POS AM 1 d456237dposam.htm POS AM POS AM
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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 10, 2013

Registration No. 333-169533

 

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

POST-EFFECTIVE AMENDMENT NO. 4

to

Form S-11

FOR REGISTRATION UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

OF SECURITIES OF CERTAIN REAL ESTATE COMPANIES

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Governing Instruments)

 

 

2325 East Camelback Road, Suite 1100

Phoenix, Arizona 85016

(602) 778-8700

(Address, Including Zip Code and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

 

 

D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr.

Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.

2325 East Camelback Road, Suite 1100

Phoenix, Arizona 85016

(602) 778-8700

(Name, Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Agent for Service)

 

 

Copies to:

Lauren Burnham Prevost, Esq.

Heath D. Linsky, Esq.

Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP

1600 Atlanta Financial Center

3343 Peachtree Road, N.E.

Atlanta, Georgia 30326-1044

(404) 233-7000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:    As soon as practicable following effectiveness of this Registration Statement.

If any of the securities registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act, check the following box:    þ

If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

If delivery of the prospectus is expected to be made pursuant to Rule 434, check the following box.    ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer  ¨

   Accelerated filer  ¨    Non-accelerated filer  þ    Smaller reporting company  ¨
      (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)   

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant files a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement will thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(c) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement becomes effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(c), may determine.

 

 

 


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This Post-Effective Amendment No. 4 consists of the following:

 

  1. The Registrant’s prospectus dated October 24, 2012.

 

  2. Supplement No. 5 dated January 10, 2013 to the Registrant’s prospectus dated October 24, 2012, included herewith, which supersedes and replaces all prior supplements to the prospectus dated October 24, 2012, and which will be delivered as an unattached document along with the prospectus dated October 24, 2012.

 

  3. Part II, included herewith.

 

  4. Signatures, included herewith.


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PROSPECTUS

LOGO

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.

Maximum Offering of 300,000,000 Shares of Common Stock

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc. is a Maryland corporation that intends to invest primarily in income-producing necessity retail properties that are single-tenant or multi-tenant “power centers” subject to long-term triple net or double net leases with national or regional creditworthy tenants. We intend to qualify as a real estate investment trust (REIT) for federal income tax purposes, and we are externally managed by our advisor, Cole REIT Advisors IV, LLC, an affiliate of our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments.

We are offering up to 250,000,000 shares of our common stock in our primary offering for $10.00 per share, with discounts available for certain categories of purchasers. We also are offering under this prospectus up to 50,000,000 shares of our common stock pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan at a purchase price during this offering of $9.50 per share. We will offer these shares until January 26, 2014, which is two years after the effective date of this offering, unless the offering is extended. We may need to renew the registration of this offering annually with certain states in which we expect to offer and sell shares. In no event will we extend this offering beyond 180 days after the third anniversary of the initial effective date, and we may terminate this offering at any time. We reserve the right to reallocate the shares we are offering between our primary offering and our distribution reinvestment plan.

See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 22 for a description of the principal risks you should consider before buying shares of our common stock. These risks include the following:

 

 

The amount of distributions we may pay, if any, is uncertain. Due to the risks involved in the ownership of real estate, there is no guarantee of any return on your investment in our common stock, and you may lose your investment.

 

 

We are a “blind pool,” as we have not identified all of the properties we intend to purchase, and we have a limited operating history.

 

 

This investment has limited liquidity. No public market currently exists, and one may never exist, for shares of our common stock. If you are able to sell your shares, you would likely have to sell them at a substantial discount to their market value.

 

 

You should consider an investment in our common stock a long-term investment. If we do not successfully implement our exit strategy, you may suffer losses on your investment, or your shares may continue to have limited liquidity.

 

 

The offering price for our shares is not intended to reflect the book value or net asset value of our investments, or our expected cash flow. Until such time as our shares are valued by our board of directors, the price of our shares is not intended to reflect the net asset value of our shares.

 

 

We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, including borrowings and proceeds from the sale of our securities or asset sales, and we have no limits on the amounts we may pay from such other sources. Payments of distributions from sources other than cash flows from operations may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in real estate and may negatively impact the value of your investment. As a result, the amount of distributions paid at any time may not reflect the current performance of our properties or our current operating cash flows.

 

 

This is a “best efforts” offering. If we are not able to raise a substantial amount of capital in the near term, we may have difficulties investing in properties and our ability to achieve our investment objectives could be adversely affected.

 

 

There are substantial conflicts of interest between us and our advisor and its affiliates. Key persons associated with our advisor perform similar duties for other Cole-sponsored programs that may use investment strategies similar to ours creating potential conflicts of interest when allocating investment opportunities. In addition, our advisor and its affiliates have substantial discretion in managing our operations, and we pay them substantial fees.

 

 

Although you will be provided with information about our investments after the investments have been made, you will be unable to evaluate the economic merit of future investments, including how the proceeds from this offering will be invested. This makes an investment in our shares speculative.

 

 

Our board of directors may change our investment objectives and certain investment policies without stockholder approval.

 

 

We expect to incur debt, which could adversely impact your investment if the value of the property securing the debt falls or if we are forced to refinance the debt during adverse economic conditions.

 

 

We may suffer from delays in our advisor locating suitable investments, which could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions and the value of your investment.

 

 

If we fail to qualify as a REIT, cash available for distributions to be paid to you could decrease materially.

 

 

For qualified accounts, if an investment in our shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), you may be subject to the imposition of significant excise taxes and penalties with respect to the amount invested.

This investment involves a high degree of risk. You should purchase these securities only if you can afford a complete loss of your investment.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Attorney General of the State of New York, nor any other state securities regulator, has approved or disapproved of our common stock, nor determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete or passed on or endorsed the merits or demerits of this offering. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The use of projections in this offering is prohibited. Any representation to the contrary, and any predictions, written or oral, as to the amount or certainty of any future benefit or tax consequence that may flow from an investment in this program is not permitted. All proceeds from this offering are held in trust until subscriptions are accepted and funds are released.

 

     Price to Public      Selling
Commissions
     Dealer
Manager Fee
     Net Proceeds
(Before Expenses)
 

Primary Offering Per Share

   $ 10.00       $ 0.70       $ 0.20       $ 9.10   

Total Maximum

   $ 2,500,000,000       $ 175,000,000       $ 50,000,000       $ 2,275,000,000   

Distribution Reinvestment Plan Per Share

   $ 9.50       $       $       $ 9.50   

Total Maximum

   $ 475,000,000       $       $       $ 475,000,000   

The dealer manager of this offering, Cole Capital Corporation, a member firm of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (FINRA), is an affiliate of our advisor and will offer the shares on a “best efforts” basis. The minimum investment generally is 250 shares. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus for a description of such compensation. We expect that up to 10% of our gross offering proceeds, excluding proceeds from our distribution reinvestment plan, will be used to pay selling commissions, dealer manager fees and other expenses considered to be underwriting compensation.

The date of this prospectus is October 24, 2012


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SUITABILITY STANDARDS

An investment in our common stock is only suitable for persons who have adequate financial means and desire a long-term investment (generally, an investment horizon in excess of seven years). The value of your investment may decline significantly. In addition, the investment will have limited liquidity, which means that it may be difficult for you to sell your shares. Persons who may require liquidity within several years from the date of their investment or seek a guaranteed stream of income should not invest in our common stock.

In consideration of these factors, we have established minimum suitability standards for initial stockholders and subsequent purchasers of shares from our stockholders. These minimum suitability standards require that a purchaser of shares have, excluding the value of a purchaser’s home, furnishings and automobiles, either:

 

   

a net worth of at least $250,000; or

 

   

a gross annual income of at least $70,000 and a net worth of at least $70,000.

Certain states have established suitability requirements in addition to the minimum standards described above. Shares will be sold to investors in these states only if they meet the additional suitability standards set forth below:

 

   

Alabama — Investors must have a liquid net worth of at least ten times their investment in us and similar programs.

 

   

California — Investors must have either (i) a net worth of at least $250,000, or (ii) a gross annual income of at least $75,000 and a net worth of at least $75,000. In addition, the investment must not exceed ten percent (10%) of the net worth of the investor.

 

   

Iowa and New Mexico — Investors may not invest, in the aggregate, more than 10% of their liquid net worth in us and all of our affiliates.

 

   

Kansas and Massachusetts — It is recommended by the office of the Kansas Securities Commissioner and the Massachusetts Securities Division that investors in Kansas and Massachusetts not invest, in the aggregate, more than 10% of their liquid net worth in this and similar direct participation investments. For purposes of this recommendation, “liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth that consists of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities.

 

   

Kentucky, Michigan, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Tennessee — Investors must have a liquid net worth of at least 10 times their investment in us.

 

   

Maine — The investment in us (plus any investments in our affiliates) by an investor must not exceed 10% of the net worth of the investor.

 

   

Nebraska — Investors must have (excluding the value of their home, furnishings and automobiles) either (i) a minimum net worth of $100,000 and an annual income of $70,000, or (ii) a minimum net worth of $350,000. In addition, the investment in us must not exceed 10% of the investor’s net worth.

 

   

North Dakota — Investors must have a liquid net worth of at least ten times their investment in us and our affiliates.

 

   

Ohio — Investors may not invest, in the aggregate, more than 10% of their liquid net worth in us, our affiliates and other non-traded real estate investment programs. For purposes of this limitation, “liquid net worth” is defined as that portion of net worth (total assets exclusive of home, home furnishings and automobiles minus total liabilities) that is comprised of cash, cash equivalents and readily marketable securities.

Because the minimum offering of our common stock was less than $297,500,000 Pennsylvania investors are cautioned to evaluate carefully our ability to accomplish fully our stated objectives and to inquire as to the current dollar volume of our subscription proceeds.

In the case of sales to fiduciary accounts, the minimum suitability standards must be met by either the fiduciary account, by the person who directly or indirectly supplied the funds for the purchase of the shares, or by the beneficiary of the account.

Our sponsor and affiliated dealer manager are responsible for determining if investors meet our minimum suitability standards and state specific suitability standards for investing in our common stock. In making this determination, our sponsor and affiliated dealer manager will rely on the participating broker-dealers and/or information provided by investors. In addition to the minimum suitability standards described above, each

 

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participating broker-dealer, authorized representative or any other person selling shares on our behalf, and our sponsor, is required to make every reasonable effort to determine that the purchase of shares is a suitable and appropriate investment for each investor.

It shall be the responsibility of your participating broker-dealer, authorized representative or other person selling shares on our behalf to make this determination, based on a review of the information provided by you,

including your age, investment objectives, income, net worth, financial situation and other investments held by you, and consider whether you:

 

   

meet the minimum income and net worth standards established in your state;

 

   

can reasonably benefit from an investment in our common stock based on your overall investment objectives and portfolio structure;

 

   

are able to bear the economic risk of the investment based on your overall financial situation; and

 

   

have an apparent understanding of:

 

   

the fundamental risks of an investment in our common stock;

 

   

the risk that you may lose your entire investment;

 

   

the lack of liquidity of our common stock;

 

   

the restrictions on transferability of our common stock;

 

   

the background and qualifications of our advisor; and

 

   

the tax, including ERISA, consequences of an investment in our common stock.

Such persons must maintain records for at least six years of the information used to determine that an investment in the shares is suitable and appropriate for each investor.

Restrictions Imposed by the USA PATRIOT Act and Related Acts

In accordance with the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the USA PATRIOT Act), the shares offered hereby may not be offered, sold, transferred or delivered, directly or indirectly, to any “Unacceptable Investor,” which means anyone who is:

 

   

a “designated national,” “specially designated national,” “specially designated terrorist,” “specially designated global terrorist,” “foreign terrorist organization,” or “blocked person” within the definitions set forth in the Foreign Assets Control Regulations of the U.S. Treasury Department;

 

   

acting on behalf of, or an entity owned or controlled by, any government against whom the United States maintains economic sanctions or embargoes under the Regulations of the U.S. Treasury Department;

 

   

within the scope of Executive Order 13224 — Blocking Property and Prohibiting Transactions with Persons who Commit, Threaten to Commit, or Support Terrorism, effective September 24, 2001;

 

   

a person or entity subject to additional restrictions imposed by any of the following statutes or regulations and executive orders issued thereunder: the Trading with the Enemy Act, the National Emergencies Act, the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, the United Nations Participation Act, the International Security and Development Cooperation Act, the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994, the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act, the Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996, the Cuban Democracy Act, the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act and the Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs Appropriations Act or any other law of similar import as to any non-U.S. country, as each such act or law has been or may be amended, adjusted, modified or reviewed from time to time; or

 

   

designated or blocked, associated or involved in terrorism, or subject to restrictions under laws, regulations, or executive orders as may apply in the future similar to those set forth above.

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

SUITABILITY STANDARDS

     i   

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THIS OFFERING

     1   

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

     7   

RISK FACTORS

     22   

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

     57   

ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS

     58   

MANAGEMENT

     61   

MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION

     76   

STOCK OWNERSHIP

     83   

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

     84   

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

     91   

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

     113   

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     114   

PRIOR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

     123   

DESCRIPTION OF SHARES

     133   

SUMMARY OF DISTRIBUTION REINVESTMENT PLAN

     149   

OUR OPERATING PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

     153   

FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

     157   

INVESTMENT BY TAX-EXEMPT ENTITIES AND ERISA CONSIDERATIONS

     174   

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

     180   

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE

     186   

SUPPLEMENTAL SALES MATERIAL

     187   

LEGAL MATTERS

     187   

EXPERTS

     187   

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

     187   

INDEX TO FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     FS-1   

Appendix A: Prior Performance Tables

     A-1   

Appendix B: Initial Subscription Agreement

     B-1   

Appendix C: Additional Subscription Agreement

     C-1   

Appendix D: Alternative Form of Subscription Agreement

     D-1   

Appendix E: Initial Subscription Agreement (Alabama Investors)

     E-1   

Appendix F: Additional Subscription Agreement (Alabama Investors)

     F-1   

Appendix G: Distribution Reinvestment Plan

     G-1   

 

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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THIS OFFERING

Below we have provided some of the more frequently asked questions and answers relating to an offering of this type. Please see “Prospectus Summary” and the remainder of this prospectus for more detailed information about this offering.

 

Q: What is a REIT?

 

A: In general, a REIT is a company that:

 

   

pays distributions to investors of at least 90% of its taxable income;

 

   

avoids the “double taxation” treatment of income that generally results from investments in a corporation because a REIT generally is not subject to federal corporate income taxes on its net income, provided certain income tax requirements are satisfied; and

 

   

combines the capital of many investors to acquire a large-scale diversified real estate portfolio under professional management.

 

Q: How are you different from your competitors who offer non-listed finite-life public REIT shares or real estate limited partnership units?

 

A: We believe that our sponsor’s disciplined investment focus on core commercial real estate and experience in managing such properties will distinguish us from other non-listed REITs. We use the term “core” to describe existing properties currently operating and generating income, that are leased to national and regional creditworthy tenants under long-term net leases and are strategically located. In addition, core properties typically have high occupancy rates (greater than 90%) and low to moderate leverage (0% to 50% loan to value).

We invest primarily in income-producing necessity retail properties that are single-tenant or multi-tenant “power centers,” which are leased to national and regional creditworthy tenants under long-term leases, and are strategically located throughout the United States and U.S. protectorates. Necessity retail properties are properties leased to retail tenants that attract consumers for everyday needs, such as pharmacies, home improvement stores, national superstores, restaurants and regional retailers. We expect that most of our properties will be subject to triple net and double net leases, whereby the tenant is obligated to pay for most of the expenses of maintaining the property. Through our investments in core commercial real estate, we expect to achieve a relatively predictable and stable stream of income, which will provide a principal source of return for investors in our common stock, and the potential for capital appreciation in the value of our real estate assets.

For over three decades, our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments, has developed and utilized this investment approach in acquiring and managing core commercial real estate assets in the retail sector. We believe that our sponsor’s experience in assembling real estate portfolios, which principally focus on national and regional creditworthy tenants subject to long-term net leases, will provide us with a competitive advantage. In addition, our sponsor has built a business of over 325 employees, who are experienced in the various aspects of acquiring, financing and managing commercial real estate, and that our access to these resources also will provide us with an advantage.

 

Q: Will you invest in anything other than retail commercial properties?

 

A:

Yes. We also may invest in other income-producing properties, such as office and industrial properties, which may share certain core characteristics with our retail investments, such as a principal creditworthy tenant, a long-term net lease, and a strategic location. Our sponsor’s disciplined investment focus on core commercial real estate historically has included office and industrial properties. To the extent that we invest in office and industrial properties, we will focus on core properties that are essential to the business

 

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  operations of the tenant. We believe investments in these properties are consistent with our goal of providing investors with a relatively stable stream of current income and an opportunity for capital appreciation. Our portfolio also may include other income-producing real estate, as well as real estate-related investments such as mortgage, mezzanine, bridge and other loans and securities related to real estate assets, provided that such investments do not cause us to lose our REIT status or cause us to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (Investment Company Act). Although this is our current target portfolio, we may make adjustments to our target portfolio based on real estate market conditions and investment opportunities. We will not forgo a high quality investment because it does not precisely fit our expected portfolio composition. Our goal is to assemble a portfolio that is diversified by investment type, investment size and investment risk, which will provide attractive and reasonably stable returns to our investors. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Investment Objectives and Policies — Acquisition and Investment Policies” for a more detailed discussion of all of the types of investments we may make.

 

Q: Generally, what are the terms of your leases?

 

A: We will seek to secure leases from creditworthy tenants before or at the time we acquire a property. We expect that many of our leases will be what is known as triple net or double net leases. Triple net leases typically require the tenant to pay all costs associated with a property in addition to the base rent and percentage rent, if any, including capital expenditures for the roof and the building structure. Double net leases typically hold the landlord responsible for the capital expenditures for the roof and structure, while the tenant is responsible for all lease payments and remaining operating expenses associated with the property. This helps ensure the predictability and stability of our expenses, which we believe will result in greater predictability and stability of our cash distributions to stockholders. Our leases generally have terms of ten or more years and include renewal options. We may, however, enter into leases that have a shorter term.

 

Q: How will you determine whether tenants are creditworthy?

 

A: Our advisor and its affiliates have a well-established underwriting process to determine the creditworthiness of our potential tenants. The underwriting process includes analyzing the financial data and other information about the tenant, such as income statements, balance sheets, net worth, cash flow, business plans, data provided by industry credit rating services, and/or other information our advisor may deem relevant. In addition, we may obtain guarantees of leases by the corporate parent of the tenant, in which case our advisor will analyze the creditworthiness of the guarantor. In many instances, especially in sale-leaseback situations, where we are acquiring a property from a company and simultaneously leasing it back to such company under a long-term lease, we will meet with the senior management to discuss the company’s business plan and strategy. We may use an industry credit rating service to determine the creditworthiness of potential tenants and any personal guarantor or corporate guarantor of the tenant. We consider the reports produced by these services along with the relevant financial and other data relating to the proposed tenant before acquiring a property subject to an existing lease or entering into a new lease.

 

Q: What is the experience of your sponsor and your advisor?

 

A:

Our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments, is a group of affiliated entities directly or indirectly controlled by Christopher H. Cole, including Cole Capital Advisors, Inc. (Cole Capital Advisors), Cole Capital Partners, LLC (Cole Capital Partners) and other affiliates of our advisor. From January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2011, Cole Real Estate Investments sponsored 67 prior programs, including 63 privately offered programs and four publicly offered REITs, which are comprised of Cole Credit Property Trust II, Inc. (CCPT II), Cole Credit Property Trust III, Inc. (CCPT III), Cole Corporate Income Trust, Inc. (CCIT) and Cole Real Estate Income Strategy (Daily NAV), Inc. (Cole Income NAV Strategy). These prior programs had raised approximately $6.8 billion from over 134,000 investors and had purchased 1,639 properties located in 47 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands at an acquisition cost of $9.7 billion as of

 

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  December 31, 2011. CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy are each currently raising capital pursuant to their respective initial public offerings of shares of their common stock.

For over three decades, our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments, has developed and utilized a conservative investment approach that focuses on single-tenant commercial properties, which are leased to name-brand creditworthy tenants, subject to long-term “net” leases. While our sponsor has used this investment strategy primarily in the retail sector, our sponsor has also used the same investment strategy (single-tenant commercial properties subject to long-term net leases with creditworthy tenants) in the office and industrial sector. We expect that our sponsor’s prior experience in applying this conservative and disciplined investment strategy in both the retail and corporate sectors will provide us with a competitive advantage, as our advisor, an affiliate of our sponsor, acquires and manages, on our behalf, a portfolio of necessity retail properties. In addition, our sponsor has built an organization of over 325 employees, who are experienced in the various aspects of acquiring, financing and managing commercial real estate, and we believe that our access to these resources will also provide us with a competitive advantage. A summary of the real estate programs managed over the last ten years by our sponsor, including adverse business and other developments, is set forth in the section of this prospectus captioned “Prior Performance Summary.”

Our advisor is Cole REIT Advisors IV, LLC (CR IV Advisors), an affiliate of our sponsor that was formed solely for the purpose of managing our company. The chief executive officer and president of our advisor, and other key personnel of our advisor, have been associated with Cole Real Estate Investments for several years. For additional information about the key personnel of our advisor, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Management — The Advisor.”

 

Q: What will be the source of your distributions?

We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, including from the proceeds of this offering, from borrowings or from the sale of properties or other investments, among others, and we have no limit on the amounts we may pay from such sources. We expect that our cash flow from operations available for distribution will be lower in the initial stages of this offering until we have raised significant capital and made substantial investments. As a result, we expect that during the early stages of our operations, and from time to time thereafter, we may declare distributions from sources other than cash flows from operations. Our distributions will constitute a return of capital for federal income tax purposes to the extent that they exceed our earnings and profits as determined for tax purposes.

 

Q: Do you expect to acquire properties in transactions with affiliates of your advisor?

 

A: Other than as set forth below, our board of directors has adopted a policy to prohibit acquisitions and loans from or to affiliates of our advisor. First, from time to time, our advisor may direct certain of its affiliates to acquire properties that would be suitable investments for us or our advisor may create special purpose entities to acquire properties that would be suitable investments for us. Subsequently, we may acquire such properties from such affiliates of our advisor. Any and all acquisitions from affiliates of our advisor must be approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as being fair and reasonable to us and at a price to us that is no greater than the cost of the property to the affiliate of our advisor (including acquisition fees and expenses), unless a majority of the independent directors determines that there is substantial justification for any amount that exceeds such cost and that the difference is reasonable. In no event will we acquire a property from an affiliate of our advisor if the cost to us would exceed the property’s current appraised value as determined by an independent appraiser. In no event will our advisor or any of its affiliates be paid more than one acquisition fee in connection with any such transaction.

Second, from time to time, we may borrow funds from affiliates of our advisor, including our sponsor, as bridge financing to enable us to acquire a property when offering proceeds alone are insufficient to do so and third party financing has not been arranged. Any and all such transactions must be approved by a

 

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majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as fair, competitive and commercially reasonable, and no less favorable to us than comparable loans between unaffiliated parties.

Finally, our advisor or its affiliates may pay costs on our behalf, pending our reimbursement, or we may defer payment of fees to our advisor or its affiliates, neither of which would be considered a loan.

Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, none of these restrictions would preclude us from paying our advisor or its affiliates fees or other compensation in connection with internalizing our advisor if our board of directors determines an internalization transaction is in the best interests of our stockholders. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Management Compensation — Becoming Self-Administered.”

 

Q: Will you acquire properties in joint ventures, including joint ventures with affiliates?

 

A: It is possible that we may acquire properties through one or more joint ventures in order to increase our purchasing power and diversify our portfolio of properties in terms of geographic region, property type and tenant industry group. Increased portfolio diversification reduces the risk to investors as compared to a program with less diversified investments. Our joint ventures may be with affiliates of our advisor or with non-affiliated third parties. Any joint venture with an affiliate of our advisor must be approved by a majority of our independent directors and the cost of our investment must be supported by a current appraisal of the asset. Generally, we will only enter into a joint venture in which we will approve major decisions of the joint venture. If we do enter into joint ventures, we may assume liabilities related to a joint venture that exceed the percentage of our investment in the joint venture.

 

Q: Will the distributions I receive be taxable as ordinary income?

 

A: Generally, unless your investment is held in a qualified tax-exempt account, distributions that you receive, including distributions that are reinvested pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan, will be taxed as ordinary income to the extent they are from current or accumulated earnings and profits. We expect that some portion of your distributions in any given year may not be subject to tax because depreciation and other non-cash expenses reduce taxable income but do not reduce cash available for distribution. In addition, distributions may be made from other sources, such as borrowings in anticipation of future operating cash flows or proceeds of this offering, which would not be currently taxed. The portion of your distribution that is not currently taxable is considered a return of capital for tax purposes and will reduce the tax basis of your investment. This, in effect, defers a portion of your tax until your investment is sold or we are liquidated, at which time you likely will be taxed at capital gains rates. However, because each investor’s tax considerations are different, we recommend that you consult with your tax advisor. You also should review the section of this prospectus entitled “Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

Q: What will you do with the money raised in this offering before you invest the proceeds in real estate?

 

A: Until we invest the proceeds of this offering in real estate, we may invest in short-term, highly liquid or other authorized investments. We may not be able to invest the proceeds from this offering in real estate promptly and such short-term investments will not earn as high of a return as we expect to earn on our real estate investments.

 

Q: How does a “best efforts” offering work?

 

A: When shares are offered to the public on a “best efforts” basis, the dealer manager and the broker-dealers participating in the offering are only required to use their best efforts to sell the shares and have no firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of the shares. Therefore, we may not sell all of the shares that we are offering.

 

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Q: Who can buy shares?

 

A: In order to buy shares of our common stock, you must meet our minimum suitability standards, which generally require that you have either (1) a net worth of at least $70,000 and a gross annual income of at least $70,000, or (2) a net worth of at least $250,000. For this purpose, net worth does not include your home, home furnishings and automobiles. You may be required to meet certain state suitability standards. In addition, all investors must meet suitability standards determined by his or her broker or financial advisor. You should carefully read the more detailed description under “Suitability Standards” immediately following the cover page of this prospectus.

 

Q: For whom might an investment in our shares be appropriate?

 

A: An investment in our shares may be appropriate for you if, in addition to meeting the suitability standards described above, you seek to diversify your personal portfolio with a real estate-based investment, seek to receive current income, and seek the opportunity to achieve capital appreciation over an investment horizon of more than seven years. An investment in our shares has limited liquidity and therefore is not appropriate if you may require liquidity within several years from the date of your investment or seek a guaranteed stream of income.

 

Q: May I make an investment through my IRA or other tax-deferred account?

 

A: Yes. You may make an investment through your individual retirement account (IRA) or other tax-deferred account. In making these investment decisions, you should consider, at a minimum, (1) whether the investment is in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your IRA, plan or other account, (2) whether the investment would constitute a prohibited transaction under applicable law, (3) whether the investment satisfies the fiduciary requirements associated with your IRA, plan or other account, (4) whether the investment will generate unrelated business taxable income (UBTI) to your IRA, plan or other account, (5) whether there is sufficient liquidity for such investment under your IRA, plan or other account, and (6) the need to value the assets of your IRA, plan or other account annually or more frequently. You should note that an investment in shares of our common stock will not, in itself, create a retirement plan and that, in order to create a retirement plan, you must comply with all applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (Internal Revenue Code).

 

Q: Is there any minimum investment required?

 

A: The minimum investment generally is 250 shares. You may not transfer any of your shares if such transfer would result in your owning less than the minimum investment amount, unless you transfer all of your shares. In addition, you may not transfer or subdivide your shares so as to retain less than the number of shares required for the minimum purchase. In order to satisfy the minimum purchase requirements for retirement plans, unless otherwise prohibited by state law, a husband and wife may jointly contribute funds from their separate IRAs, provided that each such contribution is made in increments of $1,000.

After you have purchased the minimum investment amount in this offering or have satisfied the minimum purchase requirement of any other Cole-sponsored public real estate program, any additional purchase must be in increments of at least 100 shares or made pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan, which may be in lesser amounts.

 

Q: How do I subscribe for shares?

 

A: If you choose to purchase shares in this offering, in addition to reading this prospectus, you will need to complete and sign a subscription agreement, similar to the one contained in this prospectus as Appendix B (Appendix E for investors in Alabama), for a specific number of shares and pay for the shares at the time you subscribe. After you become a stockholder, you may purchase additional shares by completing and signing an additional investment subscription agreement, similar to the one contained in this prospectus as Appendix C (Appendix F for investors in Alabama).

 

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Q: Who is the transfer agent?

 

A: The name, address and telephone number of our transfer agent is as follows:

DST Systems, Inc.

P.O. Box 219312

Kansas City, Missouri 64121-9312

(866) 907-2653

To ensure that any account changes are made promptly and accurately, all changes, including your address, ownership type and distribution mailing address, should be directed to the transfer agent.

 

Q: Will I be notified of how my investment is doing?

 

A: Yes. We will provide you with periodic updates on the performance of your investment with us, including:

 

   

three quarterly financial reports;

 

   

an annual report;

 

   

a annual Form 1099;

 

   

supplements to the prospectus during the offering period; and

 

   

notification to Maryland residents regarding the sources of their distributions if such distributions are not entirely from our funds from operations, which will be sent via U.S. mail in connection with every third monthly distribution statement and/or check, as applicable.

Except as set forth above, we will provide this information to you via one or more of the following methods, in our discretion and with your consent, if necessary:

 

   

U.S. mail or other courier;

 

   

facsimile;

 

   

electronic delivery, including email and/or CD-ROM; or

 

   

posting, or providing a link, on our affiliated website, which is www.colecapital.com.

 

Q: When will I get my detailed tax information?

 

A: Your Form 1099 tax information will be placed in the mail by January 31 of each year.

 

Q: Who can help answer my questions?

 

A: If you have more questions about the offering or if you would like additional copies of this prospectus, you should contact your registered representative or contact:

Cole Capital Corporation

2325 E. Camelback Road, Suite 1100

Phoenix, Arizona 85016

(866) 907-2653

Attn: Investor Services

www.colecapital.com

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This prospectus summary highlights some of the material information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. Because it is a summary, it may not contain all of the information that is important to you. To understand this offering fully, you should read the entire prospectus carefully, including the “Risk Factors” section and the financial statements, before making a decision to invest in our common stock.

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.

Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc. is a Maryland corporation, formed on July 27, 2010, which intends to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes beginning with the taxable year ending December 31, 2012. We intend to use substantially all of the net proceeds from this offering to acquire and operate a diversified portfolio of core commercial real estate investments primarily consisting of necessity retail properties located throughout the United States, including U.S. protectorates. Our retail properties primarily have been and will be single-tenant properties and multi-tenant “power centers” anchored by large, creditworthy national or regional retailers. Our retail properties typically are and we expect that they will continue to be subject to long-term triple net or double net leases, which means the tenant will be obligated to pay for most of the expenses of maintaining the property. Frequently, our leases will be guaranteed by the tenant’s corporate parent. Through our investments in core commercial real estate, we expect to achieve a relatively predictable and stable stream of income, which will provide a principal source of return for our investors in our common stock, and the potential for capital appreciation in the value of our real estate assets.

We also may invest in other income-producing properties, such as office and industrial properties which may share certain core characteristics with our retail investments, such as a principal creditworthy tenant, a long-term net lease, and a strategic location. We believe investments in these types of office and industrial properties are consistent with our goal of providing investors with a relatively stable stream of current income and an opportunity for capital appreciation.

In addition, we may further diversify our portfolio by making and investing in mortgage, mezzanine, bridge and other loans secured, directly or indirectly, by the same types of properties that we may acquire directly. We also may acquire majority or minority interests in other entities (or business units of such entities) with investment objectives similar to ours or with management, investment or development capabilities that our advisor deems desirable or advantageous to acquire. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Investment Objectives and Policies — Acquisition and Investment Policies” for a more detailed discussion of all of the types of investments we may make.

We believe that our sponsor’s experience in assembling real estate portfolios, which principally focus on national and regional creditworthy tenants subject to long-term leases, will provide us with a competitive advantage. We believe that another competitive advantage is our ability to purchase properties for cash and to close transactions quickly. Cole Capital Corporation, the broker-dealer affiliate of our sponsor, raised approximately $4.8 billion on behalf of CCPT III in CCPT III’s public offerings, and we expect that, through its well-developed distribution capabilities and relationships with other broker-dealers, Cole Capital Corporation will be successful in raising capital on our behalf in this offering.

Our offices are located at 2325 East Camelback Road, Suite 1100, Phoenix, Arizona 85016. Our telephone number is 866-907-2653. Our fax number is 877-616-1118, and the e-mail address of our investor relations department is investorservices@colecapital.com.

Additional information about us and our affiliates may be obtained at www.colecapital.com, but the contents of that site are not incorporated by reference in or otherwise a part of this prospectus.

 

 

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Our Sponsor and our Advisor

Our sponsor is Cole Real Estate Investments, a trade name we use to refer to a group of affiliated entities directly or indirectly controlled by Christopher H. Cole, including Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners and other affiliates of our advisor. Our advisor, CR IV Advisors, a Delaware limited liability company, is responsible for managing our affairs on a day-to-day basis, identifying and making acquisitions and investments on our behalf, and recommending to our board of directors an approach for providing our investors with liquidity. Our chairman, chief executive officer and president, Christopher H. Cole, is the indirect sole owner of our advisor. See “— Summary of Prior Offerings” below. Our advisor will use its best efforts, subject to the oversight of our board of directors, to, among other things, manage our portfolio. Management of our portfolio will include making decisions about the active management of our portfolio, including decisions to acquire or dispose of real estate assets. Our advisor is responsible for identifying and acquiring potential real estate investments of our behalf. All acquisitions of commercial properties will be evaluated for the reliability and stability of their future income, as well as for their potential for capital appreciation. We expect that our advisor will consider the risk profile, credit quality and reputation of potential tenants and the impact of each particular acquisition as it relates to the portfolio as a whole. Our board of directors has delegated to our advisor broad authority to manage our business in accordance with our investment objectives, strategy, guidelines, policies and limitations; provided, however, that our board of directors will exercise its fiduciary duties to our stockholders by overseeing our advisor’s investment process.

Our Dealer Manager

Cole Capital Corporation, which we refer to as our dealer manager, is an affiliate of our sponsor and a member of FINRA. Our dealer manager has distributed shares of many of our sponsor’s prior real estate programs, and has built relationships with a large number of broker-dealers throughout the country, which participated in some or all of those prior offerings. Our dealer manager will distribute the shares of our common stock on a “best efforts” basis, and will advise us regarding this offering, manage our relationships with participating broker-dealers and financial advisors and provide assistance in connection with compliance matters relating to the offering, including compliance regarding any sales literature that we may prepare.

Our Board of Directors

We operate under the direction of our board of directors, the members of which are accountable to us and our stockholders as fiduciaries. We have five directors, Christopher H. Cole, Lawrence S. Jones, J. Marc Myers, Marc T. Nemer and Scott P. Sealy, Sr. Three of our directors, Messrs. Jones, Myers and Sealy, are each independent directors. Our charter requires that a majority of our directors be independent of our advisor. Our charter also provides that our independent directors will be responsible for reviewing the performance of our advisor and determining the compensation paid to our advisor and its affiliates is reasonable. See the “Conflicts of Interest — Certain Conflict Resolution Procedures” section of this prospectus. Our directors will be elected annually by our stockholders.

Investment Objectives

Our primary investment objectives are:

 

   

to acquire quality commercial real estate properties, net leased under long-term leases to creditworthy tenants, which provide current operating cash flows;

 

   

to provide reasonably stable, current income for you through the payment of cash distributions; and

 

   

to provide the opportunity to participate in capital appreciation in the value of our investments.

See the “Investment Objectives and Policies” section of this prospectus for a more complete description of our investment objectives and policies, and investment restrictions. We may not achieve our investment objectives. See “— Summary Risk Factors” below.

 

 

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Summary Risk Factors

Following are some of the risks relating to your investment:

 

   

The amount of distributions we may pay is uncertain. Due to the risks involved in the ownership of real estate, there is no guarantee of any return on your investment in our common stock, and you may lose your investment.

 

   

We are a “blind pool,” as we have not identified all of the properties we intend to purchase with the proceeds of this offering, and we have a limited operating history.

 

   

This investment has limited liquidity. No public market currently exists, and one may never exist, for shares of our common stock. If you are able to sell your shares, you would likely have to sell them at a substantial discount to their market value.

 

   

You should consider an investment in our common stock a long-term investment. If we do not successfully implement our exit strategy, you may suffer losses on your investment, or your shares may continue to have limited liquidity.

 

   

The offering price for our shares is not intended to reflect the book value or net asset value of our investments, or our expected cash flow. Until such time as our shares are valued by our board of directors, the price of our shares is not intended to reflect the net asset value of our shares.

 

   

We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, including borrowings and proceeds from the sale of our securities or asset sales, and we have no limits on the amounts we may pay from such other sources. Payments of distributions from sources other than cash flows from operations may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in real estate and may negatively impact the value of your investment. As a result, the amount of distributions paid at any time may not reflect the current performance of our properties or our current operating cash flows.

 

   

This is a “best efforts” offering. If we are not able to raise a substantial amount of capital in the near term, we may have difficulties investing in properties and our ability to achieve our investment objectives could be adversely affected.

 

   

There are substantial conflicts of interest between us and our advisor and its affiliates. Key persons associated with our advisor perform similar duties for other Cole-sponsored programs that may use investment strategies similar to ours creating potential conflicts of interest when allocating investment opportunities. In addition, our advisor and its affiliates have substantial discretion in managing our operations, and we pay them substantial fees.

 

   

Although you will be provided with information about our investments after the investments have been made, you will be unable to evaluate the economic merit of future investments, including how the proceeds from this offering will be invested. This makes an investment in our shares speculative.

 

   

Our board of directors may change our investment objectives and certain investment policies without stockholder approval.

 

   

We have incurred, and expect to continue to incur debt, which could adversely impact your investment if the value of the property securing the debt falls or if we are forced to refinance the debt during adverse economic conditions.

 

   

We may suffer from delays in our advisor locating suitable investments, which could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions and the value of your investment.

 

   

If we fail to qualify as a REIT, cash available for distributions to be paid to you could decrease materially.

 

   

For qualified accounts, if an investment in our shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA, you may be subject to the imposition of significant excise taxes and penalties with respect to the amount invested.

 

 

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Before you invest in us, you should carefully read and consider the more detailed “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus.

Description of Real Estate Investments

As of October 3, 2012, our investment portfolio consisted of 32 properties located in 15 states, consisting of approximately 582,000 gross rentable square feet of commercial space. Our properties as of October 3, 2012 are listed below in order of their date of acquisition.

 

Property Description

  Type   Number of
Tenants
   

Tenant(s)

  Rentable
Square
Feet
    Purchase Price  

Advance Auto Parts –
North Ridgeville, OH(1)

  Automotive Parts     1    

Advance Stores Company, Inc.

    6,000      $ 1,673,000   

PetSmart –
Wilkesboro, NC(1)

  Specialty Retail     1     

PetSmart Inc.

    12,259        2,650,000   

Nordstrom Rack –
Tampa, FL

  Department Store     1    

Nordstrom, Inc.

    44,925        11,998,039   

Walgreens – Blair, NE

  Drugstore     1    

Walgreens Co.

    14,820        4,242,424   

CVS – Corpus Christi, TX

  Drugstore     1     

CVS EGL South Alameda TX, LP

    11,306        3,400,000   

CVS – Charleston, SC

  Drugstore     1     

South Carolina CVS Pharmacy, LLC

    10,125        2,137,778   

CVS – Asheville, NC

  Drugstore     1     

North Carolina CVS Pharmacy, LLC

    10,125        2,365,249   

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Brownfield, TX

  Automotive     1     

O’Reilly Automotive Stores, Inc.

