10-Q 1 a14-8892_110q.htm 10-Q

Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(MARK ONE)

 

x                QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31, 2014

 

OR

 

o                   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from              to

 

Commission file number 001-35909

 

MARKETO, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Delaware

 

56-2558241

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Incorporation or Organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

901 Mariners Island Boulevard, Suite 200

San Mateo, California 94404

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(650) 376-2300

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  YES x  NO o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  YES x  NO o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filero

 

Accelerated filero

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filerx

 

Smaller reporting companyo

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  YES o  NO x

 

There were 40,490,495 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock issued and outstanding as of May 13, 2014.

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

 

Table of Contents

 

Part I — Financial Information

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements:

5

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2014 (unaudited) and December 31, 2013

5

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 (unaudited)

6

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 (unaudited)

7

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 (unaudited)

8

 

 

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)

9

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

20

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

29

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

29

 

 

 

Part II — Other Information

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

29

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

29

 

 

 

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

48

 

 

 

Item 3.

Default Upon Senior Securities

48

 

 

 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

48

 

 

 

Item 5

Other Information

48

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

48

 

 

 

Signatures

 

50

 

 

EX-31.1 (CERTIFICATION OF THE CEO PURSUANT TO SECTION 302)

 

 

 

EX-31.2 (CERTIFICATION OF THE CFO PURSUANT TO SECTION 302)

 

 

 

EX-32.1 (CERTIFICATION OF THE CEO PURSUANT TO SECTION 906)

 

 

 

EX-32.2 (CERTIFICATION OF THE CFO PURSUANT TO SECTION 906)

 

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements that are based on our management’s beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to our management. The forward-looking statements are contained principally in, but not limited to, the sections titled “Risk Factors,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts and can be identified by terms such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts”, “projects,” “should,” “will,” “would” or similar expressions and the negatives of those terms. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

·                  our future financial performance, including our expectations regarding our revenue, cost of revenue, gross profit or gross margin, operating expenses, ability to generate cash flow, and ability to achieve, and maintain, future profitability;

 

·                  our anticipated growth and growth strategies and our ability to effectively manage that growth and effect these strategies;

 

·                  anticipated trends, growth rates and challenges in our business and in the markets in which we operate;

 

·                  our ability to anticipate market needs and develop new and enhanced products and services to meet those needs, and our ability to successfully monetize them;

 

·                  maintaining and expanding our customer base and our relationships with other companies;

 

·                  the impact of competition in our industry and innovation by our competitors;

 

·                  our ability to sell our products and expand internationally;

 

·                  the impact of any failure to anticipate and adapt to future changes in our industry;

 

·                  the impact of seasonality on our business;

 

·                  our ability to hire and retain necessary qualified employees to expand and scale our operations;

 

·                  the impact of any failure of our solutions or solution innovations;

 

·                  our reliance on our third-party service providers;

 

·                  the evolution of technology affecting our products, services and markets;

 

·                  our ability to adequately protect our intellectual property;

 

·                  our ability to integrate businesses that we have acquired or may acquire;

 

·                  the anticipated effect on our business of litigation to which we are or may become a party;

 

·                  our ability to stay abreast of new or modified laws and regulations that currently apply or become applicable to our business both in the United States and internationally;

 

·                  the increased expenses and administrative workload associated with being a public company;

 

·                  failure to maintain an effective system of internal controls necessary to accurately report our financial results and prevent fraud;

 

·                  our liquidity and working capital requirements;

 

·                  the estimates and estimate methodologies used in preparing our consolidated financial statements; and

 

·                  the future trading prices of our common stock and the impact of securities analysts’ reports on these prices.

 

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Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. We discuss these risks in greater detail in the section entitled “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Also, forward-looking statements represent our management’s beliefs and assumptions only as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. You should read this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.

 

Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update these forward-looking statements publicly, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.

 

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Table of Contents

 

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

MARKETO, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in thousands)

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

119,572

 

$

128,299

 

Accounts receivable, net of allowances

 

25,240

 

26,946

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

6,874

 

3,218

 

Total current assets

 

151,686

 

158,463

 

Property and equipment, net

 

15,567

 

13,856

 

Goodwill

 

26,045

 

25,941

 

Intangible assets, net

 

6,768

 

7,095

 

Other assets

 

945

 

484

 

Total assets

 

$

201,011

 

$

205,839

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

3,964

 

$

3,527

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

13,488

 

23,055

 

Deferred revenue

 

45,606

 

41,356

 

Current portion of credit facility

 

2,564

 

2,187

 

Total current liabilities

 

65,622

 

70,125

 

Credit facility, net of current portion

 

4,702

 

5,372

 

Other liabilities

 

1,812

 

1,900

 

Total liabilities

 

72,136

 

77,397

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Redeemable non-controlling interests

 

1,572

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock

 

4

 

4

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

269,219

 

257,801

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

150

 

198

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(142,070

)

(129,561

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

127,303

 

128,442

 

Total liabilities, redeemable non-controlling interests and stockholders’ equity

 

$

201,011

 

$

205,839

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

(in thousands, except per share data)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

$

28,611

 

$

17,555

 

Professional services and other

 

3,681

 

2,181

 

Total revenue

 

32,292

 

19,736

 

Cost of revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

6,235

 

5,820

 

Professional services and other

 

4,841

 

2,618

 

Total cost of revenue

 

11,076

 

8,438

 

Gross profit:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

22,376

 

11,735

 

Professional services and other

 

(1,160

)

(437

)

Total gross profit

 

21,216

 

11,298

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

7,131

 

4,996

 

Sales and marketing

 

20,368

 

12,318

 

General and administrative

 

6,192

 

3,427

 

Total operating expenses

 

33,691

 

20,741

 

Loss from operations

 

(12,475

)

(9,443

)

Other income (expense), net

 

(59

)

(61

)

Loss before provision for income taxes

 

(12,534

)

(9,504

)

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

(14

)

20

 

Net loss

 

(12,520

)

(9,524

)

Net loss attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests

 

11

 

 

Net loss attributable to Marketo

 

$

(12,509

)

$

(9,524

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted

 

$

(0.32

)

$

(2.99

)

Shares used in computing net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted

 

39,379

 

3,181

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(12,520

)

$

(9,524

)

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

(50

)

38

 

Total comprehensive loss

 

(12,570

)

(9,486

)

Net loss attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests

 

11

 

 

Other comprehensive loss attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests

 

2

 

 

Comprehensive loss attributable to Marketo

 

$

(12,557

)

$

(9,486

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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MARKETO, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months 
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(12,520

)

$

(9,524

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

2,131

 

806

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

5,007

 

1,001

 

Deferred income taxes

 

(74

)

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

1,709

 

(109

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

(3,724

)

(1,848

)

Other assets

 

(393

)

164

 

Accounts payable

 

44

 

1,924

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

(9,628

)

(1,296

)

Deferred revenue

 

4,251

 

3,906

 

Other liabilities

 

(14

)

71

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(13,211

)

(4,905

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of property and equipment

 

(2,579

)

(2,877

)

Capitalized software development

 

(179

)

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(2,758

)

(2,877

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock upon exercise of stock options

 

2,518

 

490

 

Proceeds from the issuance of common stock issued under the employee stock purchase plan

 

3,384

 

 

Investment from redeemable non-controlling interests

 

1,953

 

 

Repurchase of unvested common stock from terminated employees

 

(23

)

(2

)

Withholding taxes remitted for the net share settlement of an equity award

 

(15

)

 

Repayment of debt

 

(293

)

 

Payment of deferred initial public offering and follow-on offering costs

 

(104

)

(794

)

Payment incurred for common stock registration related to acquisition

 

(155

)

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

7,265

 

(306

)

Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

(23

)

17

 

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

 

(8,727

)

(8,071

)

Cash and cash equivalents — beginning of period

 

128,299

 

44,247

 

Cash and cash equivalents — end of period

 

$

119,572

 

$

36,176

 

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

 

$

75

 

$

32

 

Cash paid for income taxes

 

29

 

13

 

Supplemental disclosure of noncash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Vesting of early exercise options

 

115

 

256

 

Property and equipment acquired through tenant improvement allowance

 

 

929

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

1. The Company and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Business

 

Marketo, Inc. (Marketo or the Company) was incorporated in the state of California on January 20, 2006. The Company was reincorporated in the state of Delaware on December 17, 2009. The Company operates from its headquarters in San Mateo, California and has operating subsidiaries in Ireland, Australia, Israel and Japan.

 

Marketo is a provider of a cloud-based marketing software platform that enables organizations to engage in modern relationship marketing. The Company’s software platform is designed to enable the effective management, optimization and analytical measurement of marketing activities, enabling organizations to acquire new customers more efficiently, build stronger relationships with existing customers, improve sales effectiveness and drive faster revenue growth. On this platform, the Company delivers an easy to use, integrated suite of advanced applications. The Company generally offers its services on an annual subscription basis with quarterly or annual payment terms.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes of the Company reflect all adjustments (all of which are normal and recurring in nature) that, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation of the interim periods presented. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Marketo and its wholly-owned and majority-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

The results of operations for the interim periods presented are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any subsequent quarter or for the entire year ending December 31, 2014. Certain information and note disclosures normally included in annual financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP) have been condensed or omitted under the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited financial statements and related notes presented in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 3, 2014 pursuant to Rule 424(b) of the Securities Act of 1933. There have been no changes in the Company’s significant accounting policies from those that were disclosed in the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. Such management estimates and assumptions include the estimated selling price for the various elements in our customer contracts, the allowance for doubtful accounts, amounts collectible for sales tax, stock-based compensation expense, useful lives of intangible assets, redemption value of redeemable non-controlling interests and the valuation of deferred tax assets. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates, and such differences could be material to the financial statements and affect the results of operations reported in future periods.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2013-11, Income Taxes (Topic 740) - Presentation of an unrecognized Tax Benefit When a Net Operating Loss Carryforward, a Similar Tax Loss, or a Tax Credit Carryforward Exists. This amendment clarifies the guidance on the presentation of an unrecognized tax benefit, or a portion of an unrecognized tax benefit, in the financial statements as a reduction to a deferred tax asset for a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward. The adoption of this update in the first quarter of 2014 did not have a material impact to the consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

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MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

2. Joint Venture

 

On February 19, 2014, the Company entered into an agreement with SunBridge Corporation and Dentsu eMarketing One K.K. (collectively, the Investors) to engage in the investment, organization, management and operation of a Japanese subsidiary (Marketo KK) of the Company that is focused on the sale of the Company’s products and services in Japan. The Investors contributed approximately $2.0 million (200,000,000 Japanese Yen) in cash in exchange for 35.4% of the outstanding equity interests of Marketo KK. As of March 31, 2014, the Company owned approximately 64.6% of the outstanding equity interests of Marketo KK. Furthermore, the Company and the Investors have agreed to subscribe to additional shares by contributing additional funding of approximately $2.3 million (237,480,955 Japanese Yen) and approximately $2.0 million (200,000,000 Japanese Yen), respectively, on or before April 1, 2015, at which point the Company and the Investors would own approximately 60.1% and 39.9% of the outstanding equity interests in Marketo KK, respectively.

