10-K 1 a13-26102_110k.htm 10-K

Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

x      ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013

 

OR

 

o         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                 to                

 

Commission File Number: 1-33476

 

BENEFICIAL MUTUAL BANCORP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

United States

 

56-2480744

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

1818 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

 

19103

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:  (215) 864-6000

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

Nasdaq Stock Market, LLC

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web Site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

(Check one):

Large Accelerated Filer o

Accelerated Filer x

 

 

 

 

Non-Accelerated Filer o

Smaller Reporting Company o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2013 was approximately $277.2 million.  As of March 10, 2014, there were 76,670,126 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.  Of such shares outstanding, 45,792,775 were held by Beneficial Savings Bank MHC and 30,877,351 shares were publicly held.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated byreference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

INDEX

 

 

 

Page

 

Part I

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Business

1

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

19

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

23

Item 2.

Properties

23

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

23

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

23

 

 

 

 

Part II

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

24

Item 6.

Selected Consolidated Financial Data and Other Data

26

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

28

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

61

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

61

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

61

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

61

Item 9B.

Other Information

66

 

 

 

 

Part III

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

66

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

66

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

66

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

67

Item 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

67

 

 

 

 

Part IV

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

68

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

 



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This annual report contains forward-looking statements that are based on assumptions and may describe future plans, strategies and expectations of Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. These forward-looking statements are generally identified by use of the words “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project” or similar expressions. Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.’s ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on the operations of Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. and its subsidiaries include, but are not limited to, changes in interest rates, national and regional economic conditions, legislative and regulatory changes, monetary and fiscal policies of the U.S. government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board, the quality and composition of the loan or investment portfolios, demand for loan products, deposit flows, competition, demand for financial services in Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.’s market area, changes in real estate market values in Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.’s market area, changes in relevant accounting principles and guidelines and inability of third party service providers to perform. Additional factors that may affect our results are discussed in Item 1A to this annual report titled “Risk Factors” below.

 

These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Except as required by applicable law or regulation, Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. does not undertake, and specifically disclaims any obligation, to release publicly the result of any revisions that may be made to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of the statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events.

 

Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references in this annual report to “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

 

PART I

 

Item 1.                            BUSINESS

 

General

 

Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. (the “Company”) was organized in 2004 under the laws of the United States in connection with the mutual holding company reorganization of Beneficial Bank (the “Bank”), a Pennsylvania chartered savings bank which has also operated under the name Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank.  In connection with the reorganization, the Company became the wholly owned subsidiary of Beneficial Savings Bank MHC (the “MHC”), a federally chartered mutual holding company.  In addition, the Company acquired 100% of the outstanding common stock of the Bank.

 

The Company’s business activities are the ownership of the Bank’s capital stock and the management of the proceeds it retained in connection with its initial public offering.  The Company does not own or lease any property but instead uses the premises, equipment and other property of the Bank with the payment of appropriate rental fees, as required by applicable law and regulations, under the terms of an expense allocation agreement.

 

The Bank was founded in 1853.  We have served the financial needs of our depositors and the local community since our founding and are a community-minded, customer service-focused institution.  We offer traditional financial services to consumers and businesses in our market areas.  We attract deposits from the general public and use those funds to originate a variety of loans, including commercial real estate loans, consumer loans, home equity loans, one-to-four family real estate loans, commercial business loans and construction loans.  We offer insurance brokerage and investment advisory services through our wholly owned subsidiaries, Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC and Beneficial Advisors, LLC, respectively.

 

On July 13, 2007, the Company completed its initial public offering in which it sold 23,606,625 shares, or 28.70%, of its outstanding common stock to the public, including 3,224,772 shares purchased by the Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank Employee Stock Ownership Plan Trust (the “ESOP”).  In addition, 45,792,775 shares, or 55.67% of the Company’s outstanding common stock, were issued to the MHC.  To further emphasize the Bank’s existing community activities, the Company also contributed $500,000 in cash and issued 950,000 shares, or 1.15% of the Company’s outstanding common stock, to The Beneficial Foundation (the “Foundation”), a Pennsylvania nonstock charitable foundation organized by the Company in connection with the Company’s initial public offering.

 

In addition to completing its initial public offering in July 2007, the Company issued 11,915,200 shares, or 14.48% of its outstanding common stock, to stockholders of FMS Financial Corporation (“FMS Financial”) in connection with the Company’s acquisition of FMS Financial.  In the merger, FMS Financial merged with and into the Company and FMS Financial’s wholly owned subsidiary, Farmers & Mechanics Bank, merged with and into the Bank.

 

In April 2012, the Company acquired SE Financial Corp. (“SE Financial”) and, immediately, thereafter, St. Edmond’s Federal Savings Bank, the wholly owned subsidiary of SE Financial, merged with and into the Bank.  SE Financial shareholders received $14.50 in cash for each share of SE Financial common stock they owned as of the effective date of the acquisition for a total of $29.4 million.  The results of SE Financial’s operations are included in the Company’s unaudited condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the period beginning on April 3, 2012, the date of the acquisition, and in all subsequent periods.

 

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The acquisitions of SE Financial and St. Edmond’s increased the Company’s market share in southeastern Pennsylvania, specifically Philadelphia and Delaware Counties.  Additionally, the acquisition provided Beneficial with new branches in Roxborough, Pennsylvania and Deptford, New Jersey.

 

The Company’s and the Bank’s executive offices are located at 1818 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and our main telephone number is (215) 864-6000.  Our website address is http://www.thebeneficial.com.  Information on our website should not be considered part of this filing.

 

Market Area

 

We are headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  We currently operate 35 full-service banking offices in Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Philadelphia and Bucks Counties, Pennsylvania and 25 full-service banking offices in Burlington, Gloucester, and Camden Counties, New Jersey.  We also operate one lending office in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.  We regularly evaluate our network of banking offices to optimize the penetration of our market area in the most efficient way.  We will occasionally open or consolidate banking offices.

 

Philadelphia is the sixth largest metropolitan region in the United States and home to over 63 colleges and universities.  Traditionally, the economy of the Philadelphia metropolitan area was driven by the manufacturing and distribution sectors.  However, the region has evolved into a more diverse economy geared toward information and service-based businesses.  Currently, the leading employment sectors in the region are (i) educational and health services; (ii) transportation, trade and utilities services; (iii) professional and business services; and (iv) due to the region’s numerous historic attractions, leisure and hospitality services.  The region’s leading employers include Jefferson Health System, the University of Pennsylvania Health System, Merck & Company, Inc. and Comcast Corporation.  The Philadelphia metropolitan area has also evolved into one of the major corporate centers in the United States due to its geographic location, access to transportation, significant number of educational facilities to supply technical talent and available land for corporate and industrial development.  The Philadelphia metropolitan area is currently home to 13 Fortune 500 companies, including AmerisourceBergen, Comcast, Sunoco, DuPont, Aramark and Lincoln Financial.

 

According to a 2012 census estimate, the population of our eight-county primary retail market area totaled approximately 5.3 million.  Overall, the eight counties that comprise our primary retail market area provide attractive long-term growth potential by demonstrating relatively strong household income and wealth growth trends relative to national and state-wide projections.  However, the Philadelphia region is slowly recovering from the effects of the recent economic recession where falling home prices and sharply reduced sales volumes, along with the collapse of the United States’ subprime mortgage industry in 2008 that followed a national home price peak, significantly contributed to a recession that officially lasted until June 2009, although the effects continued thereafter.  The average unemployment rate for our eight-county primary retail market area in December 2013 was 6.8% compared to a national unemployment rate of 6.7%.  In addition, the average median household income for the Philadelphia metropolitan area was $57 thousand for 2012 compared to a national median household income of $50 thousand.

 

Competition

 

We face significant competition for the attraction of deposits and origination of loans.  Our most direct competition for deposits has historically come from the many banks, thrift institutions and credit unions operating in our market area and, to a lesser extent, from other financial service companies such as brokerage firms and insurance companies.  We also face competition for investors’ funds from money market funds, mutual funds and other corporate and government securities.

 

In recent years, several large holding companies that operate banks in our market area have experienced significant credit, capital and liquidity setbacks that have led to their acquisition by even larger holding companies, some of which are located outside of the United States, including Sovereign Bank and Commerce Bank, which were acquired by Banco Santander, S.A. and Toronto Dominion Bank, respectively.  In addition, Wachovia Bank, which held the largest deposit market share in our market area, has been acquired by Wells Fargo & Company.

 

Our competition for loans comes primarily from the competitors referenced above and other regional and local community banks, thrifts and credit unions and from other financial service providers, such as mortgage companies and mortgage brokers, as well as commercial real estate and multi-family brokers.  Competition for loans also comes from the increasing number of non-depository financial service companies participating in the mortgage market, such as insurance companies, securities companies and specialty finance companies.

 

We expect competition to remain intense in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry.  Technological advances, for example, have lowered barriers to entry, allowed banks to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the internet and made it possible for non-depository institutions to offer products and services that traditionally have been provided by banks.  Competition for deposits and the origination of loans could limit our growth in the future.

 

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Lending Activities

 

We offer a variety of loans including commercial, residential and consumer loans.  Our commercial loan portfolio includes business loans, commercial real estate loans and commercial construction loans. Our consumer loan portfolio primarily includes automobile loans, home equity loans and lines of credit, personal loans including recreational vehicles, manufactured housing and marine loans, and educational loans.  Our residential loan portfolio includes one-to-four family residential real estate loans and one-to-four family residential construction loans. Total loans decreased $105.5 million, or 4.3%, to $2.3 billion at December 31, 2013 from $2.4 billion at December 31, 2012.  Despite total loan originations of $560.4 million during the year ended December 31, 2013, our loan portfolio has decreased as a result of high commercial loan repayments due to the low rate environment which has resulted in high re-financings as well as continued weak loan demand. The increase in intermediate and long term interest rates during the second half of 2013 also resulted in lower mortgage loans originations due to decreased refinance activity.  Throughout 2013, we held in portfolio the majority of our agency eligible mortgage production as the yields on these mortgages were attractive compared to the rates available on investment securities.  As a result of this decision, our mortgage banking income decreased $1.7 million to $1.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 as compared to $2.7 million for the same period last year.

 

We continue to invest in and hire additional lenders to grow our loan portfolio. We are focused on commercial real estate, commercial and business, mortgage, and small business lending and adding lenders in each of those areas.  We will continue to proactively monitor and manage existing credit relationships.  During 2013, we have continued to invest in our credit risk management and lending staff and processes to position us for future growth.

 

We focus our lending efforts within our market area.

 

Commercial Real Estate Loans.  At December 31, 2013, commercial real estate loans totaled $584.1 million, or 24.9%, of our total loan portfolio. This portfolio is comprised of loans for the acquisition (purchase), financing and/or refinancing of commercial real estate and the financing of income-producing real estate. Income-producing real estate includes real estate held for lease to third parties and nonresidential real estate.  These loans are generally non-owner occupied properties in which 50% or more of the primary source of repayment is derived from rental income from unaffiliated third-parties. The commercial real estate portfolio includes loans to finance hotels, motels, dormitories, nursing homes, assisted-living facilities, mini-storage warehouse facilities and similar non-owner occupied properties.

 

We offer both fixed and adjustable rate commercial real estate loans.  We originate a variety of commercial real estate loans generally for terms of up to 10 years and with payments generally based on an amortization schedule of up to 25 years.  Our fixed rate loans are typically based on either the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Pittsburgh’s borrowing rate or U.S. Treasury rate and generally most are fixed with a rate reset after a five year period.

