10-K 1 a10k123113.htm 10-K 10K 12/31/13

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended:
December 31, 2013
 
Commission file number: 001-34516
Cowen Group, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
27-0423711
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
599 Lexington Avenue
New York, New York 10022
(212) 845-7900
(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant's principal executive office)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Exchange on Which Registered
Class A Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share
 
The Nasdaq Global Market
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No Q
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No Q
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes Q    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes  Q  No o 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of the Annual Report on Form 10-K or any amendment to the Annual Report on Form 10-K. Q
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer o
 
Accelerated filer Q
 
Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller
reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No Q
The aggregate market value of Class A common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2013, the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, based upon the closing sale price of the Class A common stock on the NASDAQ Global Market on that date was $311,324,854.
As of February 28, 2014 there were 115,042,048 shares of the registrant's common stock outstanding.
Documents incorporated by reference:
Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K incorporates by reference information (to the extent specific sections are referred to herein) from the Registrant's Proxy Statement for its 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.
 



TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
We have included or incorporated by reference into our Annual Report on Form 10-K (the "Annual Report"), and from time to time may make in our public filings, press releases or other public documents, certain statements, including (without limitation) those under Item 1—"Business," Item 1A—"Risk Factors," Item 3—"Legal Proceedings," Item 7—"Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and Item 7A—"Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk" that may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, you can identify these statements by forward-looking terms such as "may," "might," "will," "would," "could," "should," "expect," "plan," "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "predict," "project," "possible," "potential," "intend," "seek" or "continue," the negative of these terms and other comparable terminology or similar expressions. In addition, our management may make forward-looking statements to analysts, representatives of the media and others. These forward-looking statements represent only the Company's beliefs regarding future events (many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and beyond our control) and are predictions only, based on our current expectations and projections about future events. There are important factors that could cause our actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In particular, you should consider the risks outlined under Item 1A—"Risk Factors" in this Annual Report.
Although we believe the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, level of activity, performance or achievements. Moreover, neither we nor any other person assumes responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of any of these forward-looking statements. You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. We undertake no obligation to update any of these forward-looking statements after the date of this filing to conform our prior statements to actual results or revised expectations.





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PART I
When we use the terms "we," "us," "Cowen Group" and the "Company," we mean Cowen Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, its consolidated subsidiaries and entities in which it has a controlling financial interest, taken as a whole, as well as any predecessor entities, unless the context otherwise indicates.
Item 1.    Business
Overview
Cowen Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation formed in 2009, is a diversified financial services firm and, together with its consolidated subsidiaries (collectively, "Cowen", "Cowen Group" or the "Company"), provides alternative investment management, investment banking, research, and sales and trading services through its two business segments: Ramius LLC and its affiliates (“Ramius”) comprise the Company's alternative investment segment, while Cowen and Company, LLC ("Cowen and Company") and its affiliates comprise the Company's broker-dealer segment. For a discussion of certain financial information broken down by segment, please see the notes to the Company's consolidated financial statements.
Ramius is an alternative investment platform offering innovative products and solutions across the liquidity spectrum to institutional and private clients. The predecessor to this business was founded in 1994 and, through one of its subsidiaries, has been a registered investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 since 1997. Ramius offers investors access to strategies to meet their specific needs including small-cap activism, healthcare royalties, customized solutions, event driven equity, real estate, long/short credit and managed futures. Ramius focuses on attracting and retaining talented in-house and affiliated investment teams and providing them with institutional infrastructure, robust sales and marketing and industry knowledge. A significant portion of the Company’s capital is invested alongside Ramius’s alternative investment clients. Our alternative investment business had approximately $9.4 billion of assets under management as of January 1, 2014.
Our broker-dealer businesses include research, brokerage and investment banking services to companies and institutional investor clients primarily in our target sectors ("Target Sectors"): healthcare, technology, media and telecommunications, consumer, aerospace and defense, industrials, real estate investment trusts ("REITs"), clean technology, energy, metals and mining, transportation, chemicals and agriculture. We provide research and brokerage services to over 1,000 domestic and international clients seeking to trade securities, principally in our target sectors. Historically, we have focused our investment banking efforts on small to mid-capitalization public companies as well as private companies.
Principal Business Lines
Alternative Investment Products and Services
Hedge Fund Strategies
The Company's hedge funds are focused on addressing the needs of institutional investors and high net worth individuals to preserve and grow allocated capital. The Company and its affiliates offer a number of single-strategy hedge funds, including strategies focused on merger arbitrage, global long/short credit and small-cap activism. The Company also serves as investment advisor to Ramius Event Driven Equity Fund, a mutual fund that offers U.S. investors exposure to a broad spectrum of transformative corporate events with a core focus on shareholder activism. The Company and its affiliates also manage certain multi-strategy hedge funds that are currently in wind-down. The majority of assets remaining in these funds include private investments in public companies, investments in private companies, real estate investments and special situations.
Alternative Solutions
The Company's alternative solutions business offers a range of customized hedge fund investment and advisory solutions, including customized and commingled fund of funds, hedge fund replication, liquid alternative risk premia products, customized solutions and mutual funds to a global institutional client base.  The Company's alternative solutions business also develops and manages customized investment portfolios, which may include a combination of direct hedge fund investments, liquid alternative risk premia products and hedging overlays. The Company's alternative solutions business has also launched two mutual funds, Ramius Dynamic Replication Fund and Ramius Strategic Volatility Fund, which offer U.S. retail investors access to liquid alternative investment strategies.
Ramius Trading Strategies     
The Company’s managed futures fund business offers investors access to returns uncorrelated with the public equity and debt markets while maintaining a strong liquidity profile. In order to achieve this objective, the Company’s managed futures fund business identifies, and allocates capital to various third party commodity trading advisors that pursue a managed futures strategy in a managed account format. The Company’s managed futures fund business serves as investment adviser to various commodity pools including Ramius Trading Strategies Managed Futures Fund, a mutual fund that offers U.S. investors access

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to a multi-manager strategy that seeks to capture returns tied to a combination of global macroeconomic trends in the commodity futures and financial futures markets and interest income and capital appreciation.
Real Estate
The Company's real estate business focuses on generating attractive, risk adjusted returns by using our owner/manager approach to underwriting, structuring, financing and redevelopment of all real estate property types since 1999. This approach emphasizes a focus on real estate fundamentals and potential market inefficiencies. The RCG Longview platform provides senior bridge loans, subordinated mortgages, mezzanine loans, and preferred equity through its debt fund series, and makes equity investments through its equity fund. As of December 31, 2013, the members of the general partners of the RCG Longview platform and its affiliates, independent of the RCG Longview funds, collectively owned interests in and/or manage over 21,000 apartments and approximately 20 million square feet of commercial space for their own accounts. As of December 31, 2013, the Ramius Urban American funds owned interests in and managed approximately 9,000 multi family housing units in the New York metropolitan area. The Company's ownership interests in the various general partners of the RCG Longview funds and Ramius Urban American Funds range from 20% to 55%.
HealthCare Royalty Partners ("HRP") (formerly Cowen HealthCare Royalty Partners)
The Company’s healthcare royalties business invests principally in commercial-stage biopharmaceutical products and companies through the purchase of royalty or synthetic royalty interests and structured debt and equity instruments (through the funds managed by HRP (the "HRP Funds")). The HRP Funds seek these royalty interests in end-user sales of commercial-stage or near commercial-stage medical products such as pharmaceuticals, biotechnology products and medical devices. We share the net management fees from the HRP Funds equally with the founders of the HRP Funds. In addition, we have interests in the general partners of the HRP Funds ranging from 25% to 40.2%.
Broker-Dealer Business
Investment Banking
Our investment banking professionals are focused on providing strategic advisory and capital raising services to U.S. and international public and private companies in the Company's Target Sectors. By focusing on Cowen and Company's target sectors over a long period of time, we have developed a significant understanding of the unique challenges and demands with respect to public and private capital raising and strategic advice in these sectors. Our advisory and capital raising capabilities begin at the early stages of a private company's accelerated growth phase and continue through its evolution as a public company. Our advisory business focuses on mergers and acquisitions, including providing fairness opinions and providing advice on other strategic transactions. Our capital markets capabilities include equity, including private investments in public equity and registered direct offerings, credit and fixed income, including public and private debt placements, exchange offers, consent solicitations and tender offers, as well as origination and distribution capabilities for convertible securities. We have a unified capital markets group which we believe allows us to be effective in providing cohesive solutions for our clients. Historically, a significant majority of Cowen and Company's investment banking revenue has been earned from high-growth small and mid-capitalization companies.
Brokerage
Our team of brokerage professionals serves institutional investor clients in the United States and internationally. Cowen and Company trades common stocks, listed options and equity-linked securities on behalf of its clients. We also provide our clients with an electronic execution suite. As a result of our acquisition of ATM USA, LLC ("ATM USA") and Algorithmic Trading Management, LLC ("ATM LLC"), we provide global, multi-asset class algorithmic execution trading models to both buy side and sell side clients as well as offering execution capabilities relating to these trading models through ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC). In addition, we now engage in the securities lending business through Cowen Equity Finance. We have relationships with over 1,000 institutional investor clients. Our brokerage team is comprised of experienced professionals dedicated to Cowen and Company's target sectors, which allows us to develop a level of knowledge and focus that we believe differentiates our brokerage capabilities from those of many of our competitors. We tailor our account coverage to the unique needs of our clients. We believe that our sector traders are able to provide superior execution because of their knowledge of the interests of our institutional investor clients in specific companies in Cowen and Company's target sectors.
Our sales professionals also provide our institutional investor clients with access to the management of our investment banking clients outside the context of financing transactions. These meetings are commonly referred to as non-deal road shows. Non-deal road shows allow our investment banking clients to increase their visibility within the institutional investor community while providing our institutional investor clients with the opportunity to further educate themselves on companies and industries through meetings with management. We believe Cowen and Company's deep relationships with company management teams and its sector-focused approach provide us with broad access to management for the benefit of our institutional investor and investment banking clients.

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Research
As of December 31, 2013, we had a research team of 42 senior analysts covering approximately 700 companies. Within our coverage universe, approximately 25% are healthcare companies, 19% are TMT (technology, media and telecom) companies, 19% are energy companies, 12% are capital goods and industrial companies, 11% are basic materials companies, 7% are consumer companies, and 6% are REITs. Our differentiated approach to research focuses our analysts' efforts toward delivering specific investment ideas and de-emphasizes maintenance research.  We sponsor a number of conferences every year that are focused on our target sectors and sub-sectors. During these conferences we highlight our investment research and provide significant investor access to corporate management teams.
Information About Geographic Areas
We are principally engaged in providing alternative investment services to global institutional investors and investment banking sales and trading and research services to corporations and institutional investor clients primarily in the United States. We provide investment banking services to companies in China through Cowen and Company (Asia) Limited ("Cowen Asia"). We provide investment banking services to companies and institutional investor clients in Europe through our U.K. broker-dealer, Cowen International Limited ("CIL").
Employees
As of March 3, 2014, the Company had 633 employees.
Competition
We compete with many other firms in all aspects of our business, including raising funds, seeking investment opportunities and hiring and retaining professionals, and we expect our business will continue to be highly competitive. The alternative investment and investment banking industries are currently undergoing contraction and consolidation, reducing the number of industry participants and generally resulting in the larger firms being better positioned to retain and gain market share. We compete in the United States and globally for investment opportunities, investor capital, client relationships, reputation and talent. We face competitors that are larger than we are and have greater financial, technical and marketing resources. Certain of these competitors continue to raise additional amounts of capital to pursue investment strategies that may be similar to ours. Some of these competitors may also have access to liquidity sources that are not available to us, which may pose challenges for us with respect to investment opportunities. In addition, some of these competitors may have higher risk tolerances or make different risk assessments than we do, allowing them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish broader networks of business relationships. Our competitive position depends on our reputation, our investment performance and processes, the breadth of our business platform and our ability to continue to attract and retain qualified employees while managing compensation and other costs. For additional information regarding the competitive risks that we face, see "Item 1A Risk Factors-Risks Related to the Company's Alternative Investment Business" and "Risk Factors-Risks Related to the Company's Broker-Dealer Business."
Regulation
Our businesses, as well as the financial services industry generally, are subject to extensive regulation, including periodic examinations by governmental and self-regulatory organizations, in the United States and the jurisdictions in which we operate around the world. As a publicly traded company in the United States, we are subject to the U.S. federal securities laws and regulation by the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC").
Most of the investment advisers of our alternative investment funds are registered as investment advisers with the SEC. Registered investment advisers are subject to the requirements of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the "Advisers Act") and the regulations promulgated thereunder. Such requirements relate to, among other things, fiduciary duties to clients, maintaining an effective compliance program, solicitation agreements, conflicts of interest, recordkeeping and reporting requirements, disclosure requirements, limitations on agency cross and principal transactions between an advisor and advisory clients and general anti-fraud prohibitions. We believe all of our wholly-owned investment advisers to our alternative investment funds comply in all material respects with the Advisers Act requirements and regulations.
We are also subject to regulation under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and various other statutes. Many of the investment advisers to our alternative investment funds are also subject to regulation by the National Futures Association (the "NFA") and the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the "CFTC"). In addition, we are subject to regulation by the Department of Labor under the U.S. Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 ("ERISA"). In the United Kingdom, we are subject to regulation by the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority ("FCA"), in Luxembourg by the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier, in Japan by the Financial Services Agency and in Hong Kong by the Securities and Futures Commission ("SFC"). Our investment activities around the globe are subject to a variety of regulatory regimes that vary country by country and

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starting in July, 2014, certain of our investment advisers marketing alternative investment funds to investors domiciled in the European Union and/or advising alternative investment funds domiciled in the European Union will become subject to the Alternative Investment Fund Manager Directive (the “AIFMD”). Also, our captive insurance and reinsurance companies are regulated by the New York State Department of Finance and the Luxembourg Commissariat aux Assurances, respectively.
Regulatory bodies in the United States and the rest of the world are charged with safeguarding the integrity of the securities and other financial markets and with protecting the interests of customers participating in those markets. In light of recent events in the financial markets, governmental authorities in the United States and in the other countries in which we operate have proposed or adopted additional disclosure requirements and regulation of hedge funds and other alternative asset managers. For example, rulemaking by the SEC and other regulatory authorities outside the United States has imposed trading and reporting requirements on short selling, which could adversely affect trading opportunities, including hedging opportunities, for our funds. In addition, on July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act ("Dodd-Frank Act") was signed into law in the United States. Implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act will be accomplished through extensive rulemaking by the SEC and other governmental agencies. The Dodd-Frank Act establishes the Financial Services Oversight Council (the "FSOC") to identify threats to the financial stability of the United States; promote market discipline; and respond to emerging risks to the stability of the United States financial system. The FSOC is empowered to determine whether the material financial distress or failure of a non-bank financial company would threaten the stability of the United States financial system, and such a determination can subject a non-banking finance company to supervision by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve and the imposition of standards and supervision including stress tests, liquidity requirements and enhanced public disclosures.
The FSOC has released a proposed rule regarding its authority to require the supervision and regulation of systemically significant non-bank financial companies. On October 26, 2011, the SEC adopted Rule 204(b)-1 under the Advisers Act, which requires certain advisers to file information under the new Form PF. The information is mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act and is intended for use by FSOC in an effort to measure systemic risk. Most of our registered investment advisers file Form PF on a quarterly basis and several of our registered investment advisers which are also registered commodity pool operators (“CPOs”) and commodity trading advisers (“CTAs”) file Form CPO-PQR and Form CTA-PR, respectively with the CFTC on a quarterly basis as well. In addition, on February 9, 2012 the CFTC issued final rules on the registration and compliance of CPOs, including rescinding an exemption relating to private funds and narrowing an exception from registration with respect to registered investment companies. These new rules have resulted in additional regulatory and registration requirements with respect to certain of the private funds, commodity pools and registered funds managed by our investment advisers. In addition, in July 2013, rules relating to portfolio reconciliation and swap trading relationship documentation went into effect. See "Item 1A Risk Factors" for more information.
Our businesses have operated for many years within a legal framework that requires us to be able to monitor and comply with a broad range of legal and regulatory developments that affect our activities. In addition, certain of our businesses are subject to compliance with laws and regulations of United States federal and state governments, foreign governments, their respective agencies and/or various self-regulatory organizations or exchanges relating to the privacy of client information, and any failure to comply with these regulations could expose us to liability and/or reputational damage. Additional legislation, changes in rules promulgated by the SEC, the CFTC and self-regulatory organizations or changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, either in the United States or elsewhere, may directly affect the mode of our operation and profitability. The United States and non-United States government agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the United States, are empowered to conduct administrative proceedings that can result in censure, fine, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or the suspension or expulsion of a broker-dealer or its directors, officers or employees. Occasionally, we have been subject to investigations and proceedings, and sanctions have been imposed for infractions of various regulations relating to our activities.
Cowen and Company is a registered broker-dealer with the SEC and in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Self-regulatory organizations, including the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority ("FINRA"), adopt and enforce rules governing the conduct and activities of its member firms, including Cowen and Company, ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC), ATM USA and Cowen Equity Finance. In addition, state securities regulators have regulatory or oversight authority over our broker-dealer entities. Accordingly, Cowen and Company, ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC), ATM USA and Cowen Equity Finance are subject to regulation and oversight by the SEC and FINRA. Cowen and Company is also a member of, and subject to regulation by, the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE"), the NASDAQ OMX PHLX, the NYSE MKT LLC, the International Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Exchange.
Broker-dealers are subject to regulations that cover all aspects of the securities business, including sales methods, trade practices among broker-dealers, use and safekeeping of customers' funds, securities and information, capital structure, record-keeping, the financing of customers' purchases and the conduct and qualifications of directors, officers and employees. In particular, as registered broker-dealers and members of various self-regulatory organizations, Cowen and Company and ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC), ATM USA and Cowen Equity Finance are subject to the SEC's uniform net