    6,365        965,447   

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Columbus, TX

  Automotive     1     

O’Reilly Automotive Stores, Inc.

    6,047        1,130,213   

Walgreens – Suffolk, VA

  Drugstore     1     

Walgreen, Co.

    14,820        4,925,000   

Walgreens –
Springfield, IL

  Drugstore     1     

Walgreen, Co.

    14,820        5,223,000   

Walgreens –
Montgomery, AL

  Drugstore     1     

Walgreen, Co.

    14,820        4,477,000   

Tractor Supply –
Cambridge, MN

  Home Improvement     1     

Tractor Supply Company

    18,000        2,245,000   

HEB Center –
Waxahachie, TX

  Shopping Center     6     

Various

    82,458        13,000,000   

CVS – Bainbridge, GA

  Drugstore     1     

Georgia CVS Pharmacy, LLC

    10,125        2,650,000   

Advance Auto –
Starkville, MS

  Automotive     1     

Advance Stores Company, Inc.

    6,129        1,344,964   

AutoZone –
Philipsburg, PA

  Automotive     1     

AutoZone Northeast, Inc.

    7,380        1,620,000   

Benihana Portfolio –
Various(2)

  Restaurant     4     

Various

    36,911        17,335,757   

Wawa – Cape May, NJ

  Convenience Store     1     

Wawa, Inc.

    5,594        7,639,896   

Wawa – Galloway, NJ

  Convenience Store     1     

Wawa, Inc.

    5,605        8,123,926   

Stripes Portfolio I –
Various(3)

  Convenience Store     3     

Stripes LLC

    14,216        8,228,130   

Stripes Portfolio II –
Various(4)

  Convenience Store     3     

Town & Country Food Stores, Inc.

    11,433        16,936,887   

Pick’n Save –
Sheboygan, WI

  Grocery     1     

Roundy’s Supermarkets, Inc.

    70,072        14,122,000   

The Marquis –
Williamsburg, VA

  Shopping Center     2     

Kohl’s Department Stores, Inc./Dick’s Sporting Goods, Inc.

    134,911        14,260,000   

Golden Corral –
Garland, TX

  Restaurant     1     

Golden Corral Corporation

    12,763        3,903,000   
       

 

 

   

 

 

 
          582,029      $ 156,596,710   
       

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

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(1) These properties were acquired by purchasing 100% of the membership interests in Cole AA North Ridgeville OH, LLC (AA North Ridgeville) and Cole PM Wilkesboro NC, LLC (PM Wilkesboro), respectively, each a Delaware limited liability company, from Series C, LLC (Series C), an affiliate of our advisor. AA North Ridgeville and PM Wilkesboro owned, as their only asset, single tenant retail buildings located in North Ridgeville, OH and Wilkesboro, NC, respectively. Series C had acquired these properties for the purpose of holding them temporarily until we were able to raise sufficient proceeds in our public offering to acquire them from Series C at its acquisition cost (including acquisition related expenses). A majority of our board of directors (including a majority of our independent directors) not otherwise interested in the transactions approved the acquisitions as being fair and reasonable to us and determined that the cost to us of each property was equal to the cost of the respective property to Series C (including acquisition related expenses). In addition, the purchase price of each property, exclusive of closing costs, was less than the current appraised value of the respective property as determined by an independent third party appraiser.
(2) The Benihana Portfolio consists of four single-tenant commercial properties located in Florida, Illinois, Minnesota and Texas, which were purchased under individual sale-leaseback agreements with Benihana National of Florida Corp., Benihana Lombard Corp., The Samurai, Inc. and Benihana Woodlands Corp., respectively, as tenants. The properties are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.
(3) The Stripes Portfolio I consists of three single-tenant commercial properties located in Texas, which are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.
(4) The Stripes Portfolio II consists of three single-tenant commercial properties located in Texas, which are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.

 

Borrowing Policy

Our charter limits our aggregate borrowings to 75% of the cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) of our gross assets, unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in the next quarterly report along with the justification for such excess borrowing. Our board of directors has adopted a policy to further limit our borrowings to 60% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our gross assets, unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in the next quarterly report along with the justification for such excess borrowing. There is no limitation on the amount we may borrow against any single improved property.

 

 

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Estimated Use of Proceeds of This Offering

Depending primarily on the number of shares we sell in this offering and assuming all shares sold under our distribution reinvestment plan are sold at $9.50 per share, we estimate for each share sold in this offering that between approximately 88.1% (assuming all shares available under our distribution reinvestment plan are sold) and approximately 86.7% (assuming no shares available under our distribution reinvestment plan are sold) of gross offering proceeds will be available for the purchase of real estate and other real estate-related investments, including repayment of any indebtedness incurred in respect of such purchases. We will use the remainder of the offering proceeds to pay the costs of the offering, including selling commissions and the dealer manager fee, and fees and expenses of our advisor in connection with acquiring properties. We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from proceeds raised in this offering in anticipation of future cash flows, and we have not placed a limit on the amount of net proceeds we may use to pay distributions. We will not pay selling commissions or a dealer manager fee on shares sold under our distribution reinvestment plan. The table below sets forth our estimated use of proceeds from this offering:

 

     Maximum Offering
(Including Distribution
Reinvestment Plan)
    Maximum Offering
(Not Including Distribution
Reinvestment Plan)
 
     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent  

Gross Offering Proceeds

   $ 2,975,000,000         100   $ 2,500,000,000         100

Less Public Offering Expenses:

          

Selling Commissions and Dealer Manager Fee

     225,000,000         7.6     225,000,000         9.0

Other Organization and Offering Expenses

     59,500,000         2.0     50,000,000         2.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount Available for Investment

     2,690,500,000         90.4     2,225,000,000         89.0

Acquisition and Development:

          

Acquisition Fee

     52,446,394         1.8     43,372,320         1.8

Acquisition Expenses

     13,111,598         0.4     10,843,080         0.4

Initial Working Capital Reserve

     2,622,320         0.1     2,168,616         0.1
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount Invested in Assets

   $ 2,622,319,688         88.1   $ 2,168,615,984         86.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

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Conflicts of Interest

Our advisor will experience potential conflicts of interest in connection with the management of our business affairs, including the following:

 

   

Our advisor and its affiliates will receive substantial fees in connection with the services provided to us, and, while those fees are approved on an annual basis by our independent directors, the approval process may be impacted by the fact that our stockholders invested with the understanding and expectation that an affiliate of Cole Real Estate Investments would act as our advisor;

 

   

The management personnel of our advisor, each of whom also makes investment decisions for other Cole-sponsored programs, must determine which investment opportunities to recommend to us or another Cole-sponsored program or joint venture, many of which have investment objectives similar to ours, and such persons must determine how to allocate their time and other resources among us and the other Cole-sponsored programs; and

 

   

We have retained Cole Realty Advisors, Inc. (Cole Realty Advisors), an affiliate of our advisor, to manage and lease some or all of our properties.

Our executive officers and the chairman of our board of directors also will face conflicts similar to those described above because of their affiliation with our advisor and other Cole-sponsored programs. See the “Conflicts of Interest” section of this prospectus for a detailed discussion of the various conflicts of interest relating to your investment, as well as the procedures that we have established to mitigate a number of these potential conflicts.

The following chart shows the ownership structure of the various Cole entities that are affiliated with our advisor immediately prior to this offering.

 

LOGO

 

(1) Cole Holdings Corporation, an affiliate of our sponsor, currently owns 20,000 shares of our common stock, which represents less than 0.2% of the outstanding shares of common stock, as of October 3, 2012. As we continue to admit investors in this offering, this percentage will be reduced. Pursuant to our charter, Cole Holdings Corporation is prohibited from selling the 20,000 shares of our common stock for so long as Cole Real Estate Investments remains our sponsor; provided, however, that Cole Holdings Corporation may transfer ownership of all or a portion of the 20,000 shares of our common stock to other affiliates of our sponsor.

 

 

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(2) CR IV Advisors currently owns less than 0.01% limited partner interest in our operating partnership. As we continue to admit investors in this offering, that limited partner interest will be reduced. CR IV Advisors is a disregarded entity for federal tax purposes, and its activity will be reported on the federal tax return of Cole Holdings Corporation.

 

(3) Our operating partnership will file its own federal tax return, separate from our federal tax return.

Summary of Prior Offerings

The “Prior Performance Summary” section of this prospectus contains a discussion of the programs sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments from January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2011. Certain financial results and other information relating to such programs with investment objectives similar to ours are also provided in the “Prior Performance Tables” included as Appendix A to this prospectus. The prior performance of the programs previously sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments is not necessarily indicative of the results that we will achieve. For example, most of the prior programs were privately offered and did not bear the additional costs associated with being a publicly held entity. Therefore, you should not assume that you will experience returns comparable to those experienced by investors in prior real estate programs sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments.

Concurrent Offerings

Our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments, is sponsoring CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy, both of which are currently raising capital pursuant to initial public offerings of shares of their common stock. For additional information regarding concurrent offerings sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Conflicts of Interest — Interests in Other Real Estate Programs and Other Concurrent Offerings.”

The Offering

We are offering up to 250,000,000 shares of common stock in our primary offering on a “best efforts” basis at $10.00 per share. Discounts are available for certain categories of purchasers, as described in the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus. We also are offering under this prospectus up to 50,000,000 additional shares of common stock under our distribution reinvestment plan at a purchase price of $9.50 per share during this offering, and until such time as our board of directors determines a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares. Thereafter, the purchase price per share under our distribution reinvestment plan will be the most recent estimated value per share as determined by our board of directors as described in the “Summary of Distribution Reinvestment Plan” section of this prospectus. We reserve the right to reallocate the shares of common stock we are offering between our primary offering and our distribution reinvestment plan. We will offer shares of common stock in our primary offering until the earlier of January 26, 2014, which is two years from the effective date of this offering, or the date we sell 300,000,000 shares; provided, however, that our board of directors may terminate this offering at any time or extend the offering. If we decide to extend the primary offering beyond two years from the date of this prospectus, we will provide that information in a prospectus supplement; however, in no event will we extend this offering beyond 180 days after the third anniversary of the initial effective date. Nothing in our organizational documents prohibits us from engaging in additional subsequent public offerings of our stock. We may sell shares under the distribution reinvestment plan beyond the termination of our primary offering until we have sold 50,000,000 shares through the reinvestment of distributions, but only if there is an effective registration statement with respect to the shares. Pursuant to the Securities Act, and in some states, we may not be able to continue the offering for these periods without filing a new registration statement, or in the case of shares sold under the distribution reinvestment plan, renew or extend the registration statement in such state.

 

 

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The registration statement for our initial public offering of 300,000,000 shares of common stock was declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 26, 2012. On April 13, 2012, we satisfied the general conditions of our escrow agreement and issued 308,206 shares of our common stock in the offering, resulting in gross proceeds of approximately $3.1 million. As of October 3, 2012, we had accepted investors’ subscriptions for, and issued, approximately 16.1 million shares of our common stock in the offering, resulting in gross proceeds to us of approximately $160.3 million.

Compensation to Our Advisor and its Affiliates

Our advisor and its affiliates will receive compensation and reimbursement for services relating to this offering and the investment, management and disposition of our assets. All of the items of compensation are summarized in the table below. We will not pay a separate fee for financing, leasing or property management, although we may rely on our advisor or its affiliates to provide such services to us. See the “Management Compensation” section of this prospectus for a more detailed description of the compensation we will pay to our advisor and its affiliates. The selling commissions and dealer manager fee may vary for different categories of purchasers. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus for a more detailed discussion of the selling commissions and dealer manager fees we will pay. The table below assumes the shares are sold through distribution channels associated with the highest possible selling commissions and dealer manager fees, and accounts for the fact that shares are sold through our distribution reinvestment plan at $9.50 per share with no selling commissions and no dealer manager fee.

 

Type of Compensation

  

Determination of Amount

  

Estimated Amount for

Maximum Offering

Offering Stage

Selling Commissions

   We generally will pay to our affiliated dealer manager, Cole Capital Corporation, 7% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering. Cole Capital Corporation will reallow 100% of the selling commissions to participating broker-dealers. We will not pay any selling commissions with respect to sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.    $175,000,000

Dealer Manager Fee

   We generally will pay to Cole Capital Corporation 2% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering. Cole Capital Corporation may reallow all or a portion of its dealer manager fee to participating broker-dealers. We will not pay a dealer manager fee with respect to sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.   

$50,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

Reimbursement of Other Organization and
Offering Expenses

   Our advisor, CR IV Advisors, will incur or pay our organization and offering expenses (excluding selling commissions and the dealer manager fee). We will then reimburse our advisor for these amounts up to 2.0% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.   

$59,500,000

Of the $59,500,000, we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $25,000,000 (1.0% of the gross offering proceeds of our primary offering, or 0.8% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from shares issued under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover offering expenses that are deemed to be underwriting expenses, and we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $34,500,000 (1.2% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover non-underwriting organization and offering expenses.

 

 

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Type of Compensation

  

Determination of Amount

    

Estimated Amount for

Maximum Offering

Acquisition and Operations Stage

Acquisition Fee

   We will pay to our advisor 2% of: (i) the contract purchase price of each property or asset; (ii) the amount paid in respect of the development, construction or improvement of each asset we acquire; (iii) the purchase price of any loan we acquire; and (iv) the principal amount of any loan we originate.             $52,446,394 assuming no debt or $209,785,575 assuming leverage of 75% of the contract purchase price.

Advisory Fee

  

We will pay to our advisor a monthly advisory fee based upon our monthly average invested assets. Monthly average invested assets will equal the average book value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by our real estate, before reserves for depreciation and amortization or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves, other than impairment charges, computed by taking the average of such values at the end of each business day, over the course of the month. After our board of directors begins to determine the estimated per share value of our common stock, the monthly advisory fee will be based upon the value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by our real estate as determined by our board of directors.

 

The advisory fee will be calculated according to the following fee schedule:

                 

   

   The annualized advisory fee rate, and the actual dollar amounts, are dependent upon the amount of our monthly average invested assets and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. Based on the following assumed levels of monthly average invested assets, our annualized advisory fee will be as follows:
       

Monthly

Average

Invested

Assets

 

Annualized 
Effective 
Fee Rate

 

Annualized
Advisory
Fee

      $1 billion   0.75%   $  7,500,000
      $2 billion   0.75%   $15,000,000
      $3 billion   0.7333%   $22,000,000
      $4 billion   0.7250%   $29,000,000
      $5 billion   0.7100%   $35,500,000
    

Monthly

Average

Invested

Assets Range

 

Annualized

Fee Rate for

Each Range

              
  

$0 — $2 billion

    0.75%           
  

over $2 billion — $4 billion

    0.70%           
  

over $4 billion

    0.65%           

 

 

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Type of Compensation

  

Determination of Amount

  

Estimated Amount for Maximum Offering

Operating Expenses

  

We will reimburse our advisor for acquisition expenses incurred in acquiring each property or in the origination or acquisition of a loan. We expect these expenses to be approximately 0.5% of the purchase price of each property or the amount of each loan; provided, however, that acquisition expenses are not included in the contract purchase price of a property.

 

We will also reimburse our advisor for the expenses incurred in connection with its provision of advisory and administrative services, including related personnel costs and payments to third party service providers; provided, however, that we will not reimburse our advisor for the salaries and benefits paid to our personnel in connection with services for which our advisor receives acquisition fees, and we will not reimburse our advisor for salaries and benefits paid to our executive officers.

   $13,111,598 estimated for reimbursement of acquisition expenses assuming no debt or $43,048,000 estimated for reimbursement of acquisition expenses assuming leverage of 75% of the contract purchase price. For all other reimbursements, actual amounts are dependent upon the expenses incurred and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time.

Liquidation/Listing Stage

Disposition Fee

   For substantial assistance in connection with the sale of properties, we will pay our advisor or its affiliates an amount equal to up to one-half of the brokerage commission paid on the sale of property, not to exceed 1% of the contract price of the property sold; provided, however, in no event may the disposition fee paid to our advisor or its affiliates, when added to the real estate commissions paid to unaffiliated third parties, exceed the lesser of the customary competitive real estate commission or an amount equal to 6% of the contract sales price.    Actual amounts are dependent upon the contract price of properties sold and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. Because the disposition fee is based on a fixed percentage of the contract price for sold properties the actual amount of the disposition fees cannot be determined at the present time.

Subordinated Performance Fee

   After investors have received a return of their net capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return, then our advisor will be entitled to receive 15% of the remaining net sale proceeds. We cannot assure you that we will provide this 8% return, which we have disclosed solely as a measure for our advisor’s incentive compensation. We will pay a subordinated fee under only one of the following events: (i) if our shares are listed on a national securities exchange; (ii) if our company is sold or our assets are liquidated; or (iii) upon termination of the advisory agreement.    Actual amounts are dependent upon results of operations and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. There is no limit on the aggregate amount of these payments.

Distributions

To qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we are required to, among other things, make aggregate annual distributions to our stockholders of at least 90% of our annual taxable income (which does not necessarily equal net income as calculated in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (GAAP)). Our board of directors may authorize distributions in excess of those required for us to maintain REIT status, depending on our present and reasonably projected future cash flow from operations and such other factors as our board of directors deems relevant. We have not established a minimum distribution level. Distributions are paid to our stockholders as of the record date or dates selected by our board of directors. We expect that our board of directors will continue to declare distributions with a daily record date, and pay distributions monthly in arrears. In the event we do not have sufficient cash flow from operations to make distributions, we may borrow, use proceeds from this offering, issue additional securities or sell assets in order to

 

 

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fund distributions, and we have no limits on the amounts we may pay from such other sources. Payments of distributions from sources other than cash flows from operations may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in properties, and negatively impact the value of your investment. As a result, the amount of distributions paid at any time may not reflect the performance of our properties or our current operating cash flow.

Liquidity Opportunities

Our board of directors will consider future liquidity opportunities, which may include the sale of our company, the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, a merger or similar transaction, the listing of our shares of common stock for trading on a national securities exchange or an alternative strategy that will result in a significant increase in the opportunities for stockholders to dispose of their shares. We expect to engage in a strategy to provide our investors with liquidity at a time and in a method recommended by our advisor and determined by our independent directors to be in the best interests of our stockholders. As we are unable to determine what macro- or micro-economic factors may affect the decisions our board of directors make in the future with respect to any potential liquidity opportunity, we have not selected a fixed time period or determined criteria for any such decisions. As a result, while our board of directors will consider a variety of options to provide stockholders with liquidity throughout the life of this program, there is no requirement that we commence any such action on or before a specified date. Stockholder approval would be required for the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or the sale or merger of our company.

Distribution Reinvestment Plan

Our board of directors has approved a distribution reinvestment plan, pursuant to which you may have the distributions you receive from us reinvested in additional shares of our common stock. The purchase price per share under our distribution reinvestment plan will be $9.50 per share during this offering and until such time as our board of directors determines a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares. Thereafter, the purchase price per share under our distribution reinvestment plan will be the most recent estimated value per share as determined by our board of directors. No sales commissions or dealer manager fees are paid with respect to shares sold under our distribution reinvestment plan.

If you participate in the distribution reinvestment plan, you will not receive the cash from your distributions, other than special distributions that are designated by our board of directors. As a result, you may have a tax liability with respect to your share of our taxable income, but you will not receive cash distributions to pay such liability.

Share Redemption Program

Our board of directors has adopted a share redemption program to enable you to sell your shares to us in limited circumstances. Our share redemption program would permit you to sell your shares back to us after you have held them for at least one year, subject to the significant conditions and limitations summarized below and described in more detail in the section captioned “Description of Shares — Share Redemption Program.”

Our share redemption program includes numerous restrictions that limit your ability to sell your shares. Generally, you must have held your shares for at least one year in order to participate in our share redemption program. Subject to funds being available, we will further limit the number of shares redeemed pursuant to our share redemption program as follows: (1) we will not redeem in excess of 5% of the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the trailing 12 months prior to the end of the fiscal quarter for which the redemptions are being paid (provided, however, that while shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will be included in calculating the maximum number of shares that may be redeemed, shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will not be subject to the percentage cap); and (2) funding for the redemption of shares will be limited to the net proceeds we receive from the sale of shares

 

 

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under our distribution reinvestment plan. In an effort to accommodate redemption requests throughout the calendar year, we intend to limit quarterly redemptions to approximately 1.25% of the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the trailing 12-month period ending on the last day of the fiscal quarter (provided, however, that while shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will be included in calculating the maximum number of shares that may be redeemed, shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will not be subject to the percentage cap), and funding for redemptions for each quarter generally will be limited to the net proceeds we receive from the sale of shares in the respective quarter under our distribution reinvestment plan; however, our board of directors may waive these quarterly limitations in its sole discretion, subject to the 5% cap on the number of shares we may redeem during the respective trailing 12 month period. Any of the foregoing limits might prevent us from accommodating all redemption requests made in any quarter, in which case we will give priority to the redemption of deceased stockholders’ shares, then to requests for full redemption of accounts with a balance of 250 shares or less, and then the remaining redemption requests will be honored on a pro rata basis. Following such redemption period, if you would like to resubmit the unsatisfied portion of the prior redemption request for redemption, you must submit a new request for redemption of such shares prior to the last day of the new quarter. Unfulfilled requests for redemption will not be carried over automatically to subsequent redemption periods.

During the term of this offering, and until such time as our board of directors determines a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares, the redemption price per share (other than for shares purchased pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan) will depend on the price you paid for your shares and the length of time you have held such shares as follows: after one year from the purchase date, 95% of the amount you paid for each share; after two years from the purchase date, 97.5% of the amount you paid for each share; and after three years from the purchase date, 100% of the amount you paid for each share. During this time period, the redemption price for shares purchased pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan will be 100% of the amount you paid for each share. After such time as our board of directors has determined a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares, the per share redemption price (other than for shares purchased pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan) will depend on the length of time you have held such shares as follows: after one year from the purchase date, 95% of the most recent estimated value of each share; after two years from the purchase date, 97.5% of the most recent estimated value of each share; and after three years from the purchase date, 100% of the most recent estimated value of each share. During this time period, the redemption price for shares purchased pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan will be 100% of the most recent estimated value of each share.

Upon receipt of a request for redemption, we may conduct a Uniform Commercial Code search to ensure that no liens are held against the shares. We will bear any costs in conducting the Uniform Commercial Code search. We will not redeem any shares that are subject to a lien.

Our board of directors may amend, suspend or terminate the share redemption program at any time upon 30 days notice to our stockholders.

Cole Operating Partnership IV, LP

We are structured as an “umbrella partnership real estate investment trust” (UPREIT). As such, we expect to own substantially all of our assets through Cole Operating Partnership IV, LP (CCPT IV OP), our operating partnership. We may, however, own assets directly, through subsidiaries of CCPT IV OP or through other entities. We are the sole general partner of CCPT IV OP, and our advisor is the initial limited partner of CCPT IV OP.

ERISA Considerations

You may make an investment in our shares through your IRA or other tax-deferred retirement account. However, any retirement plan trustee or individual considering purchasing shares for a retirement plan or an individual retirement account should read the “Investment by Tax-Exempt Entities and ERISA Considerations” section of this prospectus very carefully.

 

 

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Description of Shares

Uncertificated Shares

Under our charter, we are authorized to issue shares of our common stock without certificates unless our board of directors determines otherwise. Therefore, we do not intend to issue shares of common stock in certificated form. Our transfer agent will maintain a stock ledger that contains the name and address of each stockholder and the number of shares that the stockholder holds. Stockholders wishing to transfer shares of our stock may request an application for transfer by contacting us. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Where You Can Find More Information.” With respect to transfers of uncertificated stock, we will continue to treat the stockholder registered on our stock ledger as the owner of the shares until the record owner and the new owner deliver a properly executed application for transfer to our transfer agent at the address set forth in the application for transfer. Any questions regarding the transferability of shares should be directed to our transfer agent, whose contact information is set forth on page 6 of this prospectus and in the application for transfer.

Stockholder Voting Rights and Limitations

We will hold annual meetings of our stockholders for the purpose of electing our directors and conducting other business matters that may be properly presented at such meetings. We may also call special meetings of stockholders from time to time. You are entitled to one vote for each share of common stock you own.

Restriction on Share Ownership

Our charter contains restrictions on ownership of the shares that prevent any one person from owning more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares or more than 9.8% (in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive), of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of common stock, unless exempted by our board of directors. These restrictions are designed, among other purposes, to enable us to comply with ownership restrictions imposed on REITs by the Internal Revenue Code. These restrictions may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders. For a more complete description of the restrictions on the ownership of our shares, see the “Description of Shares” section of this prospectus. Our charter also limits your ability to transfer your shares unless the transferee meets the minimum suitability standards regarding income and/or net worth and the transfer complies with our minimum purchase requirements, which are described in the “Suitability Standards” section of this prospectus.

Investment Company Act Considerations

We intend to conduct our operations, and the operations of our operating partnership, and any other subsidiaries, so that no such entity meets the definition of an “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act. Under the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, a company is an “investment company” if:

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(A), it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities; or

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(C), it is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis. “Investment securities” excludes U.S. Government securities and securities of majority owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

We intend to acquire a diversified portfolio of income-producing real estate assets; however, our portfolio may include, to a much lesser extent, other real estate-related investments. We also may acquire real estate assets

 

 

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through investments in joint venture entities, including joint venture entities in which we may not own a controlling interest. We anticipate that our assets generally will be held in wholly and majority-owned subsidiaries of the company, each formed to hold a particular asset. We intend to monitor our operations and our assets on an ongoing basis in order to ensure that neither we, nor any of our subsidiaries, meet the definition of “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act.

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our common stock involves various risks and uncertainties. You should carefully consider the following risk factors in conjunction with the other information contained in this prospectus before purchasing our common stock. The risks discussed in this prospectus can adversely affect our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition, and cause the value of your investment to decline. The risks and uncertainties discussed below are not the only ones we face but do represent those risks and uncertainties that we believe are most significant to our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition. You should carefully consider these risks together with all of the other information included in this prospectus before you decide to purchase any shares of our common stock.

Risks Related to an Investment in Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.

We have a limited operating history. Further, we are considered to be a “blind pool,” as we currently have not identified all of the properties we intend to purchase. For this and other reasons, an investment in our shares is speculative.

We are a newly formed entity with limited operating history. Since we currently have not identified all of the properties we intend to purchase with future offering proceeds, we are considered to be a “blind pool.” You will not be able to evaluate the economic merit of our future investments until after such investments have been made. As a result, an investment in our shares is speculative.

You should consider our prospects in light of the risks, uncertainties and difficulties frequently encountered by companies that are, like us, in their early stages of development. To be successful in this market, we and our advisor must, among other things:

 

   

identify and acquire investments that further our investment objectives;

 

   

increase awareness of the Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc. name within the investment products market;

 

   

expand and maintain our network of licensed broker-dealers and others who sell shares on our behalf and other agents;

 

   

rely on our advisor and its affiliates to attract, integrate, motivate and retain qualified personnel to manage our day-to-day operations;

 

   

respond to competition for our targeted real estate and other investments as well as for potential investors;

 

   

rely on our advisor and its affiliates to continue to build and expand our operations structure to support our business; and

 

   

be continuously aware of, and interpret, marketing trends and conditions.

We may not succeed in achieving these goals, and our failure to do so could cause you to lose all or a portion of your investment.

An investment in our shares will have limited liquidity. There is no public trading market for our shares and there may never be one; therefore, it will be difficult for you to sell your shares. You should purchase our shares only as a long-term investment.

There currently is no public market for our common stock and there may never be one. In addition, we do not have a fixed date or method for providing stockholders with liquidity. If you are able to find a buyer for your

 

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shares, you will likely have to sell them at a substantial discount to your purchase price. It also is likely that your shares would not be accepted as the primary collateral for a loan. You should purchase our shares only as a long-term investment (more than seven years) because of the generally illiquid nature of the shares. See the sections captioned “Suitability Standards,” “Description of Shares — Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer” and “Description of Shares — Share Redemption Program” elsewhere in this prospectus for a more complete discussion on the restrictions on your ability to transfer your shares.

You are limited in your ability to sell your shares pursuant to our share redemption program and may have to hold your shares for an indefinite period of time.

Our share redemption program includes numerous restrictions that limit your ability to sell your shares. Generally, you must have held your shares for at least one year in order to participate in our share redemption program. Subject to funds being available, we will further limit the number of shares redeemed pursuant to our share redemption program as follows: (1) we will not redeem in excess of 5% of the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the trailing 12 months prior to the end of the fiscal quarter for which the redemption is being paid (provided, however, that while shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will be included in calculating the maximum number of shares that may be redeemed, shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will not be subject to the percentage cap); and (2) funding for the redemption of shares will be limited to the net proceeds we receive from the sale of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan. In an effort to accommodate redemption requests throughout the calendar year, we intend to limit quarterly redemptions to approximately 1.25% of the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the trailing 12-month period ending on the last day of the fiscal quarter (provided, however, that while shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will be included in calculating the maximum number of shares that may be redeemed, shares subject to a redemption requested upon the death of a stockholder will not be subject to the percentage cap), and funding for redemptions for each quarter generally will be limited to the net proceeds we receive from the sale of shares in the respective quarter under our distribution reinvestment plan; however, our board of directors may waive these quarterly limitations in its sole discretion, subject to the 5% cap on the number of shares we may redeem during the respective trailing 12 month period. Any of the foregoing limits might prevent us from accommodating all redemption requests made in any fiscal quarter or in any 12-month period. Our board of directors may amend the terms of, suspend, or terminate our share redemption program without stockholder approval upon 30 days prior written notice or reject any request for redemption. See the “Description of Shares — Share Redemption Program” section of this prospectus for more information about the share redemption program. These restrictions severely limit your ability to sell your shares should you require liquidity, and limit your ability to recover the value you invested or the fair market value of your shares.

Two prior real estate programs sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments have suspended redemptions under their respective share redemption programs, although one of the programs subsequently resumed its share redemption program. The board of directors of Cole Credit Property Trust, Inc. (CCPT I) determined that there was an insufficient amount of cash available for CCPT I to fulfill redemption requests during the years ended December 31, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. CCPT I continues to accept redemption requests which are considered for redemption if and when sufficient cash is available for CCPT I to fund redemptions. The board of directors of CCPT I will determine, at the beginning of each fiscal year, the maximum amount of shares that CCPT I may redeem during that year. Requests relating to approximately 284,000 shares remained unfulfilled as of December 31, 2011, representing approximately $2.3 million in unfulfilled requests, based on the most recent estimated value of CCPT I’s common stock of $7.95 per share. On November 10, 2009, the board of directors of CCPT II voted to temporarily suspend CCPT II’s share redemption program other than for requests made upon the death of a stockholder, which it continued to accept. CCPT II’s board of directors considered many factors in making this decision, including the expected announcement of an estimated value of CCPT II’s common stock in June 2010 and continued uncertainty in the economic environment and credit markets. One June 22, 2010, CCPT II’s board of directors reinstated the share redemption program, with certain amendments, effective August 1, 2010. During the year ended December 31, 2011 CCPT II received valid redemption requests relating to

 

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approximately 20.4 million shares, including requests that were unfulfilled and resubmitted from a previous period, and requests relating to approximately 6.2 million shares were redeemed for $55.2 million at an average price of $8.90 per share, of which approximately 1.6 million shares were redeemed subsequent to December 31, 2011. The remaining redemption requests relating to approximately 14.2 million shares went unfulfilled including those requests unfulfilled and resubmitted from a previous period.

The offering price for our shares is not based on the book value or net asset value of our investments or our expected cash flow.

The offering price for our shares is not based on the book value or net asset value of our investments or our expected cash flow. Our board of directors does not intend to provide a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares until 18 months after the end of the offering period, which could include a possible follow-on offering. Until such time as our board of directors determines a reasonable estimate of the value of our shares, the price of our shares is not intended to reflect our per share net asset value.

We may be unable to pay or maintain cash distributions or increase distributions over time.

There are many factors that can affect the availability and timing of cash distributions to our stockholders. The amount of cash available for distributions is affected by many factors, such as the performance of our advisor in selecting investments for us to make, selecting tenants for our properties and securing financing arrangements, our ability to buy properties as offering proceeds become available, rental income from our properties, and our operating expense levels, as well as many other variables. We may not always be in a position to pay distributions to you and any distributions we do make may not increase over time. In addition, our actual results may differ significantly from the assumptions used by our board of directors in establishing the distribution rate to our stockholders. There also is a risk that we may not have sufficient cash from operations to make a distribution required to maintain our REIT status.

We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, which may reduce the amount of capital we ultimately invest in real estate and may negatively impact the value of your investment.

To the extent that cash flow from operations is insufficient to fully cover our distributions to you, we have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations. Such sources may include borrowings, proceeds from asset sales or the sale of our securities in this or future offerings. We have no limits on the amounts we may pay from sources other than cash flows from operations.

We commenced principal operations on April 13, 2012. As of June 30, 2012, cumulative since inception, we have paid $83,803 in distributions, all of which was paid using proceeds from the issuance of common stock. As of June 30, 2012, cumulative since inception, net cash used in operating activities of approximately $1.4 million, reflects a reduction for real estate acquisition fees and related costs incurred and expensed of approximately $1.9 million, in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification 805, Business Combinations. As set forth in the “Estimated Use of Proceeds” section, we treat our real estate acquisition related expenses as funded by the proceeds from the offering of our shares. Therefore, for consistency, real estate acquisition related expenses are treated in the same manner (i.e., as funded by the proceeds of the offering of our shares) in describing the sources of distributions above, to the extent that acquisition expenses have reduced net cash flows from operating activities. The payment of distributions from sources other than cash provided by operating activities may reduce the amount of proceeds available for investment and operations or cause us to incur additional interest expense as a result of borrowed funds, and may cause subsequent investors to experience dilution.

 

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Because we have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from sources other than our cash flows from operations, distributions at any point in time may not reflect the current performance of our properties or our current operating cash flows.

Our organizational documents permit us to make distributions from any source, including the sources described in the risk factor above. Because the amount we pay out in distributions may exceed our cash flow from operations, distributions may not reflect the current performance of our properties or our current operating cash flows. To the extent distributions exceed cash flow from operations, distributions may be treated as a return of your investment and could reduce your basis in our stock. A reduction in a stockholder’s basis in our stock could result in the stockholder recognizing more gain upon the disposition of his or her shares, which in turn could result in greater taxable income to such stockholder.

We may suffer from delays in locating suitable investments, which could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to you and the value of your investment.

We could suffer from delays in locating suitable investments, particularly if the capital we raise in this offering outpaces our advisor’s ability to identify potential investments and/or close on acquisitions. Delays we encounter in the selection and/or acquisition of income-producing properties likely would adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to you and the value of your overall returns. The large size of our offering, coupled with competition from other real estate investors, increase the risk of delays in investing our net offering proceeds. Our stockholders should expect to wait at least several months after the closing of a property acquisition before receiving cash distributions attributable to that property. If our advisor is unable to identify suitable investments, we will hold the proceeds we raise in this offering in an interest-bearing account or invest the proceeds in short-term, investment-grade investments, which would provide a significantly lower return to us than the return we expect from our investments in real estate.

In the event we are not able to raise a substantial amount of capital in the near term, we may have difficulty investing the proceeds of this offering in properties, and our ability to achieve our investment objectives, including diversification of our portfolio by property type and location, could be adversely affected.

This offering is being made on a “best efforts” basis, which means that the dealer manager and the broker-dealers participating in this offering are only required to use their best efforts to sell the shares and have no firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of the shares. As a result, we may not be able to raise a substantial amount of capital in the near term. If we are not able to accomplish this goal, we may have difficulty in identifying and purchasing suitable properties on attractive terms in order to meet our investment objectives. Therefore, there could be a delay between the time we receive net proceeds from the sale of shares of our common stock in this offering and the time we invest the net proceeds. This could cause a substantial delay in the time it takes for your investment to realize its full potential return and could adversely affect our ability to pay regular distributions of cash flow from operations to you. If we fail to timely invest the net proceeds of this offering, our ability to achieve our investment objectives, including diversification of our portfolio by property type and location, could be adversely affected. In addition, subject to our investment policies, we are not limited in the number or size of our investments or the percentage of net proceeds that we may dedicate to a single investment. If we use all or substantially all of the proceeds from this offering to acquire one or a few investments, the likelihood of our profitability being affected by the performance of any one of our investments will increase, and an investment in our shares will be subject to greater risk.

You will not have the opportunity to evaluate our future investments before we make them, which makes an investment in our common stock more speculative.

While we will provide you with information on a regular basis regarding our real estate investments after they are acquired, we will not provide you with a significant amount of information, if any, for you to evaluate our future investments prior to our making them. Since we have not identified all of the properties that we intend

 

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to purchase with the proceeds from this offering, we are considered a “blind pool,” which makes your investment in our common stock speculative. We have established policies relating to the types of investments we will make and the creditworthiness of tenants of our properties, but our advisor will have wide discretion in implementing these policies, subject to the oversight of our board of directors. Additionally, our advisor has discretion to determine the location, number and size of our investments and the percentage of net proceeds we may dedicate to a single investment. For a more detailed discussion of our investment policies, see the “Investment Objectives and Policies — Acquisition and Investment Policies” section of this prospectus.

We are dependent upon the net proceeds of this offering to conduct our proposed business activities. If we are unable to raise substantial proceeds from this offering, we may not be able to invest in a diverse portfolio of real estate and real estate-related investments and an investment in our shares will be subject to greater risk.

We are dependent upon the net proceeds of this offering to conduct our proposed activities. As such, our ability to implement our business strategy is dependent, in part, upon our dealer manager and participating broker-dealers to successfully conduct this offering and you, rather than us, will incur the bulk of the risk if we are unable to raise substantial funds. This offering is being made on a “best efforts” basis, whereby our dealer manager and the broker-dealers participating in this offering are only required to use their best efforts to sell shares of our common stock and have no firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of the shares of our common stock. In addition, the broker-dealers participating in this offering also may be participating in the offerings of competing REIT products, some of which may have a focus that is nearly identical to our focus, and the participating broker-dealers could emphasize such competing products to their retail clients. As a result, we do not know the amount of proceeds that will be raised in this offering, which may be substantially less than the amount we would need to achieve a broadly diversified portfolio of real estate and real estate-related investments.

If we are unable to raise substantial proceeds from this offering, we will make fewer investments, resulting in less diversification in terms of the number of investments owned, the geographic regions in which our investments are located and the types of investments that we make. In addition, our fixed operating expenses, as a percentage of gross income, would be higher, and our financial condition and ability to pay distributions could be adversely affected if we are unable to raise substantial funds in this offering and invest in a diverse portfolio of real estate and real estate-related investments.

The purchase price you pay for shares of our common stock may be higher than the value of our assets per share of common stock at the time of your purchase.

This is a fixed price offering, which means that the offering price for shares of our common stock is fixed and will not vary based on the underlying value of our assets at any time. The offering price for our shares is not based on the book value or net asset value of our current or expected investments or our current or expected operating cash flows. Therefore, the fixed offering price established for shares of our common stock may not accurately represent the current value of our assets per share of our common stock at any particular time and may be higher or lower than the actual value of our assets per share at such time. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Investment Objectives and Policies — Dilution of the Net Tangible Book Value of Our Shares” for further discussion.

There is no fixed date or method for providing our stockholders with liquidity, and your shares may have limited liquidity for an indefinite period of time.