 

When making commercial real estate loans, we consider the financial statements and tax returns of the borrower, the borrower’s payment history of its debt, the debt service capabilities of the borrower, the projected cash flows of the real estate, leases for any of the tenants located at the collateral property and the value of the collateral.

 

As of December 31, 2013, our largest commercial real estate loan was a $21.7 million loan for a 136 unit hotel in the greater Philadelphia area.  The loan is well collateralized and was performing in accordance with its original terms at December 31, 2013.

 

Commercial Business Loans.  At December 31, 2013, commercial business loans totaled $378.7 million, or 16.2%, of our total loan portfolio. This portfolio is comprised of loans to individuals, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and other business enterprises, whether secured or unsecured, single-payment or installment, for commercial, industrial and professional purposes as well as owner occupied real estate loans. Owner occupied real estate loans are loans where the primary source of repayment is the cash flow generated by the occupying business.  Proceeds from these loans may finance the acquisition or construction of business premises or may be used for other business purposes such as working capital.  In many cases, the owner of the occupying business owns the building in a separate entity and leases it to the business.  In owner-occupied property, more than 50% of the primary source of repayment is derived from the affiliated entity.  Properties such as hospitals, golf courses, recreational facilities, and car washes are considered owner-occupied unless leased to an unaffiliated party.

 

We offer lines of credit, intermediate term loans and long term loans primarily to assist businesses in achieving their growth objectives and/or working or long term capital needs.  The loans are typically LIBOR, bank prime, U.S. Treasury or Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh borrowing rate based. These loans are usually secured by business assets, including but not limited to, accounts receivable, inventory, equipment and real estate.  Many of these loans include the personal guarantees of the owners or business owners.

 

When making commercial business loans, we review financial information of the borrowers and guarantors.  We apply a due diligence process that includes a review of the borrowers’/guarantors’ payment history, an understanding of the business and its industry, an assessment of the management capabilities, an analysis of the financial capacity, financial condition and cash flow of the borrower, an assessment of the collateral and when applicable a review of the guarantors’ financial capacity and condition.

 

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At December 31, 2013, there were two loans that each had a $15.0 million outstanding balance.  The borrower of each loan is a Fortune 500 company and each loan is secured by substantially all the business assets of the respective borrower.  These loans are well collateralized and were performing in accordance with their original terms at December 31, 2013.

 

Commercial Construction Loans.  At December 31, 2013, commercial construction loans totaled $38.1 million, or 1.6%, of our total loan portfolio.  We have deemphasized this segment of our loan portfolio in recent periods based on prevailing market conditions. As market conditions improve, we expect that this portfolio will increase in future periods.

 

We offer commercial construction loans to commercial real estate construction developers in our market area. We offer loans secured by real estate, with original maturities of 60 months or less, made to finance land development costs incurred prior to erecting new structures (i.e., the process of improving land including laying sewers, water pipes, etc.) or the on-site construction of industrial, commercial, residential, or farm buildings. Commercial construction loans include loans secured by real estate which are used to acquire and improve developed and undeveloped property as well as used to alter or demolish existing structures to allow for new development.

 

We generally limit the number of model homes and homes built on speculation, and scheduled draws against executed agreements of sales as conditions of the commercial construction loans.

 

Commercial real estate construction loans are typically based upon the prime rate as published in The Wall Street Journal and/or LIBOR.  Commercial real estate loans for developed real estate and for real estate acquisition and development are originated generally with loan-to-value ratios up to 75%, while loans for the acquisition of land are originated with a maximum loan to value ratio of 65%.

 

When making commercial construction loans, we consider the financial statements of the borrower, the borrower’s payment history, the projected cash flows from the proposed real estate collateral, and the value of the collateral.  In general, our real estate construction loans are guaranteed by the borrowers. We consider the financial statements and tax returns of the guarantors, along with the guarantors’ payment history, when underwriting a commercial construction loan.

 

At December 31, 2013, our largest commercial construction loan was a $6.7 million loan secured by a hotel located in Philadelphia and general business assets.  The loan is well collateralized and was performing in accordance with its original terms at December 31, 2013.

 

One-to-Four Family Residential Loans.  At December 31, 2013, residential loans totaled $683.7 million, or 29.2%, of our total loan portfolio.

 

We offer fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage loans with terms of up to 30 years.  Approximately 92.7% of our outstanding residential loans are fixed rate.  We also offer adjustable-rate mortgage loans with interest rates and payments that adjust annually after an initial fixed period of one, three or five years.  Interest rates and payments on our adjustable-rate loans generally are adjusted to a rate equal to a percentage above the U.S. Treasury Security Index or LIBOR.  Our adjustable-rate single-family residential real estate loans generally have a cap of 2% on any increase or decrease in the interest rate at any adjustment date, and a maximum adjustment limit of 6% on any such increase or decrease over the life of the loan. In order to increase the originations of adjustable-rate loans, we have been originating loans which bear a fixed interest rate for a period of three to five years after which they convert to one-year adjustable-rate loans. Our adjustable-rate loans require that any payment adjustment resulting from a change in the interest rate be sufficient to result in full amortization of the loan by the end of the loan term and, thus, do not permit any of the increased payment to be added to the principal amount of the loan, creating negative amortization. Although we offer adjustable-rate loans with initial rates below the fully indexed rate, loans tied to the one-year constant maturity treasury (“CMT”) are underwritten using methods approved by the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) or the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), which require borrowers to be qualified at a rate equal to 200 basis points above the note rate under certain conditions.

 

Borrower demand for adjustable-rate loans compared to fixed-rate loans is a function of the level of interest rates, the expectations of changes in the level of interest rates, and the difference between the interest rates and loan fees offered for fixed-rate mortgage loans as compared to the interest rates and loan fees for adjustable-rate loans. At December 31, 2013, floating or adjustable rate mortgage loans totaled approximately $50.0 million and fixed rate mortgage loans totaled approximately $633.7 million. The loan fees, interest rates and other provisions of mortgage loans are determined by us on the basis of our own pricing criteria and competitive market conditions.

 

All of our residential mortgage loans are consistently underwritten to standards established by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  In 2011, we began to sell the majority of our agency eligible mortgage production. During the quarter ended December 31, 2012, we made a decision to begin to hold in portfolio some of our agency eligible mortgage production as the yields on these mortgages were attractive compared to the rates available on investment securities. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we originated $174.2 million of residential loans and sold $20.6 million of

 

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these loans and recorded mortgage banking income of $1.0 million related to the sale of these loans.  The Bank retains the servicing rights for the loans that were sold to Fannie Mae.

 

While one-to-four family residential real estate loans are normally originated with up to 30-year terms, such loans typically remain outstanding for substantially shorter periods because borrowers often prepay their loans in full either upon sale of the property pledged as security or upon refinancing the original loan.  Therefore, average loan maturity is a function of, among other factors, the level of purchase and sale activity in the real estate market, prevailing interest rates and the interest rates payable on outstanding loans.  We do not offer loans with negative amortization or interest only loans.

 

It is our general policy not to make high loan-to-value loans (defined as loans with a loan-to-value ratio of 80% or more) without private mortgage insurance.  However, we offer loans with loan-to-value ratios over 80% under a special low income loan program, which totaled $17.8 million as of December 31, 2013.  The maximum loan-to-value ratio we generally permit is 95% with private mortgage insurance, although occasionally we originate loans with loan-to-value ratios as high as 97% under special loan programs, including our first time home owner loan program.  We require all properties securing mortgage loans to be appraised by an independent appraiser approved by our Board of Directors.  We require title insurance on all first mortgage loans.  Borrowers must obtain hazard insurance, and flood insurance is required for loans on properties located in a flood zone.

 

One-to-Four Family Residential Construction LoansWe offer loans to facilitate the construction of a one-to-four family residence.  These loans are primarily short term loans and the underwriting guidelines are consistent with the underwriting guidelines for our one-to-four family residential mortgages. Generally, upon completion of construction and issuance of a certificate of occupancy, these loans convert to one-to-four family residential mortgages with long term amortization.  We began to de-emphasize these loans following the financial crisis and at December 31, 2013, residential construction loans totaled $277 thousand.

 

Consumer Home Equity and Equity Lines of Credit.  At December 31, 2013, consumer home equity loans and equity lines of credit totaled $234.2 million, or 10.0%, of our total loan portfolio.

 

We offer consumer home equity loans and equity lines of credit that are secured by one-to-four family residential real estate, where we may be in a first or second lien position. We generally offer home equity loans and lines of credit with a maximum combined loan-to-value ratio of 80%.  Home equity loans have fixed-rates of interest and are originated with terms of generally up to 15 years with some exceptions up to 20 years.  Home equity lines of credit have adjustable rates and are based upon the prime rate as published in The Wall Street Journal.  Home equity lines of credit can have repayment schedules of both principal and interest or interest only paid monthly.  We hold a first mortgage position on approximately 56% of the homes that secure our home equity loans and lines of credit.

 

The procedures for underwriting consumer home equity and equity lines of credit include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan, as well as verification of employment history and minimum credit score requirements.  Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral to the proposed loan amount.

 

Consumer Personal Loans.  At December 31, 2013, consumer personal loans totaled $40.9 million, or 1.8%, of our total loan portfolio.

 

We offer a variety of consumer personal loans, including loans for automobiles, unsecured personal loans and lines of credit.  Our consumer loans secured by passbook accounts and certificates of deposit held at the Bank are based upon the prime rate as published in The Wall Street Journal with terms up to four years.  We will offer such loans up to 100% of the principal balance of the certificate of deposit or balance in the passbook account.  We also offer unsecured loans and lines of credit with terms up to five years.  Our unsecured loans and lines of credit bear a substantially higher interest rate than our secured loans and lines of credit. For more information on our loan commitments, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Risk Management—Liquidity Management.”

 

Consumer Education Loans.  At December 31, 2013, consumer education loans totaled $206.5 million, or 8.8%, of our total loan portfolio. We do not currently originate consumer education loans and our consumer education loans are unsecured but generally 98% government guaranteed.  These loans are serviced by the Philadelphia Higher Education Assistance Agency (“PHEAA”) and Sallie Mae.

 

Indirect Automobile Loans.  At December 31, 2013, automobile loans that we originated totaled $175.4 million, or 7.5%, of our total loan portfolio.  We offer loans secured by new and used automobiles.  The majority of the loans in this portfolio are indirect automobile loans.  These loans have fixed interest rates and generally have terms up to six years.  We offer automobile loans with loan-to-value ratios of up to 100% of the purchase price of the vehicle depending upon the credit history of the borrower and other factors.

 

The procedures for underwriting automobile loans include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan. Although the applicant’s

 

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creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral to the proposed loan amount and ensuring that the collateral is properly secured.

 

Credit Risks

 

Commercial Real Estate Loans.  Loans secured by commercial real estate generally have larger balances and involve a greater degree of risk than one-to-four family residential mortgage loans.  Of primary concern in commercial real estate lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project.  Additional considerations include: location, market and geographic concentrations, loan to value, strength of guarantors and quality of tenants.  Payments on loans secured by income properties often depend on successful operation and management of the properties.  As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent than residential real estate loans to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy.  To monitor cash flows on income properties, we require borrowers and loan guarantors, if any, to provide annual financial statements on commercial real estate loans and rent rolls where applicable.  In reaching a decision on whether to make a commercial real estate loan, we consider and review a global cash flow analysis of the borrower, when applicable, and consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability and the value of the underlying property.  We have generally required that the properties securing these real estate loans have debt service coverage ratios (the ratio of earnings before debt service to debt service) of at least 1.2x and a loan to value no greater than 75%.  An environmental report is obtained when the possibility exists that hazardous materials may have existed on the site, or the site may have been impacted by adjoining properties that handled hazardous materials.