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capital rule. Rule 15c3-1 under the Exchange Act. Rule 15c3-1 specifies the minimum level of net capital a broker-dealer must maintain and also requires that a significant part of a broker-dealer's assets be kept in relatively liquid form. The SEC and various self-regulatory organizations impose rules that require notification when net capital falls below certain predefined criteria, limit the ratio of subordinated debt to equity in the regulatory capital composition of a broker-dealer and constrain the ability of a broker-dealer to expand its business under certain circumstances. Additionally, the SEC's uniform net capital rule requires us to give prior notice to the SEC for certain withdrawals of capital. As a result, our ability to withdraw capital from our broker-dealer subsidiaries may be limited.
The research functions of investment banks have been, and continue to be, the subject of regulatory scrutiny. In 2002 and 2003, acting in part pursuant to a mandate contained in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the SEC, the NYSE and the predecessor to FINRA adopted rules imposing heightened restrictions on the interaction between equity research analysts and investment banking personnel at member securities firms. The requirements resulting from these regulations have necessitated the development and enhancement of corresponding policies and procedures. In 2012, the JOBS Act was passed which, among other things, liberalized a number of the restrictions between equity research analysts and investment banking personnel with respect to emerging growth companies.
The effort to combat money laundering and terrorist financing is a priority in governmental policy with respect to financial institutions. The Bank Secrecy Act ("BSA"), as amended by Title III of the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 and its implementing regulations ("Patriot Act"), requires broker-dealers and other financial services companies to maintain an anti-money laundering compliance program that includes written policies and procedures, designated compliance officer(s), appropriate training, independent review of the program, standards for verifying client identity at account opening and obligations to report suspicious activities and certain other financial transactions. Through these and other provisions, the BSA and Patriot Act seek to promote the identification of parties that may be involved in financing terrorism or money laundering. We must also comply with sanctions programs administered by the U.S. Department of Treasury's Office of Foreign Asset Control, which may include prohibitions on transactions with designated individuals and entities and with individuals and entities from certain countries.
Anti-money laundering laws outside the United States contain certain similar provisions. The obligation of financial institutions, including us, to identify their customers, watch for and report suspicious transactions, respond to requests for information by regulatory authorities and law enforcement agencies, and share information with other financial institutions, has required the implementation and maintenance of internal practices, procedures and controls that have increased, and may continue to increase, our costs. Any failure with respect to our programs in this area could subject us to serious regulatory consequences, including substantial fines, and potentially other liabilities.
Rigorous legal and compliance analysis of our businesses and investments is important to our culture and risk management. In addition, disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting are documented, tested and assessed for design and operating effectiveness in compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. We strive to maintain a culture of compliance through the use of policies and procedures such as oversight compliance, codes of conduct, compliance systems, communication of compliance guidance and employee education and training. Our corporate risk management function further analyzes our business, investment and other key risks, reinforcing their importance in our environment. We have a compliance group that monitors our compliance with all of the regulatory requirements to which we are subject and manages our compliance policies and procedures. Our General Counsel supervises our compliance group, which is responsible for addressing all regulatory and compliance matters that affect our activities. Our compliance policies and procedures address a variety of regulatory and compliance risks such as the handling of material non-public information, position reporting, personal securities trading, valuation of investments on a fund-specific basis, document retention, potential conflicts of interest and the allocation of investment opportunities. Our compliance group also monitors the information barriers that we maintain between each of our different businesses. We believe that our various businesses' access to the intellectual capital, contacts and relationships that reside throughout our firm benefits all of our businesses. However, in order to maximize that access without compromising our legal and contractual obligations, our compliance group oversees and monitors the communications between or among our firm's different businesses.
Available Information
We routinely file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information required by the Exchange Act with the SEC. You may read and copy any document we file with the SEC at the SEC's public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549, U.S.A. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. Our SEC filings also are available to the public from the SEC's internet site at http://www.sec.gov.
We maintain a public internet site at http://www.cowen.com and make available free of charge through this site our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statements and Forms 3, 4 and 5 filed on behalf of directors and executive officers, as well as any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or

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furnish it to, the SEC. We also post on our website the charters for our Board of Directors' Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, as well as our Corporate Governance Guidelines, our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics governing our directors, officers and employees and other related materials. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report.
Item 1A.    Risk Factors
RISK FACTORS
Risks Related to the Company's Businesses and Industry
        For purposes of the following risk factors, references made to the Company's funds include hedge funds and other alternative investment products, services and solutions offered by the Company, investment vehicles through which the Company invests its own capital, funds in the Company's fund of funds business and real estate funds. References to the Company's broker-dealer business include Cowen and Company, ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC), ATM USA and Cowen Equity Finance LP ("Cowen Equity Finance").
The Company
The Company's alternative investment and broker-dealer businesses have incurred losses in recent periods and may incur losses in the future.
The Company's broker-dealer and alternative investment businesses have incurred losses in recent periods. For example, the Company's broker-dealer business incurred losses in each of the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011. In addition, the Company's alternative investment business incurred losses in each of the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008. The Company may incur losses in any of its future periods. Future losses may have a significant effect on the Company's liquidity as well as our ability to operate.
In addition, we may incur significant expenses in connection with any expansion, strategic acquisition or investment with respect to our businesses. Specifically, we have invested, and will continue to invest, in our broker-dealer business, including hiring a number of senior professionals to expand our research and sales and trading product offerings. Accordingly, the Company will need to increase its revenues at a rate greater than its expenses to achieve and maintain profitability. If the Company's revenues do not increase sufficiently, or even if its revenues increase but it is unable to manage its expenses, the Company will not achieve and maintain profitability in future periods. As an alternative to increasing its revenues, the Company may seek additional capital through the sale of additional common stock or other forms of debt or equity financing. Particularly in light of current market conditions, the Company cannot be certain that it would have access to such financing on acceptable terms.
The Company depends on its key senior personnel and the loss of their services would have a material adverse effect on the Company's businesses and results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
The Company depends on the efforts, skill, reputations and business contacts of its principals and other key senior personnel, the information and investment activity these individuals generate during the normal course of their activities and the synergies among the diverse fields of expertise and knowledge held by the Company's senior professionals. Accordingly, the Company's continued success will depend on the continued service of these individuals. Key senior personnel may leave the Company in the future, and we cannot predict the impact that the departure of any key senior personnel will have on our ability to achieve our investment and business objectives. The loss of the services of any of them could have a material adverse effect on the Company's revenues, net income and cash flows and could harm our ability to maintain or grow assets under management in existing funds or raise additional funds in the future. Our senior and other key personnel possess substantial experience and expertise and have strong business relationships with investors in its funds, clients and other members of the business community. As a result, the loss of these personnel could have a material adverse effect on the Company's businesses and results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
The Company's ability to retain its senior professionals is critical to the success of its businesses, and its failure to do so may materially affect the Company's reputation, business and results of operations.
Our people are our most valuable resource. Our success depends upon the reputation, judgment, business generation capabilities and project execution skills of our senior professionals. Our employees' reputations and relationships with our clients are critical elements in obtaining and executing client engagements. The Company may encounter intense competition for qualified employees from other companies inside and outside of their industries. From time to time, the Company has experienced departures of professionals. Losses of key personnel have occurred and may occur in the future. In addition, if any of our client-facing employees or executive officers were to join an existing competitor or form a competing company, some of our clients could choose to use the services of that competitor instead of the services of the Company.

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The success of our businesses is based largely on the quality of our employees and we must continually monitor the market for their services and seek to offer competitive compensation. In challenging market conditions, such as have occurred in recent years, it may be difficult to pay competitive compensation without the ratio of our compensation and benefits expense to revenues becoming higher. In addition, a portion of the compensation of many of our employees takes the form of restricted stock or deferred cash that vest over a period of years, which is not as attractive to existing and potential employees as compensation consisting solely of cash or a lesser percentage of stock or other deferred compensation that may be offered by our competitors.
Difficult market conditions, market disruptions and volatility have adversely affected, and may in the future adversely affect, the Company's businesses, results of operations and financial condition.
The Company's businesses, by their nature, do not produce predictable earnings, and all of the Company's businesses may be materially affected by conditions in the global financial markets and by global economic conditions, such as interest rates, the availability of credit, inflation rates, economic uncertainty, changes in laws, commodity prices, asset prices (including real estate), currency exchange rates and controls and national and international political circumstances (including wars, terrorist acts, protests or security operations). Recently the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling debates in the United States impacted global credit and other financial markets and resulted in substantial stress, volatility, illiquidity and disruption. These factors, combined with volatile commodity prices and foreign exchange rates, contributed to recessionary economic conditions globally and deterioration in consumer and corporate confidence. These type of market conditions could affect the level and volatility of securities prices and the liquidity and the value of investments in the Company's funds, including Ramius Enterprise LP (which we refer to as Enterprise Fund), Cowen Overseas Investment LP (which we refer to as COIL), and other investments, respectively, in which the Company has investments of approximately $102.4 million, $178.4 million, and $9.4 million, respectively, of its own capital as of December 31, 2013, and the Company may not be able to effectively manage its alternative investment business's exposure to these market conditions. Losses in the Enterprise Fund, COIL or other private investments could adversely affect our results of operations.
Volatility in the value of the Company's investments and securities portfolios or other assets and liabilities or negative returns from the investments made by the Company could adversely affect the financial condition or results of operations of the Company.
The Company invests a significant portion of its capital base to help drive results and facilitate growth of its alternative investment and broker-dealer businesses. As of December 31, 2013, the Company's invested capital amounted to a net value $427.6 million (supporting a long market value of $532.9 million), representing approximately 84% of Cowen Group's stockholders' equity presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("US GAAP"). In accordance with U.S. GAAP, we define fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. U.S. GAAP also establishes a framework for measuring fair value and a valuation hierarchy based upon the transparency of inputs used in the valuation of an asset or liability. Changes in fair value are reflected in the statement of operations at each measurement period. Therefore, continued volatility in the value of the Company's investments and securities portfolios or other assets and liabilities, including funds, will result in volatility of the Company's results. In addition, the investments made by the Company may not generate positive returns. As a result, changes in value or negative returns from investments made by the Company may have an adverse effect on the Company's financial condition or operations in the future.
If the Company were deemed an "investment company" under the U.S. Investment Company Act, applicable restrictions could make it impractical for the Company to continue its respective businesses as contemplated and could have a material adverse effect on the Company's businesses and prospects.
We do not believe that we are an "investment company" as defined in the U.S. Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, because the nature of our assets and the sources of our income exclude us from the definition of investment company in the Investment Company Act and we are primarily engaged in a non-investment company business.
 The Investment Company Act and the rules thereunder contain detailed requirements for the organization and operation of investment companies. Among other things, the Investment Company Act and the rules thereunder limit transactions with affiliates, impose limitations on the issuance of debt and equity securities, generally prohibit the issuance of options and impose certain governance requirements. The Company intends to conduct its operations so that the Company will not be deemed to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act. If anything were to happen which would cause the Company to be deemed to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act, requirements imposed by the Investment Company Act, including limitations on its capital structure, ability to transact business with affiliates (including subsidiaries) and ability to compensate key employees, could make it impractical for the Company to continue its business as currently conducted, impair the agreements and arrangements between and among it, its subsidiaries and its senior personnel, or any combination thereof, and materially adversely affect its business, financial condition and results of operations. Accordingly, the Company

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may be required to limit the amount of investments that it makes as a principal or otherwise conduct its business in a manner that does not subject the Company to the registration and other requirements of the Investment Company Act.
Limitations on access to capital by the Company and its subsidiaries could impair its liquidity and its ability to conduct its businesses.
Liquidity, or ready access to funds, is essential to the operations of financial services firms. Failures of financial institutions have often been attributable in large part to insufficient liquidity. Liquidity is of particular importance to Cowen and Company's trading business and perceived liquidity issues may affect the willingness of the Company's investment banking clients and counterparties to engage in brokerage transactions with Cowen and Company. Cowen and Company's liquidity could be impaired due to circumstances that the Company may be unable to control, such as a general market disruption or an operational problem that affects Cowen and Company, its trading clients or third parties. Furthermore, Cowen and Company's ability to sell assets may be impaired if other market participants are seeking to sell similar assets at the same time.
The Company is a holding company and primarily depends on its subsidiaries to fund its operations. Cowen and Company, ATM Execution LLC (formerly Cowen Capital LLC), ATM USA and Cowen Equity Finance are subject to the net capital requirements of the SEC and various self-regulatory organizations of which they are members. These requirements typically specify the minimum level of net capital a broker-dealer must maintain and also mandate that a significant part of its assets be kept in relatively liquid form. CIL, the Company's U.K. registered broker-dealer subsidiary, is subject to the capital requirements of the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority (the "FCA"). Cowen Asia is subject to the financial resources requirements of the SFC of Hong Kong. Any failure to comply with these capital requirements could impair the Company's ability to conduct its investment banking business.
The Company and its funds and/or Cowen and Company and the Company's other broker-dealer subsidiaries may become subject to additional regulations which could increase the costs and burdens of compliance or impose additional restrictions which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's businesses and the performance of the funds in its alternative investment business.
Firms in the financial services industry have been subject to an increasingly regulated environment. The industry has experienced increased scrutiny from a variety of regulators, including the SEC, CFTC, FINRA, the NYSE and state attorneys general. Penalties and fines sought by regulatory authorities have increased substantially over the last several years. In light of current conditions in the global financial markets and the global economy, regulators have increased their focus on the regulation of the financial services industry. The Company may be adversely affected by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules by these governmental authorities and self-regulatory organizations. The Company also may be adversely affected as a result of new or revised legislation or regulations imposed by the SEC, other United States or foreign governmental regulatory authorities or self-regulatory organizations that supervise the financial markets. Among other things, the Company could be fined, prohibited from engaging in some of its business activities or subjected to limitations or conditions on its business activities. In addition, the Company could incur significant expense associated with compliance with any such legislation or regulations or the regulatory and enforcement environment generally. Substantial legal liability or significant regulatory action against the Company could have a material adverse effect on the financial condition and results of operations of the Company or cause significant reputational harm to the Company, which could seriously affect its business prospects.
The Company may need to modify the strategies or operations of its alternative investment business, face increased constraints or incur additional costs in order to satisfy new regulatory requirements or to compete in a changed business environment. The Company's alternative investment business is subject to regulation by various regulatory authorities both within and outside the United States that are charged with protecting the interests of investors. The activities of certain of the Company's subsidiaries are regulated primarily within the United States by the SEC, FINRA, the NFA and the CFTC, as well as various state agencies, and are also subject to regulation by other agencies in the various jurisdictions in which they operate and are offered, including the FCA, the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier in Luxembourg and the European Securities and Markets Authority. The activities of our investment advisor entities are all regulated by the SEC due to their registrations as U.S. investment advisers. Certain of these entities are also all registered as CPOs and/or CTAs with the National Futures Association. Starting in July 2014, certain of our investment advisers marketing alternative investment funds to investors domiciled in the European Union and/or advising alternative investment funds domiciled in the European Union will become subject to the AIFMD.
In addition, the Company's alternative investment business is subject to regulation in the jurisdictions in which organizes and offers its various investment products. These and other regulators in these jurisdictions have broad regulatory powers dealing with all aspects of financial services including, among other things, the authority to make inquiries of companies regarding compliance with applicable regulations, to grant permits and to regulate marketing and sales practices and the maintenance of adequate financial resources as well as significant reporting obligations to regulatory authorities. The Company is also subject to applicable anti-money laundering regulations and net capital requirements in the jurisdictions in

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which it operates. Additionally, the regulatory environment in which the Company operates frequently changes and has seen significant increased regulation in recent years and it is possible that this trend may continue. In addition, in July 2013, CFTC rules relating to portfolio reconciliation and swap trading relationship documentation went into effect. Such additional regulation could, among other things, increase compliance costs or limit our ability to pursue investment opportunities and strategies.
The regulatory environment continues to be turbulent. There is an extraordinary volume of regulatory discussion papers, draft directives and proposals being issued around the world and these initiatives are not always coordinated. The European Commission has issued the new AIFMD, recommendations on directors' pay and financial services sector compensation and proposals on packaged retail investment products. In addition, the predecessor to the FCA has issued a discussion paper entitled "A Regulatory Response to the Global Banking Crisis" as well as undertaken an exercise to collect data to assess the systemic risk that hedge funds may or may not pose. The Bank of England is also collecting data on the systemic risk of hedge funds. Recent rulemaking by the SEC and other regulatory authorities outside the United States have imposed trading restrictions and reporting requirements on short selling, which have impacted certain of the investment strategies of the Company's investment funds and managed accounts, and continued restrictions on or further regulations of short sales could negatively impact the performance of the investment funds and managed accounts.
In addition, financial services firms are subject to numerous perceived or actual conflicts of interest, which have drawn and which we expect will continue to draw scrutiny from the SEC and other federal and state regulators. For example, the research areas of investment banks have been and remain the subject of heightened regulatory scrutiny, which has led to increased restrictions on the interaction between equity research analysts and investment banking personnel at securities firms. More recently, regulations have been focusing on the use of experts and expert networks and potential conflicts of interest or issues relating to impermissible disclosure of material nonpublic information. While the Company maintains various policies, controls and procedures to address or limit actual or perceived conflicts and regularly seeks to review and update such policies, controls and procedures, appropriately dealing with conflicts of interest is complex and difficult, and our reputation could be damaged if it fails to do so. Such policies and procedures to address or limit actual or perceived conflicts may also result in increased costs, additional operational personnel and increased regulatory risk. Failure to adhere to these policies and procedures may result in regulatory sanctions or client litigation.
The Company is subject to third party litigation risk and regulatory risk which could result in significant liabilities and reputational harm which, in turn, could materially adversely affect its business, results of operations and financial condition.
The Company depends to a large extent on its reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services to attract and retain clients. As a result, if a client is not satisfied with the Company's services, it may be more damaging in its business than in other businesses. Moreover, the Company's role as advisor to clients on underwriting or merger and acquisition transactions involves complex analysis and the exercise of professional judgment, including rendering "fairness opinions" in connection with mergers and other transactions. Such activities may subject the Company to the risk of significant legal liabilities to clients and aggrieved third parties, including stockholders of clients who could commence litigation against the Company. Although the Company's investment banking engagements typically include broad indemnities from its clients and provisions to limit exposure to legal claims relating to such services, these provisions may not protect the Company, may not be enforceable, or may be with foreign companies requiring enforcement in foreign jurisdictions which may raise the costs and decrease the likelihood of enforcement. As a result, the Company may incur significant legal and other expenses in defending against litigation and may be required to pay substantial damages for settlements and/or adverse judgments. Substantial legal liability or significant regulatory action against the Company could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or cause significant reputational harm, which could seriously harm our business and prospects.
In general, the Company is exposed to risk of litigation by investors in its alternative investment business if the management of any of its funds is alleged to have engaged in negligence or dishonesty. Investors could sue to recover amounts lost by the Company's funds due to any alleged misconduct, up to the entire amount of the loss. In addition, the Company faces the risk of litigation from investors in the Company's funds if restrictions applicable to such funds are violated. We may also be exposed to litigation by investors in the Company's alternative solutions platform for losses resulting from similar conduct at an underlying fund. Furthermore, the Company may be subject to litigation arising from investor dissatisfaction with the performance of the Company's funds and the funds invested in by the Company's alternative solutions platform. In addition, the Company is exposed to risks of litigation or investigation relating to transactions that presented conflicts of interest that were not properly addressed. In the majority of such actions the Company would be obligated to bear legal, settlement and other costs, which may be in excess of any available insurance coverage. In addition, although the Company is indemnified by the Company's funds, our rights to indemnification may be challenged. If the Company is required to incur all or a portion of the costs arising out of litigation or investigations as a result of inadequate insurance proceeds, if any, or fails to obtain indemnification from its funds, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. In its alternative investment business, the Company is exposed to the risk of litigation if a fund suffers catastrophic