Due to the unpredictable nature of future macro- and micro- economic and market conditions, we have not set a fixed time period or method for providing our stockholders with liquidity. We expect that our board of directors will make that determination in the future based, in part, upon advice from our advisor. As a result, your shares may continue to have limited liquidity for an indefinite period of time and should be purchased only as a long-term investment.

 

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If our advisor loses or is unable to obtain key personnel, including in the event another Cole-sponsored program internalizes its advisor, our ability to achieve our investment objectives could be delayed or hindered, which could adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to you and the value of your investment.

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the contributions of certain executive officers and other key personnel of our advisor, as listed on page 69 of this prospectus, each of whom would be difficult to replace. Our advisor does not have an employment agreement with any of these key personnel and we cannot guarantee that all, or any particular one, will remain affiliated with us and/or our advisor. If any of our key personnel were to cease their affiliation with our advisor, our operating results could suffer. This could occur, among other ways, if another Cole-sponsored program internalizes its advisor. If that occurs, key personnel of our advisor, who also are key personnel of the internalized advisors, would become employees of the other program and would no longer be available to our advisor. Further, we do not intend to separately maintain key person life insurance on Mr. Cole or any other person. We believe that our future success depends, in large part, upon our advisor’s ability to hire and retain highly skilled managerial, operational and marketing personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and we cannot assure you that our advisor will be successful in attracting and retaining such skilled personnel. If our advisor loses or is unable to obtain the services of key personnel, our ability to implement our investment strategies could be delayed or hindered, and the value of your investment may decline.

If our board of directors elects to internalize our management functions in connection with a listing of our shares of common stock on an exchange or other liquidity event, your interest in us could be diluted, and we could incur other significant costs associated with being self-managed.

In the future, we may undertake a listing of our common stock on an exchange or other liquidity event that may involve internalizing our management functions. If our board of directors elects to internalize our management functions, we may negotiate to acquire our advisor’s assets and personnel. At this time, we cannot be sure of the form or amount of consideration or other terms relating to any such acquisition. Such consideration could take many forms, including cash payments, promissory notes and shares of our stock. The payment of such consideration could result in dilution of your interests as a stockholder and could reduce the net income per share and funds from operations per share attributable to your investment. Internalization transactions involving the acquisition of advisors affiliated with entity sponsors have also, in some cases, been the subject of litigation. Even if these claims are without merit, we could be forced to spend significant amounts of money defending claims, which would reduce the amount of funds available to operate our business and to pay distributions.

In addition, while we would no longer bear the costs of the various fees and expenses we expect to pay to our advisor under the advisory agreement, our direct expenses would include general and administrative costs, including legal, accounting, and other expenses related to corporate governance, including Securities and Exchange Commission reporting and compliance. We would also incur the compensation and benefits costs of our officers and other employees and consultants that we now expect will be paid by our advisor or its affiliates. In addition, we may issue equity awards to officers, employees and consultants, which awards would decrease net income and funds from operations and may further dilute your investment. If the expenses we assume as a result of an internalization are higher than the expenses we avoid paying to our advisor, our net income per share and funds from operations per share would be lower as a result of the internalization than it otherwise would have been, potentially decreasing the amount of funds available to distribute to you and the value of our shares.

As currently organized, we do not directly have any employees. If we elect to internalize our operations, we would employ personnel and would be subject to potential liabilities commonly faced by employers, such as workers disability and compensation claims, potential labor disputes and other employee-related liabilities and grievances. Upon any internalization of our advisor, certain key personnel may not remain with our advisor, but instead will remain employees of our sponsor or its affiliates.

If we internalize our management functions, we could have difficulty integrating these functions as a stand-alone entity. Currently, our advisor and its affiliates perform asset management and general and administrative

 

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functions, including accounting and financial reporting, for multiple entities. They have a great deal of know-how and can experience economies of scale. We may fail to properly identify the appropriate mix of personnel and capital needs to operate as a stand-alone entity. An inability to manage an internalization transaction effectively could thus result in our incurring excess costs and/or have a negative effect on our results of operations.

Our participation in a co-ownership arrangement would subject us to risks that otherwise may not be present in other real estate investments.

We may enter in co-ownership arrangements with respect to a portion of the properties we acquire. Co-ownership arrangements involve risks generally not otherwise present with an investment in real estate, such as the following:

 

   

the risk that a co-owner may at any time have economic or business interests or goals that are or become inconsistent with our business interests or goals;

 

   

the risk that a co-owner may be in a position to take action contrary to our instructions or requests or our policies or objectives;

 

   

the possibility that an individual co-owner might become insolvent or bankrupt, or otherwise default under the applicable mortgage loan financing documents, which may constitute an event of default under all of the applicable mortgage loan financing documents or allow the bankruptcy court to reject the agreements entered into by the co-owners owning interests in the property;

 

   

the possibility that a co-owner might not have adequate liquid assets to make cash advances that may be required in order to fund operations, maintenance and other expenses related to the property, which could result in the loss of current or prospective tenants and otherwise adversely affect the operation and maintenance of the property, could cause a default under the mortgage loan financing documents applicable to the property and result in late charges, penalties and interest, and could lead to the exercise of foreclosure and other remedies by the lender;

 

   

the risk that a co-owner could breach agreements related to the property, which may cause a default under, and possibly result in personal liability in connection with, the applicable mortgage loan financing documents, violate applicable securities law, result in a foreclosure or otherwise adversely affect the property and the co-ownership arrangement;

 

   

the risk that a default by any co-owner would constitute a default under the applicable mortgage loan financing documents that could result in a foreclosure and the loss of all or a substantial portion of the investment made by the co-owner;

 

   

the risk that we could have limited control and rights, with management decisions made entirely by a third-party; and

 

   

the possibility that we will not have the right to sell the property at a time that otherwise could result in the property being sold for its maximum value.

In the event that our interests become adverse to those of the other co-owners, we may not have the contractual right to purchase the co-ownership interests from the other co-owners. Even if we are given the opportunity to purchase such co-ownership interests in the future, we cannot guarantee that we will have sufficient funds available at the time to purchase co-ownership interests from the co-owners.

We might want to sell our co-ownership interests in a given property at a time when the other co-owners in such property do not desire to sell their interests. Therefore, because we anticipate that it will be much more difficult to find a willing buyer for our co-ownership interests in a property than it would be to find a buyer for a property we owned outright, we may not be able to sell our interest in a property at the time we would like to sell.

 

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Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest

We are subject to conflicts of interest arising out of our relationships with our advisor and its affiliates, including the material conflicts discussed below. The “Conflicts of Interest” section of this prospectus provides a more detailed discussion of the conflicts of interest between us and our advisor and its affiliates, and our policies to reduce or eliminate certain potential conflicts.

Our advisor and its affiliates, including our dealer manager, face conflicts of interest caused by their compensation arrangements with us, which could result in actions that are not in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

Our advisor and its affiliates, including our dealer manager, receive substantial fees from us under the terms of the advisory agreement and dealer manager agreement. These fees could influence the judgment of our advisor and its affiliates in performing services for us. Among other matters, these compensation arrangements could affect their judgment with respect to:

 

   

the continuation, renewal or enforcement of our agreements with our advisor and its affiliates, including the advisory agreement and the dealer manager agreement;

 

   

public offerings of equity by us, which entitle our dealer manager to fees and will likely entitle our advisor to increased acquisition and asset management fees;

 

   

property acquisitions from other Cole-sponsored real estate programs, which might entitle affiliates of our advisor to real estate commissions and possible success-based sale fees in connection with its services for the seller;

 

   

property acquisitions from third parties, which entitle our advisor to acquisition fees and advisory fees;

 

   

property dispositions, which may entitle our advisor or its affiliates to disposition fees;

 

   

borrowings to acquire properties, which borrowings will increase the acquisition and asset management fees payable to our advisor;

 

   

whether and when we seek to sell our company, liquidate our assets or list our common stock on a national securities exchange, which liquidation or listing could entitle our advisor to the payment of fees; and

 

   

how and when to recommend to our board of directors a proposed strategy to provide our investors with liquidity, which proposed strategy, if implemented, could entitle our advisor to the payment of fees.

Our advisor’s fee structure is principally based on the cost or book value of investments and not on performance, which could result in our advisor taking actions that are not necessarily in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

The acquisition fee and the advisory fee we pay to our advisor are both based on the cost or book value of such investments. As a result, our advisor receives these fees regardless of the quality of such investments, the performance of such investments or the quality of our advisor’s services rendered to us in connection with such investments. This creates a potential conflict of interest between us and our advisor, as the interests of our advisor in receiving the acquisition fee and the advisory fee is not well aligned with our interest of acquiring real estate that is likely to produce the maximum risk adjusted returns.

Our advisor faces conflicts of interest relating to the incentive fee structure under our advisory agreement, which could result in actions that are not necessarily in the long-term best interests of our stockholders.

Pursuant to the terms of our advisory agreement, our advisor is entitled to a subordinated performance fee that is structured in a manner intended to provide incentives to our advisor to perform in our best interests and in

 

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the best interests of our stockholders. However, because our advisor does not maintain a significant equity interest in us and is entitled to receive certain fees regardless of performance, our advisor’s interests are not wholly aligned with those of our stockholders. Furthermore, our advisor could be motivated to recommend riskier or more speculative investments in order for us to generate the specified levels of performance or sales proceeds that would entitle our advisor to performance-based fees. In addition, our advisor will have substantial influence with respect to how and when our board of directors elects to provide liquidity to our investors, and these performance-based fees could influence our advisor’s recommendations to us in this regard. Our advisor also has the right to terminate the advisory agreement under certain circumstances that could result in our advisor earning a performance fee, which could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change of control.

A number of other Cole-sponsored real estate programs use investment strategies that are similar to ours, therefore our executive officers and the officers and key personnel of our advisor and its affiliates may face conflicts of interest relating to the purchase and leasing of properties, and such conflicts may not be resolved in our favor.

Our sponsor currently has simultaneous offerings of funds that have a substantially similar mix of fund characteristics, including targeted investment types, investment objectives and criteria, and anticipated fund terms. As a result, we may be seeking to acquire properties and other real estate-related investments at the same time as one or more of the other Cole-sponsored programs managed by officers and key personnel of our advisor and/or its affiliates, and these other Cole-sponsored programs may use investment strategies and have investment objectives that are similar to ours. Our executive officers and the executive officers of our advisor also are the executive officers of other Cole-sponsored REITs and/or their advisors, the general partners of Cole-sponsored partnerships and/or the advisors or fiduciaries of other Cole-sponsored programs. There is a risk that our advisor’s allocation of investment properties may result in our acquiring a property that provides lower returns to us than a property purchased by another Cole-sponsored program. In addition, we have acquired, and may continue to acquire, properties in geographic areas where other Cole-sponsored programs own properties. If one of the other Cole-sponsored programs attracts a tenant that we are competing for, we could suffer a loss of revenue due to delays in locating another suitable tenant. Similar conflicts of interest may arise if our advisor recommends that we make or purchase mortgage loans or participations in mortgage loans, since other Cole-sponsored programs may be competing with us for these investments. You will not have the opportunity to evaluate the manner in which these conflicts of interest are resolved before or after making your investment.

Our officers face conflicts of interest related to the positions they hold with affiliated entities, which could hinder our ability to successfully implement our business strategy and to generate returns to you.

Each of our executive officers, including Mr. Cole, who also serves as the chairman of our board of directors, also is an officer of other Cole-sponsored real estate programs and of one or more entities affiliated with our advisor. As a result, these individuals have fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders, as well as to these other entities and their stockholders, members and limited partners. These fiduciary duties to such other entities and persons may create conflicts with the fiduciary duties that they owe to us and our stockholders. There is a risk that their loyalties to these other entities could result in actions or inactions that are detrimental to our business and violate their fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders, which could harm the implementation of our investment strategy and our investment and leasing opportunities. Conflicts with our business and interests are most likely to arise from involvement in activities related to (i) allocation of new investments and management time and services between us and the other entities, (ii) our purchase of properties from, or sale of properties to, affiliated entities, (iii) the timing and terms of the investment in or sale of an asset, (iv) development of our properties by affiliates, (v) investments with affiliates of our advisor, (vi) compensation to our advisor and its affiliates, and (vii) our relationship with, and compensation to, our dealer manager. If we do not successfully implement our investment strategy, we may be unable to maintain or increase the value of our assets and our operating cash flows and ability to pay distributions could be adversely affected.

 

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Our advisor and its officers and key personnel face conflicts of interest related to the positions they hold with affiliated entities, which could hinder our ability to successfully implement our business strategy and to pay distributions.

Our advisor and its officers and key personnel are officers, key personnel and partners of other real estate programs that have investment objectives, targeted assets, and legal and financial obligations similar to ours and/or the advisors to such programs, and they may have other business interests as well. In addition, we have only two executive officers, each of whom also is an officer, director and/or key person of other real estate programs that have investment objectives, targeted assets and legal and financial obligations similar to ours, and may also have other business interests. As a result, these individuals have fiduciary duties to both us and our stockholders and these other entities and their stockholders, members and limited partners. These fiduciary duties to such other entities and persons may create conflicts with the fiduciary duties that they owe to us and our stockholders. There is a risk that their loyalties to these other entities could result in actions or inactions that are detrimental to our business and violate their fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders, which could harm the implementation of our investment strategy and our investment and leasing opportunities.

Conflicts with our business and interests are most likely to arise from involvement in activities related to (i) allocation of new investments and management time and services between us and the other entities, (ii) our purchase of properties from, or sale of properties to, affiliated entities, (iii) the timing and terms of the investment in or sale of an asset, (iv) development of our properties by affiliates, (v) investments with affiliates of our advisor, (vi) compensation to our advisor and its affiliates, and (vii) our relationship with, and compensation to, our dealer manager. If we do not successfully implement our investment strategy, we may be unable to maintain or increase the value of our assets and our operating cash flows and ability to pay distributions could be adversely affected. Even if these persons do not violate their fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders, they will have competing demands on their time and resources and may have conflicts of interest in allocating their time and resources between our business and these other entities. Should such persons devote insufficient time or resources to our business, returns on our investments may suffer.

Our charter permits us to acquire assets and borrow funds from affiliates of our advisor and sell or lease our assets to affiliates of our advisor, and any such transaction could result in conflicts of interest.

Under our charter, we are permitted to acquire properties from affiliates of our advisor, provided, that any and all acquisitions from affiliates of our advisor must be approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as being fair and reasonable to us and at a price to us that is no greater than the cost of the property to the affiliate of our advisor, unless a majority of the independent directors determines that there is substantial justification for any amount that exceeds such cost and that the difference is reasonable. In no event will we acquire a property from an affiliate of our advisor if the cost to us would exceed the property’s current appraised value as determined by an independent appraiser. In the event that we acquire a property from an affiliate of our advisor, we may be foregoing an opportunity to acquire a different property that might be more advantageous to us. In addition, under our charter, we are permitted to borrow funds from affiliates of our advisor, including our sponsor, provided, that any such loans from affiliates of our advisor must be approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as fair, competitive and commercially reasonable, and no less favorable to us than comparable loans between unaffiliated parties. Under our charter, we are also permitted to sell and lease our assets to affiliates of our advisor, and we have not established a policy that specifically addresses how we will determine the sale or lease price in any such transaction. Any such sale or lease transaction would be subject to our general policy that governs all transactions with entities affiliated with our advisor. To the extent that we acquire any properties from affiliates of our advisor, borrow funds from affiliates of our advisor or sell or lease our assets to affiliates of our advisor, such transactions could result in a conflict of interest.

 

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Our advisor faces conflicts of interest relating to joint ventures or other co-ownership arrangements that we enter into with other Cole-sponsored programs, which could result in a disproportionate benefit to another Cole-sponsored program.

We may enter into joint ventures with other Cole-sponsored programs for the acquisition, development or improvement of properties as well as the acquisition of real-estate related investments. Officers and key persons of our advisor also are officers and key persons of other Cole-sponsored REITs and/or their advisors, the general partners of other Cole-sponsored partnerships and/or the advisors or fiduciaries of other Cole-sponsored programs. These officers and key persons may face conflicts of interest in determining which Cole-sponsored program should enter into any particular joint venture or co-ownership arrangement. These persons also may have a conflict in structuring the terms of the relationship between us and the Cole-affiliated co-venturer or co-owner, as well as conflicts of interests in managing the joint venture.

In the event we enter into joint venture or other co-ownership arrangements with another Cole-sponsored program, our advisor and its affiliates may have a conflict of interest when determining when and whether to buy or sell a particular property, or to make or dispose of another real estate-related investment. In addition, if we become listed for trading on a national securities exchange, we may develop more divergent goals and objectives from a Cole-affiliated co-venturer or co-owner that is not listed for trading. In the event we enter into a joint venture or other co-ownership arrangement with a Cole-sponsored program that has a term shorter than ours, the joint venture may be required to sell its properties earlier than we may desire to sell the properties. Even if the terms of any joint venture or other co-ownership agreement between us and another Cole-sponsored program grant us the right of first refusal to buy such properties, we may not have sufficient funds or borrowing capacity to exercise our right of first refusal under these circumstances.

Since Mr. Cole and his affiliates control our advisor and the advisors to other Cole-sponsored programs, agreements and transactions between or among the parties with respect to any joint venture or other co-ownership arrangement will not have the benefit of arm’s-length negotiation of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers or co-owners, which may result in the co-venturer or co-owner receiving benefits greater than the benefits that we receive. We have adopted certain procedures for dealing with potential conflicts of interest as described in the section of this prospectus captioned “Conflicts of Interest — Certain Conflict Resolution Procedures.”

Risks Related to This Offering and Our Corporate Structure

The dealer manager is an affiliate of our advisor, therefore you will not have the benefit of an independent review of the prospectus or of us that customarily is performed in underwritten offerings.

The dealer manager, Cole Capital Corporation, is an affiliate of our advisor and, as a result, is not in a position to make an independent review of us or this offering. Accordingly, you will have to rely on your own broker-dealer to make an independent review of the terms of this offering. If your broker-dealer conducts an independent review of this offering, and/or engages an independent due diligence reviewer to do so on its behalf, we expect that we will pay or reimburse the expenses associated with such review, which may create conflicts of interest. If your broker-dealer does not conduct such a review, you will not have the benefit of an independent review of the terms of this offering.

Payment of fees and reimbursements to our dealer manager, and our advisor and its affiliates, reduces cash available for investment.

We pay Cole Capital Corporation, our dealer manager, up to 9% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering in the form of selling commissions and a dealer manager fee, most of which is reallowed to participating broker-dealers. We also reimburse our advisor and its affiliates for up to 2.0% of our gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan, for other organization and offering expenses. Such payments will reduce the amount of cash we have available to invest in properties and

 

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result in a lower total return to you than if we were able to invest 100% of the gross proceeds from this offering in properties. Moreover, dealer manager fees and selling commissions are included in the $10 per share offering price, therefore our offering price does not, and is not intended to, reflect our net asset value. In addition, we intend to pay substantial fees to our advisor and its affiliates for the services they perform for us. The payment of these fees reduces the amount of cash available for investment in properties. For a more detailed discussion of the fees payable to such entities in respect of this offering, see the “Management Compensation” section of this prospectus.

The limit on the number of shares a person may own may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. Unless exempted by our board of directors, no person may own more than 9.8% in value of the aggregate of our outstanding shares or more than 9.8% (in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive) of the aggregate of our outstanding shares of common stock. These restrictions may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium to the purchase price of our common stock for our stockholders. See the “Description of Shares — Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer” section of this prospectus.

Our charter permits our board of directors to issue stock with terms that may subordinate the rights of common stockholders or discourage a third party from acquiring us in a manner that might result in a premium price to our stockholders.

Our charter permits our board of directors to issue up to 500,000,000 shares of stock, including 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock. In addition, our board of directors, without any action by our stockholders, may amend our charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares or the number of shares of any class or series of stock that we have authority to issue. Our board of directors may classify or reclassify any unissued common stock or preferred stock and establish the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to distributions, qualifications and terms and conditions of redemption of any such stock. Shares of our common stock shall be subject to the express terms of any series of our preferred stock. Thus, if also approved by a majority of our independent directors not otherwise interested in the transaction, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of preferred stock with terms and conditions that could have a priority as to distributions and amounts payable upon liquidation over the rights of the holders of our common stock. Preferred stock could also have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing the removal of incumbent management or a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium to the purchase price of our common stock for our stockholders. See the “Description of Shares — Preferred Stock” section of this prospectus.

Maryland law prohibits certain business combinations, which may make it more difficult for us to be acquired and may limit your ability to dispose of your shares.

Under Maryland law, “business combinations” between a Maryland corporation and an interested stockholder or an affiliate of an interested stockholder are prohibited for five years after the most recent date on which the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. These business combinations include a merger, consolidation, share exchange or, in circumstances specified in the statute, an asset transfer or issuance or reclassification of equity securities. An interested stockholder is defined as:

 

   

any person who beneficially owns 10% or more of the voting power of the corporation’s shares; or

 

   

an affiliate or associate of the corporation who, at any time within the two-year period prior to the date in question, was the beneficial owner of 10% or more of the voting power of the then outstanding voting stock of the corporation.

 

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A person is not an interested stockholder under the statute if the board of directors approved in advance the transaction by which he or she otherwise would have become an interested stockholder. However, in approving a transaction, the board of directors may provide that its approval is subject to compliance, at or after the time of approval, with any terms and conditions determined by our board of directors.

After the five-year prohibition, any business combination between the Maryland corporation and an interested stockholder generally must be recommended by the board of directors of the corporation and approved by the affirmative vote of at least:

 

   

80% of the votes entitled to be cast by holders of outstanding shares of voting stock of the corporation; and

 

   

two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast by holders of voting stock of the corporation other than shares held by the interested stockholder with whom or with whose affiliate the business combination is to be effected or held by an affiliate or associate of the interested stockholder.

These super-majority vote requirements do not apply if the corporation’s stockholders receive a minimum price, as defined under Maryland law, for their shares in the form of cash or other consideration in the same form as previously paid by the interested stockholder for its shares. The business combination statute permits various exemptions from its provisions, including business combinations that are exempted by the board of directors prior to the time that the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. Pursuant to the statute, our board of directors has exempted any business combination involving our advisor or any affiliate of our advisor. Consequently, the five-year prohibition and the super-majority vote requirements will not apply to business combinations between us and our advisor or any affiliate of our advisor. As a result, our advisor and any affiliate of our advisor may be able to enter into business combinations with us that may not be in the best interest of our stockholders, without compliance with the super-majority vote requirements and the other provisions of the statute. The business combination statute may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating any offer. For a more detailed discussion of the Maryland laws governing us and the ownership of our shares of common stock, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Description of Shares — Business Combinations.”

Maryland law also limits the ability of a third party to buy a large percentage of our outstanding shares and exercise voting control in electing directors.

Under its Control Share Acquisition Act, Maryland law also provides that “control shares” of a Maryland corporation acquired in a “control share acquisition” have no voting rights except to the extent approved by the corporation’s disinterested stockholders by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. Shares of stock owned by interested stockholders, that is, by the acquirer, or officers of the corporation or employees of the corporation who are directors of the corporation, are excluded from shares entitled to vote on the matter. “Control shares” are voting shares of stock that would entitle the acquirer, except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy, to exercise voting control in electing directors within specified ranges of voting control. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder approval. A “control share acquisition” means the acquisition of control shares. The control share acquisition statute does not apply (a) to shares acquired in a merger, consolidation or share exchange if the corporation is a party to the transaction or (b) to acquisitions approved or exempted by the charter or bylaws of the corporation. Our bylaws contain a provision exempting from the Control Share Acquisition Act any and all acquisitions of our stock by Cole Capital Advisors or any affiliate of Cole Capital Advisors. This statute could have the effect of discouraging offers from third parties to acquire us and increasing the difficulty of successfully completing this type of offer by anyone other than our advisor or any of its affiliates. For a more detailed discussion on the Maryland laws governing control share acquisitions, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Description of Shares — Control Share Acquisitions.”

 

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Our charter includes an anti-takeover provision that may discourage a stockholder from launching a tender offer for our shares.

Our charter requires that any tender offer, including any “mini-tender” offer, must comply with Regulation 14D of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act). The offering person must provide our company notice of the tender offer at least ten business days before initiating the tender offer. If the offering person does not comply with these requirements, we will have the right to redeem that person’s shares and any shares acquired in such tender offer. In addition, the non-complying person shall be responsible for all of our expenses in connection with that person’s noncompliance. This provision of our charter may discourage a person from initiating a tender offer for our shares and prevent you from receiving a premium to your purchase price for your shares in such a transaction.

If we are required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we could not continue our current business plan, which may significantly reduce the value of your investment.

We intend to conduct our operations, and the operations of our operating partnership and any other subsidiaries, so that no such entity meets the definition of an “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act. Under the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, a company is an “investment company” if:

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(A), it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities; or

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(C), it is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis (the 40% test). “Investment securities” excludes U.S. Government securities and securities of majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

We intend to monitor our operations and our assets on an ongoing basis in order to ensure that neither we, nor any of our subsidiaries, meet the definition of “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act. If we were obligated to register as an investment company, we would have to comply with a variety of substantive requirements under the Investment Company Act imposing, among other things:

 

   

limitations on capital structure;

 

   

restrictions on specified investments;

 

   

restrictions on specified investments;

 

   

prohibitions on transactions with affiliates;

 

   

compliance with reporting, record keeping, voting, proxy disclosure and other rules and regulations that would significantly change our operations; and

 

   

potentially, compliance with daily valuation requirements.

In order for us to not meet the definition of an “investment company” and avoid regulation under the Investment Company Act, we must engage primarily in the business of buying real estate, and these investments must be made within a year after the offering ends. If we are unable to invest a significant portion of the proceeds of this offering in properties within one year of the termination of the offering, we may avoid being required to register as an investment company by temporarily investing any unused proceeds in certificates of deposit or other cash items with low returns. This would reduce the cash available for distribution to investors and possibly lower your returns.

To avoid meeting the definition of an “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act, we may be unable to sell assets we would otherwise want to sell and may need to sell assets we

 

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would otherwise wish to retain. Similarly, we may have to acquire additional income or loss generating assets that we might not otherwise have acquired or may have to forgo opportunities to acquire interests in companies that we would otherwise want to acquire and would be important to our investment strategy. Accordingly, our board of directors may not be able to change our investment policies as our board of directors may deem appropriate if such change would cause us to meet the definition of an “investment company.” In addition, a change in the value of any of our assets could negatively affect our ability to avoid being required to register as an investment company. If we were required to register as an investment company but failed to do so, we would be prohibited from engaging in our business, and criminal and civil actions could be brought against us. In addition, our contracts would be unenforceable unless a court were to require enforcement, and a court could appoint a receiver to take control of us and liquidate our business.

If you do not agree with the decisions of our board of directors, you only have limited control over changes in our policies and operations and may not be able to change such policies and operations.

Our board of directors determines our major policies, including our policies regarding investments, financing, growth, debt capitalization, REIT qualification and distributions. Our board of directors may amend or revise these and other policies without a vote of the stockholders. Under the Maryland General Corporation Law and our charter, our stockholders generally have a right to vote only on the following:

 

   

the election or removal of directors;

 

   

any amendment of our charter, except that our board of directors may amend our charter without stockholder approval to increase or decrease the aggregate number of our shares, to increase or decrease the number of our shares of any class or series that we have the authority to issue, to change our name, to classify or reclassify any unissued shares of common stock or preferred stock into one or more classes or series of shares and to establish the terms of such shares, and to change the name or other designation or the par value of any class or series of our stock and the aggregate par value of our stock or to effect certain reverse stock splits; provided, however, that any amendment that would materially and adversely affect the rights, preferences and privileges of the stockholders must be approved by the stockholders;

 

   

our dissolution; and

 

   

a merger or consolidation of the sale or other disposition of all or substantially all of our assets.

All other matters are subject to the discretion of our board of directors.

Our board of directors may change certain of our investment policies without stockholder approval, which could alter the nature of your investment.

Our charter requires that our independent directors review our investment policies at least annually to determine that the policies we are following are in the best interest of the stockholders. These policies may change over time. The methods of implementing our investment policies also may vary, as new real estate development trends emerge and new investment techniques are developed. Subject to certain limits set forth in our charter and as may be required to avoid meeting the definition of an “investment company” under the Investment Company Act, our investment policies, the methods for their implementation, and our other objectives, policies and procedures may be altered by our board of directors without the approval of our stockholders, unless otherwise provided in our organizational documents. As a result, the nature of your investment could change without your consent.

Our rights and the rights of our stockholders to recover claims against our officers, directors and our advisor are limited, which could reduce your and our recovery against them if they cause us to incur losses.

Maryland law provides that a director has no liability in that capacity if he or she performs his or her duties in good faith, in a manner he or she reasonably believes to be in the corporation’s best interests and with the care

 

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that an ordinarily prudent person in a like position would use under similar circumstances. Our charter, in the case of our directors and officers, and our charter and the advisory agreement, in the case of our advisor and its affiliates, require us, subject to certain exceptions, to indemnify and advance expenses to our directors, our officers, and our advisor and its affiliates. Our charter permits us to provide such indemnification and advance for expenses to our employees and agents. Additionally, our charter limits, subject to certain exceptions, the liability of our directors and officers to us and our stockholders for monetary damages. Although our charter does not allow us to indemnify our directors or our advisor and its affiliates for any liability or loss suffered by them or hold harmless our directors or our advisor and its affiliates for any loss or liability suffered by us to a greater extent than permitted under Maryland law or the Statement of Policy Regarding Real Estate Investment Trusts published by the North American Securities Administrators Association, also known as the NASAA REIT Guidelines, we and our stockholders may have more limited rights against our directors, officers, employees and agents, and our advisor and its affiliates, than might otherwise exist under common law, which could reduce your and our recovery against them. In addition, our advisor is not required to retain cash to pay potential liabilities and it may not have sufficient cash available to pay liabilities if they arise. If our advisor is held liable for a breach of its fiduciary duty to us, or a breach of its contractual obligations to us, we may not be able to collect the full amount of any claims we may have against our advisor. In addition, we may be obligated to fund the defense costs incurred by our directors, officers, employees and agents or our advisor in some cases, which would decrease the cash otherwise available for distribution to you. See the section captioned “Management — Limited Liability and Indemnification of Our Directors, Officers, Advisor and Other Agents” elsewhere in this prospectus.

Your interest in us will be diluted if we issue additional shares.

Existing stockholders and potential investors in this offering do not have preemptive rights to any shares issued by us in the future. Our charter currently has authorized 500,000,000 shares of stock, of which 490,000,000 shares are designated as common stock and 10,000,000 are designated as preferred stock. Subject to any limitations set forth under Maryland law, our board of directors may increase the number of authorized shares of stock, increase or decrease the number of shares of any class or series of stock designated, or classify or reclassify any unissued shares without the necessity of obtaining stockholder approval. All of such shares may be issued in the discretion of our board of directors, except that the issuance of preferred stock must also be approved by a majority of our independent directors not otherwise interested in the transaction. Investors purchasing shares in this offering likely will suffer dilution of their equity investment in us, in the event that we (1) sell shares in this offering or sell additional shares in the future, including those issued pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan, (2) sell securities that are convertible into shares of our common stock, (3) issue shares of our common stock in a private offering of securities to institutional investors, (4) issue shares of our common stock to our advisor, its successors or assigns, in payment of an outstanding fee obligation as set forth under our advisory agreement or (5) issue shares of our common stock to sellers of properties acquired by us in connection with an exchange of limited partnership interests of our operating partnership. In addition, the partnership agreement for our operating partnership contains provisions that would allow, under certain circumstances, other entities, including other Cole-sponsored programs, to merge into or cause the exchange or conversion of their interest in that entity for interests of our operating partnership. Because the limited partnership interests of our operating partnership may, in the discretion of our board of directors, be exchanged for shares of our common stock, any merger, exchange or conversion between our operating partnership and another entity ultimately could result in the issuance of a substantial number of shares of our common stock, thereby diluting the percentage ownership interest of other stockholders. Because of these and other reasons described in this “Risk Factors” section, you should not expect to be able to own a significant percentage of our shares.

 

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General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate

Our operating results will be affected by economic and regulatory changes that have an adverse impact on the real estate market in general, which may prevent us from being profitable or from realizing growth in the value of our real estate properties.

Our operating results will be subject to risks generally incident to the ownership of real estate, including:

 

   

changes in general economic or local conditions;

 

   

changes in supply of or demand for similar or competing properties in an area;

 

   

changes in interest rates and availability of permanent mortgage funds that may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive;

 

   

the illiquidity of real estate investments generally;

 

   

changes in tax, real estate, environmental and zoning laws; and

 

   

periods of high interest rates and tight money supply.

These risk and other factors may prevent us from being profitable, or from maintaining or growing the value of our real estate properties.

Many of our properties may depend upon a single tenant, or a limited number of major tenants, for all or a majority of its rental income; therefore, our financial condition and ability to make distributions to you may be adversely affected by the bankruptcy or insolvency, a downturn in the business, or a lease termination of a single tenant.

Many of our properties may be occupied by only one tenant or derive a majority of its rental income from a limited number of major tenants and, therefore, the success of those properties will be materially dependent on the financial stability of such tenants. Such tenants face competition within their industries and other factors that could reduce their ability to make rent payments. For example, our retail tenants face competition from other retailers, as well as competition from other retail channels, such as factory outlet centers, wholesale clubs, mail order catalogs, television shopping networks and various developing forms of e-commerce. In addition, our retail properties will be located in public places, where crimes, violence and other incidents may occur. Such incidents could reduce the amount of business conducted by the tenants at our properties, thus reducing the tenants’ abilities to pay rent, and such incidents could also expose us to civil liability, as the property owner. Furthermore, if we invest in industrial properties, a general reduction in U.S. manufacturing activity could reduce our manufacturing tenants’ abilities to pay rent. Lease payment defaults by tenants could cause us to reduce the amount of distributions we pay. A default of a tenant on its lease payments to us would cause us to lose revenue from the property and force us to find an alternative source of revenue to meet any expenses associated with the property and prevent a foreclosure if the property is subject to a mortgage. In the event of a default by a single or major tenant, we may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment and re-letting the property. If a lease is terminated, we may not be able to lease the property for the rent previously received or sell the property without incurring a loss. A default by a tenant, the failure of a guarantor to fulfill its obligations or other premature termination of a lease, or a tenant’s election not to extend a lease upon its expiration, could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and our ability to pay distributions to you.

A high concentration of our properties in a particular geographic area, or with tenants in a similar industry, would magnify the effects of downturns in that geographic area or industry.

In the event that we have a concentration of properties in any particular geographic area, any adverse situation that disproportionately affects that geographic area would have a magnified adverse effect on our portfolio. Similarly, if tenants of our properties become concentrated in a certain industry or industries, any adverse effect to that industry generally would have a disproportionately adverse effect on our portfolio.

 

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If a major tenant declares bankruptcy, we may be unable to collect balances due under relevant leases, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and ability to pay distributions to you.

We may experience concentration in one or more tenants. Any of our tenants, or any guarantor of one of our tenant’s lease obligations, could be subject to a bankruptcy proceeding pursuant to Title 11 of the bankruptcy laws of the United States. Such a bankruptcy filing would bar us from attempting to collect pre-bankruptcy debts from the bankrupt tenant or its properties unless we receive an enabling order from the bankruptcy court. Post-bankruptcy debts would be paid currently. If we assume a lease, all pre-bankruptcy balances owing under it must be paid in full. If a lease is rejected by a tenant in bankruptcy, we would have a general unsecured claim for damages. If a lease is rejected, it is unlikely we would receive any payments from the tenant because our claim would be capped at the rent reserved under the lease, without acceleration, for the greater of one year or 15% of the remaining term of the lease, but not greater than three years, plus rent already due but unpaid. This claim could be paid only in the event funds were available, and then only in the same percentage as that realized on other unsecured claims.

The bankruptcy of a tenant or lease guarantor could delay our efforts to collect past due balances under the relevant lease, and could ultimately preclude full collection of these sums. Such an event also could cause a decrease or cessation of current rental payments, reducing our operating cash flows and the amount available for distributions to you. In the event a tenant or lease guarantor declares bankruptcy, the tenant or its trustee may not assume our lease or its guaranty. If a given lease or guaranty is not assumed, our operating cash flows and the amounts available for distributions to you may be adversely affected. The bankruptcy of a major tenant could have a material adverse effect on our ability to pay distributions to you.

If a sale-leaseback transaction is re-characterized in a tenant’s bankruptcy proceeding, our financial condition could be adversely affected.

We may enter into sale-leaseback transactions, whereby we would purchase a property and then lease the same property back to the person from whom we purchased it. In the event of the bankruptcy of a tenant, a transaction structured as a sale-leaseback may be re-characterized as either a financing or a joint venture, either of which outcomes could adversely affect our financial condition, cash flow and the amount available for distributions to you.

If the sale-leaseback were re-characterized as a financing, we might not be considered the owner of the property, and as a result would have the status of a creditor in relation to the tenant. In that event, we would no longer have the right to sell or encumber our ownership interest in the property. Instead, we would have a claim against the tenant for the amounts owed under the lease, with the claim arguably secured by the property. The tenant/debtor might have the ability to propose a plan restructuring the term, interest rate and amortization schedule of its outstanding balance. If confirmed by the bankruptcy court, we could be bound by the new terms, and prevented from foreclosing our lien on the property. If the sale-leaseback were re-characterized as a joint venture, our lessee and we could be treated as co-venturers with regard to the property. As a result, we could be held liable, under some circumstances, for debts incurred by the lessee relating to the property.

Challenging economic conditions could adversely affect vacancy rates, which could have an adverse impact on our ability to make distributions and the value of an investment in our shares.

Challenging economic conditions, the availability and cost of credit, turmoil in the mortgage market, and declining real estate markets have contributed to increased vacancy rates in the commercial real estate sector. If we experience vacancy rates that are higher than historical vacancy rates, we may have to offer lower rental rates and greater tenant improvements or concessions than expected. Increased vacancies may have a greater impact on us, as compared to REITs with other investment strategies, as our investment approach relies on long-term leases in order to provide a relatively stable stream of income for our stockholders. As a result, increased vacancy rates could have the following negative effects on us:

 

   

the values of our potential investments in commercial properties could decrease below the amount paid for such investments;

 

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revenues from such properties could decrease due to low or no rental income during vacant periods, lower future rental rates and/or increased tenant improvement expenses or concessions; and/or

 

   

revenues from such properties that secure loans could decrease, making it more difficult for us to meet our payment obligations.

All of these factors could impair our ability to make distributions and decrease the value of an investment in our shares.

Properties that have vacancies for a significant period of time could be difficult to sell, which could diminish the return on your investment.

A property may incur vacancies either by the continued default of a tenant under its leases, the expiration of a tenant lease or early termination of a lease by a tenant. If vacancies continue for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenues resulting in less cash to be distributed to you. In addition, because a property’s market value depends principally upon the value of the property’s leases, the resale value of a property with prolonged vacancies could decline, which could further reduce your return.

We may be unable to secure funds for future tenant improvements or capital needs, which could adversely impact our ability to pay cash distributions to you.

When tenants do not renew their leases or otherwise vacate their space, it is usual that, in order to attract replacement tenants, we will be required to expend substantial funds for tenant improvements and tenant refurbishments to the vacated space. In addition, although we expect that our leases with tenants will require tenants to pay routine property maintenance costs, we will likely be responsible for any major structural repairs, such as repairs to the foundation, exterior walls and rooftops. We will use substantially all of the gross proceeds from this offering to buy real estate and real estate-related investments and to pay various fees and expenses. We intend to reserve only approximately 0.1% of the gross proceeds from this offering for future capital needs. Accordingly, if we need additional capital in the future to improve or maintain our properties or for any other reason, we will have to obtain funds from other sources, such as cash flow from operations, borrowings, property sales or future equity offerings. These sources of funding may not be available on attractive terms or at all. If we cannot procure additional funding for capital improvements, our investments may generate lower cash flows or decline in value, or both.