 

Commercial Business Loans.  Unlike residential mortgage loans, which generally are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from his or her employment or other income, and which are secured by real property, the value of which tends to be more easily ascertainable, commercial business loans are of higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flow of the borrower’s business.  As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial business loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself.  Further, any collateral securing such loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value.  Our commercial business loans also include owner occupied commercial real estate where the cash flow supporting the loan is derived from the owners underlying business.

 

Commercial Construction Loans.  Loans made to facilitate construction of commercial business space are primarily short term loans used to finance the construction of income producing assets. Generally, upon stabilization, these loans convert to commercial real estate loans with long term amortization. Payments during construction consist of an interest only period funded generally by borrower equity.  As these loans represent higher risk, due to the non-income producing characteristic of construction, each project is monitored for progress throughout the life of the loan, and loan funding occurs through borrower draw requests.  These requests are compared to agreed-upon project milestones and progress is verified by independent inspectors engaged by us.

 

Residential Real Estate.  The value of the collateral underlying loans secured by one to four family residential real estate tends to remain relatively stable, and is easily ascertainable.  Borrowers are evaluated based on underlying fundamentals such as verifiable income obtained from employment, length of employment, level of debt maintained by the borrower and demonstrated debt repayment history.  Risk can be evaluated and monitored by usage of debt to income ratios and conservative loan to property value ratios.

 

Residential Construction Loans.  Loans made to facilitate construction of a one to four family residence are primarily short term loans used to finance the construction of an owner occupied residence.  Generally, upon completion of construction and issuance of a certificate of occupancy, these loans convert to real estate mortgages with long term amortization.  Payments during construction consist of an interest only period funded generally by borrower equity.  As these loans represent higher risk, due to the nature of carrying additional debt during the construction period, each project is monitored for progress throughout the life of the loan, and loan funding occurs through borrower draw requests.  These requests are compared to agreed-upon project milestones and progress is verified by independent inspectors engaged by us.

 

Consumer Home Equity and Equity Lines of Credit.  Consumer home equity loans and equity lines of credit are loans secured by one-to-four family residential real estate, where we may be in a first or second lien position.  In each instance, the value of the property is determined and the loan is made against identified equity in the market value of the property.  When a residential mortgage is not present on the property, a first lien position is secured against the property.  In cases where a mortgage is present on the property, a second lien position is established, subordinated to the mortgage.  As these subordinated liens represent higher risk, loan collection becomes more influenced by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

 

Consumer Personal Loans.  Unlike consumer home equity loans, these loans are either unsecured or secured by rapidly depreciating assets such as boats or motor homes. In the latter case, repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and a small remaining

 

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deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower. Consumer loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore are likely to be adversely affected by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

 

Consumer Education Loans.  These consumer loans are unsecured but generally 98% government guaranteed.  Consumer education loan collections depend on the efforts of the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (the “PHEAA”) and Sallie Mae and are dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability.  Therefore, these loans are likely to be adversely affected by various factors including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  As a result of the government guarantee, we will ultimately be unaffected materially by delinquencies in the portfolio.

 

Automobile Loans.  Auto loans may entail greater risk than residential mortgage loans, as they are secured by assets that depreciate rapidly.  Repossessed collateral for a defaulted automobile loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and a small remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower.  Automobile loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore are likely to be adversely affected by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

 

Loan Originations and Purchases.  Loan originations come from a number of sources.  The primary sources of loan originations are existing customers, walk-in traffic, advertising and referrals from customers.

 

We have purchased participations in loans from other banks to supplement our lending portfolio.  Loan participations totaled $104.6 million at December 31, 2013.  Loan participations are subject to the same credit analysis and loan approvals as loans we originate. We are permitted to review all of the documentation relating to any loan in which we participate.  However, in a purchased participation loan, we do not service the loan and thus are subject to the policies and practices of the lead lender with regard to monitoring delinquencies, pursuing collections and instituting foreclosure proceedings.

 

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority.  Our lending activities follow written, non-discriminatory, underwriting standards and loan origination procedures established by management and approved by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors has granted loan approval authority to certain officers or groups of officers up to prescribed limits, based on the officer’s experience and tenure.  Generally, all commercial loans less than $15.0 million must be approved by a Loan Committee, which is comprised of personnel from the Credit, Finance and Lending departments. Individual loans or lending relationships with aggregate exposure in excess of $15.0 million must be approved by the Directors’ Loan Committee of the Company’s Board, which is comprised of senior Bank officers and five non-employee directors.

 

Loans to One Borrower.  The maximum amount that we may lend to one borrower and the borrower’s related entities is limited, by regulation, to generally 15% of our stated capital and reserves.  At December 31, 2013, our regulatory limit on loans to one borrower was $98.1 million.  The Company’s internal lending limits are lower than the levels permitted by regulation and at December 31, 2013, the total exposure with our largest lending relationship was $30.7 million, which was secured by various mixed use commercial real estate and general business assets.  All of the loans in the relationship were performing in accordance with their original terms at December 31, 2013.

 

Loan Commitments.  We issue commitments for fixed and adjustable-rate mortgage loans conditioned upon the occurrence of certain events.  Commitments to originate mortgage loans are legally binding agreements to lend to our customers.  Generally, our loan commitments expire after 60 days.

 

Delinquent Loans.  We identify loans that may need to be charged-off as a loss by reviewing all delinquent loans, classified loans and other loans that management may have concerns about collectability.  For individually reviewed loans, the borrower’s inability to make payments under the terms of the loan as well as a shortfall in collateral value may result in a write down to management’s estimate of net realizable value.  The collateral or cash flow shortfall on all secured loans is charged-off when the loan becomes 90 days delinquent or in the case of unsecured loans the entire balance is charged-off when the loan becomes 90 days delinquent. For more information on delinquencies, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Risk Management.”

 

Deposit Activities and Other Sources of Funds

 

General.  Deposits, borrowings and loan and investment repayments are the major sources of our funds for lending and other investment purposes.  Scheduled loan and investment repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposit inflows and outflows and loan prepayments are significantly influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions.

 

Deposit Accounts.  Deposits are primarily attracted from within our market area through the offering of a broad selection of deposit instruments, including non-interest bearing demand deposits (such as individual checking

 

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accounts), interest-bearing demand accounts (such as NOW, municipal and money market accounts), savings accounts and certificates of deposit.

 

Our three primary categories of deposit customers consist of retail or individual customers, businesses and municipalities. Our business banking and municipal deposit products include a commercial checking account and a checking account specifically designed for small businesses.  Additionally, we offer cash management, including remote deposit, lockbox service and sweep accounts.

 

Deposit account terms vary according to the minimum balance required, the time periods the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate, among other factors.  In determining the terms of our deposit accounts, we consider the rates offered by our competition, the rates on borrowings, brokered deposits, our liquidity needs, profitability to us, and customer preferences and concerns.  We generally review our deposit mix and pricing bi-weekly.  Our deposit pricing strategy has generally been to offer competitive rates on all types of deposit products. In response to the low interest rate environment, we have repositioned the balance sheet and improved the Bank’s profitability, interest rate risk, and capital position through the run-off of higher cost, non-relationship-based municipal deposits.

 

At December 31, 2013, municipal checking accounts comprised 10.5% of our deposit portfolio. The number of municipal deposit accounts as of December 31, 2013 totaled 758 and the average balance of an account totaled $505 thousand.

 

Certificate of Deposit Account Registry Service (CDARS). Our participation in this program enables our customers to invest balances in excess of the FDIC deposit insurance limit into other banks within the CDARS network while maintaining their relationship with our Bank. We work with our customers to obtain the most favorable rates and combine all accounts for convenience onto one statement.

 

Brokered Certificates of Deposit.  Our use of brokered deposits is limited. However, we will use brokered certificates of deposit to extend the maturity of our deposits and limit interest rate risk in our deposit portfolio. We generally limit our use of brokered certificates of deposit to 10% or less of total deposits. At December 31, 2013, our brokered certificates of deposits represented approximately 4.1% of total deposits. The cost of these funds was 2.37% for the year ended December 31, 2013 and our brokered certificates of deposit have a weighted average remaining life of 2.59 years at December 31, 2013.

 

Borrowings.  We have the ability to utilize advances from the FHLB of Pittsburgh to supplement our liquidity.  As a member, we are required to own capital stock in the FHLB of Pittsburgh and are authorized to apply for advances on the security of such stock and certain mortgage loans and other assets, provided certain standards related to creditworthiness have been met.  Advances are made under several different programs, each having its own interest rate and range of maturities.  We also utilize securities sold under agreements to repurchase and overnight repurchase agreements, along with the Federal Reserve Bank’s discount window and Federal Funds lines with correspondent banks to supplement our supply of investable funds and to meet deposit withdrawal requirements.  To secure our borrowings, we generally pledge securities and/or loans.  At December 31, 2013, we had the ability to borrow up to $1.3 billion combined from the FHLB of Pittsburgh and the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

 

Personnel

 

As of December 31, 2013, we had 772 full-time employees and 103 part-time employees, none of whom is represented by a collective bargaining unit.  We believe our relationship with our employees is good.

 

Subsidiaries

 

Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC is a Pennsylvania Limited Liability Company formed in 2004 and is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank.  In 2005, Beneficial Insurance Services LLC acquired the assets of Philadelphia-based insurance brokerage firm, Paul Hertel & Co., Inc., which provides property, casualty, life, health and benefits insurance services to individuals and businesses.  In 2005, Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC also acquired a 51% majority interest in Graphic Arts Insurance Agency, Inc. through its acquisition of the assets of Paul Hertel & Co. Inc. In 2007, Beneficial Insurance Services LLC acquired the assets of the insurance brokerage firm, CLA Agency, Inc., based in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania CLA Agency, Inc. provides property/casualty insurance to commercial business and provides professional liability insurance to physician groups, hospitals and healthcare facilities.

 

Beneficial Advisors, LLC, which is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank, is a Pennsylvania limited liability company formed in 2000 to offer wealth management services and investment and insurance related products, including, but not limited to, fixed- and variable-rate annuities and the sale of mutual funds and securities through a third party broker dealer.

 

Neumann Corporation, which was formed in 1990, is a Delaware Investment Holding Company that holds title to various securities and other investments.  Neumann Corporation is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank.

 

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BSB Union Corporation was formed in 1994 to engage in the business of owning and leasing automobiles.  BSB Corporation is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank.  In 2012, BSB Union Corporation obtained approval to engage in equipment leasing activities.  The leasing operations of BSB Union Corporation are currently inactive.

 

Beneficial Abstract, LLC is a currently inactive title insurance company in which the Bank purchased a 40% ownership interest in 2006.

 

Beneficial Equity Holdings, LLC which is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank was formed in 2004 and is currently inactive.

 

PA Real Property GP, LLC which is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank is a special purpose entity formed in 2009 to manage and hold other real estate owned (OREO) properties in Pennsylvania until disposition.