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losses due to the failure of a particular investment strategy or due to the trading activity of an employee who has violated market rules or regulations. Any litigation arising in such circumstances is likely to be protracted, expensive and surrounded by circumstances which are materially damaging to the Company's reputation and businesses.
The potential for conflicts of interest within the Company, and a failure to appropriately identify and deal with conflicts of interest could adversely affect our businesses.
Due to the combination of our alternative investment and investment banking businesses, we face an increased potential for conflicts of interest, including situations where our services to a particular client or investor or our own interests in our investments conflict with the interests of another client. Such conflicts may also arise if our investment banking business has access to material non-public information that may not be shared with our alternative investment business or vice versa. Additionally, our regulators have the ability to scrutinize our activities for potential conflicts of interest, including through detailed examinations of specific transactions.
We have developed and implemented procedures and controls that are designed to identify and address conflicts of interest, including those designed to prevent the improper sharing of information among our businesses. However, appropriately identifying and dealing with conflicts of interest is complex and difficult, and the willingness of clients to enter into transactions or engagements in which such a conflict might arise may be affected if we fail to identify and appropriately address potential conflicts of interest. In addition, potential or perceived conflicts could give rise to litigation or enforcement actions.
Employee misconduct could harm the Company by, among other things, impairing the Company's ability to attract and retain investors and subjecting the Company to significant legal liability, reputational harm and the loss of revenue from its own invested capital.
It is not always possible to detect and deter employee misconduct. The precautions that the Company takes to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in all cases, and we may suffer significant reputational harm and financial loss for any misconduct by our employees. The potential harm to the Company's reputation and to our business caused by such misconduct is impossible to quantify.
There is a risk that the Company's employees or partners, or the managers of funds invested in by the Company's alternative solutions platform, could engage in misconduct that materially adversely affects the Company's business, including a decrease in returns on its own invested capital. The Company is subject to a number of obligations and standards arising from its businesses. The violation of these obligations and standards by any of the Company's employees could materially adversely affect the Company and its investors. For instance, the Company's businesses require that the Company properly deal with confidential information. If the Company's employees were improperly to use or disclose confidential information, we could suffer serious harm to our reputation, financial position and current and future business relationships. If one of the Company's employees were to engage in misconduct or were to be accused of such misconduct, the business and reputation of the Company could be materially adversely affected.
The Company may be unable to successfully identify, manage and execute future acquisitions, investments and strategic alliances, which could adversely affect our results of operations.
We intend to continually evaluate potential acquisitions, investments and strategic alliances to expand our alternative investment and broker-dealer businesses. In the future, we may seek additional acquisitions, investments, strategic alliances or similar arrangements, which may expose us to risks such as:
the difficulty of identifying appropriate acquisitions, investments, strategic allies or opportunities on terms acceptable to us;
the possibility that senior management may be required to spend considerable time negotiating agreements and monitoring these arrangements;
potential regulatory issues applicable to the financial services business;
the loss or reduction in value of the capital investment;
our inability to capitalize on the opportunities presented by these arrangements; and
the possibility of insolvency of a strategic ally. 
Furthermore, any future acquisitions of businesses could entail a number of risks, including:
problems with the effective integration of operations;
inability to maintain key pre-acquisition business relationships;
increased operating costs;
exposure to unanticipated liabilities; and
difficulties in realizing projected efficiencies, synergies and cost savings.

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 There can be no assurance that we would successfully overcome these risks or any other problems encountered with these acquisitions, investments, strategic alliances or similar arrangements.
The Company's future results will suffer if the Company does not effectively manage its expanded operations.
The Company may continue to expand its operations through new product and service offerings and through additional strategic investments, acquisitions or joint ventures, some of which may involve complex technical and operational challenges. The Company's future success depends, in part, upon its ability to manage its expansion opportunities, which pose numerous risks and uncertainties, including the need to integrate new operations into its existing business in an efficient and timely manner, to combine accounting and data processing systems and management controls and to integrate relationships with customers and business partners. In addition, future acquisitions or joint ventures may involve the issuance of additional shares of common stock of the Company, which may dilute the ownership of the Company's stockholders.
The Company's failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes‑Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations and business and the price of our Class A common stock.
The Sarbanes‑Oxley Act and the related rules require our management to conduct an annual assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and require a report by our independent registered public accounting firm addressing our internal control over financial reporting. To comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes‑Oxley Act, we are required to document formal policies, processes and practices related to financial reporting that are necessary to comply with Section 404. Such policies, processes and practices are important to ensure the identification of key financial reporting risks, assessment of their potential impact and linkage of those risks to specific areas and activities within our organization.
If we fail for any reason to comply with the requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner, our independent registered public accounting firm may, at that time, issue an adverse report regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Matters impacting our internal controls may cause us to be unable to report our financial information on a timely basis and thereby subject us to adverse regulatory consequences, including sanctions by the SEC or violations of applicable stock exchange listing rules. There could also be a negative reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of investor confidence in us and the reliability of our financial statements. Any such event could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and business, and result in a decline in the price of our Class A common stock.
Certain provisions of the Company's amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws and Delaware law may have the effect of delaying or preventing an acquisition by a third party.
The Company's amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain several provisions that may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of the Company, even if such acquisition would be financially beneficial to the Company's stockholders. These provisions also may delay, prevent or deter a merger, acquisition, tender offer, proxy contest or other transaction that might otherwise result in the Company's stockholders receiving a premium over the then-current trading price of our common stock. For example, the Company's amended and restated certificate of incorporation authorizes its board of directors to issue up to 10,000,000 shares of "blank check" preferred stock. Without stockholder approval, the board of directors has the authority to attach special rights, including voting and dividend rights, to this preferred stock. With these rights, preferred stockholders could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire the Company. In addition, the Company's amended and restated bylaws provide for an advance notice procedure with regard to the nomination of candidates for election as directors and with regard to business to be brought before a meeting of stockholders. The Company is also subject to the anti-takeover provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law. Under these provisions, if anyone becomes an "interested stockholder," the Company may not enter into a "business combination" with that person for three years without special approval, which could discourage a third party from making a takeover offer and could delay or prevent a change of control. For the purposes of Section 203, "interested stockholder" means, generally, someone owning 15% or more of the Company's outstanding voting stock or an affiliate of the Company that owned 15% or more of our outstanding voting stock during the past three years, subject to certain exceptions as described in Section 203.
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 may adversely impact the Company's business.
The Dodd-Frank Act, signed into law on July 21, 2010, represents a comprehensive overhaul of the financial services industry within the United States and is being implemented through extensive rulemaking by the SEC and other governmental agencies. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act established the federal Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the "BCFP") and the FSOC and will require the BCFP and FSOC, among other federal agencies, to implement new rules and regulations. Some of these new rules have already been adopted, including new rules which require certain investment advisers to file information under Form PF and rules that require certain registered investment advisers which are also registered CPOs and CTAs to file Form CPO-PQR and Form CTA-PR, respectively, with the CFTC. These filings require extensive information and we may

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incur significant costs to satisfy these new filing requirements. As these rules and resulting changes are recent developments, it is not practical at this time to assess the full impact that the Dodd-Frank Act or the resulting rules and regulations will have on the Company's business or the financial services industry within the United States.
Risks Related to the Company's Alternative Investment Business
The Company's profitability may be adversely affected by decreases in revenue relating to changes in market and economic conditions.
Market conditions have been and remain inherently unpredictable and outside of the Company's control, and may result in reductions in the Company's revenue and results of operations. Such reductions may be caused by a decline in assets under management, resulting in lower management fees and incentive income, an increase in the cost of financial instruments, lower investment returns or reduced demand for assets held by the Company's funds, which would negatively affect the funds' ability to realize value from such assets or continued investor redemptions, resulting in lower fees and increased difficulty in raising new capital.
These factors may reduce the Company's revenue, revenue growth and income and may slow the growth of the alternative investment business or may cause the contraction of the alternative investment business. In particular, negative fund performance reduces assets under management, which decreases the management fees and incentive income that the Company earns. Negative performance of the Enterprise Fund, COIL and other private investments also decreases revenue derived from the Company's returns on investment of its own capital.
The Company's ability to increase revenues and improve profitability will depend on increasing assets under management in existing products and developing and marketing new products and strategies.
The Company’s alternative investment business generates management and incentive fee income based on its assets under management. If the Company is unable to increase its assets under management in its existing products it may be difficult to increase its revenues. The Company has recently developed and launched several new products, including mutual funds that seek to offer U.S. investors the ability to invest in alternative investment strategies, and the Company may also launch funds focusing on new investment strategies. If these products or strategies are not successful, thee Company's profitability could be adversely affected.
The Company's revenues and, in particular, its ability to earn incentive income, would be adversely affected if its funds or managed accounts fall beneath their "high-water marks" as a result of negative performance.
Incentive income, which has historically comprised a substantial portion of the Company’s alternative investment business annual revenues, is, in most cases, subject to "high-water marks" whereby incentive income is earned by the Company only to the extent that the net asset value of a fund or managed account at the end of a measurement period exceeds the highest net asset value as of the end of a preceding measurement period for which the Company earned incentive income. The Company's incentive allocations are also subject, in some cases, to performance hurdles or benchmarks. To the extent the Company's funds or managed accounts experience negative investment performance, the investors in these funds or managed accounts would need to recover cumulative losses before the Company can earn incentive income with respect to the investments of those investors who previously suffered losses.
It may be difficult for the Company's alternative investment business to retain investment professionals during periods where market conditions make it more difficult to generate positive investment returns.
Certain of the Company's funds face particular retention issues with respect to investment professionals whose compensation is tied, often in large part, to such performance thresholds. This retention risk is heightened during periods where market conditions make it more difficult to generate positive investment returns. For example, several investment professionals receive performance-based compensation at the end of each year based upon their annual investment performance, and this performance-based compensation represents substantially all of the compensation the professional is entitled to receive during the year. If the investment professional's annual performance is negative, the professional may not be entitled to receive any performance-based compensation for the year. If investment professionals or funds, as the case may be, produce investment results that are negative (or below the applicable hurdle or benchmark), the affected investment professionals may be incentivized to join a competitor because doing so would allow them to earn performance-based compensation without the requirement that they first satisfy the high-water mark.
Investors in the Company's funds and investors with managed accounts can generally redeem investments with prior notice. The rate of redemptions could accelerate at any time. Historically, redemptions have created difficulties in managing the liquidity of certain of the Company's funds and managed accounts, reduced assets under management and adversely affected the Company's revenues, and may do so in the future.

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Investors in the Company's funds and investors with managed accounts may generally redeem their investments with prior notice, subject to certain initial holding periods. Investors may reduce the aggregate amount of their investments, or transfer their investments to other funds or asset managers with different fee rate arrangements, for any number of reasons, including investment performance, changes in prevailing interest rates and financial market performance. Furthermore, investors in the Company's funds may be investors in products managed by other alternative asset managers where redemptions have been restricted or suspended. Such investors may redeem capital from Company's funds, even if the Company's funds' performance is superior, due to an inability to redeem capital from other managers. Increased volatility in global markets could accelerate the pace of fund and managed account redemptions. Redemptions of investments in the Company's funds could also take place more quickly than assets may be sold by those funds to meet the price of such redemptions, which could result in the relevant funds and/or the Company being in breach of applicable legal, regulatory and contractual requirements in relation to such redemptions, resulting in possible regulatory and investor actions against the Company and/or the Company's funds. If the Company's funds or managed accounts underperform, existing investors may decide to reduce or redeem their investments or transfer asset management responsibility to other asset managers and the Company may be unable to obtain new alternative investment business. Any such action could potentially cause further redemptions and/or make it more difficult to attract new investors.
The redemption of investments in the Company's funds or in managed accounts could also adversely affect the revenues of the Company's alternative investment business, which are substantially dependent upon the assets under management in the Company's funds. If redemptions of investments cause revenues to decline, they would likely have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. As a result of the disruptions and the resulting uncertainty during the second half of 2008 and early 2009, the Company's alternative investment business experienced an increase in the level of redemptions from the Company's funds and managed accounts. If this level of redemption activity returns, it could become more difficult to manage the liquidity requirements of the Company's funds, making it more difficult or more costly for the Company's funds to liquidate positions rapidly to meet redemption requests or otherwise. This in turn may negatively impact the Company's returns on its own invested capital.
In addition to the impact on the market value of assets under management, illiquidity and volatility of the global financial markets could negatively affect the ability of the Company's alternative investment business to manage inflows and outflows from the Company's funds. Several alternative investment managers, including the Company's alternative investment business, have in the past exercised, and may in the future exercise, their rights to limit, and in some cases, suspend, redemptions from the funds they manage. The Company's alternative investment business has also negotiated, and may in the future negotiate, with investors or exercise such rights in an attempt to limit redemptions or create a variety of other investor structures to bring fund assets and liquidity requirements into a more manageable balance. To the extent that the Company's alternative investment business has negotiated with investors to limit redemptions, it may be likely that such investors will continue to seek further redemptions in the future. Such actions may have an adverse effect on the ability of the Company's funds to attract new capital to existing funds or to develop new investment platforms. The Company's fund of funds platform may also be adversely impacted as the hedge funds in which it invests themselves face similar investor redemptions or if such hedge funds exercise their rights to limit or suspend the Company's redemptions from such funds. Poor performance relative to other asset management firms may result in reduced investments in the Company's funds and managed accounts and increased redemptions from the Company's funds and managed accounts. As a result, investment underperformance would likely have a material adverse effect on the Company's results of operations and financial condition.
Hedge fund investments, including the investments of the Company's own capital in the Enterprise Fund, COIL and other private investments, are subject to other additional risks.
Investments by the Company's funds (including the Enterprise Fund, COIL and other private investments, in which the Company's own capital is invested) are subject to certain risks that may result in losses. Decreases to assets under management as a result of investment losses or client redemptions may have a material adverse effect on the Company's revenues, net income and cash flows and could harm our ability to maintain or grow assets under management in existing funds or raise additional funds in the future. Additional risks include the following:
Generally, there are few limitations on hedge funds' investment strategies, which are often subject to the sole discretion of the management company or the general partner of such funds.
Hedge funds may engage in short selling, which is subject to a theoretically unlimited risk of loss because there is no limit on how much the price of a security sold short may appreciate before the short position is closed out. A fund may be subject to losses if a security lender demands return of the lent securities and an alternative lending source cannot be found or if the fund is otherwise unable to borrow securities that are necessary to hedge its positions. Furthermore, by the SEC and other regulatory authorities outside the United States have imposed trading restrictions and reporting requirements on short selling, which in certain circumstances may impair hedge funds' ability to use short selling effectively.

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The efficacy of investment and trading strategies depend largely on the ability to establish and maintain an overall market position through a combination of financial instruments. A hedge fund's trading orders may not be executed in a timely and efficient manner due to various circumstances, including systems failures or human error. In such event, the fund might only be able to acquire some but not all of the components of the position, or if the overall position were in need of adjustment, the fund might not be able to make such an adjustment. As a result, a hedge fund would not be able to achieve the market position selected by the management company or general partner of such fund, and might incur a loss in liquidating its position.
Credit risk may arise through a default by one of several large institutions that are dependent on one another to meet their respective liquidity or operational needs, so that a default by one institution causes a series of defaults by the other institutions. This "systemic risk" may adversely affect the financial intermediaries (such as clearing agencies, clearing houses, banks, securities firms, other counterparties and exchanges) with which the hedge funds interact on a daily basis.
Hedge funds are subject to risks due to the potential illiquidity of assets. Hedge funds may make investments or hold trading positions in markets that are volatile and which may become illiquid. The timely sale of trading positions can be impaired by decreased trading volume, increased price volatility, concentrated trading positions, limitations on the ability to transfer positions in highly specialized or structured transactions to which they may be a party, and changes in industry and government regulations. It may be impossible or highly costly for hedge funds to liquidate positions rapidly to meet margin calls, redemption requests or otherwise, particularly if there are other market participants seeking to dispose of similar assets at the same time, if the relevant market is otherwise moving against a position or in the event of trading halts or daily price movement limitations on the market. In addition, increased levels of redemptions may result in increased illiquidity as more liquid assets are sold to fund redemptions. Moreover, these risks may be exacerbated for the Company's alternative solutions platform. For example, if the Company's alternative solutions platform invested in two or more hedge funds that each had illiquid positions in the same issuer, the illiquidity risk for the Company's alternative solutions portfolios would be compounded. Furthermore, certain of the investments of the Company's alternative solutions platform were in third party hedge funds that halted redemptions in the recent past in the face of illiquidity and other issues, and could do so again in the future.
Hedge fund investments are subject to risks relating to investments in commodities, futures, options and other derivatives, the prices of which are highly volatile and may be subject to the theoretically unlimited risk of loss in certain circumstances. Price movements of commodities, futures and options contracts and payments pursuant to swap agreements are influenced by, among other things, interest rates, changing supply and demand relationships, trade, fiscal, monetary and exchange control programs and policies of governments and national and international political and economic events and policies. The value of futures, options and swap agreements also depends upon the price of the commodities underlying them. In addition, hedge funds' assets are subject to the risk of the failure of any of the exchanges on which their positions trade. 
If the Company's or managed account's counterparty for any of its derivative or non-derivative contracts defaults on the performance of those contracts, the Company may not be able to cover its exposure under the relevant contract.
The Company's funds and managed accounts enter into numerous types of financing arrangements with a wide array of counterparties around the world, including loans, hedge contracts, swaps, repurchase agreements and other derivative and non-derivative contracts. The terms of these contracts are generally complex and often customized and generally are not subject to regulatory oversight. The Company is subject to the risk that the counterparty to one or more of these contracts may default, either voluntarily or involuntarily, on its performance under the contract. Any such default may occur at any time without notice. Additionally, the Company may not be able to take action to cover its exposure if a counterparty defaults under such a contract, either because of a lack of the contractual ability or because market conditions make it difficult to take effective action. The impact of market stress or counterparty financial condition may not be accurately foreseen or evaluated and, as a result, the Company may not take sufficient action to reduce its risks effectively.
Counterparty risk is accentuated where the fund or managed account has concentrated its transactions with a single or small group of counterparties. Generally, hedge funds are not restricted from concentrating any or all of their transactions with one counterparty. Moreover, the Company's internal review of the creditworthiness of their counterparties may prove inaccurate. The absence of a regulated market to facilitate settlement and the evaluation of creditworthiness may increase the potential for losses.
In addition, these financing arrangements often contain provisions that give counterparties the ability to terminate the arrangements if any of a number of defaults occurs with respect to the Company or its funds or managed accounts, as the case may be, including declines in performance or assets under management and losses of key management personnel, each of which may be beyond our control. In the event of any such termination, the Company's funds or managed accounts may not be able to enter into alternative arrangements with other counterparties and our business may be materially adversely affected.