We may obtain only limited warranties when we purchase a property and would have only limited recourse in the event our due diligence did not identify any issues that lower the value of our property.

The seller of a property often sells such property in its “as is” condition on a “where is” basis and “with all faults,” without any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. In addition, purchase agreements may contain only limited warranties, representations and indemnifications that will only survive for a limited period after the closing. The purchase of properties with limited warranties increases the risk that we may lose some or all of our invested capital in the property, as well as the loss of rental income from that property.

Our inability to sell a property when we desire to do so could adversely impact our ability to pay cash distributions to you.

The real estate market is affected by many factors, such as general economic conditions, availability of financing, interest rates, supply and demand, and other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot predict whether we will be able to sell any property for the price or on the terms set by us, or whether any price or other terms offered by a prospective purchaser would be acceptable to us. We may be required to expend funds to correct defects or to make improvements before a property can be sold. We may not have adequate funds available to correct such defects or to make such improvements. Moreover, in acquiring a property, we may

 

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agree to restrictions that prohibit the sale of that property for a period of time or impose other restrictions, such as a limitation on the amount of debt that can be placed or repaid on that property. We cannot predict the length of time needed to find a willing purchaser and to close the sale of a property. Our inability to sell a property when we desire to do so may cause us to reduce our selling price for the property. Any delay in our receipt of proceeds, or diminishment of proceeds, from the sale of a property could adversely impact our ability to pay distributions to you.

We are exposed to risks related to increases in market lease rates and inflation, as income from long-term leases will be the primary source of our cash flows from operations.

We are exposed to risks related to increases in market lease rates and inflation, as income from long-term leases will be the primary source of our cash flows from operations. Leases of long-term duration or which include renewal options that specify a maximum rate increase may result in below-market lease rates over time if we do not accurately estimate inflation or market lease rates. Provisions of our leases designed to mitigate the risk of inflation and unexpected increases in market lease rates, such as periodic rental increases, may not adequately protect us from the impact of inflation or unexpected increases in market lease rates. If we are subject to below-market lease rates on a significant number of our properties pursuant to long-term leases, our cash flow from operations and financial position may be adversely affected.

We may not be able to sell our properties at a price equal to, or greater than, the price for which we purchased such property, which may lead to a decrease in the value of our assets.

Some of our leases will not contain rental increases over time. When that is the case, the value of the leased property to a potential purchaser may not increase over time, which may restrict our ability to sell that property, or if we are able to sell that property, may result in a sale price less than the price that we paid to purchase the property.

We may acquire or finance properties with lock-out provisions, which may prohibit us from selling a property, or may require us to maintain specified debt levels for a period of years on some properties.

A lock-out provision is a provision that prohibits the prepayment of a loan during a specified period of time. Lock-out provisions may include terms that provide strong financial disincentives for borrowers to prepay their outstanding loan balance and exist in order to protect the yield expectations of investors. We expect that many of our properties will be subject to lock-out provisions. Lock-out provisions could materially restrict us from selling or otherwise disposing of or refinancing properties when we may desire to do so. Lock-out provisions may prohibit us from reducing the outstanding indebtedness with respect to any properties, refinancing such indebtedness on a non-recourse basis at maturity, or increasing the amount of indebtedness with respect to such properties. Lock-out provisions could impair our ability to take other actions during the lock-out period that could be in the best interests of our stockholders and, therefore, may have an adverse impact on the value of our shares relative to the value that would result if the lock-out provisions did not exist. In particular, lock-out provisions could preclude us from participating in major transactions that could result in a disposition of our assets or a change in control even though that disposition or change in control might be in the best interests of our stockholders.

Increased operating expenses could reduce cash flow from operations and funds available to acquire investments or make distributions.

Our properties will be subject to operating risks common to real estate in general, any or all of which may negatively affect us. If any property is not fully occupied or if rents are being paid in an amount that is insufficient to cover operating expenses, we could be required to expend funds with respect to that property for operating expenses. The properties will be subject to increases in tax rates, utility costs, insurance costs, repairs and maintenance costs, administrative costs and other operating expenses. Some of our property leases may not

 

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require the tenants to pay all or a portion of these expenses, in which event we may have to pay these costs. If we are unable to lease properties on terms that require the tenants to pay all or some of the properties’ operating expenses, if our tenants fail to pay these expenses as required or if expenses we are required to pay exceed our expectations, we could have less funds available for future acquisitions or cash available for distributions to you.

Adverse economic and geopolitical conditions may negatively affect our returns and profitability.

Our operating results may be affected by market and economic challenges, which may result from a continued or exacerbated general economic downturn experienced by the nation as a whole, by the local economies where our properties may be located, or by the real estate industry including the following:

 

   

poor economic conditions may result in tenant defaults under leases;

 

   

poor economic conditions may result in lower revenue to us from retailers who pay us a percentage of their revenues under percentage rent leases;

 

   

re-leasing may require concessions or reduced rental rates under the new leases;

 

   

changes in interest rates and availability of permanent mortgage funds that may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive;

 

   

constricted access to credit may result in tenant defaults or non-renewals under leases; and

 

   

increased insurance premiums may reduce funds available for distribution or, to the extent such increases are passed through to tenants, may lead to tenant defaults. Increased insurance premiums may make it difficult to increase rents to tenants on turnover, which may adversely affect our ability to increase our returns.

The length and severity of any economic slow down or downturn cannot be predicted. Our operations could be negatively affected to the extent that an economic slow down or downturn is prolonged or becomes more severe.

The United States’ armed conflicts in various parts of the world could have a further impact on our tenants. The consequences of any armed conflict are unpredictable, and we may not be able to foresee events that could have an adverse effect on our tenants, our business or your investment. More generally, any of these events could result in increased volatility in or damage to the United States and worldwide financial markets and economy. They also could result in higher energy costs and increased economic uncertainty in the United States or abroad. Our revenues will be dependent upon payment of rent by retailers, which may be particularly vulnerable to uncertainty in the local economy. Adverse economic conditions could affect the ability of our tenants to pay rent, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition, as well as our ability to pay distributions to you.

The current market environment may adversely affect our operating results, financial condition and ability to pay distributions.

The global financial markets have undergone pervasive and fundamental disruptions since mid-2007. The disruptions in the global financial markets had an adverse impact on the availability of credit to businesses generally. The continuing impact of the recent global economic recession has the potential to materially affect the value of our properties and other investments we make, the availability or the terms of financing that we may anticipate utilizing, and our ability to make principal and interest payments on, or refinance, any outstanding debt when due, and/or, for our leased properties, the ability of our tenants to enter into new leasing transactions or satisfy rental payments under existing leases. The current market environment also could affect our operating results and financial condition as follows:

 

   

Debt Markets — Since 2010, the volume of mortgage lending for commercial real estate has been increasing and lending terms have improved and continue to improve; however the real estate debt

 

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markets could begin experiencing increasing volatility as a result of certain factors, including the tightening of underwriting standards by lenders and credit rating agencies. Should overall borrowing costs increase, either by increases in the index rates or by increases in lender spreads, our operations may generate lower returns. In addition, dislocations in the debt markets could reduce the amount of capital that is available to finance real estate, which, in turn: (1) limits the ability of real estate investors to make new acquisitions and to potentially benefit from reduced real estate values or to realize enhanced returns on real estate investments; (2) could slow real estate transaction activity; and (3) may result in an inability to refinance debt as it becomes due. In addition, deterioration in the state of the debt markets could have a material adverse impact on the overall amount of capital being invested in real estate, which may result in price or value decreases of real estate assets and impact our ability to raise equity capital. In addition, the failure of any lending source with which we entered, or enter, into a credit facility or line of credit would adversely affect our ability to meet our obligations if we were unable to replace the funding source.

 

 

   

Real Estate Markets — The global economic recession caused commercial real estate values to decline substantially. The U.S. commercial real estate markets began a recovery in 2010 which has continued through 2011 and into 2012. However, if the global recession were to persist or worsen, or it were to affect the U.S. financial markets, there may be uncertainty in the valuation, or in the stability of the value, of the properties we own or may acquire that could result in a substantial decrease in the value of our properties. Consequently, we may not be able to recover the carrying amount of our properties, which may require us to recognize an impairment charge in earnings.

 

 

   

Government Intervention — The disruptions in the global financial markets have led to extensive and unprecedented government intervention. Although the government intervention is intended to stimulate the flow of capital and to strengthen the U.S. economy in the short term, it is impossible to predict the actual effect of the government intervention and what effect, if any, additional interim or permanent governmental intervention may have on the financial markets and/or the effect of such intervention on us.

The failure of any bank in which we deposit our funds could reduce the amount of cash we have available to pay distributions and make additional investments.

We have diversified, and expect to continue to diversify, our cash and cash equivalents among several banking institutions in an attempt to minimize exposure to any one of these entities. However, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation only insures amounts up to $250,000 per depositor per insured bank. We likely will have cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash deposited in certain financial institutions in excess of federally insured levels. If any of the banking institutions in which we deposit funds ultimately fails, we may lose our deposits over $250,000. The loss of our deposits could reduce the amount of cash we have available to distribute or invest and could result in a decline in the value of your investment.

If we suffer losses that are not covered by insurance or that are in excess of insurance coverage, we could lose invested capital and anticipated profits.

Generally, our tenants are responsible for insuring its goods and premises and, in some circumstances, may be required to reimburse us for a share of the cost of acquiring comprehensive insurance for the property, including casualty, liability, fire and extended coverage customarily obtained for similar properties in amounts that our advisor determines are sufficient to cover reasonably foreseeable losses. Tenants of single-user properties leased on a triple net basis typically are required to pay all insurance costs associated with those properties. Material losses may occur in excess of insurance proceeds with respect to any property, as insurance may not be sufficient to fund the losses. However, there are types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters, which are either uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. Insurance risks associated with potential terrorist acts could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims. Additionally, mortgage lenders in some

 

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cases insist that commercial property owners purchase specific coverage against terrorism as a condition for providing mortgage loans. It is uncertain whether such insurance policies will be available, or available at reasonable cost, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our potential properties. In these instances, we may be required to provide other financial support, either through financial assurances or self-insurance, to cover potential losses. We may not have adequate, or any, coverage for such losses. The Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002 is designed for a sharing of terrorism losses between insurance companies and the federal government. We cannot be certain how this act will impact us or what additional cost to us, if any, could result. If such an event damaged or destroyed one or more of our properties, we could lose both our invested capital and anticipated profits from such property.

Real estate related taxes may increase, and if these increases are not passed on to tenants, our income will be reduced.

Local real property tax assessors may reassess our properties, which may result in increased taxes. Generally, property taxes increase as property values or assessment rates change, or for other reasons deemed relevant by property tax assessors. An increase in the assessed valuation of a property for real estate tax purposes will result in an increase in the related real estate taxes on that property. Although some tenant leases may permit us to pass through such tax increases to the tenants for payment, renewal leases or future leases may not be negotiated on the same basis. Tax increases not passed through to tenants may adversely affect our income, cash available for distributions, and the amount of distributions to you.

CC&Rs may restrict our ability to operate a property.

Some of our properties will be contiguous to other parcels of real property, comprising part of the same retail center. In connection with such properties, we will be subject to significant covenants, conditions and restrictions, known as “CC&Rs,” restricting the operation of such properties and any improvements on such properties, and related to granting easements on such properties. Moreover, the operation and management of the contiguous properties may impact such properties. Compliance with CC&Rs may adversely affect our operating costs and reduce the amount of funds that we have available to pay distributions to you.

Our operating results may be negatively affected by potential development and construction delays and resultant increased costs and risks.

We may use proceeds from this offering to acquire properties upon which we will construct improvements. If we engage in development or construction projects, we will be subject to uncertainties associated with re-zoning for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities and/or community groups, and our builder’s ability to build in conformity with plans, specifications, budgeted costs, and timetables. If a builder fails to perform, we may resort to legal action to rescind the purchase or the construction contract or to compel performance. A builder’s performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the builder’s control. Delays in completion of construction could also give tenants the right to terminate preconstruction leases. We may incur additional risks if we make periodic progress payments or other advances to builders before they complete construction. These and other such factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment. In addition, we will be subject to normal lease-up risks relating to newly constructed projects. We also must rely on rental income and expense projections and estimates of the fair market value of property upon completion of construction when agreeing upon a price at the time we acquire the property. If our projections are inaccurate, we may pay too much for a property, and our return on our investment could suffer.

We may invest in unimproved real property. Returns from development of unimproved properties are also subject to risks associated with re-zoning the land for development and environmental concerns of governmental entities and/or community groups.

 

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If we contract with a development company for newly developed property, our earnest money deposit made to the development company may not be fully refunded.

We may enter into one or more contracts, either directly or indirectly through joint ventures with other Cole-sponsored programs or others, to acquire real property from a development company that is engaged in construction and development of commercial real properties. Properties acquired from a development company may be either existing income-producing properties, properties to be developed or properties under development. We anticipate that we will be obligated to pay a substantial earnest money deposit at the time of contracting to acquire such properties. In the case of properties to be developed by a development company, we anticipate that we will be required to close the purchase of the property upon completion of the development of the property. At the time of contracting and the payment of the earnest money deposit by us, the development company typically will not have acquired title to any real property. Typically, the development company will only have a contract to acquire land, a development agreement to develop a building on the land and an agreement with one or more tenants to lease all or part of the property upon its completion. We may enter into such a contract with the development company even if at the time we enter into the contract, we have not yet raised sufficient proceeds in our offering to enable us to close the purchase of such property. However, we may not be required to close a purchase from the development company, and may be entitled to a refund of our earnest money, in the following circumstances:

 

   

the development company fails to develop the property;

 

   

all or a specified portion of the pre-leased tenants fail to take possession under their leases for any reason; or

 

   

we are unable to raise sufficient proceeds from our offering to pay the purchase price at closing.

The obligation of the development company to refund our earnest money will be unsecured, and we may not be able to obtain a refund of such earnest money deposit from it under these circumstances since the development company may be an entity without substantial assets or operations.

If we purchase an option to acquire a property but do not exercise the option, we likely would forfeit the amount we paid for such option, which would reduce the amount of cash we have available to make other investments.

In determining whether to purchase a particular property, we may obtain an option to purchase such property. The amount paid for an option, if any, normally is forfeited if the property is not purchased and normally is credited against the purchase price if the property is purchased. If we purchase an option to acquire a property but do not exercise the option, we likely would forfeit the amount we paid for such option, which would reduce the amount of cash we have available to make other investments.

Competition with third parties in acquiring properties and other investments may reduce our profitability and the return on your investment.

We will compete with many other entities engaged in real estate investment activities, including individuals, corporations, bank and insurance company investment accounts, other REITs, real estate limited partnerships, and other entities engaged in real estate investment activities, many of which have greater resources than we do. Larger competitors may enjoy significant advantages that result from, among other things, a lower cost of capital and enhanced operating efficiencies. In addition, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investments may increase. Any such increase would result in increased demand for these assets and therefore increased prices paid for them. If we pay higher prices for properties and other investments as a result of competition with third parties without a corresponding increase in tenant lease rates, our profitability will be reduced, and you may experience a lower return on your investment.

 

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Our properties face competition that may affect tenants’ ability to pay rent and the amount of rent paid to us may affect the cash available for distributions to you and the amount of distributions.

We typically will acquire properties located in developed areas. Therefore, there likely will be numerous other retail properties within the market area of each of our properties that will compete with us for tenants. The number of competitive properties could have a material effect on our ability to rent space at our properties and the amount of rents charged. We could be adversely affected if additional competitive properties are built in close proximity to our properties, causing increased competition for customer traffic and creditworthy tenants. This could result in decreased cash flow from tenants and may require us to make capital improvements to properties that we would not have otherwise made, thus affecting cash available for distributions to you and the amount of distributions we pay.

Acquiring or attempting to acquire multiple properties in a single transaction may adversely affect our operations.

From time to time, we may acquire multiple properties in a single transaction. Portfolio acquisitions are more complex and expensive than single property acquisitions, and the risk that a multiple-property acquisition does not close may be greater than in a single-property acquisition. Portfolio acquisitions may also result in us owning investments in geographically dispersed markets, placing additional demands on our ability to manage the properties in the portfolio. In addition, a seller may require that a group of properties be purchased as a package even though we may not want to purchase one or more properties in the portfolio. In these situations, if we are unable to identify another person or entity to acquire the unwanted properties, we may be required to operate or attempt to dispose of these properties. To acquire multiple properties in a single transaction we may be required to accumulate a large amount of cash. We would expect the returns that we earn on such cash to be less than the ultimate returns on real property, therefore accumulating such cash could reduce our funds available for distributions to you. Any of the foregoing events may have an adverse effect on our operations.

If we set aside insufficient capital reserves, we may be required to defer necessary capital improvements.

If we do not have enough reserves for capital to supply needed funds for capital improvements throughout the life of the investment in a property and there is insufficient cash flow from operations, we may be required to defer necessary improvements to a property, which may cause that property to suffer from a greater risk of obsolescence or a decline in value, or a greater risk of decreased operating cash flows as a result of fewer potential tenants being attracted to the property. If this happens, we may not be able to maintain projected rental rates for affected properties, and our results of operations may be negatively impacted.

Costs of complying with environmental laws and regulations may adversely affect our income and the cash available for any distributions.

All real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. These laws and regulations generally govern wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid hazardous materials, and the remediation of contamination associated with disposals. Some of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on tenants, owners or operators for the costs of investigation or remediation of contaminated properties, regardless of fault or whether the acts causing the contamination were legal. This liability could be substantial. In addition, the presence of hazardous substances, or the failure to properly remediate these substances, may adversely affect our ability to sell or rent such property or to use such property as collateral for future borrowing.

Compliance with new or more stringent laws or regulations or stricter interpretation of existing laws may require material expenditures by us. Future laws, ordinances or regulations may impose material environmental

 

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liability. Additionally, our properties may be affected by our tenants’ operations, the existing condition of land when we buy it, operations in the vicinity of our properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks, or activities of unrelated third parties. In addition, there are various local, state and federal fire, health, life-safety and similar regulations that we may be required to comply with, and that may subject us to liability in the form of fines or damages for noncompliance. Any material expenditures, fines, or damages we must pay will reduce our ability to make distributions to you and may reduce the value of your investment.

From time to time, we may acquire properties, or interests in properties, with known adverse environmental conditions where we believe that the environmental liabilities associated with these conditions are quantifiable and that the acquisition will yield a superior risk-adjusted return. In such an instance, we will estimate the costs of environmental investigation, clean-up and monitoring in determining the purchase price. Further, in connection with property dispositions, we may agree to remain responsible for, and to bear the cost of, remediating or monitoring certain environmental conditions on the properties.

We may not obtain an independent third-party environmental assessment for every property we acquire. In addition, any such assessment that we do obtain may not reveal all environmental liabilities. The cost of defending against claims of liability, of compliance with environmental regulatory requirements, of remediating any contaminated property, or of paying personal injury claims would materially adversely affect our business, assets or results of operations and, consequently, amounts available for distribution to you.

Discovery of previously undetected environmentally hazardous conditions may adversely affect our operating results.

Under various federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be liable for the cost of removal or remediation of hazardous or toxic substances on, under or in such property. The costs of removal or remediation could be substantial. Such laws often impose liability whether or not the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. Environmental laws also may impose restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or businesses may be operated, and these restrictions may require substantial expenditures. Environmental laws provide for sanctions in the event of noncompliance and may be enforced by governmental agencies or, in certain circumstances, by private parties. Certain environmental laws and common law principles could be used to impose liability for release of and exposure to hazardous substances, including asbestos-containing materials into the air, and third parties may seek recovery from owners or operators of real properties for personal injury or property damage associated with exposure to released hazardous substances. The cost of defending against claims of liability, of compliance with environmental regulatory requirements, of remediating any contaminated property, or of paying personal injury claims could materially adversely affect our business, assets or results of operations and, consequently, amounts available for distribution to you.

If we sell properties by providing financing to purchasers, defaults by the purchasers would adversely affect our cash flow from operations.

In some instances we may sell our properties by providing financing to purchasers. When we provide financing to purchasers, we will bear the risk that the purchaser may default on its obligations under the financing, which could negatively impact cash flow from operations. Even in the absence of a purchaser default, the distribution of sale proceeds, or their reinvestment in other assets, will be delayed until the promissory notes or other property we may accept upon the sale are actually paid, sold, refinanced or otherwise disposed of. In some cases, we may receive initial down payments in cash and other property in the year of sale in an amount less than the selling price, and subsequent payments will be spread over a number of years. If any purchaser defaults under a financing arrangement with us, it could negatively impact our ability to pay cash distributions to you.

 

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Our costs associated with complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, may affect cash available for distributions.

Our properties generally will be subject to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (Disabilities Act). Under the Disabilities Act, all places of public accommodation are required to comply with federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. The Disabilities Act has separate compliance requirements for “public accommodations” and “commercial facilities” that generally require that buildings and services be made accessible and available to people with disabilities. The Disabilities Act’s requirements could require removal of access barriers and could result in the imposition of injunctive relief, monetary penalties, or, in some cases, an award of damages. We will attempt to acquire properties that comply with the Disabilities Act or place the burden on the seller or other third party, such as a tenant, to ensure compliance with the Disabilities Act. However, we may not be able to acquire properties or allocate responsibilities in this manner. If we cannot, our funds used for Disabilities Act compliance may affect cash available for distributions and the amount of distributions to you.

A proposed change in U.S. accounting standards for leases could reduce the overall demand to lease our properties.

The existing accounting standards for leases require lessees to classify their leases as either capital or operating leases. Under a capital lease, both the leased asset, which represents the tenant’s right to use the property, and the contractual lease obligation are recorded on the tenant’s balance sheet if one of the following criteria are met: (i) the lease transfers ownership of the property to the lessee by the end of the lease term; (ii) the lease contains a bargain purchase option; (iii) the non-cancellable lease term is more than 75% of the useful life of the asset; or (iv) if the present value of the minimum lease payments equals 90% or more of the leased property’s fair value. If the terms of the lease do not meet these criteria, the lease is considered an operating lease, and no leased asset or contractual lease obligation is recorded by the tenant.

In order to address concerns raised by the SEC regarding the transparency of contractual lease obligations of lessees under the existing accounting standards for operating leases, the U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board (the FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (the IASB) initiated a joint project to develop new guidelines to lease accounting. The FASB and IASB (collectively, the Boards) issued exposure drafts on August 17, 2010 (the Exposure Drafts), which propose substantial changes to the current lease accounting standards, primarily by eliminating the concept of operating lease accounting. As a result, a lease asset and obligation would be recorded on the tenant’s balance sheet for all lease arrangements. In addition, the Exposure Drafts will impact the method in which contractual lease payments will be recorded. In order to mitigate the effect of the proposed lease accounting, tenants may seek to negotiate certain terms within new lease arrangements or modify terms in existing lease arrangements, such as shorter lease terms or fewer extension options, which would generally have less impact on tenant balance sheets. Also, tenants may reassess their lease-versus-buy strategies. This could result in a greater renewal risk, a delay in investing our offering proceeds, or shorter lease terms, all of which may negatively impact our operations and our ability to pay distributions to you.

The Exposure Drafts do not include a proposed effective date, are still being deliberated, and are subject to change. The Boards intend to complete their deliberations and publish revised exposure drafts by the end of 2012; however, final standards are not expected to be issued until 2013.

Risks Associated with Debt Financing

We may incur mortgage indebtedness and other borrowings, which may increase our business risks, hinder our ability to make distributions, and decrease the value of your investment.

We likely will acquire real estate and other real estate-related investments by borrowing new funds. In addition, we may incur mortgage debt and pledge all or some of our real properties as security for that debt to obtain funds to acquire additional real properties and other investments and to pay distributions to stockholders.

 

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We may borrow additional funds if we need funds to satisfy the REIT tax qualification requirement that we distribute at least 90% of our annual REIT taxable income to our stockholders. We may also borrow additional funds if we otherwise deem it necessary or advisable to assure that we maintain our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes.

Our advisor believes that utilizing borrowing is consistent with our investment objective of maximizing the return to investors. There is no limitation on the amount we may borrow against any individual property or other investment. However, under our charter, we are required to limit our borrowings to 75% of the cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) of our gross assets, unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in our next quarterly report along with a justification for such excess borrowing. Moreover, our board of directors has adopted a policy to further limit our borrowings to 60% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our gross assets, unless such borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in the next quarterly report along with a justification for such excess borrowing. Our borrowings will not exceed 300% of our net assets as of the date of any borrowing, which is the maximum level of indebtedness permitted under the NASAA REIT Guidelines; however, we may exceed that limit if approved by a majority of our independent directors. We expect that from time to time during the period of this offering we will request that our independent directors approve borrowings in excess of these limitations since we will then be in the process of raising our equity capital to acquire our portfolio. We expect that during

the period of this offering, high debt levels would cause us to incur higher interest charges, would result in higher debt service payments, and could be accompanied by restrictive covenants. These factors could limit the amount of cash we have available to distribute to you and could result in a decline in the value of your investment.

We do not intend to incur mortgage debt on a particular property unless we believe the property’s projected operating cash flow is sufficient to service the mortgage debt. However, if there is a shortfall between the cash flow from a property and the cash flow needed to service mortgage debt on a property, the amount available for distributions to you may be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In that case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default, thus reducing the value of your investment. For tax purposes, a foreclosure of any of our properties would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage. If the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we would recognize taxable income on foreclosure, but would not receive any cash proceeds from the foreclosure. In such event, we may be unable to pay the amount of distributions required in order to maintain our REIT status. We may give full or partial guarantees to lenders of mortgage debt to the entities that own our properties. If we provide a guaranty on behalf of an entity that owns one of our properties, we will be responsible to the lender for satisfaction of the debt if it is not paid by such entity. If any mortgages contain cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, a default on a single property could affect multiple properties. If any of our properties are foreclosed upon due to a default, our ability to pay cash distributions to you will be adversely affected, which could result in our losing our REIT status and would result in a decrease in the value of your investment.

High interest rates may make it difficult for us to finance or refinance properties, which could reduce the number of properties we can acquire and the amount of cash distributions we can make to you.

We run the risk of being unable to finance or refinance our properties on favorable terms or at all. If interest rates are higher when we desire to mortgage our properties or when existing loans come due and the properties need to be refinanced, we may not be able to finance the properties and we would be required to use cash to purchase or repay outstanding obligations. Our inability to use debt to finance or refinance our properties could reduce the number of properties we can acquire, which could reduce our operating cash flows and the amount of cash distributions we can make to you. Higher costs of capital also could negatively impact operating cash flows and returns on our investments.

 

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Increases in interest rates could increase the amount of our debt payments and adversely affect our ability to pay distributions to you.

We may incur indebtedness that bears interest at a variable rate. To the extent that we incur variable rate debt, increases in interest rates would increase our interest costs, which could reduce our operating cash flows and our ability to pay distributions to you. In addition, if we need to repay existing debt during periods of rising interest rates, we could be required to liquidate one or more of our investments at times that may not permit realization of the maximum return on such investments.

Lenders may require us to enter into restrictive covenants relating to our operations, which could limit our ability to make distributions to you.

In connection with providing us financing, a lender could impose restrictions on us that affect our distribution and operating policies and our ability to incur additional debt. In general, our loan agreements restrict our ability to encumber or otherwise transfer our interest in the respective property without the prior consent of the lender. Loan documents we enter into may contain covenants that limit our ability to further mortgage the property, discontinue insurance coverage or replace CR IV Advisors as our advisor. These or other limitations imposed by a lender may adversely affect our flexibility and our ability to achieve our investment and operating objectives, which could limit our ability to make distributions to you.

Interest-only indebtedness may increase our risk of default and ultimately may reduce our funds available for distribution to you.

We may finance our property acquisitions using interest-only mortgage indebtedness. During the interest-only period, the amount of each scheduled payment will be less than that of a traditional amortizing mortgage loan. The principal balance of the mortgage loan will not be reduced (except in the case of prepayments) because there are no scheduled monthly payments of principal during this period. After the interest-only period, we will be required either to make scheduled payments of amortized principal and interest or to make a lump-sum or “balloon” payment at maturity. These required principal or balloon payments will increase the amount of our scheduled payments and may increase our risk of default under the related mortgage loan. If the mortgage loan has an adjustable interest rate, the amount of our scheduled payments also may increase at a time of rising interest rates. Increased payments and substantial principal or balloon maturity payments will reduce the funds available for distribution to our stockholders because cash otherwise available for distribution will be required to pay principal and interest associated with these mortgage loans.

Our ability to make a balloon payment at maturity is uncertain and may depend upon our ability to obtain additional financing or our ability to sell the property. At the time the balloon payment is due, we may or may not be able to refinance the loan on terms as favorable as the original loan or sell the property at a price sufficient to make the balloon payment. The effect of a refinancing or sale could affect the rate of return to stockholders and the projected time of disposition of our assets. In addition, payments of principal and interest made to service our debts may leave us with insufficient cash to pay the distributions that we are required to pay to maintain our qualification as a REIT. Any of these results would have a significant, negative impact on your investment.

To hedge against exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations, we may use derivative financial instruments that may be costly and ineffective and may reduce the overall returns on your investment.

We may use derivative financial instruments to hedge our exposure to changes in exchange rates and interest rates on loans secured by our assets and investments in commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS). Derivative instruments may include interest rate swap contracts, interest rate cap or floor contracts, futures or forward contracts, options or repurchase agreements. Our actual hedging decisions will be determined in light of the facts and circumstances existing at the time of the hedge and may differ from time to time.

To the extent that we use derivative financial instruments to hedge against exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations, we will be exposed to credit risk, basis risk and legal enforceability risks. In this context, credit risk

 

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is the failure of the counterparty to perform under the terms of the derivative contract. If the fair value of a derivative contract is positive, the counterparty owes us, which creates credit risk for us. Basis risk occurs when the index upon which the contract is based is more or less variable than the index upon which the hedged asset or liability is based, thereby making the hedge less effective. Finally, legal enforceability risks encompass general contractual risks, including the risk that the counterparty will breach the terms of, or fail to perform its obligations under, the derivative contract. If we are unable to manage these risks effectively, our results of operations, financial condition and ability to pay distributions to you will be adversely affected.

Risks Associated with Investments in Mortgage, Bridge and Mezzanine Loans and Real Estate-Related Securities

Investing in mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loans could adversely affect our return on our loan investments.

We may make or acquire mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loans, or participations in such loans, to the extent our advisor determines that it is advantageous for us to do so. However, if we make or invest in mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loans, we will be at risk of defaults on those loans caused by many conditions beyond our control, including local and other economic conditions affecting real estate values, interest rate changes, rezoning, and failure by the borrower to maintain the property. If there are defaults under these loans, we may not be able to repossess and sell quickly any properties securing such loans. An action to foreclose on a property securing a loan is regulated by state statutes and regulations and is subject to many of the delays and expenses of any lawsuit brought in connection with the foreclosure if the defendant raises defenses or counterclaims. In the event of default by a mortgagor, these restrictions, among other things, may impede our ability to foreclose on or sell the mortgaged property or to obtain proceeds sufficient to repay all amounts due to us on the loan, which could reduce the value of our investment in the defaulted loan. In addition, investments in mezzanine loans involve a higher degree of risk than long-term senior mortgage loans secured by income-producing real property because the investment may become unsecured as a result of foreclosure on the underlying real property by the senior lender.

We may invest in various types of real estate-related securities.

Aside from investments in real estate, we are permitted to invest in real estate-related securities, including securities issued by other real estate companies, CMBS, mortgage, bridge, mezzanine or other loans and Section 1031 tenant-in-common interests, and we may invest in real estate-related securities of both publicly traded and private real estate companies. We are focused, however, on acquiring interests in retail and other income-producing properties. We may not have the expertise necessary to maximize the return on our investment in real estate-related securities. If our advisor determines that it is advantageous to us to make the types of investments in which our advisor or its affiliates do not have experience, our advisor intends to employ persons, engage consultants or partner with third parties that have, in our advisor’s opinion, the relevant expertise necessary to assist our advisor in evaluating, making and administering such investments.

Investments in real estate-related securities will be subject to specific risks relating to the particular issuer of the securities and may be subject to the general risks of investing in subordinated real estate securities, which may result in losses to us.

Our investments in real estate-related securities will involve special risks relating to the particular issuer of the securities, including the financial condition and business outlook of the issuer. Issuers of real estate-related equity securities generally invest in real estate or real estate-related assets and are subject to the inherent risks associated with real estate-related investments discussed in this prospectus, including risks relating to rising interest rates.

Real estate-related securities are often unsecured and also may be subordinated to other obligations of the issuer. As a result, investments in real estate-related securities are subject to risks of (1) limited liquidity in the

 

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secondary trading market in the case of unlisted or thinly traded securities, (2) substantial market price volatility resulting from changes in prevailing interest rates in the case of traded equity securities, (3) subordination to the prior claims of banks and other senior lenders to the issuer, (4) the operation of mandatory sinking fund or call/redemption provisions during periods of declining interest rates that could cause the issuer to reinvest redemption proceeds in lower yielding assets, (5) the possibility that earnings of the issuer may be insufficient to meet its debt service and distribution obligations and (6) the declining creditworthiness and potential for insolvency of the issuer during periods of rising interest rates and economic slow down or downturn. These risks may adversely affect the value of outstanding real estate-related securities and the ability of the issuers thereof to repay principal and interest or make distribution payments.

The CMBS in which we may invest are subject to all of the risks of the underlying mortgage loans, the risks of the securitization process and dislocations in the mortgage-backed securities market in general.

CMBS are securities that evidence interests in, or are secured by, a single commercial mortgage loan or a pool of commercial mortgage loans. Accordingly, these securities are subject to all of the risks of the underlying mortgage loans. In a rising interest rate environment, the value of CMBS may be adversely affected when payments on underlying mortgages do not occur as anticipated, resulting in the extension of the security’s effective maturity and the related increase in interest rate sensitivity of a longer-term instrument. The value of CMBS may also change due to shifts in the market’s perception of issuers and regulatory or tax changes adversely affecting the mortgage securities market as a whole. In addition, CMBS are subject to the credit risk associated with the performance of the underlying mortgage properties. CMBS are issued by investment banks, not financial institutions, and are not insured or guaranteed by the U.S. government.

CMBS are also subject to several risks created through the securitization process. Subordinate CMBS are paid interest only to the extent that there are funds available to make payments. To the extent the collateral pool includes delinquent loans, there is a risk that interest payments on subordinate CMBS will not be fully paid. Subordinate CMBS are also subject to greater credit risk than those CMBS that are more highly rated. In certain instances, third-party guarantees or other forms of credit support can reduce the credit risk.

The value of any CMBS in which we invest may be negatively impacted by any dislocation in the mortgage-backed securities market in general. Currently, the mortgage-backed securities market is suffering from a severe dislocation created by mortgage pools that include sub-prime mortgages secured by residential real estate. Sub-prime loans often have high interest rates and are often made to borrowers with credit scores that would not qualify them for prime conventional loans. In recent years, banks made a great number of the sub-prime residential mortgage loans with high interest rates, floating interest rates, interest rates that reset from time to time, and/or interest-only payment features that expire over time. These terms, coupled with rising interest rates, have caused an increasing number of homeowners to default on their mortgages. Purchasers of mortgage-backed securities collateralized by mortgage pools that include risky sub-prime residential mortgages have experienced severe losses as a result of the defaults and such losses have had a negative impact on the CMBS market.

Federal Income Tax Risks

Failure to qualify as a REIT would adversely affect our operations and our ability to make distributions.

Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP, our legal counsel, has rendered an opinion to us that we will be organized in conformity with the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code for our taxable year ending December 31, 2012 and that our proposed method of operations will enable us to meet the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT beginning with our taxable year ending December 31, 2012. This opinion is based upon our representations as to the manner in which we are and will be owned, invest in assets and operate, among other things. However, our qualification as a REIT will depend upon our ability to meet requirements regarding our organization and ownership, distributions of our income, the nature and diversification of our income and assets and other tests imposed by the Internal Revenue Code. Morris,

 

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Manning & Martin, LLP will not review our operations or compliance with the REIT qualification standards on an ongoing basis, and we may fail to satisfy the REIT requirements in the future. Also, the legal opinion represents Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP’s legal judgment based on the law in effect as of the commencement of this offering. Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP’s opinion is not binding on the Internal Revenue Service or the courts and we will not apply for a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service regarding our status as a REIT. Future legislative, judicial or administrative changes to the federal income tax laws could be applied retroactively, which could result in our disqualification as a REIT.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT for any taxable year, we will be subject to federal income tax on our taxable income at corporate rates. In addition, we would generally be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year of losing our REIT status. Losing our REIT status would reduce our net earnings available for investment or distribution to you because of the additional tax liability. In addition, distributions to you would no longer qualify for the dividends paid deduction, and we would no longer be required to make distributions. If this occurs, we might be required to borrow funds or liquidate some investments in order to pay the applicable tax. Our failure to qualify as a REIT would adversely affect the return on your investment.

Re-characterization of sale-leaseback transactions may cause us to lose our REIT status.

We may purchase properties and lease them back to the sellers of such properties. The Internal Revenue Service could challenge our characterization of certain leases in any such sale-leaseback transactions as “true leases,” which allows us to be treated as the owner of the property for federal income tax purposes. In the event that any sale-leaseback transaction is challenged and re-characterized as a financing transaction or loan for federal income tax purposes, deductions for depreciation and cost recovery relating to such property would be disallowed. If a sale-leaseback transaction were so re-characterized, we might fail to satisfy the REIT qualification “asset tests” or the “income tests” and, consequently, lose our REIT status effective with the year of re-characterization. Alternatively, the amount of our REIT taxable income could be recalculated, which might also cause us to fail to meet the distribution requirement for a taxable year.

You may have current tax liability on distributions you elect to reinvest in our common stock.

If you participate in our distribution reinvestment plan, you will be deemed to have received, and for income tax purposes will be taxed on, the amount reinvested in shares of our common stock to the extent the amount reinvested was not a tax free return of capital. In addition, you will be treated, for tax purposes, as having received an additional distribution to the extent the shares are purchased at a discount to fair market value. As a result, unless you are a tax-exempt entity, you may have to use funds from other sources to pay your tax liability on the value of the common stock received.

Distributions payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates that apply to other corporate distributions.

Tax legislation enacted in 2003, amended in 2005 and extended by the Tax Relief Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010, generally reduces the maximum U.S. federal income tax rate for distributions payable by corporations to domestic stockholders that are individuals, trusts or estates to 15% prior to 2013. Distributions payable by REITs, however, generally continue to be taxed at the normal rate applicable to the individual recipient, rather than the 15% preferential rate. Our distributions will be taxed as ordinary income at the non-preferential rate, to the extent they are from our current or accumulated earnings and profits. To the extent distributions exceed our current or accumulated earnings and profits, they will be treated first as a tax free return of capital, reducing the tax basis in each U.S. stockholder’s shares (but not below zero), then the distributions will be taxed as gain from the sale of shares. You should discuss the difference in treatment of REIT distributions and regular corporate distributions with your tax advisor.

 

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If our operating partnership fails to maintain its status as a partnership, its income may be subject to taxation, which would reduce the cash available to us for distribution to you.

