10-K 1 mtst10k_02282014.htm FORM 10-K mtst10k_02282014.htm


U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
(MARK ONE)
[X]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2014
OR
 
[   ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the Transition Period from _______________ to _________________
 
Commission file number: 000-52735

METASTAT, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

NEVADA
 
20-8753132
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
8 Hillside Drive, Suite 207
   
Montclair, New Jersey
 
07042
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (973) 744-7618
 
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12 (B) OF THE ACT:    NONE
 
SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12 (G) OF THE ACT:
 
COMMON STOCK, PAR VALUE $0.0001 PER SHARE
 
Name of each exchange on which registered: The OTC Bulletin Board
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   [  ] Yes     [X] No
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   [  ]  Yes     [X] No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   [X] Yes     [  ] No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). [X] Yes   [  ] No

 
 

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  [X]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer
[  ]
Non-accelerated filer
[  ]
Accelerated filer 
[  ]
Smaller reporting company  
[X]
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  [  ] Yes  [X] No
 
The aggregate market value of the shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of the registrant held by non-affiliates on August 31, 2013 was $34,226,000, which was computed upon the basis of the closing price on that date.
 
There were 21,623,899 shares of common stock of the registrant outstanding as of June 11, 2014.

 


 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
    Page
PART I
   
     
 
Item 1.
2
 
Item 1A.
21
 
Item 1B.
34
 
Item 2.
34
 
Item 3.
34
 
Item 4.
34
       
PART II
   
     
 
Item 5.
35
 
Item 6.
36
 
Item 7.
36
 
Item 7A.
44
 
Item 8.
44
 
Item 9.
44
 
Item 9A.
44
 
Item 9B.
45
       
PART III
   
     
 
Item 10.
46
 
Item 11.
53
 
Item 12.
55
 
Item 13.
57
 
Item 14.
58
       
PART IV
   
       
 
Item 15.
59
 
 
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
 
Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Form 10-K”) to the “Company,” “MetaStat,” “we,” “us” or “our” are references to the combined business of MetaStat, Inc., a Nevada corporation, and its consolidated subsidiary.
 
Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

The statements contained in this Form 10-K, including under the section titled "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and other sections of this Form 10-K, include forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, including, without limitation, statements regarding our or our management's expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. The words "believe," "may," "will," "estimate," "continue," "anticipate," "intend," "expect," "plan" and similar expressions may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking. The forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-K are based on our current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effects on us. There can be no assurance that future developments affecting us will be those that we have anticipated. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control) or other assumptions that may cause actual results or performance to be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those factors described in the section titled "Risk Factors." Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should any of our assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary in material respects from those projected in these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

 
 
Item 1.
BUSINESS

Overview

We are a development stage life sciences company that is focused on developing and commercializing novel diagnostic technologies and therapeutics for the early and reliable prediction and treatment of systemic metastasis - cancer that spreads from a primary tumor through the bloodstream to other areas of the body. Systemic metastasis is responsible for ~90% of all solid tumor cancer related deaths. As such, we believe that more effective treatment of metastatic disease and/or the prevention of systemic metastasis is needed to improve patient outcomes.

MetaStat’s licensed proprietary platform technologies are based on the identification of a common pathway for the development of metastatic disease in solid epithelial-based tumors. These discoveries are the result of almost 20 years of collaboration with four scientific/academic institutions including Massachusetts Institute of Technology (“MIT”), the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (“Einstein”), Cornell University (“Cornell”), and the IFO-Regina Elena Cancer Institute (“IFO-Regina” and, collectively with MIT, Einstein, and Cornell, the “Licensors”) that enabled us to understand the underlying biology and mechanisms of systemic metastasis. Central to these discoveries are i) the pivotal role of the Mena protein and its isoforms in the metastatic cascade, and ii) the “MetaSite” the micro-anatomical site, or “window” in the blood vessels that metastatic cells squeeze through to enter the blood stream to begin their deadly spread, both of which are described in greater detail herein.

We are developing function-based diagnostic tests with an initial focus on breast cancer. Further, we believe that our MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostic assays, based on the measurement of the balance of the Mena protein isoforms, is broadly applicable in solid epithelial-based cancers, including breast, prostate, lung and colorectal. Our diagnostics are designed to accurately predict the probability of systemic metastasis and to allow clinicians to better "customize" cancer treatment decisions by positively identifying patients with a high-risk of systemic metastasis who need aggressive therapy and by sparing patients with a low-risk of systemic metastasis from the harmful side effects and expense of chemotherapy. We anticipate commencing initial marketing of our breast cancer diagnostic in 2015 followed by diagnostics for other cancer indications in 2016 and beyond.

Additionally, we are developing our therapeutic program that aims to build upon our unique understanding of mena biology and alternative splicing events as drivers of disease progression. This allows us to identify important and novel targets against which we can potentially develop new classes of chemotherapy.

Scientific Background

Our licensed technologies are based on novel ways of observing the behavior and mechanisms of metastatic cancer cells in tumors. As described in Nature / Nature Methods in December 2008, the Licensors’ research team(s) invented and patented several tools that led to the discovery of our platform technologies, including an Intra-vital Imaging Window (the ability to capture images in a live animal) that is used in conjunction with multi-photon microscopy to directly observe how metastatic cells move inside living functioning tumors. The Licensors’ research team(s) then invented and patented an artificial blood vessel that enabled us to attract a genetically discrete population of highly metastatic cells that allowed us to describe in detail the gene signature characteristic of tumor cells with high metastatic potential within intact primary tumors in living animals, which was described in BMC Biotechnology in 2003. The Licensors’ research team(s) were the first to discover and explain how and why metastatic cells are attracted to blood vessels, which was described in Clinical Cancer Research in April 2009. Through direct visual observation, we discovered the micro-anatomical site, or “window” in the blood vessels that metastatic cells squeeze through to enter the blood stream to begin their deadly spread. This window or site was named the “Tumor Microenvironment of Metastasis” or “TMEM.” The TMEM is a trio of cells present together in the same microanatomic site: an endothelial cell (a type of cell that lines the blood vessels), a perivascular macrophage (a type of immune cell found near blood vessels), and a tumor cell that produces the protein Mena. For convenience and ease of description, we have re-named this site of metastasis the “MetaSite.”


The Licensors’ research team(s) reasoned that the density of these “windows” or MetaSites present in a tumor tissue sample correlated to the probability of distant site metastasis, as detailed in Clinical Cancer Research in April 2009. This is the basis of our MetaSite Breast ™ test, which is more fully described herein.
 
In continued research through collaborative studies by the Licensors’ research team(s), the Mena protein and its isoforms were shown to enhance a cancer cell’s invasiveness by helping cancer cells subvert normal regulatory networks regulating cell motility. These findings were published in Development Cell in December 2008. Cancer cells are thereby enabled to invade surrounding tissues and migrate toward and penetrate blood vessels. Mena is a member of a family of proteins known as vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, or VASP proteins, which regulate cell motility by controlling the geometry of assembling actin fiber networks. The growth and elongation of actin fibers, part of the cell’s cytoskeleton, are controlled by a process that caps their ends. Mena interferes with the actin capping allowing the actin fibers to lengthen by continuously polymerizing, thus pushing forward the leading edge of the cell. Mena also makes the cancer cells more sensitive to being attracted to blood vessels by epidermal growth factor (“EGF”). EGF is secreted by peri-vascular (associated with blood vessels) macrophages (one of the three cell types that constitute a MetaSite) and thus attracts and guides the migrant metastatic tumor cells to the MetaSite where they gain entry to the blood vessel and spread.

In research published in Cancer Research in March 2007, the Licensors’ research team(s) discovered that Mena could be alternatively spliced to produce isoforms. These isoforms are slightly different sequences of the same amino acids that result in subtly different versions of the Mena protein. These small differences in Mena structure produce large differences in Mena protein effect.  In further research published in Development Cell in December 2008, testing was done to compare the effects of the isoforms of Mena. Cancers expressing the invasive isoform of Mena, MenaINV, were compared with the less dangerous Mena isoforms including Mena11A.  In a further experiment the invasive isoform of Mena caused the metastatic cancer cells that carried it to be up to forty times more sensitive to the chemo-attractant EGF. 

The Licensors’ research team(s) reasoned that individual metastatic potential of cancer could be detected by measurement of the relative amount of the isoforms of Mena, which was also published in Development Cell in December 2008. This is the basis of our MenaCalc™ diagnostic platform, which is more fully described below.

Further, in a proof-of-concept study published in a 2010 issue of Breast Cancer Research, the Licensors’ research team(s) investigated the role of Mena in tumor progression and metastasis. They developed a “Mena null” mouse; a mouse unable to produce the Mena protein or its isoforms. These Mena null mice were crossbred with polyoma middle T oncoprotein or “PyMT” mice (mice genetically predisposed to spontaneously develop highly metastatic breast cancer tumors). These Mena null PyMT mice were compared to control PyMT mice. Both groups of mice developed breast cancer tumors; however the Mena null mice’s tumors stayed localized while the control mice developed systemic metastasis. More importantly, all the control mice succumbed to metastatic disease while the Mena null mice showed significant survival advantage with most dying of old age.

The Problem

Cancer is a complex disease characterized most simply by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. Cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems and is the second most common cause of death in the United States after heart disease. The American Cancer Society (“ACS”) reported that in 2012 nearly 1.7 million people in the United States and 12.7 million people worldwide were diagnosed with cancer. Further, the ACS predicted that there would be 232,340 new cases of breast cancer in 2013 and that 39,620 women will die from breast cancer in 2013.

 
When dealing with cancer, patients and physicians need to develop strategies for local, regional, and distant control of the disease. Ultimately, however, distant or metastatic disease is responsible for more than 90% of all cancer related deaths in patients with such common types of solid tumors as breast, prostate, lung and colon.  Currently established clinical prognostic criteria such as the histopathologic grade of the tumor or tumor size do not successfully predict systemic metastatic potential. Even angiolymphatic invasion and the presence of regional lymph node involvement do not reliably correlate with subsequent systemic metastasis. This creates a dilemma for both patients and physicians as some patients require chemotherapy at the time of diagnosis of their tumor and others should be managed expectantly as they actually have a very small risk of developing metastatic disease. The morbidity and small mortality associated with a complete course of chemotherapy is ideally only warranted in patients who stand to benefit from this and should be avoided in patients with minimal metastatic risk. The actual benefit from chemotherapy is sometimes over-estimated as the benefit is only a 3% to 10% increase in 15-year survival in patients with breast cancer. To further illustrate the problem, 80% of patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer have historically been treated with chemotherapy. However, because only approximately 40% of these patients eventually relapse and develop metastatic disease, there is a significant subset of patients who are unnecessarily subjected to the acute and long-term side effects of current chemotherapeutic regimens.

In order to refine the quality of their diagnosis, pathologists may also use molecular staining techniques, including protein-specific staining in order to identify receptor sites that recognize hormones such as estrogen and progesterone and also the “Her-2/Neu” receptor.  In breast cancer patients, oncologists may supplement this information by ordering the Oncotype DX assay commercialized by Genomic Health, Inc., which has been endorsed by both the American Society of Clinical Oncology (“ASCO”) and the National Comprehensive Caner Network (“NCCN”), or one of the other proliferative diagnostic tests currently on the market. While these breast cancer assays, which primarily focus on gene-based diagnostics specific to proliferation (growth) of the tumor, have been useful and provide valuable information, they possess limitations. We believe these limitations include, but are not limited to: i) not being universally applicable to all new breast cancer cases, ii) being unable to provide an actionable recommendation for patients assigned to an intermediate risk classification, and iii) are based on statistical correlations.

As a result, we believe many cancer patients are misclassified as high risk when they are truly low risk for systemic metastasis or low risk when they are high risk for systemic metastasis, resulting in over-treatment for some and under-treatment for others.

Our Function-Based Diagnostic Solution

Through direct observation and our unique understanding of the process of systemic metastasis, our function-based diagnostics aim to accurately predict the probability of systemic metastasis in cancer patients and to allow clinicians to better "customize" cancer treatment decisions by positively identifying patients with a high-risk of systemic metastasis who need aggressive therapy and by sparing patients with a low-risk of systemic metastasis from the harmful side effects and expense of chemotherapy. Based on this approach, we are developing two patent protected diagnostic assays: (i) the MetaSite Breast™ test for early stage cancer patients and (ii) the MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostic assays for breast, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers. We anticipate commercializing both of these diagnostics, as we believe they will offer complimentary information that will allow even better risk stratification for each individual patient. We expect our breast cancer diagnostic, that uniquely leverages our MetaSite Breast™ test and our MenaCalc™ test for breast cancer (the “Breast Cancer Diagnostic”) to be commercially available in 2015 followed by MenaCalc™ diagnostics for lung and prostate in 2016 and beyond.

We believe our function-based diagnostic products will provide valuable and actionable information to treating physicians with the following benefits:

Improved Quality of Treatment Decisions. MetaStat’s approach to cancer diagnosis and prognosis should improve the quality of cancer treatment decisions by providing each patient with a probability of systemic metastasis. Our approach represents a substantial departure from existing approaches to treatment that often use statistically based or qualitative factors to determine treatments that are predominantly focused on proliferation. Our Breast Cancer Diagnostic including the MetaSite Breast™ test have been shown in clinical studies, such as data published in an April 2009 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, to allow physicians to accurately classify many patients into systemic metastasis risk categories different from classifications based primarily on tumor pathology grade and stage, thus enabling patients and physicians to make more informed decisions about treatment risk-benefit considerations and, consequently, design an individualized treatment plan according to each patient.
 
 
Improved Economics of Cancer Care. We believe that improving the quality of treatment decisions can result in significant economic benefits. For example, in early stage breast cancer, data shows that many patients are misclassified as high or low risk for systemic metastasis. Many low-risk patients misclassified as high-risk receive toxic and expensive chemotherapy treatment regimens they might not undergo if the risks were accurately assessed. Chemotherapy and related costs have been estimated to range from $20,000 to $100,000 per patient, as compared to the anticipated list price of $2,500 for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic. On the other hand, some high-risk breast cancer patients are misclassified as low-risk and are not provided chemotherapy treatment when it makes sense for them to receive such treatment, possibly necessitating future treatment that would be more expensive ($128,000 on average) if the cancer metastasizes.

Our Breast Cancer Diagnostic

Our commercial Breast Cancer Diagnostic is designed to provide the patient and her physician with an individual “Metastasis Score” for each of the MetaSite Breast™ and the MenaCalc™ breast test as well as an integrated “Metastasis Score,” which we anticipate will provide the most actionable information.

We anticipate the list price for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic will be $2,500, which is considerably cheaper than the $4,290 list price of Genomic Health’s Oncotype DX test for breast cancer, one of the most commonly used breast cancer diagnostics. We arrived at our projected list price for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test by calculating our costs. We accounted for processing the arriving tumor tissue samples and we considered the wholesale price of reagents and the time factor for machinery involved in the staining of the three relevant cell types involved. Additionally, we also analyzed technician and administrative time and included a calculation for professional fees for the supervising pathologist(s).  Finally, after sales and marketing expenses, we added a commercially reasonable factor for profit margin. This list price is not based upon any indication of what the market may be willing to pay for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, and as such is a list price we hope to charge based on our internal costs.

The MetaSite Breast Test

The MetaSite Breast™ test is designed to be a clinical laboratory test pursuant to which we analyze Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue samples in our reference laboratory. We plan to provide physicians with information specific to the patient’s tumor that predicts metastatic potential. The MetaSite Breast™ test is a tissue test that detects the presence and density of MetaSites or TMEMs. The test consists of a triple immunohistochemical stain containing antibodies to the three cell types found in the MetaSite. By delineating these windows, or MetaSites, we are able to establish the density of MetaSites, which correlates to the risk of systemic metastasis. Using predetermined cut-points, we aim to stratify patients into either low, intermediate or high risk of developing metastatic disease within ten years of diagnosis.

The MetaSite Breast™ test will not require additional procedures on the patient or new equipment for treating physicians. We expect that once a patient is diagnosed with breast cancer and a physician orders the test, the pathology lab at the hospital or cancer center will provide us with a FFPE tumor block or thin section from the biopsy specimen utilized for the diagnosis. These specimens are chemically preserved and embedded in paraffin wax and therefore require no special handling and can be sent via overnight mail to our central reference laboratory. Once we receive the tissue sample, our pathology laboratory would log the sample and begin the processing procedure. Our staff will perform immunostaining, the process of staining cells using antibody-based stains, and will repeat this process multiple times for quality assurance. We expect to analyze the tissue sample and deliver our “Metastasis Score” and analysis to the treating physician within one week of receipt of the tissue sample. This is well within the critical decision timeframe after the tumor has been surgically removed and typically well before the patient and the treating physician(s) discuss additional treatment options.

 
Clinical Development and Validation of the MetaSite Breast™ Test

The MetaSite Breast™ test has, thus far, been validated in three human clinical studies. The results of a 60 patient trial were published in the peer-reviewed journal, Clinical Cancer Research in April 2009, which described how the MetaSite Breast™ test was able to predict the probability of systemic metastasis. In this five year minimum retrospective analysis, thirty pairs of women were selected and matched as closely as possible for clinical characteristics such as age, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular involvement, and hormone status (ER, PR, Her2/Neu). No association was seen between MetaSite density/count and these clinical characteristics. However, MetaSite density was greater in patients who subsequently developed systemic metastasis compared with the patients who had only localized breast cancer (median, 105 vs. 50, respectively; P = 0.00006). For every 10-unit increase in MetaSites the odds ratio of systemic metastasis increased by 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4). In other words, the number of MetaSites observed per patient ranged from 12 to 240 and the odds of metastasis nearly doubled for every increase of 10 MetaSites.

In data from an unpublished trial of 44 women with breast cancer, the MetaSite Breast™ test was compared to the Oncotype DX test distributed by Genomic Health, Inc.  The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score was compared to the MetaSite count and the analysis showed an insignificant correlation between the two tests with a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of 0.19. If this lack of correlation holds in planned larger scale testing it would mean that MetaSite Breast™ test will provide an invaluable source of additional information critical to clinical care and stratification of breast cancer patients.

We entered into a Sponsored Research Agreement (the “Sponsored Research Agreement”) in April 2011 with Einstein and Cornell for and on behalf of its Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College to conduct a “Large Population Validation” study of the MetaSite Breast™ test. The purposes of the Large Population Validation study was to (i) study the association between TMEM or MetaSite count at initial diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and risk of systemic metastasis, and (ii) identify a cut-point for TMEM or MetaSite count that differentiates best between those who develop systemic metastasis and those who do not, and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of these cut-points.  In consideration for the study, we were required to pay $202,798 to Cornell and $514,756 to Einstein. On September 12, 2012, we entered into a formal amendment to the Sponsored Research Agreement to expand the scope of the research to include a comparison of TMEM or MetaSite count with the IHC4 score. The consideration for the study was amended to $169,514 to Cornell and $595,929 to Einstein in the aggregate which have been satisfied. The Large Population Validation study was conducted retrospectively on already collected human tissue samples and accompanying patient medical histories, which were provided from Kaiser Permanente Northwest health plan. In this ten-year minimum retrospective study, 259 metastatic and 259 non-metastatic patients were matched as closely as possible with regard to tumor size, grade, lymph node involvement, and hormone receptor status at presentation and had their tissue samples scored and the results were compared to the known outcome from their medical records. 

The results of the MetaSite Breast™ 481 patient Large Population Validation study were published in the June 3, 2014 online publication of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The conclusion from that paper is that the MetaSite score or “Metastasis Score” predicted the risk of distant metastasis in estrogen receptor positive/her2/Neu negative (ER+/HER2-) breast cancer patients independently of classical clinicopathologic features. Furthermore we compared the MetaSite Breast™ test to another commercially available breast cancer diagnostic, the IHC4 and found our prognostic ability was superior.

We anticipate conducting two additional clinical studies that further validate and demonstrate the effectiveness and health economic benefit of the MetaSite Breast™ test as well as chemotherapy benefit in order to gain market acceptance and penetration as well as favorable reimbursement coverage from payors. We have identified additional tumor sample cohorts (with accompanying medical records) and anticipate commencing an additional study or studies in 2014 and 2015, depending on access to the desired cohort(s).

 
MenaCalc™ Test for Breast Cancer

The MenaCalc™ test for breast cancer is a tissue test that can utilize either FFPE tissue samples or disassociated, discontinuous cells available from either a needle biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA). The individual expression levels of the isoforms of the Mena protein can be measured in cancer cells and the relationship of their levels are determined to establish a “Metastasis Score,” or risk of systemic metastasis. In as of yet unpublished data, we have established a strong correlation between the Metastasis Score from the MetaSite Breast™ test and the MenaCalc™ test for breast cancer.  Because the Metastasis Score from the MenaCalc™ test for breast cancer can be derived from disassociated, discontinuous cells available from a needle biopsy or FNA at a patients’ initial or early visit, we believe that this diagnostic can be a valuable pre-operative tool to obtain the earliest possible picture of a breast cancer patient’s individual metastatic profile.

Results from a completed 797 patient trial were published in Breast Cancer Research in September 2012. The results showed that MenaCalc™ could predict survival in breast cancer patients and was predictive in all molecular subtypes of breast cancer including estrogen, progesterone, and her2-Neu receptor negative (triple-negative) cancers. Additionally, data on 406 women presented in abstract form at the 2014 USCAP annual meeting showed that high MenaCalc™ metastasis scores were associated with decreased overall survival of women with axillary node-negative breast cancer. A formal manuscript is currently being prepared. We believe that further validation studies are needed in order to begin initial marketing of the MenaCalc™ assay for breast cancer.

We anticipate conducting two additional clinical studies that further validate and demonstrate the effectiveness and health economic benefit of the MenaCalc™ test for breast cancer as well as chemotherapy benefit in order to gain market acceptance and penetration as well as favorable reimbursement coverage from payors. We have identified additional tumor sample cohorts (with accompanying medical records) and anticipate commencing an additional study or studies in 2014 and 2015, depending on access to the desired cohort(s).

Market Potential of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic

The ACS predicted that in the U.S. there would be 232,340 new cases of breast cancer in 2013 and that 39,620 deaths from the disease.

The data from the published trials show that the metastatic outcome was independent of traditional clinicopathologic characteristics including age, tumor grade, tumor size, and lymph node involvement. Additionally, we believe that the market potential for the MetaSite Breast™ test includes those classified as ER+/HER2-, a group that constitutes between 50 and 60 percent of breast cancer patients. Accordingly, we believe that our MetaSite Breast™ test will be applicable for approximately 115,000 to 138,000 new breast cancer cases annually. 

Results from the MenaCalc™ breast cancer trial on 797 patients published in Breast Cancer Research in September 2012 showed that MenaCalc™ was predictive in all molecular subtypes of breast cancer including estrogen receptor negative and estrogen, progesterone, and her2-Neu receptor negative (triple-negative) cancers.