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The Company may suffer losses in connection with the insolvency of prime brokers, custodians, administrators and other agents whose services the Company uses and who may hold assets of the Company's funds.
All of the Company's funds use the services of prime brokers, custodians, administrators or other agents to carry out certain securities transactions and to conduct certain business of the Company's funds. In the event of the insolvency of a prime broker and/or custodian, the Company's funds might not be able to recover equivalent assets in full as they may rank among the prime broker's and custodian's unsecured creditors in relation to assets which the prime broker or custodian borrows, lends or otherwise uses. In addition, the Company's funds' cash held with a prime broker or custodian (if any) may not be segregated from the prime broker's or custodian's own cash, and the funds will therefore rank as unsecured creditors in relation thereto.
Operational risks relating to the failure of data processing systems and other information systems and technology may disrupt our alternative investment business, result in losses and/or limit the business's operations and growth.
The Company's alternative investment business and its funds rely heavily on financial, accounting, trading and other data processing systems to, among other things, execute, confirm, settle and record transactions across markets and geographic locations in a time-sensitive, efficient and accurate manner. If any of these systems does not operate properly or are disabled, the Company could suffer financial loss, a disruption of its business, liability to the Company's funds, regulatory intervention and/or reputational damage. In addition, the Company's alternative investment business is highly dependent on information systems and technology, and the cost of maintaining such systems may increase from its current level. Such a failure to accommodate the operational needs of the Company's alternative investment business , or an increase in costs related to such information systems, could have a material adverse effect on the Company, both with respect to a decrease in the operational performance of its alternative investment business and an increase in costs that may be necessary to improve such systems.
The Company depends on its presence in New York, New York, where most of the Company's alternative investment personnel are located, for the continued operation of its business. We have taken precautions to limit the impact that a disruption to operations at our New York headquarters could cause (for example, by ensuring that the Company can operate independently of offices in other geographic locations). Although these precautions have been taken, a disaster or a disruption in the infrastructure that supports our alternative investment business, including a disruption involving electronic communications or other services used by the third parties with whom the Company's alternative investment business conducts business (including the funds invested in by the Company’s fund of funds platform), or directly affecting the New York, New York, headquarters, could have a material adverse impact on the Company's ability to continue to operate its alternative investment business without interruption. The Company's disaster recovery programs may not be sufficient to mitigate the harm that may result from such a disaster or disruption. In addition, insurance might only partially reimburse us for our losses, if at all. Finally, the Company relies on third party service providers for certain aspects of its business, including for certain information systems and technology and administration of the Company's funds. Severe interruptions or deteriorations in the performance of these third parties or failures of their information systems and technology could impair the quality of the Company's alternative investment business operations and could impact the Company's reputation and materially adversely affect our alternative investment business.
Certain of the Company's funds may invest in relatively high-risk, illiquid assets, and the Company may fail to realize any profits from these activities for a considerable period of time or lose some or all of the principal amounts of these investments.
Certain of the Company's funds and managed accounts (including the Enterprise Fund, COIL, and other investments, in which the Company had approximately $102.4 million, $178.4 million, and $9.4 million, respectively, of its own capital invested as of December 31, 2013) invest a portion of their assets in securities that are not publicly traded and funds invested in by the Company's alternative solutions platform may do the same. In many cases, such funds may be prohibited by contract or by applicable securities laws from selling such securities for a period of time or there may not be a public market for such securities. Even if the securities are publicly traded, large holdings of securities can often be disposed of only over a substantial length of time, exposing the investment returns to risks of downward movement in market prices during the disposition period. Accordingly, under certain conditions, the Company's funds, or funds invested in by the Company's alternative solutions platform, may be forced to either sell securities at lower prices than they had expected to realize or defer, potentially for a considerable period of time, sales that they had planned to make. Investing in these types of investments can involve a high degree of risk, and the Company's funds (including the Enterprise Fund, COIL and other private investments ) may lose some or all of the principal amount of such investments, including our own invested capital.
Risk management activities may materially adversely affect the return on the Company's funds' investments if such activities do not effectively limit a fund's exposure to decreases in investment values or if such exposure is overestimated.
When managing the Company's funds' exposure to market risks, the relevant fund (or one of the funds invested in by the Company's alternative solutions platform) may use forward contracts, options, swaps, caps, collars and floors or pursue other strategies or use other forms of derivative financial instruments to limit its exposure to changes in the relative values of

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investments that may result from market developments, including changes in interest rates, currency exchange rates and asset prices. The success of such derivative transactions generally will depend on the Company's (or the underlying fund manager's) ability to accurately predict market changes in a timely fashion, the degree of correlation between price movements of a derivative instrument, the position being hedged, the creditworthiness of the counterparty and other factors. As a result, these transactions may result in poorer overall investment performance than if they had not been executed. Such transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the value of a hedged position increases. For a variety of reasons, a perfect correlation between the instruments used in a hedging or other derivative transaction and the position being hedged may not be attained. An imperfect correlation could give rise to a loss. Also, it may not be possible to fully or perfectly limit exposure against all changes in the value of an investment because the value of an investment is likely to fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, many of which will be beyond the Company's (or the underlying fund manager's) control or ability to hedge.
Fluctuations in currency exchange rates could materially affect the Company's alternative investment business and its results of operations and financial condition.
The Company uses U.S. dollars as its reporting currency. Investments in the Company's funds and managed accounts are made in different currencies, including Euros, Pounds Sterling and Yen. In addition, the Company's funds and managed accounts hold investments denominated in many foreign currencies. To the extent that the Company's revenues from its alternative investment business are based on assets under management denominated in such foreign currencies, our reported revenues may be significantly affected by the exchange rate of the U.S. dollar against these currencies. Typically, an increase in the exchange rate between U.S. dollars and these currencies will reduce the impact of revenues denominated in these currencies in the financial results of our alternative investment business. For example, management fee revenues derived from each Euro of assets under management denominated in Euros will decline in U.S. dollar terms if the value of the U.S. dollar appreciates against the Euro. In addition, the calculation of the amount of assets under management is affected by exchange rate movements as assets under management denominated in foreign currencies are converted to U.S. dollars. The Company's alternative investment business also incurs a portion of its expenditures in currencies other than U.S. dollars. As a result, our alternative investment business is subject to the effects of exchange rate fluctuations with respect to any currency conversions and the Company’s ability to hedge these risks and the cost of such hedging or the Company’s decision not to hedge could impact the performance of the Company's funds and our alternative investment business and its results of operations and financial condition.
The due diligence process that the Company's alternative investment business undertakes in connection with investments by the Company's funds is inherently limited and may not reveal all facts that may be relevant in connection with making an investment.
Before making investments, particularly investments in securities that are not publicly traded, the Company endeavors to conduct a due diligence review of such investment that it deems reasonable and appropriate based on the facts and circumstances applicable to each investment. When conducting due diligence, the Company is often required to evaluate critical and complex business, financial, tax, accounting, environmental and legal issues. Outside consultants, legal advisors, accountants, investment bankers and financial analysts may be involved in the due diligence process in varying degrees depending on the type of investment. Nevertheless, when conducting due diligence and making an assessment regarding an investment, the Company is limited to the resources available, including information provided by the target of the investment and, in some circumstances, third party investigations. The due diligence investigation that the Company conducts with respect to any investment opportunity may not reveal or highlight all relevant facts that may be necessary or helpful in evaluating such investment opportunity. Moreover, such an investigation will not necessarily result in the investment being successful, which may adversely affect the performance of the Company's funds and managed accounts and the Company's ability to generate returns on its own invested capital from any such investment.
The Company's real estate business is subject to the risks inherent in the ownership and operation of real estate and the construction and development of real estate.
The Company's real estate business is subject to the risks inherent in the ownership and operation of real estate and real estate-related businesses and assets. These risks include those associated with general and local economic conditions, changes in supply of and demand for competing properties in an area, changes in environmental regulations and other laws, various uninsured or uninsurable risks, natural disasters, changes in real property tax rates, changes in interest rates, the reduced availability of mortgage financing which may render the sale or refinancing of properties difficult or impracticable, environmental liabilities, contingent liabilities on disposition of assets, terrorist attacks, war and other factors that are beyond our control. Further, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has found that global climate change could increase the severity and perhaps the frequency of extreme weather events, which could subject real property to increased weather-related risks in the coming years. There are also presently a number of current and proposed regulatory initiatives, both domestically and globally, that are geared towards limiting and scaling back the emission of greenhouse gases, which certain scientists have

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linked to global climate change. Although not known with certainty at this time, such regulation could adversely affect the costs to construct and operate real estate in the coming years, such as through increased energy costs.
In recent years commercial real estate markets in the United States generally experienced major disruptions due to the unprecedented lack of available capital, in the form of either debt or equity, and declines in value as a result of the overall economic decline. If these conditions were to occur again transaction volume may drop precipitously, negatively impacting the valuation and performance of the Company's real estate investments significantly. Additionally, if the Company's real estate business acquires direct or indirect interests in undeveloped land or underdeveloped real property, which may often be non-income producing, they will be subject to the risks normally associated with such assets and development activities, including risks relating to the availability and timely receipt of zoning and other regulatory or environmental approvals, the cost, potential for cost overruns and timely completion of construction (including risks beyond the control of the investor, such as weather or labor conditions or material shortages) and the availability of both construction and permanent financing on favorable terms.
The alternative investment industry is intensely competitive, which may adversely affect the Company's ability to attract and retain investors and investment professionals.
The alternative investment industry is extremely competitive. Competition includes numerous international, national, regional and local asset management firms and broker-dealers, commercial bank and thrift institutions, and other financial institutions. Many of these institutions offer products and services that are similar to, or compete with, those offered by us and have substantially more personnel and greater financial resources than the Company does. The key areas for competition include historical investment performance, the ability to identify investment opportunities, the ability to attract and retain the best investment professionals and the quality of service provided to investors. The Company's ability to compete may be adversely affected if it underperforms in comparison to relevant benchmarks, peer groups or competing asset managers. The competitive market environment may result in increased downward pressure on fees, for example, by reduced management fee and incentive allocation percentages. The future results of operations of the Company's alternative investment business are dependent in part on its ability to maintain appropriate fee levels for its products and services. In the current economic environment, many competing asset managers experienced substantial declines in investment performance, increased redemptions, or counterparty exposures which impaired their businesses. Some of these asset managers have reduced their fees in an attempt to avoid additional redemptions. Competition within the alternative investment industry could lead to pressure on the Company to reduce the fees that it charges its clients for alternative investment products and services. A failure to compete effectively may result in the loss of existing clients and business, and of opportunities to generate new business and grow assets under management, each of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company's alternative investment business and results of operations, financial condition and prospects. Furthermore, consolidation in the alternative investment industry may accelerate, as many asset managers are unable to withstand the substantial declines in investment performance, increased redemptions, and other pressures impacting their businesses, including increased regulatory, compliance and control requirements. Some competitors may acquire or combine with other competitors. The combined business may have greater resources than the Company does and may be able to compete more effectively against the Company and rapidly acquire significant market share.
Increased regulatory focus could result in regulation that may limit the manner in which the Company and the Company's funds invest and the types of investors that may invest in the Company's funds, materially impacting the Company's business.
The Company's alternative investment business may be adversely affected if new or revised legislation or regulations are enacted, or by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing rules and regulations imposed by the SEC, other U.S. or foreign governmental regulatory authorities or self-regulatory organizations that supervise the financial markets and their participants. Such changes could place limitations on the type of investor that can invest in alternative investment funds or on the conditions under which such investors may invest. Further, such changes may limit the scope of investing activities that may be undertaken by alternative investment managers as well as their funds. It is impossible to determine the extent of the impact of any new or recently enacted laws, including the Dodd-Frank Act, or any regulations or initiatives that may be proposed, or whether any of the proposals will become law. Compliance with any new laws or regulations could be difficult and expensive and affect the manner in which the Company's alternative investment business conducts itself, which may adversely impact its results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Additionally, as a result of highly publicized financial scandals, investors, regulators and the general public have exhibited concerns over the integrity of both the U.S. financial markets and the regulatory oversight of these markets. As a result, the business environment in which Company's alternative investment business operates is subject to heightened regulation. With respect to alternative investment funds, in recent years, there has been debate in both U.S. and foreign governments about new rules or regulations, including increased oversight or taxation, in addition to the recently enacted legislation described above. As calls for additional regulation have increased, there may be a related increase in regulatory investigations of the trading and other investment activities of alternative investment funds, including the Company's funds.

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Such investigations may impose additional expenses on the Company, may require the attention of senior management and may result in fines if any of the Company's funds are deemed to have violated any regulations.
The Company's alternative investment business may suffer as a result of loss of business from key investors.
The loss of all or a substantial portion of the business provided by key investors could have a material impact on income derived from management fees and incentive allocations and consequently have a material adverse effect on our alternative investment business and results of operations or financial condition.
Risks Related to the Company's Broker-Dealer Business
The Company's broker-dealer business focuses principally on specific sectors of the economy, and deterioration in the business environment in these sectors or a decline in the market for securities of companies within these sectors could materially affect our broker-dealer business.
Cowen and Company focuses principally on the Target Sectors of the economy. Therefore, volatility in the business environment in these sectors or in the market for securities of companies within these sectors could substantially affect the Company's financial results and, thus, the market value of the Class A common stock. The business environment for companies in these sectors has been subject to substantial volatility, and Cowen and Company's financial results have consequently been subject to significant variations from year to year. The market for securities in each of Cowen and Company's target sectors may also be subject to industry-specific risks. For example, changes in policies of the United States Food and Drug Administration, along with changes in Medicare and government reimbursement policies, may affect the market for securities of healthcare companies.
As an investment bank which focuses primarily on specific growth sectors of the economy, Cowen and Company also depends significantly on private company transactions for sources of revenues and potential business opportunities. To the extent the pace of these private company transactions slows or the average size declines due to a decrease in private equity financings, difficult market conditions in Cowen and Company's target sectors or other factors, the Company's business and results of operations may be adversely affected.
The financial results of the Company's broker-dealer business may fluctuate substantially from period to period, which may impair the stock price of the Class A common stock.
Cowen and Company has experienced, and we expect to experience in the future, significant periodic variations in its revenues and results of operations. These variations may be attributed in part to the fact that its investment banking revenues are typically earned upon the successful completion of a transaction, the timing of which is uncertain and beyond Cowen and Company's control. In most cases, Cowen and Company receives little or no payment for investment banking engagements that do not result in the successful completion of a transaction. As a result, our investment banking business is highly dependent on market conditions as well as the decisions and actions of its clients and interested third parties. For example, a client's acquisition transaction may be delayed or terminated because of a failure to agree upon final terms with the counterparty, failure to obtain necessary regulatory consents or board or stockholder approvals, failure to secure necessary financing, adverse market conditions or unexpected financial or other problems in the client's or counterparty's business. If the parties fail to complete a transaction on which Cowen and Company is advising or an offering in which Cowen and Company is participating, we will earn little or no revenue from the transaction, and we may incur significant expenses that may not be recouped. This risk may be intensified by Cowen and Company's focus on growth companies in the Target Sectors as the market for securities of these companies has experienced significant variations in the number and size of equity offerings. Many companies initiating the process of an IPO are simultaneously exploring other strategic alternatives, such as a merger and acquisition transaction. The Company's investment banking revenues would be adversely affected in the event that an IPO for which it is acting as an underwriter is preempted by the company's sale if Cowen and Company is not also engaged as a strategic advisor in such sale. As a result, our investment banking business is unlikely to achieve steady and predictable earnings on a quarterly basis, which could in turn adversely affect the stock price of the Class A common stock.
Pricing and other competitive pressures may impair the revenues of the Company's brokerage business.
Cowen and Company's brokerage business accounted for approximately 68% of Cowen and Company's revenues during 2013. Along with other firms, Cowen and Company has experienced price competition in this business in recent years. In particular, the ability to execute trades electronically and through alternative trading systems has increased the pressure on trading commissions and spreads. We expect to continue to experience competitive pressures in these and other areas in the future as some of our competitors in the investment banking industry seek to obtain market share by competing on the basis of price or use their own capital to facilitate client trading activities. In addition, the Company faces pressure from Cowen and Company's larger competitors, who may be better able to offer a broader range of complementary products and services to clients in order to win their trading business. We are committed to maintaining and improving Cowen and Company's