 

Twenty percent of the common stock held by the Investors may be callable by the Company or puttable by the Investors beginning on the seventh anniversary of the initial capital contribution by the Investors. This percentage increases to forty percent and one hundred percent on the eighth and tenth anniversary, respectively.  Should the call or put option be exercised, the redemption value would be determined based on a prescribed formula derived from the relative revenues of Marketo KK and the Company and may be settled at the Company’s discretion with Company stock (with no limit on the shares that may be issued) or cash.  Additionally, the common stock held by the Investors may be callable or puttable following a change of control of the Company.  The redeemable non-controlling interests in Marketo KK is classified outside of permanent equity in the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2014, primarily due to the put right available to the redeemable non-controlling interest holders in the future which may be settled in cash or common stock of the Company. The balance of the redeemable non-controlling interests is reported at the greater of the initial carrying amount adjusted for the redeemable non-controlling interest’s share of earnings, or its estimated redemption value. The resulting changes in the estimated redemption amount (increases or decreases) are recorded with corresponding adjustments against retained earnings or, in the absence of retained earnings, additional paid-in-capital. The estimated redemption value of the call/put option embedded in the redeemable non-controlling interests was $0 at March 31, 2014.

 

3. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company measures certain financial assets at fair value on a recurring basis based on a fair value hierarchy that requires the Company to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Inputs used in the valuation techniques to derive fair values are classified based on a three-level hierarchy, as follows:

 

·                  Level 1 — Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

·                  Level 2 — Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets with insufficient volume or infrequent transactions (less active markets); or model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs are observable or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

 

·                  Level 3 — Unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are significant to the measurement of fair value of assets or liabilities.

 

As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis were comprised of money market funds and certificates of deposit included within cash and cash equivalents.

 

The fair value of these financial assets was determined using the following inputs for the periods presented:

 

 

 

March 31, 2014

 

December 31, 2013

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Money market funds

 

$

106,972

 

$

 

$

 

$

121,466

 

$

 

$

 

Certificate of deposit

 

 

374

 

 

 

 

3,219

 

 

 

Total

 

$

106,972

 

$

374

 

$

 

$

121,466

 

$

3,219

 

$

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

4. Balance Sheet Components

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents consist of the following:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Cash

 

$

12,226

 

$

3,614

 

Cash equivalents:

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

106,972

 

121,466

 

Certificate of deposit

 

374

 

3,219

 

 

 

107,346

 

124,685

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

119,572

 

$

128,299

 

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable consist of the following:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Accounts receivable

 

$

25,614

 

$

27,275

 

Allowance for doubtful accounts

 

(374

)

(329

)

Accounts receivable, net

 

$

25,240

 

$

26,946

 

 

Property and Equipment, Net

 

Property and equipment, net consists of the following:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Computer equipment

 

$

15,080

 

$

12,919

 

Software

 

2,357

 

2,314

 

Office furniture

 

1,337

 

1,318

 

Leasehold improvements

 

2,927

 

2,993

 

Construction in progress

 

1,218

 

51

 

Total property and equipment

 

22,919

 

19,595

 

Less accumulated depreciation

 

(7,352

)

(5,739

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

15,567

 

$

13,856

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities are as follows:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Accrued bonuses, commissions and wages

 

$

5,327

 

$

12,321

 

Accrued ESPP

 

840

 

3,278

 

Accrued vacation

 

2,552

 

2,202

 

Accrued marketing expenses

 

1,420

 

1,062

 

Accrued legal, consulting and audit fees

 

608

 

672

 

Accrued employee expense reimbursement

 

391

 

643

 

Accrued sales taxes and other taxes

 

416

 

638

 

Liability payable for unvested stock options exercises

 

445

 

552

 

Accrued sales awards

 

337

 

320

 

Accrued other

 

1,152

 

1,367

 

Total

 

$

13,488

 

$

23,055

 

 

Changes in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

 

Changes in accumulated other comprehensive income are as follows:

 

 

 

Foreign Currency
Items

 

Total

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Balance at December 31, 2013

 

$

198

 

$

198

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income before reclassifications

 

(50

)

(50

)

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

 

 

 

Other comprehensive loss attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests

 

2

 

2

 

Balance at March 31, 2014

 

$

150

 

$

150

 

 

5. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

Goodwill and intangible assets consisted of the following as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013:

 

 

 

March 31,
2014
(in thousands)

 

Weighted
Average
Remaining
Useful Life
(in years)

 

December 31,
2013
(in thousands)

 

Weighted
Average
Remaining
Useful Life
(in years)

 

Developed technology

 

$

4,950

 

3.7

 

$

4,950

 

3.9

 

Domain names

 

950

 

4.3

 

950

 

4.5

 

Customer relationships

 

1,600

 

2.4

 

1,600

 

4.9

 

Non-compete agreements

 

130

 

0.0

 

130

 

0.3

 

Capitalized software development costs

 

1,545

 

1.4

 

1,355

 

1.3

 

 

 

9,175

 

 

 

8,985

 

 

 

Less accumulated amortization

 

(2,407

)

 

 

(1,890

)

 

 

Intangible assets, net

 

6,768

 

 

 

7,095

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

26,045

 

 

 

25,941

 

 

 

Goodwill and intangible assets, net

 

$

32,813

 

 

 

$

33,036

 

 

 

 

The Company also recorded $0.1 million of measurement period adjustments increasing goodwill related to the acquisition of Insightera, Ltd. (Insightera) during the three months ended March 31, 2014.

 

12



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Amortization expense for the periods indicated below was as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Amortization expense

 

$

517

 

$

158

 

 

Based on the carrying amount of intangible assets as of March 31, 2014, the estimated future amortization is as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Nine Months

 

Years Ending December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

Ending
December 31, 2014

 

2015

 

2016

 

2017

 

2018

 

2019
and beyond

 

Total

 

Developed Technology

 

$

856

 

$

1,141

 

$

1,141

 

$

1,056

 

$

 

$

 

4,194

 

Domain Names

 

138

 

183

 

180

 

100

 

100

 

29

 

730

 

Customer Relationships

 

410

 

547

 

315

 

 

 

 

1,272

 

Non-compete Agreements

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

Capitalized Software Development Costs

 

229

 

314

 

26

 

 

 

 

569

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

1,636

 

$

2,185

 

$

1,662

 

$

1,156

 

$

100

 

$

29

 

$

6,768

 

 

6. Stockholders’ Equity and Redeemable Non-controlling Interests

 

The following table summarizes the activity in stockholders’ equity and redeemable non-controlling interests for the period indicated below (in thousands):

 

 

 

Total
Stockholders’
Equity

 

Redeemable
Non-controlling
Interests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance as of December 31, 2013

 

$

128,442

 

$

 

Issuance of common stock upon exercise and early exercise of stock options

 

2,487

 

 

Issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan

 

3,384

 

 

Investment by redeemable non-controlling interests

 

369

 

1,585

 

Withholding taxes for the net share settlement of an equity award

 

(16

)

 

Vesting of early exercised options

 

115

 

 

Costs incurred with follow-on offering

 

62

 

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

5,017

 

 

Net loss

 

(12,509

)

(11

)

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

(48

)

(2

)

Balance as of March 31, 2014

 

$

127,303

 

$

1,572

 

 

13



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

7. Credit Facility

 

On May 21, 2012, the Company entered into a loan and security agreement with a bank related to an equipment facility providing the Company with an equipment line of up to $4.0 million. On June 6, 2013, the Company entered into a first amendment to the loan and security agreement, which provided an additional line of credit for advances of up to $4.5 million. The interest rate associated with both lines of credit is the greater of 4% or three-quarters percentage points above the prime rate, as determined on the applicable funding date. For each equipment advance, the Company will pay interest only for approximately nine months. Subsequently, the Company will make thirty-six equal monthly payments of principal and interest. The loan is secured by a security interest on substantially all of the Company’s assets, including the equipment purchased with the advances, and excludes the Company’s intellectual property. The loan and security agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including, among other things, maintaining certain business performance levels and limitations on disposal of assets, certain fundamental business changes, incurrences of debt, incurrences of liens, payments of dividends, repurchases of stock and engaging in affiliate transactions, in each case subject to certain exceptions. The loan and security agreement also contains customary events of default and provides that during the existence of an event of default, interest on the obligations could be increased by 5%. As of March 31, 2014, the Company was in compliance with certain covenants and subsequently received consent for the remaining covenant as part of an amendment to the loan and security agreement.  As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, the outstanding loan balance was $7.3 million and $7.6 million, respectively.

 

There were no material changes in the Company’s commitments under the outstanding loan balance, as disclosed in the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

8. Commitments and Contingencies

 

There were no material changes in our commitments under contractual obligations, as disclosed in the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

9. Stockholder’s Equity and Stock Based Compensation

 

Common Stock Authorized and Outstanding

 

As of March 31, 2014, the Company was authorized to issue 1,000,000,000 common shares with a par value of $0.0001 per share and 20,000,000 convertible preferred shares with a par value of $0.0001 per share. As of March 31, 2014, the Company had approximately 40.3 million shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

 

Summary of Stock Option Activity

 

A summary of the Company’s stock option activity under all stock option plans and related information for three months ended March 31, 2014 is as follows:

 

 

 

OPTIONS OUTSTANDING

 

 

 

Shares Available
for Grant
(in thousands)

 

Number of Stock
Options
Outstanding
(in thousands)

 

Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price

 

Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life
(Years)

 

Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
(in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance as of December 31, 2013

 

3,486

 

6,343

 

$

5.33

 

7.98

 

$

201,305

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional shares authorized

 

1,962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Granted

 

(780

)

780

 

40.68

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

(783

)

3.21

 

 

 

 

 

Repurchased

 

6

 

 

6.08

 

 

 

 

 

RSUs granted, net of cancellations/forfeitures

 

(894

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cancelled/forfeited

 

174

 

(174

)

9.42

 

 

 

 

 

Balance as of March 31, 2014

 

3,954

 

6,166

 

9.96

 

8.16

 

146,149

 

Exercisable as of March 31, 2014

 

 

 

5,203

 

5.05

 

7.91

 

143,675

 

Vested and expected to vest as of March 31, 2014

 

 

 

6,017

 

$

10.10

 

8.16

 

$

141,913

 

 

The aggregate intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the underlying awards and the Company’s closing price of $32.67 as of March 31, 2014 for options that were in-the-money as of that date.

 

14



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Option awards generally vest over a four year period, with 25% vesting after one year from date of grant and monthly thereafter. Stock options granted under our 2006 Plan provided employee option holders with an early exercise provision, where in the event of termination any unvested shares purchased are subject to repurchase by the Company at the original purchase price. This right of repurchase lapses as the option vests. Options exercisable as of March 31, 2014 include options that are exercisable prior to vesting.

 

The weighted average grant date fair value of options granted and the total intrinsic value of options exercised were as follows (in thousands, except weighted average grant date fair value):

 

 

 

Three Months 
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Weighted average grant date fair value

 

$

21.78

 

$

4.00

 

Total intrinsic value of options exercised

 

$

28,623

 

$

1,182

 

 

The total estimated grant date fair value of options vested during the three months ended March 31, 2014 was approximately $1.2 million.

 

Determining Fair Value of Stock Options

 

The fair value of each option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option valuation model. The following assumptions were used to estimate the fair value of options granted to employees:

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Expected term (in years)

 

6

 

6

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.84

%

1.09%-1.18

%

Expected volatility

 

56

%

57

%

Expected dividend rate

 

0

%

0

%

 

Restricted Stock Units

 

A summary of the Company’s Restricted Stock Units (RSUs) activity and related information for the three months ended March 31, 2014 are as follows:

 

 

 

Number of
RSUs
(in thousands)

 

Weighted Average
Grant Date
 Fair Value

 

Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
(in thousands)

 

Balance as of December 31, 2013

 

582

 

$

22.57

 

$

21,579

 

RSUs Granted

 

926

 

41.57

 

 

 

RSUs Vested

 

(5

)

7.79

 

 

 

RSUs Cancelled/Forfeited

 

(32

)

38.89

 

 

 

Balance as of March 31, 2014

 

1,471

 

$

34.22

 

$

48,065

 

 

RSUs granted during the three months ended March 31, 2014 are subject to a time-based vesting condition that ranges from 3 to 4 years.