 

NJ Real Property GP, LLC which is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank is a special purpose entity formed in 2010 to manage and hold OREO properties in New Jersey until disposition.

 

DE Real Property Holding, Inc. which is 100% owned by Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank is a special purpose entity formed in 2011 to manage and hold OREO properties in Delaware until disposition.

 

REGULATION AND SUPERVISION

 

The following discussion describes elements of an extensive regulatory framework applicable to savings and loan holding companies and banks.  Federal and state regulation of banks and bank and savings and loan holding companies is intended primarily for the protection of depositors and the Deposit Insurance Fund, rather than for the protection of potential shareholders and creditors.

 

General

 

The Bank is a Pennsylvania-chartered savings bank that is subject to extensive regulation, examination and supervision by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking (the “Department”), as its primary regulator, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”), as its deposits insurer.  The Bank is a member of the FHLB system and its deposit accounts are insured up to applicable limits of the Deposit Insurance Fund managed by the FDIC.  The Bank must file reports with the Department and the FDIC concerning its activities and financial condition, in addition to obtaining regulatory approvals prior to entering into certain transactions such as mergers with, or acquisitions of, other financial institutions.  The Department and/or the FDIC conduct periodic examinations to test the Bank’s safety and soundness and compliance with various regulatory requirements.  This regulatory structure gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to the classification of assets and the establishment of adequate loan loss reserves for regulatory purposes.  As a federal mutual holding company, the MHC is required by federal law to report to, and otherwise comply with the rules and regulations of, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve Board”). The Company, as a federally chartered corporation, is also subject to reporting to and regulation by the Federal Reserve Board. Any change in the regulatory requirements and policies, whether by the Department, the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board or Congress, could have a material adverse impact on the Bank, the Company, the MHC and their operations.

 

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act’) made extensive changes in the regulation of depository institutions. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Office of Thrift Supervision was eliminated. Responsibility for the supervision and regulation of savings and loan holding companies was transferred to the Federal Reserve Board effective July 21, 2011.  The Federal Reserve Board now supervises savings and loan holding companies as well as bank holding companies. Additionally, the Dodd-Frank Act created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as an independent bureau of the Federal Reserve Board. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau assumed responsibility for the implementation of the federal financial consumer protection and fair lending laws and regulations, a function previously assigned to prudential regulators, and has authority to impose new requirements. However, institutions of less than $10.0 billion in assets, such as the Bank, continue to be examined for compliance with consumer protection and fair lending laws and regulations by, and be subject to the enforcement authority of, their prudential regulator.  In response to the changing regulatory environment, we have made enhancements to people, processes, and controls to ensure we are complying with new regulations. It is unclear what impact the Dodd-Frank Act will have on our business in the future as many of the regulations under the act are still being developed.  However, we expect that we will need to continue to make additional investments in people, systems and outside consulting and legal resources to comply with the new regulations.

 

Certain regulatory requirements applicable to the Bank, the Company and the MHC are referred to below or elsewhere herein.  This description of statutes and regulations is not intended to be a complete explanation of such statutes and regulations and their effects on the Bank, the Company and the MHC and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the actual statutes and regulations.

 

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Bank Regulation

 

Pennsylvania Savings Bank Law.  The Pennsylvania Banking Code of 1965, as amended (the “1965 Code”), and the Pennsylvania Department of Banking Code, as amended (the “Department Code,” and collectively, the “Codes”), contain detailed provisions governing the organization, location of offices, rights and responsibilities of directors, officers and employees, as well as corporate powers, savings and investment operations and other aspects of the Bank and its affairs.  The Codes delegate extensive rule-making power and administrative discretion to the Department so that the supervision and regulation of state-chartered savings banks may be flexible and readily responsive to changes in economic conditions and in savings and lending practices.  Specifically, under the Department Code, the Department is given the authority to exercise such supervision over state-chartered savings banks as to afford the greatest safety to creditors, shareholders and depositors, ensure business safety and soundness, conserve assets, protect the public interest and maintain public confidence in such institutions.

 

The 1965 Code provides, among other powers, that state-chartered savings banks may engage in any activity permissible for a national banking association or federal savings association, subject to regulation by the Department (which shall not be more restrictive than the regulation imposed upon a national banking association or federal savings association, respectively).  Before it engages in such an activity allowable for a national banking association or federal savings association, a state-chartered savings bank must either obtain prior approval from the Department or provide at least 30 days’ prior written notice to the Department.  The authority of the Bank under Pennsylvania law, however, may be constrained by federal law and regulation.  See “Investments and Activities” below.

 

Regulatory Capital Requirements.  Under FDIC regulations, federally insured state-chartered banks rated composite 1 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System established by the Federal Financial Institutions Examinations Council must maintain a ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of 3%.  For all other institutions, the minimum leverage capital ratio is not less than 4%.  Tier 1 capital is the sum of common stockholders’ equity, noncumulative perpetual preferred stock (including any related surplus) and minority investments in certain subsidiaries, less intangible assets (except for certain servicing rights and credit card relationships).

 

The Bank must also comply with the FDIC risk-based capital guidelines.  The FDIC guidelines require state non-member banks to maintain certain levels of regulatory capital in relation to regulatory risk-weighted assets.  Risk-based capital ratios are determined by allocating assets and specified off-balance sheet items to four risk-weighted categories, with higher levels of capital being required for the categories perceived as representing greater risk.

 

State non-member banks must maintain a minimum ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 8%, of which at least one-half must be Tier 1 capital.  Total capital consists of Tier 1 capital plus Tier 2 or supplementary capital items, which include allowances for loan losses in an amount of up to 1.25% of risk-weighted assets, cumulative preferred stock, long-term preferred stock, hybrid capital instruments, including mandatory convertible debt securities, term subordinated debt and certain other capital instruments and a portion of the net unrealized gain on equity securities.  The includable amount of Tier 2 capital cannot exceed the amount of the institution’s Tier 1 capital.  At December 31, 2013, the Bank met each of these capital requirements.

 

Savings and loan holding companies are not currently subject to specific regulatory capital requirements. The Dodd-Frank Act, however, required the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies, including savings and loan holding companies, that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves. In early July 2013, the Federal Reserve Board and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency approved revisions to their capital adequacy guidelines and prompt corrective action rules that implement the revised standards of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, commonly called Basel III, and address relevant provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. “Basel III” refers to two consultative documents released by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision in December 2009, the rules text released in December 2010, and loss absorbency rules issued in January 2011, which include significant changes to bank capital, leverage and liquidity requirements.

 

The rules include new risk-based capital and leverage ratios, which are effective January 1, 2015, and revise the definition of what constitutes “capital” for purposes of calculating those ratios. The new minimum capital level requirements applicable to the Company and the Bank will be: (i) a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5%; (ii) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6% (increased from 4%); (iii) a total capital ratio of 8% (unchanged from current rules); and (iv) a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 4% for all institutions. The rules eliminate the inclusion of certain instruments, such as trust preferred securities, from Tier 1 capital. Instruments issued prior to May 19, 2010 will be grandfathered for companies with consolidated assets of $15 billion or less. The rules also establish a “capital conservation buffer” of 2.5% above the new regulatory minimum capital requirements, which must consist entirely of common equity Tier 1 capital and would result in the following minimum ratios: (i) a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 7.0%, (ii) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 8.5%, and (iii) a total capital ratio of 10.5%. The new capital conservation buffer requirement will be phased in beginning in January 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and would increase by that amount each year until fully implemented in January 2019. An institution would be subject to limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying discretionary bonuses if its capital level falls below the buffer amount. These limitations would establish a maximum percentage of eligible retained income that could be utilized for such actions.

 

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As of December 31, 2013, our current capital levels exceed the required capital amounts to be considered “well capitalized” and we believe they also meet the fully-phased in minimum capital requirements, including the related capital conservation buffers, as required by the Basel III capital rules.

 

Restrictions on Dividends.  The Company’s ability to declare and pay dividends may depend in part on dividends received from the Bank.  The 1965 Code regulates the distribution of dividends by savings banks and provides that dividends may be declared and paid only out of accumulated net earnings and may be paid in cash or property other than its own shares.  Dividends may not be declared or paid unless stockholders’ equity is at least equal to contributed capital.

 

Interstate Banking and Branching.  Federal law permits a bank to acquire an institution by merger in a state other than Pennsylvania unless the other state has opted out of interstate banking and branching. Federal law, as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act, also authorizes de novo branching into another state if the host state allows banks chartered by that state to establish such branches within its borders.  The Bank currently has 26 full-service locations in Burlington, Gloucester and Camden counties, New Jersey.  At its interstate branches, the Bank may conduct any activity that is authorized under Pennsylvania law that is permissible either for a New Jersey savings bank (subject to applicable federal restrictions) or a New Jersey branch of an out-of-state national bank.  The New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance may exercise certain regulatory authority over the Bank’s New Jersey branches.

 

Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action.  Federal law requires, among other things, that federal bank regulatory authorities take “prompt corrective action” with respect to banks that do not meet minimum capital requirements.  For these purposes, the law establishes three categories of capital deficient institutions:  undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized.

 

The FDIC has adopted regulations to implement the prompt corrective action legislation.  An institution is deemed to be “well capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6% or greater, and a leverage ratio of 5% or greater.  An institution is “adequately capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 8% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 4% or greater and generally a leverage ratio of 4% or greater (3% or greater for institutions with the highest examination rating).  An institution is “undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 8%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 4%, or generally a leverage ratio of less than 4% (less than 3% for institutions with the highest examination rating).  An institution is deemed to be “significantly undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 6%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 3%, or a leverage ratio of less than 3%.  An institution is considered to be “critically undercapitalized” if it has a ratio of tangible equity (as defined in the regulations) to total assets that is equal to or less than 2%.  As of December 31, 2013, the Bank met the conditions to be classified as a “well capitalized” institution.

 

“Undercapitalized” banks must adhere to growth, capital distribution (including dividend) and other limitations and are required to submit a capital restoration plan.  No institution may make a capital distribution, including payment as a dividend, if it would be “undercapitalized” after the payment.  A bank’s compliance with such plans is required to be guaranteed by its parent holding company in an amount equal to the lesser of 5% of the institution’s total assets when deemed undercapitalized or the amount needed to comply with regulatory capital requirements. If an “undercapitalized” bank fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is treated as if it is “significantly undercapitalized.”  “Significantly undercapitalized” banks must comply with one or more of a number of additional restrictions, including but not limited to, an order by the FDIC to sell sufficient voting stock to become adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce assets and cease receipt of deposits from correspondent banks or dismiss directors or officers, and restrictions on interest rates paid on deposits, compensation of executive officers and capital distributions by the parent holding company.  “Critically undercapitalized” institutions must comply with additional sanctions including, subject to a narrow exception, the appointment of a receiver or conservator within 270 days after it obtains such status.