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comprehensive research coverage to support its brokerage business and the Company may be required to make additional investments in Cowen and Company's research capabilities.
Cowen and Company faces strong competition from larger firms.
The research, brokerage and investment banking industries are intensely competitive, and the Company expects them to remain so. Cowen and Company competes on the basis of a number of factors, including client relationships, reputation, the abilities of Cowen and Company's professionals, market focus and the relative quality and price of Cowen and Company's services and products. Cowen and Company has experienced intense price competition in some of its businesses, including trading commissions and spreads in its brokerage business. In addition, pricing and other competitive pressures in investment banking, including the trends toward multiple book runners, co-managers and financial advisors, and a larger share of the underwriting fees and discounts being allocated to the book-runners, could adversely affect the Company's revenues from its investment banking business.
Cowen and Company is a relatively small investment bank. Many of Cowen and Company's competitors in the research, brokerage and investment banking industries have a broader range of products and services, greater financial resources, larger customer bases, greater name recognition and marketing resources, a larger number of senior professionals to serve their clients' needs, greater global reach and more established relationships with clients than Cowen and Company has. These larger competitors may be better able to respond to changes in the research, brokerage and investment banking industries, to compete for skilled professionals, to finance acquisitions, to fund internal growth and to compete for market share generally.
The scale of our competitors in the investment banking industry has increased in recent years as a result of substantial consolidation among companies in the research, brokerage and investment banking industries. In addition, a number of large commercial banks and other broad-based financial services firms have established or acquired underwriting or financial advisory practices and broker- dealers or have merged with other financial institutions. These firms have the ability to offer a wider range of products than Cowen and Company does which may enhance their competitive position. They also have the ability to support their investment banking and advisory groups with commercial banking and other financial services in an effort to gain market share, which has resulted, and could further result, in pricing pressure in Cowen and Company's businesses. If we are unable to compete effectively with our competitors in the investment banking industry, the Company's business and results of operations may be adversely affected.
The Company's capital markets and strategic advisory engagements are singular in nature and do not generally provide for subsequent engagements.
The Company's investment banking clients generally retain Cowen and Company on a short-term, engagement-by-engagement basis in connection with specific capital markets or mergers and acquisitions transactions, rather than on a recurring basis under long-term contracts. As these transactions are typically singular in nature and Cowen and Company's engagements with these clients may not recur, Cowen and Company must seek out new engagements when its current engagements are successfully completed or are terminated. As a result, high activity levels in any period are not necessarily indicative of continued high levels of activity in any subsequent period. If Cowen and Company is unable to generate a substantial number of new engagements that generate fees from new or existing clients, the Company's investment banking business and results of operations would likely be adversely affected.
Larger and more frequent capital commitments in the Company's trading and underwriting businesses increase the potential for significant losses.
There has been a trend toward larger and more frequent commitments of capital by financial services firms in many of their activities. For example, in order to compete for certain transactions, investment banks may commit to purchase large blocks of stock from publicly traded issuers or significant stockholders, instead of the more traditional marketed underwriting process in which marketing is completed before an investment bank commits to purchase securities for resale. To the extent the total net capital of the Company's broker-dealers allows it, the Company anticipates participating in this trend and, as a result, Cowen and Company will be subject to increased risk as it commits capital to facilitate business. As of December 31, 2013, Cowen and Company has total net capital of approximately $36.4 million. Furthermore, Cowen and Company may suffer losses as a result of the positions taken in these transactions even when economic and market conditions are generally favorable for others in the industry.
Cowen and Company may enter into large transactions in which it commits its own capital as part of its trading business to facilitate client trading activities. The number and size of these large transactions may materially affect Cowen and Company's results of operations in a given period. Market fluctuations may also cause Cowen and Company to incur significant losses from its trading activities. To the extent that Cowen and Company owns assets (i.e., has long positions), a downturn in the value of those assets or in the markets in which those assets are traded could result in losses. Conversely, to the extent that Cowen and Company has sold assets it does not own (i.e., has short positions), in any of those markets, an upturn in the value

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of those assets or in markets in which those assets are traded could expose the Company's investment banking business to potentially large losses as it attempts to cover short positions by acquiring assets in a rising market.
Operational risks relating to the failure of data processing systems and other information systems and technology or other infrastructure may disrupt the Company's broker-dealer business, result in losses or limit the our operations and growth in the industry.
The Company's broker-dealer business is highly dependent on its ability to process, on a daily basis, a large number of transactions across diverse markets, and the transactions that the Company processes have become increasingly complex. The inability of the Company's systems to accommodate an increasing volume of transactions could also constrain the Company's ability to expand its broker-dealer business. If any of these systems do not operate properly or are disabled, or if there are other shortcomings or failures in the Company's internal processes, people or systems, the Company could suffer impairments, financial loss, a disruption of its broker-dealer business, liability to clients, regulatory intervention or reputational damage.
The Company has outsourced certain aspects of its technology infrastructure including data centers and wide area networks, as well as some trading applications. The Company is dependent on its technology providers to manage and monitor those functions. A disruption of any of the outsourced services would be out of the Company's control and could negatively impact our broker-dealer business. The Company has experienced disruptions on occasion, none of which has been material to the Company's operations and results. However, there can be no guarantee that future material disruptions with these providers will not occur.
The Company also faces the risk of operational failure of or termination of relations with any of the clearing agents, exchanges, clearing houses or other financial intermediaries that the Company uses to facilitate its securities transactions. Any such failure or termination could adversely affect the Company's ability to effect transactions and to manage its exposure to risk.
In addition, the Company's ability to conduct its broker-dealer business may be adversely impacted by a disruption in the infrastructure that supports Company and the communities in which we are located. This may affect, among other things, the Company's financial, accounting or other data processing systems. This may include a disruption involving electrical, communications, transportation or other services used by us or third parties with which the Company conducts business, whether due to fire, other natural disaster, power or communications failure, act of terrorism or war or otherwise. Nearly all of our broker-dealer employees in our primary locations in New York, Boston, San Francisco and London work in close proximity to each other. Although the Company has a formal disaster recovery plan in place, if a disruption occurs in one location and our broker-dealer employees in that location are unable to communicate with or travel to other locations, the Company's ability to service and interact with its clients may suffer, and the Company may not be able to implement successfully contingency plans that depend on communication or travel.
Our investment banking business also relies on the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and other information in its computer systems and networks. The Company's computer systems, software and networks may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, computer viruses or other malicious code and other events that could have a security impact. If one or more of such events occur, this could jeopardize our or our broker-dealer clients' or counterparties' confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, the Company's computer systems and networks, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in our broker-dealer business', its clients', its counterparties' or third parties' operations. The Company may be required to expend significant additional resources to modify its protective measures, to investigate and remediate vulnerabilities or other exposures or to make required notifications, and the Company may be subject to litigation and financial losses that are either not insured against or not fully covered through any insurance maintained by the Company.
The Company provides guaranties to Cowen Equity Finance's counterparties and if the Company is required to perform under those guaranties our business would be adversely affected.
In the securities lending business, customers typically require their counterparties to have substantial capital. The Company has provided guaranties to counterparties in order to induce those counterparties to trade with Cowen Equity Finance, our entity that engages in the securities lending business. While these guaranties are limited to obligations arising under the contracts relating to our securities lending business, in the event of non performance by Cowen Equity Finance, if the Company were required to perform under those guaranties, our business would be adversely affected.
The market structure in which our market-making business operates may continue to change or lose its viability, making it difficult for this business to achieve or maintain profitability.
        Market structure changes have had an adverse affect on the results of operations of our market-making business. These changes may make it difficult for us to maintain and/or predict levels of profitability of, or may cause us to generate losses in, our market-making business.

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The growth of electronic trading and the introduction of new technology in the markets in which our market-making business operates may adversely affect this business and may increase competition.
        The continued growth of electronic trading and the introduction of new technologies is changing our market-making business and presenting new challenges. Securities, futures and options transactions are increasingly occurring electronically, through alternative trading systems. It appears that the trend toward alternative trading systems will continue to accelerate. This acceleration could further increase program trading, increase the speed of transactions and decrease our ability to participate in transactions as principal, which would reduce the profitability of our market-making business. Some of these alternative trading systems compete with our market-making business and with our algorithmic trading platform, and we may experience continued competitive pressures in these and other areas. Significant resources have been invested in the development of our electronic trading systems, which includes our ATM business, but there is no assurance that the revenues generated by these systems will yield an adequate return on the investment, particularly given the increased program trading and increased percentage of stocks trading off of the historically manual trading markets.
Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2.    Properties
Our main offices, all of which are leased, are located in New York City, Boston, San Francisco and London. Our other offices, all of which are leased, are located in Atlanta, Chicago, Stamford, Geneva, Purchase (New York), Luxembourg, Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai. Our corporate headquarters are located at 599 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York, and comprise approximately 91,124 square feet of leased space pursuant to lease agreements expiring in 2022. We lease approximately 19,000 square feet of space at Two International Place in Boston pursuant to a lease agreement expiring in 2023, which is used primarily by our broker-dealer segment. In San Francisco, we lease approximately 29,072 square feet of space at 555 California Street, pursuant to a lease agreement expiring in 2015 which is used by our broker-dealer segment. Our London offices are located at Broadgate West Phase II, 1 Snowden Street, subject to a lease agreement expiring in 2017 that is used by our alternative investment and broker-dealer segments, respectively.
Item 3.    Legal Proceedings    
In the ordinary course of business, we are named as defendants in, or as parties to, various legal actions and proceedings. Certain of these actions and proceedings assert claims or seek relief in connection with alleged violations of securities, banking, anti-fraud, anti-money laundering, employment and other statutory and common laws. Certain of these actual or threatened legal actions and proceedings include claims for substantial or indeterminate compensatory or punitive damages, or for injunctive relief.
In the ordinary course of business, we are also subject to governmental and regulatory examinations, information gathering requests (both formal and informal), certain of which may result in adverse judgments, settlements, fines, penalties, injunctions or other relief. Certain of our affiliates and subsidiaries are investment banks, registered broker-dealers, futures commission merchants, investment advisers or other regulated entities and, in those capacities, are subject to regulation by various U.S., state and foreign securities, commodity futures and other regulators. In connection with formal and informal inquiries by these regulators, we receive requests, and orders seeking documents and other information in connection with various aspects of our regulated activities.
Due to the global scope of our operations, and presence in countries around the world, we may be subject to litigation, and governmental and regulatory examinations, information gathering requests, investigations and proceedings (both formal and informal), in multiple jurisdictions with legal and regulatory regimes that may differ substantially, and present substantially different risks, from those we are subject to in the United States.

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The Company seeks to resolve all litigation and regulatory matters in the manner management believes is in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders, and contests liability, allegations of wrongdoing and, where applicable, the amount of damages or scope of any penalties or other relief sought as appropriate in each pending matter.
In accordance with the US GAAP, the Company establishes reserves for contingencies when the Company believes that it is probable that a loss has been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. The Company discloses a contingency if there is at least a reasonable possibility that a loss may have been incurred and there is no reserve for the loss because the conditions above are not met. The Company's disclosure includes an estimate of the reasonably possible loss or range of loss for those matters, for which an estimate can be made. Neither a reserve nor disclosure is required for losses that are deemed remote.
The Company appropriately reserves for certain matters where, in the opinion of management, the likelihood of liability is probable and the extent of such liability is reasonably estimable. Such amounts are included within accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities in the consolidated statements of financial condition. Estimates, by their nature, are based on judgment and currently available information and involve a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the type and nature of the litigation, claim or proceeding, the progress of the matter, the advice of legal counsel, the Company's defenses and its experience in similar cases or proceedings as well as its assessment of matters, including settlements, involving other defendants in similar or related cases or proceedings. The Company may increase or decrease its legal reserves in the future, on a matter-by-matter basis, to account for developments in such matters. The Company accrues legal fees as incurred.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not Applicable.
PART II
Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Stock Price Information and Stockholders
Our Class A common stock is listed and trades on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol "COWN." As of February 28, 2014, there were approximately 66 holders of record of our Class A common stock. This number does not include stockholders for whom shares were held in "nominee" or "street" name.
The following table contains historical quarterly price information for the year ended December 31, 2013. On February 28, 2014, the last reported sale price of our Class A common stock was $4.28.
2013 Fiscal Year
High
 
Low
First Quarter
$
2.95

 
$
2.40

Second Quarter
3.29

 
2.45

Third Quarter
3.69

 
2.92

Fourth Quarter
4.13

 
3.45

 
 
 
 
2012 Fiscal Year
High
 
Low
First Quarter
$
2.98

 
$
2.53

Second Quarter
2.85

 
2.24

Third Quarter
2.95

 
2.26

Fourth Quarter
2.91

 
2.16

Dividend Policy
We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on Class A common stock or any other class of stock. Any payment of cash dividends on stock in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our results of operations, earnings, capital requirements, financial condition, future prospects, contractual restrictions and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. We currently intend to retain any future earnings to fund the operation, development and expansion of our business, and therefore we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities: Sales of Unregistered Securities
The Company's Board of Directors has approved a share repurchase program that authorizes the Company to purchase up to $50.0 million of Cowen Class A common stock from time to time through a variety of methods, including in the open market

22


or through privately negotiated transactions, in accordance with applicable securities laws. During the year ended December 31, 2013, through the share repurchase program, the Company repurchased 3,402,619 shares of Cowen Class A common stock at an average price of $3.76 per share.
In December 2013, the Company also reissued 24,744 shares of treasury stock valued at $65,000 in the aggregate based on the volume weighted average price over the term of an agreement for services provided to the Company. This issuance of treasury stock was made in reliance upon the exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 provided by Section 4(a)(2) thereof for transaction by an issuer not involving any public offering.
The table below sets forth the information with respect to purchases made by or on the behalf of the Company or any “affiliated purchaser” (as defined in Rule 10b-18(a)(3) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended), of our common stock during the year ended December 31, 2013.
Period
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased
 
Average Price Paid per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
 
Maximum Number of Shares That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 1 (January 1, 2013 – January 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 

 
$

 

 

 
Total
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 2 (February 1, 2013 – February 28, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
155,295

 
$
2.66

 

 

 
Total
 
155,295

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 3 (March 1, 2013 – March 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 

 
$

 

 

 
Total
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 4 (April 1, 2013 – April 30, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 

 
$

 

 

 
Total
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 5 (May 1, 2013 – May 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
403,865

 
$
2.80

 

 

 
Total
 
403,865

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 6 (June 1, 2013 – June 30, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
479,449

 
$
3.13

 

 

 
Total
 
479,449

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 7 (July 1, 2013 – July 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
16,538

 
$
3.34

 

 

 
Total
 
16,538

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 8 (August 1, 2013 – August 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 
561,919

 
$
3.48

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
55,455

 
$
3.60

 

 

 
Total
 
617,374

 

 
 
 
 
 

23


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 9 (September 1, 2013 – September 30, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 
162,728

 
$
3.28

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
28,435

 
$
3.25

 

 

 
Total
 
191,163

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 10 (October 1, 2013 – October 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 

 
$

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 

 
$

 

 

 
Total
 

 
$

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 11 (November 1, 2013 – November 30, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 
598,757

 
$
3.84

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
64,417

 
$
3.99

 

 

 
Total
 
663,174

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Month 12 (December 1, 2013 – December 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 
2,079,215

 
$
3.85

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 

 
$

 

 

 
Total
 
2,079,215

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total (January 1, 2013 – December 31, 2013)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common stock repurchases(1)
 
3,402,619

 
$
3.76

 

 

(3
)
Employee transactions(2)
 
1,203,454

 
$
3.03

 

 

 
Total
 
4,606,073

 

 
 
 
 
 
(1)
The Company's Board of Directors have authorized the repurchase, subject to market conditions, of up to $50.0 million of the Company's outstanding common stock.
(2)
Represents shares of common stock withheld in satisfaction of tax withholding obligations upon the vesting of equity awards or other similar transactions.
(3)
Board approval of repurchases is based on dollar amount. The Company cannot estimate the number of shares that may yet be purchased.
Item 6.    Selected Financial Data
The following table sets forth our selected consolidated financial and other data for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, and 2009. The selected consolidated statements of financial condition data and consolidated statements of operations data as of and for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, and 2009 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. Our selected consolidated financial data are only a summary and should be read in conjunction with the section entitled "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and with our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The selected financial data includes the results of Cowen Holdings for the period from November 2, 2009 through December 31, 2009 and for the subsequent years.