 

The aggregate intrinsic value of RSUs outstanding at March 31, 2014 was determined using the Company’s closing stock price of $32.67 per share as of March 31, 2014.

 

15



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

The weighted average grant date fair value of RSUs granted and the total intrinsic value of RSUs that vested during the periods presented were as follows (in thousands, except weighted average grant date fair value):

 

 

 

Three Months 
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Weighted average grant date fair value

 

$

41.57

 

$

7.42

 

Total intrinsic value of vested RSUs

 

$

195

 

$

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

The assumptions used to value employee stock purchase rights under the Black-Scholes model during the three months ended March 31, 2014 were as follows:

 

Expected term (in months)

 

6 - 9

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

0.08% - 0.11

%

Expected volatility

 

41% - 42

%

Expected dividend rate

 

0

%

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2014, the Company recorded stock-based compensation expense relating to the ESPP of approximately $0.6 million.

 

In February 2014 the Company issued approximately 0.3 million shares of common stock under the employee stock purchase plan with an average purchase price of $11.05 per share.

 

Stock Compensation Expense

 

The stock-based compensation expense included in operating results was allocated as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Cost of subscription and support revenue

 

$

384

 

$

63

 

Cost of professional services and other revenue

 

447

 

93

 

Research and development

 

1,079

 

210

 

Sales and marketing

 

1,779

 

230

 

General and administrative

 

1,318

 

405

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

5,007

 

$

1,001

 

 

As of March 31, 2014, total unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested awards not yet recognized under all equity compensation plans, adjusted for estimate forfeitures, was as follows:

 

 

 

March 31, 2014

 

 

 

Unrecognized
Expense

 

Average Expected
Recognition Period

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

(in years)

 

Stock options

 

$

22,819

 

2.58

 

Restricted stock units

 

8,914

 

3.29

 

Employee stock purchase plan

 

818

 

0.38

 

Total unrecognized stock-based compensation expense

 

$

32,551

 

2.72

 

 

16



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

10. Net Loss per Share

 

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing the net loss by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period, less the weighted-average unvested common stock subject to repurchase or forfeiture as they are not deemed to be issued for accounting purposes. Diluted net loss per share is computed by giving effect to all potential shares of common stock, including preferred stock, stock options, RSUs and employee stock purchase plan, to the extent they are dilutive.

 

The following table sets forth the computation of the Company’s basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock under the two-class method attributable to common stockholders (in thousands, except per share amount):

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(12,520

)

$

(9,524

)

Less: Net loss attributable to non-controlling interest

 

11

 

 

Net loss attributable to Marketo

 

(12,509

)

(9,524

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average common shares outstanding

 

39,628

 

3,335

 

Less: Weighted-average unvested common shares subject to repurchase or forfeiture and shares held in escrow

 

(249

)

(154

)

Weighted-average shares used in computing net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted

 

39,379

 

3,181

 

Net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted

 

$

(0.32

)

$

(2.99

)

 

The Company applied the two-class method to calculate its basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock, as its convertible preferred stock, common stock subject to repurchase and common stock held in escrow are participating securities. The two-class method is an earnings allocation formula that treats a participating security as having rights to earnings that otherwise would have been available to common shareholders.

 

However, the two-class method does not impact the net loss per share of common stock as the Company was in a loss position for each of the periods presented and preferred shareholders,  holders of common stock subject to repurchase and common stock held in escrow do not have to participate in losses.

 

Additionally, since the Company was in a loss position for each of the periods presented, diluted net loss per share is the same as basic net loss per share for each period, as the inclusion of all potential common shares outstanding would have been anti-dilutive. Potentially dilutive securities that were excluded from the diluted per share calculation because they would have been antidilutive were as follows:

 

 

 

As of March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Convertible preferred stock

 

 

25,876

 

Stock options to purchase common stock

 

6,166

 

7,983

 

Employee stock purchase plan

 

124

 

 

Common stock held in escrow

 

137

 

12

 

Common stock subject to repurchase

 

104

 

143

 

Restricted stock units

 

1,471

 

346

 

 

 

8,002

 

34,360

 

 

17



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

11. Income Taxes

 

The benefit for income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2014 was approximately $14,000. The provision for income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2013 was approximately $20,000. The benefit for income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2014 consisted primarily of foreign and state income taxes offset by a deferred tax benefit resulting primarily from the reduction in the foreign deferred tax liability as a result of the amortization of the acquired intangibles relating to the acquisition of Insightera, which occurred in December 2013.  The provision for income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2013 consisted primarily of foreign income taxes.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, the provision for income taxes differed from the statutory amount primarily due to state and foreign taxes currently payable.  The Company realized no benefit for current year losses due to maintaining a full valuation allowance against the U.S. and foreign net deferred tax assets.

 

The realization of tax benefits of deferred tax assets is dependent upon future levels of taxable income, of an appropriate character, in the periods the items are expected to be deductible or taxable. Based on the available objective evidence, the Company does not believe it is more likely than not that the U.S. Federal and state net deferred tax assets will be realizable. Accordingly, the Company has provided a full valuation allowance against the domestic net deferred tax assets and certain foreign jurisdictions with net deferred tax assets as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013. The Company intends to maintain the remaining valuation allowance until sufficient positive evidence exists to support a reversal of, or decrease in, the valuation allowance. During the three months ended March 31, 2014, there have been no material changes to the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits.

 

12. Segment Information and Information about Geographic Areas

 

The accounting principles guiding disclosures about segments of an enterprise and related information establishes standards for the reporting by business enterprises of information about operating segments, products and services, geographic areas, and major customers. The method of determining which information is reported is based on the way that management organizes the operating segments within the Company for making operational decisions and assessments of financial performance. The Company’s chief operating decision maker (the CODM) is considered to be the Company’s chief executive officer (CEO). The CODM reviews financial information presented on a consolidated basis for purposes of making operating decisions and assessing financial performance. As such, the Company is determined to be operating in one business segment.

 

All of the Company’s principal operations and decision-making functions are located in the United States.

 

Revenue

 

Revenue by geography is based on the shipping address of the customer. The following table presents our revenue by geographic region for the periods presented:

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

United States

 

$

27,350

 

$

16,992

 

EMEA

 

2,656

 

1,407

 

Other

 

2,286

 

1,337

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

32,292

 

$

19,736

 

 

No single customer accounted for more than 10% of our total revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. No single customer accounted for more than 10% of accounts receivable as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013.

 

18



Table of Contents

 

MARKETO, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Long-lived Assets

 

The following table sets forth the Company’s long-lived assets by geographic areas as of the periods presented:

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

United States

 

$

15,287

 

$

13,573

 

EMEA

 

222

 

280

 

Other

 

58

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

15,567

 

$

13,856

 

 

19



Table of Contents

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on March 3, 2014. As discussed in the section above titled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” the following discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, as well as assumptions that, if they never materialize or prove incorrect, could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified below, and those discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors” included under Part II, Item 1A below.

 

Overview

 

We are the provider of a leading cloud-based marketing software platform that enables organizations to engage in modern relationship marketing. Our software platform is designed to enable the effective execution, management and analytical measurement of marketing activities, helping organizations to acquire new customers more efficiently, build stronger relationships with existing customers, improve sales effectiveness and drive faster revenue growth. On our platform, we deliver an easy-to-use, integrated suite of advanced applications, which today include Marketing Automation, Social Marketing, Marketing Management, and Real-time Personalization. To enable our customers to obtain maximum value from our platform, we have created an ecosystem of third-party applications, as well as a network of resources to foster marketing thought leadership, sharing and collaboration among our users. Furthermore, we provide our customers with expert professional services, delivered by marketers, for marketers, to enable rapid time to value through effective implementation and usage of our solutions.

 

We deliver our solutions entirely through a multi-tenant cloud-based, or Software as a Service (SaaS), architecture which customers can configure to their specific needs. We designed our platform to be valuable across large enterprises and small and medium businesses (SMBs) that sell to both businesses and consumers in virtually any industry. We define the SMB market as companies with fewer than 1,500 employees and the enterprise market as companies with 1,500 or more employees.

 

We market and sell our products directly and through a growing network of distribution partners. Our client base is diverse, with 3,215 customers across a wide range of industries including business services, consumer, financial services, healthcare, manufacturing, media, technology and telecommunications. Representative customers include one or more divisions of the following companies: Capgemini, CenturyLink, Citrix, General Electric, Hyundai, Medtronic, Moody’s, Panasonic, Symantec and Sony.  No single customer represented more than 1% of subscription and support revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. During the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, our 20 largest customers accounted for approximately 10% of our total revenue. The percentage of our subscription and support revenue from enterprise customers was 28% and 25% during the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

Our direct sales force has separate sales teams for the enterprise market and for the SMB market. Within our direct sales force, we also have a team that is responsible for selling to existing customers, who may renew their subscriptions, increase their usage of our platform and applications, acquire additional applications from our product family, or broaden the deployment of our solutions across their organizations. In addition, we have indirect sales teams that sell to distributors, agencies, resellers and OEMs, who in turn resell or use our platform to provide managed marketing services to their end customers. To date, substantially all of our revenue has been derived from direct sales, but we intend to invest in our indirect sales teams to increase indirect revenue as a percentage of our total revenue over time.

 

We provide our solutions on a subscription basis, and we generated revenue of $32.3 million and $19.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We derive most of our revenue from subscriptions to our cloud-based software and related customer support services. Subscription and support revenue accounted for 89% of our total revenue during each of the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.  We price our products based on customer usage measures, which can include the number of records in each customer’s database and the number of user seats authorized to access our service. Our subscription contracts are typically one year in length, but can range from one quarter to three years in length.

 

Professional services revenue accounted for 11% of our total revenue during each of the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.  Our solution is designed to be ready to use immediately upon provisioning of a new customer subscription. However, we believe that our customers’ success is enhanced by the effective use of modern relationship marketing strategies performed with our software, which we foster primarily through the sale and delivery of expert services that educate our customers on the best use of our solutions as well as assist in the implementation of our solutions. In addition, some of our customers require services to support integrating their existing systems with our solutions. Enterprise customers typically exhibit a higher demand for all of these services. Over the near term, due to market demand for expertise in modern relationship marketing, we expect our professional services revenue to grow at a faster rate than our subscription and support revenue, and therefore, to increase as a percentage of our total revenue. In addition, we also partner with third party consulting organizations that provide similar services to our customers in connection with their use of our solutions.

 

20



Table of Contents

 

We generate the majority of our revenue in the United States; however, we are focused on growing our international business. Revenue generated from our international customers was approximately 15% and 14% during the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

We have focused on rapidly growing our business and plan to continue to invest in growth. We expect our cost of revenue and operating expenses to continue to increase in absolute dollars in future periods. Marketing and sales expenses are expected to increase in absolute dollars as we continue to expand our sales teams, increase our marketing activities and grow our international operations. Research and development expenses are expected to increase in absolute dollars to support the enhancement of our existing products and the development of new products. We also intend to invest in maintaining a high level of customer service and support which we consider critical for our continued success. We plan to continue investing in our data center infrastructure and services capabilities in order to support continued future customer growth. We also expect to incur additional general and administrative expenses as a result of both our growth and the infrastructure required to be a public company. We also may acquire or invest in businesses, products or technologies that we believe could complement or expand our platform and enhance our technical capabilities. Considering our plans for investment, we do not expect to be profitable in the near term and, in order to achieve profitability, we will need to grow revenue at a rate faster than our investments in cost of revenue and operating expenses. For the remaining nine months of 2014, we expect the demand for our solutions and services, along with revenue growth rates, to remain strong.