 

Investments and Activities.  Under federal law, all state-chartered FDIC-insured banks have generally been limited to activities as principal and equity investments of the type and in the amount authorized for national banks, notwithstanding state law.  The FDIC Improvement Act and the FDIC permit exceptions to these limitations.  For example, state chartered banks may, with FDIC approval, continue to exercise grandfathered state authority to invest in common or preferred stocks listed on a national securities exchange or the Nasdaq Global Select Market and in the shares of an investment company registered under federal law.  The Bank received grandfathering authority from the FDIC to invest in listed stocks and/or registered shares.  The maximum permissible investment is 100% of Tier I capital, as specified by the FDIC’s regulations, or the maximum amount permitted by Pennsylvania Banking Law, whichever is less.  Such grandfathering authority may be terminated upon the FDIC’s determination that such investments pose a safety and soundness risk to the Bank or if the Bank converts its charter or undergoes a change in control.  In addition, the FDIC is authorized to permit such institutions to engage in other state authorized activities or investments (other than non-subsidiary equity investments) that meet all applicable capital requirements if it is determined that such activities or investments do not pose a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund.  As of December 31, 2013, the Bank held no marketable equity securities under such grandfathering authority.

 

Transactions with Related Parties.  Federal law limits the Bank’s authority to lend to, and engage in certain other transactions with (collectively, “covered transactions”), “affiliates” (e.g., any company that controls or is under common control with an institution, including the Company, the MHC and their non-savings institution subsidiaries).

 

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The aggregate amount of covered transactions with any individual affiliate is limited to 10% of the capital and surplus of the savings institution.  The aggregate amount of covered transactions with affiliates is limited to 20% of an institution’s capital and surplus.  Certain transactions with affiliates are required to be secured by collateral in an amount and of a type specified by federal law.  The purchase of low quality assets from affiliates is generally prohibited.  Transactions with affiliates must generally be on terms and under circumstances, that are at least as favorable to the institution as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with non-affiliated companies.  In addition, savings institutions are prohibited from lending to any affiliate that is engaged in activities that are not permissible for bank holding companies and no savings institution may purchase the securities of any affiliate other than a subsidiary.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 generally prohibits loans by the Bank to its executive officers and directors.  However, the law contains a specific exception for loans by the Bank to its executive officers and directors in compliance with federal banking laws.  Under such laws, the Bank’s authority to extend credit to executive officers, directors and 10% shareholders (“insiders”), as well as entities such persons control, is limited.  The law limits both the individual and aggregate amount of loans we may make to insiders based, in part, on the Company’s capital position and requires certain board approval procedures to be followed.  Such loans are required to be made on terms substantially the same as those offered to unaffiliated individuals and not involve more than the normal risk of repayment.  There is an exception for loans made pursuant to a benefit or compensation program that is widely available to all employees of the institution and does not give preference to insiders over other employees.  Loans to executives are subject to further limitations based on the type of loan involved.

 

Enforcement.  The FDIC has extensive enforcement authority over insured savings banks, including the Bank.  This enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease and desist orders and to remove directors and officers.  In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated in response to violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices.

 

Insurance of Deposit Accounts.  The Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC.  The deposit insurance per account owner is currently $250,000.

 

Under the FDIC’s risk-based assessment system, insured institutions are assigned to one of four risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and certain other factors, with less risky institutions paying lower assessments.  An institution’s assessment rate depends upon the category to which it is assigned.  On February 7, 2011, the FDIC approved a final rule that implemented changes to the deposit insurance assessment system mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act.  Under the final rule, assessment base for payment of FDIC premiums was changed from a deposit level base to an asset level base consisting of average tangible assets less average tangible equity.

 

The FDIC may adjust rates uniformly from one quarter to the next, except that no adjustment can deviate more than three basis points from the base scale without notice and comment rulemaking.  No institution may pay a dividend if in default of the FDIC assessment.

 

The FDIC has authority to increase insurance assessments.  A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and our results of operations.  Management cannot predict what insurance assessment rates will be in the future.

 

Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC or the Department.  The management of the Bank does not know of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of deposit insurance.

 

Federal Home Loan Bank System.  The Bank is a member of the FHLB system, which consists of 12 regional Federal Home Loan Banks.  The FHLB provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions.  At December 31, 2013 the Bank had a maximum borrowing capacity from the FHLB Pittsburgh of $1.1 billion of which we had $195.0 million in outstanding borrowings and $800 thousand in outstanding letters of credit.  The balance remaining of $904.4 million is our unused borrowing capacity with the FHLB at December 31, 2013.  The Bank, as a member of the FHLB of Pittsburgh, is required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in that FHLB.  The Bank was in compliance with requirements for FHLB Pittsburgh with an investment of $17.4 million at December 31, 2013.

 

Community Reinvestment Act.  A state non-member bank has a continuing and affirmative obligation consistent with its safe and sound operation to help meet the credit needs of its entire community, including low and moderate-income neighborhoods.  The Community Reinvestment Act neither establishes specific lending requirements or programs for financial institutions nor limits an institution’s discretion to develop the types of products and services that it believes are best suited to its particular community.  The Community Reinvestment Act requires the FDIC, in connection with its examination of an institution, to assess the institution’s record of meeting the credit needs of its community and to consider such record when it evaluates applications made by such institution.  The Community Reinvestment Act requires public disclosure of an institution’s Community Reinvestment Act rating.  The Bank’s latest Community Reinvestment Act rating received from the FDIC was “outstanding.”

 

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Other Regulations.  Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by the Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates.  The Bank’s operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

 

·                                          Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

·                                          Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

·                                          Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

·                                          Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

·                                          Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies; and

 

·                                          Rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

 

The operations of the Bank also are subject to the:

 

·                                          Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

·                                          Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated there under, which establishes the rights, liabilities and responsibilities of consumers who use electronic fund transfer (EFT) services and financial institutions that offer these services; its primary objective is the protection of individual consumers in their dealings with these services;

 

·                                          Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which allows banks to create and receive “substitute checks” (paper reproduction of the original check), and discloses the customers rights regarding “substitute checks” pertaining to these items having the “same legal standing as the original paper check”;

 

·                                          Title III of The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (referred to as the “USA PATRIOT Act”), and related regulations which require savings associations operating in the United States to develop new anti-money laundering compliance programs (including a customer identification program that must be incorporated into the AML compliance program), due diligence policies and controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering; and

 

·                                          The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which prohibits a financial institution from disclosing nonpublic personal information about a consumer to nonaffiliated third parties, unless the institution satisfies various notice and opt-out requirements.

 

·                                          The Fair and Accurate Reporting Act of 2003, as an amendment to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, as noted previously, which includes provisions to help reduce identity theft by providing procedures for the identification, detection, and response to patterns, practices, or specific activities — known as “red flags”.

 

·                                          Truth in Savings Act, which establishes the requirement for clear and uniform disclosure of terms and conditions regarding interest and fees to help promote economic stability, competition between depository institutions, and allow the consumer to make informed decisions.

 

Holding Company Regulation

 

General.  The Company and the MHC are savings and loan holding companies within the meaning of federal law.  As such, they are registered with the Federal Reserve Board and are subject to Federal Reserve Board regulations, examinations, supervision, reporting requirements and regulations concerning corporate governance and activities.  The Federal Reserve Bank has enforcement authority over the Company and the MHC and their non-savings institution subsidiaries.  Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Bank to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a serious risk to the Bank.

 

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The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”) also takes the position that its capital distribution regulations apply to state savings banks in savings and loan holding company structures.  Those regulations impose limitations upon all capital distributions by an institution, including cash dividends, payments to repurchase its shares and payments to shareholders of another institution in a cash-out merger.  Under the regulations, an application to and prior approval of the OCC is required prior to any capital distribution if the institution does not meet the criteria for “expedited treatment” of applications under OCC regulations (i.e., generally, examination and Community Reinvestment Act ratings in the two top categories), the total capital distributions for the calendar year exceed net income for that year plus the amount of retained net income for the preceding two years, the institution would be undercapitalized following the distribution or the distribution would otherwise be contrary to a statute, regulation or agreement with the OCC.  If an application is not required, the institution must still provide prior notice to the OCC of the capital distribution if, like the Bank, it is a subsidiary of a holding company.  In the event the Bank’s capital fell below its regulatory requirements or the OCC notified it that it was in need of increased supervision, the Bank’s ability to make capital distributions could be restricted.  In addition, the OCC could prohibit a proposed capital distribution by any institution, which would otherwise be permitted by the regulation, if the OCC determines that such distribution would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice.

 

To be regulated as a savings and loan holding company (rather than as a bank holding company by the Federal Reserve Board), the Bank must qualify as a Qualified Thrift Lender (“QTL”).  To qualify as a QTL, the Bank must maintain compliance with the test for a “domestic building and loan association,” as defined in the Internal Revenue Code, or with a Qualified Thrift Test.  Under the QTL Test, a savings institution is required to maintain at least 65% of its “portfolio assets” (total assets less: (1) specified liquid assets up to 20% of total assets; (2) intangibles, including goodwill; and (3) the value of property used to conduct business) in certain “qualified thrift investments” (primarily residential mortgages and related investments, including mortgage-backed and related securities, but also including education, credit and small business loans) in at least nine months out of each 12-month period.  At December 31, 2013, the Bank maintained 81.1% of its portfolio assets in qualified thrift investments.  For the year ended December 31, 2013, the Bank met the QTL test in at least nine months out of each of the 12-month period as required.

 

Restrictions Applicable to Mutual Holding Companies.  According to federal law and regulations, a mutual holding company, such as the MHC, may generally engage in the following activities:  (1) investing in the stock of a savings association; (2) acquiring a mutual association through the merger of such association into a savings association subsidiary of such holding company or an interim savings association subsidiary of such holding company; (3) merging with or acquiring another holding company, one of whose subsidiaries is a savings association; (4) investing in a corporation, the capital stock of which is available for purchase by a savings association under federal law or under the law of any state where the subsidiary savings association or associations share their home offices; (5) furnishing or performing management services for a savings association subsidiary of such company; (6) holding, managing or liquidating assets owned or acquired from a savings subsidiary of such company; (7) holding or managing properties used or occupied by a savings association subsidiary of such company; (8) acting as trustee under deeds of trust; (9) any other activity (A) that the Federal Reserve Board, by regulation, has determined to be permissible for bank holding companies under Section 4(c) of the Bank Holding Company Act, unless the Federal Reserve Board, by regulation, prohibits or limits any such activity for savings and loan holding companies; or (B) in which multiple savings and loan holding companies were authorized (by regulation) to directly engage on March 5, 1987; and (10) purchasing, holding, or disposing of stock acquired in connection with a qualified stock issuance if the purchase of such stock by such savings and loan holding company is approved by the Federal Reserve Board.

 

Federal law prohibits a savings and loan holding company, including a federal mutual holding company, from directly or indirectly, or through one or more subsidiaries, acquiring more than 5% of the voting stock of another savings institution, or its holding company, without prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Board.  Federal law also prohibits a savings and loan holding company from acquiring more than 5% of a company engaged in activities other than those authorized for savings and loan holding companies by federal law; or acquiring or retaining control of a depository institution that is not insured by the FDIC.  In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings institutions, the Federal Reserve Board must consider the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the company and institution involved the effect of the acquisition on the risk to the insurance funds, the convenience and needs of the community and competitive factors.

 

The Federal Reserve Board is prohibited from approving any acquisition that would result in a multiple savings and loan holding company controlling savings institutions in more than one state, except: (1) the approval of interstate supervisory acquisitions by savings and loan holding companies, and (2) the acquisition of a savings institution in another state if the laws of the state of the target savings institution specifically permit such acquisitions.  The states vary in the extent to which they permit interstate savings and loan holding company acquisitions.

 

If the savings bank subsidiary of a savings and loan holding company fails to meet the QTL test, the company is subject to certain operating restrictions, including dividend limitations. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act made noncompliance with the QTL test subject to agency enforcement action as a violation of law.