We intend to maintain the status of CCPT IV OP, our operating partnership, as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. However, if the Internal Revenue Service were to successfully challenge the status of our operating partnership as an entity taxable as a partnership, CCPT IV OP would be taxable as a corporation. In such event, this would reduce the amount of distributions that the operating partnership could make to us. This could also result in our losing REIT status, and becoming subject to a corporate level tax on our income. This would substantially reduce the cash available to us to make distributions to you and the return on your investment. In addition, if any of the partnerships or limited liability companies through which CCPT IV OP owns its properties, in whole or in part, loses its characterization as a partnership for federal income tax purposes, it would be subject to taxation as a corporation, thereby reducing distributions to our operating partnership. Such a re-characterization of an underlying property owner also could threaten our ability to maintain REIT status.

In certain circumstances, we may be subject to federal and state income taxes as a REIT, which would reduce our cash available for distribution to you.

Even if we qualify and maintain our status as a REIT, we may be subject to federal income taxes or state taxes. For example, net income from the sale of properties that are “dealer” properties sold by a REIT (a “prohibited transaction” under the Internal Revenue Code) will be subject to a 100% tax. We may not be able to make sufficient distributions to avoid excise taxes applicable to REITs. We may also decide to retain income we earn from the sale or other disposition of our property and pay income tax directly on such income. In that event, our stockholders would be treated as if they earned that income and paid the tax on it directly. However, stockholders that are tax-exempt, such as charities or qualified pension plans, would have no benefit from their deemed payment of such tax liability. We may also be subject to state and local taxes on our income or property, either directly or at the level of our operating partnership or at the level of the other entities through which we indirectly own our assets. Any federal or state taxes we pay will reduce our cash available for distribution to you.

Legislative or regulatory action could adversely affect the returns to our investors.

Changes to the tax laws are likely to occur, and such changes may adversely affect the taxation of a stockholder. Any such changes could have an adverse effect on an investment in our shares or on the market value or the resale potential of our assets. You are urged to consult with your own tax advisor with respect to the status of legislative, regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on an investment in our shares. You also should note that our counsel’s tax opinion is based upon existing law and treasury regulations, applicable as of the date of its opinion, all of which are subject to change, either prospectively or retroactively.

Congress passed major federal tax legislation in 2003, with modifications to that legislation in 2005 and in 2010. One of the changes affected by that legislation generally reduced the tax rate on dividends paid by corporations to individuals to a maximum of 15% prior to 2013. REIT distributions generally do not qualify for this reduced rate. The tax changes did not, however, reduce the corporate tax rates. Therefore, the maximum corporate tax rate of 35% has not been affected. However, as a REIT, we generally would not be subject to federal or state corporate income taxes on that portion of our ordinary income or capital gain that we distribute currently to our stockholders, and we thus expect to avoid the “double taxation” that other corporations are typically subject to.

The tax rate changes contained in the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 are currently scheduled to expire at the end of 2012. It is widely anticipated that this expiration will provoke a legislative response from Congress for tax years beginning after December 31, 2012; however, it is impossible to anticipate the effects of any such legislation at this time.

Although REITs continue to receive substantially better tax treatment than entities taxed as corporations, it is possible that future legislation would result in a REIT having fewer tax advantages, and it could become more advantageous for a company that invests in real estate to elect to be taxed, for federal income tax purposes, as a

 

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corporation. As a result, our charter provides our board of directors with the power, under certain circumstances, to revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election and cause us to be taxed as a corporation, without the vote of our stockholders. Our board of directors has fiduciary duties to us and our stockholders and could only cause such changes in our tax treatment if it determines in good faith that such changes are in the best interests of our stockholders.

Complying with the REIT requirements may cause us to forego otherwise attractive opportunities.

To maintain our qualification as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the nature and diversification of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our stockholders and the ownership of shares of our common stock. We may be required to pay distributions to our stockholders at disadvantageous times or when we do not have funds readily available for distribution. Complying with the REIT requirements may cause us to forego otherwise attractive opportunities. In addition, we may be required to liquidate otherwise attractive investments in order to comply with the REIT requirements. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits.

Foreign purchasers of our common stock may be subject to FIRPTA tax upon the sale of their shares.

A foreign person disposing of a U.S. real property interest, including shares of a U.S. corporation whose assets consist principally of U.S. real property interests, is generally subject to the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980, as amended (FIRPTA) on the gain recognized on the disposition. Such FIRPTA tax does not apply, however, to the disposition of stock in a REIT if the REIT is “domestically controlled.” A REIT is “domestically controlled” if less than 50% of the REIT’s stock, by value, has been owned directly or indirectly by persons who are not qualifying U.S. persons during a continuous five-year period ending on the date of disposition or, if shorter, during the entire period of the REIT’s existence. We cannot assure you that we will qualify as a “domestically controlled” REIT. If we were to fail to so qualify, gain realized by foreign investors on a sale of our shares would be subject to FIRPTA tax, unless our shares were traded on an established securities market and the foreign investor did not at any time during a specified testing period directly or indirectly own more than 10% of the value of our outstanding common stock. See the “Federal Income Tax Considerations — Special Tax Considerations for Non-U.S. Stockholders — Sale of Our Shares by a Non-U.S. Stockholder” section of this prospectus.

For qualified accounts, if an investment in our shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Internal Revenue Code, it is possible that you may be subject to the imposition of significant excise taxes and penalties with respect to the amount invested. In order to avoid triggering additional taxes and/or penalties, if you intend to invest in our shares through pension or profit-sharing trusts or IRAs, you should consider additional factors.

If you are investing the assets of a pension, profit-sharing, 401(k), Keogh or other qualified retirement plan or the assets of an IRA in our common stock, you should satisfy yourself that, among other things:

 

   

your investment is consistent with your fiduciary obligations under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code;

 

   

your investment is made in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your plan or IRA, including your plan’s investment policy;

 

   

your investment satisfies the prudence and diversification requirements of ERISA and other applicable provisions of ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code;

 

   

your investment will not impair the liquidity of the plan or IRA;

 

   

your investment will not produce UBTI for the plan or IRA;

 

   

you will be able to value the assets of the plan annually in accordance with ERISA requirements and applicable provisions of the plan or IRA; and

 

   

your investment will not constitute a prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

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Failure to satisfy the fiduciary standards of conduct and other applicable requirements of ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code may result in the imposition of civil and criminal penalties and could subject the fiduciary to equitable remedies. In addition, if an investment in our shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Internal Revenue Code, the fiduciary who authorized or directed the investment may be subject to the imposition of excise taxes with respect to the amount invested. For a more complete discussion of the foregoing risks and other issues associated with an investment in shares by retirement plans, see the “Investment by Tax-Exempt Entities and ERISA Considerations” section of this prospectus.

 

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements. Such statements include, in particular, statements about our plans, strategies and prospects. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts but are the intent, belief or current expectations of our business and industry. You can generally identify forward-looking statements by our use of forward-looking terminology, such as “may,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate,” “would,” “could,” “should” and variations of these words and similar expressions. You should not rely on our forward-looking statements because the matters they describe are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other unpredictable factors, many of which are beyond our control. Our actual results, performance and achievements may be materially different from that expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

You should carefully review the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus for a discussion of the risks and uncertainties that we believe are material to our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition. Except as otherwise required by federal securities laws, we do not undertake to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

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ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS

The following table sets forth information about how we intend to use the proceeds raised in this offering, assuming that we sell the maximum offering of 300,000,000 shares of common stock pursuant to this offering. Many of the figures set forth below represent management’s best estimate since they cannot be precisely calculated at this time. Assuming a maximum offering, we expect that approximately 88.1% of the money that stockholders invest (86.7% if no shares are sold pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan) will be used to purchase real estate or other real estate-related investments, while the remaining approximately 11.9% (13.3% if no shares are sold pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan) will be used for working capital, and to pay costs of the offering, including selling commissions and the dealer manager fee, and fees and expenses of our advisor in connection with acquiring properties. Proceeds used to purchase real estate or other real estate-related investments include proceeds used to repay any indebtedness incurred in respect of such purchases. We have paid, and may continue to pay, distributions from proceeds raised in this offering in anticipation of future cash flows, and we have not placed a limit on the amount of net proceeds we may use to pay distributions.

 

     Maximum Offering
(Including Distribution
Reinvestment Plan)
(1)
    Maximum Offering
(Not Including Distribution
Reinvestment Plan)
(2)
 
     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent  

Gross Offering Proceeds

   $ 2,975,000,000         100   $ 2,500,000,000         100

Less Public Offering Expenses:

          

Selling Commissions and Dealer Manager Fee(3)

     225,000,000         7.6     225,000,000         9.0

Other Organization and Offering Expenses(4)

     59,500,000         2.0     50,000,000         2.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount Available for Investment(5)

     2,690,500,000         90.4     2,225,000,000         89.0

Acquisition and Development:

          

Acquisition Fee(6)

     52,446,394         1.8     43,372,320         1.8

Acquisition Expenses(7)

     13,111,598         0.4     10,843,080         0.4

Initial Working Capital Reserve(8)

     2,622,320         0.1     2,168,616         0.1
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amount Invested in Assets(9)

   $ 2,622,319,688         88.1   $ 2,168,615,984         86.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Assumes the sale to the public of 250,000,000 shares at $10.00 per share pursuant to the primary offering and 50,000,000 shares at $9.50 per share pursuant to the distribution reinvestment plan. In the event that stockholders redeem shares pursuant to our share redemption program, the redemptions will be paid using proceeds from the sale of shares pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan. Accordingly, the amount of proceeds from the maximum offering, including the distribution reinvestment plan, that is used to purchase real estate and other real estate-related assets, and to pay acquisition-related fees and expenses, will be reduced to the extent that proceeds from our distribution reinvestment plan are used to pay redemptions.

 

(2) Assumes the sale to the public of 250,000,000 shares at $10.00 per share pursuant to the primary offering and no shares sold pursuant to the distribution reinvestment plan.

 

(3)

Includes selling commissions equal to 7% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering, which commissions may be reduced under certain circumstances, and a dealer manager fee equal to 2% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering, both of which are payable to the dealer manager, an affiliate of our advisor. The dealer manager will reallow 100% of the selling commissions to participating broker-dealers. In addition, the dealer-manager, in its sole discretion, may reallow to broker-dealers participating in this offering up to all of its dealer manager fee as marketing fees and due diligence expense allowance based on such factors as the number of shares sold by the participating broker-dealer, the participating broker-dealer’s level of marketing support, and bona fide conference fees incurred, each as compared to those of the other participating broker-dealers. We will not pay a selling commission or a dealer manager fee on shares purchased pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan. The amount of selling commissions may be reduced under certain circumstances for volume discounts and other types of sales. Furthermore, we may increase the dealer manager fee to 3% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering for purchases made through certain

 

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  selected dealers, in which event the selling commission would be reduced to 6% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering for those purchases. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus for a description of such provisions.

 

(4) Assuming we raise the maximum offering amount, we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $25,000,000 (0.8% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover offering expenses that are deemed to be underwriting expenses, and we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $34,500,000 (1.2% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover non-underwriting organization and offering expenses. These organization and offering expenses consist of all expenses (other than selling commissions and the dealer manager fee) to be paid by us in connection with the offering, including (i) our legal, accounting, printing, mailing and filing fees, charges of our transfer agent for account set up fees, due diligence expenses that are included in a detailed and itemized invoice (such as expenses related to a review of this offering by one or more independent due diligence reviewers engaged by broker-dealers participating in this offering); (ii) amounts to reimburse our advisor for the portion of the salaries paid to employees of its affiliates that are attributed to services rendered to our advisor in connection with preparing supplemental sales materials for us, holding educational conferences and attending retail seminars conducted by our participating broker-dealers and (iii) reimbursements for our dealer manager’s wholesaling costs, and other marketing and organization costs, including (a) payments made to participating broker-dealers for performing these services, (b) the dealer-manager’s wholesaling commissions, salaries and expense reimbursements, (c) the dealer manager’s due diligence costs and legal fees and (d) costs associated with business entertainment, logoed items and sales incentives. Expenses to educational conferences and retail seminars described in (ii) above, expenses relating to our dealer-manager’s wholesaling costs and payments to participating broker-dealers described in (iii) above and expenses described in (iii)(b) and (iii)(c) above will constitute underwriting compensation, subject to the underwriting limit of 10% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering.

In no event will total organization and offering expenses, including selling commissions, the dealer manager fee and reimbursement of other organization and offering expenses, exceed 15% of the gross proceeds of this offering, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.

 

(5) Until required in connection with the acquisition of real estate or other real estate-related investments, substantially all of the net proceeds of this offering and, thereafter, any working capital reserves we may have, may be invested in short-term, highly-liquid investments including government obligations, bank certificates of deposit, short-term debt obligations and interest-bearing accounts.

 

(6) Acquisition fees are defined generally as fees and commissions paid by any party to any person in connection with identifying, reviewing, evaluating, investing in and the purchase, development or construction of properties, or the making or investing in loans or other real estate-related investments. We will pay our advisor acquisition fees up to a maximum amount of 2% of the contract purchase price of each property or asset acquired. With respect to a development or a redevelopment project, we will pay our advisor an acquisition fee of 2% of the amount expended on such project. For purposes of this table, we have assumed that the aggregate contract purchase price for our assets will be an amount equal to the estimated amount invested in assets. With respect to any loan we originate or acquire, we will pay our advisor an acquisition fee of 2% of the amount of the loan. For purposes of this table, we also have assumed that no financing is used to acquire properties or other real estate assets. We may incur additional fees, such as real estate commissions, development fees, construction fees, non-recurring management fees, loan fees or points, or any fee of a similar nature. Acquisition fees do not include acquisition expenses.

 

(7)

Acquisition expenses include legal fees and expenses, travel expenses, costs of appraisals, nonrefundable option payments on property not acquired, accounting fees and expenses, title insurance premiums and other closing costs and miscellaneous expenses relating to the selection, acquisition and development of real estate properties. For purposes of this table, we have assumed average expenses of 0.5% of the estimated amount invested in assets; however, expenses on a particular acquisition may be higher. Acquisition expenses are not included in the contract purchase price of an asset. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the total

 

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  of all acquisition expenses and acquisition fees paid by any party to any party, including any real estate commission, selection fee, development fees paid to an affiliate of our advisor, construction fee paid to an affiliate of our advisor, non-recurring management fee, loan fees or point or any fee of a similar nature, payable with respect to a particular property or investment shall be reasonable, and shall not exceed an amount equal to 6% of the contract purchase price of the property, or in the case of a mortgage loan 6% of the funds advanced, unless a majority of our directors (including a majority of our independent directors) not otherwise interested in the transaction approve fees and expenses in excess of this limit and determine the transaction to be commercially competitive, fair and reasonable to us.

 

(8) Working capital reserves typically are utilized for extraordinary expenses that are not covered by revenue generated by the property, such as tenant improvements, leasing commissions and major capital expenditures. Alternatively, a lender may require its own formula for escrow of working capital reserves. Because we expect most of our leases will be triple net or double net leases, as described elsewhere herein, we do not expect to maintain significant working capital reserves.

 

(9) Includes amounts anticipated to be invested in properties net of organization and offering expenses, acquisition fees and expenses and initial working capital reserves.

 

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MANAGEMENT

General

We operate under the direction of our board of directors, the members of which are accountable to us and our stockholders as fiduciaries. We have retained CR IV Advisors as our advisor to manage our day-to-day affairs and the acquisition and disposition of our investments, subject to our board of directors’ supervision. Our charter has been reviewed and ratified by our board of directors, including a majority of the independent directors. This ratification by our board of directors is required by the NASAA REIT Guidelines.

Our charter and bylaws provide that the number of directors on our board of directors may be established by a majority of the entire board of directors, but may not be more than 15, nor fewer than three. Our charter provides, in general, that a majority of the directors must be independent directors. An “independent director” is a person who is not, and within the last two years has not been, directly or indirectly associated with us or any of our affiliates or with our sponsor, our advisor or any of their affiliates by virtue of (1) ownership of an interest in our sponsor, our advisor or any of their affiliates, (2) employment by us, our sponsor our advisor or any of our or their affiliates, (3) service as an officer or director of our sponsor, our advisor or any of their affiliates, (4) performance of services, (5) service as a director of more than three REITs organized by our sponsor or advised by our advisor, or (6) maintenance of a material business or professional relationship with our sponsor, our advisor or any of their affiliates. Each director deemed to be independent pursuant to our charter also will be independent in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines. There are no family relationships among any of our directors or officers, or officers of our advisor. Each director who is not an independent director must have at least three years of relevant experience demonstrating the knowledge and experience required to successfully acquire and manage the type of assets being acquired by us. At least one of our independent directors must have at least three years of relevant real estate experience. We currently have a total of three directors, including a majority of independent directors.

Each director will serve until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until his or her successor is duly elected and qualifies. Although the number of directors may be increased or decreased, a decrease will not have the effect of shortening the term of any incumbent director.

Any director may resign at any time and may be removed with or without cause by the stockholders upon the affirmative vote of at least a majority of all the votes entitled to be cast at a meeting properly called for the purpose of the proposed removal. The notice of the meeting will indicate that the purpose, or one of the purposes, of the meeting is to determine if the director shall be removed. None of the members of our board of directors, nor our advisor, nor any of their affiliates, may vote or consent on matters submitted to the stockholders regarding the removal of our advisor or any director or any of their affiliates or any transaction between us and any of them. In determining the requisite percentage in interest required to approve such a matter, shares owned by members of our board of directors and their respective affiliates will not be included.

Any vacancy created by the death, resignation, removal, adjudicated incompetence or other incapacity of a director may be filled only by a vote of a majority of the remaining directors. Any vacancy created by an increase in the number of directors must be filled by an affirmative vote of the board of directors, including a majority of the independent directors. Independent directors shall nominate replacements for vacancies in the independent director positions or to fill newly-created independent director positions. If at any time there are no directors in office, successor directors shall be elected by the stockholders. Each director will be bound by our charter and bylaws.

Our directors will not be required to devote all of their time to our business and only are required to devote the time to our affairs as their duties require. Our directors meet quarterly, in person or by teleconference, or more frequently if necessary. Consequently, in the exercise of their responsibilities, the directors will rely heavily on our advisor and on information provided by our advisor. Our directors have a fiduciary duty to our stockholders to supervise the relationship between us and our advisor. Our board of directors is empowered to fix

 

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the compensation of all officers that it selects and approve the payment of compensation to directors for services rendered to us.

Our board of directors has adopted written policies on investments and borrowing, the general terms of which are set forth in this prospectus. The directors may revise those policies or establish further written policies on investments and borrowings and monitor our administrative procedures, investment operations and performance to ensure that the policies are fulfilled and are in the best interests of our stockholders. During the discussion of a proposed transaction, independent directors may offer ideas for ways in which transactions may be structured to offer the greatest value to us, and our advisor will take these suggestions into consideration when structuring transactions.

In addition, our board of directors is responsible for reviewing our fees and expenses on at least an annual basis and with sufficient frequency to determine that the expenses incurred are in the best interests of the stockholders. In addition, a majority of the directors, including a majority of the independent directors, who are not otherwise interested in the transaction must approve all transactions with our advisor or its affiliates. The independent directors also will be responsible for reviewing the performance of our advisor and determining, from time to time and at least on an annual basis, that the compensation to be paid to our advisor is reasonable in relation to the nature and quality of services to be performed and that the provisions of the advisory agreement are being carried out. The independent directors will consider such factors as they deem relevant, including:

 

   

the amount of the fees paid to our advisor in relation to the size, composition and performance of our investments;

 

   

the success of our advisor in generating appropriate investment opportunities;

 

   

rates charged to other REITs, especially REITs of similar structure, and to investors other than REITs by advisors performing similar services;

 

   

additional revenues realized by our advisor and its affiliates through their relationship with us, including loan administration, underwriting or broker commissions, and servicing, engineering, inspection and other fees, whether such amounts are paid by us or others with whom we do business;

 

   

the quality and extent of service and advice furnished by our advisor and the performance of our investment portfolio; and

 

   

the quality of our portfolio relative to the investments generated by our advisor for its own account.

The advisory agreement has a one-year term and may be renewed for an unlimited number of successive one-year periods. Either party may terminate the advisory agreement upon 60 days’ written notice without cause or penalty. Fees payable to our advisor pursuant to the advisory agreement, including any fees that may be paid upon termination of the advisory agreement, are described below under the caption “— The Advisory Agreement” and the section of this prospectus captioned “Management Compensation.”

Neither our advisor nor any of its affiliates will vote or consent to the voting of shares of our common stock they now own or hereafter acquire on matters submitted to the stockholders regarding either (1) the removal of our advisor, any director or any of their respective affiliates, or (2) any transaction between us and our advisor, any director or any of their respective affiliates. In determining the requisite percentage in interest required to approve such a matter, shares owned by our advisor and its affiliates will not be included.

Committees of our Board of Directors

Our entire board of directors will be responsible for supervising our entire business. However, our bylaws provide that our board of directors may establish such committees as our board of directors believes appropriate and in our best interests. Our board of directors will appoint the members of the committee in our board of directors’ discretion. Our charter and bylaws require that a majority of the members of each committee of our board of directors is comprised of independent directors.

 

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Audit Committee

Our board of directors has established an audit committee consisting of Lawrence S. Jones, J. Marc Myers and Scott P. Sealy, Sr., our independent directors. Mr. Jones serves as chairman of the audit committee. The audit committee, by approval of at least a majority of its members, will select the independent registered public accounting firm to audit our annual financial statements, review with the independent registered public accounting firm the plans and results of the audit engagement, approve the audit and non-audit services provided by the independent registered public accounting firm, review the independence of the independent registered public accounting firm, consider the range of audit and non-audit fees and review the adequacy of our internal accounting controls. Our board of directors has adopted a charter for the audit committee that sets forth its specific functions and responsibilities.

Executive Officers and Directors

Our board of directors has elected Christopher H. Cole to serve as our chief executive officer and president and D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr. to serve as our executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer. Although most of the services Mr. McAllaster provides to our company are in his role as an executive officer of our advisor, both Messrs. Cole and McAllaster have certain duties in their capacities as executive officers of our company arising from Maryland corporate law, our charter and bylaws. We do not directly compensate Messrs. Cole or McAllaster for their services as executive officers of our company, nor do we reimburse our advisor or any affiliate of our advisor for their salaries or benefits. We have provided below certain information about our executive officers and directors.

 

Name

   Age*   

Position(s)

Christopher H. Cole

   60    Chairman of the Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and President

D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr.  

   45    Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Marc T. Nemer

   39    Director

Lawrence S. Jones

   65    Independent Director

J. Marc Myers

   65    Independent Director

Scott P. Sealy, Sr.  

   66    Independent Director

 

* As of October 10, 2012.

Christopher H. Cole has served as our chairman, chief executive officer and president since our formation in July 2010. He served as the chief executive officer and president of CR IV Advisors, our advisor, from its formation in July 2010 until June 2011. Mr. Cole has served as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of CCPT I since its formation in March 2004. He served as the chief executive officer of Cole REIT Advisors, LLC (CCPT I Advisors) from its formation in April 2004 until June 2011, and as its president from April 2004 until March 2007 and from October 2007 until April 2010. Mr. Cole has served as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of CCPT II since its formation in September 2004. He served as the chief executive officer of Cole REIT Advisors II, LLC (CCPT II Advisors) from its formation in September 2004 until June 2011, and as its president from September 2004 until March 2007 and from October 2007 until April 2010. Mr. Cole has served as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of CCPT III since its formation in January 2008. He served as the chief executive officer of Cole REIT Advisors III, LLC (CCPT III Advisors) from its formation in January 2008 until June 2011, and as its president from January 2008 until April 2010 and as its treasurer from January 2008 until September 2008. He has served as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of CCIT since its formation in April 2010. He served as the chief executive officer of Cole Corporate Income Advisors, LLC (Cole Corporate Income Advisors) from its formation in April 2010 until

 

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June 2011. Mr. Cole has served as the chairman, chief executive officer and president of Cole Income NAV Strategy since its formation in July 2010. He served as the chief executive officer of Cole Real Estate Income Strategy (Daily NAV) Advisors, LLC (Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors) from its formation in July 2010 until June 2011.

Mr. Cole has been the sole shareholder of Cole Holdings Corporation since its formation in August 2004, has served as its chairman since October 2007, and previously served as its chief executive officer from August 2004 until June 2011, as its president and treasurer from August 2004 until April 2010, and as its secretary from October 2007 to April 2010. Mr. Cole has also been engaged as a general partner in the structuring and management of real estate limited partnerships since February 1979. Mr. Cole previously served as the treasurer of Cole Realty Advisors, Inc. (Cole Realty Advisors) from its formation in November 2002 until September 2009, as its chief executive officer from December 2002 until June 2011, as its president from November 2002 until March 2007 and from October 2007 until September 2009, and as its secretary from November 2002 until December 2002. Mr. Cole previously served as the treasurer of Cole Capital Partners from January 2003 until April 2010, as its chief executive officer from January 2003 until June 2011, and as its president from January 2003 to March 2007 and from October 2007 until April 2010. Mr. Cole previously served as the treasurer of Cole Capital Advisors from its formation in November 2002 until April 2010, as its chief executive officer from December 2002 until June 2011, as its president from November 2002 until March 2007 and from October 2007 until April 2010, and as its secretary from November 2002 until December 2002.

Mr. Cole has served as the chief executive officer and treasurer of the Cole Growth Opportunity Fund I GP, LLC since its formation in March 2007. Mr. Cole served as the executive vice president and treasurer of Cole Capital Corporation from December 2002 until January 2008. Mr. Cole has been the sole director of Cole Capital Corporation since December 2002. Mr. Cole was selected to serve as a director of our company because he is the chief executive officer of our company, and Mr. Cole’s experience and relationships in the non-traded REIT and real estate industries, along with his knowledge of the Cole Real Estate Investments organization, are believed to provide significant value to the board of directors.

D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr. has served as our executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer since our formation in July 2010. He also has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of CR IV Advisors since January 2012 and as its executive vice president and chief financial officer from its formation in July 2010 until January 2012. Mr. McAllaster has also served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of CCPT I and CCPT II since October 2007, as the treasurer of each since May 2011, and has been a member of the board of directors of CCPT I since May 2008. He has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of CCPT I Advisors and CCPT II Advisors since January 2012, and previously served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of each from March 2007 until January 2012, and as vice president, finance of each from December 2005 until March 2007. He has served as executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer of CCPT III since its formation in January 2008, and served as its secretary from January 2008 to November 2010. He also has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of CCPT III Advisors since January 2012 and as its executive vice president and chief financial officer from its formation in January 2008 until January 2012. Mr. McAllaster has served as executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer if CCIT since its formation in April 2010 and served as its secretary from April 2010 until August 2010 and from January 2011 until March 2011. He has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of Cole Corporate Income Advisors since January 2012 and as its executive vice president and chief financial officer from its formation in April 2010 until January 2012. He has served as the executive vice president, chief financial officer and treasurer of Cole Income NAV Strategy since its formation in July 2010. He has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors since January 2012 and as its executive vice president and chief financial officer from its formation in July 2010 until January 2012. Mr. McAllaster has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of Cole Realty Advisors since January 2012 and as its treasurer since September 2009, and previously served as executive vice president and chief

 

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financial officer from March 2007 until January 2012. Mr. McAllaster has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (REITs and real estate funds) of Cole Capital Partners and Cole Capital Advisors since January 2012, and previously served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of each from March 2007 until January 2012 and as vice president, finance of each from December 2005 until March 2007. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments in May 2003, Mr. McAllaster worked for six years with Deloitte & Touche LLP, most recently as audit senior manager. He has over 20 years of accounting and finance experience in public accounting and private industry. Mr. McAllaster received a B.S. degree from California State Polytechnic University — Pomona with a major in Accounting. He is a Certified Public Accountant licensed in the states of Arizona and Tennessee and is a member of the American Institute of CPAs and the Arizona Society of CPAs.

Marc T. Nemer has served as a director since March 2012. He has served as chief executive officer of CR IV Advisors since June 2011 and as its president since its formation in July 2010. Mr. Nemer has served as chief executive officer of Cole Holdings Corporation (d/b/a Cole Real Estate Investments), the parent company of our advisor and affiliates, since June 2011 and as its president since April 2010. He has served as president, secretary and treasurer of Cole Capital Corporation since January 2008. Mr. Nemer has served as a member of the boards of directors of CCPT I and CCPT III since May 2010, and as a member of the boards of directors of CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy since January 2011 and January 2012, respectively. Mr. Nemer has served as chief executive officer of CCPT I Advisors and CCPT II Advisors since June 2011 and as president of each since April 2010, and previously served as executive vice president and managing director of capital markets of each from March 2008 until April 2010, and as executive vice president, securities and regulatory affairs of each from October 2007 until March 2008. He has served as chief executive officer of CCPT III Advisors since June 2011 and its president since April 2010, and previously served as executive vice president and managing director of capital markets from September 2008 until April 2010, and as executive vice president, securities and regulatory affairs from its formation in January 2008 until September 2008. Mr. Nemer has served as chief executive officer of Cole Corporate Income Advisors since June 2011 and as its president since its formation in April 2010. Mr. Nemer has served as the chief executive officer of Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors since June 2011 and as its president since its formation in July 2010. Mr. Nemer has served as chief executive officer for Cole Realty Advisors since June 2011, and previously served as its executive vice president and managing director of capital markets from March 2008 to June 2011, as its executive vice president, securities and regulatory affairs from October 2007 until March 2008, and as its vice president, legal services and compliance from March 2007 until October 2007. He has served as chief executive officer of Cole Capital Advisors and Cole Capital Partners since June 2011 and as president of each since April 2010, and previously served as executive vice president and managing director of capital markets of each from March 2008 to April 2010, as executive vice president, securities and regulatory affairs of each from October 2007 until March 2008 and as vice president, legal services and compliance of each from March 2007 until October 2007. Mr. Nemer also served as legal counsel to Cole Capital Advisors from February 2006 to March 2007. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments, Mr. Nemer was an attorney with the international law firm Latham & Watkins LLP, where he specialized in securities offerings (public and private), corporate governance, and mergers and acquisitions from July 2000 until February 2006. Prior to that, Mr. Nemer worked at the international law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, where he worked as an attorney in a similar capacity from August 1998 until July 2000. Mr. Nemer earned a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1998 and a B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1995. Mr. Nemer was selected to serve as a director of the Company because of his extensive knowledge and relationships within the non-traded REIT industry, his knowledge of the Cole Real Estate Investments organization in his capacity as its chief executive officer and president, and his legal, regulatory and compliance experience, all of which are expected to bring valuable insight to the board of directors.

Lawrence S. Jones has served as an independent director and as the chairman of our audit committee since March 2012. Mr. Jones served as the managing director of Encore Enterprises, Inc. — Equity Funds, a real estate development company, from August 2008 to April 2010. Previously, he served as a senior audit partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP from September 1999 to July 2007, where he was the financial services industry leader for the Dallas and Houston markets from September 1999 to July 2006, and the firm’s representative to the Board of Governors of the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT) from 1999 to

 

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2007. Prior to joining PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Mr. Jones served from March 1998 to June 1999 as executive vice president and treasurer of Wyndham International, Inc., an upscale and luxury hotel operating company. Mr. Jones began his career in 1972 at Coopers & Lybrand, a predecessor of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, and served as the partner in charge of Coopers & Lybrand’s national REIT practice from 1992 until March 1998. From July 1982 to June 1984, Mr. Jones served as a professional accounting fellow with the Office of the Chief Accountant of the Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C. Mr. Jones has previously served as a director of the Dallas Arts District Alliance and is currently a member of the Dallas Park and Recreation Board, the National Association of Corporate Directors, NAREIT, the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Mr. Jones is a past-president of the Haas School of Business Alumni Association (University of California at Berkeley). He served as an independent director of Moody National REIT I, Inc. from March 2010 to February 2012. Mr. Jones received a B.A. degree in Economics and Corporate Finance from the University of California at Berkeley and a Master’s Degree in Corporate Finance from the UCLA Anderson School of Management. Mr. Jones was selected to serve as a director of our company because of his extensive experience as a certified public accountant and as a real estate industry executive, with strong leadership, management and technical skills, all of which are expected to bring valuable insight to our board of directors.

J. Marc Myers has served as an independent director since January 2012. Mr. Myers co-founded Myers & Crow Company, Ltd., a real estate development company, in 1994, and is a partner of that firm. Prior to that, Mr. Myers spent 23 years with Trammell Crow Company, where he was chief executive officer of the Dallas Industrial Division and a member of its management board. Mr. Myers is active in a number of real estate organizations and is a member of the Dallas Real Estate Developer Hall of Fame. In addition, Mr. Myers serves on the board of directors for the Baylor Health Care System Foundation. He is a recent past chairman of the McCombs School of Business Advisory Council. He also has served on the boards of the Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, Special Camps for Special Kids and the University of Texas at Austin’s Commission of 125. Mr. Myers received a B.B.A and an M.B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin. After receiving his degrees, Mr. Myers served in the U.S. Army as a Second Lieutenant. Mr. Myers was selected to serve as a director of our company because of his significant leadership experience in the real estate industry, which is expected to bring valuable insight to the board of directors.

Scott P. Sealy, Sr. has served as an independent director since January 2012. Mr. Sealy also serves as a director of CCPT III, a position he has held since October 2008. Mr. Sealy has been a principal of Sealy & Company, Incorporated, a real estate and investment company, since 1968 and has served as chairman of its board of directors since February 2000. Mr. Sealy provides strategic planning and business development for the company, which is in the business of acquisitions, repositioning and ground-up development of regional distribution and industrial facilities. During his tenure, Sealy & Company, Incorporated and its affiliates have acquired or developed and sold over $1 billion of industrial real estate totaling approximately 31 million square feet. In 2008, Sealy & Company, Incorporated entered into a $200 million joint venture with California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS). The joint venture, named SeaCal, pursues the acquisition and development of value-added industrial and office properties. Mr. Sealy is a member of the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors and has served as a chapter president, a member of its national board of directors, and a member of its strategic planning committee. Mr. Sealy was selected to serve as a director of our company because of his significant real estate and leadership experience as a fiduciary to other real estate programs. Our board of directors believes that this experience will assist the board of directors in its strategic and operational initiatives.

Duties of Independent Directors

In accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines, a majority of our independent directors generally must approve corporate actions that directly relate to the following:

 

   

any transfer or sale of our sponsor’s initial investment in us; provided, however, our sponsor may not sell its initial investment while it remains our sponsor, but our sponsor may transfer the shares to an affiliate;

 

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the duties of our directors, including ratification of our charter, the written policies on investments and borrowing, the monitoring of administrative procedures, investment operations and our performance and the performance of our advisor;

 

   

the advisory agreement;

 

   

liability and indemnification of our directors, advisor and its affiliates;

 

   

fees, compensation and expenses, including organization and offering expenses, acquisition fees and acquisition expenses, total operating expenses, real estate commissions on the resale of property, incentive fees, and advisor compensation;

 

   

any change or modification of our statement of objectives;

 

   

real property appraisals;

 

   

our borrowing policies;

 

   

annual and special meetings of stockholders;

 

   

election of our directors; and

 

   

our distribution reinvestment plan.

Compensation of Directors

We pay to each of our independent directors a retainer of $50,000 per year, plus an additional retainer of $7,500 to the chairman of the audit committee. We also pay $2,000 for each meeting of our board of directors or committee thereof the director attends in person ($2,500 for the attendance in person by the chairperson of the audit committee at each meeting of the audit committee) and $250 for each meeting the director attends by telephone. In the event there is a meeting of our board of directors and one or more committees thereof in a single day, the fees paid to each director will be limited to $2,500 per day ($3,000 per day for the chairperson of the audit committee if there is a meeting of such committee). All directors will receive reimbursement of reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with attendance at each meeting of our board of directors. Independent directors are not reimbursed by us, our sponsor, our advisor or any of their affiliates for spouses’ expenses to attend events to which spouses are invited. If a non-independent director is also an employee of our company or our advisor or their affiliates, we will not pay compensation for services rendered as a director. We will not compensate Messrs. Cole or Nemer for their service to us on the board of directors.

Limited Liability and Indemnification of Our Directors, Officers, Advisor and Other Agents

We are permitted to limit the liability of our directors and officers, and to indemnify and advance expenses to our directors, officers and other agents, only to the extent permitted by Maryland law and the NASAA REIT Guidelines. Our charter contains a provision that eliminates directors’ and officers’ liability for money damages, requires us to indemnify and, in certain circumstances, advance expenses to our directors, officers, our advisor and its affiliates and permits us to indemnify and advance expenses to our employees and agents, subject to the limitations of Maryland law and the NASAA REIT Guidelines. To the extent that our board of directors determines that the Maryland General Corporation Law conflicts with the provisions set forth in the NASAA REIT Guidelines, the NASAA REIT Guidelines will control, unless the provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law are mandatory under Maryland law.

Maryland law permits us to include in our charter a provision limiting the liability of our directors and officers to our stockholders and us for money damages, except for liability resulting from (i) actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or services or (ii) active and deliberate dishonesty established by a final judgment and that is material to the cause of action.

The Maryland General Corporation Law requires us (unless our charter provides otherwise, which our charter does not) to indemnify a director or officer who has been successful in the defense of any proceeding to

 

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which he is made or threatened to be made a party by reason of his service in that capacity. The Maryland General Corporation Law allows directors and officers to be indemnified against judgments, penalties, fines, settlements and expenses actually incurred by them in connection with any proceeding unless it is established that:

 

   

an act or omission of the director or officer was material to the cause of action adjudicated in the proceeding and was committed in bad faith or was the result of active and deliberate dishonesty;

 

   

the director or officer actually received an improper personal benefit in money, property or services;

 

   

with respect to any criminal proceeding, the director or officer had reasonable cause to believe his act or omission was unlawful; or

 

   

in a proceeding by us or on our behalf, the director or officer was adjudged to be liable to us or for a judgment of liability on the basis that personal benefit was improperly received (although in either case a court may order indemnification solely for expenses).

In addition to the above limitations of the Maryland General Corporation Law, and as set forth in the NASAA REIT Guidelines, our charter further limits our ability to indemnify our directors, our advisor and its affiliates for losses or liability suffered by them or hold harmless our directors or our advisor and its affiliates for losses or liability suffered by us by requiring that the following additional conditions are met:

 

   

the directors, our advisor or its affiliates have determined, in good faith, that the course of conduct that caused the loss or liability was in our best interests;

 

   

the directors, our advisor or its affiliates were acting on our behalf or performing services for us;

 

   

in the case of non-independent directors, our advisor or its affiliates, the liability or loss was not the result of negligence or misconduct by the party seeking indemnification;

 

   

in the case of independent directors, the liability or loss was not the result of gross negligence or willful misconduct by the party seeking indemnification; and

 

   

the indemnification or agreement to hold harmless is recoverable only out of our net assets and not from the stockholders.

We also will agree to indemnify and hold harmless our advisor and its affiliates performing services for us from specific claims and liabilities arising out of the performance of their obligations under the advisory agreement. As a result, our stockholders and we may be entitled to a more limited right of action than they and we would otherwise have if these indemnification rights were not included in the advisory agreement.

The general effect to our stockholders of any arrangement under which we agree to insure or indemnify any persons against liability is a potential reduction in distributions resulting from our payment of premiums associated with insurance or indemnification payments in excess of amounts covered by insurance. In addition, indemnification could reduce the legal remedies available to our stockholders and us against our officers and directors. The Maryland General Corporation Law permits us to advance reasonable expenses to a director or officer upon receipt of (1) a written affirmation by the director or officer of his or her good faith belief that he or she has met the standard of conduct necessary for indemnification and (2) a written undertaking by him or her or on his or her behalf to repay the amount paid or reimbursed if it is ultimately determined that the standard of conduct was not met. However, indemnification does not reduce the exposure of directors and officers to liability under federal or state securities laws, nor does it limit the stockholders’ ability to obtain injunctive relief or other equitable remedies for a violation of a director’s or an officer’s duties to us, although the equitable remedies may not be an effective remedy in some circumstances.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and some state securities commissions take the position that indemnification against liabilities arising under the Securities Act is against public policy and unenforceable.