We believe that the market opportunity for our function-based diagnostic assays for breast cancer will cover the full spectrum of the approximately 232,340 new invasive breast cancer cases each year in the U.S. alone without regard to molecular subtype.

MenaCalc™ Test for Other Cancer Indications

The Mena protein isoforms have been shown to be a key potentiating factor in the progression to systemic metastasis in solid tumor epithelial–based cancers, including prostate, lung and colorectal. We believe that we may be able to develop MenaCalc™ based diagnostic assays that will aid physicians in the management of a large proportion of future cancer patients.

In 2012, we completed a 70 patient trial at Yale University for a MenaCalc™ test for adenocarcinoma of the lung.  In unpublished data, we found that MenaCalc™ could predict survival in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Although the sample size was small, we believe these findings were promising and we plan to initiate a larger confirmatory trial for the MenaCalc assay in adenocarcinoma of the lung patients.

 
Additionally, we have completed a small pilot study at MIT for a MenaCalc test in predicting metastasis in prostate cancer. The results from this pilot study were sufficient for us to justify the planning and preparation of a larger scale confirmatory trial for MenaCalcin prostate cancer.

Our Therapeutic Solution

We believe our therapeutic program will build upon Mena biology and alternative RNA splicing as a driver of disease progression to exploit novel targets that provide precision medicines in oncology.  Through our Alternative Splicing License Agreements, which are more fully described in the “Patent and Intellectual Property” section below, we acquired rights to a collection of alternative splicing events that occur when tumor cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process linked to the acquisition of drug resistance for a number of settings including prostate cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and breast cancer. These finding were published in (Shapiro et al, PLOS, 2011).

Our program will utilize alternative splicing events in the drug resistant state to both provide a methodology to mine, identify and validate novel alternatively spliced targets and provide a companion diagnostic that can be deployed in the clinic to identify patients who will respond to a therapeutic directed against the alternatively spliced target

Business Strategies

Our goal is to build a leading life sciences company focused on the development and commercialization of novel diagnostics and therapeutics that improve clinical outcomes and reduce overall medical costs. Key elements of our strategy to achieve this goal are to:

continue to innovate and advance our licensed proprietary technologies;

obtain and maintain our clinical reference laboratory accreditations and licenses and any other necessary approvals;
 
 
initiate marketing efforts for our breast cancer diagnostics;

successfully develop our MenaCalc™ platform other indications including, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers;

successfully develop our MenaBloc™ therapeutic platform;

obtain positive reimbursement decisions from third-party payors;

expand in countries outside of the United States;

attract and retain skilled personnel; and

continue to obtain intellectual property and/or other protection for our technologies and products.
 
Research and Development
 
Our net research and development expenditures were $824,336 and $516,798 for the years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively.

As of February 28, 2014, our research and development department included 3 full time employees located at our drug discovery laboratory in Stony Brook, NY.  Additionally, depending on the timing of our sponsored projects, it included up to 19 medical doctors, Ph.D. level scientists, and biomedical engineers, nine of whom we engaged in a consulting capacity and up to ten of whom are full time researchers that we funded through our research and development collaborations in connection with (i) the development of the MetaSite Breast™ test at Einstein, ii) the Sponsored Research Agreement for the Large Population Validation study of the MetaSite Breast™ test, (iii) studies using MenaCalc™ for breast and lung cancer at both MIT and Yale University, and (iv) the early discovery and development of the MenaBloc™ therapeutic at MIT.

 
Manufacturing

One of the advantages of the MetaSite Breast™ test is that it uses widely available immunohistochemical dyeing techniques to identify individual cell types. This staining technique uses antibodies that recognize individual cell types. By attaching different dye colors to different antibody types, the operator can view different cell types on a single slide. We believe this approach to diagnosis and prognosis of cancer is more cost effective than many genomic-based approaches currently on the market. We believe the most economical way to enter the market with the MetaSite Breast™ test will be through contract manufacturing for these immunohistochemicals. We have identified over twenty contract manufacturers that we intend to interview in anticipation of marketing for the diagnostic. We believe these contract manufacturers have experience and expertise to cost effectively produce, package, and ship the MetaSite Breast™ test reagents to us.

One of the advantages of the MenaCalc™ test is that it uses widely available immunofluorescence techniques to identify individual cell types, allowing the test to interrogate tumor cells separately within tumor microenvironment rather than measuring homogenous biopsies containing tumor and non-tumor cell types. This staining technique uses antibodies that recognize or detect the different protein variants of Mena. The antibodies used for MenaCalc™ are detected by labeling the different antibody types different fluorescent dyes that allow the operator to measure and quantify the levels selectively within the tumor cells on the slide. We believe this approach to diagnosis and prognosis of cancer is more cost effective than many genomic-based approaches currently on the market that utilize heterogeneous mixtures of tumor and stromal cells in patient samples. We have produced antibodies for the MenaCalc™ test, which we believe should be sufficient to meet our research and development and clinical needs for the next twenty-four months.

Selling and Marketing

We have begun the planning and preparation for marketing of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test. We plan to concentrate our initial marketing efforts beginning in 2015 at several large cancer centers in 5 to 10 select cities in the U.S.  These centers have been selected because of the relationships between key opinion leaders at these centers and our management and advisory board members. We are currently pursuing strategic relationships with these and other cancer centers in order to apprise the medical community of the utility of our novel function-based diagnostic assays.

We will commence our commercialization efforts including establishing a CLIA certified reference laboratory, while concurrently building an appropriate sales and marketing team. We plan to hire and/or contract a sales staff with significant clinical oncology selling and marketing experience. Our sales approach will focus on the clinical and economic benefits of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and the scientific validation supporting them. Our marketing strategy will focus on educating physicians, laboratory personnel and other healthcare professionals regarding the development of our novel technologies. We also plan to work closely with national and regional patient advocacy organizations that are focused on breast cancer care. Additionally, we intend to utilize the Internet for communicating with external constituencies, and develop our website to comprehensively present clinical information for healthcare professionals and educational information and materials for breast cancer patients.

We believe the key factors that will drive adoption for our breast cancer diagnostic tests include, but are not limited to, our commercial efforts, continued publication of peer-reviewed articles and/or studies, clinical presentations at major symposia and conferences such as ASCO, the inclusion of our breast cancer diagnostic tests in clinical practice guidelines, and the adoption of favorable reimbursement coverage by payors including Medicare and Medicaid.

Reimbursement

Based on our discussions with oncologists and heads of the departments of breast medical oncology at major cancer treatment centers, our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test is expected to expand the field for diagnostics that will help payors lower costs through the implementation of customized cancer therapy. We hope to follow the recent roadmap established by Genomic Health, Inc. for its Oncotype DX test for breast cancer to serve as a template for establishing a reimbursement strategy. When Genomic Health completed and published its 668 patient validation trial results for its Oncotype DX test for breast cancer in 2004, it began receiving reimbursement from several regional payors. Shortly thereafter, Genomic Health entered into a reimbursement agreement with larger national payors.

 
We expect to offer our function-based diagnostic tests,, as a clinical laboratory service. Revenues for our clinical laboratory diagnostics may come from several sources, including commercial third-party payors, such as insurance companies and health maintenance organizations (“HMOs”), government payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, patient self-pay and, in some cases, from hospitals or referring laboratories who, in turn, may bill third-party payors. It is essential to our commercial success to get favorable reimbursement coverage by third-party payors for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and other function-based diagnostic assays.

In order to gain broad reimbursement coverage, we expect to have to expend substantial resources on educating payors such as Kaiser Permanente, Aetna, United Healthcare, and others on the following attributes of our function-based diagnostic assays:

Test performance;
 
Clinical utility and effectiveness;
 
Peer-reviewed publication and consistent study outcomes;
 
Patient and physician demand; and
 
Improved economics.
  
In determining whether or not Medicare will pay for a test, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, which oversees Medicare, can permit third party contractors who process and pay Medicare claims to make that determination or it can make a national coverage determination, which will bind all Medicare contractors. In addition, each state’s Medicaid program, which pays for services furnished to the eligible medically indigent, will usually make its own decision whether or not to cover our MetaSite Breast™ test. We anticipate that we will spend significant time and resources working with CMS in our effort to gain reimbursement coverage from Medicare and Medicaid.

Competition

The life sciences, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are characterized by rapidly advancing technologies, intense competition and a strong emphasis on proprietary technologies and products. Any diagnostic product(s) that we successfully develop and commercialize will compete with existing diagnostics as well as new diagnostics that may become available in the future. While we believe that our technology and scientific knowledge provide us with competitive advantages, we face potential competition from many different sources.
 
We believe our main competition will be from existing diagnostic methods used by both pathologists and oncologists. It is difficult to change or augment these methods as they have been used for many years by treating physicians. In addition, capital equipment and kits or reagents offered to local pathology laboratories represent another source of potential competition. These kits are used directly by the pathologist, which facilitates adoption more readily than diagnostic tests like ours that are performed outside the pathology laboratory.
 
We also face competition from competitors that develop diagnostic tests, such as Genomic Health, Inc., Agendia, Inc., Genoptix Medical Laboratory, a part of the Novartis Pharmaceuticals Division, Roche Diagnostics, a division of Roche Holding, Ltd, Siemens AG and Veridex LLC, a Johnson & Johnson company, as well as others. Other competition may come from companies that focus on gene profiling and gene or protein expression, including Celera Corporation, GE Healthcare, a business unit of General Electric Company, Hologic, Inc., Novartis AG, Myriad Genetics, Inc., Qiagen N.V. and Response Genetics, Inc., and many other public and private companies. Commercial laboratories, such as Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, with strong distribution networks for diagnostic tests, may also compete with us.

Many of our present and potential competitors have widespread brand recognition and substantially greater financial and technical resources and development, production and marketing capabilities than we do. If we are unable to compete successfully against current or future competitors, we may be unable to gain market acceptance and therefore revenue from our diagnostics may be limited.

 
Regulation

Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988

We anticipate that we will be a clinical reference laboratory as defined under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (“CLIA”). Clinical laboratory tests such as our function-based diagnostics including the MetaSite Breast™ test and our MenaCalc™ diagnostics are regulated under CLIA. As such, we will be required to hold certain federal, state and local licenses, certifications and permits to conduct our business. Under CLIA, we are required to hold a certificate applicable to the type of work we perform and to comply with standards covering personnel, facilities administration, quality systems and proficiency testing.
 
We have consulted with FDA regulatory counsel in advance of a meeting with the FDA prior to marketing and commercialization of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and have formulated a plan to apply for a certificate of accreditation under CLIA to perform testing. We believe we will be subject to survey and inspection every two years to assess compliance with program standards and may be subject to additional inspections without prior notice. The standards applicable to the testing which we perform may change over time. We cannot assure that we will be able to operate profitably should regulatory compliance requirements become substantially more costly in the future.

If our clinical reference laboratory falls out of compliance with CLIA requirements, we may be subject to sanctions such as suspension, limitation or revocation of our CLIA certificate, as well as directed plan of correction, state on-site monitoring, civil money penalties, civil injunctive suit or criminal penalties. Additionally, we must maintain CLIA compliance and certification to be eligible to bill for tests provided to Medicare beneficiaries. If we were to be found out of compliance with CLIA program requirements and subjected to sanction, our business would be harmed.

United States Food and Drug Administration

The United States Food and Drug Administration, or the FDA, regulates the sale or distribution, in interstate commerce, of medical devices, including in vitro diagnostic test kits. Devices subject to FDA regulation must undergo pre-market review prior to commercialization unless the device is of a type exempted from such review.  Additionally, medical device manufacturers must comply with various regulatory requirements under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and regulations promulgated under that Act, including quality system review regulations, unless exempted from those requirements for particular types of devices.  Entities that fail to comply with FDA requirements can be liable for criminal or civil penalties, such as recalls, detentions, orders to cease manufacturing and restrictions on labeling and promotion.

Clinical laboratory services are not subject to FDA regulation, but in vitro diagnostic test kits and reagents and equipment used by these laboratories may be subject to FDA regulation. Clinical laboratory tests that are developed and validated by a laboratory for use in examinations the laboratory performs itself are called “home brew” tests or more recently, Laboratory Developed Tests (LDTs). Most LDTs currently are not subject to premarket review by FDA although analyte-specific reagents or software provided to us by third parties and used by us to perform LDTs may be subject to review by the FDA prior to marketing.  Although we have not confirmed this with the FDA, we believe our MetaSite Breast™ test will not be subject to regulation under current FDA policies. We believe that the container we provide for collection and transport of tumor samples from a pathology laboratory to our reference laboratory is a medical device subject to FDA regulation but exempt from premarket review. We cannot provide any assurance that FDA regulation, including premarket review, will not be required in the future for the MetaSite Breast™ test or any of our function-based diagnostic assays. If premarket review is required, this would adversely affect our business until such review is completed and approval or clearance to market is obtained. If premarket review is required by the FDA, there can be no assurance that our test will be cleared or approved on a timely basis, if at all. Ongoing compliance with FDA regulations would increase the cost of conducting our business, subject us to inspection by the FDA and to the requirements of the FDA and penalties for failure to comply with the requirements of the FDA. Should any of the clinical laboratory device reagents obtained by us from vendors and used in conducting our home brew test be affected by future regulatory actions, we could be adversely affected by those actions, including increased cost of testing or delay, limitation or prohibition on the purchase of reagents necessary to perform testing.

 
Beginning in January 2006, the FDA began indicating its belief that laboratory-developed tests were subject to FDA regulation as devices and issued a series of guidance documents intending to establish a framework by which to regulate certain laboratory tests. In September 2006, the FDA issued draft guidance on a new class of tests called "In Vitro Diagnostic Multivariate Index Assays", or IVDMIAs. Under this draft guidance, specific tests could be classified as either a Class II or a Class III medical device, which may require varying levels of FDA pre-market review depending on intended use and the level of control necessary to assure the safety and effectiveness of the test. In July 2007, the FDA posted revised draft guidance that addressed some of the comments submitted in response to the September 2006 draft guidance.

In May 2007, the FDA issued a guidance document "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Gene Expression Profiling Test System for Breast Cancer Prognosis." This guidance document was developed to support the classification of gene expression profiling test systems for breast cancer prognosis into Class II. In addition, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, requested that its Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society make recommendations about the oversight of genetics testing. A final report was published in April 2008.

In June 2010, the FDA announced a public meeting to discuss the agency's oversight of LDTs prompted by the increased complexity of LDTs and their increasingly important role in clinical decision making and disease management. The FDA indicated that it is considering a risk-based application of oversight to LDTs and that, following public input and discussion; it may issue separate draft guidance on the regulation of LDTs which may vary from the previously issued draft guidance on the regulation of IVDMIAs. The public meeting was held in July 2010 and further public comments were submitted to the FDA in September 2010. FDA spokespersons continue to indicate that the agency has prepared draft guidance regarding proposed oversight of LDTs, which is under review for possible issuance. To date, draft guidance has not yet been issued.

Separately, in June 2011, the FDA issued draft guidance regarding "Commercially Distributed In Vitro Diagnostic Products Labeled for Research Use Only or Investigational Use Only," which was finalized in November 2013. Public comments were submitted in response to this draft guidance, which has not been finalized. In addition, the FDA has issued other draft guidance documents, which may impact our tests or our future tests, including draft guidance regarding Mobile Medical Applications that is directed at patient management tools. Public comments were submitted in response to this draft guidance, which has not been finalized. In October 2012, the FDA published a list of planned guidance documents that the agency stated it plans to focus on in its fiscal year 2013, including the finalization of previously issued draft guidance which could include guidance documents addressing FDA regulation of laboratory tests such as ours. We cannot predict the ultimate form of any such guidance or regulation and the potential impact on our tests or materials used to perform our tests. While we expect all materials used in our tests to qualify according to CLIA regulations, we cannot be certain that the FDA might not enact rules or guidance documents which could impact our ability to purchase materials necessary for the performance of our tests. Should any of the reagents obtained by us from vendors and used in conducting our tests be affected by future regulatory actions, our business could be adversely affected by those actions, including increasing the cost of testing or delaying, limiting or prohibiting the purchase of reagents necessary to perform testing.

We cannot provide any assurance that FDA regulation, including pre-market review, will not be required in the future for our tests, whether through additional guidance issued by the FDA, new enforcement policies adopted by the FDA or new legislation enacted by Congress. Legislative proposals addressing oversight of genetic testing and LDTs as well as health information technologies, such as clinical decision support technologies were introduced in recent years and we expect that new legislative proposals will be introduced from time to time. It is possible that legislation could be enacted into law or guidance could be issued by the FDA, which may result in new or increased regulatory requirements for us to continue to offer our tests or develop and introduce new tests.

 
If pre-market review is required, our business could be negatively impacted until such review is completed and clearance to market or approval is obtained, and the FDA could require that we stop selling our tests pending pre-market clearance or approval. If our tests are allowed to remain on the market but there is uncertainty about our tests, if they are labeled investigational by the FDA, or if labeling claims the FDA allows us to make are limited, orders or reimbursement may decline. The regulatory approval process may involve, among other things, successfully completing additional clinical trials and submitting a pre-market clearance notice or filing a PMA application with the FDA. If pre-market review is required by the FDA, there can be no assurance that our tests will be cleared or approved on a timely basis, if at all, nor can there be assurance that labeling claims will be consistent with our current claims or adequate to support continued adoption of and reimbursement for our tests. Ongoing compliance with FDA regulations would increase the cost of conducting our business, and subject us to inspection by the FDA and to the requirements of the FDA and penalties for failure to comply with these requirements. We may also decide voluntarily to pursue FDA pre-market review of our tests if we determine that doing so would be appropriate.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

The federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH, and final omnibus rules, were issued by HHS to protect the privacy and security of protected health information used or disclosed by health care providers, such as us. HIPAA also regulates standardization of data content, codes and formats used in health care transactions and standardization of identifiers for health plans and providers. Penalties for violations of HIPAA regulations include civil and criminal penalties.
 
We plan on developing policies and procedures to comply with these regulations by any respective compliance enforcement dates. The requirements under these regulations may change periodically and could have an adverse effect on our business operations if compliance becomes substantially more costly than under current requirements.
 
In addition to federal privacy regulations, there are a number of state and international laws governing confidentiality of health information that may be applicable to our operations. The United States Department of Commerce, the European Commission and the Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner have agreed on a set of data protection principles and frequently asked questions (the "Safe Harbor Principles") to enable U.S. companies to satisfy the requirement under European Union and Swiss law that adequate protection is given to personal information transferred from the European Union or Switzerland to the United States. The European Commission and Switzerland have also recognized the Safe Harbor Principles as providing adequate data protection.
 
New laws governing privacy may be adopted in the future as well. We have taken steps to comply with health information privacy requirements to which we are aware that we will be subject. However, we can provide no assurance that we will be in compliance with diverse privacy requirements in all of the jurisdictions in which we do business. Failure to comply with privacy requirements could result in civil or criminal penalties, which could have a materially adverse impact on our business.

Federal and State Physician Self-referral Prohibitions

We will be subject to the federal physician self-referral prohibitions, commonly known as the Stark Law, and to similar state restrictions such as the California's Physician Ownership and Referral Act, or PORA. Together these restrictions generally prohibit us from billing a patient or any governmental or private payor for any test when the physician ordering the test, or any member of such physician's immediate family, has an investment interest in or compensation arrangement with us, unless the arrangement meets an exception to the prohibition. Both the Stark Law and PORA contain an exception for compensation paid to a physician for personal services rendered by the physician. We would be required to refund any payments we receive pursuant to a referral prohibited by these laws to the patient, the payor or the Medicare program, as applicable.
 
Both the Stark Law and certain state restrictions such as PORA contain an exception for referrals made by physicians who hold investment interests in a publicly traded company that has stockholders’ equity exceeding $75 million at the end of its most recent fiscal year or on average during the previous three fiscal years, and which satisfies certain other requirements. In addition, both the Stark Law and certain state restrictions such as PORA contain an exception for compensation paid to a physician for personal services rendered by the physician.

 
However, in the event that we enter into any compensation arrangements with physicians, we cannot be certain that regulators would find these arrangements to be in compliance with Stark, PORA or similar state laws. In such event, we would be required to refund any payments we receive pursuant to a referral prohibited by these laws to the patient, the payor or the Medicare program, as applicable.
 
Sanctions for a violation of the Stark Law include the following:

denial of payment for the services provided in violation of the prohibition;

refunds of amounts collected by an entity in violation of the Stark Law;

a civil penalty of up to $15,000 for each service arising out of the prohibited referral;

possible exclusion from federal healthcare programs, including Medicare and Medicaid; and

a civil penalty of up to $100,000 against parties that enter into a scheme to circumvent the Stark Law’s prohibition.

These prohibitions apply regardless of the reasons for the financial relationship and the referral. No finding of intent to violate the Stark Law is required for a violation.  In addition, under an emerging legal theory, knowing violations of the Stark Law may also serve as the basis for liability under the Federal False Claims Act.
 
Further, a violation of PORA is a misdemeanor and could result in civil penalties and criminal fines. Finally, other states have self-referral restrictions with which we have to comply that differ from those imposed by federal and California law. It is possible that any financial arrangements that we may enter into with physicians could be subject to regulatory scrutiny at some point in the future, and we cannot provide assurance that we will be found to be in compliance with these laws following any such regulatory review.

Federal, State and International Anti-kickback Laws

The Federal Anti-kickback Law makes it a felony for a provider or supplier, including a laboratory, to knowingly and willfully offer, pay, solicit or receive remuneration, directly or indirectly, in order to induce business that is reimbursable under any federal health care program. A violation of the Anti-kickback Law may result in imprisonment for up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 in the case of individuals and $500,000 in the case of organizations. Convictions under the Anti-kickback Law result in mandatory exclusion from federal health care programs for a minimum of five years. In addition, HHS has the authority to impose civil assessments and fines and to exclude health care providers and others engaged in prohibited activities from Medicare, Medicaid and other federal health care programs.
 
Actions which violate the Anti-kickback Law or similar laws may also involve liability under the Federal False Claims Act, which prohibits the knowing presentation of a false, fictitious or fraudulent claim for payment to the United States Government. Actions under the Federal False Claims Act may be brought by the Department of Justice or by a private individual in the name of the government.

Although the Anti-kickback Law applies only to federal health care programs, a number of states have passed statutes substantially similar to the Anti-kickback Law pursuant to which similar types of prohibitions are made applicable to all other health plans and third-party payors.

Federal and state law enforcement authorities scrutinize arrangements between health care providers and potential referral sources to ensure that the arrangements are not designed as a mechanism to induce patient care referrals and opportunities. The law enforcement authorities, the courts and the United States Congress have also demonstrated a willingness to look behind the formalities of a transaction to determine the underlying purpose of payments between health care providers and actual or potential referral sources. Generally, courts have taken a broad interpretation of the scope of the Anti-kickback Law, holding that the statute may be violated if merely one purpose of a payment arrangement is to induce future referrals.