 

Stock Holding Company Subsidiary Regulation.  The Federal Reserve board has adopted regulations governing the two-tier mutual holding company form of organization and subsidiary stock holding companies that are controlled by mutual holding companies.  We have adopted this form of organization, pursuant to which the Company is permitted to engage in activities that are permitted for the MHC subject to the same restrictions and conditions.

 

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Waivers of Dividends by Beneficial Savings Bank MHC.  Federal Reserve Board regulations require the MHC to notify the Federal Reserve Board if it proposes to waive receipt of dividends from the Company.  The Federal Reserve Board reviews dividend waiver notices on a case-by-case basis, and, in general, does not object to a waiver if: (1) if the mutual holding company involved has, prior to December 1, 2009, reorganized into a mutual holding company structure, engaged in a minority stock offering and waived dividends; (2) the board of directors of the mutual holding company expressly determines that a waiver of the dividend is consistent with its fiduciary duties to members and (3) the waiver would not be detrimental to the safe and sound operation of the savings association subsidiaries of the holding company.  The MHC did not waive dividends prior to December 1, 2009.

 

Capital Requirements.  Savings and loan holding companies are not currently subject to specific regulatory capital requirements.  The Dodd-Frank Act, however, requires the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves.  There is a five year transition period from the July 21, 2010 date of enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act before the capital requirements will apply to savings and loan holding companies.  The Dodd-Frank Act also requires the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate regulations implementing the “source of strength” policy that requires holding companies to act as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

 

Conversion of Beneficial Savings Bank MHC to Stock Form.  Federal Reserve Board regulations permit the MHC to convert from the mutual form of organization to the capital stock form of organization. In a conversion transaction, a new holding company would be formed as the successor to the Company, the MHC’s corporate existence would end, and certain depositors of the Bank would receive the right to subscribe for additional shares of the new holding company.  In a conversion transaction, each share of common stock held by stockholders other than the MHC would be automatically converted into a number of shares of common stock of the new holding company based on an exchange ratio determined at the time of conversion that ensures that stockholders other than the MHC own the same percentage of common stock in the new holding company as they owned in the Company immediately before conversion.  The total number of shares held by stockholders other than the MHC after a conversion transaction would be increased by any purchases by such stockholders in the stock offering conducted as part of the conversion transaction.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act provides that waived dividends will also not be considered in determining the appropriate exchange ratio after the transfer of responsibilities to the Federal Reserve Board provided that the mutual holding company involved was formed, engaged in a minority offering and waived dividends prior to December 1, 2009.  Although the MHC was formed and engaged in a minority offering prior to December 1, 2009, the MHC had not waived dividends prior to that date.

 

Acquisition of Control.  Under the federal Change in Bank Control Act, a notice must be submitted to Federal Reserve Board if any person (including a company), or group acting in concert, seeks to acquire “control” of a savings and loan holding company.  An acquisition of “control” can occur upon the acquisition of 10% or more of the voting stock of a savings and loan holding company or as otherwise defined by the Federal Reserve Board.  Under the Change in Bank Control Act, the Federal Reserve Board generally has 60 days from the filing of a complete notice to act, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the anti-trust effects of the acquisition.  Any company that so acquires control would then be subject to regulation as a savings and loan holding company.

 

Financial Reform Legislation

 

On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Act.  In addition to eliminating the Office of Thrift Supervision and creating the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Dodd-Frank Act, among other things, repeals non-payment of interest on commercial demand deposits, requires changes in the way that institutions are assessed for deposit insurance, mandates the imposition of consolidated capital requirements on savings and loan holding companies, forces originators of securitized loans to retain a percentage of the risk for the transferred loans, requires regulatory rate-setting for certain debit card interchange fees and contains a number of reforms related to mortgage origination.  Many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to delayed effective dates and require the issuance of implementing regulations.  Their impact on operations cannot yet be fully assessed by management.  However, there is a significant possibility that the Dodd-Frank Act will, at a minimum, result in increased regulatory burden, compliance costs and interest expense as well as potential reduced fee income for the Bank, Company and MHC.

 

Effective July 21, 2011, we began offering interest on certain commercial checking accounts as permitted by the Dodd-Frank Act. We have been actively marketing full service commercial checking accounts that include interest earned on these funds. Interest paid on commercial checking accounts will increase our interest expense in the future.

 

In December 2013, final rules implementing the Volcker Rule (Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act) were promulgated by the five federal financial regulatory agencies responsible for implementing and enforcing the rule.  The final rules are effective July 21, 2015. The Volcker Rule prohibits “banking

 

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entities” from proprietary trading and imposes substantial restrictions on their ownership or sponsorship of, and relationships with, certain “covered funds,” largely hedge funds and private equity funds. Importantly, with respect to proprietary trading, the final rule tightens the requirements for the hedging exemption to require that the hedge demonstrably mitigates a “specific, identified exposure.”

 

During the quarter ended December 31, 2013, the Company sold $6.2 million of pooled trust securities that resulted in a $1.2 million loss due to the uncertainty regarding banking institutions being allowed to hold pooled trust preferred securities under the Volcker Rule.  These securities were in a $740 thousand unrealized loss position at the time of the sale. Management reviewed the securities included in the Company’s investment portfolio and noted that, at December 31, 2013, the majority of the investment portfolio was comprised of mortgage-backed securities issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), including collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMO”) securities issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.  The Company’s investment portfolio also includes municipal bonds, government-sponsored enterprise (“GSE”) and government agency notes, foreign bonds, mutual funds and money market funds.  The Company does not engage in proprietary trading and does not have a position in covered funds as defined in the Volcker Rule as of December 31, 2013.  Management believes that securities held in the Company’s investment portfolio as of December 31, 2013 are not impacted by Volcker Rule. In addition, management determined that we have no hedges that would be impacted by the Volcker Rule.

 

Income Taxation

 

General.  We report our income on a calendar year basis using the accrual method of accounting. The federal income tax laws apply to us in the same manner as to other corporations with some exceptions, including particularly our reserve for bad debts discussed below. The following discussion of tax matters is intended only as a summary and does not purport to be a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to us. The tax years 2010 through 2012 remain subject to examination by the IRS, Pennsylvania and Philadelphia taxing authorities.  The 2012 tax year remains subject to examination by New Jersey taxing authorities.  For 2013, the Bank’s maximum federal income tax rate was 35%.

 

The Company and the Bank have entered into a tax allocation agreement.  Because the Company owns 100% of the issued and outstanding capital stock of the Bank, the Company and the Bank are members of an affiliated group within the meaning of Section 1504(a) of the Internal Revenue Code, of which group the Company is the common parent corporation.  As a result of this affiliation, the Bank is included in the filing of a consolidated federal income tax return with the Company and, the parties compensate each other for their individual share of the consolidated tax liability and/or any tax benefits provided by them in the filing of the consolidated federal income tax return.

 

Bad Debt Reserves.  For fiscal years beginning before June 30, 1996, thrift institutions that qualified under certain definitional tests and other conditions of the Internal Revenue Code were permitted to use certain favorable provisions to calculate their deductions from taxable income for annual additions to their bad debt reserve. A reserve could be established for bad debts on qualifying real property loans, generally secured by interests in real property improved or to be improved, under the percentage of taxable income method or the experience method. The reserve for non-qualifying loans was computed using the experience method.  Federal legislation enacted in 1996 repealed the reserve method of accounting for bad debts and the percentage of taxable income method for tax years beginning after 1995 and required savings institutions to recapture or take into income certain portions of their accumulated bad debt reserves as of December 31, 1987.  Approximately $2.3 million of income tax related to our accumulated bad debt reserves would not be recognized unless the Bank makes a “non-dividend distribution” to the Company as described below.

 

Distributions.  If the Bank makes “non-dividend distributions” to the Company, the distributions will be considered to have been made from the Bank’s un-recaptured tax bad debt reserves, including the balance of its reserves as of December 31, 1987, to the extent of the “non-dividend distributions,” and then from the Bank’s supplemental reserve for losses on loans, to the extent of those reserves, and an amount based on the amount distributed, but not more than the amount of those reserves, will be included in the Bank’s taxable income. Non-dividend distributions include distributions in excess of the Bank’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, as calculated for federal income tax purposes, distributions in redemption of stock, and distributions in partial or complete liquidation.  Dividends paid out of the Bank’s current or accumulated earnings and profits will not be so included in the Bank’s taxable income.

 

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The amount of additional taxable income triggered by a non-dividend is an amount that, when reduced by the tax attributable to the income, is equal to the amount of the distribution. Therefore, if the Bank makes a non-dividend distribution to the Company, approximately one and one-half times the amount of the distribution not in excess of the amount of the reserves would be includable in income for federal income tax purposes, assuming a 35% federal corporate income tax rate.  The Bank does not intend to pay dividends that would result in a recapture of any portion of its bad debt reserves.

 

State Taxation

 

Pennsylvania Taxation.  The Bank, as a savings bank conducting business in Pennsylvania, is subject to tax under the Pennsylvania Mutual Thrift Institutions Tax (MTIT) Act, as amended to include thrift institutions having capital stock.  The MTIT is a tax upon separately stated net book income, determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles with certain adjustments.  In computing income subject to MTIT taxation, there is an allowance for the deduction of interest income earned on state, federal and local obligations, while also disallowing a portion of a thrift’s interest expense associated with such tax-exempt income.  The MTIT tax rate is 11.5%. Net operating losses, if any, can be carried forward a maximum of three years for MTIT purposes.

 

Philadelphia Taxation.  In addition, as a savings bank conducting business in Philadelphia, the Bank is also subject to the City of Philadelphia Business Income and Receipts Tax.  The City of Philadelphia Business Income and Receipts Tax is a tax upon net income or taxable receipts imposed on persons carrying on or exercising for gain or profit certain business activities within Philadelphia.  Pursuant to the City of Philadelphia Business Income and Receipts Tax, the 2013 tax rate was 6.43% on net income and 0.14% on gross receipts.  For regulated industry taxpayers, the tax is the lesser of the tax on net income or the tax on gross receipts.  The City of Philadelphia Business Income and Receipts Tax allows for the deduction by financial businesses from receipts of (a) the cost of securities and other intangible property and monetary metals sold, exchanged, paid at maturity or redeemed, but only to the extent of the total gross receipts from securities and other intangible property and monetary metals sold, exchanged, paid out at maturity or redeemed; (b) moneys or credits received in repayment of the principal amount of deposits, advances, credits, loans and other obligations; (c) interest received on account of deposits, advances, credits, loans and other obligations made to persons resident or having their principal place of business outside Philadelphia; (d) interest received on account of other deposits, advances, credits, loans and other obligations but only to the extent of interest expenses attributable to such deposits, advances, credits, loans and other obligations; and (e) payments received on account of shares purchased by shareholders.  An apportioned net operating loss may be carried forward for three tax years following the tax year for which it was first reported.

 

New Jersey Taxation.  The Bank and BSB Union Corporation are subject to New Jersey’s Corporation Business Tax at the rate of 9.0% on their separate company apportioned taxable income.  For this purpose, “taxable income” generally means federal taxable income subject to certain adjustments (including addition of interest income on state and municipal obligations).  Net operating losses may be carried forward for twenty years following the tax year for which it was reported.