 

We had net losses of $12.5 million and $9.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, primarily due to increased investments in our current and projected future growth.

 

Since our inception, we financed our operations through cash collected from customers as well as preferred equity financings, our initial public offering and concurrent private placement completed in May 2013, and our follow-on public offering completed in September 2013.  We also maintain a credit facility. As of March 31, 2014, we had outstanding borrowings of $7.3 million under this facility.

 

Seasonality, Cyclicality and Quarterly Trends

 

We have historically experienced seasonality in terms of when we enter into new customer agreements for our service. We sign a significantly higher percentage of agreements with new customers as well as renewal agreements with existing customers in the fourth quarter of each year as compared to any of the prior quarters. The first quarter and third quarter are typically the slowest in this regard. Furthermore, we usually sign a significant portion of these agreements during the last month, and often the last two weeks, of each quarter. This seasonality is reflected to a much lesser extent, and sometimes is not immediately apparent, in our revenue, because we recognize subscription revenue over the term of the license agreement, which is typically one year, but generally ranges from one to three years. As a result, a slowdown in our ability to enter into customer agreements may not be apparent in our revenue for the quarter, as the revenue recognized in any quarter is primarily from customer agreements entered into in prior quarters. Historical patterns should not be considered a reliable indicator of our future sales activity or performance.

 

Our revenue has increased over the periods presented due to increased sales to new customers, as well as increased usage of existing and new products by existing customers. Our operating expenses generally have increased sequentially in every quarter primarily due to increases in headcount and other related expenses to support our growth. We anticipate our operating expenses will continue to increase in absolute dollars in future periods as we invest in the long-term growth of our business.

 

In addition, each year we typically participate in several key industry trade shows, including our own annual user conference, which typically occurs in the second quarter of the fiscal year. The timing of these events can vary from year to year, and the costs associated with these events typically have a significant effect on our sales and marketing expenses for the applicable quarter and cause our quarterly results to fluctuate.

 

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Results of Operations for the Three Ended March 31, 2014 and 2013

 

The following tables set forth our results of operations for the periods presented and as a percentage of our total revenue for those periods. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of financial results to be achieved in future periods.

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

88.6

%

88.9

%

Professional services and other

 

11.4

 

11.1

 

Total revenue

 

100.0

 

100.0

 

Cost of revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

19.3

 

29.5

 

Professional services and other

 

15.0

 

13.3

 

Total cost of revenue

 

34.3

 

42.8

 

Gross margin:

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

69.3

 

59.5

 

Professional services and other

 

-3.6

 

-2.2

 

Total gross margin

 

65.7

 

57.2

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

22.1

 

25.3

 

Sales and marketing

 

63.1

 

62.4

 

General and administrative

 

19.2

 

17.4

 

Total operating expenses

 

104.3

 

105.1

 

Loss from operations

 

-38.6

 

-47.8

 

Other income (expense), net

 

-0.2

 

-0.3

 

Loss before provision for income taxes

 

-38.8

 

-48.2

 

Provision for income taxes

 

0.0

 

0.1

 

Net loss

 

-38.8

 

-48.3

 

Net loss attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests

 

0.0

 

0.0

 

Net loss attributable to Marketo

 

-38.7

%

-48.3

%

 

Percentages are based on actual values. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

 

Revenue

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

2014

 

2013

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

$

28,611

 

$

17,555

 

$

11,056

 

63.0

%

Professional services and other

 

3,681

 

2,181

 

1,500

 

68.8

%

Total revenue

 

$

32,292

 

$

19,736

 

$

12,556

 

63.6

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

88.6

%

88.9

%

 

 

 

 

Professional services and other

 

11.4

%

11.1

%

 

 

 

 

Total

 

100.0

%

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenue increased $12.6 million, or 64%, during the first quarter of 2014 compared to the comparable period in 2013, due to the increase in subscription and support revenue of $11.1 million and an increase in professional services revenue of $1.5 million.

 

The increase in subscription and support revenue was primarily attributable to (1) growth in our total customer count primarily from the SMB market and customers added in the first three months of 2014 who generally had larger record databases, on average, managed by our solution than the customers that we added in the first three months of 2013 and (2) our subscription dollar retention rates have increased as a result of higher customer retention rates, volume and price increases resulting from the lapsing of introductory discounts on subscriptions and growth in both usage rights (driven by higher use, consumptions and/or database size of our products used by existing customers) and cross sell of additional products either during the term of their subscription or at the point of renewal of their subscription.

 

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Of the total increase in subscription and support revenue for the first quarter of 2014, 69% was attributable to revenue from new customers acquired from April 1, 2013 through March 31, 2014, and 31% was attributable to revenue from customers existing on or before March 31, 2013.

 

The increase in professional services revenue resulted from increased delivery of services across our customer base. During the fourth quarter of 2013, we added a higher proportion of enterprise customers and the majority of these projects for our enterprise customer base were delivered during the first quarter of 2014. We expect professional services revenue from enterprise customers to continue to comprise a larger proportion of the total balance in future quarters.

 

Cost of Revenue and Gross Margin

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

2014

 

2013

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

Cost of revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

$

6,235

 

$

5,820

 

$

415

 

7.1

%

Professional services and other

 

4,841

 

2,618

 

2,223

 

84.9

%

Total cost of revenue

 

$

11,076

 

$

8,438

 

$

2,638

 

31.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross margin:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription and support

 

78.2

%

66.8

%

 

 

 

 

Professional services and other

 

-31.5

%

-20.0

%

 

 

 

 

Total gross margin

 

65.7

%

57.2

%

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of subscription and support increased due to the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Change

 

 

 

Three Months

 

Personnel-related costs

 

$

833

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

819

 

Hosting costs

 

(1,500

)

Various other items

 

263

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

415

 

 

The increase in cost of subscription and support for the three months ended March 31, 2014 reflects an increase in personnel-related costs (salary, benefits and stock-based compensation) and depreciation and amortization expense. The increase in salary and benefit costs primarily reflects an increase in headcount directly associated with our cloud infrastructure, customer support and customer success organizations to support our customer growth, while the increase in stock-based compensation reflects grants of additional equity awards to existing employees and of equity awards to new employees. The increase in depreciation and amortization expense reflects the completion of our transition to co-location data center facilities at the end of fiscal 2013, where we now manage our own computer equipment and systems. These increases were partially offset by a decrease in hosting costs for the three months ended March 31, 2014 as compared to the corresponding period in 2013 as a result of our decreased use of a managed hosting service provider due to the completion of the transition to our own co-location data center facilities.

 

Our subscription and support gross margin were 78.2% and 66.8% for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  The increase in subscription and support gross margin for the three months ended March 31, 2014 primarily reflects the transition to our own co-location data center facilities from a managed hosting service provider which we completed at the end of fiscal 2013.

 

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Cost of professional services and other increased due to the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Change

 

 

 

Three Months

 

Personnel-related costs

 

$

1,353

 

Consulting

 

566

 

Various other items

 

304

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,223

 

 

The increase in cost of professional services and other during the three months ended March 31, 2014 was due primarily to an increase in personnel-related costs (salary, benefits and stock-based compensation).  The increase in salary and benefit costs primarily reflects an increase in headcount as we continue to grow our professional services organization to support demand for expert marketing services, while the increase in stock-based compensation reflects grants of additional equity awards to existing employees and of equity awards to new employees. Additionally, consulting costs increased as a result of increased usage of outside contractors to supplement our existing staff.

 

Our professional services and other gross margin were (31.5)% and (20.0)% for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The decrease in gross margin was due in part to lower staff utilization. As we have added headcount in our professional services group, these new employees undergo a training period before becoming fully billable, and as a result, their associated costs have a near-term negative impact on gross margins.

 

We expect that cost of revenue may increase in the future depending on the growth rate of new customer acquisition. We also expect that cost of revenue as a percentage of total revenue could fluctuate from period to period depending on growth of our professional services business and any associated costs relating to the delivery of professional services, the timing of sales of products that have royalties associated with them and the timing of significant expenditures.

 

Research and Development

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

2014

 

2013

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

Research and development

 

$

7,131

 

$

4,996

 

$

2,135

 

42.7

%

Percentage of total revenue

 

22.1

%

25.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development expenses increased due to the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Change

 

 

 

Three Months

 

Personnel-related costs

 

$

1,785

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

273

 

Capitalized software development

 

(190

)

Various other items

 

267

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,135

 

 

The increase in research and development expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2014 was primarily due to an increase in personnel-related costs (salary, benefits and stock-based compensation). The increase in salary and benefit costs primarily reflects the increase in headcount to help continue the enhancement of our existing product suite and to a lesser extent, an increase in headcount from our acquisition of Insightera in December 2013, while the increase in stock-based compensation reflects grants of additional equity awards to existing employees and of equity awards to new employees. The increase in depreciation and amortization expense is primarily driven by growth in depreciable assets. These increases were partially offset by an increase in capitalized software development costs, which consists primarily of personnel-related expenses.

 

We believe that continued investment in our technology is important for our future growth, and, as a result, we expect research and development expenses to increase in absolute dollars, but decline modestly, as a percentage of total revenue for the remainder of 2014.

 

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Sales and Marketing

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

2014

 

2013

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

Sales and marketing

 

$

20,368

 

$

12,318

 

$

8,050

 

65.4

%

Percentage of total revenue

 

63.1

%

62.4

%

 

 

 

 

 

Sales and marketing expenses increased due to the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Change

 

 

 

Three Months

 

Personnel-related expenses

 

$

5,484

 

Marketing expenses

 

1,467

 

Facilities and IT allocation

 

560

 

Various other items

 

539

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

8,050

 

 

The increase in sales and marketing expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2014 was due primarily to an increase in personnel-related costs (salary, benefits and stock-based compensation). The increase in salary and benefit costs was primarily driven by an increase in headcount for our sales, marketing and business development employees and executives, while the increase in stock-based compensation reflects grants of additional equity awards to existing employees and of equity awards to new employees. The increase in marketing program costs reflects increased activity to support growth in our business.  The increase in the allocation of facility and IT expenses was due principally to headcount growth in the sales and marketing department as compared to other departments and overall higher IT and facilities expenses.

 

We expect sales and marketing expenses to increase in absolute dollars and remain our largest expense in absolute dollars and as a percentage of total revenue, although they may fluctuate as a percentage of total revenue for the remainder of 2014.

 

General and Administrative

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages)

 

2014

 

2013

 

$ Change

 

% Change

 

General and administrative

 

$

6,192

 

$

3,427

 

$

2,765

 

80.7

%

Percentage of total revenue

 

19.2

%

17.4

%

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses increased due to the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Change

 

 

 

Three Months

 

Personnel-related costs

 

$

1,753

 

Professional Services

 

644

 

Recruiting

 

305

 

Consulting

 

(233

)

Various other items

 

296

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,765

 

 

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The increase in general and administrative expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2014 was primarily due to increased personnel-related costs (salary, benefits and stock-based compensation). The increase in salary and benefit costs was primarily driven by an increase in headcount for our administrative, legal, human resources, finance and accounting departments, while the increase in stock-based compensation reflects grants of additional equity awards to existing employees and of equity awards to new employees. The increase in professional services represents increases in both legal and accounting fees, primarily from supporting our international expansion and our Sarbanes-Oxley compliance efforts. The increase in recruiting expense reflects a general increase in the use of outside recruiters as we added more headcount throughout the Company.  The decrease in consulting fees reflects our decreased use of external consultants during the first three months of March 31, 2014, as we utilized outside consultants to assist us with preparatory work associated with our IPO in the comparable quarter of 2013.