24


 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
(in thousands except per share data)
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment banking
$
105,333

 
$
71,762

 
$
50,976

 
$
38,965

 
$
10,557

Brokerage
114,593

 
91,167

 
99,611

 
112,217

 
17,812

Management fees
37,303

 
38,116

 
52,466

 
38,847

 
41,694

Incentive income
12,586

 
5,411

 
3,265

 
11,363

 
1,911

Interest and dividends
39,454

 
24,608

 
22,306

 
11,547

 
477

Reimbursement from affiliates
9,161

 
5,239

 
4,322

 
6,816

 
10,326

Other revenues
5,418

 
3,668

 
1,583

 
1,936

 
4,732

Consolidated Funds revenues
3,398

 
509

 
749

 
12,119

 
36,392

Total revenues
327,246

 
240,480

 
235,278

 
233,810

 
123,901

Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee compensation and benefits
207,248

 
194,034

 
203,767

 
194,919

 
96,592

Non-compensation expense
151,630

 
131,190

 
161,955

 
136,902

 
69,818

Goodwill impairment

 

 
7,151

 

 

Consolidated Funds expenses
2,039

 
1,676

 
2,782

 
8,121

 
23,581

Total expenses
360,917

 
326,900

 
375,655

 
339,942

 
189,991

Other income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net gain (loss) on securities, derivatives and other investments
40,924

 
55,665

 
15,128

 
21,980

 
(2,154
)
Bargain purchase gain

 

 
22,244

 

 

Consolidated Funds net gains (losses)
11,044

 
7,246

 
4,395

 
31,062

 
20,999

Total other income (loss)
51,968

 
62,911

 
41,767

 
53,042

 
18,845

Income (loss) before income taxes
18,297

 
(23,509
)
 
(98,610
)
 
(53,090
)
 
(47,245
)
Income tax expense (benefit)
457

 
448

 
(20,073
)
 
(21,400
)
 
(8,206
)
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
17,840

 
(23,957
)
 
(78,537
)
 
(31,690
)
 
(39,039
)
Net income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 
(23,646
)
 

 

Net income (loss)
17,840

 
(23,957
)
 
(102,183
)
 
(31,690
)
 
(39,039
)
Net income (loss) attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests in consolidated subsidiaries
13,193

 
(72
)
 
5,827

 
13,727

 
16,248

Net income (loss) attributable to Cowen Group, Inc. stockholders
$
4,647

 
$
(23,885
)
 
$
(108,010
)
 
$
(45,417
)
 
$
(55,287
)
Weighted average common shares outstanding:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Basic
116,703

 
114,400

 
95,532

 
73,149

 
41,001

Diluted
121,117

 
114,400

 
95,532

 
73,149

 
41,001

Earnings (loss) per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
$
0.04

 
$
(0.21
)
 
$
(0.88
)
 
$
(0.62
)
 
$
(1.35
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
$

 
$

 
$
(0.25
)
 
$

 
$

Diluted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
$
0.04

 
$
(0.21
)
 
$
(0.88
)
 
$
(0.62
)
 
$
(1.35
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
$

 
$

 
$
(0.25
)
 
$

 
$

 

 
As of December 31,
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
1,842,000

 
$
1,638,476

 
$
1,535,838

 
$
1,247,170

 
$
959,441

Total liabilities
1,248,420

 
1,057,664

 
922,786

 
653,568

 
255,091

Redeemable non-controlling interests
85,814

 
85,703

 
104,587

 
144,346

 
230,825

Total Stockholders' Equity
$
507,766

 
$
495,109

 
$
508,465

 
$
449,256

 
$
473,525



25


Item 7.    Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
       The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this Annual Report. In addition to historical information, this discussion includes forward-looking information that involves risks and assumptions, which could cause actual results to differ materially from management's expectations. See "Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Overview
Cowen Group, Inc. is a diversified financial services firm and, together with its consolidated subsidiaries, provides alternative investment management, investment banking, research, market-making and sales and trading services through its two business segments: alternative investment and broker-dealer. The alternative investment segment offers investors access to strategies to meet their unique needs including small-cap activism, healthcare royalties, customized solutions, event driven equity, real estate, long/short credit and managed futures and is offered primarily under the Ramius name. The broker-dealer segment offers industry focused investment banking for growth-oriented companies including advisory and global capital markets origination and domain knowledge-driven research and a sales and trading platform for institutional investors, primarily under the Cowen name.
Ramius is an alternative investment platform offering innovative products and solutions across the liquidity spectrum to institutional and private clients. The predecessor to this business was founded in 1994 and, through one of its subsidiaries, has been a registered investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 since 1997. Ramius offers investors access to strategies to meet their specific needs including small-cap activism, healthcare royalties, customized solutions, event driven equity, real estate, long/short credit and managed futures. Ramius focuses on attracting and retaining talented in-house and affiliated investment teams and providing them with institutional infrastructure, robust sales and marketing and industry knowledge. A significant portion of the Company’s capital is invested alongside Ramius’s alternative investment clients. Our alternative investment business had approximately $9.4 billion of assets under management as of January 1, 2014.
Our broker-dealer businesses include research, brokerage and investment banking services to companies and institutional investor clients primarily in our Target Sectors. We provide research and brokerage services to over 1,000 domestic and international clients seeking to trade securities, principally in our target sectors. Historically, we have focused our investment banking efforts on small to mid-capitalization public companies as well as private companies.
Certain Factors Impacting Our Business
Our alternative investment business and results of operations are impacted by the following factors:
Assets under management.  Our revenues from management fees are directly linked to assets under management. As a result, the future performance of our alternative investment business will depend on, among other things, our ability to retain assets under management and to grow assets under management from existing and new products. In addition, positive performance increases assets under management which results in higher management fees. As previously disclosed, redemptions in Ramius Multi-Strategy Fund Ltd triggered certain contractual rights of affiliates of UniCredit S.p.A (“UniCredit S.p.A”), which would have allowed them to withdraw their assets held in that fund upon 30 days notice. Such affiliates of UniCredit S.p.A instead agreed, pursuant to a modification agreement, to extend the time period pursuant to which the Company was required to return the bulk of its assets in our funds by the end of 2010. The Company returned a significant portion of the assets during 2010 and as of December 31, 2013, including redemptions effective on January 1, 2014, we have returned approximately $629 million to affiliates of UniCredit S.p.A with a remaining investment balance of approximately $114 million invested in our investment vehicles, including a fund of funds managed account.
Investment performance.  Our revenues from incentive income are linked to the performance of the funds and accounts that we manage. Performance also affects assets under management because it influences investors' decisions to invest assets in, or withdraw assets from, the funds and accounts managed by us.
Fee and allocation rates.  Our management fee revenues are linked to the management fee rates we charge as a percentage of assets under management. Our incentive income revenues are linked to the incentive allocation rates we charge as a percentage of performance-driven asset growth. Our incentive allocations are generally subject to “high-water marks,” whereby incentive income is generally earned by us only to the extent that the net asset value of a fund at the end of a measurement period exceeds the highest net asset value as of the end of the earlier measurement period for which we earned incentive income. Our incentive allocations, in some cases, are subject to performance hurdles.
Investment performance of our own capital.  We invest our own capital and the performance of such invested capital affects our revenues. As of January 1, 2014, we had investments of approximately $102.4 million, $178.4 million, and

26


$9.4 million in the Enterprise Fund (an entity which invests its capital in Ramius Enterprise Master Fund Ltd), Cowen Overseas Investment LP (“COIL”), and other investments, respectively. Enterprise Fund is a fund vehicle that currently has external investors, is closed to new investors and is in liquidation. COIL is a wholly owned entity managed by Ramius which the Company uses solely for the firm's invested capital.
Our broker-dealer business and results of operations are impacted by the following factors:
Underwriting, private placement and strategic/financial advisory fees.  Our revenues from investment banking are directly linked to the underwriting fees we earn in equity and debt securities offerings in which the Company acts as an underwriter, private placement fees earned in non-underwritten transactions, sales commissions earned in at-the-market offerings and success fees earned in connection with advising both buyers and sellers, principally in mergers and acquisitions. As a result, the future performance of our investment banking business will depend on, among other things, our ability to secure lead manager and co-manager roles in clients capital raising transactions as well as our ability to secure mandates as a client's strategic financial advisor.
Commissions.  Our commission revenues depend for the most part on our customer trading volumes.
Principal transactions. Principal transactions revenue includes net trading gains and losses from the Company's market-making activities and net trading gains and losses on inventory and other firm positions. Commissions associated with these transactions are also included herein. In certain cases, the Company provides liquidity to clients buying or selling blocks of shares of listed stocks without previously identifying the other side of the trade at execution, which subjects the Company to market risk.
Equity research fees.  Equity research fees are paid to the Company for providing equity research. The Company also permits institutional customers to allocate a portion of their commissions to pay for research products and other services provided by third parties. Our ability to generate revenues relating to our equity research depends on the quality of our research and its relevance to our institutional customers and other clients.
External Factors Impacting Our Business
Our financial performance is highly dependent on the environment in which our businesses operate. A favorable business environment is characterized by many factors, including a stable geopolitical climate, transparent financial markets, low inflation, low interest rates, low unemployment, strong business profitability and high business and investor confidence. Unfavorable or uncertain economic or market conditions can be caused by declines in economic growth, business activity or investor or business confidence, limitations on the availability (or increases in the cost of) credit and capital, increases in inflation or interest rates, exchange rate volatility, unfavorable global asset allocation trends, outbreaks of hostilities or other geopolitical instability, corporate, political or other scandals that reduce investor confidence in the capital markets, or a combination of these or other factors. Our businesses and profitability have been and may continue to be adversely affected by market conditions in many ways, including the following:
Our alternative investment business was affected by the conditions impacting the global financial markets and the hedge fund industry during 2008, which was characterized by substantial declines in investment performance and unanticipated levels of requested redemptions. While the environment for investing in alternative investment products has since improved, the variability of redemptions could continue to affect our alternative investment business, and it is possible that we could intermittently experience redemptions above historical levels, regardless of fund performance.
Our broker-dealer business has been, and may continue to be, adversely affected by market conditions. Increased competition continues to affect our investment banking and capital markets businesses. The same factors also affect trading volumes in secondary financial markets, which affect our brokerage business. Commission rates, market volatility, increased competition from larger financial firms and other factors also affect our brokerage revenues and may cause these revenues to vary from period to period.
Our broker-dealer business focuses primarily on small to mid-capitalization and private companies in specific industry sectors. These sectors may experience growth or downturns independent of general economic and market conditions, or may face market conditions that are disproportionately better or worse than those impacting the economy and markets generally. In addition, increased government regulation has had, and may continue to have, a disproportionate effect on capital formation by smaller companies. Therefore, our broker-dealer business could be affected differently than overall market trends.
Our businesses, by their nature, do not produce predictable earnings. Our results in any period can be materially affected by conditions in global financial markets and economic conditions generally. We are also subject to various legal and regulatory actions that impact our business and financial results.

27


Basis of presentation
The Company's consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America ("US GAAP") as promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") through Accounting Standards Codification as the source of authoritative accounting principles in the preparation of financial statements, of the Company appearing in Part IV of this Form 10-K include the accounts of the Company, its subsidiaries, and entities in which the Company has a controlling financial interest or a substantive, controlling general partner interest. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation. Certain fund entities that are consolidated in the consolidated financial statements, are not subject to these consolidation provisions with respect to their own investments pursuant to their specialized accounting.
The Company serves as the managing member/general partner and/or investment manager to affiliated fund entities which it sponsors and manages. Certain of these funds in which the Company has a substantive, controlling general partner interest are consolidated with the Company pursuant to US GAAP as described below (the “Consolidated Funds”). Consequently, the Company's consolidated financial statements reflect the assets, liabilities, income and expenses of these funds on a gross basis. The ownership interests in these funds which are not owned by the Company are reflected as redeemable non-controlling interests in consolidated subsidiaries in the consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Form 10-K. The management fees and incentive income earned by the Company from these funds are eliminated in consolidation.
Acquisitions
The June 2011 acquisition of LaBranche was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with US GAAP. In this case, the acquisition was accounted for as an acquisition by Cowen of LaBranche. As such, results of operations for LaBranche are included in the accompanying statements of operations since the date of acquisition, and the assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at their estimated fair values. During the fourth quarter of 2011, the Company decided to discontinue the market making business operated by the subsidiaries acquired through the LaBranche acquisition, as a result of the subsidiaries not meeting the Company's expectations as to their results of operations and not generating positive cash flows. In accordance with US GAAP, the Company reclassified and reported the results of operations related to these subsidiaries in discontinued operations for the year ended December 31, 2011.
On November 1, 2012, the Company completed the acquisition of KDC Securities, LP (“KDC”), a securities lending business. KDC was the broker-dealer subsidiary of Kellner Capital, LLC, an alternative investment manager. KDC was renamed Cowen Equity Finance LP (“Cowen Equity Finance”) following the acquisition. On April 5, 2012, the Company completed its acquisition of all the outstanding interests in ATM USA, LLC ("ATM USA"), Algorithmic Trading Management, LLC ("ATM LLC") and Algo Trading Management Inc. ("ATM INC"), a provider of global, multi-asset class algorithmic execution trading models. The results of operations for the ATM Group and Cowen Equity Finance LP are included in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations since the dates of the respective acquisitions, and the assets acquired, liabilities assumed and the resulting goodwill were recorded at their fair values within their respective line items on the accompanying consolidated statement of financial condition.
The March 11, 2013 acquisition of Dahlman, subsequently renamed to Cowen Securities LLC ("Cowen Securities"), was accounted for under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with US GAAP. As such, results of operations for Cowen Securities are included in the accompanying statements of operations since the date of acquisition, and the assets acquired and liabilities assumed and the resulting goodwill were recorded at their estimated fair values.
During the fourth quarter of 2013, the Company finalized its purchase price allocation with insignificant adjustments to the recognized amounts on the consolidated statements of financial condition. The purchase price allocation of Cowen Securities is based upon all information available to us at the present time, and is based upon management's estimates of the fair values using valuation techniques including income, cost and market approaches.
Revenue recognition
Our principal sources of revenue are derived from two segments: an alternative investment segment and a broker-dealer segment, as more fully described below.
Our alternative investment segment generates revenue through two principal sources: management fees and incentive income.
Our broker-dealer segment generates revenue through two principal sources: investment banking and brokerage.


28


Management fees
The Company earns management fees from affiliated funds and certain managed accounts that it serves as the investment manager based on assets under management. The actual management fees received vary depending on distribution fees or fee splits paid to third parties either in connection with raising the assets or structuring the investment.
Management fees are generally paid on a quarterly basis at the beginning of each quarter in arrears and are prorated for capital inflows and redemptions. While some investors may have separately negotiated fees, in general the management fees are as follows:
Hedge Funds. Management fees for the Company's hedge funds are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 2% of assets under management. Management fees are generally calculated monthly based on assets under management at the end of each month before incentive income.
Mutual Funds. Management fees for the Company’s mutual funds (Ramius Trading Strategies Managed Futures Fund, Ramius Event Driven Equity Fund, Ramius Dynamic Replication Fund and Ramius Strategic Volatility Fund) are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 1.60% of assets under management (subject to an overall expense cap of up to 2%).
Alternative Solutions. Management fees for the Alternative Solutions business are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 2% of assets under management. Management fees are generally calculated monthly based on assets under management at the end of each month before incentive income or based on assets under management at the beginning of the month. Management fees earned from the Alternative Solutions business are based and initially calculated on estimated net asset values and actual fees ultimately earned could be impacted to the extent of any changes in these estimates.
Real Estate. Management fees from the Company's real estate business are generally charged by their general partners at an annual rate from 0.75% to 1.50% of total capital commitments during the investment period and of invested capital or net asset value of the applicable fund after the investment period has ended. Management fees are typically paid to the general partners on a quarterly basis, at the beginning of the quarter in arrears, and are prorated for changes in capital commitments throughout the investment period and invested capital after the investment period. The general partners of the funds on the RCG Longview platform are owned jointly by the Company and third parties. Accordingly, the management fees (in addition to incentive income and investment income) generated by these real estate funds are split between the Company and the other general partners. Pursuant to US GAAP, these fees and other income received by the general partners that are accounted for under the equity method of accounting and are reflected under net gains (losses) on securities, derivatives and other investments in the consolidated statements of operations.
HealthCare Royalty Partners. During the investment period (as defined in the management agreement of the HealthCare Royalty Partners funds), management fees for the funds advised by HealthCare Royalty Partners are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 2% of committed capital. After the investment period, management fees are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 2% of net asset value. Management fees for the HealthCare Royalty Partners funds are calculated on a quarterly basis. Accordingly, the management fees (in addition to incentive income and investment income) generated by these real estate funds are split between the Company and the other general partners. Pursuant to US GAAP, these fees and other income received by the general partners that are accounted for under the equity method of accounting and are reflected under net gains (losses) on securities, derivatives and other investments in the consolidated statements of operations.
Ramius Trading Strategies. Management fees and platform fees for the Company's private commodity trading advisory business are generally charged at an annual rate of up to 1%. Management and platform fees are generally calculated monthly based on assets under management at the end of each month.
Incentive income
The Company earns incentive income based on net profits (as defined in the respective investment management agreements) with respect to certain of the Company's funds and managed accounts, allocable for each fiscal year that exceeds cumulative unrecovered net losses, if any, that have been carried forward from prior years. For the products we offer, incentive income earned is typically up to 20% for hedge funds and up to 10% for alternative solutions products (in certain cases on performance in excess of a benchmark), of the net profits earned for the full year that are attributable to each fee-paying investor. Generally, incentive income on real estate funds is earned after the investor has received a full return of their invested capital, plus a preferred return. However, for certain real estate funds, the Company is entitled to receive incentive fees earlier, provided that the investors have received their preferred return on a current basis. These funds are subject to a potential clawback of these incentive fees upon the liquidation of the fund if the investor has not received a full return of its invested

29


capital plus the preferred return thereon. Incentive income in the HealthCare Royalty Partners funds is earned only after investors receive a full return of their capital plus a preferred return.
In periods following a period of a net loss attributable to an investor, the Company generally does not earn incentive income on any future profits attributable to that investor until the accumulated net loss from prior periods is recovered, an arrangement commonly referred to as a “high-water mark.” The Company has elected to record incentive income revenue in accordance with “Method 2” of US GAAP. Under Method 2, the incentive income from the Company's funds and managed accounts for any period is based upon the net profits of those funds and managed accounts at the reporting date. Any incentive income recognized in the consolidated statement of operations may be subject to future reversal based on subsequent negative performance prior to the conclusion of the fiscal year, when all contingencies have been resolved.
Carried interest in the real estate funds is subject to clawback to the extent that the carried interest actually distributed to date exceeds the amount due to the Company based on cumulative results. As such, the accrual for potential repayment of previously received carried interest, which is a component of accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities, represents all amounts previously distributed to the Company, less an assumed tax liability, that would need to be repaid to certain real estate funds if these funds were to be liquidated based on the current fair value of the underlying funds' investments as of the reporting date. The actual clawback liability does not become realized until the end of a fund's life.
Investment Banking
The Company earns investment banking revenue primarily from fees associated with public and private capital raising transactions and providing strategic advisory services. Investment banking revenues are derived primarily from small and mid-capitalization companies within the Company's Target Sectors.     
Investment banking revenue consists of underwriting fees, strategic/financial advisory fees and placement and sales agent fees.    
Underwriting fees. The Company earns underwriting revenues in securities offerings in which the Company acts as an underwriter, such as initial public offerings, follow-on equity offerings, debt offerings, and convertible security offerings. Underwriting revenues include management fees, selling concessions and underwriting fees. Fee revenue relating to underwriting commitments is recorded when all significant items relating to the underwriting process have been completed and the amount of the underwriting revenue has been determined. This generally is the point at which all of the following have occurred: (i) the issuer's registration statement has become effective with the SEC, or the other offering documents are finalized; (ii) the Company has made a firm commitment for the purchase of securities from the issuer; and (iii) the Company has been informed of the number of securities that it has been allotted.
When the Company is not the lead manager for an underwriting transaction, management must estimate the Company's share of transaction-related expenses incurred by the lead manager in order to recognize revenue. Transaction-related expenses are deducted from the underwriting fee and therefore reduce the revenue the Company recognizes as co-manager. Such amounts are adjusted to reflect actual expenses in the period in which the Company receives the final settlement, typically within 90 days following the closing of the transaction.
Strategic/financial advisory fees.  The Company's strategic advisory revenues include success fees earned in connection with advising companies, principally in mergers and acquisitions and liability management transactions. The Company also earns fees for related advisory work such as providing fairness opinions. The Company records strategic advisory revenues when the services for the transactions are completed under the terms of each assignment or engagement and collection is reasonably assured. Expenses associated with such transactions are deferred until the related revenue is recognized or the engagement is otherwise concluded.
Placement and sales agent fees. The Company earns agency placement fees and sales agent commissions in non-underwritten transactions such as private placements of debt and equity securities, including, private investment in public equity transactions (“PIPEs”), and as sales agent in at-the-market offerings of equity securities. The Company records placement revenues when the services for the transactions are completed under the terms of each assignment or engagement and collection is reasonably assured. The Company records sales agent commissions on a trade date basis. Expenses associated with such transactions are deferred until the related revenue is recognized or the engagement is otherwise concluded.
Brokerage
Brokerage revenue consists of commissions, principal transactions, net and equity research fees.
Commissions. Commission revenue includes fees from executing client transactions. These fees are recognized on a trade date basis. The Company permits institutional customers to allocate a portion of their commissions to pay for research products and other services provided by third parties. The amounts allocated for those purposes are