 

Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

The Board of Directors annually elects the executive officers of MHC, the Company, and the Bank, who serve at the Board’s discretion.  Our executive officers are:

 

Name

 

Position

Gerard P. Cuddy

 

President and Chief Executive Officer of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

Thomas D. Cestare

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

Martin F. Gallagher

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

James E. Gould

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

Robert J. Maines

 

Executive Vice President and Director of Operations of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

Pamela M. Cyr

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Retail Banking Officer of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

Joanne R. Ryder

 

Executive Vice President and Director of Brand & Strategy of the MHC, the Company and the Bank

 

Below is information regarding our executive officers who are not also directors.  Each executive officer has held his or her current position for the period indicated below.  Ages presented are as of December 31, 2013.

 

Gerard P. Cuddy has been our President and Chief Executive Officer since 2007.  From May 2005 to November 2006, Mr. Cuddy was a senior lender at Commerce Bank and from 2002 to 2005, Mr. Cuddy served as a Senior Vice

 

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President of Fleet/Bank of America.  Prior to Mr. Cuddy’s service with Fleet/Bank of America, Mr. Cuddy held senior management positions with First Union National Bank and Citigroup.  Age 54.

 

Thomas D. Cestare joined Beneficial Bank as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Beneficial Bank in July 2010.  Prior to joining the Company and Bank, Mr. Cestare served as Executive Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer of Sovereign Bancorp, Inc.  Mr. Cestare is a certified public accountant who was a Partner with the public accounting firm of KPMG LLP prior to joining Sovereign Bancorp in 2005. Age 45.

 

Martin F. Gallagher joined Beneficial Bank’s commercial banking group in June 2011 and was named Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer in January 2012.  Prior to that time, Mr. Gallagher managed and developed commercial banking portfolios for Bryn Mawr Trust Company and National Penn Bank.  Age 57.

 

James E. Gould has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer of Beneficial Bank since May 2011.  Prior to joining the Company and Bank, Mr. Gould served as Managing Director of Private Banking for Wilmington Trust Bank in the Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey Regions. Prior to joining Wilmington Trust Bank in 2007, Mr. Gould was Senior Vice President and Regional Managing Director of Credit for Wachovia Bank’s Wealth Management Division.  Age 66.

 

Robert J. Maines joined Beneficial Bank in July 2008 and was named Executive Vice President and Director of Operations in January 2012.  Prior to that time, Mr. Maines served as the Director of Risk Management at Accume Partners.  Prior to joining Accume Partners in 2006, Mr. Maines served as First Vice President, Senior Audit Manager at MBNA.  Age 45.

 

Pamela M. Cyr is the former President & CEO of SE Financial.  Ms. Cyr joined Beneficial Bank in June 2012 and was named Executive Vice President and Chief Retail Banking Officer.  Age 46.

 

Joanne R. Ryder joined Beneficial Bank in July 2007 as Director of Marketing and was named Executive Vice President and Director of Brand & Strategy in January 2012.  Prior to that time, Ms. Ryder served as Vice President, Field Marketing Manager at Commerce Bank.  Age 39.

 

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Item 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

A return to recessionary conditions or status quo in the current economic environment could result in increases in our level of non-performing loans and/or reduce demand for our products and services, which would lead to lower revenue, higher loan losses and lower earnings.

 

Although economic conditions have improved since the end of the economic recession in June 2009, growth in gross deposit products has been slow, unemployment remains high and concerns still exist over the federal deficit and government spending, which have all contributed to diminished expectations for the economy.  A return of recessionary conditions and/or continued negative developments in the domestic and international credit markets may significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the value of our loans and investments, and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability.  Further declines in real estate values and sales volumes and continued high unemployment levels may result in higher than expected loan delinquencies, increases in our levels of nonperforming and classified assets and a decline in demand for our products and services. These negative events may cause us to incur losses and may adversely affect our capital, liquidity, and financial condition.

 

Continued low loan demand may negatively impact our earnings and results of operations.

 

The severe economic recession of 2008 and 2009 and the weak economic recovery since then have resulted in continued uncertainty in the financial markets and the expectation of weak general economic conditions, including high levels of unemployment. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and businesses has adversely affected our business, financial condition, and results of operations and has reduced loan demand in our market areas.  As a result of this reduced loan demand, we have invested excess liquidity in low yielding cash equivalent assets and investment securities, which has negatively impacted our earnings.  Prolonged low loan demand in our market area could require us to continue to invest excess liquidity in these types of low yielding assets, which would continue to adversely affect our earnings and results of operations.

 

Our business is subject to interest rate risk and variations in interest rates may negatively affect our financial performance.

 

Changes in the interest rate environment may reduce profits. The primary source of our income is the differential or “spread” between the interest earned on loans, securities and other interest-earning assets, and interest paid on deposits, borrowings and other interest-bearing liabilities. As prevailing interest rates change, net interest spreads are affected by the difference between the maturities and re-pricing characteristics of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. At December 31, 2013, in the event of a 200 basis point increase in interest rates, we would be expected to experience an 8.78% decline in the economic value of equity and a 2.46% decrease in net interest income.  In addition, loan volume and yields are affected by market interest rates on loans, and rising interest rates generally are associated with a lower volume of loan originations. An increase in the general level of interest rates may also adversely affect the ability of certain borrowers to pay the interest on and principal of their obligations. Accordingly, changes in levels of market interest rates could materially adversely affect our net interest spread, asset quality, loan origination volume and overall profitability. In addition, our deposits are subject to increases in interest rates and as interest rates rise we may lose these deposits if we do not pay competitive interest rates which may affect our liquidity and profits.

 

Our emphasis on commercial loans may expose us to increased lending risks.

 

At December 31, 2013, $622.2 million, or 26.5%, of our loan portfolio consisted of commercial real estate and commercial construction loans, including loans for the acquisition and development of property, and $378.7 million, or 16.2%, of our loan portfolio consisted of commercial business loans.  At December 31, 2013, we had a total of 18 land acquisition and development loans totaling $20.7 million included in commercial real estate and commercial construction loans, which consist of 3 residential land acquisition and development loans totaling $5.6 million and 15 commercial land acquisition and development loans totaling $15.1 million.

 

Commercial real estate loans and commercial business loans generally expose a lender to a greater risk of loss than one-to-four family residential loans.  Repayment of commercial real estate and commercial business loans generally is dependent, in large part, on sufficient income from the property to cover operating expenses and debt service.  Commercial real estate loans typically involve larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers compared to one-to-four family residential mortgage loans.  Changes in economic conditions that are out of the control of the borrower and lender could impact the value of the security for the loan, the future cash flow of the affected property, or the marketability of a construction project with respect to loans originated for the acquisition and development of property.  Additionally, any decline in real estate values may be more pronounced with respect to commercial real estate properties than residential properties.

 

A substantial portion of our loan portfolio consists of consumer loans secured by rapidly depreciable assets.

 

At December 31, 2013, our loan portfolio included $175.4 million in automobile loans, which represented 7.5% of our total loan portfolio at that date.  In addition, at December 31, 2013, other consumer loans totaled $481.6 million, or 20.6%, of our loan portfolio.  Included in other consumer loans is approximately $2.0 million in loans secured by

 

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manufactured housing and mobile homes, $20.3 million in loans secured by recreational vehicles and $14.9 million in loans secured by boats.  Consumer loans secured by rapidly depreciable assets such as automobiles, recreational vehicles and boats may subject us to greater risk of loss than loans secured by real estate because any repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment of the outstanding loan balance.

 

Our emphasis on residential mortgage loans exposes us to lending risks.

 

At December 31, 2013, $683.7 million, or 29.2%, of our loan portfolio was secured by one- to four-family real estate and we intend to continue to emphasize this type of lending. One- to four-family residential mortgage lending is generally sensitive to regional and local economic conditions that significantly impact the ability of borrowers to meet their loan payment obligations, making loss levels difficult to predict. The decline in residential real estate values as a result of the downturn in our local housing market has reduced the value of the real estate collateral securing these types of loans. Declines in real estate values could cause some of our residential mortgages to be inadequately collateralized, which would expose us to a greater risk of loss if we seek to recover on defaulted loans by selling the real estate collateral.

 

Because most of our borrowers are located in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, a prolonged downturn in the local economy, or a decline in local real estate values, could cause an increase in nonperforming loans or a decrease in loan demand, which would reduce our profits.

 

Substantially all of our loans are secured by real estate located in our primary market areas.  Continued weakness in our local economy and our local real estate markets could adversely affect the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans and the value of the collateral securing our loans, which could adversely affect our results of operations.  Real estate values are affected by various factors, including supply and demand, changes in general or regional economic conditions, interest rates, governmental rules or policies and natural disasters.  Continued weakness in economic conditions also could result in reduced loan demand and a decline in loan originations.  In particular, a significant decline in real estate values would likely lead to a decrease in new commercial real estate and home equity loan originations and increased delinquencies and defaults in our real estate loan portfolio.

 

We rely on high-average balance municipal deposits and time deposits as a source of funds and a reduced level of those deposits may adversely affect our liquidity and our profits.

 

Municipal deposits, consisting primarily of interest earning checking accounts, are a significant source of funds for our lending and investment activities. Over the past three years, we have significantly reduced our municipal deposits from a high of $1.1 billion at December 31, 2010, or 27.2% of total deposits, to $383.0 million, or 10.5% of our total deposits, as of December 31, 2013. For the year ended December 31, 2013, the balance of municipal deposits decreased $228.6 million, or 37.4%, as a result of the planned run-off of higher-rate non-relationship based accounts.  The average balance of municipal deposit relationships is significantly higher than the average balance of all deposit relationships.  The number of municipal deposits totaled 758 as of December 31, 2013 and the average balance of an account totaled $505 thousand. Given our dependence on high-average balance municipal deposits as a source of funds, our inability to retain such funds could significantly and adversely affect our liquidity.  Further, our municipal checking accounts are demand deposits and are therefore considered rate-sensitive instruments.  If we are forced to pay higher rates on our municipal checking accounts to retain those funds, or if we are unable to retain such funds and we are forced to resort to other sources of funds for our lending and investment activities, such as borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh, the interest expense associated with these other funding sources may be higher than the rates we are currently paying on the municipal deposits, which would adversely affect our profits.

 

Certificates of deposit due within one year of December 31, 2013 totaled $376.1 million, or 51.5% of certificates of deposit. The large percentage of certificates of deposit that mature within one year reflects customers’ hesitancy to invest their funds for long periods in the current low interest rate environment.  If these maturing deposits do not remain with us, we will be required to seek other sources of funds, including other certificates of deposit and borrowings.  Depending on market conditions, we may be required to pay higher rates on such deposits or other borrowings than we currently pay on the certificates of deposit due on or before December 31, 2013.  We have the ability to attract and retain deposits by adjusting the interest rates offered.

 

We are subject to certain risks in connection with our strategy of growing through mergers and acquisitions.

 

Mergers and acquisitions have contributed significantly to our growth in the past, and remain a component of our business model.  Accordingly, it is possible that we could acquire other financial institutions, financial service providers or branches of banks through negotiated transactions in the future.  Our ability to engage in future mergers and acquisitions depends on various factors, including (i) our ability to identify suitable merger partners and acquisition opportunities, (ii) our ability to finance and complete negotiated transactions on acceptable terms and at acceptable prices, (iii) our ability to receive the necessary regulatory approvals and (iv), when required, our ability to receive necessary stockholder approvals.  Furthermore, mergers and acquisitions involve a number of risks and challenges, including (i) our ability to integrate the branches and operations we acquire, and the internal controls and regulatory functions into our current operations and (ii) the diversion of management’s attention from existing

 

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operations.  Our inability to engage in or effectively integrate an acquisition or merger for any of these reasons could have an adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We hold goodwill, an intangible asset that could be classified as impaired in the future. If goodwill is considered to be either partially or fully impaired in the future, our earnings and the book value of goodwill would decrease.