 

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Indemnification of our directors, our advisor or its affiliates and any persons acting as a broker-dealer participating in the sale of our securities will not be allowed for liabilities arising from or out of a violation of state or federal securities laws, unless one or more of the following conditions are met:

 

   

there has been a successful adjudication on the merits in favor of the indemnitee of each count involving alleged securities law violations;

 

   

such claims have been dismissed with prejudice on the merits by a court of competent jurisdiction; or

 

   

a court of competent jurisdiction approves a settlement of the claims against the indemnitee and finds that indemnification of the settlement and the related costs should be made, and the court considering the request for indemnification has been advised of the position of the Securities and Exchange Commission and of the published position of any state securities regulatory authority in which our securities were offered as to indemnification for violations of securities laws.

Our charter provides that the advancement of our funds to our directors, our advisor or our advisor’s affiliates for legal expenses and other costs incurred as a result of any legal action for which indemnification is being sought is permissible only if all of the following conditions are satisfied: (i) the legal action relates to acts or omissions with respect to the performance of duties or services on our behalf; (ii) our directors, our advisor or our advisor’s affiliates provide us with written affirmation of their good faith belief that they have met the standard of conduct necessary for indemnification; (iii) the legal action is initiated by a third party who is not a stockholder or, if the legal action is initiated by a stockholder acting in his or her capacity as such, a court of competent jurisdiction approves such advancement; and (iv) our directors, our advisor or our advisor’s affiliates agree in writing to repay the advanced funds to us together with the applicable legal rate of interest thereon, in cases in which such persons are found not to be entitled to indemnification.

The Advisor

Our advisor is CR IV Advisors, a Delaware limited liability company that was formed on July 27, 2010, and is an affiliate of our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments. Whereas CR IV Advisors was formed solely for the purpose of managing our company and has a limited operating history, certain employees within the Cole Real Estate Investments organization, which employed over 325 persons as of the date of this prospectus, perform the services required to manage our operations. These employees include the members of our advisor’s real estate management team. Our advisor has contractual and fiduciary responsibility to us and our stockholders. Our advisor is wholly-owned indirectly by Christopher H. Cole.

The officers and key personnel of our advisor or certain affiliates are as follows:

 

Name

   Age*   

Position(s)

Marc T. Nemer

   39    Chief Executive Officer and President

Jeffrey C. Holland

   41    Executive Vice President and Head of Capital Markets

Chong P. Huan

   55    Executive Vice President and Head of Technology & Infrastructure

Indraneel Karlekar

   40    Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Strategist

Stephan Keller

   45    Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr.

   45    Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (REITs and Real Estate Funds)

John M. Pons

   48    Executive Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel, Real Estate

Thomas W. Roberts

   53    Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Real Estate

Mitchell A. Sabshon

   60    Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

 

* As of October 10, 2012.

 

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The backgrounds of Messrs. Nemer and McAllaster are described in the “— Executive Officers and Directors” section above. Below is a brief description of the other executive officers and key employees of CR IV Advisors.

Jeffrey C. Holland has served as executive vice president and head of capital markets of CR IV Advisors since January 2011. In this role, he provides strategic direction and oversees external and internal sales, marketing, broker-dealer relations, due diligence and securities operations. He also serves as executive vice president and head of capital markets of Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners, CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Corporate Income Advisors and Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments in December 2010, Mr. Holland held several roles at BlackRock, Inc.’s U.S. retail division, an asset management business focused on financial advisor-intermediated distribution channels, including chief operating officer from 2008 to 2010 and co-head of product development and management from 2006 to 2008. Prior to joining BlackRock, Mr. Holland served as vice president, consulting services, for Raymond James & Associates from 2003 to 2006. Mr. Holland served at Capital Resource Advisors from 1999 to 2003, most recently as director in the Business Strategies Group. From 1996 to 1999, he worked as an engagement manager for McKinsey & Company, Inc. Mr. Holland earned a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from the University of Puget Sound.

Chong P. Huan has served as executive vice president and head of technology & infrastructure of CR IV Advisors since January 2012, and previously served as executive vice president and chief technology officer of CR IV Advisors from January 2011 to January 2012. In this role, he is responsible for oversight of all facilities and technology operations, including facilities management, technology infrastructure and application development, strategic planning and information management. He also serves as executive vice president and head of technology & infrastructure of Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners, CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Corporate Income Advisors and Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments, Mr. Huan served as principal and founder of CIR Solutions LLC, an information technology consulting firm, from 2009 to 2010. Mr. Huan served as chief technology officer and managing director for Citi Global Investment Research from 2007 to 2009. Prior to joining Citi Global Investment Research, he served as senior information officer and vice president of AIG Investment in 2007, chief information officer and senior managing director of New York Life Investment Management from 2000 to 2006, and head of information technology in the Americas with UBS Private Banking and Asset Management from 1996 to 2000. Mr. Huan holds an Executive Masters in technology management from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and an M.B.A. from Northeastern University, and received a B.S. in engineering with honors from Oxford, U.K. He is also a Moore Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Indraneel Karlekar has served as executive vice president and chief investment strategist of CR IV Advisors since May 2011. In this role, he is responsible for leading our advisor’s real estate investment strategy and continually enhancing Cole Real Estate Investments’ product offerings. He also works on a broad range of initiatives across the Cole Real Estate Investments organization, including serving as the firm’s economist. Mr. Karlekar also serves as executive vice president and chief investment strategist of Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners, CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Corporate Income Advisors and Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments in May 2011, Mr. Karlekar was head of global research and strategy at ING Clarion Real Estate Securities/ING Clarion Partners from 2003 through April 2011, where he was a member of the firm’s investment team and head of its asset allocation committee. Mr. Karlekar served as vice president and head of research of AIG Global Real Estate in 2003, and as a senior analyst — Asia-Pacific for The Economist Intelligence Unit (Economist Group) from 1999 to 2003. Mr. Karlekar received his Ph.D. in Economic Geography and his M.Phil. in International Relations from the University of Cambridge, England; an M.A. in International History from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India; and a B.A. in Global History from St. Stephen’s College in New Delhi, India.

Stephan Keller has served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of our advisor since January 2012. In this role, he is responsible for leading our advisor’s accounting and reporting functions. He also focuses on corporate strategy, corporate business planning, treasury, controls and corporate financing activities.

 

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Mr. Keller also serves as executive vice president and chief financial officer of Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners, CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Corporate Income Advisors and Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments as executive vice president and chief financial officer in November 2011, Mr. Keller worked for UBS AG from 1992 to 2011, including serving as vice chairman, investment banking of the Financial Institutions Group from 2010 to 2011, group treasurer from 2006 to 2010, chief risk officer of UBS Investment Bank from 2004 to 2006 and chief risk officer for the U.S. Wealth Management business from 2002 to 2004. Mr. Keller received his M.B.A. from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.

John M. Pons has served as the executive vice president and general counsel, real estate of CR IV Advisors since its formation in July 2010, and as its secretary since January 2011. Mr. Pons served as secretary for CCPT I from March 2004 to January 2011, and was a member of its board of directors from March 2004 until May 2010. He has served as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary of CCPT I Advisors since September 2008, and previously served as executive vice president, chief administrative officer, general counsel and secretary from October 2007 until September 2008, as executive vice president, chief operating officer, general counsel and secretary from March 2007 until October 2007, as senior vice president and general counsel from December 2005 until March 2007, as senior vice president and counsel from August 2005 until December 2005, and as vice president, counsel and secretary from March 2004 until August 2005. Mr. Pons served as secretary of CCPT II from its formation in September 2004 until November 2010. He served as a member of CCPT II’s board of directors from September 2004 until November 2004. Mr. Pons has served as executive vice president and general counsel of CCPT II Advisors since September 2008 and as its secretary since January 2011, and previously served as executive vice president, chief administrative officer, general counsel and secretary from October 2007 until September 2008, as executive vice president, chief operating officer, general counsel and secretary from March 2007 until October 2007, as senior vice president and general counsel from December 2005 until March 2007, as senior vice president and counsel from August 2005 until December 2005, and as vice president, counsel and secretary from September 2004 until August 2005. Mr. Pons has served as executive vice president and general counsel of CCPT III Advisors since its formation in January 2008 and as its secretary since January 2011, and previously served as its chief operating officer from January 2008 until May 2008. He has served as executive vice president and general counsel, real estate of Cole Corporate Income Advisors since its formation in April 2010 and as its secretary since January 2011. Mr. Pons has served as executive vice president and general counsel, real estate of Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors since July 2010, and as its secretary since January 2011. Mr. Pons has served as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary of Cole Realty Advisors since September 2008, and previously served as executive vice president, chief administrative officer, general counsel and secretary from October 2007 until September 2008, as executive vice president, chief operating officer and general counsel from March 2007 until October 2007, and as senior vice president from January 2006 until March 2007. He has served as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary of Cole Capital Partners and Cole Capital Advisors since September 2008, and previously served for each as executive vice president, chief administrative officer, general counsel and secretary from October 2007 until September 2008, as executive vice president, chief operating officer and general counsel from March 2007 until October 2007, as senior vice president and general counsel from December 2005 until March 2007, as senior vice president and counsel from August 2005 until December 2005, and as vice president and counsel from September 2003 until August 2005. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments in September 2003, Mr. Pons was an associate general counsel and assistant secretary with GE Capital Franchise Finance Corporation from December 2001. Before attending law school, Mr. Pons was a Captain in the United States Air Force where he served from 1988 until 1992. Mr. Pons received a B.S. degree in Mathematics from Colorado State University and a M.S. degree in Administration from Central Michigan University before earning his J.D. (Order of St. Ives) in 1995 at the University of Denver.

Thomas W. Roberts has served as executive vice president and managing director of real estate of CR IV Advisors since July 2010. He has served as president of Cole Realty Advisors since September 2009. He has served as executive vice president and managing director of real estate of CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Capital Partners and Cole Capital Advisors since September 2009. He has served as

 

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executive vice president and managing director of real estate of Cole Corporate Income Advisors since its formation in April 2010, and of Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors since July 2010. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments, Mr. Roberts served as president and chief executive officer of Opus West Corporation, a Phoenix-based real estate developer, from March 1993 until May 2009. Mr. Roberts also worked as vice president, real estate development for the Koll Company from 1986 until 1990. In July 2009, Opus West Corporation filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Mr. Roberts received a B.S. from Arizona State University. Mr. Roberts has been active in many professional and community organizations including the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, International Council of Shopping Centers, National Association of Industrial and Office Properties, Young Presidents Organization, ULI, Phoenix Boys and Girls Club, and Xavier College Preparatory Board of Trustees.

Mitchell A. Sabshon has served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of CR IV Advisors since January 2011. In this role, he is responsible for corporate finance, asset management, property management, leasing and high yield portfolio management. He also works on a broad range of initiatives across the Cole Real Estate Investments organization, including issues pertaining to corporate and portfolio strategy, product development and systems. He also serves as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Cole Capital Advisors, Cole Capital Partners, CCPT I Advisors, CCPT II Advisors, CCPT III Advisors, Cole Corporate Income Advisors and Cole Income NAV Strategy Advisors. Prior to joining Cole Real Estate Investments in November 2010, Mr. Sabshon served as managing partner and chief investment officer of EndPoint Financial LLC, an advisory firm providing acquisition and finance advisory services to equity investors, from 2008 to 2010. Mr. Sabshon served as chief investment officer and executive vice president of GFI Capital Resources Group, Inc., a national owner-operator of multifamily properties, from 2007 to 2008. Prior to joining GFI, Mr. Sabshon served with Goldman Sachs & Company from 2004 to 2007 and from 1997 to 2002 in several key strategic roles, including president and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Commercial Mortgage Capital and head of the Insurance Client Development Group. From 2002 to 2004, Mr. Sabshon was executive director of the U.S. Institutional Sales Group at Morgan Stanley. Mr. Sabshon held various positions at Lehman Brothers Inc. from 1991 to 1997, most recently as senior vice president in the Real Estate Investment Banking Group. Prior to joining Lehman Brothers, Mr. Sabshon was an attorney in the Real Estate Structured Finance group of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP. Mr. Sabshon received his J.D. from Hofstra University School of Law and a B.A. from George Washington University.

In addition to the officers and key personnel listed above, our advisor employs personnel who have extensive experience in selecting, managing and selling commercial properties similar to the properties sought to be acquired by us. As of the date of this prospectus our advisor is the sole limited partner of our operating partnership.

The Advisory Agreement

CR IV Advisors is an entity created by our sponsor for the sole purpose of managing the day-to-day operations of our company. We entered into an advisory agreement with CR IV Advisors on January 20, 2012. Many of the services performed by our advisor in managing our day-to-day activities pursuant to the advisory agreement are summarized below. We believe that our advisor currently has sufficient staff and experience so as to be capable of fulfilling the duties set forth in the advisory agreement, along with the duties owed to other real estate programs managed by affiliates of our advisor. This summary is provided to illustrate the material functions that CR IV Advisors will perform for us as our advisor, and it is not intended to include additional services that may be provided to us by third parties, for which they will be separately compensated either directly by us or by our advisor and reimbursed by us. In the event that our advisor engages a third party to perform services that we have engaged our advisor to perform pursuant to the advisory agreement, such third party will be compensated by the advisor out of its advisory fee.

Under the terms of the advisory agreement, our advisor undertakes to use its commercially reasonable best efforts to present to us investment opportunities consistent with our investment policies and objectives as adopted

 

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by our board of directors. In its performance of this undertaking, CR IV Advisors, either directly or indirectly by engaging an affiliate or an unaffiliated third party, shall, among other duties and subject to the supervision of our board of directors:

 

   

find, evaluate, present and recommend to us investment opportunities consistent with our investment policies and objectives;

 

   

serve as our investment and financial advisor and provide research and economic and statistical data in connection with our assets and our investment policies;

 

   

provide the daily management and perform and supervise the various administrative functions reasonably necessary for our management and operations;

 

   

investigate, select, and, on our behalf, engage and conduct business with such third parties as the advisor deems necessary to the proper performance of its obligations under the advisory agreement;

 

   

consult with, and provide information to, our officers and board of directors and assist the board of directors in formulating and implementing our financial policies;

 

   

structure and negotiate the terms and conditions of our real estate acquisitions, sales or joint ventures;

 

   

review and analyze each property’s operating and capital budget;

 

   

acquire properties and make investments on our behalf in compliance with our investment objectives and policies;

 

   

arrange, structure and negotiate financing and refinancing of properties;

 

   

enter into leases of property and service contracts for assets and, to the extent necessary, perform all other operational functions for the maintenance and administration of such assets, including the servicing of mortgages;

 

   

prepare and review on our behalf, with the participation of one designated principal executive officer and principal financial officer, all reports and returns required by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Internal Revenue Service and other state or federal governmental agencies; and

 

   

dispose of properties on our behalf in compliance with our investment objectives and policies, and at the appropriate time, advise our board of directors on the timing and method of providing our investors with liquidity.

It is the duty of our board of directors to evaluate the performance of our advisor before entering into or renewing the advisory agreement, and the criteria used in such evaluation shall be reflected in the minutes of the board of directors’ meeting at which such evaluation was conducted. The advisory agreement will have a one-year term ending January 20, 2013, and may be renewed for an unlimited number of successive one-year periods. Additionally, either party may terminate the advisory agreement upon 60 days’ written notice without cause or penalty. After termination of the advisory agreement, our advisor will not be entitled to any further compensation, however it will be entitled to receive all unpaid reimbursements of expenses, subject to certain limitations, and all fees payable to the advisor that accrued prior to the termination of the advisory agreement. A subordinated performance fee also may be payable, as discussed below. Our charter does not permit us to enter into an advisory agreement that includes terms that would impose a penalty, such as a termination fee, on the party that elects to terminate the agreement. If we elect to terminate the agreement, we must obtain the approval of a majority of our independent directors. In the event of the termination of our advisory agreement, our advisor is required to cooperate with us and take all reasonable steps requested by us to assist our board of directors in making an orderly transition of the advisory function.

We pay our advisor a monthly advisory fee based upon our monthly average invested assets, equal to the following amounts: (i) an annualized rate of 0.75% will be paid on our average invested assets that are between $0 and $2 billion; (ii) an annualized rate of 0.70% will be paid on our average invested assets that are between

 

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$2 billion and $4 billion; and (iii) an annualized rate of 0.65% will be paid on our average invested assets that are over $4 billion. Monthly average invested assets will equal the average book value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by our real estate, before reserves for depreciation and amortization or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves, other than impairment charges, computed by taking the average of such values at the end of each business day, over the course of the month. After our board of directors begins to determine the estimated per share value of our common stock, the average invested assets will be based upon the aggregate valuation of our invested assets, as reasonably estimated by our board of directors. Any portion of this fee may be deferred and paid in a subsequent period upon the mutual agreement of us and our advisor.

We also pay our advisor acquisition fees equal to 2% of: (i) the contract purchase price of each property or asset that we acquire; (ii) the amount paid in respect of the development, construction or improvement of each asset we acquire; (iii) the purchase price of any loan we acquire; and (iv) the principal amount of any loan we originate. Any portion of the acquisition fee may be deferred and paid in a subsequent period upon the mutual agreement of us and our advisor. We are prohibited from paying more than 6% of the contract price of a property, or in the case of a mortgage loan, 6% of the funds advanced, in acquisition fees, including development fees, construction fees and acquisition expenses, unless otherwise approved by a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in the transaction, as commercially competitive, fair and reasonable to us, although we intend to limit such payments below 6%.

If our advisor or its affiliates provides a substantial amount of services (as determined by a majority of our independent directors) in connection with the sale of properties, we will pay our advisor or its affiliate a disposition fee in an amount equal to up to one-half of the brokerage commission paid on the sale of properties, not to exceed 1% of the contract price of the properties sold; provided, however, in no event may the disposition fee paid to our advisor or its affiliates, when added to the real estate commissions paid to unaffiliated third parties, exceed the lesser of the customary competitive real estate commission or an amount equal to 6% of the contract sales price.

Additionally, we will be required to pay to our advisor, in cash, a non-interest bearing promissory note or shares of our common stock (or any combination thereof), at our election, subordinated fees based on a percentage of proceeds or stock value in the event of our sale of assets or the listing of our common stock on a national securities exchange, but only if, in the case of our sale of assets, our investors have received, from regular distributions plus special distributions paid from proceeds of such sale, a return of their net capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return or, in the case of the listing of our common stock, the market value of our common stock plus the distributions paid to our investors exceeds the sum of the total amount of capital raised from investors plus the amount of distributions necessary to generate an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return to investors. Upon termination of the advisory agreement, we may incur an obligation to pay to our advisor a subordinated performance fee, in cash, a non-interest bearing promissory note or our shares, at our election, similar to that which our advisor would have been entitled had the portfolio been liquidated (based on an independent appraised value of the portfolio) on the date of termination.

Other than the fees described above, neither the advisor nor its affiliates will be entitled to any additional fees for managing or leasing our properties.

We reimburse our advisor for the expenses incurred in connection with its provision of advisory and administrative services, such as the portion of the salaries paid to employees of Cole Real Estate Investments who are dual employees of our advisor (including executive officers and key personnel of our advisor who are not also executive officers of our company) that are attributed to services rendered by our advisor in connection with our operations, including non-offering related legal and accounting services; provided, however, that we will not reimburse our advisor for the salaries and benefits paid to our executive officers, or for personnel costs in connection with services for which the advisor receives acquisition fees.

 

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Officers, employees and affiliates of our advisor engage in other business ventures and, as a result, their resources will not be dedicated exclusively to our business. However, pursuant to the advisory agreement, our advisor will be required to devote sufficient resources to our administration to discharge its obligations. The Cole Real Estate Investments organization has over 325 full-time employees, many of whom may dedicate a portion of their time to providing services on behalf of our advisor. Our advisor is responsible for a pro rata portion of each employee’s compensation based upon the approximate percentage of time the employee dedicates to our advisor.

Our advisor may assign the advisory agreement to an affiliate upon approval of a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of our independent directors. We may assign or transfer the advisory agreement to a successor entity; provided that at least a majority of our independent directors determines that any such successor advisor possesses sufficient qualifications to perform the advisory function and to justify the compensation payable to the advisor. Our independent directors will base their determination on the general facts and circumstances that they deem applicable, including the overall experience and specific industry experience of the successor advisor and its management. Other factors that will be considered are the compensation to be paid to the successor advisor and any potential conflicts of interest that may occur.

The fees payable to our advisor under the advisory agreement are described in further detail in the “Management Compensation” section of this prospectus. We also describe in that section our obligation to reimburse our advisor for organization and offering expenses, advisory and administrative services, and payments made by our advisor to third parties in connection with potential acquisitions.

Our advisor’s principal assets will be its cash balances and its advisory agreement with our company, and the revenues associated with such agreement. In addition, we expect that our advisor will be covered by an errors and omissions insurance policy. If our advisor is held liable for a breach of its fiduciary duty to us, or a breach of its contractual obligations to us, we expect that the liability would be paid by our advisor from its cash balances or by the insurance policy. However, our advisor is not required to retain cash to pay potential liabilities and it may not have sufficient cash available to pay liabilities if they arise. In such event, and if insurance proceeds are insufficient, we may not be able to collect the full amount of any claims we may have against our advisor.

Affiliated Dealer Manager

Cole Capital Corporation, our dealer manager, is a member firm of FINRA. Cole Capital Corporation was organized in December 1992 for the purpose of participating in and facilitating the distribution of securities of real estate programs sponsored by Cole Holdings Corporation, its affiliates and its predecessors.

Cole Capital Corporation provides certain wholesaling, sales, promotional and marketing assistance services to us in connection with the distribution of the shares offered pursuant to this prospectus. It may also sell a limited number of shares at the retail level. The compensation we pay to Cole Capital Corporation in connection with this offering is described in the section of this prospectus captioned “Management Compensation.” See also “Plan of Distribution — Compensation We Will Pay for the Sale of Our Shares.”

Cole Capital Corporation is wholly-owned by Cole Capital Advisors, which is wholly-owned by Cole Holdings Corporation. Christopher H. Cole is the sole stockholder of Cole Holdings Corporation. Cole Capital Corporation is an affiliate of our advisor. The backgrounds of the officers of Cole Capital Corporation are described in the “— Executive Officers and Directors” and “— The Advisor” sections above.

Investment Decisions

The primary responsibility for the investment decisions of our advisor and its affiliates, the negotiation for the purchase and sale of these investments, and the management of our assets resides with Marc T. Nemer and the other executive officers and key personnel of our advisor. The backgrounds of the officers of our advisor are described in the “— Executive Officers and Directors” and “— The Advisor” sections above. Our board of directors is responsible for supervising and monitoring the activities of our advisor.

 

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MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION

We have no paid employees. Our advisor and its affiliates manage our day-to-day affairs. The following table summarizes all of the compensation and fees we will pay to our advisor and its affiliates, including amounts to reimburse their costs in providing services. We will not pay a separate fee for financing, leasing or property management, although we may rely on our advisor or its affiliates to provide such services to us. The selling commissions may vary for different categories of purchasers. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus. This table assumes the shares are sold through distribution channels associated with the highest possible selling commissions and dealer manager fee.

 

Type of Compensation(1)

  

Determination of Amount

  

Estimated Amount for

Maximum Offering(2)

Offering Stage

Selling Commissions — Cole Capital Corporation(3)    We generally will pay to our affiliated dealer manager, Cole Capital Corporation, 7% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering. Cole Capital Corporation will reallow 100% of selling commissions to participating broker-dealers. We will not pay any selling commissions with respect to sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.    $175,000,000
Dealer Manager Fee — Cole Capital Corporation(3)    We generally will pay to Cole Capital Corporation 2% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering. Cole Capital Corporation may reallow all or a portion of its dealer manager fee to participating broker-dealers. We will not pay a dealer manager fee with respect to sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.    $50,000,000
Reimbursement of Other Organization and Offering Expenses — CR IV Advisors(4)    Our advisor will incur or pay our organization and offering expenses (excluding selling commissions and the dealer manager fee). We will then reimburse our advisor for these amounts up to 2.0% of gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.   

$59,500,000

Of the $59,500,000, we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $25,000,000 (1.0% of the gross offering proceeds of our primary offering, or 0.8% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from shares issued under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover offering expenses that are deemed to be underwriting expenses, and we expect to reimburse our advisor up to $34,500,000 (1.2% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan) to cover non-underwriting organization and offering expenses.

Acquisition and Operations Stage

Acquisition Fee — CR IV Advisors(5)    In consideration for finding, evaluating, structuring and negotiating our real estate acquisitions, we will pay to our advisor up to 2% of: (i) the contract purchase price of each property or asset; (ii) the amount paid in respect of the development, construction or improvement of each asset we acquire; (iii) the purchase price of any loan we acquire; and (iv) the principal amount of any loan we originate.    $52,446,394 assuming no debt or $209,785,575 assuming leverage of 75% of the contract purchase price.

 

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Type of Compensation(1)

  

Determination of Amount

  

Estimated Amount for

Maximum Offering(2)

Advisory Fee — CR IV Advisors(6)   

In consideration for the day-to-day management of our company, we will pay to our advisor a monthly advisory fee based upon our monthly average invested assets. Monthly average invested assets will equal the average book value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by our real estate, before reserves for depreciation and amortization or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves, other than impairment charges, computed by taking the average of such values at the end of each business day, over the course of the month. After our board of directors begins to determine the estimated per share value of our common stock, the monthly advisory fee will be based upon the value of our assets invested, directly or indirectly, in equity interests in and loans secured by our real estate as determined by our board of directors.

 

The advisory fee will be calculated according to the following fee schedule:

 

  

The annualized advisory fee rate, and the actual dollar amounts, are dependent upon the amount of our monthly average invested assets and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. Based on the following assumed levels of monthly average invested assets, our annualized advisory fee will be as follows:

 

        

Monthly

Average

Invested

Assets

  

Annualized 
Effective 
Fee Rate

  

Annualized
Advisory
Fee

      $1 billion    0.75%    $  7,500,000
      $2 billion    0.75%    $15,00,000
      $3 billion    0.7333%    $22,000,000
      $4 billion    0.7250%    $29,000,000
      $5 billion    0.7100%    $35,500,000
           
           
  

Monthly

Average

Invested

Assets Range

   Annualized

Fee Rate

for Each

Range

        
  

$0 — $2 billion

   0.75%         
  

over $2 billion — $4 billion

   0.70%         
  

over $4 billion

   0.65%         
Operating Expenses —
CR IV Advisors(7)
  

We will reimburse our advisor for acquisition expenses incurred in the process of acquiring each property or in the origination or acquisition of a loan. We expect these expenses will be approximately 0.5% of the purchase price of each property or of the amount of each loan; provided, however, that acquisition expenses are not included in the contract purchase price of a property.

 

We also will reimburse our advisor for the expenses incurred in connection with its provision of advisory and administrative services, including related personnel costs and payments to third party service providers; provided, however, that we will not reimburse our advisor for the salaries and benefits paid to personnel in connection with services for which our advisor receives acquisition fees, and we will not reimburse our advisor for salaries and benefits paid to our executive officers.

   $13,111,598 estimated for reimbursement of acquisition expenses assuming no debt or $43,048,000 estimated for reimbursement of acquisition expenses assuming leverage of 75% of the contract purchase price.

 

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Type of Compensation(1)

  

Determination of Amount

  

Estimated Amount for

Maximum Offering(2)

Liquidity/Listing Stage

Disposition Fee —
CR IV Advisors or its affiliates(8)
   For substantial assistance in connection with the sale of properties, we will pay our advisor or its affiliates an amount equal to up to one-half of the brokerage commission paid on the sale of property, not to exceed 1% of the contract price of the properties sold; provided, however, in no event may the disposition fee paid to our advisor or its affiliates, when added to the real estate commissions paid to unaffiliated third parties, exceed the lesser of the customary competitive real estate commission or an amount equal to 6% of the contract sales price.    Actual amounts are dependent upon the contract price of properties sold and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. Because the disposition fee is based on a fixed percentage of the contract price for sold properties the actual amount of the disposition fees cannot be determined at the present time.
Subordinated
Performance Fee —
CR IV Advisors(9)
   After investors have received a return of their net capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return, then our advisor will be entitled to receive 15% of the remaining net sale proceeds. We cannot assure you that we will provide this 8% return, which we have disclosed solely as a measure for our advisor’s incentive compensation. We will pay a subordinated fee under only one of the following events: (i) if our shares are listed on a national securities exchange; (ii) if our company is sold or our assets are liquidated; or (iii) upon termination of the advisory agreement.    Actual amounts are dependent upon results of operations and, therefore, cannot be determined at the present time. There is no limit on the aggregate amount of these payments.

 

(1) We will pay all fees, commissions and expenses in cash, other than the subordinated performance fee, which we may pay in cash, common stock, a non-interest bearing promissory note or any combination of the foregoing, as we may determine in our discretion.

 

(2) The estimated maximum dollar amounts are based on the sale to the public of 250,000,000 shares at $10.00 per share and 50,000,000 shares at $9.50 per share pursuant to our distribution reinvestment plan.

 

(3) These payments are underwriting compensation. Underwriting compensation paid from any source in connection with this offering may not exceed 10% of the gross proceeds of the primary offering. Selling commissions and, in some cases, the dealer manager fee, will not be charged with regard to shares sold to or for the account of certain categories of purchasers. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus.

 

(4) These organization and offering expenses consist of all expenses (other than selling commissions and the dealer manager fee) to be paid by us in connection with the offering, including: (i) our legal, accounting, printing, mailing and filing fees, charges of our transfer agent for account set up fees, due diligence expenses that are included in a detailed and itemized invoice (such as expenses related to a review of this offering by one or more independent due diligence reviewers engaged by broker-dealers participating in this offering); (ii) amounts to reimburse our advisor for the portion of the salaries paid to employees of its affiliates that are attributed to services rendered to our advisor in connection with preparing supplemental sales materials for us, holding educational conferences and attending retail seminars conducted by our participating broker-dealers; and (iii) reimbursements for our dealer manager’s wholesaling costs, and other marketing and organization costs, including (a) payments made to participating broker-dealers for performing these services, (b) the dealer-manager’s wholesaling commissions, salaries and expense reimbursements, (c) the dealer manager’s due diligence costs and legal fees and (d) costs associated with business entertainment, logoed items and sales incentives. Expenses relating to educational conferences and retail seminars described in (ii) above, expenses relating to our dealer-manager’s wholesaling costs and payments to participating broker-dealers described in (iii) above and expenses described in (iii)(b) and (iii)(c) above will constitute underwriting compensation, subject to the underwriting limit of 10% of the gross proceeds of our primary offering.

 

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The estimated maximum reimbursement for other organization and offering expenses, $59,500,000, is calculated based upon gross offering proceeds including proceeds from our distribution reinvestment plan. The $25,000,000 portion of the estimated maximum reimbursement for other organization and offering expenses that we expect will be used to cover offering expenses that are deemed to be underwriting expenses equals 0.8% of aggregate gross offering proceeds, including proceeds from shares issued under our distribution reinvestment plan. However, because we do not take proceeds from the sale of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan into account when we calculate the maximum amount we will pay for underwriting compensation, the table also indicates that the $25,000,000 that we expect will be used to cover offering expenses that are deemed to be underwriting expenses equals 1.0% of the gross offering proceeds of our offering, excluding proceeds from our distribution reinvestment plan (which we refer to in this prospectus as our primary offering). In no event will total organization and offering expenses, including selling commissions, the dealer manager fee and reimbursement of other organization and offering expenses, exceed 15% of the gross proceeds of this offering, including proceeds from sales of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan.

 

(5) Any portion of this fee may be deferred and paid in a subsequent period upon the mutual agreement of us and our advisor. Pursuant to our charter, in accordance with the NASAA REIT Guidelines, our total of all acquisition fees and expenses relating to any purchase, including fees and expenses paid to third parties, shall not exceed 6% of the contract purchase price unless a majority of our directors (including a majority of our independent directors) not otherwise interested in the transaction approve fees and expenses in excess of this limit and determine the transaction to be commercially competitive, fair and reasonable to us. Included in the computation of such fees will be any real estate commission, acquisition fee, development fee, construction fee, non-recurring management fee, loan fees or points, or any fee of a similar nature. On a quarterly basis, we will review the total acquisition fees and expenses relating to each purchase to ensure that such fees and expenses do not exceed 6% of the contract purchase price. For a description of the duties of our advisor pursuant to the advisory agreement, including acquisition services, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Management — The Advisory Agreement.”

 

(6) Any portion of this fee may be deferred and paid in a subsequent period upon the mutual agreement of us and our advisor. An asset’s book value typically will equal its cost. However, in the event that an asset suffers an impairment, we will reduce the real estate and related intangible assets and liabilities to their estimated fair market value. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Application of Critical Accounting Policies — Investment in and Valuation of Real Estate and Related Assets” for additional information. For a description of the duties of our advisor pursuant to the advisory agreement, including day-to-day advisory services, see the section of this prospectus captioned “Management — The Advisory Agreement.”

 

(7) We reimburse our advisor for the portion of the salaries paid to employees of Cole Real Estate Investments who are dual employees of our advisor, including executive officers and key personnel of our advisor who are not also executive officers of our company, that are attributed to services rendered by our advisor in connection with our operations, including non-offering related legal and accounting services.

Additional services may be provided to us by third parties, for which they will be separately compensated either directly by us or by our advisor and reimbursed by us. In the event that our advisor engages a third party to perform services that we have engaged our advisor to perform pursuant to the advisory agreement, such third parties will be compensated by the advisor out of its advisory fee.

 

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We will not reimburse our advisor for any amount by which the operating expenses (which exclude, among other things, the expenses of raising capital, interest payments, taxes, non-cash items such as depreciation, amortization and bad debt reserves, and acquisition fees and acquisition expenses) paid during the four preceding fiscal quarters exceeds the greater of (i) 2% of average invested assets, or (ii) 25% of net income other than any additions to reserves for depreciation, bad debt or other similar non-cash reserves and excluding any gain from the sale of assets for that period. We will perform the above calculation on a quarterly basis to ensure that the operating expense reimbursements are within these limitations. Acquisition expenses are accounted for separately.

We lease our office space from an affiliate of our advisor and share the space with other Cole-related entities. The amount we will pay under the lease will be determined on a monthly basis based upon on the allocation of the overall lease cost to the approximate percentage of time, size of the area that we utilize and other resources allocated to us.

 

(8) Although we are most likely to pay disposition fees to CR IV Advisors or its affiliates at the time of our liquidation, these fees may be earned during our operational state if we sell properties prior to our liquidation.

 

(9) We will pay a subordinated performance fee under only one of the following alternative events: (i) if our shares are listed on a national securities exchange, our advisor will be entitled to a subordinated performance fee equal to 15% of the amount, if any, by which (1) the market value of our outstanding stock plus distributions paid by us prior to listing, exceeds (2) the sum of the total amount of capital raised from investors and the amount of distributions necessary to generate an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return to investors; (ii) if our company is sold or our assets are liquidated, our advisor will be entitled to a subordinated performance fee equal to 15% of the net sale proceeds remaining after investors have received a return of their capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return; or (iii) upon termination of the advisory agreement, our advisor may be entitled to a subordinated performance fee similar to that to which it would have been entitled had the portfolio been liquidated (based on an independent appraised value of the portfolio) on the date of termination. Under our charter, we could not increase these success-based fees without the approval of a majority of our independent directors, and any increase in these fees would have to be reasonable. Our charter provides that these subordinated fees are “presumptively reasonable” if they do not exceed 15% of the balance of such net proceeds or such net market value remaining after investors have received a return of their net capital contributions and an 8% per year cumulative, non-compounded return.

The subordinated performance fee likely will be paid in the form of a non-interest bearing promissory note that will be repaid from the net sale proceeds of each sale after the date of the termination or listing, although, at our discretion, we may pay this fee with cash or shares of our common stock, or any combination of the foregoing. At the time of such sale, we may, however, again at our discretion, pay all or a portion of such non-interest bearing promissory note with shares of our common stock. If shares are used for payment, we do not anticipate that they will be registered under the Securities Act and, therefore, will be subject to restrictions on transferability. Any portion of the subordinated performance fee that our advisor receives prior to our listing will offset the amount otherwise due pursuant to the subordinated performance fee payable upon listing. In no event will the amount paid to our advisor under the non-interest bearing promissory note, if any, exceed the amount considered presumptively reasonable by the NASAA REIT Guidelines. Any subordinated performance fee payable in respect of net sale proceeds that is not paid at the date of sale because investors have not received their required minimum distribution will be deferred and paid at such time as the subordination conditions have been satisfied.

The market value of our outstanding stock will be calculated based on the average market value of the shares issued and outstanding at listing over the 30 trading days beginning 180 days after the shares are first listed. We have the option to cause our operating partnership to pay the subordinated performance fee in the form of stock, cash, a non-interest bearing promissory note or any combination thereof. In the event the subordinated performance fee is earned by our advisor, any previous payments of the subordinated

 

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participation in net sale proceeds will offset the amounts due pursuant to the subordinated performance fee, and we will not be required to pay our advisor any further subordinated participation in net sale proceeds.

The following table summarizes the compensation, fees and reimbursements paid to our advisor and its affiliates related to the offering stage during the following periods:

 

      For the Three Months Ended  
      June 30, 2012      March 31, 2012  

Offering Stage:

     

Selling commissions

   $  2,979,558       $  —   

Selling commissions reallowed by Cole Capital Corporation

   $ 2,979,558       $   

Dealer manager fee

   $ 905,191       $   

Dealer manager fee reallowed by Cole Capital Corporation

   $ 317,719       $   

Other organization and offering expenses

   $ 906,121       $   

As of June 30, 2012, our advisor had paid organization and offering costs of $2.1 million in connection with our ongoing public offering, of which $1.2 million was not included in our financial statements because such costs were not a liability to us as they exceeded 2.0% of gross proceeds from our ongoing public offering. As we raise additional proceeds from our ongoing public offering, these $2.1 million in costs may become payable.

The following table summarizes any compensation, fees and reimbursements paid to our advisor and its affiliates related to the acquisition and operations stage during the respective periods reflected below.

 

      For the Three Months Ended
June 30, 2012
     For the Year Ended
December 31, 2011
 

Acquisition and Operations Stage:

     

Acquisition fees and expenses

   $  1,303,721       $  —   

Advisory fees and expenses

   $ 99,251       $   

Operating expenses

   $ 48,039       $   

During the six months ended June 30, 2012, no compensation, fees or reimbursements were incurred for services provided by our advisor and its affiliates related to the liquidity/listing stage. As of December 31, 2011, we had not yet commenced material operations or entered into any arrangements to acquire any specific investments.

At least a majority of our independent directors must determine, from time to time but at least annually, that our total fees and expenses are reasonable in light of our investment performance, net assets, net income and the fees and expenses of other comparable unaffiliated REITs. Each such determination will be reflected in the minutes of our board of directors. The total operating expenses (as defined in the NASAA REIT Guidelines) of the company will not exceed, in any four consecutive fiscal quarters, the greater of 2% of the Average Invested Assets (as defined in the NASAA REIT Guidelines) or 25% of Net Income (as defined in the NASAA REIT Guidelines), unless our independent directors determine, based on unusual and non-recurring factors, that a higher level of expense is justified. In such an event, we will send notice to each of our stockholders within 60 days after the end of the fiscal quarter for which such determination was made, along with an explanation of the factors our independent directors considered in making such determination. Our independent directors shall also supervise the performance of our advisor and the compensation that we pay to it to determine that the provisions of our advisory agreement are being carried out.