 
In addition to statutory exceptions to the Anti-kickback Law, regulations provide for a number of safe harbors. If an arrangement meets the provisions of a safe harbor, it is deemed not to violate the Anti-kickback Law. An arrangement must fully comply with each element of an applicable safe harbor in order to qualify for protection.
 
Among the safe harbors that may be relevant to us is the discount safe harbor. The discount safe harbor potentially applies to discounts provided by providers and suppliers, including laboratories, to physicians or institutions where the physician or institution bills the payor for the test, not when the laboratory bills the payor directly. If the terms of the discount safe harbor are met, the discounts will not be considered prohibited remuneration under the Anti-kickback Law. We anticipate that this safe harbor may be potentially applicable to any agreements that we enter into to sell tests to hospitals where the hospital submits a claim to the payor.

The personal services safe harbor to the Anti-kickback Law provides that remuneration paid to a referral source for personal services will not violate the Anti-kickback Law provided all of the elements of that safe harbor are met. One element is that, if the agreement is intended to provide for the services of the physician on a periodic, sporadic or part-time basis, rather than on a full-time basis for the term of the agreement, the agreement specifies exactly the schedule of such intervals, their precise length, and the exact charge for such intervals. Failure to meet the terms of the safe harbor does not render an arrangement illegal. Rather, such arrangements must be evaluated under the language of the statute, taking into account all facts and circumstances.
 
In the event that we enter into relationships with physicians, hospitals and other customers, there can be no assurance that our relationships with those physicians, hospitals and other customers will not be subject to investigation or a successful challenge under such laws. If imposed for any reason, sanctions under the Anti-kickback Law or similar laws could have a negative effect on our business.
 
Other Federal and State Fraud and Abuse Laws

In addition to the requirements that are discussed above, there are several other health care fraud and abuse laws that could have an impact on our business. For example, provisions of the Social Security Act permit Medicare and Medicaid to exclude an entity that charges the federal health care programs substantially in excess of its usual charges for its services. The terms “usual charge” and “substantially in excess” are ambiguous and subject to varying interpretations.
 
Further, the Federal False Claims Act prohibits a person from knowingly submitting a claim, making a false record or statement in order to secure payment or retaining an overpayment by the federal government. In addition to actions initiated by the government itself, the statute authorizes actions to be brought on behalf of the federal government by a private party having knowledge of the alleged fraud. Because the complaint is initially filed under seal, the action may be pending for some time before the defendant is even aware of the action. If the government is ultimately successful in obtaining redress in the matter or if the plaintiff succeeds in obtaining redress without the government’s involvement, then the plaintiff will receive a percentage of the recovery. Finally, the Social Security Act includes its own provisions that prohibit the filing of false claims or submitting false statements in order to obtain payment. Violation of these provisions may result in fines, imprisonment or both, and possible exclusion from Medicare or Medicaid programs.

New York Laboratory Licensing

We anticipate that our clinical reference laboratory will be located in New York. Accordingly, we will be required to be licensed by New York, under New York laws and regulations, which establish standards for:

day-to-day operation of a clinical laboratory, including training and skill levels required of laboratory personnel;

physical requirements of a facility;

equipment; and 

quality control.
 
 
We expect to apply for and receive the licenses necessary for our clinical reference laboratory for our MetaSite Breast™ test. New York law also mandates proficiency testing for laboratories licensed under New York state law, regardless of whether or not such laboratories are located in New York. If a laboratory is not in compliance with New York statutory or regulatory standards, the New York State Department of Health may suspend, limit, revoke or annul the laboratory’s New York license, censure the holder of the license or assess civil money penalties. Statutory or regulatory noncompliance may result in a laboratory’s operator being found guilty of a misdemeanor under New York law. In the event that we should be found not to be in compliance with New York laboratory requirements, we could be subject to such sanctions, which could harm our business.

Other States’ Laboratory Testing

Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island require out-of-state laboratories, which accept specimens from those states to be licensed. We expect to obtain licenses in those four states.

From time to time, we may become aware of other states that require out-of-state laboratories to obtain licensure in order to accept specimens from the state, and it is possible that other states do have such requirements or will have such requirements in the future. If we identify any other state with such requirements or if we are contacted by any other state advising us of such requirements, we intend to follow instructions from the state regulators as to how we should comply with such requirements.
 
Compliance with Environmental Laws

We expect to be subject to regulation under federal, state and local laws and regulations governing environmental protection and the use, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous substances. The cost of complying with these laws and regulations may be significant. Our planned activities may require the controlled use of potentially harmful biological materials, hazardous materials and chemicals. We cannot eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury to employees or third parties from the use, storage, handling or disposal of these materials. In the event of contamination or injury, we could be held liable for any resulting damages, and any liability could exceed our resources or any applicable insurance coverage we may have.

Employees

We currently have six full time employees and two part-time employees on a consultancy basis.  In addition, we utilize outside consultants to support certain elements of our drug discovery and research and development operations. We have also engaged several consulting firms involved with investor relations, regulatory strategy and clinical trial planning. We plan to increase the number of employees in the areas of clinical research and testing, engineering, manufacturing, and sales and marketing in 2014 and 2015.

Patents and Intellectual Property

We believe that clear and extensive patent coverage for our technologies is central to our long-term success and we have invested and will invest accordingly. This has been accomplished in conjunction with the resources of the Licensors. This applies to both domestic and international patent coverage.

In December 2013, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) issued U.S. Patent Number US 8,603,738 entitled: " Metastasis specific splice variants of Mena and uses thereof in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of tumors" which claims center on our MenaCalc™ diagnostic platform.  Additionally, in February 2014, the USPTO issued U.S. Patent No. 8,642,277 entitled: " Tumor Microenvironment of Metastasis (TMEM) and Uses Thereof in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Tumors” which claims center on our MetaSite Breast™ diagnostic assay.  Both patents are covered under the License Agreement (as defined below).

On August 26, 2010, MetaStat entered into a License Agreement (the “License Agreement”) with Einstein, MIT, Cornell and IFO-Regina. The License Agreement covers pending patent applications, patent disclosures, cell lines and technology surrounding discoveries in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of systemic metastasis in solid epithelial cancers. The License Agreement calls for certain customary payments such as a license signing fee, reimbursement of patent expenses, annual license maintenance fees, milestone payments, and the payment of royalties on sales of products or services covered under the agreement.
 
The intellectual property covered by the License Agreement is summarized as follows:

1.
U.S. Patent No. 8,642,277, entitled “Tumor Microenvironment of Metastasis (TMEM) and Uses Thereof in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment of Tumors”, inventors: Frank Gertler, John Condeelis, Thomas Rohan, and Joan Jones; assigned to MIT, Cornell and Einstein; and

2.
U.S. Continuation-in-part of PCT/US08/1343, entitled “Metastasis specific splice variants of Mena and uses thereof in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of tumors”, inventors: John Condeelis, Sumanta Goswami, Paola Nistico, and Frank Gertler; assigned to Einstein, IFO and MIT; and

3.
U.S. Patent No. 8,603,738, entitled “Metastasis specific splice variants of Mena and uses thereof in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of tumors”, inventors: John Condeelis, Sumanta Goswami, Paola Nistico, and Frank Gertler; assigned to Einstein, IFO and MIT; and

4.
European Patent Application No. 08713370.8, entitled “Metastasis specific splice variants of Mena and uses thereof in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of tumors”, inventors: John Condeelis, Sumanta Goswami, Paola Nistico, and Frank Gertler; assigned to Einstein, IFO and MIT; and

5.
Canadian Patent Application No. 2,676,179, entitled “Metastasis specific splice variants of Mena and uses thereof in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of tumors”, inventors: John Condeelis, Sumanta Goswami, Paola Nistico, and Frank Gertler; assigned to Einstein, IFO and MIT

Pursuant to the License Agreement, we have the right to initiate legal proceedings on our behalf or in the Licensors’ names, if necessary, against any infringer, or potential infringer, of an licensed intellectual property who imports, makes, uses, sells or offers to sell products. Any settlement or recovery received from any such proceeding shall be divided eighty percent (80%) to us and twenty percent (20%) to the Licensors after we deduct from any such settlement or recovery our actual counsel fees and out-of-pocket expenses relative to any such legal proceeding. If we decide not to initiate legal proceedings against any such infringer, then the Licensors shall have the right to initiate such legal proceedings. Any settlement or recovery received from any such proceeding initiated by the Licensors shall be divided twenty percent (20%) to us and eighty percent (80%) to the Licensors after the Licensors deduct from any such settlement or recovery their actual counsel fees and out-of-pocket expenses relative to any such legal proceeding.
 
Further, in accordance with the terms of the License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $25,000 in connection with entering into the License Agreement and are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty payments beginning on the first anniversary date, or August 26, 2011.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year five. To date, we have satisfied payments for 2011, 2012 and 2013 in the amount of $30,000, respectively. We are required to make additional payments of $30,000 in 2014, $50,000 in 2015, $75,000 in 2016 and $100,000 in 2017 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.
 
Additionally, effective in March 2012, we entered into two additional license agreements with Einstein. The second license agreement with Einstein (the “Second License Agreement”) and the third license agreement with Einstein (the “Third License Agreement”) both cover pending patent applications, patent disclosures, cell lines and technology surrounding discoveries in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of systemic metastasis in solid epithelial cancers. The Second License Agreement and the Third License Agreement both require certain customary payments such as a license signing fee, reimbursement of patent expenses, annual license maintenance fees, milestone payments, and the payment of royalties on sales of products or services covered under such agreements.
 
The intellectual property covered by the Second License Agreement is summarized as follows:

1.
U.S. Patent No. 8,298,756 entitled “Isolation, Gene Expression, And Chemotherapeutic Resistance Of Motile Cancer Cells”; inventor: John S. Condeelis; and

2.
Canadian Patent Application No. 2,576,702 entitled “Isolation, Gene Expression, And Chemotherapeutic Resistance Of Motile Cancer Cells”; inventor: John S. Condeelis; and

3.
European Patent Application No. 05807467.5 entitled “Isolation, Gene Expression, And Chemotherapeutic Resistance Of Motile Cancer Cells”; inventor: John S. Condeelis; and 
 
4.
U.S. Provisional Patent Application (pending) entitled “Human Invasion Signature For Prognosis Of Metastatic Risk”; inventors: John S. Condeelis and Antonia Patsialou.
 
The intellectual property covered by the Third License Agreement is summarized as follows:

1.
U.S. Patent Application No. 12/998,237 (based on PCT International Patent Application No. PCT/2009/005851) entitled “An In Vivo Quantitative Screening Test For Anti-Metastasis Treatment Efficacy”; inventors: Jeffrey Edward Segall, John Condeelis, Dmitriy Kedrin, Jacco van Rheenen, Bojana Gligorijevic.
 
Pursuant to the Second License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $15,000 in connection with entering into the Second License Agreement and are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments beginning on the first anniversary date of the effective date, or January 3, 2013.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year three. We have satisfied the license maintenance payment of $12,000 for the first anniversary in 2013. We are required to make additional payments of $12,000 in 2014, which payment due date has been mutually extended by the parties, $30,000 in each of 2015 and 2016, $50,000 in 2017, $75,000 in 2018 and $100,000 in 2019 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.
 
Pursuant to the Third License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $15,000 in connection with entering into the Third License Agreement and are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments beginning on the first anniversary date of the effective date, or January 3, 2013.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year three. We have satisfied the license maintenance payment of $12,000 for the first anniversary in 2013. We are required to make additional payments of $12,000 in 2014, which have been mutually extended by the parties, $30,000 in each of 2015 and 2016, $50,000 in 2017, $75,000 in 2018 and $100,000 in 2019 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.
 
On December 7, 2013, we entered into two separate worldwide exclusive license agreements with MIT and its David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT and its Department of Biology, Einstein, and Montefiore Medical Center (“Montefiore” and, together with MIT and Einstein, the “Alternative Splicing Licensors”). The diagnostic license agreement (the “Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement”) covers pending patent applications, patent disclosures, and technology surrounding discoveries of alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoform markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer through the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (“EMT”) in epithelial solid tumor cancers. The therapeutic license agreement (the “Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement” and, together with the Diagnostic License Agreement, the “2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements”) covers pending patent applications, patent disclosures, and technology surrounding discoveries of alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoform markers for the treatment and/or prevention of cancer through the EMT in epithelial solid tumor cancers. The 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements call for certain customary payments such as a license signing fee, reimbursement of patent expenses, annual license maintenance fees, milestone payments, and the payment of royalties on sales of products or services covered under the agreement.


The intellectual property covered by the 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements is summarized as follows:

1.
U.S. Patent Application No. 14/000,995 entitled “Alternatively Spliced mRNA Isoforms as Prognostic Indicators for  Metastatic Cancer”, by Christopher B. Burge, Wu Albert Cheng, John Condeelis, Frank B. Gertler, Maja Oktay and Irina M. Sharpiro; and

2.
European Patent Application No. 12749944.0 entitled “Alternatively Spliced mRNA Isoforms as Prognostic Indicators for  Metastatic Cancer”, by Christopher B. Burge, Wu Albert Cheng, John Condeelis, Frank B. Gertler, Maja Oktay and Irina M. Sharpiro; and

3.
Singaporean Patent Application No. 201306378-9 entitled “Alternatively Spliced mRNA Isoforms as Prognostic Indicators for  Metastatic Cancer”, by Christopher B. Burge, Wu Albert Cheng, John Condeelis, Frank B. Gertler, Maja Oktay and Irina M. Sharpiro.

In accordance with the terms of the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $15,000 in connection with entering into the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement.  In accordance with the terms of the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $5,000 in connection with entering into the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement. Pursuant to the 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements, we are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments for each license beginning on January 1, 2015. For a period of five years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase each year. The payments are $10,000 in 2015, $15,000 in 2016, $25,000 in 2017, $37,500 in 2018, and $50,000 in 2019, respectively. We are required to make additional payments of $50,000 every year each license is in effect thereafter. The license maintenance fee pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement shall not be due for as long as the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement is in effect. Additionally, these annual license maintenance payments will be credited to running royalties due on net sales earned in the same calendar year.

Further, pursuant to the 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements, we have the right to initiate legal proceedings on our behalf or in the Licensors’ names, if necessary, against any infringer, or potential infringer, of any licensed intellectual property who imports, makes, uses, sells or offers to sell products. Any settlement or recovery received from any such proceeding shall be divided 80% to us and 20% to the Licensors after we deduct from any such settlement or recovery our actual counsel fees and out-of-pocket expenses relative to any such legal proceeding. If we decide not to initiate legal proceedings against any such infringer, then the Licensors shall have the right to initiate such legal proceedings. Any settlement or recovery received from any such proceeding initiated by the Licensors shall be divided 20% to us and 80% to the Licensors after the Licensors deduct from any such settlement or recovery their actual counsel fees and out-of-pocket expenses relative to any such legal proceeding.

We also seek to ensure a competitive position and add to our intellectual property portfolio through licensing, partnerships, joint development and joint venture agreements.

Insurance

We have general and umbrella liability insurance as well as directors and officers insurance in amounts that we believe comply with industry standards.
 
Corporate Structure

We were incorporated on March 28, 2007 under the laws of the State of Nevada.  From inception until November of 2008, our business plan was to produce and market inexpensive solar cells and in November 2008, our board of directors determined that the implementation of our business plan was no longer financially feasible.  At such time, we discontinued the implementation of our prior business plan and pursued an acquisition strategy, whereby we sought to acquire a business. Based on these business activities, until February 27, 2012, we were considered a "blank check" company, with no or nominal assets (other than cash) and no or nominal operations.

 
MetaStat BioMedical, Inc. (“MBM”) (formerly known as MetaStat, Inc.), our Delaware operating subsidiary, was incorporated in the State of Texas on July 22, 2009 and re-incorporated in the State of Delaware on August 26, 2010.  MBM was formed to allow cancer patients to benefit from the latest discoveries in how cancer spreads to other organs in the body. The Company’s mission is to become an industry leader in the emerging field of personalized cancer therapy.

On February 27, 2012 (the “Closing Date”), we consummated a share exchange as more fully described below, whereby we acquired all the outstanding shares of MBM and, MBM became our wholly owned subsidiary. From and after the share exchange, our business is conducted through our wholly owned subsidiary, MBM, and the discussion of our business is that of our current business which is conducted through MBM.
 
Prior to April 9, 2012, our company name was Photovoltaic Solar Cells, Inc. For the sole purpose of changing our name, on April 9, 2012, we merged with a newly-formed, wholly owned subsidiary incorporated under the laws of Nevada called MetaStat, Inc. As a result of the merger, our corporate name was changed to MetaStat, Inc.  In May 2012, we changed the name of our Delaware operating subsidiary to MetaStat BioMedical, Inc. from MetaStat, Inc.
 
Share Exchange
 
Share Exchange
 
On the Closing Date, we entered into a Share Exchange Agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”) by and among us, MBM, the holders of all outstanding shares of MBM (the “MBM Shareholders”) and Waterford Capital Acquisition Co IX, LLC, our principal shareholder (the “Company Principal Shareholder”), whereby we acquired all of the outstanding shares of MBM (the “MBM Shares”) from the MBM Shareholders.  In exchange, we issued to the MBM Shareholders an aggregate of 18,369,421 shares of our common stock (the “Exchange Shares”), equal to 95.6% of our outstanding shares of common stock after such issuance.  As a result of the transactions contemplated by the Exchange Agreement (collectively, the “Share Exchange”), MBM became our wholly owned subsidiary. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, we assumed warrants to purchase up to 780,511 shares of MBM’s common stock, with exercise prices ranging between $1.50 and $2.00 per share on a 2.2-for-1 basis, equivalent to 1,717,122 shares of our common stock with exercise prices ranging from $0.68 to $0.91 per share. Immediately prior to the Share Exchange, we converted approximately $336,075 of debt owed to the Company Principal Shareholder into 309,595 shares of our common stock (the “Debt Conversion”) and issued an aggregate of 36,000 shares of our common stock to certain of our officers, directors and consultants in consideration for services rendered to us, leaving 840,000 shares of our common stock outstanding immediately prior to the issuance of the Exchange Shares. Additionally, immediately prior to the Share Exchange, we issued five-year warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 350,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $1.40 per share, of which warrants to purchase 337,500 shares were issued for a purchase price of $21,000 and warrants to purchase 12,500 shares were issued for services rendered to us prior to the Share Exchange  (the “Warrant Financing”). We used the proceeds of the Warrant Financing to pay off all of our liabilities prior to the Share Exchange.
 
On the Closing Date, we assumed MBM’s 2012 Omnibus Securities and Incentive Plan (the “2012 Plan”) and reserved 1,116,789 shares of our common stock for the benefit of our employees, nonemployee directors and consultants. All 507,500 options outstanding under the 2012 Plan were converted, on a 2.2-for-1 basis, into the right to receive options to purchase up to 1,116,500 shares of our common stock with an exercise price of $0.68 per share.  On May 21, 2012, we increased the number of authorized and unissued shares of common stock reserved for issuance pursuant to the 2012 Plan to 3,116,789.
   
Principal Executive Offices
 
Our principal executive office is located at 8 Hillside Drive, Suite 207, Montclair, New Jersey 07042 and the telephone number at this address is (973) 744-7618.  We have additional executive offices at 1510 Broadway, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10018 and the telephone number at this address is (212) 796-8170. Our website is http://www.metastat.com.  Information contained on our website does not constitute part of, and is not deemed incorporated by reference into, this Form 10-K.

 
Item 1A.
RISK FACTORS
 
In addition to the other information in this Form 10-K, readers should carefully consider the following important factors. These factors, among others, in some cases have affected, and in the future could affect, our financial condition and results of operations and could cause our future results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements that appear in this on Form 10-K or that we have made or will make elsewhere.

Risks Relating to Our Business

If we are unable to continue as a going concern, our securities will have little or no value.

The reports of our independent registered public accounting firms that accompanies our audited consolidated financial statements for the years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013 contain a going concern qualification in which such firm expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. As of February 28, 2014 we had an accumulated deficit of $10,727,675. We currently anticipate that our cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to fund our operations through June 2014, without raising additional capital. Our continuation as a going concern is dependent upon continued financial support from our shareholders, the ability of us to obtain necessary equity and/or debt financing to continue operations, and the attainment of profitable operations. These factors raise substantial doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. We cannot make any assurances that additional financings will be available to us and, if available, completed on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all. If we are unable to complete a debt or equity offering, or otherwise obtain sufficient financing when and if needed, it would negatively impact our business and operations, which would likely cause the price of our common stock to decline. It could also lead to the reduction or suspension of our operations and ultimately force us to cease our operations.

We are at an early stage of development as a company and do not have, and may never have, any products that generate revenues.

We are a development stage life sciences company. At this time, we do not have any commercial products or laboratory services that generate revenues. Our existing diagnostic offerings will require additional clinical evaluation, regulatory review, significant marketing efforts and substantial investment before they could provide any revenues. Given the stage of development where we are, we expect to be able to begin initial marketing as early as 2015 for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and commence full implementation of our sales and marketing strategy as early as 2016. If we are unable to develop, receive approval for, or successfully commercialize any of our diagnostic candidates, we will be unable to generate significant revenues, or any revenues at all. If our development programs are delayed, we may have to raise additional capital or reduce or cease our operations. 

We have a history of net losses, and we expect to incur net losses for the foreseeable future and we expect to continue to incur significant expenses to develop and commercialize our tests.

We have incurred substantial net losses since our inception. For the fiscal years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, we incurred net losses of $5,365,196 and $2,520,579, respectively. From our inception in July 2009 through February 28, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of $10,727,675. To date, we have not achieved, and we may never achieve, revenues sufficient to offset expenses. We expect to devote substantially all of our resources to continue commercializing and enhancing our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, and to continue developing the MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostics assays for breast, prostate and lung cancers, the MenaBloc™ therapeutic platform, and any other future diagnostic tests and therapies. We expect to incur additional losses in the future, and we may never achieve profitability.

We expect to continue to incur significant research and development expenses, which may make it difficult for us to achieve profitability.

In recent years, we have incurred significant costs in connection with the development of our the MetaSite Breast™ test, the MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostics assays for breast, prostate and lung cancers, as well as initial work on the MenaBloc™ therapeutic. Our research and development expenses were $824,336 and $516,798 for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively. We expect our research and development expense levels to remain high for the foreseeable future as we seek to expand the clinical utility of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and develop additional diagnostics and therapeutics in our product portfolio. As a result, we will need to generate significant revenues in order to achieve profitability. Our failure to achieve profitability in the future could cause the market price of our common stock to decline.
 
We do not have our own diagnostic research facilities and will be dependent on third parties for diagnostic product development.

We do not have our own research and development facilities dedicated to diagnostic development and may engage consultants and independent contract research organizations to design and conduct clinical trials in connection with the development of our diagnostic products. As a result, these important aspects of a product's development will be outside of our direct control. In addition, there can be no assurance that such third parties will perform all of their obligations under arrangements with us or will perform those obligations satisfactorily.

