopted a Code of Ethics which applies to, among others, our senior officers, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as well as all of our officers, directors and employees. Our officers and directors also remain subject to the fiduciary obligations imposed by both the 1940 Act and applicable state corporate law. Our Code of Ethics requires that all employees and directors avoid any conflict, or the appearance of a conflict, between an individual’s personal interests and our interests. Pursuant to our

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Code of Ethics, each employee and director must disclose any conflicts of interest, or actions or relationships that might give rise to a conflict, to our chief compliance officer. Our board of directors is charged with approving any waivers under our Code of Ethics. As required by the NASDAQ corporate governance listing standards, the Audit Committee of our board of directors is also required to review and approve any transactions with related parties (as such term is defined in Item 404 of Regulation S-K).

Finally, we pay GSV Capital Service Company our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by GSV Capital Service Company in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including a portion of the rent and the compensation of our chief financial officer and chief compliance officer and any administrative support personnel, which creates conflicts of interest that our board of directors must monitor. We estimate that we will incur approximately $2.5 million in aggregate expenses under our Administration Agreement during the 12 months of operations following completion of this offering.

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CONTROL PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS

The following table sets forth certain ownership information as of March 27, 2012 with respect to our common stock for those persons who directly or indirectly own, control or hold with the power to vote, 5% or more of our outstanding common stock and all officers and directors, as a group.

     
Name   Type of ownership   Shares owned   Percentage(1)
All officers and directors as a group (8 persons)(2)     Beneficial       110,969       2.01 % 

(1) Based upon 12,420,100 shares outstanding as of March 27, 2012.
(2) The address for all officers and directors is c/o GSV Capital Corp., 2965 Woodside Road, Woodside, CA 94062.

The following table sets forth the dollar range of our equity securities that are beneficially owned by each of our directors as of March 27, 2012.

 
Name of Director   Dollar Range of Equity
Securities in GSV Capital(1)(2)
Interested Directors
        
Michael T. Moe   $ 1 – $10,000  
Mark D. Klein     Over $100,000  
Independent Directors
        
Leonard A. Potter     Over $100,000  
Mark W. Flynn     None  
R. David Spreng   $ 10,001 - $50,000  

(1) Dollar ranges are as follows: None, $1 – $10,000, $10,001 – $50,000, $50,001 – $100,000, or Over $100,000.
(2) The dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned in us is based on a price per share of our common stock of $20.39, the highest reported sale price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Capital Market on March 27, 2012.

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REGULATION AS A BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

General

A business development company is regulated by the 1940 Act. A business development company must be organized in the United States for the purpose of investing in or lending to primarily private companies and making significant managerial assistance available to them. A business development company may use capital provided by public stockholders and from other sources to make long-term, private investments in businesses. A business development company provides stockholders the ability to retain the liquidity of a publicly trad