 

We expect that our general and administrative expenses will increase in absolute dollars as we continue to expand our business and infrastructure to support being a public company although they may fluctuate as a percentage of total revenue for the remainder of 2014.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

To date, we have financed our operations through cash collected from customers as well as preferred equity financings, our IPO and concurrent private placement completed in May 2013, and our follow-on public offering completed in September 2013.  We also maintain a credit facility. As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, we had cash and cash equivalents of $119.6 million and $128.3 million, respectively, most of which was held in money market accounts.

 

In May 2012, we entered into a loan and security agreement with a bank related to a credit facility providing us with an equipment line of up to $4.0 million. In June 2013 we entered into a first amendment to the loan and security agreement, which provided an additional line of credit for advances of up to $4.5 million. The interest rate associated with both lines of credit is the greater of 4% or 0.75 of a percentage point above the bank’s prime rate, as determined on the applicable funding date. For each equipment loan advance, we pay interest only for approximately nine months. Subsequently, we make thirty-six equal monthly payments of principal and interest. As of March 31, 2014, we were in compliance with certain covenants and subsequently received consent for the remaining covenant as part of an amendment to the loan and security agreement. As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, the outstanding loan balance was $7.3 million and $7.6 million, respectively. See Note 7 - Credit Facility to our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion of our credit facility.

 

A substantial source of our cash flow from operating activities results from changes in our deferred revenue balance, which is included on our consolidated balance sheet as a liability. Deferred revenue consists of the unearned portion of billed fees for our software subscriptions and professional services and is amortized into revenue in accordance with our revenue recognition policy. As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, we had working capital of $86.1 million and $88.3 million, respectively, which included $45.6 million and $41.4 million of deferred revenue recorded as a current liability, respectively. The decrease in our working capital at March 31, 2014 is primarily due to our net cash used in operating activities, partially offset by proceeds received for common stock issued upon exercise of stock options and under our employee stock purchase plan and the investment we received from the redeemable non-controlling interests holders in our Japan joint venture.

 

We assess our liquidity primarily through our cash on hand as well as the projected timing of billings under contract with our customers and related collection cycles. We believe our current cash and cash equivalents, cash to be received from existing and new customers will be sufficient to meet our working capital and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next 12 months.

 

Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including revenue growth and costs incurred to support customer growth, international expansion, research and development, litigation, increased general and administrative expenses to support the anticipated growth in our operations, including being a public company, capital equipment required to support our growing headcount and equipment required in connection with our co-location data center facilities which we manage and own. Our capital expenditures in future periods are expected to grow in line with our business. To the extent that existing cash and cash from operations are not sufficient to fund our future operations, we may need to raise additional funds through public or private equity or additional debt financing. Although we currently are not a party to any agreement and do not have any understanding with any third parties with respect to potential investments in, or acquisitions of, businesses or technologies, we may enter into these types of arrangements in the future, which could also require us to seek additional equity or debt financing. Additional funds may not be available on terms favorable to us or at all.

 

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The table below provides selected cash flow information for the periods indicated (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months 
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

$

(13,211

)

$

(4,905

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(2,758

)

(2,877

)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

7,265

 

(306

)

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents, net of impact of foreign exchange rates on cash

 

(8,727

)

(8,071

)

 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities

 

Cash used in operating activities is significantly influenced by the amount of cash we invest in personnel to support the anticipated growth of our business, the increase in the number of customers using our cloud-based software and services, the amount and timing of customer payments and variable compensation such as bonus and commissions payments. Cash used in operating activities has historically come from a net loss driven by sales of subscriptions to our solutions and adjusted for non-cash expense items, such as depreciation and amortization of property and equipment, stock-based compensation and acquired intangible assets. The percentage of customers that pay quarterly rather than annually varies from quarter to quarter. The percentage of customers who pay us quarterly has a material impact on our net cash used in operating activities.

 

Our cash used in operating activities during the three months ended March 31, 2014 primarily reflected our net loss of $12.5 million, offset by non-cash expenses that included $2.1 million of depreciation and amortization and $5.0 million in stock-based compensation. Cash outflows resulting from changes in assets and liabilities included decreases in accrued expenses and other current liabilities and increases in prepaid expenses and other current assets. The decrease in accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $9.6 million primarily reflected cash payments of fiscal 2013 liabilities including year-end bonuses and commissions. The increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets of $3.7 million primarily reflected prepaid costs related to our annual user summit which occurred in April 2014 and to a lesser extent, amounts paid for annual subscription software services. These cash outflows were partially offset by an increase in deferred revenue and a decrease in accounts receivable. The increase in deferred revenue of $4.3 million primarily reflected the addition of new customers and the customer mix of more annual versus quarterly billing invoiced during the period. The decrease in accounts receivable of $1.7 million primarily reflected the decrease in days’ sales outstanding (DSO), which were 71 days during the first quarter of 2014 compared to 87 days in the fourth quarter of 2013.

 

Our cash used in operating activities during the three months ended March 31, 2013 primarily reflected our net loss of $9.5 million, offset by non-cash expenses that included $0.8 million of depreciation and amortization and $1.0 million in stock-based compensation. Working capital sources of cash included a $3.9 million increase in deferred revenue resulting primarily from the addition of new customers invoiced during the period. These sources of cash were partially offset by a $1.8 million increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets, primarily associated with amounts paid for annual subscription software services which are amortized over the contracted service period, as well as prepaid costs associated with our annual user summit which occurred in April 2013.

 

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2014, cash used in investing activities of $2.8 million consisted of $2.6 million for the purchases of property and equipment, primarily associated with an increase in equipment in our co-location data center facilities as we continue to expand capacity and to a lesser extent, increases associated with our higher employee headcount and supporting general growth in our business and capitalized software development costs of $0.2 million.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2013, cash used in investing activities consisted of $2.9 million for the purchases of property and equipment, primarily associated with our transition from a managed hosting service provider to co-location data center facilities, and to a lesser extent, an increase in equipment, furniture and fixtures and leasehold improvements associated with supporting our higher employee headcount.

 

Net Cash Provided By (Used In) Financing Activities

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2014, cash provided by financing activities of $7.3 million consisted of $3.4 million of proceeds from the issuance of common stock under our employee stock purchase plan, $2.5 million of proceeds received from the issuance of common stock upon the exercise of stock options and $2.0 million of investment proceeds received from our redeemable non-controlling interest holders in our Japan joint venture. These increases were partially offset by $0.3 million related to repayments under our credit facility, $0.1 million in cash payments related to costs associated with our follow-on offering and $0.2 million in cash payments related to the registration of common stock issued in connection with our acquisition of Insightera during the fourth quarter of 2013.

 

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Table of Contents

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2013, cash used in financing activities consisted of $0.8 million in cash payments related to costs associated with our initial public offering, partially offset by $0.5 million of proceeds received from the issuance of common stock upon the exercise of stock options.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

 

Our management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based on our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, as well as the reported revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. These items are monitored and analyzed by us for changes in facts and circumstances, and material changes in these estimates could occur in the future. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Changes in estimates are reflected in reported results for the period in which they become known. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

There have been no significant changes in our critical accounting policies and estimates during the first quarter of 2014 as compared to the critical accounting policies and estimates disclosed in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-11, Income Taxes (Topic 740) - Presentation of an Unrecognized Tax Benefit When a Net Operating Loss Carryforward, a Similar Tax Loss, or a Tax Credit Carryforward Exists. This amendment clarifies the guidance on the presentation of an unrecognized tax benefit, or a portion of an unrecognized tax benefit, in the financial statements as a reduction to a deferred tax asset for a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward. The adoption of this update in the first quarter of 2014 did not have a material impact to our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

 

There were no material changes in our commitments under contractual obligations, as disclosed in our audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2013.

 

Our primary contractual obligations are from our operating leases, a credit facility and other contractual commitments. See Note 7 - Credit Facility to our condensed consolidated financial statements for a discussion of our credit facility.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, we did not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. As such, we are not exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in those types of relationships.

 

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Item 3. Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

We have foreign currency risks related to our revenue and operating expenses denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, primarily the Euro, British Pound Sterling, Australian dollar and Japanese Yen. Decreases in the relative value of the U.S. dollar to other currencies may negatively affect our revenue and other operating results as expressed in U.S. dollars.

 

We have experienced and will continue to experience fluctuations in our net income (loss) as a result of transaction gains or losses related to revaluing certain current asset and current liability balances that are denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the entities in which they are recorded. We recognize foreign currency gains (losses) from time to time, but such gains (losses) were in immaterial amounts during the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.

 

Interest Rate Sensitivity

 

We have a credit facility with outstanding equipment advances of approximately $7.3 million and $7.6 million as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively. The interest rate associated with this facility is the greater of 4% or three quarters of a percentage point above the prime rate. A one percent increase in the prime rate would not have an impact on our operating results as the greater of the two rates is 4%, and we would still pay interest of 4%. A 10% increase or decrease in interest rates would not result in a material change in either our obligations under this facility or in the returns on our cash and cash equivalents.

 

Inflation Risk

 

We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our business. However, if our costs, in particular personnel, sales and marketing and infrastructure costs, were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer (principle executive officer) and Chief Financial Officer (principle financial officer), has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)), as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Based on such evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during our most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

PART II— OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we may become involved in legal proceedings or be subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. Although the results of litigation and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, we currently believe that the final outcome of these ordinary course matters will not have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial position or cash flows. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

A description of the risks and uncertainties associated with our business is set forth below. You should carefully consider such risks and uncertainties, together with the other information contained in this report, and in our other public filings. If any of such risks and uncertainties actually occurs, our business, financial condition or operating results could differ materially from the plans, projections and other forward-looking statements included in the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and elsewhere in this report and in our other public filings. In addition, if any of the following risks and uncertainties, or if any other risks and uncertainties, actually occurs, our business, financial condition or operating results could be harmed substantially, which could cause the market price of our stock to decline, perhaps significantly.

 

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We have a history of losses and may not achieve consistent profitability in the future.

 

We generated net losses of $47.4 million, $34.4 million and $22.6 million in 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and $12.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2014. As of March 31, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of $142.1 million. We will need to generate and sustain increased revenue levels in future periods in order to become consistently profitable, and, even if we do, we may not be able to maintain or increase our level of profitability. We intend to continue to expend significant funds to expand our marketing and sales operations, develop and enhance our marketing software, meet the increased compliance requirements associated with our transition to and operation as a public company, upgrade our data center infrastructure and services capabilities and expand into new markets. Historically, we also have experienced negative gross margins on our professional services, which are expected to continue to be negative. Our efforts to grow our business may be more costly than we expect, and we may not be able to increase our revenue enough to offset our higher operating expenses. We may incur significant losses in the future for a number of reasons, including the other risks described in this report, and unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays and other unknown events. If we are unable to achieve and sustain profitability, the market price of our common stock may significantly decrease.

 

If we are unable to attract new customers or sell additional services and functionality to our existing customers, our revenue growth will be adversely affected.

 

To increase our revenue, we must add new customers, encourage existing customers to renew their subscriptions on terms favorable to us, increase their usage of our solutions, and sell additional functionality to existing customers. As our industry matures, as interactive channels develop further, or as competitors introduce lower cost and/or differentiated products or services that are perceived to compete with ours, our ability to sell and renew based on pricing, technology and functionality could be impaired. As a result, we may be unable to renew our agreements with existing customers or attract new customers or new business from existing customers on terms that would be favorable or comparable to prior periods, which could have an adverse effect on our revenue and growth.

 

We face significant competition from both established and new companies offering marketing software and other related applications, as well as internally developed software, which may harm our ability to add new customers, retain existing customers and grow our business.