If we fail to obtain additional financing, we will be unable to complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates or continue our research and development programs.

In addition to the funds raised in our recent private placements, we may be required to raise additional capital to complete the development and to begin commercialization of our current and future product candidates. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue one or more of our clinical trials, and the commercialization of our diagnostic tests.

If third-party payors, including managed care organizations and Medicare, do not provide reimbursement for our products, their commercial success could be compromised.

Our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test has an anticipated list price of $2,500. Physicians and patients may decide not to order the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test unless third-party payors, such as managed care organizations as well as government payors such as Medicare and Medicaid, pay a substantial portion or all of the test’s price. There is significant uncertainty concerning third-party reimbursement of any test incorporating new technology, including our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and any of our future diagnostics and therapies. Reimbursement by a third-party payor may depend on a number of factors, including a payor’s determination that tests using our technologies are:
 
not experimental or investigational,
medically necessary,
appropriate for the specific patient,
cost-effective, and
supported by peer-reviewed publications.
 
Since each payor makes its own decision as to whether to establish a policy to reimburse, seeking these approvals is a time-consuming and costly process. To date, we have not secured policy-level reimbursement approval from any third-party payors and have no approvals for state Medicaid programs. We cannot be certain that coverage for our products will be provided in the future by any third-party payors.

Several entities conduct technology assessments of new medical tests and devices and provide the results of their assessments for informational purposes to other parties. These assessments may be used by third-party payors and health care providers such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, which collectively provide healthcare coverage for nearly one-third of all Americans, as grounds to deny coverage for a test or procedure. These assessments have not yet been carried for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test. We can offer no assurance that these evaluations will ever be conducted, and if conducted, will result in a positive conclusion resulting in any third party reimbursement to us.

Insurers, including managed care organizations as well as government payors such as Medicare, have increased their efforts to control the cost, utilization and delivery of health care services. From time to time, the United States Congress has considered and implemented changes in the Medicare fee schedules in conjunction with budgetary legislation. Further reductions of reimbursement for Medicare services may be implemented from time to time. Reductions in the reimbursement rates of other third-party payors have occurred and may occur in the future. These measures have resulted in reduced prices, added costs and decreased test utilization for the clinical laboratory industry.

If we are unable to obtain reimbursement approval from private payors and Medicare and Medicaid programs for our diagnostic tests, or if the amount reimbursed is inadequate, our ability to generate revenues could be limited. Even if we are being reimbursed, insurers may withdraw their coverage policies or cancel their contracts with us at any time or stop paying for our tests, which would reduce our revenue.


We may experience delays in our clinical trials that could adversely affect our financial position and our commercial prospects.

Any delays in completing our clinical trials for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and our MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostics assays may delay our ability to raise additional capital or to generate revenue, and we may have insufficient capital resources to support our operations.  Even if we have sufficient capital resources, the ability to become profitable will be delayed if there are problems with the timing or completion of our clinical trials.

Adverse events in our clinical trials may force us to stop development of our product candidates or prevent regulatory approval, if needed, of our product candidates.

Our technology platform may provide us the opportunity to develop therapeutic candidates to preemptively suppress or eliminate metastasis. The eventual testing of our product candidates in human clinical trials may produce serious adverse events. These adverse events could interrupt, delay or halt clinical trials of product candidates and could result in the FDA or other regulatory authorities denying approval of our product candidates for any or all targeted indications. An independent data safety monitoring board, the FDA, other regulatory authorities or we may suspend or terminate clinical trials at any time. We cannot assure that any of our product candidates will be safe for human use.

If our product candidates do not meet safety or efficacy endpoints in clinical evaluations, they will not receive regulatory approval and we will be unable to market them.

The regulatory approval process typically is extremely expensive, takes many years and the timing of any approval cannot be accurately predicted. If we fail to obtain regulatory approval for our current or future product candidates, we will be unable to market and sell such products and therefore may never be profitable. The FDA and other regulatory agencies can delay, limit or deny approval for many reasons, including: (i) a product candidate may not be safe or effective; (ii) the manufacturing processes or facilities we have selected may not meet the applicable requirements; and (iii) changes in FDA’s approval policies or adoption of new regulations may require additional work. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain, regulatory approval for any of our products could prevent us from ever generating meaningful revenues or achieving profitability. 

Even if we receive regulatory approvals, our product candidates may later exhibit adverse effects that limit or prevent their widespread use or that force us to withdraw those product candidates from the market. In addition, a marketed product continues to be subject to strict regulation after approval. Any unforeseen problems with an approved product or any violation of regulations could result in restrictions on the product, including our withdrawal from the market. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain regulatory approval for, any of our products could prevent us from ever generating meaningful revenues or achieving profitability.

Healthcare policy changes, including recently enacted legislation reforming the U.S. healthcare system, may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act, collectively, the PPACA, enacted in March 2010, makes changes that are expected to significantly impact the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and clinical laboratories. Beginning in 2013, each medical device manufacturer will have to pay a sales tax in an amount equal to 2.3% of the price for which such manufacturer sells its medical devices that are listed with the FDA. Although the FDA has contended that clinical laboratory tests that are developed and validated by a laboratory for its own use, or LDTs, such as our MetaSite Breast™ test are medical devices, none of our products are currently listed with the FDA. We cannot assure you that the tax will not be extended to services such as ours in the future. The PPACA also mandates a reduction in payments for clinical laboratory services paid under the Medicare Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule, or CLFS, of 1.75% through 2015 and a productivity adjustment to the CLFS.

 
Other significant measures contained in the PPACA include, for example, coordination and promotion of research on comparative clinical effectiveness of different technologies and procedures, initiatives to revise Medicare payment methodologies, such as bundling of payments across the continuum of care by providers and physicians, and initiatives to promote quality indicators in payment methodologies. The PPACA also includes significant new fraud and abuse measures, including required disclosures of financial arrangements with physician customers, lower thresholds for violations and increasing potential penalties for such violations. In addition, the PPACA establishes an Independent Payment Advisory Board, or IPAB, to reduce the per capita rate of growth in Medicare spending. The IPAB has broad discretion to propose policies to reduce expenditures, which may have a negative impact on payment rates for services. The IPAB proposals may impact payments for clinical laboratory services beginning in 2016 and for hospital services beginning in 2020. We are monitoring the impact of the PPACA in order to enable us to determine the trends and changes that may be necessitated by the legislation that may potentially impact on our business over time.

In addition to the PPACA, the effect of which cannot presently be fully quantified given its recent enactment, various healthcare reform proposals have also emerged from federal and state governments. For example, in February 2012, Congress passed the "Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012" which in part reduced the potential future cost-based increases to the Medicare Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule by 2%. Overall the expected total fee cut to the CLFS for 2013 is 2.95% not including a further reduction of 2% anticipated from implementation of the automatic expense reductions (sequester) under the Budget Control Act of 2011, which will go into effect for dates of service on or after April 1, 2013 unless Congress acts to modify the automatic cuts.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, CMS, sought public input through the notice and comment period for the Proposed Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, on whether all new AMA Molecular Diagnostic codes be placed on either the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, which would likely require a 20% patient co-payment for such services, or remain on the CLFS. On November 1, 2012, CMS issued a final rule on the Physician Fee Schedule, which described that these new codes would be placed on the CLFS. On August 31, 2012, CMS also issued a preliminary determination for the 2013 CLFS which proposed not to recognize Multi-Analyte codes with Algorithmic Analyses, or MAAA, and questioned whether algorithm-based tests are covered benefits for Medicare beneficiaries. However, in its final determination released on November 6, 2012, CMS deleted the statement about not covering algorithmic analysis, and stated that laboratories performing MAAA tests for Medicare beneficiaries should continue to bill for these tests in 2013 as they are currently billed under the CLFS. CMS intends to consider its payment policy for MAAAs again in 2013 and may issue a determination to pay or not pay for these tests beginning in 2014. Our current Medicare reimbursement determination was set by a local coverage decision and not set nationally by CMS. These or any future changes in covered benefit determination, proposed fees or mandated reductions in payments may apply to some or all of our clinical laboratory tests delivered to Medicare beneficiaries.

Changes in healthcare policy, such as the creation of broad test utilization limits for diagnostic products in general or requirements that Medicare patients pay for portions of clinical laboratory tests or services received, could substantially impact the sales of our tests, decrease revenues, increase costs and divert management's attention from our business.

We cannot predict whether future healthcare initiatives will be implemented at the federal or state level or in countries outside of the United States in which we may do business, or the effect any future legislation or regulation will have on us. The taxes imposed by the new federal legislation, cost reduction measures and the expansion in government's role in the U.S. healthcare industry may result in decreased profits to us, lower reimbursements by payors for our products or reduced medical procedure volumes, all of which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, sales of our tests outside the United States make us subject to foreign regulatory requirements and cost-reduction measures, which may also change over time.

 
If the FDA were to begin regulating our MetaSite Breasttest, we could experience significant delays in commercializing the test, be forced to stop our sales, experience significant delays in commercializing any future products, incur substantial costs and time delays associated with meeting requirements for pre-market clearance or approval as well as experience decreased demand for our products and demand for reimbursement of our products.

Clinical laboratory tests like our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test are regulated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, or CLIA, as administered through the CMS, as well as by applicable state laws. Diagnostic kits that are sold and distributed through interstate commerce are regulated as medical devices by FDA. Clinical laboratory tests that are developed and validated by a laboratory for its own use are called laboratory development tests, or LDTs. Most LDTs currently are not subject to FDA regulation, although reagents or software provided by third parties and used to perform LDTs may be subject to regulation. We believe that our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test is not a diagnostic kit and also believe that it is an LDT. As a result, we believe the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test should not be subject to regulation under established FDA policies. The FDA may decide at any time at its sole discretion to modify these rules, or the United States Congress may enact new legislation, resulting in the need for us to conduct further trials in order to qualify the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test for marketing approval. This may reduce or eliminate any potential revenue from sales of the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and may necessitate further round(s) of fund raising resulting in substantial dilution to investors.

Testing of potential products may be required and there is no assurance of FDA or any other regulatory approval.

The FDA and comparable agencies in foreign countries impose substantial requirements upon the introduction of both therapeutic and diagnostic biomedical products, through lengthy and detailed laboratory and clinical testing procedures, sampling activities and other costly and time-consuming procedures. Satisfaction of these requirements typically takes several years or more and varies substantially based upon the type, complexity, and novelty of the product. The effect of government regulation and the need for FDA approval may be to delay marketing of new products for a considerable period of time, to impose costly procedures upon our activities, and to provide an advantage to larger companies that compete with us. There can be no assurance that FDA or other regulatory approval for any products developed by us will be granted on a timely basis or at all. Any such delay in obtaining, or failure to obtain, such approvals would materially and adversely affect the marketing of any contemplated products and the ability to earn product revenue. Further, regulation of manufacturing facilities by state, local, and other authorities is subject to change. Any additional regulation could result in limitations or restrictions on our ability to utilize any of our technologies, thereby adversely affecting our operations. Human diagnostic and pharmaceutical products are subject to rigorous preclinical testing and clinical trials and other approval procedures mandated by the FDA and foreign regulatory authorities. Various federal and foreign statutes and regulations also govern or influence the manufacturing, safety, labeling, storage, record keeping and marketing of pharmaceutical products. The process of obtaining these approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate United States and foreign statutes and regulations are time-consuming and require the expenditure of substantial resources. In addition, these requirements and processes vary widely from country to country. Among the uncertainties and risks of the FDA approval process are the following: (i) the possibility that studies and clinical trials will fail to prove the safety and efficacy of the product, or that any demonstrated efficacy will be so limited as to significantly reduce or altogether eliminate the acceptability of the product in the marketplace, (ii) the possibility that the costs of development, which can far exceed the best of estimates, may render commercialization of the drug marginally profitable or altogether unprofitable, and (iii) the possibility that the amount of time required for FDA approval of a product may extend for years beyond that which is originally estimated. In addition, the FDA or similar foreign regulatory authorities may require additional clinical trials, which could result in increased costs and significant development delays. Delays or rejections may also be encountered based upon changes in FDA policy and the establishment of additional regulations during the period of product development and FDA review. Similar delays or rejections may be encountered in other countries.

 
If we were required to conduct additional clinical trials prior to marketing our diagnostic tests, those trials could lead to delays or failure to obtain necessary regulatory approvals and harm our ability to become profitable.

The FDA requires extensive pre-market clinical testing prior to submitting a regulatory application for commercial sales. Our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and our product candidates require pre-market clinical trials, and whether using prospectively acquired samples or archival samples, delays in the commencement or completion of clinical testing could significantly increase our test development costs and delay commercialization. Many of the factors that may cause or lead to a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to delay or denial of regulatory approval. The commencement of clinical trials may be delayed due to insufficient patient enrollment, which is a function of many factors, including the size of the patient population, the nature of the protocol, the proximity of patients to clinical sites and the eligibility criteria for the clinical trial. We may find it necessary to engage contract research organizations to perform data collection and analysis and other aspects of our clinical trials, which might increase the cost and complexity of our trials. We may also depend on clinical investigators, medical institutions and contract research organizations to perform the trials properly. If these parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or obligations or meet expected deadlines, or if the quality, completeness or accuracy of the clinical data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our clinical protocols or for other reasons, our clinical trials may have to be extended, delayed or terminated. Many of these factors would be beyond our control. We may not be able to enter into replacement arrangements without undue delays or considerable expenditures. If there are delays in testing or approvals as a result of the failure to perform by third parties, our research and development costs would increase, and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for our test. In addition, we may not be able to establish or maintain relationships with these parties on favorable terms, if at all. Each of these outcomes would harm our ability to market our test, or to become profitable.
 
Complying with numerous regulations pertaining to our business is an expensive and time-consuming process, and any failure to comply could result in substantial penalties.

We are subject to CLIA, a federal law that regulates clinical laboratories that perform testing on specimens derived from humans for the purpose of providing information for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of disease. CLIA is intended to ensure the quality and reliability of clinical laboratories in the United States by mandating specific standards in the areas of personnel qualifications, administration, and participation in proficiency testing, patient test management, quality control, quality assurance and inspections. We plan to obtain a certificate of accreditation under CLIA to perform testing. To renew the certificate of accreditation, we will be subject to survey and inspection every two years. Moreover, CLIA inspectors may make random inspections of our laboratory. Currently, CLIA regulations do not include specific standards for a genetic specialty.
 
If we were to lose our CLIA accreditation or appropriate state license(s), whether as a result of a revocation, suspension or limitation, we would no longer be able to sell our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, or other diagnostic tests, which would significantly harm our business. If we were to lose our license in other states where we are required to hold licenses, we would not be able to test specimens from those states.
 
We are subject to other regulations by both the federal government and the states in which we conduct our business, including:
   
●   
Medicare billing and payment regulations applicable to clinical laboratories;
   
●   
the federal Medicare and Medicaid Anti-kickback Law and state anti-kickback prohibitions;
   
●   
the federal physician self-referral prohibition, commonly known as the Stark Law, and the state equivalents;
   
●   
the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996;
   
●   
the Medicare civil money penalty and exclusion requirements; and
   
●   
the federal civil and criminal False Claims Act.

We have and will continue to adopt policies and procedures designed to comply with these laws, including policies and procedures relating to financial arrangements between us and physicians who refer patients to us. In the ordinary course of our business, we conduct internal reviews of our compliance with these laws. Our compliance is also subject to governmental review. The growth of our business and sales organization may increase the potential of violating these laws or our internal policies and procedures. The risk of our being found in violation of these laws and regulations is further increased by the fact that many of them have not been fully interpreted by the regulatory authorities or the courts, and their provisions are open to a variety of interpretations. Any action brought against us for violation of these laws or regulations, even if we successfully defend against it, could cause us to incur significant legal expenses and divert our management’s attention from the operation of our business. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws and regulations, we may be subject to any applicable penalty associated with the violation, including civil and criminal penalties, damages and fines, we could be required to refund payments received by us, and we could be required to curtail or cease our operations. Any of the foregoing consequences could seriously harm our business and our financial results.

Initially, our financial results will depend on sales of one test, the MetaSite Breasttest, and we will need to generate sufficient revenues from this and our other diagnostics or therapies to run our business.

For the foreseeable future, we expect to derive substantially all of our revenues from sales of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test. We anticipate commencing full implementation of our sales and marketing strategy as early as 2015.. We are in various stages of research and development for other function-based diagnostic assays that we may offer as well as for enhancements to our existing test.  We do not currently expect to commercialize these additional tests for additional cancer indications until at least 2016, and we are not currently able to estimate when we may be able to commercialize therapeutics for cancer metastasis or whether we will be successful in doing so.  If we are unable to increase sales of the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test or to successfully develop and commercialize other diagnostic tests, enhancements, or therapeutics, our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability would be impaired, and the market price of our common stock could decline.

We may experience limits on our revenues if physicians decide not to order our tests.

If medical practitioners do not order the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test or any future tests developed by us, we will likely not be able to create demand for our products in sufficient volume for us to become profitable. To generate demand, we will need to continue to make oncologists, surgeons and pathologists aware of the benefits of the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and any products we may develop in the future through published papers, presentations at scientific conferences and one-on-one education by our sales force. Some physicians may decide not to order our test due to its price, part or all of which may be payable directly by the patient if the applicable payor denies reimbursement in full or in part. Even if patients recommend that their physicians use our test, physicians may still decide not to use the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, either because they have not been made aware of its utility or they wish to pursue a particular course of therapy regardless of test results. If only a small portion of the physician population decides to use our test, we will experience limits on our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability. In addition, we will need to demonstrate our ability to obtain adequate reimbursement coverage from third-party payors.   

We may experience limits on our revenues if patients decide not to use our test.

Some patients may decide not to order our test due to its price, part or all of which may be payable directly by the patient if the applicable payor denies reimbursement in full or in part. Even if medical practitioners recommend that their patients use our test, patients may still decide not to use the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, either because they do not want to be made aware of the likelihood of metastasis or they wish to pursue a particular course of therapy regardless of test results. If only a small portion of the patient population decides to use our test, we will experience limits on our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability.

 
If we are unable to develop products to keep pace with rapid technological, medical and scientific change, our operating results and competitive position would be harmed.

In recent years, there have been numerous advances in technologies relating to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. These advances require us to continuously develop new products and enhance existing products to keep pace with evolving standards of care. Our tests could become obsolete unless we continually innovate and expand our products to demonstrate recurrence and treatment benefit in patients treated with new therapies. New treatment therapies typically have only a few years of clinical data associated with them, which limits our ability to perform clinical studies and correlate sets of genes to a new treatment’s effectiveness. If we are unable to demonstrate the applicability of our test to new treatments, then sales of our test could decline, which would harm our revenues.

If we become subject to product liability claims, the damages may exceed insurance coverage levels.

We will obtain liability insurance for our product candidates as each is entered into large population validation studies and/or any other studies where such liability insurance is needed. We cannot predict all of the possible harms or side effects that may result from the use of our products and, therefore, the amount of insurance coverage we currently hold, or that we or our collaborators may obtain, may not be adequate to protect us from any claims arising from the use of our products that are beyond the limit of our insurance coverage. If we cannot protect against potential liability claims, we or our collaborators may find it difficult or impossible to commercialize our products, and we may not be able to renew or increase our insurance coverage on reasonable terms, if at all.

If we are unable to develop adequate sales, marketing or distribution capabilities or enter into agreements with third parties to perform some of these functions, we will not be able to commercialize our products effectively.

We may have a limited infrastructure in sales, marketing and distribution. To directly market and distribute any products, we must effectively build a sales and marketing organization with appropriate technical expertise and distribution capabilities. We may not be able to establish sales, marketing and distribution capabilities of our own or enter into such arrangements with third parties in a timely manner or on acceptable terms.

If we do not find development and commercialization collaborators for our product candidates, we may have to reduce or delay our rate of product development and commercialization and increase our expenditures.

We may enter into relationships with selected biotechnology companies to help develop and commercialize our product candidates, especially in the field of therapeutics. If we are not able to establish such collaborative arrangements, we may have to reduce or delay further development of some of our programs, increase our planned expenditures and undertake development and commercialization activities at our own expense.
 
If we enter into development or commercialization collaborations with biotechnology companies, these relationships will also be subject to a number of risks, including: (i) collaborators may not pursue further development and commercialization of products resulting from collaborations or may elect not to renew research and development programs; (ii) collaborators may delay clinical trials, underfund a clinical trial program, stop a clinical trial or abandon a product candidate, repeat or conduct new clinical trials or require the development of a new formulation of a product candidate for clinical testing; (iii) a collaborator with marketing and distribution rights to one or more of our products may not commit enough resources to the marketing and distribution of our products, limiting our potential revenues from the commercialization of these products; and (iv) disputes may arise delaying or terminating the research, development or commercialization of our product candidates, or result in significant legal proceedings.

Once we have a laboratory facility, it will be our sole laboratory facility and should it become inoperable, we will be unable to perform our tests and our business will be harmed.

We do not currently have laboratory facilities. However, we do expect to open a laboratory facility in the New York metropolitan area. The facility may be harmed or rendered inoperable by natural or man-made disasters, including earthquakes, flooding and power outages, which may render it difficult or impossible for us to perform our tests for some period of time. The inability to perform our tests may result in the loss of customers or harm our reputation, and we may be unable to regain those customers in the future. Although we possess insurance for damage to our property and the disruption of our business, this insurance may not be sufficient to cover all of our potential losses and may not continue to be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

 
In order to rely on a third party to perform our tests, we could only use another facility with established state licensure and CLIA accreditation under the scope of which our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test could be performed following validation and other required procedures. We cannot assure you that we would be able to find another CLIA-certified facility willing to adopt the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test and comply with the required procedures, or that this laboratory would be willing to perform the tests for us on commercially reasonable terms. In order to establish a redundant laboratory facility, we would have to spend considerable time and money securing adequate space, constructing the facility, recruiting and training employees, and establishing the additional operational and administrative infrastructure necessary to support a second facility. Additionally, any new clinical laboratory facility opened by us would be subject to certification under CLIA and licensed by several states, including California and New York, which can take a significant amount of time and result in delays in our ability to begin operations.
 
We rely on a limited number of suppliers or, in some cases, a sole supplier, for some of our laboratory instruments and materials and may not be able to find replacements in the event our supplier no longer supplies that equipment.