30


commonly referred to as soft dollar arrangements. Commissions on soft dollar brokerage are recorded net of the related expenditures on an accrual basis. Commission revenues also includes fees from making algorithms available to clients. During the years ended December, 2013, 2012, and 2011, the Company earned $79.7 million, $63.0 million and $66.0 million of revenues from commissions, respectively.
Principal Transactions. Principal transaction, net revenue includes net trading gains and losses from the Company's market-making activities in over-the-counter equity securities, trading of convertible securities, and trading gains and losses on inventory and other firm positions, which include warrants previously received as part of investment banking transactions. Commissions associated with these transactions are also included herein. In certain cases, the Company provides liquidity to clients buying or selling blocks of shares of listed stocks without previously identifying the other side of the trade at execution, which subjects the Company to market risk. These positions are typically held for a very short duration. During the years ended December, 2013, 2012, and 2011, the Company earned $28.1 million, $22.5 million and $27.1 million of revenues from principal transactions, net, respectively.
Equity Research Fees. Equity research fees are paid to the Company for providing equity research. Revenue is recognized once an arrangement exists, access to research has been provided, the fee amount is fixed or determinable, and collection is reasonably assured. During the years ended December, 2013, 2012, and 2011, the Company earned $6.8 million, $5.7 million and $6.5 million of revenues from equity research fees, respectively.
Interest and dividends
Interest and dividends are earned by the Company from various sources. The Company receives interest and dividends primarily from investments held by its Consolidated Funds and its brokerage balances from invested capital and securities lending business. Interest is recognized on an accrual basis and interest income is recognized on the debt of those issuers that is deemed collectible. Interest income and expense includes premiums and discounts amortized and accreted on debt investments based on criteria determined by the Company using the effective yield method, which assumes the reinvestment of all interest payments. Dividends are recognized on the ex-dividend date.
Reimbursement from affiliates     
The Company allocates, at its discretion, certain expenses incurred on behalf of its hedge fund, fund of funds and real estate businesses. These expenses relate to the administration of such subsidiaries and assets that the Company manages for its funds. In addition, pursuant to the funds' offering documents, the Company charges certain allowable expenses to the funds, including charges and personnel costs for legal, compliance, accounting, tax compliance, risk and technology expenses that directly relate to administering the assets of the funds. Such expenses that have been reimbursed at their actual costs are included in the consolidated statements of operations as employee compensation and benefits, professional, advisory and other fees, communications, occupancy and equipment, client services and business development and other.
Expenses
The Company's expenses consist of compensation and benefits, interest expense and general, administrative and other expenses.
Compensation and Benefits.  Compensation and benefits is comprised of salaries, benefits, discretionary cash bonuses and equity-based compensation. Annual incentive compensation is variable, and the amount paid is generally based on a combination of employees' performance, their contribution to their business segment, and the Company's performance. Generally, compensation and benefits comprise a significant portion of total expenses, with annual incentive compensation comprising a significant portion of total compensation and benefits expenses.
Interest and Dividends.  Interest and dividend expense relates primarily to trading activity with respect to the Company's investments.
General, Administrative and Other.  General, administrative and other expenses are primarily related to professional services, occupancy and equipment, business development expenses, communications, insurance and other miscellaneous expenses. These expenses may also include certain one-time charges and non-cash expenses.
Consolidated Funds Expenses.  Certain funds are consolidated by the Company pursuant to US GAAP. As such, the Company's consolidated financial statements reflect the expenses of these consolidated entities and the portion attributable to other investors is allocated to a redeemable non-controlling interest.
Income Taxes
The taxable results of the Company’s U.S. operations are subject to U.S. federal, state and city taxation as a corporation. The Company is also subject to foreign taxation on income it generates in certain countries.
    

31


The Company records deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax benefit or expense that will result from differences between the carrying value of its assets for income tax purposes and for financial reporting purposes, as well as for operating or capital loss and tax credit carryovers. A valuation allowance is recorded to bring the net deferred tax assets to a level that, in management’s view, is more likely than not to be realized in the foreseeable future. This level will be estimated based on a number of factors, especially the amount of net deferred tax assets of the Company that are actually expected to be realized, for tax purposes, in the foreseeable future. As of December 31, 2013, the Company recorded a valuation allowance against substantially all of its net deferred tax assets.
Redeemable Non-controlling Interests
Redeemable non-controlling interests represent the pro rata share of the income or loss of the non-wholly owned consolidated entities attributable to the other owners of such entities. Due to the fact that the non-controlling interests are redeemable at the option of the holder they have been classified as temporary equity.
Assets Under Management and Fund Performance
Assets Under Management
Assets under management refer to all of our alternative investment products, solutions and services including hedge funds, replication products, mutual funds, managed futures funds, fund of funds, real estate and healthcare royalty funds. Assets under management also include the fair value of assets we manage pursuant to separately managed accounts, collateralized debt obligations for which we are the collateral manager, and, as indicated in the footnotes to the table below, proprietary assets which the Company has invested in these products. Also, as indicated, assets under management for certain products represent committed capital and certain products where the Company owns a portion of the general partners.
As of January 1, 2014, the Company had assets under management of $9.4 billion, an 16.8% increase as compared to assets under management of $8.1 billion as of January 1, 2013. The $1.4 billion increase in assets under management during the year ended 2013 primarily resulted from $0.7 billion in our alternative solutions product, $0.2 billion related to our real estate products and $0.5 billion related to our hedge fund products.
The following table is a breakout of total assets under management by platform as of January 1, 2014 (which excludes cross investments from other Ramius platforms):
 
 
Platform
 
 
Hedge Funds (a) (b) (j)
 
Alternative Solutions (a) (c) (k)
 
Ramius Trading Strategies (d) (l)
 
Real Estate (a) (m)
 
Healthcare Royalty Partners (e) (f) (n)
 
Other (g) (o)
 
Total
 
 
(dollars in millions)
January 1, 2011
 
$
1,385

 
$
2,792

 
$
82

 
$
1,628

 
$
1,041

 
$
2,114

 
$
9,042

Subscriptions
 
714

 
1,321

 
194

 

 
432

 
3,121

 
5,782

Redemptions
 
(221
)
 
(1,265
)
 

 

 

 
(2,996
)
 
(4,482
)
Performance (h)
 
39

 
(98
)
 
(14
)
 

 

 
(4
)
 
(77
)
Net Return (i)
 
2.82
%
 
(3.51
)%
 
(17.07
)%
 
%
 
%
 
(0.19
)%
 
(0.85
)%
January 1, 2012
 
1,917

 
2,750

 
262

 
1,628

 
1,473

 
2,235

 
10,265

Subscriptions
 
392

 
1,407

 

 

 

 
3,163

 
4,962

Redemptions
 
(333
)
 
(1,777
)
 
(111
)
 
(95
)
 

 
(5,293
)
 
(7,609
)
Performance (h)
 
373

 
85

 
(5
)
 

 

 

 
453

Net Return (i)
 
19.46
%
 
3.09
 %
 
(1.91
)%
 
%
 
%
 
 %
 
4.41
 %
January 1, 2013
 
2,349

 
2,465

 
146

 
1,533

 
1,473

 
105

 
8,071

Subscriptions
 
819

 
1,450

 

 
222

 
50

 

 
2,541

Redemptions
 
(368
)
 
(792
)
 
(53
)
 
(116
)
 

 
(38
)
 
(1,367
)
Performance (h)
 
368

 
(187
)
 
1

 

 

 

 
182

Net Return (i)
 
15.67
%
 
(7.59
)%
 
0.68
 %
 
%
 
%
 
 %
 
2.25
 %
January 1, 2014
 
$
3,168

 
$
2,936

 
$
94

 
$
1,639

 
$
1,523

 
$
67

 
$
9,427



32


(a)
The Company owns between 30% and 55% of the general partners or managing members of the real estate business, the activist business, the long/short credit business (as of July 2013) (the single strategy hedge funds) and the alternative solutions business (as of September 2013).
(b)
These amounts include the Ramius Event Driven Equity Fund and the Company's invested capital of approximately $155.6 million, $147.3 million and $149.2 million as of January 1, 2014, January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2012, respectively.
(c)
These amounts include the Company's invested capital of approximately $2.5 million and $5.2 million as of January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2012, respectively. There are no amounts related to the Company's invested capital as of January 1, 2014.
(d)
These amounts include Ramius Trading Strategies Managed Futures Fund and the Company's invested capital of approximately $19.4 million as of January 1, 2013. RTS Global 3X was liquidated on March 31, 2013, therefore, the notional amount of the Company's investment in RTS Global 3X Fund LP is only included in the Company's assets under management as of January 1, 2013 and prior years.
(e)
These amounts include the Company's invested capital of approximately $16.4 million, $16.0 million and $8.6 million as of January 1, 2014, January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2012, respectively.
(f)
This amount reflects committed capital.
(g)
The Company's cash management services business provided clients with investment guidelines for managing cash and established investment programs for managing their cash in separately managed accounts.  Given the current focus of the Company's alternative investment business and the areas where the Company believes it can achieve long term growth, as of November 1, 2012, the Company no longer offered cash management services and arranged for the transfer of the remaining assets under management related to such business to another asset manager.  This transfer was completed in December 2012. The Company continues to provide mortgage advisory services where the Company manages collateralized debt obligations held by investors.
(h)
Performance and net returns are net of all management and incentive fees and includes the effect of any foreign exchange translation adjustments and leverage in certain funds.
(i)
Net returns are calculated on the platform as a whole. Net return of individual funds will vary based on the timing and strategy the respective funds.
(j)
The Company’s actively marketed hedge fund products have varying liquidity terms typically ranging from daily to quarterly liquidity. In 2010, the Company suspended redemption rights with respect to certain hedge funds that are being wound down. The hedge funds that have suspended redemption rights represent approximately 14.4% of the total hedge fund assets under management.
(k)
The Company’s actively marketed alternative solutions products have varying liquidity terms typically ranging from daily to quarterly liquidity. Since 2008, the Company has suspended redemption rights for a number of funds that are being wound down. The alternative solutions funds that have suspended redemption rights represent approximately 1.5% of the total alternative solutions assets under management.
(l)
The Ramius Trading Strategies products offer investors daily liquidity.
(m)
The real estate business does not provide investors with redemption rights. Investors receive distributions upon realization of the real estate investments.
(n)
The Healthcare Royalty funds do not provide investors with redemption rights. Investors receive distributions upon realizations of the funds’ investments.
(o)
The collateralized debt obligations managed by the Company is an amortizing pool of assets with cash returned to investors in periodic distributions as it becomes available.
Fund Performance
The fourth quarter brought a strong finish to the year for U.S. equities as well as selected other global stock markets. There was a temporary halt of momentum when investors digested the Fed’s announcement of expected “tapering” of monthly bond purchases through a $10 billion reduction from the previous target of $85 billion per month. This was accompanied, however, by a reassurance that short term rates would be kept at low levels, even beyond the point where unemployment reached 6.5%. The fact that Congress reached a budget agreement also helped maintain positive market sentiment.


33


The S&P 500 rose 10.50% for the quarter to finish the year up 32.37%. The Russell 2000 gained 9.27% for the quarter and 41.37% for 2013. The Euro Stoxx 600 Index had its best year in the last five, appreciating 21.56%. In Japan, Prime Minister Abe’s policies and other factors help to drive the Nikkei up 59.28% for the year. In contrast, China had a challenging year as the Shanghai Composite lost 3.88%. U.S. equity market volatility remained depressed, with the VIX Index collapsing another 31% in 2013.
As expected, the Fed’s comments and intentions began to move interest rates upward, as the 10 year U.S. Treasury saw its yield rise from a second quarter low of 1.61% to close the year at 3.03%. Investors in corporate bonds were highly active, both at the retail and institutional level. While all bond-related mutual funds had withdrawals of $65.0 billion, there remained sufficient institutional buying power to allow for $361 billion of high yield issuance, and $1.11 trillion of investment grade issuance, both record figures are according to Dealogic. However, bonds did not perform as well as equities in general in 2013, with the S&P IG Bond Index declining 1.44% for year, the Barclay’s Aggregate Index declining 2.02% and the Merrill Lynch High Yield II Index increasing 7.40%.
While isolated commodities gained ground, the sector overall remained under pressure, with the Dow Jones UBS Commodity Index declining 9.58% for the year. More dramatically, gold declined 28% in 2013, after a record quarterly loss of more than 23% during the second quarter.
The Company's hedge fund vehicles had positive results across the board, including long /short corporate credit, activist and merger arbitrage. Despite its hedges and short positions, the credit fund's  performance for 2013 was slightly ahead of the Merrill Lynch High Yield II Index. The activist strategy lagged the Russell 2000 for the year, but its long term results continue to outperform the index. Year to year returns can vary over time due to the idiosyncratic nature of the fund's strategy as well as its selective hedging positions. The internally managed multi-strategy funds maintained their focus on capital preservation, while executing opportunistic transactions linked to certain assets in order to make distributions to investors. The new merger arbitrage strategy substantially exceeded the benchmark HFRX Merger Arbitrage Index during the year as well.
The more liquid alternative mutual funds (offering hedge fund exposures, multi-manager managed futures access and a long volatility strategy) had varying results for the year. Hedge fund replication was positive but lagged a representative, investable hedge fund index, which has a higher equity-related component. The managed futures fund gained ground in an environment that continues to challenge the asset class and outpaced its benchmark CTA index for the year. Consistent with the sharp deterioration in equity market volatility, the strategic volatility fund also substantially declined, but slightly less than its benchmark.
In terms of longer-dated investment vehicles, the Longview real estate debt funds were marginally positive for the year. After a strong fourth quarter, the primary real estate equity fund was also marginally higher for 2013. Both debt and equity real estate funds reflect valuations that have recovered sharply from the lows of 2009.  In another longer-term alternative asset class, our health care royalty fund continues to steadily add new investments while exceeding expectations on capital distributions to investors.
Invested Capital
The Company invests a significant portion of its capital base to help drive results and facilitate the growth of its alternative investment and broker/dealer businesses. Management allocates capital to three primary investment categories: (i) trading strategies; (ii) merchant banking investments; and (iii) real estate investments. The Company seeks to make strategic and opportunistic investments in varying capital structures across a diverse array of businesses, hedge funds and mutual funds. Much of the Company's trading strategy portfolio is invested along side the Company's alternative investment clients and includes liquid investment strategies such as corporate credit trading, event driven, macro trading, and enhanced cash management. Within its merchant banking investments, management generally takes a long-term view that typically involves investing directly in public and private companies globally, private equity funds and along side its alternative investment clients. The Company's real estate investment strategy focuses on making investments along side the alternative investment clients invested in the RCG Longview funds, as well as in direct investments in commercial real estate projects.
As of December 31, 2013, the Company's invested capital amounted to a net value of $427.6 million (supporting a long market value of $532.9 million), representing approximately 84% of Cowen Group's stockholders' equity presented in accordance with US GAAP. The table below presents the Company's invested equity capital by strategy and as a percentage of Cowen Group's stockholders' equity as of December 31, 2013. The net values presented in the table below do not tie to Cowen Group's consolidated statement of financial condition as of December 31, 2013 because they are included in various line items of the consolidated statement of financial condition, including “securities owned, at fair value”, “other investments”, “cash and cash equivalents”, and “consolidated funds-securities owned, at fair value”.