 

The marketing software market is evolving, highly competitive and significantly fragmented. We expect competition to continue to increase in the future. With the introduction of new technologies and the potential entry of new competitors into the market, we expect competition to persist and intensify in the future, which could harm our ability to increase sales, maintain or increase renewals and maintain our prices.

 

We face intense competition from other software companies that develop marketing software and from marketing services companies that provide interactive marketing services. Competition could adversely affect our ability to sell our marketing solutions on terms favorable to us. Our current and potential competitors may develop and market new technologies that render our existing or future products less competitive, unmarketable or obsolete. In addition, if these competitors develop products with similar or superior functionality to our solutions, we may need to decrease the prices for our solutions in order to remain competitive. If we are unable to maintain our current pricing due to competitive pressures, our margins will be reduced and our operating results will be negatively affected.

 

Our competitors offer various solutions that compete with us. Some of these competitors include:

 

·                  cloud-based marketing automation providers such as Act-On, Eloqua (acquired by Oracle in late 2012), ExactTarget (acquired by salesforce.com in July 2013) and HubSpot;

 

·                  traditional database marketing software vendors such as Aprimo (a division of Teradata), SAS Institute and Unica (a division of IBM);

 

·                  email marketing software vendors, such as Responsys (acquired by Oracle in early 2014) and Silverpop (expected to be acquired by IBM); and

 

·                  large-scale enterprise suites such as Oracle and SAP.

 

We also expect that new competitors, such as enterprise software vendors that have traditionally focused on enterprise resource planning or back office applications, will continue to enter the marketing software market with competing products, which could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. For example, due to the growing awareness of the importance of technology solutions to modern relationship marketing, we expect to face additional competition from new entrants to our markets. In addition to salesforce.com’s acquisition of ExactTarget, other sales force automation and CRM system vendors, such as Microsoft, NetSuite, Oracle and SAP, could acquire or develop solutions that compete with our offerings. Some of these companies have acquired social media marketing and other marketing software providers to integrate with their broader offerings.

 

Our current and potential competitors may have significantly more financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we have, and be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion, sale and support of their products and services, have more extensive customer bases and broader customer relationships than we have, and may have longer operating histories and greater name recognition than we have. As a result, these competitors may be better able to respond quickly to new technologies and to undertake more extensive marketing campaigns. In a few cases, these vendors may also be able to offer marketing software at little or no additional cost by bundling them with their existing suite of solutions. To the extent any of our competitors have existing relationships with potential customers for either marketing software or other solutions, those customers may be unwilling to purchase our solutions because of those existing relationships with that competitor. If we are unable to compete with such companies, the demand for our marketing software could substantially decline.

 

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In addition, if one or more of our competitors were to merge or partner with another of our competitors, the change in the competitive landscape could adversely affect our ability to compete effectively. For example, Oracle acquired our competitor Eloqua in late 2012 and ExactTarget acquired our competitor Pardot in 2012, and salesforce.com subsequently acquired ExactTarget in July 2013. Other companies such as Adobe and IBM have also recently acquired companies in the marketing automation and/or social marketing and related spaces. These acquisitions have resulted in fewer but larger companies with whom we compete for customers. Our competitors may also establish or strengthen cooperative relationships with our current or future strategic distribution and technology partners or other parties with whom we have relationships, thereby limiting our ability to promote and implement our solutions. We may not be able to compete successfully against current or future competitors, and competitive pressures may harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

If subscription renewal rates decrease, or we do not accurately predict subscription renewal rates, our future revenue and operating results may be harmed.

 

Our customers have no obligation to renew their subscriptions for our solutions after the expiration of their subscription period, which is typically one year, but ranges from one to three years. In addition, our customers may renew for lower subscription amounts or for shorter contract lengths. We may not accurately predict renewal rates for our customers. Our renewal rates may decline or fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, including customer usage, pricing changes, number of applications used by our customers, customer satisfaction with our service, increased competition, the acquisition of our customers by other companies and deteriorating general economic conditions. If our customers do not renew their subscriptions for our solutions or decrease the amount they spend with us, our revenue will decline and our business will suffer.

 

If we are unable to maintain a good relationship with salesforce.com and develop and grow our relationships with other platform providers, our business will suffer.

 

As of March 31, 2014, a significant percentage of our customers continued to integrate our solutions with certain capabilities of salesforce.com using publicly available application programming interfaces (APIs). In general, we rely on the fact that salesforce.com continues to allow us access to its APIs to enable these customer integrations. To date, we have not relied on a long-term written contract to govern our relationship with salesforce.com. Instead, we are subject to the standard terms and conditions for application developers of salesforce.com, which govern the distribution, operation and fees of applications on the salesforce.com platform, and which are subject to change by salesforce.com from time to time. While we expect the majority of our revenue to come from customers who also use the salesforce.com platform in the near term, we also integrate our solutions with other platform providers, including Microsoft, NetSuite, Oracle, SAP and SugarCRM. Any deterioration in our relationship with any platform provider would harm our business and adversely affect our operating results.

 

Our business may be harmed if any platform provider:

 

·                  discontinues or limits access to its APIs by us;

 

·                  terminates or does not allow us to renew or replace our contractual relationship;

 

·                  modifies its terms of service or other policies, including fees charged to, or other restrictions on, us, other application developers, or changes how customer information is accessed by us or our customers;

 

·                  establishes more favorable relationships with one or more of our competitors, or acquires one or more of our competitors and offers competing services to us; or

 

·                  otherwise develops its own competitive offerings.

 

In addition, we have benefited from these platform providers’ brand recognition, reputations and customer bases. Any losses or shifts in the market position of these platform providers in general, in relation to one another or to new competitors or new technologies could lead to losses in our relationships or customers, or our need to identify or transition to alternative channels for marketing our solutions. These factors could consume substantial resources and may not be effective. Any such changes in the future could negatively impact our ability to reach our prospective customers, which would harm our business.

 

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Our recent rapid growth may not be indicative of our future growth and, if we continue to grow rapidly, we may not be able to manage our growth effectively.

 

From 2011 to 2013, our annual revenue grew from $32.4 million to $95.9 million. For the three months ended March 31, 2014, our revenue grew to $32.3 million from $19.7 million during the three months ended March 31, 2013. We expect that, in the future, if our revenue increases to higher levels, our revenue growth rate will decline. We believe growth of our revenue depends on a number of factors, including our ability to:

 

·                  price our marketing software and services effectively so that we are able to attract and retain customers without compromising our profitability;

 

·                  attract new customers, increase our existing customers’ use of our services and provide our customers with excellent professional services and customer support;

 

·                  introduce our marketing software to new markets outside of the United States; and

 

·                  increase awareness of our brand on a global basis.

 

We may not successfully accomplish any of these objectives. We plan to continue our investment in future growth. We expect to continue to expend substantial financial and other resources on:

 

·                  sales and marketing, including a significant expansion of our sales organization;

 

·                  professional services to support implementing our software for customers and ongoing customer support;

 

·                  our technology infrastructure, including systems architecture, management tools, scalability, availability, performance and security, as well as disaster recovery measures;

 

·                  product development, including investments in our product development team and the development of new products and new features for existing products;

 

·                  international expansion; and

 

·                  general administration, including legal and accounting expenses related to being a public company.

 

In addition, our historical rapid growth has placed and may continue to place significant demands on our management and our operational and financial resources. We have also experienced significant growth in database size, the number of users and transactions and the amount of data that our hosting infrastructure supports. As we continue to grow, we will likely open new offices in the United States and internationally, and hire additional personnel for those offices. Finally, our organizational structure is becoming more complex as we integrate acquired companies as well as add additional employees. We will need to improve our operational, financial and management controls as well as our reporting systems and procedures as our operations become increasingly complex. We will require significant capital expenditures and the allocation of valuable management resources to grow and change in these areas without undermining our corporate culture of rapid innovation, teamwork and attention to customer success that has been central to our growth so far.

 

If our or our customers’ security measures are compromised or unauthorized access to customer data is otherwise obtained, our marketing platform may be perceived as not being secure, customers may curtail or cease their use of our solutions, our reputation may be harmed, and we may incur significant liabilities.

 

Our operations involve the storage and transmission of customer data, including personally identifiable information, and security incidents could result in unauthorized access to, loss of or unauthorized disclosure of this information, litigation, indemnity obligations and other possible liabilities, as well as negative publicity, which could damage our reputation, impair our sales and harm our business. Cyber attacks and other malicious Internet-based activity continue to increase generally, and cloud-based platform providers of marketing services have been targeted. If our security measures are compromised as a result of third-party action, employee or customer error, malfeasance, stolen or fraudulently obtained log-in credentials or otherwise, our reputation could be damaged, our business may be harmed and we could incur significant liability. In addition, if the security measures of our customers are compromised, even without any actual compromise of our own systems, we may face negative publicity or reputational harm if our customers or anyone else incorrectly attributes the blame for such security breaches on us or our systems. We may be unable to anticipate or prevent techniques used to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems because they change frequently and generally are not detected until after an incident has occurred. As we increase our customer base and our brand becomes more widely known and recognized, we may become more of a target for third parties seeking to compromise our security systems or gain unauthorized access to our customers’ data.

 

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Many governments have enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security incidents involving certain types of personal data. In addition, some of our customers contractually require notification of any data security compromise or suspected compromise. Security compromises experienced by our competitors, by our customers or by us may lead to public disclosures, which may lead to widespread negative publicity. Any security compromise in our industry, whether actual or perceived, could harm our reputation, erode customer confidence in the effectiveness of our security measures, negatively impact our ability to attract new customers, cause existing customers to elect not to renew their subscriptions or subject us to third-party lawsuits, regulatory fines or other action or liability, which could materially and adversely affect our business and operating results.

 

There can be no assurance that any limitations of liability provisions in our contracts for a security breach would be enforceable or adequate or would otherwise protect us from any such liabilities or damages with respect to any particular claim. We also cannot be sure that our existing general liability insurance coverage and coverage for errors or omissions will continue to be available on acceptable terms or will be available in sufficient amounts to cover one or more large claims, or that the insurer will not deny coverage as to any future claim. The successful assertion of one or more large claims against us that exceed available insurance coverage, or the occurrence of changes in our insurance policies, including premium increases or the imposition of large deductible or co-insurance requirements, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

Interruptions to or degraded performance of our service could result in customer dissatisfaction, damage to our reputation, loss of customers, limited growth and reduction in revenue.

 

We currently serve our customers from third-party data center hosting facilities located in California, Virginia and the United Kingdom. The continuous availability of our service depends on the operations of those facilities, on a variety of network service providers, on third-party vendors and on our own data center operations staff. In addition, we depend on our third-party facility providers’ ability to protect these facilities against damage or interruption from natural disasters, power or telecommunications failures, criminal acts and similar events. If there are any lapses of service or damage to a facility or our computer equipment or systems, we could experience lengthy interruptions in our service as well as delays and additional expenses in arranging new facilities, services, computer equipment or system. Even with current and planned disaster recovery arrangements, which, to date, have not been tested in an actual crisis, our business could be harmed.

 

We designed our system infrastructure and procure and own or lease the computer hardware used for our services. Design and mechanical errors, spikes in usage volume and failure to follow operations protocols and procedures could cause our systems to fail, resulting in interruptions in our solutions. Any interruptions or delays in our service, whether as a result of third-party error, our own error, natural disasters or security breaches, whether accidental or willful, could harm our relationships with customers and cause our revenue to decrease and/or our expenses to increase. Also, in the event of damage or interruption, our insurance policies may not adequately compensate us for any losses that we may incur. These factors, in turn, could further reduce our revenue, subject us to liability and cause us to issue credits or cause customers not to renew their subscriptions, any of which could materially adversely affect our business.