We expect to rely on Perkin Elmer to supply some of the laboratory equipment on which we perform our tests. We will periodically forecast our needs for laboratory equipment and enter into standard purchase orders or leasing arrangements based on these forecasts. We believe that there are relatively few equipment manufacturers that are currently capable of supplying the equipment necessary for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test. Even if we were to identify other suppliers, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into agreements with such suppliers on a timely basis on acceptable terms, if at all. If we should encounter delays or difficulties in securing from Perkin Elmer the quality and quantity of equipment we require for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, we may need to reconfigure our test process, which would result in delays in commercialization or an interruption in sales. If any of these events occur, our business and operating results could be harmed. Additionally, if Perkin Elmer deems us to have become uncreditworthy, it has the right to require alternative payment terms from us, including payment in advance. We may also be required to indemnify Perkin Elmer against any damages caused by any legal action or proceeding brought by a third party against Perkin Elmer for damages caused by our failure to obtain required approval with any regulatory agency.
 
We may also rely on several sole suppliers for certain laboratory materials such as reagents, which we use to perform our tests. Although we believe that we will be able to develop alternate sourcing strategies for these materials, we cannot be certain that these strategies will be effective. If we should encounter delays or difficulties in securing these laboratory materials, delays in commercialization or an interruption in sales could occur.

Our success depends on retention of key personnel.

We are dependent on our management team members, including Dr. Oscar L. Bronsther, our chief executive officer and chief medical officer. Our future success also will depend in large part on our continued ability to attract and retain other highly qualified scientific, technical and management personnel, as well as personnel with expertise in sales and marketing, clinical testing, and governmental regulation. We face competition for personnel from other companies, universities, public and private research institutions, government entities and other organizations. If we are unsuccessful in our recruitment and retention efforts, our business will be harmed.

Our corporate compliance program cannot guarantee that we are in compliance with all potentially applicable regulations.

The development, manufacturing, pricing, sales, and reimbursement of our products, together with our general operations, are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state and other authorities within the United States and numerous entities outside of the United States. While we have developed and instituted a corporate compliance program based on what we believe are the current best practices, we cannot assure you that we are or will be in compliance with all potentially applicable regulations. If we fail to comply with any of these regulations, we could be subject to a range of regulatory actions, including suspension or termination of clinical trials, the failure to approve a product candidate, restrictions on our products or manufacturing processes, withdrawal of products from the market, significant fines, or other sanctions or litigation. 


Our operations may involve hazardous materials, and compliance with environmental laws and regulations is expensive.

Our future research and development activities may involve the controlled use of hazardous materials, including chemicals that cause cancer, volatile solvents, radioactive materials and biological materials including human tissue samples that have the potential to transmit diseases. Our operations may also produce hazardous waste products. We are subject to a variety of federal, state and local regulations relating to the use, handling and disposal of these materials. We generally may contract with third parties for the disposal of such substances and may store certain low level radioactive waste at our facility until the materials are no longer considered radioactive. While we believe that we will comply with then current regulatory requirements, we cannot eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials. We may be required to incur substantial costs to comply with current or future environmental and safety regulations. If an accident or contamination occurred, we would likely incur significant costs associated with civil penalties or criminal fines and in complying with environmental laws and regulations.

If we use biological and hazardous materials in a manner that causes injury, we could be liable for damages.

Our activities may require the controlled use of potentially harmful biological materials, hazardous materials and chemicals and may in the future require the use of radioactive compounds. We cannot eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury to employees or third parties from the use, storage, handling or disposal of these materials. In the event of contamination or injury, we could be held liable for any resulting damages, and any liability could exceed our resources or any applicable insurance coverage we may have. Additionally, we are subject on an ongoing basis to federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the use, storage, handling and disposal of these materials and specified waste products. The cost of compliance with these laws and regulations might be significant and could negatively affect our operating results.

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

If we are unable to protect our intellectual property, we may not be able to compete effectively.

Our success will depend in part on our ability to obtain or license patents and enforce patent protection of our products and licensed technologies, as well as the ability of the Licensors to enforce patent protection covering the patents which we license pursuant to the License Agreement, Second License Agreement, Third License Agreement and the 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements both in the United States and other countries to prevent our competitors from developing, manufacturing and marketing products based on our technology. The patent positions of biotechnology companies, such as us, are generally uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions. We will be able to protect our licensed intellectual property rights from unauthorized use by third parties only to the extent that our licensed technologies are covered by any valid and enforceable patents or are effectively maintained as trade secrets. We could incur substantial costs in seeking enforcement of any eventual patent rights against infringement, and we cannot guarantee that patents that we obtain or in-license will successfully preclude others from using technology that we rely upon. We have applied and intend to apply for patents in the United States and other countries covering our technologies and therapies as and when we deem appropriate. However, these applications may be challenged or may fail to result in issued patents. We cannot predict the breadth of claims that maybe allowed and issued in patents related to biotechnology applications. The laws of some foreign countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States, and many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending such rights in foreign jurisdictions. For example, methods of treating humans are not patentable in many countries outside of the United States.

The coverage claimed in a patent application can be significantly narrowed before a patent is issued, both in the United States and other countries. We do not know whether any of the pending or future patent applications will result in the issuance of patents. Any patents we or the Licensors obtain may not be sufficiently broad to prevent others from using our technologies or from developing competing therapeutic products based on our technology or proprietary therapies. Once any such patents have issued, we cannot predict how the claims will be construed or enforced. Furthermore, others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or design around our patents.


To the extent patents may be issued, we do not know whether these patents will be subject to further proceedings that may limit their scope, provide significant proprietary protection or competitive advantage, or cause them to be circumvented or invalidated. Furthermore, patents that may issue on our or the Licensors pending applications may become subject to dispute, including interference, reissue or reexamination proceedings in the United States, or opposition proceedings in foreign countries. Any of these proceedings could result in the limitation or loss of rights.

We may rely on trade secret protection for our confidential and proprietary information. We have taken measures to protect our proprietary information and trade secrets, but these measures may not provide adequate protection. While we seek to protect our proprietary information by entering into confidentiality agreements with employees, collaborators and consultants, we cannot assure that our proprietary information will not be disclosed, or that we can meaningfully protect our trade secrets. In addition, competitors may independently develop or may have already developed substantially equivalent proprietary information or may otherwise gain access to our trade secrets.

The pending patent applications that we have in-licensed or that we may in-license in the future may not result in issued patents, and we cannot assure you that our issued patent or any patents that might ultimately be issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office will protect our technology. Any patents that may be issued to us might be challenged by third parties as being invalid or unenforceable, or third parties may independently develop similar or competing technology that avoids our patents. We cannot be certain that the steps we have taken will prevent the misappropriation and use of our intellectual property, particularly in foreign countries where the laws may not protect our proprietary rights as fully as in the United States.
 
From time to time, the United States Supreme Court, other federal courts, the United States Congress or the United States Patent and Trademark Office may change the standards of patentability and any such changes could have a negative impact on our business. For example, on September 16, 2011, the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, or the Leahy-Smith Act, was signed into law, and includes a number of significant changes to United States patent law. These include changes to transition from a "first-to-invent" system to a "first-to-file" system and to the way issued patents are challenged. These changes may favor larger and more established companies that have more resources to devote to patent application filing and prosecution. The United States Patent and Trademark Office is currently developing regulations and procedures to administer the Leahy-Smith Act, and many of the substantive changes to patent law associated with the Leahy-Smith Act will not become effective until one year or 18 months after its enactment. Accordingly, it is not clear what, if any, impact the Leahy-Smith Act will ultimately have on the cost of prosecuting our patent applications, our ability to obtain patents based on our discoveries and our ability to enforce or defend our issued patents..
 
Litigation or third party claims of intellectual property infringement could impair our ability to develop and commercialize our products successfully.

Our success will depend in part on our ability to avoid infringing patents and proprietary rights of third parties, and not breaching any licenses that we have entered into with regard to our technologies. A number of pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, independent researchers, universities and research institutions may have filed patent applications or may have been granted patents that cover technologies similar to the technologies owned by or licensed to us. For instance, a number of patents may have issued and may issue in the future on tests and technologies that we have developed or intend to develop. If patents covering technologies required by our operations are issued to others, we may have to rely on licenses from third parties, which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.

We have no knowledge of any infringement or patent litigation, threatened or filed at this time. It is possible that we may infringe on intellectual property rights of others without being aware of the infringement. If a patent holder believes that one of our product candidates infringes on our patent, it may sue we even if we has received patent protection for our technology. Third parties may claim that we are employing our proprietary technology without authorization. In addition, third parties may obtain patents that relate to our technologies and claim that use of such technologies infringes these patents. Regardless of their merit, such claims could require us to incur substantial costs, including the diversion of management and technical personnel, in defending ourselves against any such claims or enforcing our patents. In the event that a successful claim of infringement is brought against us, we may be required to pay damages and obtain one or more licenses from third parties. We may not be able to obtain these licenses at a reasonable cost, or at all. Defense of any lawsuit or failure to obtain any of these licenses could adversely affect our ability to develop and commercialize our products.

 
Our rights to use technologies licensed from third parties are not within our control, and we may not be able to sell our products if we lose our existing rights or cannot obtain new rights on reasonable terms.

We license technology necessary to develop our products from third parties. For example, we license technology from MIT, Einstein, Cornell and IFO-Regina located in Rome, Italy, that we use to analyze tissue samples in our tests and that we use in our sponsored research to develop additional tests and to develop anti-metastasis therapeutics. In return for the use of a third party’s technology, we have agreed to pay the licensors royalties based on sales of our products. Royalties are a component of cost of product revenues and impact the profit margin from sales of our test. We may need to license other technology to commercialize future products.  Our liquidity issues in the past have sometimes caused a delay in payment under our existing license agreements.  Our business may suffer if we are unable to meet our obligations, financial or otherwise, under our existing license agreements and these licenses terminate, if the licensors fail to abide by the terms of the license or fail to prevent infringement by third parties, if the licensed patents or other rights are found to be invalid or if we are unable to enter into necessary licenses on acceptable terms.

Risks Related to our Securities
 
Insiders have substantial control over us, and they could delay or prevent a change in our corporate control even if our other stockholders wanted it to occur.

Our executive officers, directors, and principal stockholders hold approximately a large majority of our outstanding common stock. Accordingly, these stockholders are able to control all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions. This could delay or prevent an outside party from acquiring or merging with us even if our other stockholders wanted it to occur.

We cannot assure you that the common stock will become liquid or that it will be listed on a securities exchange. In addition, there may not be sufficient liquidity in the market for our securities in order for investors to sell their securities.

Currently, we are quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board, where an investor may find it difficult to obtain accurate quotations as to the market value of our common stock. In addition, if we fail to meet the criteria set forth in SEC regulations, by law, various requirements would be imposed on broker-dealers who sell its securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors. Consequently, such regulations may deter broker-dealers from recommending or selling our common stock, which may further affect its liquidity. In addition, there is currently only a limited public market for our common stock and there can be no assurance that a trading market will develop further or be maintained in the future.

In order to raise sufficient funds to expand our operations, we may have to issue additional securities at prices, which may result in substantial dilution to our shareholders.

If we raise additional funds through the sale of equity or convertible debt, our current stockholders’ percentage ownership will be reduced. In addition, these transactions may dilute the value of our outstanding securities. We may have to issue securities that may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to our common stock. We cannot provide assurance that we will be able to raise additional funds on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If future financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we may not be able to fund our future needs, which would have a material adverse effect on our business plans, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.
 
The market price of our common stock may be volatile.

The market price of our common stock has been and will likely continue to be highly volatile, as is the stock market in general, and the market for OTC Bulletin Board quoted stocks in particular. Some of the factors that may materially affect the market price of our common stock are beyond our control, such as changes in financial estimates by industry and securities analysts, conditions or trends in the industry in which we operate or sales of our common stock. These factors may materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our performance. In addition, the public stock markets have experienced extreme price and trading volume volatility. This volatility has significantly affected the market prices of securities of many companies for reasons frequently unrelated to the operating performance of the specific companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 
Because we became a public company by means of a “reverse merger,” we may not be able to attract the attention of major brokerage firms and we will also be subject to a one-year "seasoning period" before we will be permitted to list our securities on a securities exchange.

Additional risks may exist since we became public through a “reverse takeover.” Securities analysts of major brokerage firms may not provide coverage of our securities since there is little incentive to brokerage firms to recommend the purchase of our common stock. No assurance can be given that brokerage firms will want to conduct any secondary offerings on our behalf in the future. In addition, companies that become public through a “reverse takeover” are not permitted to list their securities on a securities exchange until (i) the company has completed a one-year “seasoning period” by trading in the United States over-the-counter market or on another regulated United States or foreign exchange following the reverse merger, and filed all required reports with the SEC, including audited financial statements, and (ii) the company maintains the requisite minimum share price for a sustained period, and for at least 30 of the 60 trading days, immediately prior to its listing application and the exchange’s decision to list.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results. As a result, current and potential investors could lose confidence in our financial reporting, which could harm our business and have an adverse effect on our stock price.

Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we are required to annually furnish a report by our management on our internal control over financial reporting. Such report must contain, among other matters, an assessment by our principal executive officer and our principal financial officer on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, including a statement as to whether or not our internal control over financial reporting is effective as of the end of our fiscal year. This assessment must include disclosure of any material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting identified by management. In addition, under current SEC rules, we may be required to obtain an attestation from our independent registered public accounting firm as to our internal control over financial reporting for our annual report on Form 10-K covering our next fiscal year. Performing the system and process documentation and evaluation needed to comply with Section 404 is both costly and challenging. During the course of our testing we may identify deficiencies which we may not be able to remediate in time to meet the deadline imposed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 for compliance with the requirements of Section 404. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.
 
Our common stock is considered “penny stock.”

The SEC has adopted regulations, which generally define “penny stock” to be an equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to specific exemptions. The market price of the common stock is currently less than $5.00 per share and therefore may be a “penny stock.” Brokers and dealers effecting transactions in “penny stock” must disclose certain information concerning the transaction, obtain a written agreement from the purchaser and determine that the purchaser is reasonably suitable to purchase the securities. These rules may restrict the ability of brokers or dealers to sell the common stock and may affect your ability to sell shares.
 
The market for penny stocks has experienced numerous frauds and abuses, which could adversely impact investors in our stock.

Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board, or OTCBB, securities are frequent targets of fraud or market manipulation, both because of their generally low prices and because OTCBB reporting requirements are less stringent than those of the stock exchanges or NASDAQ.

 
Patterns of fraud and abuse include:
 
 ●   
Control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer;
 ●   
Manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases;
 ●   
“Boiler room” practices involving high pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced sales persons;
 ●   
Excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differentials and markups by selling broker-dealers; and
 ●   
Wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the inevitable collapse of those prices with consequent investor losses.
 
Our management is aware of the abuses that have occurred historically in the penny stock market.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 2.
PROPERTIES

We maintain an executive office at 8 Hillside Avenue, Suite 207, Montclair, New Jersey 07042. On March 1, 2014 entered into a six month lease arrangement for 550 square feet of executive offices at 1510 Broadway, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10018 for $5,700 per month for our management and administrative facilities. This lease agreement will automatically renew for successive periods under the same terms unless alternative arrangements have been made in writing at least sixty days prior to the end date.

Effective as of September 1, 2013, we entered into an agreement of lease with Long Island High Technology Incubator, Inc. in connection with our new drug discovery research facility located in Stony Brook, NY. The term of the lease is for one year, from September 1, 2013 through August 31, 2014, and the rent payable thereunder is $28,000 per year, payable in monthly installments of $2,333.

We anticipate entering into a lease agreement for a commercial reference laboratory and research and development space, as early as the second half of calendar 2014.
 
Item 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are not engaged in any material litigation, arbitration or claim, and no material litigation, arbitration or claim is known by our management to be pending or threatened by or against us that would have a material adverse effect on our results from operations or financial condition.
 
Item 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
 
Not applicable.

 
Item 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Market Price Information for our Common Stock

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCBB under the symbol “MTST.” The following table sets forth the high and low bid information for our common stock for the two most recent fiscal years. The OTCBB quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, are without retail markup, markdowns or commissions, and may not represent actual transactions.
 
   
Common Stock
 
   
High
   
Low
 
March 1, 2012 through May 31, 2012
 
$
5.00
   
$
0.15
 
June 1, 2012 through August 31, 2012
 
$
6.00
   
$
3.00
 
September 1, 2012 through November 30, 2012
 
$
4.25
   
$
3.00
 
December 1, 2012 through February 28, 2013
 
$
3.75
   
$
3.50
 
March 1, 2013 through May 31, 2013
 
$
3.50
   
$
2.43
 
June 1, 2013 through August 31, 2013
 
$
2.60
   
$
1.50
 
September 1, 2013 through November 30, 2013
 
$
1.79
   
$
1.30
 
December 1, 2013 through February 28, 2014
 
$
1.91
   
$
1.33
 
 
On June 12, 2014, the last reported price for our common stock on the OTC Bulletin Board was $1.09
 
Number of Record Holders of Our Common Stock
 
As of June 10, 2014, we had 21,623,899 shares of our common stock outstanding and 130 holders of record of our common stock.  The number of record holders was determined from our records and the records of our transfer agent.
 
Dividend Policy

We currently intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings for use in the operation and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock for the foreseeable future.
 
Future cash dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon our future operations and earnings, capital requirements and surplus, general financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant. We can pay dividends only out of our profits or other distributable reserves and dividends or distribution will only be paid or made if we are able to pay our debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

Equity Compensation Plan Information
Plan category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants
and rights
(a)
   
Weighted-average exercise
price of outstanding options,
warrants and rights
(b)
   
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under equity
compensation plans
(excluding securities
reflected in column (a))
(c)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
   
2,680,000
   
$
1.70
     
33,776
 
Total
   
2,680,000
   
$
1.70
     
33,776
 

* Does not include 403,013 restricted shares of common stock issued under the Plan.
 
 
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
 
May 2014 Convertible Note and Warrant Offering
 
In May and June 2014, we entered into separate convertible note and warrant purchase agreements with certain accredited investors for the issuance and sale in a private placement consisting of, in the aggregate: (a) $165,000 principal amount of convertible promissory notes (the “May 2014 Notes”) convertible into shares of our common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Common Stock”), and (b) five-year warrants to purchase up to 55,001 shares of Common Stock at an exercise price of $1.50 per share, for aggregate gross proceeds of $165,000.

The May 2014 Notes bear interest at the rate of 8% per annum, mature on August 15, 2014 and rank pari passu to the Company’s currently issued and outstanding 2013 Notes, 2014 Notes, and Additional 2014 Notes and senior to the Company’s issued and outstanding equity securities. Upon the closing by the Company of an equity or equity based financing or a series of equity or equity based financings (a “Qualified Financing”) resulting in gross proceeds to the Company of at least $5,000,000 in the aggregate and the Company, prior to or concurrent with the completion of the Qualified Financing, (the “Qualified Financing Threshold Amount”), the outstanding principal amount of the May 2014 Notes together with all accrued and unpaid interest (the “Outstanding Balance”) shall automatically convert into such securities, including Warrants of the Company as are issued in the Qualified Financing, the amount of which shall be determined in accordance with the following formula: (the Outstanding Balance as of the closing of the Qualified Financing) x (1.15) / (the per security price of the securities sold in the Qualified Financing). For purposes of determining whether the Qualified Financing Threshold Amount has been satisfied, such amount shall include (i) the Outstanding Balance of the May 2014 Notes, (ii) the outstanding principal amount of the 2013 Notes, (iii) the outstanding principal amount of the 2014 Notes, and (iv) the outstanding principal amount of the Additional 2014 Notes, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereunder.
 
The forms of each of the convertible note and warrant purchase agreement, May 2014 Note and warrant are attached to this Annual Report on Form 10-K as Exhibits 10.15, 4.4 and 4.5, respectively, and are incorporated herein by reference.  Each of the issuances reflected above were exempt from registration pursuant to Section 4(2) of, and Regulation D promulgated under, the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 7.
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Our audited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. In addition, our audited consolidated financial statements and the financial data included in this Form 10-K reflect our reorganization and have been prepared as if our current corporate structure had been in place throughout the relevant periods. The following discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including, without limitation, statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, intentions or future strategies that are signified by the words “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” or similar language. All forward-looking statements included in this document are based on information available to us on the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements. Our business and financial performance are subject to substantial risks and uncertainties. Actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. In evaluating our business, you should carefully consider the information set forth under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

 
Business Overview

We are a development stage life sciences company that is focused on developing and commercializing novel diagnostic tests and therapeutics for the early and reliable prediction and treatment of systemic metastasis - cancer that spreads from a primary tumor through the bloodstream to other areas of the body. Systemic metastasis is responsible for ~90% of all solid tumor cancer related deaths and as such, we believe the more effective treatment of metastatic disease and/or the prevention of metastasis is needed to improve patient outcomes. Our initial Breast Cancer Diagnostic test will be used for early stage breast cancer patients to predict the likelihood of systemic metastasis. We anticipate all tumor samples will be sent to our clinical reference laboratory that we anticipate establishing in New York for analysis. Upon generation and delivery of a “Metastasis Score” report to the physician, we plan to bill third-party payors for the Breast Cancer Diagnostic test. We project that the list price of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test will be $2,500.

Clinical studies of 585 patients in the aggregate for the MetaSite Breast™ test and 1,203 patients in the aggregate for the MenaCalc™ breast cancer test have successfully been completed to date.  In 2014, we plan to initiate additional clinical utility studies for both the MetaSite Breast™ and MenaCalc™ breast cancer tests.  We anticipate establishing a laboratory that will be a clinical reference laboratory as defined under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (“CLIA”). Based on CLIA certification, we anticipate commencing initial marketing of the MetaSite Breast™ test in 2015 followed by our MenaCalc™ diagnostic assay for breast cancer by late 2015. We plan to initially market to a select number of physicians and cancer centers in targeted markets in the United States. We expect this will subsequently be followed by a national rollout. We believe a subsequent increase in demand will result from the publication of further studies in one or more peer-reviewed scientific/medical journals and the presentation of study results at gatherings such as the ASCO meeting and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Initially, we expect our reference laboratory will have the capacity to process up to 1,000 tests per quarter, and our current expansion plan contemplates that we will have capacity to process up to 15,000 tests per quarter by the end of calendar 2015.

We believe the key factors that will drive broader adoption of function-based diagnostic assays will be acceptance by healthcare providers of their clinical benefits, demonstration of the cost-effectiveness of using our tests, expansion of our sales force and increased marketing efforts and expanded reimbursement by third-party payors. Reimbursement by third-party payors is essential to our commercial success. In general, clinical laboratory testing services, when covered, are paid under various methodologies, including prospective payment systems and fee schedules. Reimbursement from payors depends upon whether a service is covered under the patient’s policy and if payment practices for the service have been established. As a relatively new diagnostic test, we may be considered investigational by payors and not covered under current reimbursement policies.
 
Upon commercialization of our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test, we will begin working with third-party payors to establish reimbursement coverage policies. Where policies are not in place, we will pursue case-by-case reimbursement. We believe that as much as 20% of our future revenues may be derived from tests billed to Medicare. 
 