34


Strategy
Net Value
 
% of Stockholders' Equity
 
(dollars in millions)
 
 
Trading
$
263.4

 
52%
Merchant Banking
104.1

 
21%
Real Estate
60.1

 
12%
Total
427.6

 
84%
Stockholders' Equity
$
507.8

 
100%
The allocations shown in the table above will change over time.
Results of Operations
To provide comparative information of the Company's operating results for the periods presented, a discussion of Economic Income (Loss) of our alternative investment and broker-dealer segments follows the discussion of our total consolidated US GAAP results. Economic Income (Loss) reflects, on a consistent basis for all periods presented in the Company's consolidated financial statements, income earned from the Company's funds and managed accounts and from its own invested capital. Economic Income (Loss) excludes certain adjustments required under US GAAP. See the section titled “Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of the Company-Segment Analysis and Economic Income (Loss),” and Note 24 to the Company's consolidated financial statements, appearing elsewhere in this Form 10-K, for a reconciliation of Economic Income (Loss) to total Company US GAAP net income (loss).
Year Ended December 31, 2013 Compared with Year Ended Ended December 31, 2012
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Period to Period
 
2013
 
2012
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment banking
$
105,333

 
$
71,762

 
$
33,571

 
47
 %
Brokerage
114,593

 
91,167

 
23,426

 
26
 %
Management fees
37,303

 
38,116

 
(813
)
 
(2
)%
Incentive income
12,586

 
5,411

 
7,175

 
133
 %
Interest and dividends
39,454

 
24,608

 
14,846

 
60
 %
Reimbursement from affiliates
9,161

 
5,239

 
3,922

 
75
 %
Other revenues
5,418

 
3,668

 
1,750

 
48
 %
Consolidated Funds revenues
3,398

 
509

 
2,889

 
568
 %
Total revenues
327,246

 
240,480

 
86,766

 
36
 %
Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee compensation and benefits
207,248

 
194,034

 
13,214

 
7
 %
Interest and dividends
27,299

 
12,137

 
15,162

 
125
 %
General, administrative and other expenses
124,331

 
119,053

 
5,278

 
4
 %
Consolidated Funds expenses
2,039

 
1,676

 
363

 
22
 %
Total expenses
360,917

 
326,900

 
34,017

 
10
 %
Other income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net gain (loss) on securities, derivatives and other investments
40,924

 
55,665

 
(14,741
)
 
(26
)%
Consolidated Funds net gains (losses)
11,044

 
7,246

 
3,798

 
52
 %
Total other income (loss)
51,968

 
62,911

 
(10,943
)
 
(17
)%
Income (loss) before income taxes
18,297

 
(23,509
)
 
41,806

 
(178
)%
Income taxes expense (benefit)
457

 
448

 
9

 
2
 %
Net income (loss)
17,840

 
(23,957
)
 
41,797

 
(174
)%
Income (loss) attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests in consolidated subsidiaries and funds
13,193

 
(72
)
 
13,265

 
(18,424
)%
Net income (loss) attributable to Cowen Group, Inc. stockholders
$
4,647

 
$
(23,885
)
 
$
28,532

 
(119
)%




35


Revenues
Investment Banking
Investment banking revenues increased $33.5 million to $105.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $71.8 million in 2012. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the Company completed 78 underwriting transactions, seven strategic advisory transactions and 17 debt capital market transactions. During the year ended December 31, 2012, the Company completed 56 underwriting transactions, six strategic advisory transactions and 12 debt capital market transactions.
Brokerage
Brokerage revenues increased $23.4 million to $114.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $91.2 million in 2012. This was attributable to higher commissions due to an increase in customer trading volume (even though there was an industry wide decline in volume), which was partially related to an increase in stocks covered due to the Company's acquisition of Dahlman (subsequently renamed to Cowen Securities) during the first quarter of 2013, fees related to the Company's acquisition of ATM in the second quarter of 2012 and equity finance revenues related to the acquisition of KDC Securities (subsequently renamed to Cowen Equity Finance) in November 2012. Customer trading volumes across the industry (according to Bloomberg) decreased 5% in the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year.
Management Fees
Management fees decreased $0.8 million to $37.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $38.1 million in 2012.
Incentive Income
Incentive income increased $7.2 million to $12.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared with $5.4 million in 2012. This increase was primarily related to an increase in performance fees from certain alternative solutions products and our credit fund.
Interest and Dividends
Interest and dividends increased $14.9 million to $39.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $24.6 million in 2012. This was primarily attributable to the activity in our stock loan business which began in the fourth quarter of 2012.
Reimbursements from Affiliates
Reimbursements from affiliates increased $4.0 million to $9.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $5.2 million in 2012.
Other Revenues
Other revenues increased $1.7 million to $5.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $3.7 million in 2012.
Consolidated Funds Revenues
Consolidated Funds revenues increased $2.9 million to $3.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $0.5 million in 2012.
Expenses
Employee Compensation and Benefits
Employee compensation and benefits expenses increased $13.2 million to $207.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $194.0 million in 2012. The increase is primarily due to $86.8 million higher revenues during 2013 as compared to 2012 and thus resulting in a higher compensation and benefits accrual to remain consistent with the Company's compensation to revenue ratio. The increase is also related to an increase in headcount due to the acquisition of Dahlman Rose (subsequently renamed to Cowen Securities) in the first quarter of 2013. The compensation to revenue ratio, based on total revenues only, was 63% for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared with 81% in 2012. The decrease in the compensation to revenue ratio resulted from a 36% increase in total revenues from the prior year and an increase in non-controlling interest to partners in certain businesses. The increase in non-controlling interests is due to two business restructurings, during 2013, where certain amounts that were in compensation in prior years are now shown as non-controlling interests. The compensation to revenue ratio, including other income (loss), was 55% for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared with 64% in 2012. Average headcount increased by 7.2% for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year.

36


Interest and Dividends
Interest and dividends expense increased $15.2 million to $27.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $12.1 million in 2012. Interest and dividends expense relates to trading activity with respect to the Company's investments and activity in our stock loan business which began in the fourth quarter of 2012.
General, Administrative and Other Expenses
General, administrative and other expenses increased $5.2 million to $124.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $119.1 million in 2012. This was primarily due to increased communications and floor brokerage and trade execution costs due to
two acquisitions completed during second and fourth quarter of 2012 and one in the first quarter of 2013
which
required additional market data services and
generated increased trading costs.
Marketing and business development expenses have increased due to increased marketing activity firm wide.
Occupancy and depreciation and amortization costs increased due to the Dahlman Rose (renamed to Cowen
Securities) acquisition completed during the first quarter of 2013.
Consolidated Funds Expenses
Consolidated Funds expenses increased $0.3 million to $2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $1.7 million in 2012.
Other Income (Loss)
Other income (loss) decreased $10.9 million to $52.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $62.9 million in 2012. The increase primarily relates to an increase in the Company's own invested capital driven by increases in performance in certain investment strategies including our credit and equities strategies. The gains and losses shown under Consolidated Funds reflect the consolidated total performance for such funds, and the portion of those gains or losses that are attributable to other investors is allocated to redeemable non-controlling interests.
Income Taxes
Income tax expense increased $0.1 million to $0.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with $0.4 million in 2012.
Income (Loss) Attributable to Redeemable Non-controlling Interests
Income (loss) attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests increased by $13.3 million to an income of $13.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared with a loss of $0.1 million in 2012. The period over period change was primarily from the result of an extension of the partnership agreement relating to our credit business (subsequently renamed Orchard Square Partners) and our alternative solutions business which resulted in a profit split and therefore more allocations of income to non-controlling interest holders.












37


Year Ended December 31, 2012 Compared with the Year Ended December 31, 2011
Consolidated Statements of Operations
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Period to Period
 
2012
 
2011
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment banking
$
71,762

 
$
50,976

 
$
20,786

 
41
 %
Brokerage
91,167

 
99,611

 
(8,444
)
 
(8
)%
Management fees
38,116

 
52,466

 
(14,350
)
 
(27
)%
Incentive income
5,411

 
3,265

 
2,146

 
66
 %
Interest and dividends
24,608

 
22,306

 
2,302

 
10
 %
Reimbursement from affiliates
5,239

 
4,322

 
917

 
21
 %
Other revenues
3,668

 
1,583

 
2,085

 
132
 %
Consolidated Funds revenues
509

 
749

 
(240
)
 
(32
)%
Total revenues
240,480

 
235,278

 
5,202

 
2
 %
Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Employee compensation and benefits
194,034

 
203,767

 
(9,733
)
 
(5
)%
Interest and dividends
12,137

 
9,234

 
2,903

 
31
 %
General, administrative and other expenses
119,053

 
152,721

 
(33,668
)
 
(22
)%
Goodwill impairment

 
7,151

 
(7,151
)
 
NM

Consolidated Funds expenses
1,676

 
2,782

 
(1,106
)
 
(40
)%
Total expenses
326,900

 
375,655

 
(48,755
)
 
(13
)%
Other income (loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net gain (loss) on securities, derivatives and other investments
55,665

 
15,128

 
40,537

 
268
 %
Bargain purchase gain

 
22,244

 
(22,244
)
 
NM

Consolidated Funds net gains (losses)
7,246

 
4,395

 
2,851

 
65
 %
Total other income (loss)
62,911

 
41,767

 
21,144

 
51
 %
Income (loss) before income taxes
(23,509
)
 
(98,610
)
 
75,101

 
(76
)%
Income taxes expense (benefit)
448

 
(20,073
)
 
20,521

 
(102
)%
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
(23,957
)
 
(78,537
)
 
54,580

 
(69
)%
Net income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax

 
(23,646
)
 
23,646

 
(100
)%
Net income (loss)
(23,957
)
 
(102,183
)
 
78,226

 
(77
)%
Income (loss) attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests in consolidated subsidiaries and funds
(72
)
 
5,827

 
(5,899
)
 
(101
)%
Net income (loss) attributable to Cowen Group, Inc. stockholders
$
(23,885
)
 
$
(108,010
)
 
$
84,125

 
(78
)%
Revenues
Investment Banking
Investment banking revenues increased $20.8 million to $71.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $51.0 million in 2011. During the year ended December 31, 2012, the Company completed 48 underwriting transactions, eight private capital raising transactions, six strategic advisory transactions and 12 debt capital market transactions. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company completed 29 underwriting transactions, eight private capital raising transactions, eight strategic advisory transactions and three debt capital market transactions.
Brokerage
Brokerage revenues decreased $8.4 million to $91.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $99.6 million in 2011. This was primarily attributable to lower commission revenues due to a reduction in customer trading volumes and a lower per share average commission. This decrease was partially offset by an increase in fees earned related to the Company's acquisition of ATM. Customer trading volumes across the industry (according to Bloomberg) decreased 24% in the twelve months ended December 31, 2012 compared to 2011.
Management Fees
Management fees decreased $14.4 million to $38.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $52.5 million in 2011. This was primarily attributable to a) our healthcare royalty funds, for which fees decreased in the current year

38


due to an increase in committed capital in the prior year that resulted in recognizing cumulative retrospective management fees and b) a reclassification of the management fees from the Value and Opportunity business, subsequent to the April 2011 restructuring, which is now recorded in other income (loss).  There was also an increase in management fees associated with our Global Credit fund.
Incentive Income
Incentive income increased $2.1 million to $5.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared with $3.3 million in 2011. This was primarily a result of an increase in performance fees earned on our Global Credit fund and a newer hybrid fund in our alternative solutions business. This was partially offset by a reclassification of the performance fees from the Value and Opportunity business, subsequent to the April 2011 restructuring, which is now recorded in other income (loss).
Interest and Dividends
Interest and dividends increased $2.3 million to $24.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $22.3 million in 2011. This was primarily attributable to a increase in the number of investments in interest bearing securities during 2012 as compared to 2011.
Reimbursements from Affiliates
Reimbursements from affiliates increased $0.9 million to $5.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $4.3 million in 2011.
Other Revenues
Other revenues increased $2.1 million to $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $1.6 million in 2011. This increase is primarily related to a sublease of facilities.
Consolidated Funds Revenues
Consolidated Funds revenues decreased $0.2 million to $0.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $0.7 million in 2011.
Expenses
Employee Compensation and Benefits
Employee compensation and benefits expenses decreased $9.8 million to $194.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $203.8 million in 2011. This was primarily attributable to lower variable compensation and severance expense partially offset by investments in new professionals. The compensation to revenue ratio, based on total revenues only, was 81% for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared with 87% in 2011. The decrease in the compensation to revenue ratio resulted from a 5% decrease in total compensation combined with a 2% increase in total revenues. The compensation to revenue ratio, including other income (loss), was 64% for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared with 74% in 2011. Average headcount remained constant for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to 2011.
Interest and Dividends
Interest and dividends expense increased $2.9 million to $12.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $9.2 million in 2011. Interest and dividends expense relates to trading activity with respect to the Company's investments and, in 2011, also related to the interest on our credit facility (which was fully repaid and terminated in June 2011).
General, Administrative and Other Expenses
General, administrative and other expenses decreased $33.6 million to $119.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $152.7 million in 2011. This was primarily due to:
professional fees incurred in the prior year for
syndication costs related to a capital raise by an alternative investment asset fund,
the LaBranche acquisition and Value and Opportunity business restructuring,
closing of acquisitions of Luxembourg reinsurance companies and
a decrease in service fees related to cost cutting efforts made in 2011 to reduce excess services.
These cost savings were partially offset by an expense reversal, during 2011 of an accrual pertaining to subordination agreements entered into by the general partners of two real estate funds with those funds lead investor.



39


Goodwill Impairment
The Company recorded a goodwill impairment charge of $7.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. In the fourth quarter of 2011, the Company conducted its annual goodwill impairment test and recognized non-cash impairment to the goodwill associated with the broker dealer segment.
Consolidated Funds Expenses
Consolidated Funds expenses decreased $1.1 million to $1.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $2.8 million in 2011.
Other Income (Loss)
Other income (loss) increased $21.1 million to $62.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with $41.8 million in 2011. The increase primarily relates to an increase in the Company's own invested capital driven by increases in performance in certain investment strategies including our activist, credit and event driven strategies and is partially offset by a $22.2 million bargain purchase gain, recorded in 2011, in relation to the acquisition of LaBranche. An increase in the Consolidated Funds' performance was mainly related to an increase in performance of RTS Global 3X Fund LP. The gains and losses shown under Consolidated Funds reflect the consolidated total performance for such funds, and the portion of those gains or losses that are attributable to other investors is allocated to redeemable non-controlling interests.
Income Taxes
Income tax expense increased $20.5 million to $0.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with an income tax benefit of $20.1 million in 2011. The Company's tax expense increased predominantly because, in 2011, a consolidated subsidiary of the Company acquired, as part of a reinsurance service program, Luxembourg reinsurance companies with deferred tax liabilities and recorded deferred tax benefits upon the acquisition of these reinsurance companies pursuant to an advance tax agreement.
Net Income (Loss) From Discontinued Operations, Net of Tax
As a result of the LaBranche subsidiaries not meeting the Company's expectations as to their results of operations and not generating positive cash flows, the Company's management decided, during the fourth quarter of 2011, to exit the business operated by these subsidiaries. In accordance with US GAAP, the Company reclassified and reported the results of operations related to these subsidiaries in discontinued operations for the year ended December 31, 2011.
Income (Loss) Attributable to Redeemable Non-controlling Interests
Income (loss) attributable to redeemable non-controlling interests decreased by $5.9 million to a loss of $0.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared with income of $5.8 million in 2011. The period over period change was the result of an overall decrease in performance of the entities with non-controlling interest and therefore less allocations of income to non-controlling interest holders.
Segment Analysis and Economic Income (Loss)
Segments
The Company conducts its operations through two segments: an alternative investment segment and a broker-dealer segment. The Company's alternative investment segment currently includes its hedge funds, replication products, managed futures funds, fund of funds, real estate, healthcare royalty funds and other investment platforms businesses. The Company's broker-dealer segment currently includes its investment banking, brokerage and equity research businesses. The consolidated financial results of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2011 excludes LaBranche's operating results related to its ETF market-making business from the date of acquisition since these results are determined to be discontinued operations and excluded from economic income.
Economic Income (Loss)
The performance measure used by the Company for each segment is Economic Income (Loss), which management uses to evaluate the financial performance of and make operating decisions for the firm as a whole and each segment. Accordingly, management assesses its business by analyzing the performance of each segment and believes that investors should review the same performance measure that it uses to analyze its segment and business performance. In addition, management believes that Economic Income (Loss) is helpful to gain an understanding of its segment results of operations because it reflects such results on a consistent basis for all periods presented.
Our Economic Income (Loss) may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies. We use Economic Income (Loss) as a measure of each segment's operating performance, not as a measure of liquidity. Economic

40


Income (Loss) should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for operating income, net income, operating cash flows, investing and financing activities, or other income or cash flow statement data prepared in accordance with US GAAP. As a result of the adjustments made to arrive at Economic Income (Loss), Economic Income (Loss) has limitations in that it does not take into account certain items included or excluded under US GAAP, including our Consolidated Funds. Economic Income (Loss) is considered by management as a supplemental measure to the US GAAP results to provide a more complete understanding of each segment's performance as measured by management. For a reconciliation of Economic Income (Loss) to US GAAP net income (loss) for the periods presented and additional information regarding the reconciling adjustments discussed above, see Note 24 to the Company's consolidated financial statements included in this 10-K.
In general, Economic Income (Loss) is a pre-tax measure that (i) eliminates the impact of consolidation for consolidated funds, (ii) excludes equity award expense related to the November 2009 Ramius/Cowen transaction, (iii) excludes certain other acquisition-related and/or reorganization expenses (including the discontinued operations of LaBranche), (iv) excludes goodwill impairment and (v) excludes the bargain purchase gain which resulted from the LaBranche acquisition. In addition, Economic Income (Loss) revenues include investment income that represents the income the Company has earned in investing its own capital, including realized and unrealized gains and losses, interest and dividends, net of associated investment related expenses. For US GAAP purposes, these items are included in each of their respective line items. Economic Income (Loss) revenues also include management fees, incentive income and investment income earned through the Company's investment as a general partner in certain real estate entities and the Company's investment in the Value and Opportunity business. For US GAAP purposes, all of these items are recorded in other income (loss). In addition, Economic Income (Loss) expenses are reduced by reimbursement from affiliates, which for US GAAP purposes is presented gross as part of revenue.
Economic Income (Loss) Revenues
The Company's principal sources of Economic Income (Loss) revenues are derived from activities in the following business segments:
Our alternative investment segment generates Economic Income (Loss) revenues through three principal sources: management fees, incentive income and investment income from our own capital. Management fees are directly impacted by any increase or decrease in assets under management, while incentive income is impacted by our funds' performance and resulting increase or decrease in assets under management. Investment income from the Company's own capital is impacted by the performance of the funds and other securities in which our capital is invested. The Company periodically receives other Economic Income (Loss) revenue which is unrelated to our own invested capital or our activities on behalf of the Company's funds.
Our broker-dealer segment generates Economic Income (Loss) revenues through two principal sources: investment banking and brokerage. The Company earns investment banking revenue primarily from fees associated with public and private capital raising transactions and providing strategic advisory services. Investment banking revenues are derived primarily from small and mid-capitalization companies within the Company's target sectors of healthcare, technology, media and telecommunications, consumer, aerospace and defense, industrials, REITs and clean technology. The Company's brokerage revenues consist of commissions, principal transactions and fees paid for equity research. Management reviews brokerage revenue on a combined basis as the vast majority of the revenue is derived from the same group of clients. The Company derives its brokerage revenue primarily from trading equity and equity-linked securities on behalf of institutional investors. The majority of the Company's trading gains and losses are a result of activities that support the facilitation of client orders in both listed and over-the-counter securities, although all trading gains and losses are recorded in brokerage in the consolidated statement of operations.
Economic Income (Loss) Expenses
The Company's Economic Income expenses consist of compensation and benefits, non-compensation expenses—fixed and non-compensation expenses—variable, less reimbursement from affiliates.
Non-controlling Interests
Non-controlling interests represent the pro rata share of the income or loss of the non-wholly owned consolidated entities attributable to the other owners of such entities.





41


Year Ended December 31, 2013 Compared with the Year Ended December 31, 2012
 
Economic Income (Loss)
 
Year Ended December 31,