 

We may not be able to scale our business quickly enough to meet our customers’ growing needs, and if we are not able to grow efficiently, our operating results could be harmed.

 

As usage of our marketing software grows and as customers use our solutions for more advanced relationship marketing programs, we will need to devote additional resources to improving our application architecture, integrating with third-party systems, and maintaining infrastructure performance. In addition, we will need to appropriately scale our internal business systems and our services organization, including customer support and professional services, to serve our growing customer base, particularly as our customer demographics expand over time. Any failure of or delay in these efforts could cause impaired system performance and reduced customer satisfaction. These issues could reduce the attractiveness of our marketing software to customers, resulting in decreased sales to new customers, lower renewal rates by existing customers, the issuance of service credits, or requested refunds, which could adversely affect our revenue growth and harm our reputation. Even if we are able to upgrade our systems and expand our staff, any such expansion will be expensive and complex, requiring management time and attention. We could also face inefficiencies or operational failures as a result of our efforts to scale our infrastructure. Moreover, there are inherent risks associated with upgrading, improving and expanding our information technology systems. We cannot be sure that the expansion and improvements to our infrastructure and systems will be fully or effectively implemented on a timely basis, if at all. These efforts may reduce revenue and our margins and adversely affect our financial results.

 

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If we are unable to further penetrate the business to consumer (B2C) market and additional vertical industries, our revenue may not grow and our operating results may be harmed.

 

Currently, a significant majority of our revenue is derived from companies in the business to business (B2B) market and a significant portion is derived from customers in the technology industry. An important part of our strategy, however, is to further penetrate the business to consumer (B2C) market and vertical industries outside of technology such as healthcare. We have less experience in this market and these industries, and expanding into them may require us to develop additional features for our products, expand our expertise in certain areas, and add sales and support personnel possessing familiarity with this market and the relevant vertical industries. In addition, B2C customers may have greater usage requirements during their peak selling seasons which could put pressure on our systems and infrastructure and require us to expand these systems and infrastructure to meet increased demand. As a result of these and other factors, our efforts to expand further into the B2C market and further into additional vertical industries may be expensive, may not succeed and may harm our revenue growth and operating results.

 

We may experience quarterly fluctuations in our operating results due to a number of factors, which makes our future results difficult to predict and could cause our operating results to fall below expectations or our guidance.

 

Our quarterly operating results have fluctuated in the past and are expected to fluctuate in the future due to a variety of factors, many of which are outside of our control. As a result, our past results may not be indicative of our future performance, and comparing our operating results on a period-to-period basis may not be meaningful. In addition to the other risks described in this report, factors that may affect our quarterly operating results include the following:

 

·                  changes in spending on marketing software by our current or prospective customers;

 

·                  pricing of our marketing software so that we are able to attract and retain customers;

 

·                  acquisition of new customers and increases of our existing customers’ use of our services;

 

·                  customer renewal rates and the amounts for which agreements are renewed;

 

·                  customer delays in purchasing decisions in anticipation of new products or product enhancements by us or our competitors;

 

·                  budgeting cycles of our customers;

 

·                  changes in the competitive dynamics of our market, including consolidation among competitors or customers;

 

·                  the amount and timing of payment for operating expenses, particularly research and development and sales and marketing expenses (including marketing events and commissions and bonuses associated with performance), and employee benefit expenses;

 

·                  the amount and timing of non-cash expenses, including stock-based compensation, goodwill impairments and other non-cash charges;

 

·                  the amount and timing of costs associated with recruiting, training and integrating new employees;

 

·                  the amount and timing of cash collections from our customers and the mix of quarterly and annual billings;

 

·                  introduction and adoption of our marketing software in markets outside of the United States;

 

·                  unforeseen costs and expenses related to the expansion of our business, operations and infrastructure;

 

·                  awareness of our thought leadership and brand on a global basis;

 

·                  changes in the levels of our capital expenditures;

 

·                  foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations; and

 

·                  general economic and political conditions in our domestic and international markets.

 

We may not be able to accurately forecast the amount and mix of future subscriptions, revenue and expenses, and, as a result, our operating results may fall below our estimates or the expectations of public market analysts and investors. If our revenue or operating results fall below the expectations of investors or securities analysts, or below any guidance we may provide, the price of our common stock could decline.

 

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If we fail to adapt and respond effectively to rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards and changing customer needs or requirements, our marketing software may become less competitive.

 

Our future success depends on our ability to adapt and innovate our marketing software. To attract new customers and increase revenue from existing customers, we need to continually enhance and improve our offerings to meet customer needs at prices that our customers are willing to pay. Such efforts will require adding new functionality and responding to technological advancements, which will increase our research and development costs. If we are unable to develop new solutions that address our customers’ needs, or to enhance and improve our solutions in a timely manner, we may not be able to achieve or maintain adequate market acceptance of our solutions. Our ability to grow is also subject to the risk of future disruptive technologies. Access and use of our marketing software is provided via the cloud, which, itself, was disruptive to the previous enterprise software model. If new technologies emerge that are able to deliver marketing software and related applications at lower prices, more efficiently, more conveniently or more securely, such technologies could adversely affect our ability to compete.

 

Because we recognize revenue from subscriptions over the term of the relevant contract, downturns or upturns in sales are not immediately reflected in full in our operating results.

 

As a subscription-based business, we recognize revenue over the term of each of our contracts, which is typically one year, but range from one quarter to three years. As a result, much of the revenue we report each quarter results from contracts entered into during previous quarters. Consequently, a shortfall in demand for our solutions and professional services or a decline in new or renewed contracts in any one quarter may not significantly reduce our revenue for that quarter but could negatively affect our revenue in the future. Accordingly, the effect of significant downturns in new sales or renewals of our marketing software will not be reflected in full in our operating results until future periods. Our revenue recognition model also makes it difficult for us to rapidly increase our revenue through additional sales in any period, as revenue from new customers must be recognized over the applicable term of the contracts.

 

Because our long-term growth strategy involves further expansion of our sales to customers outside the United States, our business will be susceptible to risks associated with international operations.

 

A component of our growth strategy involves the further expansion of our operations and customer base internationally. In 2013, 2012 and 2011, and the three months ended March 31, 2014, revenue generated outside of the United States was approximately 15%, 13%, 11% and 15%, respectively, of our total revenue. We currently have international offices outside of North America in Europe, Australia, and Japan, which focus primarily on selling and implementing our solutions in those regions and an office in Israel which focuses primarily on research and development. In the future, we may expand to other international locations. Our current international operations and future initiatives will involve a variety of risks, including:

 

·                  changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic conditions;

 

·                  unexpected changes in regulatory requirements, taxes or trade laws;

 

·                  more stringent regulations relating to data security and the unauthorized use of, or access to, commercial and personal information;

 

·                  differing labor regulations, especially in the European Union, where labor laws are generally more advantageous to employees as compared to the United States, including deemed hourly wage and overtime regulations in these locations;

 

·                  challenges inherent in efficiently managing an increased number of employees over large geographic distances, including the need to implement appropriate systems, policies, benefits and compliance programs;

 

·                  difficulties in managing a business in new markets with diverse cultures, languages, customs, legal systems, alternative dispute systems and regulatory systems;

 

·                  increased travel, real estate, infrastructure and legal compliance costs associated with international operations;

 

·                  currency exchange rate fluctuations and the resulting effect on our revenue and expenses, and the cost and risk of entering into hedging transactions if we chose to do so in the future;

 

·                  limitations on our ability to reinvest earnings from operations in one country to fund the capital needs of our operations in other countries;

 

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·                  laws and business practices favoring local competitors or general preferences for local vendors;

 

·                  limited or insufficient intellectual property protection;

 

·                  political instability, international conflict or terrorist activities;

 

·                  exposure to liabilities under anti-corruption and anti-money laundering laws, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar laws and regulations in other jurisdictions; and

 

·                  adverse tax burdens and foreign exchange controls that could make it difficult to repatriate earnings and cash.

 

We opened our first international office in 2011, and our limited experience in operating our business internationally increases the risk that any potential future expansion efforts that we may undertake will not be successful. If we invest substantial time and resources to expand our international operations and are unable to do so successfully and in a timely manner, our business and operating results will suffer.

 

Failure to effectively develop and expand our marketing and sales capabilities could harm our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our solutions.

 

Our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our marketing software will depend to a significant extent on our ability to expand our marketing and sales operations. We plan to continue expanding our sales force and third-party channel partners, both domestically and internationally. We also plan to dedicate significant resources to sales and marketing programs, including Internet and other online advertising. The effectiveness of our online advertising has varied over time and may vary in the future due to competition for key search terms, changes in search engine use and changes in the search algorithms used by major search engines. All of these efforts will require us to invest significant financial and other resources. In addition, the cost to acquire customers is high due to these marketing and sales efforts. Our business will be seriously harmed if our efforts do not generate a correspondingly significant increase in revenue. We may not achieve anticipated revenue growth from expanding our sales force if we are unable to hire, develop and retain talented sales personnel, if our new sales personnel are unable to achieve desired productivity levels in a reasonable period of time or if our sales and marketing programs are not effective.

 

If we fail to enhance our brand, our ability to expand our customer base will be impaired and our financial condition may suffer.

 

We believe that our development of the Marketo brand is critical to achieving widespread awareness of our existing and future marketing software solutions, and, as a result, is important to attracting new customers and maintaining existing customers. We also believe that the importance of brand recognition will increase as competition in our market increases. Successful promotion of our brand will depend largely on the effectiveness of our marketing efforts and on our ability to provide reliable and useful marketing software at competitive prices. In the past, our efforts to build our brand have involved significant expenses. Brand promotion activities may not yield increased revenue, and even if they do, any increased revenue may not offset the expenses we incurred in building our brand. In addition, to sell to and service our customers we utilize a combination of internal personnel and third-party service providers, as well as indirect sales partners that pursue additional channel, agency and OEM distribution partnerships. These third-party service providers and indirect sales partners, who are not in our control, may harm our reputation and damage our brand perception in the marketplace. If we fail to successfully promote and maintain our brand, our business could suffer.

 

Future acquisitions, strategic investments, partnerships or alliances could be difficult to identify and integrate, divert the attention of management, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

We intend to selectively acquire businesses and technologies as we did with the acquisition of Insightera in December 2013 and Crowd Factory in April 2012. We plan to evaluate opportunities that will strengthen and expand the functionality of our platform and provide access to new customers or markets. Acquisitions we make may divert the attention of management and cause us to incur various expenses in identifying, investigating and pursuing suitable acquisitions, whether or not the acquisition purchases are completed. In addition, we have limited experience in acquiring other businesses, having acquired only two companies since our inception. If we acquire additional businesses, we may not be able to integrate successfully the acquired personnel, operations and technologies, or effectively manage the combined business following the acquisition. We may not be able to find and identify desirable acquisition targets or be successful in entering into an agreement with any particular target. Acquisitions could also result in dilutive issuances of equity securities, such as shares of common stock that we issued as a portion of the consideration for Insightera, or the incurrence of debt, which could adversely affect our operating results. In addition, if an acquired business fails to meet our expectations or if we are unable to successfully integrate it, our operating results, business and financial condition may suffer.

 

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Our quarterly results reflect seasonality in the sale of our marketing software, which can make it difficult to achieve sequential revenue growth or could result in sequential revenue declines.