Since our inception, we have generated significant net losses. As of February 28, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of $10,727,675. We incurred net losses of $5,365,196 and $2,520,579 in the years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively. We expect our net losses to continue for at least the next several years. We anticipate that a substantial portion of our capital resources and efforts will be focused on research and development, both to develop additional tests for breast cancer and to develop products for other cancers, and to scale up our commercial organization, and other general corporate purposes. Our financial results will be limited by a number of factors, including establishment of coverage policies by third-party insurers and government payors, our ability in the short term to collect from payors often requiring a case-by-case manual appeals process, and our ability to recognize revenues other than from cash collections on tests billed until such time as reimbursement policies or contracts are in effect. Until we receive routine reimbursement and are able to record revenues as tests are processed and reports delivered, we are likely to continue reporting net losses.
 
We currently anticipate that our cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to fund our operations through June 2014, without raising additional capital. Our continuation as a going concern is dependent upon continued financial support from our shareholders, the ability of us to obtain necessary equity and/or debt financing to continue operations, and the attainment of profitable operations. These factors raise substantial doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. We cannot make any assurances that additional financings will be available to us and, if available, completed on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all. If we are unable to complete a debt or equity offering, or otherwise obtain sufficient financing when and if needed, it would negatively impact our business and operations and could also lead to the reduction or suspension of our operations and ultimately force us to cease our operations.

 
Financial Operations Overview

General and Administrative Expenses
 
General and administrative expenses from our inception through February 28, 2014 were $7,345,295. Our general and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel related costs, legal costs, including intellectual property, accounting costs and other professional and administrative costs. 

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses from our inception through February 28, 2014 were $2,365,539 and substantially all of these expenses were focused on the research and development of the MetaSite Breast™ test. During this time, the MetaSite Breast™ test was not the only product under development. Research and development expenses also represent costs incurred to develop our MenaCalc™ platform of diagnostic assays in breast, lung, and prostate cancers and initial research on our MenaBloc™ therapeutic platform.

We charge all research and development expenses to operations as they are incurred. All potential future product programs, apart from the our Breast Cancer Diagnostic are in the clinical research phase, and the earliest we expect our prostate, lung and colorectal cancer programs to reach the clinical development stage is 2016. However, the expected time frame that a product related to prostate, lung and colorectal cancers can be brought to market is uncertain given the technical challenges and clinical variables that exist between different types of cancers.
 
We do not record or maintain information regarding costs incurred in research and development on a program or project specific basis. Our research and development staff working under sponsored research agreements and consulting agreements and associated infrastructure resources are deployed across several programs. Many of our costs are thus not attributable to individual programs. We believe that allocating costs on the basis of time incurred by our employees does not accurately reflect the actual costs of a project.

As a result of the uncertainties discussed above, we are unable to determine the duration and completion costs of our research and development programs or when, if ever, and to what extent we will receive cash inflows from the commercialization and sale of a product.

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates
 
This discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. We evaluate our estimates and judgments on an ongoing basis. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results could therefore differ materially from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
 
Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K.  We believe the following critical accounting policies reflect our more significant estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of our financial statements.

Stock-based Compensation

We account for share-based payments award issued to employees and members of our Board of Directors by measuring the fair value of the award on the date of grant and recognizing this fair value as stock-based compensation using a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, generally the vesting period.  For awards issued to non-employee, the measurement date is the date when the performance is complete or when the award vests, whichever is the earliest. Accordingly, non-employee awards are measured at each reporting period until the final measurement date. The fair value of the award is recognized as stock-based compensation over the requisite service period, generally the vesting period.

 
 Debt Instruments

We analyze debt issuance for various features that would generally require either bifurcation and derivative accounting, or recognition of a debt discount or premium under authoritative guidance.

Detachable warrants issued in conjunction with debt are measured at their relative fair value, if they are determined to be equity instruments, or their fair value, if they are determined to be liability instruments, and recorded as a debt discount.  Conversion features that are in the money at the commitment date constitute a beneficial conversion feature that is measured at its intrinsic value and are recognized as debt discount. Debt discount is amortized as accretion expense over the maturity period of the debt using the effective interest method. Contingent beneficial conversion feature are recognized when the contingency has been resolved.

Results of Operations

Comparison of the Years Ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013
 
Revenues.  There were no revenues for the years ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively, because we have not yet commercialized any of our function-based diagnostics assays.
 
General and Administrative Expenses.  General and administrative expenses totaled $3,526,863 for the year ended February 28, 2014 as compared to $2,000,937 for the year ended February 28, 2013. This represents an increase of $1,525,926 for the year ended February 28, 2014 over the year ended February 28, 2013. This increase was due in part to increases in costs for employee salaries, share-based compensation, legal, including intellectual property, accounting and other professional and consulting costs. General and administrative expenses included share-based compensation of $1,637,584 and $5,269 for the year ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively, and warrants issued for services of $42,993 and $228,689 for the year ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively.

Research and Development Expenses.Research and development expenses were $824,336 for the year ended February 28, 2014 as compared to $516,798 for the year ended February 28, 2013. This represents an increase of $307,538 for the year ended February 28, 2014 over the year ended February 28, 2013.  This increase resulted primarily from the initiation of our therapeutic development program and share-based compensation.  Research and development expenses included share-based compensation of $294,188 for the year ended February 28, 2014 as compared to $0 for the year ended February 28, 2013.
 
Other Expenses (Income). Other expenses (income) amounted to $1,013,933 for the year ended February 28, 2014 and consisted of $829,969 of accretion expense $137,098 of interest ,expense, and $32,853 loss on extinguishment of debt, all related to convertible promissory notes.  There were no comparable transactions during the year ended February 28, 2013.

Net Loss.  As a result of the factors described above, we had a net loss of $5,365,196 for the year ended February 28, 2014 as compared to $2,520,579 for the year ended February 28, 2013.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Since our inception, we have incurred significant losses and, as of February 28, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of $10,727,675. We have not yet achieved profitability and anticipate that we will continue to incur net losses for the foreseeable future. We expect that our research and development, general and administrative and selling and marketing expenses will continue to grow and, as a result, we will need to generate significant product revenues to achieve profitability. We may never achieve profitability.

 
Sources of Liquidity

Since our inception, substantially all of our operations have been financed through the sale of our common stock and convertible promissory notes. Through February 28, 2014, we had received net proceeds of $4,283,755 through the sale of common stock to investors and $2,842,000 from the sale of convertible promissory notes.  As of February 28, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents of $483,408 and net debt of $2,475,717.  As a result of the most recent sale of shares of common stock and convertible promissory notes, as of February 28, 2014, we have outstanding warrants to purchase 3,146,355 shares of our common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $1.24, which could result in proceeds to us of approximately $3.9 million if all outstanding warrants were exercised for cash.

Cash Flows

As of February 28, 2014, we had $483,408 in cash and cash equivalents, compared to $969,188 on February 28, 2013. 

Net cash used in operating activities was $2,199,534 for the year ended February 28, 2014, compared to $2,395,909 for the year ended February 28, 2013. The decrease in cash used of $196,375 was primarily due to an increase of accounts payable to a normalized level for the year ended February 28, 2014 as compared to the year ended February 28, 2013, where accounts payable were reduced.

Net cash used in investing activities was $172,724 for the year ended February 28, 2014, compared to $45,243 for the year ended February 28, 2013. This cash was used for purchases of equipment. We expect amounts used in investing activities to increase in fiscal year 2015 and beyond as we grow our corporate infrastructure, expand research and development activities and establish and add capacity in our commercial laboratory.

Net cash provided by financing activities during the year ended February 28, 2014 was $1,886,478, compared to $2,532,000 for the year ended February 28, 2013. Financing activities consisted primarily of the sale of our convertible promissory notes and common stock purchase warrants for the year ended February 28, 2014 and the sale of our common stock and common stock purchase warrants and convertible promissory notes and common stock purchase warrants for the year ended February 28, 2013.

Capital Raising Requirements

Pursuant to the License Agreement, the Second License Agreement and the Third License Agreement, we are required to meet certain capital raising or financing requirements beginning on the first anniversary of the effective date of the License Agreement, or August 26, 2011.  These capital raising requirements are inclusive for all three license agreements.  We must meet the following conditions:

    1.   Raise $750,000 in debt, equity or other financing or revenues by the first anniversary of the effective date of the License Agreement, which requirement has been satisfied by us.

    2.   Raise $2,000,000 in debt, equity or other financing or revenues by the third anniversary of the effective date, which requirement has been satisfied by us.

    3.   Raise $5,000,000 in debt, equity or other financing or revenues by the fifth anniversary of the effective date, which requirement has been satisfied by us.

Subsequent Events
 
Convertible Note and Warrant Offering
 
In May and June 2014, we entered into separate convertible note and warrant purchase agreements with certain institutional and accredited investors for the issuance and sale in a private placement consisting of, in the aggregate: (a) $165,000 principal amount of Notes convertible into shares of our common stock, and (b) five-year warrants to purchase up to 50,001 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $1.50 per share, for aggregate gross proceeds of $165,000.
 
 
 
Contractual Obligations

As of February 28, 2014, we had the following contractual commitments:
 
   
Payments Due by Period
       
Less than
       
More than 5
Contractual Obligations
 
Total
   
1 Year
   
1-3 Years
 
4-5 Years
 
Years
   
(In thousands)
License Agreement
 
$
455
   
$
30
   
$
225
 
$
200
 
$
(1)
                                   
Second License Agreement
 
$
397
   
$
42
   
$
155
 
$
200
 
$
(2)
                                   
Third License Agreement
 
$
397
   
$
42
   
$
155
 
$
200
 
$
(3)
                                   
Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement
 
$
187
   
$
10
   
$
77
 
$
100
 
$
(4)
                                   
Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement (6)
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
$
0
 
$
(5)

    (1) Amount of additional payments depends on several factors, including the duration of the License Agreement, which depends on expiration of the last patent to be issued pursuant to the License Agreement. That duration is uncertain because the last patent has not yet been issued.

     (2) Amount of additional payments depends on several factors, including the duration of the Second License Agreement, which depends on expiration of the last patent to be issued pursuant to the Second License Agreement. That duration is uncertain because the last patent has not yet been issued.

     (3) Amount of additional payments depends on several factors, including the duration of the Third License Agreement, which depends on expiration of the last patent to be issued pursuant to the Third License Agreement. That duration is uncertain because the last patent has not yet been issued.

(4) Amount of additional payments depends on several factors, including the duration of the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement, which depends on expiration of the last patent to be issued pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement. That duration is uncertain because the last patent has not yet been issued.

(5) Amount of additional payments depends on several factors, including the duration of the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement, which depends on expiration of the last patent to be issued pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement. That duration is uncertain because the last patent has not yet been issued.

(6) The license maintenance fee pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement shall not be due for as long as the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement is in effect.  

Pursuant to the License Agreement, we are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments under the License Agreement beginning on the first anniversary date, or August 26, 2011.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year five. To date, we have satisfied payments for 2012 and 2013 in the amount of $30,000, respectively. We are required to make additional payments of $30,000 in 2014, $50,000 in 2015, $75,000 in 2016 and $100,000 in 2017 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.

 
Pursuant to the Second License Agreement, we are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments beginning on the first anniversary date of the effective date, or January 3, 2013.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year three. We have satisfied the license maintenance payment of $12,000 for the first anniversary in 2013 We are required to make additional payments of $12,000 in 2014, which payment due date has been mutually extended by the parties, $30,000 in each of 2015 and 2016, $50,000 in 2017, $75,000 in 2018 and $100,000 in 2019 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.
 
Pursuant to the Third License Agreement, we are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments beginning on the first anniversary date of the effective date, or January 3, 2013.  For a period of seven years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase beginning in year three. We have satisfied the license maintenance payment of $12,000 for the first anniversary in 2013. We are required to make additional payments of $12,000 in 2014, which payment due date has been mutually extended by the parties, $30,000 in each of 2015 and 2016, $50,000 in 2017, $75,000 in 2018 and $100,000 in 2019 and every year the license is in effect thereafter.
 
Pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $15,000 in connection with entering into the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement and in accordance with the terms of the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement, we paid a license signing fee of $5,000 in connection with entering into the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement.  Pursuant to the 2014 Alternative Splicing License Agreements, we are required to make a series of annual minimum royalty or “license maintenance” payments for each license beginning on January 1, 2015.  For a period of five years on each anniversary, we are required to make additional payments in amounts that gradually increase each year. The payments are $10,000 in 2015, $15,000 in 2016, $25,000 in 2017, $37,500 in 2018, and $50,000 in 2019, respectively.  We are required to make additional payments of $50,000 every year each license is in effect thereafter.  The license maintenance fee pursuant to the Alternative Splicing Therapeutic License Agreement shall not be due for as long as the Alternative Splicing Diagnostic License Agreement is in effect.  Additionally, these annual license maintenance payments will be credited to running royalties due on net sales earned in the same calendar year.
 
Effective as of September 1, 2013, the Company entered into an agreement of lease with Long Island High Technology Incubator, Inc. in connection with the Company’s new drug discovery research facility located in Stony Brook, New York. The term of the lease is for one year, from September 1, 2013 through August 31, 2014, and the rent payable thereunder is $28,000 per year, payable in monthly installments of $2,333.

On March 1, 2014, we entered into a six-month lease arrangement for 550 square feet of offices at 1510 Broadway, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10018 for $5,700 per month for our management and administrative facilities. The lease agreement will automatically renew for successive periods under the same terms unless alternative arrangements have been made in writing at least sixty days prior to the end date.

Beginning as early as the first quarter of fiscal 2015, we intend to enter into arrangements for the acquisition of laboratory equipment, computer hardware and software, leasehold improvements and office equipment. We cannot at this time provide assurances that we will be able to enter into agreements with vendors on terms commercially favorable to us or that we will be able to enter into such arrangements without securing additional financing.

Operating Capital and Capital Expenditure Requirements

We expect to continue to incur substantial operating losses in the future and to make capital expenditures to keep pace with the expansion of our research and development programs and to scale up our commercial operations. It may take several years to move any one of a number of product candidates in clinical research through the development and validation phases to commercialization. We expect that the remainder of the net proceeds and our existing cash and cash equivalents will be used to fund working capital and for capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes, such as licensing technology rights, partnering arrangements for the processing of tests outside the United States or reduction of contractual obligations. A portion of the net proceeds may also be used to acquire or invest in complementary businesses, technologies, services or products. We have no current plans, agreements or commitments with respect to any such acquisition or investment, and we are not currently engaged in any negotiations with respect to any such transaction.

 
The amount and timing of actual expenditures may vary significantly depending upon a number of factors, such as the progress of our product development, regulatory requirements, commercialization efforts, the amount of cash used by operations and progress in reimbursement. We expect that we will receive limited payments for our Breast Cancer Diagnostic test billings from the beginning of our marketing efforts into the foreseeable future. As reimbursement contracts with third-party payors are put into place, we expect an increase in the number and level of payments received for the MetaSite Breast™ test billings.

We currently anticipate that our cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to fund our operations through June 2014, without raising additional capital. We cannot be certain that any of our future efforts to secure reimbursement contract programs or development of future products will be successful or that we will be able to raise sufficient additional funds to see these programs through to a successful result.  We are currently exploring various financing options that are available to us.

Our future funding requirements will depend on many factors, including the following:

the rate of progress in establishing reimbursement arrangements with third-party payors;
 
     
  ●  
the cost of expanding our commercial and laboratory operations, including our selling and marketing efforts;
 
     
  ●  
the rate of progress and cost of research and development activities associated with expansion of products for breast cancer;
     
  ●  
the rate of progress and cost of research and development activities associated with products in the research phase focused on cancer, other than breast cancer;
     
  ●  
the cost of acquiring or achieving access to tissue samples and technologies;
 
     
  ●  
the costs of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing any patent claims and other intellectual property rights;
     
  ●  
the effect of competing technological and market developments;
 
 
  ●  
the cost and delays in product development as a result of any changes in regulatory oversight applicable to our products; and
     
  ●  
the economic and other terms and timing of any collaborations, licensing or other arrangements into which we may enter.

Until we can generate a sufficient amount of product revenues to finance our cash requirements, which we may never do, we expect to finance future cash needs primarily through public or private equity offerings, debt financings, borrowings or strategic collaborations. The issuance of equity securities may result in dilution to stockholders. We do not know whether additional funding will be available on acceptable terms, or at all.  If we are not able to secure additional funding when needed, we may have to delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate one or more research and development programs or selling and marketing initiatives. In addition, we may have to work with a partner on one or more of our product development programs or market development programs, which would lower the economic value of those programs to our company.

Income Taxes

Since inception, we have incurred operating losses and, accordingly, have not recorded a provision for income taxes for any of the periods presented. As of February 28, 2014, we had cumulative net operating loss carryforwards for federal income tax purposes of $7,372,397. If not utilized, the federal net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards will expire beginning in the year 2029. Utilization of net operating loss and credit carryforwards may be subject to a substantial annual limitation due to restrictions contained in the Internal Revenue Code that are applicable if we experience an “ownership change.” The annual limitation may result in the expiration of our net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards before they can be used.

 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements

We have implemented all new relevant accounting pronouncements that are in effect through the date of these financial statements. These pronouncements did not have any material impact on the financial statements unless otherwise disclosed, and we do not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.
 
Item 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Not applicable.
 
Item 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCIAL DATA
 
Consolidated Financial Statements
 
The financial statements required by this item begin on page F-1 hereof.
 
Item 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
 
None.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
Disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including principal executive and financial officers, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. There are inherent limitations to the effectiveness of any system of disclosure controls and procedures, including the possibility of human error and the circumvention or overriding of the controls and procedures. Accordingly, even effective disclosure controls and procedures can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives.
 
Management carried out an evaluation, under the supervision of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures as of February 28, 2014. Based upon that evaluation, management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that the design and operation of disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, which is described below.
 
Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Management assessed the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of February 28, 2014.  In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on its assessment using those criteria, management concluded that internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of February 28, 2014.  The primary factors contributing to the material weakness, which relates to our financial statement close process, were:

Lack of proper segregation of duties due to limited personnel; and
 
Lack of a formal review process that includes multiple levels of review, resulting in adjustments related shared based compensation.  

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to obtain an attestation report from our registered public accounting firm regarding internal controls over financial reporting.
 
Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting.

We have had no changes in internal control over financial reporting during the period ended February 28, 2014 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, internal control over financial reporting.
 
OTHER INFORMATION
 
None.

 
 
Item 10.
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Directors and Executive Officers

Name
 
Age
 
Position
Oscar L. Bronsther, M.D., F.A.C.S.
  62  
Chief Executive Officer, Chief Medical Officer and Director (1)
Warren C. Lau
  60  
President, Chief Financial Officer and Director (2)
Daniel H. Schneiderman
  36  
Vice President, Finance, Comptroller and Secretary
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
  41  
Chairman of the Board of Directors (1)
David N. Siegel
  52  
Director (1)
Patrick T. Mooney, M.D.
  46  
Director (1)
David M. Epstein, Ph.D.
  55  
Director (3)
______________
(1)  
Appointed as a member of our board of directors on February 27, 2012, effective as of April 7, 2012.
(2)  
Appointed as a member of our board of directors on February 27, 2012.
(3)  
Appointed as a member of our board of directors on April 16, 2013.

Oscar Bronsther, M.D., F.A.C.S.  Dr. Bronsther was appointed as chief medical officer and chairman of our board of directors on February 27, 2012, effective as of April 7, 2012.  Dr Bronsther was appointed as our chief executive officer on December 21, 2012, at which time he resigned as chairman of the board.  Dr. Bronsther is a Diplomat, American Board of Surgery, and since November 2008, has served as the Chairman, Section of General Surgery, at Inova Fairfax Hospital. Since September 2003, he has also served as Clinical Professor of Surgery at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.  From 2005 to 2007, he served as Chairman of the Board of National Transplant Network.  Dr. Bronsther received his B.A. from the University of Rochester in 1973, his M.D. from Downstate Medical Center in 1978, was a Fellow in Kidney Transplantation at Downstate Medical Center, and was a Fellow in Liver Transplantation at the University of Pittsburgh Center.  Dr. Bronsther’s editorial positions include Reviewer, Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Transplantation, Transplant Proceedings, Liver Transplantation and Surgery, and the American Journal of Kidney Disease.  Dr. Bronsther is the author of 63 peer-reviewed publications, seven books and book chapters, and has participated in over 30 invited lectures. Dr. Bronsther’s broad range of experience in medicine, academia, and administration enable him to provide a unique and valuable perspective to our board of directors.

Warren C. Lau. Mr. Lau has served as our president and director since February 27, 2012.  Mr. Lau also served as our chief executive officer from February 27, 2012 to December 21, 2012.   Mr. Lau was appointed our chief financial officer on May 1, 2012. From July 2009 until February 2012, Mr. Lau served as Founder, President and CEO of MBM. For over one year prior to the incorporation of MBM in July of 2009, Mr. Lau was active in technology evaluation leading to the founding of the Company. From October 2005 to March 2008, Mr. Lau served as a director and as the founder, president and CEO of HoustonPharma, Inc., a biotechnology company located in Houston, Texas. Mr. Lau was the founder of PharmaFrontiers Corp., a biotechnology company located in Houston, Texas, in February 2003 and served as a member of such company’s board of directors and as its president, chief executive officer and treasurer until July of 2004. In 2004, PharmaFrontiers acquired Opexa Pharmaceuticals. Mr. Lau was the founder of Adventrx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in 1996.  He served as its president and CEO and as a member of its board of directors from July 1996 through November 2001. During his time as president and CEO, this company consummated two acquisitions, Immune Complex Corporation in 1997, which was later spun off to the shareholders, and Biokeys Pharmaceuticals, Inc. From November 1997 to September 1998, Mr. Lau served as a director of Immune Complex Corporation and Synthetic Genetics, Inc., privately held biotechnology companies. As our president and chief executive officer, Mr. Lau’s significant experience in the life science and biotechnology industries enable him to provide significant insights into our business and make him qualified to be a member of our board of directors.

Daniel H. Schneiderman.  Mr. Scheniderman was appointed Vice President of Finance effective December 21, 2012 and has served as the Company's Vice President, Comptroller and Secretary since February 27, 2012. Mr. Schneiderman has ten years of investment banking and corporate finance experience, focusing on private and public equity for small and mid-market capitalization companies mainly in the healthcare and life sciences sectors. Prior to joining the Company, he was senior vice president of investment banking for Burnham Hill Partners LLC, where he worked since 2008. From 2004 through 2008, Mr. Schneiderman was vice president of investment banking at Burnham Hill Partners, a division of Pali Capital, Inc. Previously, Mr. Schneiderman worked at H.C. Wainwright & Co. in 2004 as an analyst. Mr. Schneiderman holds a Bachelor's Degree from Tulane University. 