Each such determination will be recorded in the minutes of our board of directors and based on the factors that the independent directors deem relevant, including the factors listing in the “Management — General” section of this prospectus.

 

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Since our advisor and its affiliates are entitled to differing levels of compensation for undertaking different transactions on our behalf, our advisor has the ability to affect the nature of the compensation it receives by undertaking different transactions. However, our advisor is obligated to exercise good faith and integrity in all its dealings with respect to our affairs pursuant to the advisory agreement. See the “Management — The Advisory Agreement” section of this prospectus.

Becoming Self-Administered

Because our advisor manages our day-to-day operations, we are considered “externally managed.” We believe that it will be in the best interests of our stockholders for the foreseeable future for us to be externally managed, therefore we do not expect to hire and pay for the services of skilled personnel with expertise in real estate finance, acquisition and management that are dedicated solely to managing our operations and properties. We believe that the arrangements set forth in the advisory agreement with CR IV Advisors enable us to balance our real estate expertise needs, our personnel needs and our operating costs. For example, we are able to draw on the services of the executive officers and other personnel of our advisor on an as needed basis rather than having to hire similar individuals on a full-time basis.

If we elect to internalize our operations, we would employ personnel and would be subject to potential liabilities commonly faced by employers, such as workers disability and compensation claims, potential labor disputes and other employee-related liabilities and grievances. Upon any internalization of our advisor, certain key personnel may not become employed by us, but instead will remain employees of our sponsor or its affiliates. However, such personnel do not have restrictions by contract or otherwise that may affect their ability to be employed by us, or otherwise provide services to us.

We may become self-administered in the future in connection with a listing of our shares of common stock on an exchange or other liquidity event, if our board of directors determines that it would be in the best interests of our stockholders. Although there is no prerequisite that publicly-traded REITs be self-administered, we understand that most of the publicly-traded REITs are self-administered and that the market price for our shares may suffer in the event that we list our shares for trading and remain externally managed. Thus, our board of directors likely will not consider listing our shares on a national exchange until it believes that our assets and income can support an internalized management and operating staff within the context of the returns that we are paying, or seek to pay, to our stockholders. If our board of directors reaches such determination, we will likely consider various methods for internalizing these functions. One method would be for us to acquire, or consider acquiring, our advisor through a business combination. At this time, we cannot be sure of the form or amount of consideration or other terms relating to such acquisition, however, we expect that we would not acquire our advisor if we could not retain key personnel of our advisor. If we pursue a business combination with our advisor, our board of directors will have a fiduciary duty to act in our best interests, which will be adverse to the interests of our advisor. To fulfill its fiduciary duty, our board of directors will take various procedural and substantive actions which may include forming a committee comprised entirely of independent directors to evaluate the potential business combination, and granting the committee the authority to retain its own counsel and advisors to evaluate the potential business combination. For a description of some of the risks related to an internalization transaction, see “Risk Factors — Risks Related to an Investment in Cole Credit Property Trust IV, Inc.”

 

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STOCK OWNERSHIP

The following table shows, as of the date of this prospectus, the amount of our common stock beneficially owned by (1) any person who is known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our outstanding shares of common stock, (2) members of our board of directors, (3) our named executive officers, and (4) all of our directors and executive officers as a group. As of October 3, 2012, we had 4,249 stockholders.

 

     Common Stock
Beneficially Owned
(2)
 

Name of Beneficial Owner(1)

   Number of Shares
of Common Stock
     Percentage
of Class
 

Christopher H. Cole, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and President(3)

     20,000         *

Marc T. Nemer, Director

               

Lawrence S. Jones, Director

               

J. Marc Myers, Director

               

Scott P. Sealy, Sr., Director

               

D. Kirk McAllaster, Jr., Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

               
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

All directors and executive officers as a group (six persons)(3)

     20,000         *

 

* Represents less than 1% of the outstanding common stock.

 

(1) Address of each beneficial owner listed is 2325 East Camelback Road, Suite 1100, Phoenix, Arizona 85016.

 

(2) For purposes of calculating the percentage beneficially owned, the number of shares of common stock deemed outstanding includes (a) 16,094,532 shares outstanding as of October 3, 2012, and (b) shares issuable pursuant to options held by the respective person or group that may be exercised within 60 days following the date of this prospectus. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that deem shares to be beneficially owned by any person or group who has or shares voting and investment power with respect to such shares.

 

(3) Includes 20,000 shares owned by Cole Holdings Corporation, an affiliate of our sponsor. Mr. Cole is the sole stockholder of Cole Holdings Corporation and controls the voting and disposition decisions of Cole Holdings Corporation. Pursuant to our charter, Cole Holdings Corporation is prohibited from selling the 20,000 shares of our common stock for so long as Cole Real Estate Investments remains our sponsor; provided, however, that Cole Holdings Corporation may transfer ownership of all or a portion of the 20,000 shares of our common stock to other affiliates of our sponsor.

 

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CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

We are subject to various conflicts of interest arising out of our relationship with CR IV Advisors, our advisor, and its affiliates, including conflicts related to the arrangements pursuant to which we will compensate our advisor and its affiliates. While our independent directors must approve the engagement of CR IV Advisors as our advisor, the fees payable to CR IV Advisors in connection with the services provided to us, and any subsequent decision to continue such engagement, the ability of our independent directors to negotiate on our behalf may be adversely impacted by the fact that our board of directors recognizes that our stockholders invested with the understanding and expectation that an affiliate of Cole Real Estate Investments would act as our advisor. See the “Management Compensation” section of this prospectus. Some of the potential conflicts of interest in our transactions with our advisor and its affiliates, and certain conflict resolution procedures set forth in our charter, are described below.

Our officers and affiliates of our advisor will try to balance our interests with the interests of other Cole-sponsored programs to whom they owe duties. However, to the extent that these persons take actions that are more favorable to other entities than to us, these actions could have a negative impact on our financial performance and, consequently, on distributions to you and the value of your investment. In addition, our directors, officers and certain of our stockholders may engage for their own account in business activities of the types conducted or to be conducted by our subsidiaries and us. For a description of some of the risks related to these conflicts of interest, see the “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest” section of this prospectus.

Our independent directors have an obligation to function on our behalf in all situations in which a conflict of interest may arise. Furthermore, all of our directors have a fiduciary obligation to act on behalf of our stockholders.

Interests in Other Real Estate Programs and Other Concurrent Offerings

Affiliates of our advisor act as an advisor to, and our executive officers and at least one of our directors act as officers and/or directors of, CCPT I, CCPT II, CCPT III, CCIT, and Cole Income NAV Strategy, all of which are REITs distributed and managed by affiliates of our advisor. In addition, all of these REITs employ our sponsor’s investment strategy, which focuses on single-tenant corporate properties subject to long term net leases to creditworthy tenants. CCPT I, CCPT II and CCPT III, like us, focus primarily on the retail sector, while CCIT focuses primarily on the office and industrial sector and Cole Income NAV Strategy focuses primarily on commercial properties in the retail, office and industrial sectors. Nevertheless, the common investment strategy used by each REIT would permit them to purchase certain properties that also may be suitable for our portfolio.

CCPT I and CCPT II are no longer offering shares for investment and, with limited exceptions such as through the use of proceeds by CCPT II from its distribution investment plan, are not currently pursuing the acquisition of additional properties. In the event CCPT I or CCPT II sells one or more of its assets, either company may seek to acquire additional properties, which may be similar to properties in which we invest. CCPT III is no longer offering shares for investment to the public; however, CCPT III has sold and will continue to issue shares pursuant to its distribution reinvestment plan and continues to invest in real estate. CCPT III is an active investor in real estate and real estate-related investments, and the investment objective and strategy of CCPT III overlaps with our investment objective and strategy, thereby increasing the likelihood of potential acquisitions being appropriate for CCPT III and for us. CCIT commenced an initial public offering of up to $2.975 billion of shares of common stock in February 2011. Cole Income NAV Strategy commenced an initial public offering of up to $4.0 billion of shares of common stock in December 2011. We believe CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy will be active investors in real estate and real estate-related investments, and, although CCIT focuses primarily on the office and industrial sector, and Cole Income NAV Strategy focuses on commercial properties in the retail, office and industrial sectors, we anticipate that many investments that will be

 

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appropriate for investment by us also will be appropriate for investment by CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy. See “— Certain Conflict Resolution Procedures” below.

In addition, during the period from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2011, an affiliate of our advisor had issued approximately $114.2 million of debt pursuant to four private offerings, the proceeds of which were used to acquire single and multi-tenant properties in various states. In addition, during the same period, Cole Real Estate Investments sponsored 53 currently operating tenant-in-common and Delaware Statutory Trust real estate programs. Cole Real Estate Investments also sponsored Cole Growth Opportunity Fund I LP (CGOF), which is currently operating. CGOF does not have similar investment objectives to this program. Affiliates of our advisor may, from time to time, sponsor additional tenant-in-common and/or Delaware statutory trust real estate programs, which may invest in, and compete for, properties that would be suitable investments under our investment criteria. Affiliates of our advisor and of our executive officers also act as officers and directors of general partners of six limited partnerships that have invested in unimproved and improved real properties located in various states, including Cole Credit Property Fund Limited Partnership (Cole Credit LP I) and Cole Credit Property Fund II Limited Partnership (Cole Credit LP II), during the period from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2011. See the “Prior Performance Summary” section of this prospectus. Affiliates of our executive officers and entities owned or managed by such affiliates also may acquire or develop real estate for their own accounts, and have done so in the past. Furthermore, affiliates of our executive officers and entities owned or managed by such affiliates intend to form additional real estate investment entities in the future, whether public or private, which can be expected to have the same or similar investment objectives and targeted assets as we have, and such persons may be engaged in sponsoring one or more of such entities at approximately the same time as our shares of common stock are being offered. Our advisor, its affiliates and affiliates of our executive officers are not obligated to present to us any particular investment opportunity that comes to their attention, even if such opportunity is of a character that might be suitable for investment by us. Our advisor and its affiliates likely will experience conflicts of interest as they simultaneously perform services for us and other Cole-sponsored real estate programs.

Any Cole-sponsored real estate program, whether or not currently existing, could compete with us in the sale or operation of our assets. We will seek to achieve any operating efficiencies or similar savings that may result from affiliated management of competitive assets. However, to the extent that such programs own or acquire property that is adjacent, or in close proximity, to a property we own, our property may compete with the other program’s property for tenants or purchasers.

Although our board of directors adopted a policy limiting the types of transactions that we may enter into with our advisor, its affiliates, and other Cole-sponsored real estate programs, we may enter into certain such transactions, which are subject to an inherent conflict of interest. Similarly, joint ventures involving affiliates of our advisor or other Cole-sponsored programs also gives rise to conflicts of interest. In addition, our board of directors may encounter conflicts of interest in enforcing our rights against any affiliate in the event of a default by or disagreement with an affiliate or in invoking powers, rights or options pursuant to any agreement between us and our advisor, any of its affiliates or another Cole-sponsored real estate program.

In addition, we will rely on Cole Capital Corporation, our affiliated dealer manager, for the distribution of our shares of common stock to investors in this offering. Cole Capital Corporation currently distributes shares of common stock of CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy. We anticipate that Cole Capital Corporation may be required to hire additional personnel to manage our offering as well as any future concurrent offering. If our dealer manager is unable to sufficiently hire personnel to manage concurrent offerings, our dealer manager will face conflicts of interest allocating resources to our offering, which may have a negative effect on our ability to raise capital in this offering. Moreover, if the compensation our dealer manager or its personnel receive in the connection with concurrent offerings differs, our dealer manager and/or its personnel may have an incentive to devote more effort to the offering that results in a higher level of compensation.

 

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Other Activities of Our Advisor and its Affiliates

We rely on our advisor, CR IV Advisors, for the day-to-day operation of our business. As a result of the interests of members of its management in other Cole-sponsored programs and the fact that they also are engaged, and will continue to engage, in other business activities, our advisor and its officers, key persons and respective affiliates may have conflicts of interest in allocating their time between us and other Cole-sponsored programs and other activities in which they are involved. However, our advisor believes that it and its affiliates have sufficient personnel to discharge fully their responsibilities to all of the Cole-sponsored programs and other ventures in which they are involved.

In addition, each of our executive officers, including Christopher H. Cole, who also serves as the chairman of our board of directors, also has an interest in our advisor, our dealer manager and/or other affiliated entities. As a result, each of our executive officers owes fiduciary duties to these other entities, as applicable, which may conflict with the fiduciary duties that he owes to us and our stockholders.

Transactions with Our Advisor and its Affiliates

Our board of directors has adopted a policy to prohibit acquisitions and loans from or to affiliates of our advisor, other than as set forth below. From time to time, our advisor may direct certain of its affiliates to acquire properties that would be suitable investments for us or our advisor may create special purpose entities to acquire properties that would be suitable investments for us. Subsequently, we may acquire such properties from such affiliates of our advisor. Any and all acquisitions from affiliates of our advisor must be approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as being fair and reasonable to us and at a price to us that is no greater than the cost of the property to the affiliate of our advisor (including acquisition fees and expenses), unless a majority of the independent directors determines that there is substantial justification for any amount that exceeds such cost and that the difference is reasonable. In no event will we acquire a property from an affiliate of our advisor if the cost to us would exceed the property’s current appraised value as determined by an independent appraiser. In no event will our advisor or any of its affiliates be paid more than one acquisition fee in connection with any such transaction. Moreover, our advisor will not receive an acquisition fee if an affiliated entity will receive a disposition fee in connection with such transaction. Conversely, an affiliated entity will not receive an acquisition fee if our advisor will receive a disposition fee in connection with the sale of a property to an affiliate.

From time to time, we may borrow funds from affiliates of our advisor, including our sponsor, as bridge financing to enable us to acquire a property when offering proceeds alone are insufficient to do so and third party financing has not been arranged. Any and all such transactions must be approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as fair, competitive and commercially reasonable, and no less favorable to us than comparable loans between unaffiliated parties; provided, however, that our advisor or its affiliates may pay costs on our behalf, pending our reimbursement, or we may defer payment of fees to our advisor or its affiliates, neither of which would be considered a loan. Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, none of these restrictions would preclude us from internalizing our advisor if our board of directors determines an internalization transaction is in the best interests of our stockholders.

Acquiring, Leasing and Reselling of Properties

There is a risk that a potential investment would be suitable for one or more Cole-sponsored programs, in which case the officers of our advisor and the advisors of the other programs will have a conflict of interest allocating the investment opportunity to us or another program. There is a risk that the advisors will choose a property that provides lower returns to us than a property purchased by another Cole-sponsored program. However, in such event, our advisor and the advisors of the other programs, with oversight by their respective boards of directors, will determine which program will be first presented with the opportunity. See “— Certain Conflict Resolution Procedures” for details of the factors used to make that determination. Additionally, our

 

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advisor may cause a prospective tenant to enter into a lease for property owned by another Cole-sponsored program. In the event that these conflicts arise, our best interests may not be met when persons acting on our behalf and on behalf of other Cole-sponsored programs decide whether to allocate any particular property to us or to another Cole-sponsored program.

Conflicts of interest will exist to the extent that we may acquire, or seek to acquire, properties in the same geographic areas where properties owned by other Cole-sponsored programs are located. In such a case, a conflict could arise in the acquisition or leasing of properties in the event that we and another Cole-sponsored program were to compete for the same properties or tenants, or a conflict could arise in connection with the resale of properties in the event that we and another Cole-sponsored program were to attempt to sell similar properties at the same time including in particular in the event another Cole-sponsored program liquidates at approximately the same time as us. Conflicts of interest may also exist at such time as we or our affiliates managing property on our behalf seek to employ developers, contractors or building managers, as well as under other circumstances. Our advisor will seek to reduce conflicts relating to the employment of developers, contractors or building managers by making prospective employees aware of all such properties seeking to employ such persons. In addition, our advisor will seek to reduce conflicts that may arise with respect to properties available for sale or rent by making prospective purchasers or tenants aware of all such properties. However, these conflicts cannot be fully avoided in that there may be established differing compensation arrangements for employees at different properties or differing terms for resales or leasing of the various properties.

Affiliated Dealer Manager

Since Cole Capital Corporation, our dealer manager, is an affiliate of our advisor, we will not have the benefit of an independent due diligence review and investigation of the type normally performed by an unaffiliated, independent underwriter in connection with the offering of securities. Accordingly, you will have to rely on your own broker-dealer to make an independent review of the terms of this offering. If your broker-dealer conducts an independent review of this offering and/or engages an independent due diligence reviewer to do so on its behalf, we expect that we will pay or reimburse the expenses associated with such review, which may create conflicts of interest. If your broker-dealer does not conduct such a review, you will not have the benefit of an independent review of the terms of this offering. See the “Plan of Distribution” section of this prospectus.

Affiliated Property Manager

Our properties are, and we anticipate that properties we acquire in the future will be, managed and leased by our property manager, Cole Realty Advisors, an affiliate of our advisor, pursuant to property management and leasing agreements. We expect Cole Realty Advisors to also serve as property manager for properties owned by other real estate programs sponsored by Cole Real Estate Investments, some of which may be in competition with our properties.

Joint Venture and Co-ownership Arrangements with Affiliates of Our Advisor

We may enter into joint ventures or other co-ownership arrangements with other Cole-sponsored programs (as well as other parties) for the acquisition, development or improvement of properties and other investments. See the “Investment Objectives and Policies — Acquisition and Investment Policies — Joint Venture Investments” section of this prospectus. Our advisor and its affiliates may have conflicts of interest in determining which Cole-sponsored program should enter into any particular joint venture or co-ownership agreement. The co-venturer or co-owner may have economic or business interests or goals which are or which may become inconsistent with our business interests or goals. In addition, should any such joint venture be consummated, our advisor may face a conflict in structuring the terms of the relationship between our interests and the interest of the co-venturer or co-owner, and in managing the joint venture or other co-ownership arrangement. Since our advisor and its affiliates will negotiate the terms of any agreements or transactions

 

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between us and a Cole-sponsored co-venturer or co-owner, we will not have the benefit of arm’s-length negotiation of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers or co-owners. However, in such event, a majority of our board of directors, including a majority of our independent directors, not otherwise interested in the joint venture, must approve the joint venture as being fair and reasonable to us and on substantially the same terms and conditions as those received by the other joint venturers, and the cost of our investment must be supported by a current appraisal of the asset.

Receipt of Fees and Other Compensation by Our Advisor and Its Affiliates

A transaction involving the purchase or sale of properties, or the purchase or sale of any other real estate-related investment, will likely result in the receipt of fees and other compensation by our advisor and its affiliates, including acquisition and advisory fees, disposition fees, and the possibility of subordinated performance fees. Subject to oversight by our board of directors, our advisor will have considerable discretion with respect to all decisions relating to the terms and timing of all transactions. Therefore, our advisor may have conflicts of interest concerning certain actions taken on our behalf, particularly due to the fact that acquisition fees will generally be based on the cost of the investment and payable to our advisor and its affiliates regardless of the quality of the properties acquired. Similarly, until such time as our board of directors provides an estimate of the value of our shares, the advisory fees will be based on the cost of our investment, regardless of the quality of the properties acquired or services provided to us. Basing acquisition fees and advisory fees on the cost or estimated value of the investment may influence our advisor’s decisions relating to property acquisitions.

In advising our board of directors with respect to pursuing a liquidity event, our advisor and its affiliates may have conflicts of interest due to the fees and other consideration they may receive under alternative liquidity events, such as the listing of our shares of common stock on a national exchange, the sale of our company or the liquidation of our assets. In each event, a subordinated performance fee would be paid to our advisor only after our investors have received a return of their net capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return. However, in the event our shares of common stock are listed on a national exchange, we may internalize our management functions. One method for internalizing our management functions would be for us to acquire our advisor through a business combination, which could result in significant payments to our advisor or its affiliates. Such payments would be made irrespective of whether our investors have received a return of their net capital invested and an 8% annual cumulative, non-compounded return. Therefore, our advisor may have an incentive to recommend a listing transaction rather than a liquidation transaction. See the “Management Compensation” section of this prospectus.

In addition, the sale of our shares of common stock in this offering will result in dealer manager fees to Cole Capital Corporation, our dealer manager and an affiliate of our advisor.

Each transaction we enter into with our advisor or its affiliates is subject to an inherent conflict of interest. Our board of directors may encounter conflicts of interest in enforcing our rights against any affiliate in the event of a default by or disagreement with an affiliate or in invoking powers, rights or options pursuant to any agreement between us and any affiliate.

Certain Conflict Resolution Procedures

In order to reduce or eliminate certain potential conflicts of interest, our charter contains a number of restrictions relating to (1) transactions we may enter into with our advisor and its affiliates, (2) certain future offerings, and (3) allocation of investment opportunities among Cole-sponsored programs. Conflict resolution provisions in our charter and policies adopted by our board of directors include, among others, the following:

 

   

We will not purchase or lease properties from our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors or any of their respective affiliates unless a majority of the directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction determines that such transaction is fair and

 

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reasonable to us and at a price to us no greater than the cost of the property to the seller or lessor, unless there is substantial justification for any amount that exceeds such cost and such excess amount is determined to be reasonable. In no event will we acquire any property at an amount in excess of its current appraised value. We will not sell or lease properties to our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors or any of their respective affiliates unless a majority of the directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in the transaction determines that the transaction is fair and reasonable to us.

 

   

We will not make any loans to our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors or any of their respective affiliates, except that we may make or invest in mortgage loans involving our sponsor, our advisor, our directors or their respective affiliates, provided, among other things, that an appraisal of the underlying property is obtained from an independent appraiser and the transaction is approved by a majority of the directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in such transaction as fair and reasonable to us and on terms no less favorable to us than those available from unaffiliated third parties. In addition, our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors and any of their respective affiliates will not make loans to us or to joint ventures in which we are a joint venture partner unless approved by a majority of our directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in the transaction as fair, competitive and commercially reasonable, and no less favorable to us than comparable loans between unaffiliated parties.

 

   

Our advisor and its affiliates will be entitled to reimbursement, at cost, for actual expenses incurred by them on behalf of us or joint ventures in which we are a joint venture partner; provided, however, our advisor must reimburse us for the amount, if any, by which our total operating expenses, including the advisor asset management fee, paid during the immediately prior four consecutive fiscal quarters exceeded the greater of: (i) 2% of our average invested assets for such year, or (ii) 25% of our net income, before any additions to reserves for depreciation, bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves and excluding any gain from the sale of our assets, for such year.

 

   

In the event that an investment opportunity becomes available that may be suitable for both us and one or more other Cole-sponsored program, and for which more than one of such entities has sufficient uninvested funds, then our advisor and the advisors of the other programs, with oversight by their respective boards of directors, will examine the following factors, among others, in determining the entity for which the investment opportunity is most appropriate:

 

   

the investment objective of each entity;

 

   

the anticipated operating cash flows of each entity and the cash requirements of each entity;

 

   

the effect of the acquisition both on diversification of each entity’s investments by type of property, geographic area and tenant concentration;

 

   

the amount of funds available to each program and the length of time such funds have been available for investment;

 

   

the policy of each entity relating to leverage of properties;

 

   

the income tax effects of the purchase to each entity; and

 

   

the size of the investment.

If, in the judgment of the advisors, the investment opportunity may be equally appropriate for more than one program, then the entity that has had the longest period of time elapse since it was offered an investment opportunity will first be offered such investment opportunity.

If a subsequent development, such as a delay in the closing of the acquisition or a delay in the construction of a property, causes any such investment, in the opinion of the advisors, to be more appropriate for an entity other than the entity that committed to make the investment, the advisors may determine that another Cole-

 

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sponsored program will make the investment. Our board of directors, including the independent directors, has a duty to ensure that the method used for the allocation of the acquisition of properties by two or more programs seeking to acquire similar types of properties is applied fairly to us.

 

   

We will not enter into any other transaction with our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors or any of their affiliates, including the acceptance of goods or services from our sponsor, our advisor, any of our directors or any of their affiliates, unless a majority of our directors, including a majority of the independent directors, not otherwise interested in the transaction approve such transaction as fair and reasonable to us and on terms and conditions not less favorable to us than those available from unaffiliated third parties.

 

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INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

Investment Objectives

Our primary investment objectives are:

 

   

to acquire quality commercial real estate properties, net leased under long-term leases to creditworthy tenants, which provide current operating cash flows;

 

   

to provide reasonably stable, current income for you through the payment of cash distributions; and

 

   

to provide the opportunity to participate in capital appreciation in the value of our investments.

We may not achieve any of these objectives. See the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus.

Our Potential Competitive Strengths

We believe that we will be able to distinguish ourselves from other owners, operators and acquirers of retail and other income-producing properties. We believe our long-term success will be supported through the following potential competitive strengths:

 

   

Cole’s Disciplined Investment Approach.    Mr. Cole began investing in commercial real estate in 1979, focusing primarily on retail and office properties, and raw land in the metropolitan Phoenix area. From 1979 until the end of 1999, Mr. Cole, together with various investment partners, acquired 78 commercial properties and raw land. During that time, Mr. Cole founded what is now Cole Real Estate Investments. From 2002 until the end of 2011, our sponsor’s real estate programs acquired 1,639 commercial properties, predominantly in the retail sector. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Prior Performance Summary” for a discussion of the historical experience of the real estate programs managed over the last ten years by our sponsor. Under Mr. Cole’s leadership, our sponsor developed an investment approach that focuses on acquiring single-tenant necessity corporate properties subject to long-term net leases to creditworthy tenants. In addition, our sponsor’s investment strategy targets properties that typically have high occupancy rates (greater than 90%) and low to moderate leverage (0% to 50% loan to value). While our sponsor historically has applied its investment approach predominantly in the retail sector, our sponsor has utilized this investment approach in the office and industrial sectors as well. We expect that our advisor will apply this disciplined investment approach to our investments in necessity retail and other income-producing properties.

 

   

Experienced Advisor.    Mr. Roberts, our advisor’s executive vice president and managing director of real estate, has more than 24 years of commercial real estate experience, and leads a team of experienced real estate industry professionals. Additionally, our advisor’s executive management team has extensive public company operating experience, with several of its senior executives having held senior positions at publicly held REITs.

 

   

Successful Credit Underwriting Experience.    Cole Real Estate Investments has demonstrated an ability to successfully underwrite the tenants that occupy the real estate assets of Cole-sponsored real estate programs. The combined portfolios of CCPT I, CCPT II, CCPT III, CCIT and Cole Income NAV Strategy had a 98% occupancy rate as of December 31, 2011.

 

   

Strong Industry Relationships.    We believe that our advisor’s extensive network of industry relationships with the real estate brokerage, development and investor communities will enable us to successfully execute our acquisition and investment strategies. These relationships augment our advisor’s ability to source acquisitions in off-market transactions outside of competitive marketing processes, capitalize on development opportunities and capture repeat business and transaction activity. Our advisor’s strong relationships with the tenant and leasing brokerage communities are expected to aid in attracting and retaining tenants.

 

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Ability to Purchase Properties for Cash.    We expect that one of our competitive advantages will be our ability to purchase properties for cash and to close transactions quickly. We believe our ability to purchase properties for cash will expedite our acquisition process and make us an attractive purchaser to potential sellers of properties. While we have not yet raised a substantial amount of capital, Cole Capital Corporation, the broker-dealer affiliate of our sponsor, has successfully raised capital for other Cole-sponsored real estate programs, and we expect that, through its well-developed distribution capabilities and relationships with other broker-dealers, Cole Capital Corporation will be successful in selling shares on our behalf.

While we believe that these factors will help distinguish us from our competitors and contribute to our long-term success, there is no guarantee that they will provide us with any actual competitive advantages.

Liquidity Opportunities

Our board of directors will consider future liquidity opportunities, which may include the sale of our company, the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, a merger or similar transaction, the listing of our shares of common stock for trading on a national securities exchange or an alternative strategy that will result in a significant increase in the opportunities for stockholders to dispose of their shares. We expect to engage in a strategy to provide our investors with liquidity at a time and in a method recommended by our advisor and determined by our independent directors to be in the best interests of our stockholders. As we are unable to determine what macro- or micro- economic factors may affect the decisions our board of directors make in the future with respect to any potential liquidity opportunity, we have not selected a fixed time period or determined criteria for any such decisions. As a result, while our board of directors will consider a variety of options to provide stockholders with liquidity throughout the life of this program, there is no requirement that we commence any such action on or before a specified date. Stockholder approval would be required for the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or the sale or merger of our company.

Acquisition and Investment Policies

Types of Investments

We invest primarily in income-producing necessity retail properties that are single-tenant or multi-tenant “power centers,” which are leased to national and regional creditworthy tenants under long-term leases, and are strategically located throughout the United States and U.S. protectorates. Necessity retail properties are properties leased to retail tenants that attract consumers for everyday needs, such as pharmacies, home improvement stores, national superstores, restaurants and regional retailers.

For over three decades, our sponsor, Cole Real Estate Investments, has developed and utilized this investment approach in acquiring and managing core commercial real estate assets primarily in the retail sector but in the office and industrial sectors as well. We believe that our sponsor’s experience in assembling real estate portfolios, which principally focus on national and regional creditworthy tenants subject to long-term leases, will provide us with a competitive advantage. In addition, our sponsor has built a business of over 325 employees, who are experienced in the various aspects of acquiring, financing and managing commercial real estate, and that our access to these resources also will provide us with an advantage.

We also may invest in other income-producing properties, such as office and industrial properties, which may share certain core characteristics with our retail investments, such as a principal creditworthy tenant, a long-term net lease, and a strategic location. We believe investments in these types of office and industrial properties, which are essential to the business operations of the tenant, are consistent with our goal of providing investors with a relatively stable stream of current income and an opportunity for capital appreciation.

We may further diversify our portfolio by making and investing in mortgage, bridge or mezzanine loans, or in participations in such loans, secured directly or indirectly by the same types of commercial properties that we

 

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may acquire directly, and we may invest in other real estate-related securities. We may acquire properties under development or that require substantial refurbishment or renovation. We also may acquire majority or minority interests in other entities (or business units of such entities) with investment objectives similar to ours or with management, investment or development capabilities that our advisor deems desirable or advantageous to acquire. We will not forgo a high quality investment because it does not precisely fit our expected portfolio composition. Our board of directors has broad discretion to change our investment policies in order for us to achieve our investment objectives.

Many of our properties are and we anticipate that future properties will be leased to tenants in the chain or franchise retail industry, including but not limited to convenience stores, drug stores and restaurant properties, as well as leased to large national retailers as stand alone properties or as part of so-called “power centers,” which are comprised of big box national, regional and local retailers. Our advisor will monitor industry trends and identify properties on our behalf that serve to provide a favorable return balanced with risk. Our management is expected primarily to target regional or national name brand retail businesses with established track records. We generally intend to hold each property for a period in excess of seven years.

We believe that our general focus on the acquisition of a large number of single-tenant and multi-tenant necessity retail properties net leased to creditworthy tenants presents lower investment risks and greater stability than other sectors of today’s commercial real estate market. By acquiring a large number of single-tenant and multi-tenant retail properties, we believe that lower than expected results of operations from one or a few investments will not necessarily preclude our ability to realize our investment objective of cash flow from our overall portfolio. We believe this approach can result in less risk to investors than an investment approach that targets other asset classes. In addition, we believe that retail properties under long-term triple net and double net leases offer a distinct investment advantage since these properties generally require less management and operating capital, have less recurring tenant turnover and, with respect to single-tenant properties, often offer superior locations that are less dependent on the financial stability of adjoining tenants. In addition, since we intend to acquire properties that are geographically diverse, we expect to minimize the potential adverse impact of economic slow downs or downturns in local markets. Our management believes that a portfolio consisting of both freestanding, single-tenant retail properties and multi-tenant retail properties anchored by large national retailers will enhance our liquidity opportunities for investors by making the sale of individual properties, multiple properties or our investment portfolio as a whole attractive to institutional investors and by making a possible listing of our shares attractive to the public investment community.

To the extent feasible, we will seek to achieve a well-balanced portfolio diversified by geographic location, age and lease maturities of the various properties. We will pursue properties leased to tenants representing a variety of retail industries to avoid concentration in any one industry. These industries may include all types of retail establishments, such as big box retailers, convenience stores, drug stores and restaurant properties. We also will seek to diversify our tenants among national, regional and local brands. We generally expect to target properties with lease terms in excess of ten years. We may acquire properties with shorter lease terms if the property is in an attractive location, if the property is difficult to replace, or if the property has other significant favorable attributes. We expect that these investments will provide long-term value by virtue of their size, location, quality and condition, and lease characteristics. We currently expect that substantially all of our acquisitions will be in the United States, including U.S. protectorates.

Many retail companies today are entering into sale-leaseback arrangements as a strategy for applying capital that would otherwise be applied to their real estate holdings to their core operating businesses. We believe that our investment strategy will enable us to take advantage of the increased emphasis on retailers’ core business operations in today’s competitive corporate environment as many retailers attempt to divest from real estate assets.

There is no limitation on the number, size or type of properties that we may acquire or on the percentage of net proceeds of this offering that may be invested in a single property. The number and mix of properties

 

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comprising our portfolio will depend upon real estate market conditions and other circumstances existing at the time we acquire properties, and the amount of proceeds we raise in this offering. We are not restricted to investments in corporate properties. We will not forego a high quality investment because it does not precisely fit our expected portfolio composition. See “— Other Possible Investments” below for a description of other types of real estate and real estate-related investments we may make.

We intend to incur debt to acquire properties where our advisor determines that incurring such debt is in our best interests. In addition, from time to time, we may acquire some properties without financing and later incur mortgage debt secured by one or more of such properties if favorable financing terms are available. We will use the proceeds from these loans to acquire additional properties. See “— Borrowing Policies” below for a more detailed description of our borrowing intentions and limitations.

Real Estate Underwriting Process

In evaluating potential property acquisitions consistent with our investment objectives, our advisor will apply a well-established underwriting process to determine the creditworthiness of potential tenants. Similarly, our advisor will apply credit underwriting criteria to possible new tenants when we are re-leasing properties in our portfolio. Many of the tenants of our properties are and we expect will continue to be national or regional retail chains that are creditworthy entities having high net worth and operating income. Our advisor’s underwriting process includes analyzing the financial data and other available information about the tenant, such as income statements, balance sheets, net worth, cash flow, business plans, data provided by industry credit rating services, and/or other information our advisor may deem relevant. Generally, these tenants must have a proven track record in order to meet the credit tests applied by our advisor. In addition, we may obtain guarantees of leases by the corporate parent of the tenant, in which case our advisor will analyze the creditworthiness of the guarantor. In many instances, especially in sale-leaseback situations, where we are acquiring a property from a company and simultaneously leasing it back to the company under a long-term lease, we will meet with the senior management to discuss the company’s business plan and strategy.

When using debt rating agencies, a tenant typically will be considered creditworthy when the tenant has an “investment grade” debt rating by Moody’s of Baa3 or better, credit rating by Standard & Poor’s of BBB- or better, or its payments are guaranteed by a company with such rating. Changes in tenant credit ratings, coupled with future acquisition and disposition activity, may increase or decrease our concentration of creditworthy tenants in the future.

Moody’s ratings are opinions of future relative creditworthiness based on an evaluation of franchise value, financial statement analysis and management quality. The rating given to a debt obligation describes the level of risk associated with receiving full and timely payment of principal and interest on that specific debt obligation and how that risk compares with that of all other debt obligations. The rating, therefore, provides one measure of the ability of a company to generate cash in the future.

A Moody’s debt rating of Baa3, which is the lowest investment grade rating given by Moody’s, is assigned to companies which, in Moody’s opinion, have adequate financial security. However, certain protective elements may be lacking or may be unreliable over any given period of time. A Moody’s debt rating of AAA, which is the highest investment grade rating given by Moody’s, is assigned to companies that, in Moody’s opinion, have exceptional financial security. Thus, investment grade tenants will be judged by Moody’s to have at least adequate financial security, and will in some cases have exceptional financial security.

Standard & Poor’s assigns a credit rating to companies and to each issuance or class of debt issued by a rated company. A Standard & Poor’s credit rating of BBB-, which is the lowest investment grade rating given by Standard & Poor’s, is assigned to companies that, in Standard & Poor’s opinion, exhibit adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the company to meet its financial commitments. A Standard & Poor’s credit rating of

 

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AAA+, which is the highest investment grade rating given by Standard & Poor’s, is assigned to companies that, in Standard & Poor’s opinion, have extremely strong capacities to meet their financial commitments. Thus, investment grade tenants will be judged by Standard & Poor’s to have at least adequate protection parameters, and will in some cases have extremely strong financial positions.

While we will utilize ratings by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s as one factor in determining whether a tenant is creditworthy, our advisor will also consider other factors in determining whether a tenant is creditworthy, for the purpose of meeting our investment objectives. Our advisor’s underwriting process also will consider information provided by other debt or credit rating agencies, such as Dun & Bradstreet, along with our advisor’s own analysis of the financial condition of the tenant and/or the guarantor, the operating history of the property with the tenant, the tenant’s market share and track record within the tenant’s industry segment, the general health and outlook of the tenant’s industry segment, the strength of the tenant’s management team and the terms and length of the lease at the time of the acquisition. These factors may cause us to consider a prospective tenant to be creditworthy even if it does not have an investment grade rating.

Description of Leases

We expect, in most instances, to continue to acquire tenant properties with existing double net or triple net leases. “Net” leases means leases that typically require tenants to pay all or a majority of the operating expenses, including real estate taxes, special assessments and sales and use taxes, utilities, maintenance, insurance and building repairs related to the property, in addition to the lease payments. Triple net leases typically require the tenant to pay all costs associated with a property in addition to the base rent and percentage rent, if any, including capital expenditures for the roof and the building structure. Double net leases typically hold the landlord responsible for the capital expenditures for the roof and structure, while the tenant is responsible for all lease payments and remaining operating expenses associated with the property. We expect that double net and triple net leases will help ensure the predictability and stability of our expenses, which we believe will result in greater predictability and stability of our cash distributions to stockholders. Not all of our leases will be net leases. In respect of multi-tenant properties, we expect to have a variety of lease arrangements with the tenants of these properties. Since each lease is an individually negotiated contract between two or more parties, each lease will have different obligations of both the landlord and tenant. Many large national tenants have standard lease forms that generally do not vary from property to property. We will have limited ability to revise the terms of leases to those tenants. We expect that multi-tenant office space is likely to be subject to “gross” leases. “Gross” leases means leases that typically require the tenant to pay a flat rental amount and we would pay for all property charges regularly incurred as a result of our owning the property. Not all of our leases will be net leases. When spaces in a property become vacant, existing leases expire, or we acquire properties under development or requiring substantial refurbishment or renovation, we anticipate entering into “net” leases.

Typically, we expect to enter into leases that have terms of ten years or more. We may acquire properties under which the lease term has partially expired. We also may acquire properties with shorter lease terms if the property is in an attractive location, if the property is difficult to replace, or if the property has other significant favorable real estate attributes. Under most commercial leases, tenants are obligated to pay a predetermined annual base rent. Some of the leases also will contain provisions that increase the amount of base rent payable at points during the lease term. We expect that many of our leases will contain periodic rent increases. Generally, the leases require each tenant to procure, at its own expense, commercial general liability insurance, as well as property insurance covering the building for the full replacement value and naming the ownership entity and the lender, if applicable, as the additional insured on the policy. Tenants will be required to provide proof of insurance by furnishing a certificate of insurance to our advisor on an annual basis. The insurance certificates will be tracked and reviewed for compliance by our advisor’s property and risk management departments. As a precautionary measure, we may obtain, to the extent available, secondary liability insurance, as well as loss of rents insurance that covers one year of annual rent in the event of a rental loss.