 

We have historically experienced seasonal variations in our signing of customer contracts and renewals. We sign a significantly higher percentage of agreements with new customers as well as renewal agreements with existing customers in the fourth quarter of each year as compared to any of the prior quarters. The first quarter and third quarter are typically the slowest in this regard. We expect this seasonality to continue in the future, which may cause fluctuations in certain of our operating results and financial metrics, and thus limit our ability to predict future results. This seasonality is reflected to a much lesser extent, and sometimes is not immediately apparent, in our revenue, because we recognize subscription revenue over the term of the contract, which is typically one year, but ranges from one quarter to three years. As a result, a slowdown in our ability to enter into customer agreements may not be apparent in our revenue for the quarter, as the revenue recognized in any quarter is primarily from customer agreements entered into in prior quarters. Historical patterns should not be considered indicative of our future sales activity or performance.

 

If we fail to forecast our revenue accurately, or if we fail to match our expenditures with corresponding revenue, our operating results could be adversely affected.

 

Because our recent growth has resulted in the rapid expansion of our business, we do not have a long history upon which to base forecasts of future revenue. In addition, for our enterprise customers, the lengthy sales cycle for the evaluation and implementation of our solutions, which typically extends for several months, may also cause us to experience a delay between increasing operating expenses for such sales efforts, and, upon successful sales, the generation of corresponding revenue. Accordingly, we may be unable to prepare accurate internal financial forecasts or replace anticipated revenue that we do not receive as a result of delays arising from these factors. As a result, our operating results in future reporting periods may be significantly below the expectations of the public market, equity research analysts or investors, which could harm the price of our common stock.

 

We rely on our management team and other key employees, and the loss of one or more key employees could harm our business.

 

Our success and future growth depend upon the continued services of our management team, including Phillip M. Fernandez, our President and Chief Executive Officer, and other key employees in the areas of research and development, marketing, sales, services and general and administrative functions. From time to time, there may be changes in our management team resulting from the hiring or departure of executives, which could disrupt our business. We also are dependent on the continued service of our existing software engineers because of the complexity of our solutions. We may terminate any employee’s employment at any time, with or without cause, and any employee may resign at any time, with or without cause. In addition, our executive officers and certain other management-level employees benefit from management retention agreements and/or a change in control acceleration policy in which an involuntary termination by us without cause or a voluntary termination by the employee for good reason, as such terms are defined in the agreements and policy, in connection with or one year after a change of control transaction, will result in severance pay and/or acceleration of equity vesting for the individual, which would increase the cost to us of any such departure. We do not maintain key man life insurance on any of our employees. The loss of one or more of our key employees could harm our business.

 

The failure to attract and retain additional qualified personnel could prevent us from executing our business strategy.

 

To execute our business strategy, we must attract and retain highly qualified personnel. In particular, we compete with many other companies for software developers with high levels of experience in designing, developing and managing cloud-based software, as well as for skilled sales and operations professionals, and we may not be successful in attracting and retaining the professionals we need. Also, marketing domain experts and enterprise sales professionals are very important to our success and are difficult to replace. We have from time to time in the past experienced, and we expect to continue to experience in the future, difficulty in hiring and difficulty in retaining highly skilled employees with appropriate qualifications. In particular, we have experienced a more competitive hiring environment in the San Francisco Bay Area, where we are headquartered. Many of the companies with which we compete for experienced personnel have greater resources than we do. In addition, in making employment decisions, particularly in the software industry, job candidates often consider the value of the stock options or other equity incentives they are to receive in connection with their employment. If the price of our stock declines, or experiences significant volatility, our ability to attract or retain key employees will be adversely affected. If we fail to attract new personnel or fail to retain and motivate our current personnel, our growth prospects could be severely harmed.

 

If our marketing software fails due to defects or similar problems, and if we fail to correct any defect or other software problems, we could lose customers, become subject to service performance or warranty claims or incur significant costs.

 

Our solutions and the systems infrastructure underlying our marketing software platform are inherently complex and may contain material defects or errors. We have from time to time found defects in our solutions and may discover additional defects in the future. We may not be able to detect and correct defects or errors before customers begin to use our solutions. Consequently, we or our customers may discover defects or errors after our solutions have been implemented. These defects or errors could also cause inaccuracies in the data we collect and process for our customers, or even the loss, damage or inadvertent release of such confidential

 

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data. We implement bug fixes and upgrades as part of our regularly scheduled system maintenance, which may lead to system downtime. Even if we are able to implement the bug fixes and upgrades in a timely manner, any history of defects or inaccuracies in the data we collect for our customers, or the loss, damage or inadvertent release of such confidential data could cause our reputation to be harmed, and customers may elect not to purchase or renew their agreements with us and subject us to service performance credits, warranty claims or increased insurance costs. The costs associated with any material defects or errors in our software or other performance problems may be substantial and could materially adversely affect our operating results.

 

The standards and practices that private entities use to regulate the use of email have in the past interfered with, and may in the future interfere with, the effectiveness of our software and our ability to conduct business.

 

Our customers rely in part on email to communicate with their existing or prospective customers. Various private entities, such as commercial email, antivirus and network security providers, attempt to regulate the use of email for commercial solicitation. These entities often advocate standards of conduct or practice that significantly exceed current legal requirements and classify certain email solicitations that comply with current legal requirements as spam. Some of these entities maintain “blacklists” of companies and individuals, and the websites, Internet service providers and Internet protocol addresses associated with those entities or individuals that do not adhere to those standards of conduct or practices for commercial email solicitations that the blacklisting entity believes are appropriate. If a company’s Internet protocol addresses are listed by a blacklisting entity, emails sent from those addresses may be blocked if they are sent to any Internet domain or Internet address that subscribes to the blacklisting entity’s service or purchases its blacklist. Any of the foregoing restrictions or limitation on emails or internet addresses impacting our customers could lead to diminishing effectiveness of our marketing software solutions, and, in turn, result in service problems and ultimately a reduction in renewals or loss of customers for us.

 

If we do not or cannot maintain the compatibility of our marketing software with third-party applications that our customers use in their businesses, our revenue will decline.

 

The functionality and popularity of our marketing software depends, in part, on our ability to integrate our solutions with third-party applications and platforms, including CRM, event management, e-commerce, call center, and social media sites that our customers use and from which they obtain data. Third-party providers of applications and APIs may change the features of their applications and platforms, restrict our access to their applications and platforms or alter the terms governing use of their applications and APIs and access to those applications and platforms in an adverse manner. Such changes could functionally limit or terminate our ability to use these third-party applications and platforms in conjunction with our solution, which could negatively impact our offerings and harm our business. If we fail to integrate our software with new third-party applications and platforms that our customers use for marketing purposes, we may not be able to offer the functionality that our customers need, which would negatively impact our ability to generate revenue and adversely impact our business.

 

If we fail to offer high-quality education and customer support, our business and reputation may suffer.

 

High-quality education and customer support is important for the successful marketing and sale of our solution and for the renewal of existing customers. Providing this education and support requires that our customer support personnel have specific marketing domain knowledge and expertise, making it more difficult for us to hire qualified personnel and to scale up our support operations due to the extensive training required. The importance of high-quality customer support will increase as we expand our business and pursue new customers. If we do not help our customers quickly resolve post-deployment issues and provide effective ongoing support, our ability to sell additional functionality and services to existing customers may suffer and our reputation with existing or potential customers may be harmed.

 

Future product development is dependent on adequate research and development resources. If we do not adequately fund our research and development efforts, we may not be able to compete effectively and our business and operating results may be harmed.

 

In order to remain competitive, we must continue to develop new product offerings, applications and enhancements to our existing cloud-based marketing software. Maintaining adequate research and development personnel and resources to meet the demands of the market is essential. If we are unable to develop solutions internally due to certain constraints, such as high employee turnover, lack of management ability or a lack of other research and development resources, we may miss market opportunities. Further, many of our competitors expend a considerably greater amount of funds on their research and development programs, and those that do not may be acquired by larger companies that would allocate greater resources to our competitors’ research and development programs. Our failure to maintain adequate research and development resources or to compete effectively with the research and development programs of our competitors could materially adversely affect our business.

 

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Shifts over time in the mix of sizes or types of organizations that purchase our solutions or changes in the components of our solutions purchased by our customers could negatively affect our operating results.

 

Our strategy is to sell our marketing software to organizations of broadly different sizes, from SMBs to large enterprises. Our gross margins can vary depending on numerous factors related to the implementation and use of our marketing software, including the sophistication and intensity of our customers’ use of our solutions and the level of professional services and support required by a customer. For example, our enterprise customers typically require more professional services and because our professional services offerings typically have a higher cost of revenue than subscriptions to our solutions, any increase in sales of professional services would have an adverse effect on our overall gross margin and operating results. Providing professional services to enterprises allows us to utilize our staff more efficiently than is the case in providing professional services to other customers or in other contexts; consequently, while an increase in providing professional services to enterprises typically hurts our overall gross margin, it may improve our professional services and other gross margin. Sales to enterprise customers may also entail longer sales cycles and more significant selling efforts. Selling to SMB customers may involve smaller contract size, higher relative selling costs and greater credit risk and uncertainty. If the mix of organizations that purchase our solutions changes, or the mix of solution components purchased by our customers changes, our gross margins could decrease and our operating results could be adversely affected.

 

Economic uncertainties or downturns in the general economy or the industries in which our customers operate could disproportionately affect the demand for our marketing software and negatively impact our operating results.

 

General worldwide economic conditions have experienced a significant downturn and fluctuations in recent years, and market volatility and uncertainty remain widespread. As a result, we and our customers find it extremely difficult to accurately forecast and plan future business activities. In addition, these conditions could cause our customers or prospective customers to reduce their marketing and sales budgets, which could decrease corporate spending on our marketing software, resulting in delayed and lengthened sales cycles, a decrease in new customer acquisition and/or loss of customers. Furthermore, during challenging economic times, our customers may face issues with their cash flows and in gaining timely access to sufficient credit or obtaining credit on reasonable terms, which could impair their ability to make timely payments to us, impact customer renewal rates and adversely affect our revenue. If such conditions occur, we may be required to increase our reserves, allowances for doubtful accounts and write-offs of accounts receivable, and our operating results would be harmed. In addition, a downturn in the technology sector may disproportionately affect us because a significant portion of our customers are technology companies. We cannot predict the timing, strength or duration of any economic slowdown or recovery, whether global, regional or within specific markets. If the conditions of the general economy or markets in which we operate worsen, our business could be harmed. In addition, even if the overall economy improves, the market for marketing software may not experience growth or we may not experience growth.

 

If we fail to maintain our thought leadership position in modern relationship marketing, our business may suffer.

 

We believe that maintaining our thought leadership position in modern relationship marketing is an important element in attracting new customers. We devote significant resources to develop and maintain our thought leadership position, with a focus on identifying and interpreting emerging trends in relationship marketing, shaping and guiding industry dialog, and creating and sharing the best marketing practices. Our activities related to developing and maintaining our thought leadership may not yield increased revenue, and even if they do, any increased revenue may not offset the expenses we incurred in such effort. We rely upon the continued services of our management and employees with domain expertise in modern relationship marketing to maintain our leadership position, and the loss of any key management or employees in this area could harm our competitive position and reputation. If we fail to successfully grow and maintain our thought leadership position, we may not attract new customers or retain our existing customers, and our business could suffer. In addition, we may incur expenses in our attempts to maintain our thought leadership position, which could affect our profitability and business.

 

If we fail to adequately protect our proprietary rights, our competitive position could be impaired, and we may lose valuable assets, experience reduced revenue and incur costly litigation to protect our rights.

 

Our success is dependent, in part, upon protecting our proprietary technology. We rely on a combination of patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secret laws and contractual restrictions to establish and protect our proprietary rights in our products and services. However, the steps we take to protect our intellectual property may be inadequate. We will not be able to protect our intellectual property