 
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor.  Mr. Spoor was appointed to our board of directors on February 27, 2012, effective as of April 7, 2012 and was appointed chairman of the board on December 21, 2012.  Mr. Spoor is currently the chief executive officer, president, chief financial officer and director of FluoroPharma Medical Inc., a public biopharmaceutical company.  He has held these positions at FluoroPharma since May 2011. Mr. Spoor also sits on the board of directors of AtheroNova, Inc. (AHRO) and Protea Biosciences Group, Inc. (PRGB). Mr. Spoor holds a Nuclear Pharmacy degree from the University of Toronto as well as an M.B.A. from Columbia University with concentrations in finance and accounting.  Mr. Spoor has been a guest lecturer at Columbia Business School, Kings College in London and the University of Newcastle in Australia.  Mr. Spoor previously held the title of CFO for Sunstone BioSciences for the period from February 2010 through September 2010.  Prior to joining Sunstone BioSciences, he worked as a consultant at Oliver Wyman from December 2008 through February 2010 focusing on helping pharmaceutical and medical device companies evaluate their global revenue potential given the complex interplay of regulatory approvals, the reimbursement environment, as well as the impact of physician preference within constantly evolving standards of care. He further specialized on the implications of healthcare reform on new product approval and health insurance reform.  Mr. Spoor has also been an equity research analyst at J.P. Morgan from July 2007 through October 2008 and Credit Suisse from November 2005 through July 2007 covering the biotechnology and medical device industries.  Prior to his career on Wall Street, Mr. Spoor worked in the pharmaceutical industry, spending 11 years with Amersham / GE Healthcare where he worked in seven countries in a variety of roles including setting up GMP facilities, accountability for the nuclear cardiology portfolio and most recently as the Director of New Product Opportunities leading the PET strategic plan.  Mr. Spoor’s background in nuclear pharmacy, finance and accounting and as a healthcare research analyst, as well as his experience at both large and small healthcare companies, provides him with a broad familiarity of the range of issues confronting a developing biotechnology company, which makes him a qualified member of our board of directors.

David N. Siegel.  Mr. Siegel was appointed to our board of directors on February 27, 2012, effective as of April 7, 2012.  Mr. Siegel was appointed President and CEO of Frontier Airlines in January 2012. Previously, he was a Managing Director of Hyannis Port Capital from June 2010 to December 2011. Mr. Siegel served as Chairman and CEO of XOJET, a TPG Capital funded private aviation company, from October 2008 until May 2010.  Before joining XOJET, Mr. Siegel was Chairman and CEO of Gategroup, AG, an independent airline catering, hospitality and logistics company based in Zurich, from June 2004 to March 2009. Prior to Gategroup, Mr. Siegel served as president, chief executive officer of Gate Gourmet Group, Inc., an independent airline catering, hospitality and logistics company. Prior to Gate Gourmet Group, Mr. Siegel served as president, chief executive and a member of the board of US Airways Group, Inc., and US Airways, Inc., the airline operating unit. Prior to joining US Airways, Mr. Siegel was chairman and chief executive officer of Avis Rent A Car System, Inc., a subsidiary of Cendant Corp.  Mr. Siegel’s service as a member of senior management and the boards of directors of a number of U.S. corporations provides our board of directors with invaluable financial and management experience.
 
Patrick T. Mooney, M.D.  Dr. Mooney was appointed to our board of directors on February 27, 2012, effective as of April 7, 2012. From September 2007 to September 2013, Dr. Mooney served as the chief executive officer and chairman of the board of directors of Echo Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq: ECTE), a medical device company.  Dr. Mooney previously served as president, chief executive officer and director of Echo Therapeutics, Inc. (a privately-held company prior to its merger with Sontra Medical Corporation) from September 2006 to September 2007.  Prior to joining Echo Therapeutics, Inc., Dr. Mooney was president, chief executive officer and chairman of Aphton Corporation (Nasdaq: APHT), a biopharmaceutical company, from January 2004 to November 2006.  Aphton Corporation declared bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code. Dr. Mooney served as Senior Biotechnology Analyst at Thomas Weisel Partners, LLC, a full service merchant banking firm, and as Senior Biotechnology Analyst at Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC, a full services investment banking firm.  He graduated from the Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and trained as a surgical resident at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From June to September 2010, Dr. Mooney was a member of the board of directors of Quantrx Biomedical Corporation, a healthcare diagnostics company. Dr. Mooney’s medical education and experience as practicing clinician, as well as his industry specific extensive management experience, provides him with a broad and deep understanding of the science underlying our business and our competitors’ efforts, which is an invaluable resource to our board of directors.

 
David M. Epstein, Ph.D.  Dr. Epstein was appointed to our board of directors effective as of April 16, 2013 and Chairman of our Scientific Advisory Board for Therapeutics as of February 4, 2014. Dr. Epstein is currently Director of the Centre for Technology & Development (CTeD), Associate Professor Cancer & Stem Cell Biology, Associate Dean or Research and at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. Previously, from May 2006 to March 2013, Dr. Epstein served as Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer for OSI Pharmaceuticals (“OSI”), now a wholly owned subsidiary of Astellas Pharma US, Inc., where he had strategic and operational oversight of OSI’s oncology discovery research and translational medicine programs.  From May 2001 to April 2006, Dr. Epstein served as vice president of Archemix Corp, an aptamer therapeutics-focused discovery and development company, where he was responsible for overseeing Archemix’s aptamer research and pre-clinical development programs.  Dr. Epstein’s has over 20 years of global experience funding, managing and leading research organizations in early-stage, mid-size biotechnology, and multinational organizations.  Dr. Epstein’s experience provides him with a broad and deep understanding of the science underlying our business and our competitors’ efforts, which is an invaluable resource to our board of directors.

Scientific Advisory Board - Therapeutics

Effective as of February 4, 2014, the board of directors formally established a Scientific Advisory Board for Therapeutics, whose primary responsibilities include advising the Company’s management and the board on the long-term direction of the Company's scientific and research goals as it relates to drug discovery and therapeutics.  The members of the Scientific Advisory Board for Therapeutics are David M. Epstein, Ph.D, Eric Winer, M.D., Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., Mariano-Garcia Blanco, M.D., Ph.D., Michael Hemann, M.D., Ph.D., and Frank Gertler, Ph.D. Dr. Epstein will serve as Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board for Therapeutics.

David M. Epstein, Ph.D. Dr. Epstein was appointed to our board of directors effective as of April 16, 2013 and Chairman of our Scientific Advisory Board for Therapeutics as of February 4, 2014. . Please see above for a description of Dr. Epstein’s background and experience.
 
Eric Winer, M.D.  Dr. Winer is Professor, Department of Medicine, at Harvard Medical School.  He is Chief of the Division of Women’s Cancers, Director of the Breast Oncology Program, and the Thompson Chair in Breast Cancer Research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Winer received his MD from Yale University. Under Dr. Winer’s leadership, the program at Dana-Farber has played a critical role in the development of targeted therapies for HER2+ breast cancer. The group at Dana-Farber is also investigating a wide range of targeted therapies for all subtypes of breast cancer.  Dr. Winer has authored over 200 publications relating to clinical cancer research

Adrian Krainer, Ph.D.  Dr. Krainer is the St. Giles Foundation Professor of Molecular Genetics and the Program Chair of Cancer and Molecular Biology at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Dr. Krainer’s expertise is in the fundamental mechanisms and regulation of human pre-mRNA splicing, and understanding the role of defective splicing in cancer. Dr. Krainer discovered SRSF1, the founding member of a conserved family of splicing factors, and his work has provided clear evidence of splicing factors driving cancer and the role of alternative splicing in cancer-cell metabolism. Dr. Krainer’s laboratory has also developed novel antisense therapeutics to correct disease-causing splicing defects, and application of this method is currently being assessed in the clinic. Dr. Krainer is a leading expert in this area, with over 150 research articles published to date.

Mariano A. Garcia-Blanco, M.D., Ph.D.  Dr. Garcia-Blanco is the Charles D. Watts Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, and Medicine, and Director of the Center for RNA Biology at Duke University. Dr. Garcia-Blanco’s expertise is in RNA biology.  His laboratory has pioneered the use of reporters to image alternative splicing of RNA in vivo. He has discovered the role of alternative splicing in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process essential for tumor progression and metastasis. A major focus of his laboratory is elucidating signaling pathways that mediate changes in alternative splicing as tumor cells undergo EMT.

 
Michael T. Hemann, Ph.D.  Dr. Hemann is the Eisen and Chang Career Development Associate Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (“MIT”). Dr. Hemann brings expertise in modeling therapeutic resistance in order to identify new drug targets where inhibition can synergize with existing therapies.  His laboratory uses RNAi to study the roles of cancer relevant genes in mediating sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Dr. Hemann’s interests are also focused on understanding the role of genetic instability on acquired and intrinsic drug resistance.

Frank B. Gertler, Ph.D.   Dr. Gertler received his B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1985. During his post-graduate thesis work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Gertler discovered the Enabled (Ena) gene in a search for functional downstream targets of signaling by the Drosophila homolog of the c-Abl proto-oncogene. He proceeded to demonstrate that Abl and Ena function were key components of the machinery required to establish normal connections during development of the nervous system. After receiving his Ph.D. in Oncology and Genetics in 1992, Dr. Gertler trained as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Philippe Soriano at the Fred Hutchinson Center for Cancer Research from 1993 through 1997. During this time, he cloned Mena, the mammalian homolog of Drosophila Ena, and discovered a family of related molecules, the “Ena/VASP” proteins. In 1997, Dr. Gertler joined the Biology Department at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (“MIT”). His laboratory continued to work on Mena and the related Ena/VASP proteins and described pivotal roles for these proteins in controlling cell movement, shape and adhesion during fetal development. In 2005, Dr. Gertler moved to the MIT Center for Cancer Research and began to work on the role of Mena in metastatic progression and launched other efforts geared at understanding how the control of cell motility is dysregulated during metastatic diseases. Dr. Gertler reported the first comprehensive analysis of changes to the transcriptome, including alternative splicing during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).  Currently, Dr. Gertler is a Full Professor in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT and a member of the MIT Biology Department.

Scientific Advisory Board - Diagnostics

Effective as of October 24, 2012, the board of directors formally established a Scientific Advisory Board whose primary responsibilities include advising our management and the board on the long-term direction of our scientific and research goals.  The members of the Scientific Advisory Board are John Condeelis, Ph.D., Frank Gertler, Ph.D. and Thomas Rohan, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Condeelis serves as Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board.

John S. Condeelis, Ph.D.   Dr. John Condeelis is The Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research, Professor and Co-Chairman of the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM). He is the director of the Cancer Center program “Tumor Microenvironment and Metastasis” and co-Director of the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center of AECOM. His current research interests are in tumor cell motility, chemotaxis, invasion and intravasation during metastasis.  He has combined multiphoton imaging with expression analysis to derive gene expression signatures. This Human Breast Cancer Invasion Signature defines the pathways used by tumor cells in mammary tumors to move and invade blood vessels. The tumor cells are followed using multiphoton imaging for these studies using novel caged-enzymes and biosensors to test, in vivo, the predictions of the invasion signature regarding the mechanisms of tumor cell chemotaxis to EGF. Dr. Condeelis has authored more than 250 scientific papers on various aspects of cell and cancer biology, prognostic marker development and optical imaging.

Frank B. Gertler, Ph.D.   Dr. Frank Gertler received his B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1985. During his post-graduate thesis work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Gertler discovered the Enabled (Ena) gene in a search for functional downstream targets of signaling by the Drosophila homolog of the c-Abl proto-oncogene. He proceeded to demonstrate that Abl and Ena function were key components of the machinery required to establish normal connections during development of the nervous system. After receiving his Ph.D. in Oncology and Genetics in 1992, Dr. Gertler trained as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Philippe Soriano at the Fred Hutchinson Center for Cancer Research from 1993 through 1997. During this time, he cloned Mena, the mammalian homolog of Drosophila Ena, and discovered a family of related molecules, the “Ena/VASP” proteins. In 1997, Dr. Gertler joined the Biology Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His laboratory continued to work on Mena and the related Ena/VASP proteins and described pivotal roles for these proteins in controlling cell movement, shape and adhesion during fetal development.  In 2005, Dr. Gertler moved to the MIT Center for Cancer Research and began to work on the role of Mena in metastatic progression and launched other efforts geared at understanding how the control of cell motility is dysregulated during metastatic diseases. Currently, Dr. Gertler is a Full Professor in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT and a member of the MIT Biology Department.

 
Thomas E. Rohan, M.D., Ph.D.  Dr. Thomas Rohan is Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at AECOM. He is also leader of the Cancer Epidemiology Program (CEP) and Associate Director for Population Sciences in the Albert Einstein Cancer Center. Dr. Rohan is an M.D. with a Ph.D. in Epidemiology and an M.Sc. in Medical Statistics. He has published more than 300 scientific articles and two books on various aspects of epidemiology. He has a particular interest in the molecular pathogenesis of breast cancer. Dr. Rohan is Associate Editor of the Journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention and several other journals, including a new journal, Cancer Medicine, which has a focus on personalized medicine. He has served on many grant review panels, served a 4-year term on the Epidemiology of Cancer Study Section at National Cancer Institute (NCI), and is currently a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of NCI.

Clinical Advisory Board - Diagnostics

Effective as of October 24, 2012, the board of directors formally established a Clinical Advisory Board whose primary responsibilities include advising our management and the Board on the most efficient translation of our scientific and research discoveries to clinical practice.  The members of the Clinical Advisory Board are Joan Jones, M.D. and Joseph Sparano, M.D.

Joan Jones, M.D.  Dr. Joan Jones is Professor, Department of Pathology, Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology, Department of Epidemiology & Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) and is an attending Pathologist at New York Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Jones is a former Professor of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College.  Dr. Jones is an anatomic pathologist with clinical experience in breast pathology and an interest in the contribution of cell migration and the microvasculature to metastatic progression. Dr. Jones’ work with the metastasis group at AECOM began in 1991 when parallels were first being drawn between events in amoeboid chemotaxis and the behavior of metastatic tumor cells. Her role has been to provide the histologic and human disease context for observations both in culture systems and animal models. Dr. Jones was one of the originators, along with Dr. Condeelis, on the use of intra-vital imaging (IVI) of live mammary tumors to identify vascular landmarks around which tumor cells migrate and intravasate. Dr. Jones’ application of these IVI observations to human breast cancer samples led to confirmation of the concept of Tumor MicroEnvironment of Metastasis (TMEM) in humans, a microanatomic landmark consisting of a tumor cell, an endothelial cell, and a macrophage, initially observed in vivo in animals. She developed both the methodology and the approach to quantitation of this landmark in human samples. Dr. Jones continues to work on the application of Mena-related biomarkers and TMEM to the prediction of metastatic risk in breast cancer.

Dr. Joseph Sparano, M.D.    Dr. Joseph Sparano is Professor of Medicine & Women's Health at AECOM, Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center, and Associate Chairman of the Department of Oncology at Montefiore Medical Center. He is a medical oncologist and clinical researcher who has been involved in the development of numerous phase I, II, and III NCI sponsored, investigator-initiated, and industry sponsored trials, with expertise in breast cancer, lymphoma, HIV-associated cancer, developmental therapeutics, and development and validation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers. He serves as Chair of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Breast Cancer Committee, Vice-Chair of the NCI Breast Cancer Correlative Science Committee, and member of the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee.

Family Relationships
 
There are no family relationships between any of our directors or executive officers.
 
Code of Ethics

We adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to all directors, officers and employees. Our Code of Ethics is available on our website at www.metastat.com. A copy of our code of ethics will also be provided to any person without charge, upon written request sent to us at our offices located at 8 Hillside Ave., Suite 207, Montclair, New Jersey 07042.

 
Corporate Governance
 
Board Leadership Structure
 
Our board of directors (the “Board”) has a chairman, currently Mr. Spoor, who has authority, among other things, to call and preside over board meetings, to set meeting agendas and to determine materials to be distributed to the board of directors. Accordingly, the chairman has substantial ability to shape the work of the board of directors.

The positions of chief executive officer and chairman of our Board are held by different persons. The chairman of our Board, Mr. Spoor, chairs director and stockholder meetings and participates in preparing their agendas. Dr. Bronsther serves as a focal point for communication between management and the Board between board meetings, although there is no restriction on communication between directors and management. Dr. Bronsther serves as our chief executive officer as well as a member of our Board. We believe that these arrangements afford the other members of our Board sufficient resources to supervise management effectively, without being overly engaged in day-to-day operations
 
There is no lead independent director for our Board, but we believe that our current leadership structure is appropriate, as the majority of our Board is composed of independent directors and each committee of our Board is chaired by an independent director. The Board considers all of its members equally responsible and accountable for oversight and guidance of its activities.
 
Board Committees
 
Effective as of October 24, 2012, the Board established an Audit Committee, a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and a Compensation Committee. Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor, Patrick T. Mooney, M.D. and David N. Siegel, each independent directors, serves on each committee.  Mr. Spoor serves as the Chairman of the Audit Committee and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and Dr. Mooney serves as Chairman of the Compensation Committee.

The Board determined that Mr. Spoor possesses accounting or related financial management experience that qualifies him as financially sophisticated within the meaning of Rule 5605(c)(2)(A) of the Marketplace Rules of The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC and that he is an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
Board Practices
 
Our business and affairs are managed under the direction of our Board. The primary responsibilities of our Board are to provide oversight, strategic guidance, counseling and direction to our management.
 
Policy Regarding Board Attendance
 
Our directors are expected to attend meetings of the Board as frequently as necessary to properly discharge their responsibilities and to spend the time needed to prepare for each such meeting. Our directors are expected to attend annual meetings of stockholders, but we do not have a formal policy requiring them to do so.
 
Shareholder Communications
 
We have a process for shareholders who wish to communicate with our board of directors. Shareholders who wish to communicate with the board may write to it at our address given above. These communications will be reviewed by one or more of our employees designated by the board, who will determine whether they should be presented to the board. The purpose of this screening is to allow the board to avoid having to consider irrelevant or inappropriate communications.

 
Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance
 
Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, requires our executive officers, directors and persons who beneficially own more than 10% of a registered class of our equity securities to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of our common stock and other equity securities. These executive officers, directors, and greater than 10% beneficial owners are required by SEC regulation to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms filed by such reporting persons.
 
Based solely on our review of such forms furnished to us and written representations from certain reporting persons, we believe that during the fiscal year ended February 28, 2014, all filing requirements applicable to our executive officers, directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners were filed in a timely manner.
 
Nominees to the Board of Directors
 
The Board will consider director candidates recommended by security holders. Potential nominees to the Board are required to have such experience in business or financial matters as would make such nominee an asset to the Board and may, under certain circumstances, be required to be “independent”, as such term is defined under Rule 5605 of the listing standards of NASDAQ and applicable SEC regulations. Security holders wishing to submit the name of a person as a potential nominee to the Board must send the name, address, and a brief (no more than 500 words) biographical description of such potential nominee to the Board at the following address: Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor, Chairman of the Board of Directors, MetaStat, Inc., 8 Hillside Drive, Suite 207, Montclair, New Jersey 07042. Potential director nominees will be evaluated by personal interview, such interview to be conducted by one or more members of the Board, and/or any other method the Board deems appropriate, which may, but need not, include a questionnaire. The Board may solicit or receive information concerning potential nominees from any source it deems appropriate. The Board need not engage in an evaluation process unless (i) there is a vacancy on the Board, (ii) a director is not standing for re-election, or (iii) the Board does not intend to recommend the nomination of a sitting director for re-election. A potential director nominee recommended by a security holder will not be evaluated differently from any other potential nominee. Although it has not done so in the past, the Board may retain search firms to assist in identifying suitable director candidates.
 
The Board does not have a formal policy on Board candidate qualifications. The Board may consider those factors it deems appropriate in evaluating director nominees made either by the Board or stockholders, including judgment, skill, strength of character, experience with businesses and organizations comparable in size or scope to the Company, experience and skill relative to other Board members, and specialized knowledge or experience. Depending upon the current needs of the Board, certain factors may be weighed more or less heavily. In considering candidates for the Board, the directors evaluate the entirety of each candidate’s credentials and do not have any specific minimum qualifications that must be met. “Diversity,” as such, is not a criterion that the Board considers. The directors will consider candidates from any reasonable source, including current Board members, stockholders, professional search firms or other persons. The directors will not evaluate candidates differently based on who has made the recommendation.
 
Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of Officers and Directors

Our officers and directors are indemnified as provided by the Nevada Revised Statutes and our bylaws.
 
Under the Nevada Revised Statutes, director immunity from liability to a company or its shareholders for monetary liabilities applies automatically unless it is specifically limited by a company’s articles of incorporation that is not the case with our articles of incorporation. Excepted from that immunity are:

(1)  a willful failure to deal fairly with us or our shareholders in connection with a matter in which the director has a material conflict of interest;
 
(2)  a violation of criminal law (unless the director had reasonable cause to believe that his or her conduct was lawful or no reasonable cause to believe that his or her conduct was unlawful);
 
(3)  a transaction from which the director derived an improper personal profit; and
 
(4)  willful misconduct.

 
Our bylaws provide that we will indemnify our directors and officers to the fullest extent not prohibited by Nevada law. Our bylaws provide that we will advance all expenses incurred to any person who was or is a party or is threatened to be made a party to any threatened, pending or completed action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or investigative, by reason of the fact that he is or was our director or officer, or is or was serving at our request as a director or executive officer of another company, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise, prior to the final disposition of the proceeding, promptly following request. This advance of expenses is to be made upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of such person to repay said amounts should it be ultimately determined that the person was not entitled to be indemnified under our bylaws or otherwise.
 
Item 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
Summary Compensation Table

The following table sets forth the compensation paid or accrued by us to our chief executive officer and chief financial officer. For each of our last two completed fiscal years, no other officer’s compensation exceeded $100,000 in each year.
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
 
Name and Principal Position
 
 
Fiscal Year Ended
February, 28
 
 
Salary ($)
   
Bonus ($)
 
 
 
Stock Awards
 
Option Awards
(1) ($)
 
 
All Other
Compensation ($)
 
Total ($)
 
                                 
Dr. Oscar L. Bronsther, CEO and Chief Medical Officer
 
2014
   
125,833
     
68,333
 
-
 
210,931
 
6,000
   
411,097
 
   
2013
   
40,000
     
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
40,000
 
                                       
Warren C. Lau, CFO and President
 
2014
   
175,000
     
-
 
-
 
105,466
 
-
   
280,466
 
   
2013
   
178,125
     
21,769
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
199,894
 
                                       
Daniel H. Schneiderman, Vice President, Finance
 
2014
   
122,583
     
14,451
 
-
 
105,466
 
-
   
242,500
 
   
2013
   
75,770
     
7,500
 
-
 
-
 
-
   
83,050
 
 
(1)  
Reflects the aggregate grant date fair value computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. Assumptions made in the calculation of these amounts are described in Note 6 to the Company’s audited financial statements, included in this Form 10-K.
 