 

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Some leases may require that we procure insurance for both commercial general liability and property damage; however, generally the premiums are fully reimbursable from the tenant. In such instances, the policy will list us as the named insured and the tenant as the additional insured.

We do not expect to permit leases to be assigned or subleased without our prior written consent. If we do consent to an assignment or sublease, generally we expect the terms of such consent to provide that the original tenant will remain fully liable under the lease unless we release that original tenant from its obligations.

We may purchase properties and lease them back to the sellers of such properties. While we intend to use our best efforts to structure any such sale-leaseback transaction so that the lease will be characterized as a “true lease” and so that we are treated as the owner of the property for federal income tax purposes, the Internal Revenue Service could challenge this characterization. In the event that any sale-leaseback transaction is re-characterized as a financing transaction for federal income tax purposes, deductions for depreciation and cost recovery relating to such property would be disallowed, and in certain circumstances, we could lose our REIT status. See the “Federal Income Tax Considerations — Sale-Leaseback Transactions” section of this prospectus.

Investment Decisions

Our advisor has substantial discretion with respect to the selection of our specific investments, subject to our investment and borrowing policies, and our policies are approved by our board of directors. In pursuing our investment objectives and making investment decisions on our behalf, our advisor evaluates the proposed terms of the investment against all aspects of the transaction, including the condition and financial performance of the asset, the terms of existing leases and the creditworthiness of the tenant, and property location and characteristics. Because the factors considered, including the specific weight we place on each factor, vary for each potential investment, we do not, and are not able to, assign a specific weight or level of importance to any particular factor.

Our advisor will procure and review an independent valuation estimate on the proposed investment. In addition, our advisor, to the extent such information is available, will consider the following:

 

   

tenant rolls and tenant creditworthiness;

 

   

a property condition report;

 

   

unit level store performance;

 

   

property location, visibility and access;

 

   

age of the property, physical condition and curb appeal;

 

   

neighboring property uses;

 

   

local market conditions, including vacancy rates;

 

   

area demographics, including trade area population and average household income;

 

   

neighborhood growth patters and economic conditions;

 

   

presence of nearby properties that may positively or negatively impact store sales at the subject property; and

 

   

lease terms, including length of lease term, scope of landlord responsibilities, presence and frequency of contractual rental increases, renewal option provisions, exclusive and permitted use provisions, co-tenancy requirements and termination options.

Our advisor will review the terms of each existing lease by considering various factors, including:

 

   

rent escalations;

 

   

remaining lease term;

 

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renewal option terms;

 

   

tenant purchase options;

 

   

termination options;

 

   

scope of the landlord’s maintenance, repair and replacement requirements;

 

   

projected net cash flow yield; and

 

   

projected internal rates of return.

Our board of directors has adopted a policy to prohibit acquisitions from affiliates of our advisor except in limited circumstances. See the section of this prospectus captioned “Conflicts of Interest — Transactions with Our Advisor and its Affiliates.”

Conditions to Closing Our Acquisitions

Generally, we condition our obligation to close the purchase of any investment on the delivery and verification of certain documents from the seller or developer, including, where appropriate:

 

   

plans and specifications;

 

   

surveys;

 

   

evidence that title to the property can be freely sold or otherwise transferred to us, subject to such liens and encumbrances as are acceptable to our advisor;

 

   

financial statements covering recent operations of properties having operating histories;

 

   

title and liability insurance policies; and

 

   

certificates of the tenant attesting that the tenant believes that, among other things, the lease is valid and enforceable.

In addition, we will take such steps as we deem necessary with respect to potential environmental matters. See the section of this prospectus captioned “— Environmental Matters” below.

We may enter into purchase and sale arrangements with a seller or developer of a suitable property under development or construction. In such cases, we will be obligated to purchase the property at the completion of construction, provided that the construction conforms to definitive plans, specifications, and costs approved by us in advance. In such cases, prior to our acquiring the property, we generally would receive a certificate of an architect, engineer or other appropriate party, stating that the property complies with all plans and specifications. If renovation or remodeling is required prior to the purchase of a property, we expect to pay a negotiated maximum amount to the seller upon completion. We do not currently intend to construct or develop properties or to render any services in connection with such development or construction but we may do so in the future.

In determining whether to purchase a particular property, we may, in accordance with customary practices, obtain an option to purchase such property. The amount paid for an option, if any, normally is forfeited if the property is not purchased and normally is credited against the purchase price if the property is purchased.

In the purchasing, leasing and developing of properties, we are subject to risks generally incident to the ownership of real estate. See the “Risk Factors — General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate” section of this prospectus.

Ownership Structure

Our investments in real estate generally take the form of holding fee title or a long-term leasehold estate. We have acquired, and expect to continue to acquire, such interests either directly through our operating partnership or indirectly through limited liability companies, limited partnerships or other entities owned and/or

 

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controlled by our operating partnership. We may acquire properties by acquiring the entity that holds the desired properties. We also may acquire properties through investments in joint ventures, partnerships, co-tenancies or other co-ownership arrangements with third parties, including the developers of the properties or affiliates of our advisor. See the section captioned “Our Operating Partnership Agreement” in this prospectus and the “— Joint Venture Investments” section below.

Joint Venture Investments

We may enter into joint ventures, partnerships, co-tenancies and other co-ownership arrangements with affiliated entities of our advisors, including other real estate programs sponsored by affiliates of our advisor, and other third parties for the acquisition, development or improvement of properties or the acquisition of other real estate-related investments. We may also enter into such arrangements with real estate developers, owners and other unaffiliated third parties for the purpose of developing, owning and operating real properties. In determining whether to invest in a particular joint venture, our advisor will evaluate the underlying real property or other real estate-related investment using the same criteria described above in “— Investment Decisions” for the selection of our real property investments. Our advisor also will evaluate the joint venture or co-ownership partner and the proposed terms of the joint venture or a co-ownership arrangement.

Our general policy is to invest in joint ventures only when we will have an option or contract to purchase, or a right of first refusal to purchase, the property held by the joint venture or the co-venturer’s interest in the joint venture if the co-venturer elects to sell such interest. In the event that the co-venturer elects to sell all or a portion of the interests held in any such joint venture, however, we may not have sufficient funds to exercise our right of first refusal to buy the other co-venturer’s interest in the joint venture. In the event that any joint venture with an affiliated entity holds interests in more than one asset, the interest in each such asset may be specially allocated between us and the joint venture partner based upon the respective proportion of funds deemed invested by each co-venturer in each such asset.

Our advisor’s officers and key persons may have conflicts of interest in determining which Cole-sponsored program should enter into any particular joint venture agreement. The co-venturer may have economic or business interests or goals that are or may become inconsistent with our business interests or goals. In addition, our advisor’s officers and key persons may face a conflict in structuring the terms of the relationship between our interests and the interest of the affiliated co-venturer and in managing the joint venture. Since some or all of our advisor’s officers and key persons will also advise the affiliated co-venturer, agreements and transactions between us and any other Cole-sponsored co-venturer will not have the benefit of arm’s-length negotiation of the type normally conducted between unrelated co-venturers, which may result in the co-venturer receiving benefits greater than the benefits that we receive. In addition, we may assume liabilities related to the joint venture that exceed the percentage of our investment in the joint venture.

We may enter into joint ventures with other Cole real estate programs, or with our sponsor, our advisor, one or more of our directors, or any of their respective affiliates, only if a majority of our directors (including a majority of our independent directors) not otherwise interested in the transaction approve the transaction as being fair and reasonable to us and on substantially the same terms and conditions as those received by unaffiliated joint venturers, and the cost of our investment must be supported by a current appraisal of the asset.

Development and Construction of Properties

We may invest in properties on which improvements are to be constructed or completed or which require substantial renovation or refurbishment. We expect that joint ventures would be the exclusive vehicle through which we would invest in build-to-suit properties. Our general policy is to structure them as follows:

 

   

we may enter into a joint venture with third parties who have an executed lease with the developer who has an executed lease in place with the future tenant whereby we will provide a portion of the equity or debt financing;

 

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we would accrue a preferred return during construction on any equity investment;

 

   

the properties will be developed by third parties; and

 

   

consistent with our general policy regarding joint venture investments, we would have an option or contract to purchase, or a right of first refusal to purchase, the property or co-investor’s interest.

It is possible that joint venture partners may resist granting us a right of first refusal or may insist on a different methodology for unwinding the joint venture if one of the parties wishes to liquidate its interest.

In the event that we elect to engage in development or construction projects, in order to help ensure performance by the builders of properties that are under construction, completion of such properties will be guaranteed at the contracted price by a completion guaranty, completion bond or performance bond. Our advisor may rely upon the substantial net worth of the contractor or developer or a personal guarantee accompanied by financial statements showing a substantial net worth provided by an affiliate of the person entering into the construction or development contract as an alternative to a completion bond or performance bond. Development of real estate properties is subject to risks relating to a builder’s ability to control construction costs or to build in conformity with plans, specifications and timetables. See the “Risk Factors — General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate” section of this prospectus.

We may make periodic progress payments or other cash advances to developers and builders of our properties prior to completion of construction only upon receipt of an architect’s certification as to the percentage of the project then completed and as to the dollar amount of the construction then completed. We intend to use such additional controls on disbursements to builders and developers as we deem necessary or prudent. We may directly employ one or more project managers, including our advisor or an affiliate of our advisor, to plan, supervise and implement the development of any unimproved properties that we may acquire. Such persons would be compensated directly by us or through an affiliate of our advisor and reimbursed by us. In either event, the compensation would reduce the amount of any construction fee, development fee or acquisition fee that we would otherwise pay to our advisor or its affiliate.

In addition, we may invest in unimproved properties, provided that we will not invest more than 10% of our total assets in unimproved properties or in mortgage loans secured by such properties. We will consider a property to be an unimproved property if it was not acquired for the purpose of producing rental or other operating cash flows, has no development or construction in process at the time of acquisition and no development or construction is planned to commence within one year of the acquisition.

Environmental Matters

All real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. These laws and regulations generally govern wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous materials, the presence and release of hazardous substances and the remediation of contamination associated with disposals. State and federal laws in this area are constantly evolving, and we intend to take commercially reasonable steps to protect ourselves from the impact of these laws.

We generally will not purchase any property unless and until we also obtain what is generally referred to as a “Phase I” environmental site assessment and are generally satisfied with the environmental status of the property. However, we may purchase a property without obtaining such assessment if our advisor determines the assessment is not necessary because there is an existing recent Phase I site assessment. A Phase I environmental site assessment basically consists of a visual survey of the building and the property in an attempt to identify areas of potential environmental concerns, visually observing neighboring properties to assess surface conditions or activities that may have an adverse environmental impact on the property interviewing the key site manager

 

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and/or property owner, contacting local governmental agency personnel and performing an environmental regulatory database search in an attempt to determine any known environmental concerns in, and in the immediate vicinity of, the property. A Phase I environmental site assessment does not generally include any sampling or testing of soil, ground water or building materials from the property and may not reveal all environmental hazards on a property.

In the event the Phase I site assessment uncovers potential environmental problems with a property, our advisor will determine whether we will pursue the investment opportunity and whether we will have a “Phase II” environmental site assessment performed. The factors we may consider in determining whether to conduct a Phase II site assessment include, but are not limited to, (i) the types of operations conducted on the property and surrounding property, (ii) the time, duration and materials used during such operations, (iii) the waste handling practices of any tenants or property owners, (iv) the potential for hazardous substances to be released into the environment, (v) any history of environmental law violations on the subject property and surrounding property, (vi) any documented environmental releases, (vii) any observations from the consultant that conducted the Phase I environmental site assessment, and (viii) whether any party (i.e. surrounding property owners, prior owners or tenants) may be responsible for addressing the environmental conditions. We will determine whether to conduct a Phase II environmental site assessment on a case by case basis.

We expect that some of the properties that we acquire may contain, at the time of our investment, or may have contained prior to our investment, underground storage tanks for the storage of petroleum products and other hazardous or toxic substances. All of these operations create a potential for the release of petroleum products or other hazardous or toxic substances. Some of our potential properties may be adjacent to or near other properties that have contained or then currently contain underground storage tanks used to store petroleum products or other hazardous or toxic substances. In addition, certain of our potential properties may be on or adjacent to or near other properties upon which others, including former owners or tenants of our properties, have engaged, or may in the future engage, in activities that may release petroleum products or other hazardous or toxic substances.

From time to time, we may acquire properties, or interests in properties, with known adverse environmental conditions where we believe that the environmental liabilities associated with these conditions are quantifiable and that the acquisition will yield a superior risk-adjusted return. In such an instance, we will estimate the costs of environmental investigation, clean-up and monitoring in determining the purchase price. Further, in connection with property dispositions, we may agree to remain responsible for, and to bear the cost of, remediating or monitoring certain environmental conditions on the properties.

Other Possible Investments

Although we expect to invest primarily in real estate, our portfolio may also include other real estate-related investments, such as mortgage, mezzanine, bridge and other loans and securities related to real estate assets, frequently, but not necessarily always, in the corporate sector, to the extent such assets do not cause us to lose our REIT status or cause us to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act. We may make adjustments to our target portfolio based on real estate market conditions and investment opportunities. Thus, to the extent that our advisor presents us with high quality investment opportunities that allow us to meet the REIT requirements under the Internal Revenue Code and do not cause us, our operating partnership, or any other subsidiaries to meet the definition of an “investment company” under the Investment Company Act, our portfolio composition may vary from what we initially expect. Our board of directors has broad discretion to change our investment policies in order for us to achieve our investment objectives.

Investing in and Originating Loans.    The criteria that our advisor will use in making or investing in loans on our behalf is substantially the same as those involved in acquiring properties for our portfolio. We do not intend to make loans to other persons, to underwrite securities of other issuers or to engage in the purchase and sale of any types of investments other than those relating to real estate. However, unlike our property investments

 

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which we expect to hold in excess of seven years, we expect that the average duration of loans will typically be one to five years.

We do not expect to make or invest in loans that are not directly or indirectly secured by real estate. We will not make or invest in mortgage loans on any one property if the aggregate amount of all mortgage loans outstanding on the property, including our loan, would exceed an amount equal to 85% of the appraised value of the property, as determined by an independent third party appraiser, unless we find substantial justification due to other underwriting criteria. We may find such justification in connection with the purchase of loans in cases in which we believe there is a high probability of our foreclosure upon the property in order to acquire the underlying assets and in which the cost of the loan investment does not exceed the fair market value of the underlying property. We will not invest in or make loans unless an appraisal has been obtained concerning the underlying property, except for those loans insured or guaranteed by a government or government agency. In cases in which a majority of our independent directors so determine and in the event the transaction is with our advisor, any of our directors or their respective affiliates, the appraisal will be obtained from a certified independent appraiser to support its determination of fair market value.

We may invest in first, second and third mortgage loans, mezzanine loans, bridge loans, wraparound mortgage loans, construction mortgage loans on real property, and loans on leasehold interest mortgages. However, we will not make or invest in any loans that are subordinate to any mortgage or equity interest of our advisor or any of its or our affiliates. We also may invest in participations in mortgage loans. A mezzanine loan is a loan made in respect of certain real property but is secured by a lien on the ownership interests of the entity that, directly or indirectly, owns the real property. A bridge loan is short term financing, for an individual or business, until permanent or the next stage of financing, can be obtained. Second mortgage and wraparound loans are secured by second or wraparound deeds of trust on real property that is already subject to prior mortgage indebtedness. A wraparound loan is one or more junior mortgage loans having a principal amount equal to the outstanding balance under the existing mortgage loan, plus the amount actually to be advanced under the wraparound mortgage loan. Under a wraparound loan, we would generally make principal and interest payments on behalf of the borrower to the holders of the prior mortgage loans. Third mortgage loans are secured by third deeds of trust on real property that is already subject to prior first and second mortgage indebtedness. Construction loans are loans made for either original development or renovation of property. Construction loans in which we would generally consider an investment would be secured by first deeds of trust on real property for terms of six months to two years. Loans on leasehold interests are secured by an assignment of the borrower’s leasehold interest in the particular real property. These loans are generally for terms of from six months to 15 years. The leasehold interest loans are either amortized over a period that is shorter than the lease term or have a maturity date prior to the date the lease terminates. These loans would generally permit us to cure any default under the lease. Mortgage participation investments are investments in partial interests of mortgages of the type described above that are made and administered by third-party mortgage lenders.

In evaluating prospective loan investments, our advisor will consider factors such as the following:

 

   

the ratio of the investment amount to the underlying property’s value;

 

   

the property’s potential for capital appreciation;

 

   

expected levels of rental and occupancy rates;

 

   

the condition and use of the property;

 

   

current and projected cash flow of the property;

 

   

potential for rent increases;

 

   

the degree of liquidity of the investment;

 

   

the property’s income-producing capacity;

 

   

the quality, experience and creditworthiness of the borrower;

 

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general economic conditions in the area where the property is located;

 

   

in the case of mezzanine loans, the ability to acquire the underlying real property; and

 

   

other factors that our advisor believes are relevant.

In addition, we will seek to obtain a customary lender’s title insurance policy or commitment as to the priority of the mortgage or condition of the title. Because the factors considered, including the specific weight we place on each factor, will vary for each prospective loan investment, we do not, and are not able to, assign a specific weight or level of importance to any particular factor.

We may originate loans from mortgage brokers or personal solicitations of suitable borrowers, or may purchase existing loans that were originated by other lenders. Our advisor will evaluate all potential loan investments to determine if the security for the loan and the loan-to-value ratio meets our investment criteria and objectives. Most loans that we will consider for investment would provide for monthly payments of interest and some may also provide for principal amortization, although many loans of the nature that we will consider provide for payments of interest only and a payment of principal in full at the end of the loan term. We will not originate loans with negative amortization provisions.

We do not have any policies directing the portion of our assets that may be invested in construction loans, mezzanine loans, bridge loans, loans secured by leasehold interests and second, third and wraparound mortgage loans. However, we recognize that these types of loans are riskier than first deeds of trust or first priority mortgages on income-producing, fee-simple properties, and we expect to minimize the amount of these types of loans in our portfolio, to the extent that we make or invest in loans at all. Our advisor will evaluate the fact that these types of loans are riskier in determining the rate of interest on the loans. We do not have any policy that limits the amount that we may invest in any single loan or the amount we may invest in loans to any one borrower. We are not limited as to the amount of gross offering proceeds that we may use to invest in or originate loans.

Our loan investments may be subject to regulation by federal, state and local authorities and subject to various laws and judicial and administrative decisions imposing various requirements and restrictions, including among other things, regulating credit granting activities, establishing maximum interest rates and finance charges, requiring disclosures to customers, governing secured transactions and setting collection, repossession and claims handling procedures and other trade practices. In addition, certain states have enacted legislation requiring the licensing of mortgage bankers or other lenders and these requirements may affect our ability to effectuate our proposed investments in loans. Commencement of operations in these or other jurisdictions may be dependent upon a finding of our financial responsibility, character and fitness. We may determine not to make loans in any jurisdiction in which the regulatory authority determines that we have not complied in all material respects with applicable requirements.

Investment in Other Real Estate-Related Securities.    To the extent permitted by Section V.D.2 of the NASAA REIT Guidelines, and subject to the limitations set forth in this prospectus and in our charter, we may invest in common and preferred real estate-related equity securities of both publicly traded and private real estate companies. Our board of directors (including all of our independent directors) has authorized us to invest in preferred real estate-related equity securities, provided that such investments do not exceed the limitations contained in any credit facility or other agreement to which we are a party. Real estate-related equity securities are generally unsecured and also may be subordinated to other obligations of the issuer. Our investments in real estate-related equity securities will involve special risks relating to the particular issuer of the equity securities, including the financial condition and business outlook of the issuer.

We may also make investments in CMBS to the extent permitted by the NASAA REIT Guidelines. CMBS are securities that evidence interests in, or are secured by, a single commercial mortgage loan or a pool of commercial mortgage loans. CMBS are generally pass-through certificates that represent beneficial ownership

 

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interests in common law trusts whose assets consist of defined portfolios of one or more commercial mortgage loans. They are typically issued in multiple tranches whereby the more senior classes are entitled to priority distributions from the trust’s income. Losses and other shortfalls from expected amounts to be received on the mortgage pool are borne by the most subordinate classes, which receive payments only after the more senior classes have received all principal and/or interest to which they are entitled. CMBS are subject to all of the risks of the underlying mortgage loans. We may invest in investment grade and non-investment grade CMBS classes. Our board of directors has adopted a policy to limit any investments in non-investment grade CMBS to not more than 10% of our total assets.

Borrowing Policies

Our advisor believes that utilizing borrowing is consistent with our investment objective of maximizing the return to investors. By operating on a leveraged basis, we have more funds available for investment in properties. This allows us to make more investments than would otherwise be possible, resulting in a more diversified portfolio.

At the same time, our advisor believes in utilizing leverage in a moderate fashion. While there is no limitation on the amount we may borrow against any single improved property, our charter limits our aggregate borrowings to 75% of the cost (or 300% of net assets) (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in the next quarterly report along with the justification for such excess borrowing. Consistent with our advisor’s approach toward the moderate use of leverage, our board of directors has adopted a policy to further limit our borrowings to 60% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our gross assets, unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of the independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in the next quarterly report along with a justification for such excess borrowing. For example, our independent directors may find that we are justified in exceeding these limitations on borrowings during the offering stage, as we will be in the process of raising our equity capital to build our portfolio. Higher debt levels during the offering stage may enable us to acquire properties earlier than we might otherwise be able to acquire them if we were to adhere to these debt levels, which could yield returns that are accretive to the portfolio. In addition, as we will be in the offering stage, more equity could be raised in the future to reduce the debt levels to within the limitations described herein. After we have acquired a substantial portfolio, our advisor will target a leverage of 50% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non cash reserves) or fair market value of our gross assets.

Our advisor will use its best efforts to obtain financing on the most favorable terms available to us. Our advisor will have substantial discretion with respect to the financing we obtain, subject to our borrowing policies, which will be approved by our board of directors. Lenders may have recourse to assets not securing the repayment of the indebtedness. Our advisor may refinance properties during the term of a loan only in limited circumstances, such as when a decline in interest rates makes it beneficial to prepay an existing mortgage, when an existing mortgage matures or if an attractive investment becomes available and the proceeds from the refinancing can be used to purchase such investment. The benefits of the refinancing may include increased cash flow resulting from reduced debt service requirements and an increase in property ownership if some refinancing proceeds are reinvested in real estate.

Our ability to increase our diversification through borrowing may be adversely impacted if banks and other lending institutions reduce the amount of funds available for loans secured by real estate. When interest rates on mortgage loans are high or financing is otherwise unavailable on a timely basis, we may purchase properties for cash with the intention of obtaining a mortgage loan for a portion of the purchase price at a later time. To the extent that we do not obtain mortgage loans on our properties, our ability to acquire additional properties will be restricted and we may not be able to adequately diversify our portfolio.

We may not borrow money from any of our directors or from our advisor or its affiliates unless such loan is approved by a majority of the directors not otherwise interested in the transaction (including a majority of the

 

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independent directors) as fair, competitive and commercially reasonable and no less favorable to us than a comparable loan between unaffiliated parties.

Disposition Policies

We intend to hold each property we acquire for an extended period, generally in excess of seven years. Holding periods for other real estate-related investments may vary. Regardless of intended holding periods, circumstances might arise that could cause us to determine to sell an asset before the end of the expected holding period if we believe the sale of the asset would be in the best interests of our stockholders. The determination of whether a particular asset should be sold or otherwise disposed of will be made after consideration of relevant factors, including prevailing and projected economic conditions, current tenant rolls and tenant creditworthiness, whether we could apply the proceeds from the sale of the asset to make other investments, whether disposition of the asset would increase cash flow, and whether the sale of the asset would be a prohibited transaction under the Internal Revenue Code or otherwise impact our status as a REIT. The selling price of a property that is net leased will be determined in large part by the amount of rent payable under the lease. If a tenant has a repurchase option at a formula price, we may be limited in realizing any appreciation. In connection with our sales of properties we may lend the purchaser all or a portion of the purchase price. In these instances, our taxable income may exceed the cash received in the sale.

Investment Limitations, in General

Our charter places numerous limitations on us with respect to the manner in which we may invest our funds or issue securities. Until we list our shares on a national securities exchange, we:

 

   

will not borrow in excess of 75% of the aggregate cost (or 300% of net assets) (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) of our gross assets, unless excess borrowing is approved by a majority of our independent directors and disclosed to our stockholders in our next quarterly report along with the justification for such excess borrowing (although our board of directors has adopted a policy to reduce this limit from 75% to 60%);

 

   

will not make investments in unimproved property or mortgage loans on unimproved property in excess of 10% of our total assets;

 

   

will not make or invest in mortgage loans unless an appraisal is obtained concerning the underlying property, except for those mortgage loans insured or guaranteed by a government or government agency;

 

   

will not make or invest in mortgage loans, including construction loans, on any one property if the aggregate amount of all mortgage loans on such property would exceed an amount equal to 85% of the appraised value of such property unless substantial justification exists for exceeding such limit because of the presence of other underwriting criteria;

 

   

will not invest in indebtedness secured by a mortgage on real property that is subordinate to the lien or other indebtedness of our advisor, any director, our sponsor or any of our affiliates;

 

   

will not invest in real estate contracts of sale, otherwise known as land sale contracts, unless the contract is in recordable form and is appropriately recorded in the chain of title;

 

   

will not invest in commodities or commodity futures contracts, except for futures contracts when used solely for the purpose of hedging in connection with our ordinary business of investing in real estate assets and mortgages;

 

   

will not issue equity securities on a deferred payment basis or other similar arrangement;

 

   

will not issue debt securities in the absence of adequate cash flow to cover debt service;

 

   

will not issue shares that are assessable after we have received the consideration for which our board of directors authorized their issuance;

 

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will not issue equity securities redeemable solely at the option of the holder (which restriction has no effect on our share redemption program or the ability of our operating partnership to issue redeemable partnership interests);

 

   

will not issue options or warrants to our advisor, our directors, our sponsor or any of their respective affiliates except on the same terms as such options or warrants are sold to the general public and provided that such options or warrants do not exceed ten percent of our outstanding shares on the date of grant;

 

   

will not make any investment that we believe will be inconsistent with our objectives of remaining qualified as a REIT unless and until our board of directors determines, in its sole discretion, that REIT qualification is not in our best interests;

 

   

will not invest in indebtedness secured by a mortgage on real property which is subordinate to the lien of other indebtedness, except where the amount of the subordinated debt, plus the amount of the senior debt, does not exceed 90% of the appraised value of such property, if after giving effect thereto, the value of all such investments of our company (as shown on our books in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, after all reasonable reserves but before provision for depreciation) would not then exceed 25% of our tangible assets (and the value of all investments in this type of subordinated debt will be limited to 10% of our tangible assets);

 

   

will not engage in securities trading, or engage in the business of underwriting or the agency distribution of securities issued by other persons;

 

   

will not acquire interests in any entity holding investments or engaging in activities prohibited by Article IX of our charter, except for investments in which we hold a non-controlling interest or investments in publicly-traded entities; and

 

   

will continually review our investment activity to ensure that we are not classified as an “investment company” under the Investment Company Act.

In addition, our charter includes many other investment limitations in connection with transactions with affiliated entities or persons, which limitations are described in the “Conflicts of Interest” section of this prospectus. Our charter also includes restrictions on roll-up transactions, which are described under the “Description of Shares” section of this prospectus.

Investment Limitations to Avoid Registration as an Investment Company

We intend to conduct our operations, and the operations of our operating partnership, and any other subsidiaries, so that no such entity meets the definition of an “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act. Under the Investment Company Act, in relevant part, a company is an “investment company” if:

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(A), it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities; or

 

   

pursuant to Section 3(a)(1)(C), it is engaged, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire “investment securities” having a value exceeding the 40% test. “Investment securities” excludes U.S. Government securities and securities of majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

We intend to acquire a diversified portfolio of income-producing real estate assets; however, our portfolio may include, to a much lesser extent, other real estate-related investments. We also may acquire real estate assets through investments in joint venture entities, including joint venture entities in which we may not own a

 

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controlling interest. We anticipate that our assets generally will continue to be held in wholly and majority-owned subsidiaries of the company, each formed to hold a particular asset. We intend to monitor our operations and our assets on an ongoing basis in order to ensure that neither we, nor any of our subsidiaries, meet the definition of “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act.

We believe that neither we nor our operating partnership will be considered investment companies under Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because neither of these entities will engage primarily or hold themselves out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Rather, we, through our operating partnership, will be primarily engaged in non-investment company businesses related to real estate. Consequently, we expect that we and our operating partnership will be able to conduct our respective operations such that neither entity will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

In addition, because we are organized as a holding company that will conduct its business primarily through our operating partnership, which in turn is a holding company that will conduct its business through its subsidiaries, we intend to conduct our operations, and the operations of our operating partnership and any other subsidiary, so that we will not meet the 40% test under Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act.

In order for us to not meet the definition of an “investment company” and avoid regulation under the Investment Company Act, we must engage primarily in the business of buying real estate, and these investments must be made within a year after the offering ends. If we are unable to invest a significant portion of the proceeds of this offering in properties within one year of the termination of the offering, we may avoid being required to register as an investment company by temporarily investing any unused proceeds in certificates of deposit or other cash items with low returns. This would reduce the cash available for distribution to investors and possibly lower your returns.

To avoid meeting the definition of an “investment company” under Section 3(a)(1) of the Investment Company Act, we may be unable to sell assets we would otherwise want to sell and may need to sell assets we would otherwise wish to retain. Similarly, we may have to acquire additional income or loss generating assets that we might not otherwise have acquired or may have to forgo opportunities to acquire interests in companies that we would otherwise want to acquire and would be important to our investment strategy. In addition, a change in the value of any of our assets could negatively affect our ability to avoid being required to register as an investment company. If we were required to register as an investment company but failed to do so, we would be prohibited from engaging in our business, and criminal and civil actions could be brought against us. In addition, our contracts would be unenforceable unless a court were to require enforcement, and a court could appoint a receiver to take control of us and liquidate our business.

If we are required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we would become subject to substantial regulation with respect to our capital structure (including our ability to use borrowings), management, operations, transactions with affiliated persons (as defined in the Investment Company Act), and portfolio composition, including restrictions with respect to diversification and industry concentration and other matters. Compliance with the Investment Company Act would, accordingly, limit our ability to make certain investments and require us to significantly restructure our business plan.

Change in Investment Policies

Our charter requires that our independent directors review our investment policies at least annually to determine that the policies we follow are in the best interests of our stockholders. Each determination and the basis therefor shall be set forth in the minutes of the meetings of our board of directors. The methods of implementing our investment policies also may vary as new real estate development trends emerge and new investment techniques are developed.

Generally, our board of directors may revise our investment policies without the concurrence of our stockholders. However, our board of directors will not amend our charter, including any investment policies that

 

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are provided in our charter, without the concurrence of a majority of the outstanding shares, except for amendments that do not adversely affect the rights, preferences and privileges of our stockholders.

Real Property Investments

We engage in the acquisition and ownership of commercial properties throughout the United States. We invest primarily in retail and other income-producing commercial properties located throughout the United States.

As of October 3, 2012, we, through separate wholly-owned limited liability companies and limited partnerships, owned 32 properties located in 15 states, consisting of approximately 582,000 gross rentable square feet of commercial space. The properties generally were acquired through the use of proceeds from our initial public offering and proceeds from our revolving credit facility. Our properties as of October 3, 2012 are listed below in order of date of acquisition.

 

Property Description

  Date Acquired   Year
Built
  Purchase Price     Fees Paid to
Sponsor(1)
    Initial
Yield(2)
    Average
Yield(3)
    Physical
Occupancy
 

Advance Auto Parts –
North Ridgeville, OH(4)

  April 13, 2012   2008   $ 1,673,000      $ 33,460        8.30     8.30     100

PetSmart – Wilkesboro, NC(4)

  April 13, 2012   2011     2,650,000        53,000        8.10     8.33     100

Nordstrom Rack – Tampa, FL

  April 16, 2012   2010     11,998,039        239,961        7.41     7.41     100

Walgreens – Blair, NE

  April 18, 2012   2008     4,242,424        84,848        6.60     6.60     100

CVS – Corpus Christi, TX

  April 19, 2012   1998     3,400,000        68,000        6.75     6.75     100

CVS – Charleston, SC

  April 26, 2012   1998     2,137,778        42,756        6.75     6.75     100

CVS – Asheville, NC

  April 26, 2012   1998     2,365,249        47,305        6.75     6.75     100

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Brownfield, TX

  May 8, 2012   2012     965,447        19,309        7.05     7.19     100

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Columbus, TX

  May 8, 2012   2011     1,130,213        22,604        7.05     7.38     100

Walgreens – Suffolk, VA

  May 14, 2012   2007     4,925,000        98,500        6.70     6.70     100

Walgreens – Springfield, IL

  May 14, 2012   2007     5,223,000        104,460        6.70     6.70     100

Walgreens – Montgomery, AL

  May 14, 2012   2006     4,477,000        89,540        6.70     6.70     100

Tractor Supply – Cambridge, MN

  May 14, 2012   2012     2,245,000        44,900        8.02     8.85     100

HEB Center – Waxahachie, TX

  June 27, 2012   1997     13,000,000        260,000        7.19     7.26     99

CVS – Bainbridge, GA

  June 27, 2012   1998     2,650,000        53,000        7.00     7.00     100

Advance Auto – Starkville, MS

  June 29, 2012   2011     1,344,964        26,899        7.60     7.60     100

AutoZone – Philipsburg, PA

  July 27, 2012   2010     1,620,000        32,400        6.85     6.85     100

Benihana Portfolio – Various (5)

  August 21, 2012   Various     17,335,757        346,715        7.85     7.85     100

Wawa – Cape May, NJ

  August 29, 2012   2005     7,639,896        152,798        6.75     6.75     100

Wawa – Galloway, NJ

  August 29, 2012   2005     8,123,926        162,479        6.75     6.75     100

Stripes Portfolio I – Various (6)

  August 30, 2012   Various     8,228,130        164,563        7.14     7.14     100

Stripes Portfolio II – Various (7)

  August 30, 2012   Various     16,936,887        338,738        7.14     7.14     100

Pick’n Save – Sheboygan, WI

  September 6, 2012   2012     14,122,000        282,440        7.67     8.05     100

The Marquis – Williamsburg, VA

  September 21, 2012   2007     14,260,000        285,200        7.02     7.11     100

Golden Corral – Garland, TX

  September 21, 2012   2012     3,903,000        78,060        8.00     8.41     100
     

 

 

   

 

 

       
      $ 156,596,710      $ 3,131,935         
     

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

(1) Fees paid to sponsor are payments made to an affiliate of our advisor for acquisition fees in connection with the property acquisition. For more detailed information on fees paid to our advisor or its affiliates, see the section captioned “Management Compensation” beginning on page 76 of the prospectus.

 

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Index to Financial Statements
(2) Initial yield is calculated as the current annualized rental income for the in-place leases at the respective property divided by the property purchase price, exclusive of acquisition costs and acquisition fees paid to our advisor or its affiliates. In general, our properties are subject to long-term triple net or double net leases, and the future costs associated with the double net leases are unpredictable and may reduce the yield. The majority of our properties are subject to triple net leases. Accordingly, our management believes that current annualized rental income is a more appropriate figure from which to calculate initial yield than net operating income.
(3) Average yield is calculated as the average annual rental income, adjusted for any rent incentives, for the in-place leases over the non-cancellable lease term at the respective property divided by the property purchase price, exclusive of acquisition costs and acquisition fees paid to our advisor or its affiliates. In general, our properties are subject to long-term triple net or double net leases, and the future costs associated with the double net leases are unpredictable and may reduce the yield. The majority of our properties are subject to triple net leases. Accordingly our management believes that average annual rental income is a more appropriate figure from which to calculate average yield than net operating income.
(4) These properties were acquired by purchasing 100% of the membership interests in AA North Ridgeville and PM Wilkesboro, respectively, from Series C. Series C had acquired these properties for the purpose of holding them temporarily until we were able to raise sufficient proceeds in our public offering to acquire them from Series C at its acquisition cost (including acquisition related expenses). A majority of our board of directors (including a majority of our independent directors) not otherwise interested in the transactions approved the acquisitions as being fair and reasonable to us and determined that the cost to us of each property was equal to the cost of the respective property to Series C (including acquisition related expenses). In addition, the purchase price of each property, exclusive of closing costs, was less than the current appraised value of the respective property as determined by an independent third party appraiser.
(5) The Benihana Portfolio consists of four single-tenant commercial properties located in Florida, Illinois, Minnesota and Texas, which were purchased under individual sale-leaseback agreements with Benihana National of Florida Corp., Benihana Lombard Corp., The Samurai, Inc. and Benihana Woodlands Corp., respectively, as tenants. The properties are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.
(6) The Stripes Portfolio I consists of three single-tenant commercial properties located in Texas, which are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.
(7) The Stripes Portfolio II consists of three single-tenant commercial properties located in Texas, which are subject to individual lease agreements with identical terms.

 

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The following table sets forth the principal provisions of the lease term for the major tenants at each of the properties listed above:

 

Property

  Major Tenants(1)   Total
Square
Feet
Leased
    % of
Total
Rentable
Square
Feet
    Renewal
Options(2)
  Current
Annual
Base Rent
    Base Rent
per
Square
Foot
    Lease Term(3)  

Advance Auto Parts – North Ridgeville, OH

  Advance Stores Company,
Inc.
    6,000       100   3/5 yr.   $ 138,845      $ 23.14       4/13/2012        2/29/2024   

PetSmart – Wilkesboro, NC

  PetSmart Inc.     12,259       100   4/5 yr.     214,533        17.50        4/13/2012        1/31/2017   
            226,791        18.50       2/1/2017        1/31/2022   

Nordstrom Rack – Tampa, FL

  Nordstrom, Inc.     44,925       100   4/5 yr.     889,515        19.80       4/16/2012        10/31/2020   

Walgreens – Blair, NE

  Walgreens Co.     14,820       100   (4)     280,000        18.89       4/18/2012        9/30/2033   

CVS – Corpus Christi, TX

  CVS EGL South.
Alameda TX, LP
    11,306       100   5/5 yr.     229,500        20.30       4/19/2012        4/30/2037   

CVS – Charleston, SC

  South Carolina CVS
Pharmacy, LLC
    10,125       100   5/5 yr.     144,300        14.25       4/26/2012        4/30/2037   

CVS – Asheville, NC

  North Carolina CVS
Pharmacy, LLC
    10,125       100   5/5 yr.     159,700        15.77       4/26/2012        4/30/2037   

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Brownfield, TX

  O’Reilly Automotive
Stores, Inc.
    6,365       100   5/5 yr.     68,064        10.69        5/8/2012        1/20/2022   
            72,144        11.33       1/21/2022        1/20/2027   

O’Reilly Auto Parts –
Columbus, TX

  O’Reilly Automotive
Stores, Inc.
    6,047       100   4/5 yr.     79,680        13.18       5/8/2012        9/30/2021   
            84,456        13.97       10/1/2021        9/30/2026   
            89,520        14.80       10/1/2026        9/30/2031   

Walgreens – Suffolk, VA

  Walgreen, Co.     14,820       100   (4)     330,000        22.27       5/14/2012        8/31/2032   

Walgreens – Springfield, IL

  Walgreen, Co.     14,820       100   10/5 yr.     350,000        23.62       5/14/2012        10/31/2032   

Walgreens – Montgomery, AL

  Walgreen, Co.     14,820       100   10/5 yr.     300,000        20.24       5/14/2012