Employment Agreements with Executive Officers

Employment Agreement with Dr. Oscar Bronsther

Effective as of May 27, 2013, we entered into an employment agreement with Oscar L. Bronsther, M.D., F.A.C.S., to serve as our chief executive officer and chief medical officer. The employment agreement with Dr. Bronsther provides for a base salary of $175,000 and an annual milestone bonus upon the attainment of certain financial, clinical development and/or business milestones to be established annually by our board of directors or compensation committee. The employment agreement is terminable by either party at any time. In the event of termination by us without cause or by Dr. Bronsther for good reason not in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to six months’ severance. In the event of termination by us without cause or by Dr. Bronsther for good reason in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to twelve months’ severance.

 
Employment Agreement with Warren Lau
 
Effective as of May 27, 2013, we entered into an employment agreement with Warren C. Lau to serve as our president and chief financial officer. The employment agreement with Mr. Lau provides for a base salary of $175,000 and an annual milestone bonus upon the attainment of certain financial, clinical development and/or business milestones to be established annually by our board of directors or compensation committee. The term of the agreement is for an initial period of one year, provided the parties may mutually agree to renew the agreement for an additional one year period by providing written notice to the other party no later than thirty (30) days prior to the expiration of the initial one year term. The employment agreement is terminable by either party at any time. In the event the agreement is not renewed beyond the initial one year term or is terminated by us without cause or by Mr. Lau for good reason not in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to six months’ severance. In the event of termination by us without cause or by Mr. Lau for good reason in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to twelve months’ severance.  On May 28, 2014, we reached an agreement to extend Mr. Lau's employment agreement, which currently expired on May 28, 2014, through July 15, 2014. We do not expect any further extensions of Mr. Lau's employment agreement beyond July 15, 2014. Mr. Lau's salary for such extension period will be paid by us through a proportionate reduction of the severance payments due to Mr. Lau pursuant to the terms of his employment agreement. The Company is currently conducting a search for Mr. Lau's replacement.
 
Employment Agreement with Daniel H. Schneiderman

Effective as of May 27, 2013, we entered into an employment agreement with Daniel H. Schneiderman, to serve as our vice president of finance. The employment agreement with Mr. Schneiderman provides for a base salary of $125,000 and an annual milestone bonus upon the attainment of certain financial, clinical development and/or business milestones to be established annually by our board of directors or compensation committee. The employment agreement is terminable by either party at any time. In the event of termination by us without cause or by Mr. Schneiderman for good reason not in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to six months’ severance. In the event of termination by us without cause or by Mr. Schneiderman for good reason in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, he is entitled to twelve months’ severance.

Director Compensation

Currently, our directors serve without compensation.

Employee Benefits Plans
 
Pension Benefits
 
We do not sponsor any qualified or non-qualified pension benefit plans.
 
Nonqualified Deferred Compensation
 
We do not maintain any non-qualified defined contribution or deferred compensation plans.
 
Severance Arrangements
 
The employment agreements with each of Dr. Oscar Bronsther, Warren C. Lau and Daniel H. Schneiderman provide that in the event of termination by us without cause or by the executives for good reason not in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, such executives are entitled to six months’ severance. In the event of termination by us without cause or by the executives for good reason in connection with a change of control, as those terms are defined in the agreement, such executives are entitled to twelve months’ severance.

Outstanding Equity Awards At February 28, 2014

The following table summarizes the number of securities underlying outstanding plan awards for each named executive officer as of February 28, 2014.

   
Option Awards
   
Stock Awards
 
   
Equity Incentive Plan Awards:
   
Equity Incentive Plan Awards:
 
Name
 
Number of
securities
underlying
unexercised
options (#)
exercisable
   
Number of
securities
underlying
unexercised
options (#)
unexercisable
   
Number of
securities
underlying
unexercised
unearned
options (#)
   
Option
exercise
price ($)
   
Option
expiration
date
   
Number of
shares of
stock that
have not vested
(#)
   
Market
value of
shares of
stock that
have not vested
($) (1)
   
Number
of
unearned shares
that
have not
vested
(#)
   
Market or
payout value
of unearned
shares that
have not
vested
($) (1)
 
Dr. Oscar L. Bronsther
 
165,000
100,000
     
-
-
     
-
-
   
$
$
   0.68
   3.25
     
  1/6/2022
  4/5/2023
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
 
                                                                       
Warren C.
Lau
 
275,000 50,000
     
-
 
     
-
 
   
$
$
0.68
3.25
     
1/6/2022 4/5/2023
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
 
                                                                       
Daniel H. Schneiderman
 
55,000
50,000
     
-
-
     
-
-
   
$
$
0.68
3.25
     
   1/6/2022
   4/5/2023
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
 
 
Item 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

The following table sets forth certain information regarding beneficial ownership of our common stock as of June 11, 2014 by (i) each person (or group of affiliated persons) who is known by us to own more than five percent of the outstanding shares of our common stock, (ii) each director and executive officer, and (iii) all of our directors and executive officers as a group.

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with SEC rules and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Unless otherwise noted, the address of each stockholder listed below is 8 Hillside Drive, Suite 207, Montclair, New Jersey 07042.

We had 21,623,899 shares of common stock outstanding as of June 11, 2014.

 
Names and Addresses of Beneficial Owners
 
Amount and Nature
of Beneficial
Ownership  (1)
   
Percent of Class  (2)
 
Oscar Bronsther, M.D., F.A.C.S, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Medical Officer and Director (3)
   
749,003
     
3.46%
 
                 
Warren C. Lau, President, Chief Financial Officer and Director (4)
   
1,205,000
     
5.49%
 
                 
Daniel H. Schneiderman, Vice President of Finance, Comptroller and Secretary (5)
   
484,500
     
2.23%
 
                 
David M. Epstein, Ph.D., Head of Drug Development and Director (6)
   
100,000
     
*
 
                 
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor, Chairman of the Board of Directors (7)
   
222,003
     
1.03%
 
                 
David N. Siegel, Director (8)
   
935,570
     
4.30%
 
                 
Patrick T. Mooney, M.D., Director (9)
   
100,000
     
*
 
                 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, a Division of Yeshiva University (10)
   
1,150,242
     
5.32%
 
                 
MKM Opportunity Master Fund, Ltd. (11)
   
2,224,314
     
9.97%
 
                 
Matthew Balk (12)
   
1,981,000
     
8.99%
 
                 
Jason Adelman (13)
   
1,408,003
     
6.49%
 
                 
All Directors and Officers as a Group (7 Persons)
   
3,796,076
     
17.07%
 
__________________
               
* Less than 1%

(1)
Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock subject to securities anticipated to be exercisable or convertible at or within 60 days of the date hereof, are deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of the person holding such option or warrant but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other person. The indication herein that shares are anticipated to be beneficially owned is not an admission on the part of the listed stockholder that he, she or it is or will be a direct or indirect beneficial owner of those shares.
 
(2)
Based on 21,623,899 shares of common stock outstanding on June 11, 2014.
 
(3)
Consists of (i) 265,000 shares of common stock underlying options, (ii) 476,668 shares of common stock held by Marsha Bronsther, Dr. Bronsther’s wife and (iii) 7,335 shares of common stock underlying warrants held by Marsha Bronsther. 
 
(4)
Consists of (i) 880,000 shares of common stock, and (ii) 325,000 shares of common stock underlying options.
 
(5)
Consists of (i) 357,500 shares of common stock, (ii) 22,000 shares of common stock underlying warrants, and (iii) 105,000 shares of common stock underlying options.
 
(6)
Consists of (i) 100,000 shares of common stock.
 
(7)
Consists of (i) 14,668 shares of common stock, (ii) 7,335 shares of common stock underlying warrants and (iii) 50,000 restricted shares of common stock issued pursuant to the 2012 Plan that vest and become transferable upon the listing of the common stock on a national securities exchange on or before May 21, 2022, and (iv) 150,000 restricted shares of common stock issued pursuant to the 2012 Plan that vest and become transferable upon the earlier of a change in control or upon us achieving $5,000,000 in gross sales from one or more of our products on or before April 5, 2023. 

 
(8)
Consists of (i) 727,500 shares of common stock, (ii) 60,935 shares of common stock held by the David N. Siegel Revocable Trust dated April 7, 2010, (iii) 105,000 shares of common stock underlying options and (iv) 42,135 shares of common stock underlying warrants held by the David N. Siegel Revocable Trust dated April 7, 2010.
 
(9)
Consists of (i) 50,000 shares of common stock underlying options and (ii) 50,000 restricted shares of common stock issued pursuant to the 2012 Plan that vest and become transferable upon the listing of the common stock on a national securities exchange on or before May 21, 2022.  
 
(10)
Consists of 1,150,242 shares of common stock.  J. Michael Gower, Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer of Yeshiva University, is the natural person who exercises voting and investment control over our securities owned by Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, a Division of Yeshiva University.  The address of the stockholder is c/o Office of Biotechnology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, Attn: Director.
 
(11)
Based on the Schedule 13G filed by MKM Opportunity Master Fund, Ltd. on May 4, 2012, consists of (i) 1,533,998 shares of common stock; and (ii) 690,316 shares underlying warrants owned by MKM Opportunity Master Fund, Ltd (“MKM Opportunity”). Does not include (i) 173,250 shares of common stock held by David and Margaret Skriloff Irrev. Des. Trust FBO Olivia Skriloff; and (ii) 173,250 shares of common stock held by David and Margaret Skriloff Irrev. Des. Trust FBO Samuel Skriloff.  David Skrillof does not exercise voting and investment control over securities held by David and Margaret Skriloff Irrev. Des. Trust FBO Olivia Skriloff and David and Margaret Skriloff Irrev. Des. Trust FBO Samuel Skriloff.
 
MKM Capital Advisors, LLC (“MKM Capital”) serves as investment manager to MKM Opportunity, and, as such, may be deemed to hold an indirect beneficial interest in the shares of Common Stock that are directly beneficially owned by MKM Opportunity. David Skriloff is the managing member of MKM Capital and the portfolio manager of MKM Opportunity, and, as such, may be deemed to hold an indirect beneficial interest in the shares of Common Stock that are directly beneficially owned by MKM Opportunity.
 
(12)
Consists of (i) 265,000 shares of common stock underlying options, (ii) 1,573,000 shares of common stock, and  (iii) 143,000 shares of common stock underlying warrants.
 
(13)
Based on the Schedule 13G filed by Jason T. Adelman on April 20, 2012, consists of (i) 762,688 shares of common stock held as Joint Tenants with his spouse Cass G Adelman, (ii) 73,335 shares of common stock underlying warrants held as Joint Tenants with his spouse Cass G Adelman, (iii) 297,000 shares of common stock held by Cass G. Adelman Cust. Jasper G. Adelman UTMA NY and (iv) 275,000 shares of common stock held by Cass G. Adelman Cust. Philippa G. Adelman UTMA NY.
 
Item 13.
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
 
Related Transactions
 
During January and February 2012, we borrowed approximately $336,075 from Waterford Capital Acquisition Co. IX, LLC, and accounted for these as advances prior to the Share Exchange.  Immediately prior to the Share Exchange, this debt was converted into 309,595 shares of our common stock.

During the year ended February 28, 2013, we paid Matthew Balk an aggregate of $72,000 of consulting fees for financial advisory services.

During the year ended February 28, 2014, we paid Matthew Balk an aggregate of $110,000 of consulting fees for financial advisory services.

 
Additionally, pursuant to the 2012 Plan we issued Matthew Balk (i) 165,000 stock options with an exercise price equal to $0.68 on February 27, 2012 and (ii) 100,000 options with an exercise price of $3.25 on April 5, 2013.

Director Independence

Four of our directors, Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor, David N. Siegel, Dr. Patrick T. Mooney, and David M. Epstein Ph.D. have been determined to be independent as defined by NASDAQ Listing Rule 5605(a)(2) of The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC and Section 10A(m)(3) of the Exchange Act. No transactions, relationships or arrangements were considered by the board of directors in determining that these directors were independent. All of the members of our audit committee, compensation committee and nominating and corporate governance committee are independent.

Under NASDAQ Listing Rule 5605(a)(2), an "independent director" is a "person other than an officer or employee of the company or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of the company's board of directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director."
 
Item 14.
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES
 
Effective as of March 7, 2014, we formally engaged EisnerAmper LLP as our principal independent registered public accounting firm to examine our consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended February 28, 2014, replacing MaloneBailey LLP.
 
Public Accounting Fees

MaloneBailey LLP

The following chart sets forth public accounting fees in connection with services rendered by MaloneBailey LLP during the year ended February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively.
 
MaloneBailey LLP
 
Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2013
   
Fiscal Year Ended February 28, 2014
 
             
Audit Fees
 
$
62,920
   
$
40,700
 
Audit-Related Fees
 
$
-
   
$
-
   
Tax Fees
 
$
-
   
$
-
 
All Other Fees
 
$
-
   
$
-
 
 
Audit fees were for professional services rendered by MaloneBailey LLP for the audit of our annual financial statements and the review of the financial statements included in our quarterly reports on Forms 10-Q, and services that are normally provided by MaloneBailey LLP in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for that fiscal year.
 
Pre-Approval of Services
 
Our audit committee pre-approved all of the foregoing services.

 
 
Item 15.
EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

Exhibit No.
Description
2.1
Share Exchange Agreement dated February 27, 2012. (1)
3.1
Articles of Incorporation of MetaStat, Inc., as amended. (2)
3.2
By-laws. (2)
4.1
Form of Investor Warrant dated February 27, 2012. (2)
4.2
Form of Warrant issued to certain affiliates dated February 27, 2012. (2)
4.3
Form of Investor Warrant dated May 1, 2012. (3)
4.4*
Form of May 2014 Convertible Promissory Note.
4.5*
Form of Warrant issued to Holders of May 2014 Convertible Promissory Notes.
10.1
Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated February 27, 2012. (1)
10.2
Form of Registration Rights Agreement dated February 27, 2012. (2)
10.3
License Agreement with Einstein, MIT, Cornell and IFO-Regina dated August 26, 2010. (1)
10.4
Amended and Restated 2012 Omnibus Securities and Incentive Plan. (4)
10.5
Form of Consultant Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement. (2)
10.6
Form of Employee Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement. (2)
10.7
Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated May 1, 2012. (3)
10.8
Form of Registration Rights Agreement dated May 1, 2012. (3)
10.9
Sponsored Research Agreement with Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Cornell University, dated April 2011. (1)
10.10
“Second” License Agreement with Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University effective March 2012. (1)
10.11
“Third” License Agreement with Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University effective March 2012. (1)
10.12
Employment Agreement of Oscar Bronsther dated May 24, 2013.
10.13
Employment Agreement of Warren Lau dated May 24, 2013.
10.14
Employment Agreement of Daniel Schneiderman dated May 24, 2013.
10.15*
Form of May 2014 Convertible Note and Warrant Purchase Agreement.
10.16 †
Diagnostic License Agreement with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT and its Department of Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, and Montefiore Medical Center as of December 7, 2013.  (7)
10.17 †
Therapeutic License Agreement with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT and its Department of Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, and Montefiore Medical Center as of December 7, 2013. (7)
14.1
Code of Ethics.
21.1
Subsidiaries of the Registrant. (5)
31.1*
Certification of Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2*
Certification of Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1*
Certification of Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2*
Certification of Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS**
XBRL Instance Document.
101.SCH**
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema.
101.CAL**
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase.
101.DEF**
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase.
101.LAB**
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase.
101.PRE**
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase.
___________
*    Filed herewith
**  Pursuant to Rule 406T of Regulation S-T, the XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language) information included in Exhibit 101 hereto is deemed furnished and not filed or part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, is deemed not filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise is not subject to liability under these sections.
†   Confidential treatment requested.
 
(1) Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on May 25, 2012.
(2) Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on March 21, 2012.
(3) Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on May 7, 2012.
(4) Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on May 22, 2012.
(5) Incorporated by reference to our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on May 28, 2013.
(6) Incorporated by reference to our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on June 13, 2012.
(7) Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K, as amended, filed with the Commission on December 12, 2013.

 
 
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this Report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 
METASTAT, INC.
     
June 13, 2014
By:
/s/ Oscar L. Bronsther .
   
Oscar L. Bronsther M.D., F.A.C.S., Chief Executive Officer and
Chief Medical Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the date indicated.
 
Signature
 
Capacity
Date
       
/s/ Oscar L. Bronsther
 
Chief Executive Officer, Chief Medical Officer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
June 13, 2014
Oscar L. Bronsther M.D., F.A.C.S.
     
       
/s/ Warren C. Lau
 
President, Chief Financial Officer and Director
June 13, 2014
Warren C. Lau
 
(Principal Accounting Officer)
 
       
/s/ Johan M. "Thijs" Spoor
 
Chairman of the Board of Directors
June 13, 2014
Johan M. "Thijs" Spoor
     
       
/s/ David N. Siegel
 
Director
June 13, 2014
David N. Siegel
     
       
/s/ Patrick T. Mooney
 
Director
June 13, 2014
Patrick T. Mooney
     
       
/s/ David M. Epstein
 
Director
June 13, 2014
David M. Epstein, Ph.D.
     
 
 
METASTAT, INC.
 
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
FOR THE YEARS ENDED FEBRUARY 28, 2014 AND FEBRUARY 28, 2013

 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
MetaStat, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of MetaStat, Inc. and subsidiaries (a development stage company) (the "Company") as of February 28, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders' (deficit) equity and cash flows for the year then ended and for the period from July 22, 2009 (inception) through February 28, 2014.  The financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. The Company's financial statements for the period from July 22, 2009 through February 28, 2013 were audited by other auditors whose report, dated May 28, 2013, expressed an unqualified opinion on those statements.  The financial statements for the period from July 22, 2009 to February 28, 2013 reflect a net loss of $5,362,479 that is included on the related total for the period from July 22, 2009 to February 28, 2014.  The other auditor's report has been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for such prior period, is based solely on the report of such auditors.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.  The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.  An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements.  An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of MetaStat, Inc. and subsidiaries as of February 28, 2014, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for the year then ended and the period from July 22, 2009 (inception) through February 28, 2014, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note [1] to the consolidated financial statements, for the period from July 22, 2009 (inception) to February 28, 2014, the Company has accumulated a deficit of $10,727,675, including a net loss of $5,365,196 for the year ended February 28, 2014, has not generated revenues or positive cash flows from operations and, as of February 28, 2014, has a negative working capital of $2,295,379.  The aforementioned conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.  Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1.  The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.  Our opinion is not modified with respect to this matter.
 
/s/ EisnerAmper LLP

New York, New York
June 12, 2014

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 

To the Board of Directors of
Metastat, Inc.
(a development stage company)
Montclair, New Jersey
 
We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of MetaStat, Inc. (a development stage company) (the “Company”) as of February 28, 2013, and the related statements of expenses, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the years then ended and the period from July 22, 2009 (inception) through February 28, 2013. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of February 28, 2013 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years then ended and the period from July 22, 2009 (inception) through February 28, 2013, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
  
/s/ MaloneBailey, LLP
www.malonebailey.com
Houston, Texas
 
May 28, 2013
 
(A Development Stage Company)
Consolidated Balance Sheets

     
February 28,
2014
   
February 28,
2013
 
               
ASSETS            
               
CURRENT ASSETS
             
Cash
    $ 483,408     $ 969,188  
Other receivable
      20,000       -  
Prepaid insurance
      12,073       -  
Deferred financing costs
      60,523       -  
                   
Total Current Assets
      576,004       969,188  
                   
Equipment (net of accumulated depreciation of $34,192 and $12,396, respectively)
      204,254       53,326  
                   
Refundable deposits
      10,367       -  
                   
TOTAL ASSETS
    $ 790,625     $ 1,022,514  
                   
                   
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' (DEFICIT) EQUITY        
                   
LIABILITIES
                 
                   
Accounts payable
    $ 257,965     $ 168,005  
Convertible notes (net of discount of $206,636 and $71,543, respectively)
    2,475,717       716,957  
Accrued interest payable
      137,701       1,940  
                   
TOTAL LIABILITIES
      2,871,383       886,902  
                   
STOCKHOLDERS' (DEFICIT) EQUITY
                 
                   
Preferred stock
      -       -  
(50,000,000 shares authorized; none shares issued and outstanding respectively)
               
                   
Common stock
      2,157       2,106  
(Common Stock, $0.0001 par value; 150,000,000 shares authorized; 21,573,899 and 21,054,418 shares issued and outstanding respectively)
               
Paid-in-capital
      8,644,760       5,495,985  
Deficit accumulated during development stage
    (10,727,675 )     (5,362,479 )
Total (Deficit) Equity
      (2,080,758 )     135,612  
                   
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' (DEFICIT) EQUITY
  $ 790,625     $ 1,022,514  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements
 

(A Development Stage Company)
Consolidated Statement of Operations
 
   
Year
ended
February 28, 2014
   
Year
ended
February 28, 2013
   
Period from July 22, 2009
(inception)
 
                   
REVENUE
                 
Revenue
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
Total Revenue
    -       -       -  
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES
                       
General & administrative
    3,526,863       2,000,937       7,345,295  
Research & development
    824,336       516,798       2,365,539  
                         
Total  Operating Expenses
    4,351,199       2,517,735       9,710,834  
                         
OTHER EXPENSES (INCOME)
                       
Interest income
    (82 )     (596 )     (678 )
Accretion expense
    829,969       1,500       831,469  
  Deferred financing costs amortization
    14,159       -       14,159  
Interest expense
    137,098       1,940       139,038  
   Loss on extinguishment of debt
    32,853       -       32,853  
                         
Total Other Expenses (Income)
    1,013,997       2,844       1,016,841  
                         
NET LOSS
  $ (5,365,196 )   $ (2,520,579 )   $ (10,727,675 )
                         
   Net loss per share, basic and diluted
  $ (0.25 )   $ (0.12 )        
                         
      Weighted average of shares outstanding
    21,169,091       20,882,199          

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements
 
 
 
(A Development Stage Company)
Consolidated Statement of changes in Stockholders' (Deficit) Equity
From July 22, 2009 (inception) to February 28, 2014
 
    Common Stock                    
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Paid-In
Capital
   
Accumulated
Deficit
   
Total (Deficit)
Equity
 
                               
Balance at inception July 22, 2009
    -     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ -  
                                         
Issue common stock to founders for cash at $.0001 per share
    1,100,000       110       (100 )     -       10  
                                         
Sale of common stock for cash at $.0018 per share
    660,000       66       1,134       -       1,200  
                                         
Sale of common stock for cash at $.023 per share
    3,410,000       341       77,159       -       77,500  
                                         
Net loss for the period ended February 28, 2010
    -       -               (52,071 )     (52,071 )
                                         
Balance at February 28, 2010
    5,170,000       517       78,193       (52,071 )     26,639  
                                         
Issue common stock for services at $0.023 per share
    3,290,570       329       74,457               74,786  
                                         
Sale common stock for cash at $.023 per share
    6,055,500      * 606       137,169               137,775  
                                         
Sale of common stock for cash at $.45 per share
    515,900       52       232,073