 

We are required to test our goodwill for impairment on a periodic basis. The impairment testing process considers a variety of factors, including the current market price of our common shares, the estimated net present value of our assets and liabilities and information concerning the terminal valuation of similarly situated insured depository institutions. It is possible that future impairment testing could result in a partial or full impairment of the value of our goodwill, which was $122.0 million as of December 31, 2013. A portion of our goodwill balance relates to our acquired insurance companies.  These businesses have suffered declining revenues and profitability levels over the past few years.  Although the fair value of the insurance businesses currently exceeds its carrying amount including goodwill, further deterioration in financial results in future periods could cause goodwill to be impaired. If an impairment determination is made in a future reporting period, our earnings and the book value of goodwill will be reduced by the amount of the impairment.

 

Strong competition within our market area could hurt our profits and slow growth.

 

We face substantial competition in originating loans, both commercial and consumer. This competition comes principally from other banks, savings institutions, mortgage banking companies and other lenders. Many of our competitors enjoy advantages that we do not, including greater financial resources and higher lending limits, a wider geographic presence, more accessible branch office locations, the ability to offer a wider array of services or more favorable pricing alternatives, as well as lower origination and operating costs. This competition could reduce our net income by decreasing the number and size of loans that we originate and the interest rates we may charge on these loans.

 

In attracting business and consumer deposits, we face substantial competition from other insured depository institutions such as banks, savings institutions and credit unions, as well as institutions offering uninsured investment alternatives, including money market funds. Many of our competitors enjoy advantages that we do not, including greater financial resources, more aggressive marketing campaigns, better brand recognition and more branch locations. These competitors may offer higher interest rates than we do, which could decrease the deposits that we attract or require us to increase our rates to retain existing deposits or attract new deposits. Increased deposit competition could adversely affect our ability to generate the funds necessary for lending operations. As a result, we may need to seek other sources of funds that may be more expensive to obtain and could increase our cost of funds.

 

Our banking and non-banking subsidiaries also compete with non-bank providers of financial services, such as brokerage firms, consumer finance companies, credit unions, insurance agencies and governmental organizations which may offer more favorable terms. Some of our non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive regulations that govern our banking operations. As a result, such non-bank competitors may have advantages over our banking and non-banking subsidiaries in providing certain products and services. This competition may reduce or limit our margins on banking and non-banking services, reduce our market share, and adversely affect our earnings and financial condition.

 

The preparation of our tax returns requires the use of estimates and interpretations of complex tax laws and regulations and is subject to review by taxing authorities.

 

We are subject to the income tax laws of the U.S., its states and municipalities. These tax laws are complex and subject to different interpretations by the taxpayer and the relevant governmental taxing authorities. In establishing a provision for income tax expense and filing returns, we must make judgments and interpretations about the application of these inherently complex tax laws.  Actual income taxes paid may vary from estimates depending upon changes in income tax laws, actual results of operations, and the final audit of tax returns by taxing authorities. Tax assessments may arise several years after tax returns have been filed.  We are subject to ongoing tax examinations and assessments in various jurisdictions.

 

As of December 31, 2013, we had net deferred tax assets totaling $48.6 million. These deferred tax assets can only be realized if we generate taxable income in the future.  We regularly evaluate the realizability of deferred tax asset positions. In determining whether a valuation allowance is necessary, we consider the level of taxable income in prior years to the extent that carrybacks are permitted under current tax laws, as well as estimates of future pre-tax and taxable income and tax planning strategies that would, if necessary, be implemented. We currently maintain a valuation allowance for certain state net operating losses and other-than-temporary impairments, and a charitable contribution carryover that, if unused, will expire in 2015, that management believes it is more likely than not that such deferred tax assets will not be realized.  We expect to realize our remaining deferred tax assets over the allowable carryback and/or carryforward periods. Therefore, no valuation allowance is deemed necessary against our federal or remaining state deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2013. However, if an unanticipated event occurred that materially changed pre-tax and taxable income in future periods, an increase in the valuation allowance may become necessary and it could be material to our financial statements.

 

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We operate in a highly regulated environment and we may be adversely affected by changes in laws and regulations.

 

We are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the FDIC, as insurer of our deposits, and by the Department as our primary regulator.  The MHC and the Company are subject to regulation and supervision by the Federal Reserve Board.  Such regulation and supervision governs the activities in which an institution and its holding company may engage and are intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and the depositors and borrowers of the Bank rather than for holders of our common stock.  Regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the imposition of restrictions on our operations, the classification of our assets and determination of the level of our allowance for loan losses.  Any change in such regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, regulations, legislation or supervisory action, may increase our costs of operations and have a material impact on our operations.  During the quarter ended December 31, 2013, we sold $6.2 million of pooled trust securities that resulted in a $1.2 million loss due to the uncertainty regarding banking institutions being allowed to hold pooled trust preferred securities under the Volcker Rule that was issued in December 2013. These securities were in a $740 thousand unrealized loss position at the time of the sale.

 

Legislative financial reforms and future regulatory reforms required by such legislation could have a significant impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act, which was signed into law on July 21, 2010, will have a broad impact on the financial services industry, including significant regulatory and compliance changes. Many of the requirements called for in the Dodd-Frank Act will be implemented over time and most will be subject to implementing regulations over the course of several years. Given the uncertainty associated with the manner in which the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will be implemented by the various regulatory agencies and through regulations, the full extent of the impact such requirements will have on our operations is unclear.  Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Office of Thrift Supervision was merged into the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Savings and loan holding companies, including the Company and the MHC, became regulated by the Federal Reserve Board.

 

Although savings and loan holding companies are not currently subject to specific regulatory capital requirements, the Dodd-Frank Act requires the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for all depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves.  In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act codifies the Federal Reserve Board’s existing “source of strength” policy that holding companies act as a source of strength to their insured institution subsidiaries by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of distress.  The Dodd-Frank Act also provides for the creation of a new agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, to assure the implementation of federal consumer financial protection and fair lending laws for the depository institution regulators.  Furthermore, the Dodd-Frank Act repealed payment of interest on commercial demand deposits, forced originators of securitized loans to retain a percentage of the risk for the transferred loans, required regulatory rate-setting for certain debit card interchange fees and contained a number of reforms related to mortgage origination.  In response to the changing regulatory environment, we have made enhancements to people, processes, and controls to ensure we are complying with new regulations. It is unclear what impact the Dodd-Frank Act will have on our business in the future as many of the regulations under the act are still being developed.  However, we expect that we will need to continue to make additional investments in people, systems and outside consulting and legal resources to comply with the new regulations.

 

While it is difficult to predict at this time what specific impact the Dodd-Frank Act and the related yet to be written implementing rules and regulations will have on us, we expect that, at a minimum, our operating and compliance costs will increase, and our interest expense could increase, as a result of these new rules and regulations.

 

In addition to the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act, the federal regulatory agencies recently have begun to take stronger supervisory actions against financial institutions that have experienced increased loan losses and other weaknesses as a result of the recent economic crisis. The actions include the entering into of written agreements and cease and desist orders that place certain limitations on their operations. Federal bank regulators recently have also been using with more frequency their ability to impose individual minimal capital requirements on banks, which requirements may be higher than those imposed under the Dodd-Frank Act or which would otherwise qualify the bank as being “well capitalized” under the FDIC’s prompt corrective action regulations. If we were to become subject to a supervisory agreement or higher individual capital requirements, such action may have a negative impact on our ability to execute our business plans, as well as our ability to grow, pay dividends or engage in mergers and acquisitions and may result in restrictions in our operations.

 

Our framework for managing risks may not be effective in mitigating risk and loss to the Company.

 

Our risk management framework seeks to mitigate risk and loss. We have established processes and procedures intended to identify, measure, monitor, report and analyze the types of risk to which the Company is subject, including liquidity risk, credit risk, market risk and reputational risk, among others. However, as with any risk management framework, there are inherent limitations to our risk management strategies and there may exist, or develop in the

 

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future, risks that we have not anticipated or identified. If our risk management framework proves to be ineffective, we could suffer unexpected losses and could be materially adversely affected.

 

Loss of, or failure to adequately safeguard, confidential or proprietary information may adversely affect our operations, net income or reputation.

 

We regularly collect, process, transmit and store significant amounts of confidential information regarding our customers, employees and others and concerning our own business, operations, plans and strategies. In some cases, this confidential or proprietary information is collected, compiled, processed, transmitted or stored by third parties on our behalf.

 

Information security risks have generally increased in recent years because of the proliferation of new technologies and the increased sophistication and activities of perpetrators of cyber-attacks and mobile phishing. Mobile phishing, a means for identity thieves to obtain sensitive personal information through fraudulent e-mail, text or voice mail, is an emerging threat targeting the customers of popular financial entities.  A failure in or breach of our operational or information security systems, or those of our third-party service providers, as a result of cyber-attacks or information security breaches or due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions could adversely affect our business, result in the disclosure or misuse of confidential or proprietary information, damage our reputation, increase our costs and/or cause losses.

 

If this confidential or proprietary information were to be mishandled, misused or lost, we could be exposed to significant regulatory consequences, reputational damage, civil litigation and financial loss.

 

Although we employ a variety of physical, procedural and technological safeguards to protect this confidential and proprietary information from mishandling, misuse or loss, these safeguards do not provide absolute assurance that mishandling, misuse or loss of the information will not occur, and that if mishandling, misuse or loss of the information did occur, those events will be promptly detected and addressed. Similarly, when confidential or proprietary information is collected, compiled, processed, transmitted or stored by third parties on our behalf, our policies and procedures require that the third party agree to maintain the confidentiality of the information, establish and maintain policies and procedures designed to preserve the confidentiality of the information, and permit us to confirm the third party’s compliance with the terms of the agreement.  Although we believe that we have adequate information security procedures and other safeguards in place, as information security risks and cyber threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to continue to enhance our information security measures and/or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities.

 

Item 1B.            UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

Item 2.                     PROPERTIES

 

Our retail market area primarily includes all of the area surrounding our 60 banking offices located in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania and Burlington, Gloucester, and Camden Counties in New Jersey, while our lending market also includes Mercer County in New Jersey.  We own 38 properties and lease 22 other properties.  In Pennsylvania, we serve our customers through our four offices in Bucks County, seven offices in Delaware County, eight offices in Montgomery County, 14 offices in Philadelphia County, and two offices in Chester County.  In New Jersey, we serve our customers through our 19 offices in Burlington County, one office in Gloucester County, and five offices in Camden County.  In addition, Beneficial Insurance operates two offices in Pennsylvania, one in Philadelphia County and one in Delaware County.  All branches and offices are adequate for business operation. In 2014, the Company moved its headquarters to 1818 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Item 3.                     LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

The Company is involved in routine legal proceedings in the ordinary course of business.  Such routine legal proceedings, in the aggregate, are believed by management to be immaterial to the Company’s financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Item 4.                      MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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Table of Contents

 

PART II

 

Item 5.                     MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market for Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters

 

The Company’s common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (“Nasdaq”) under the trading symbol “BNCL.”  The following table sets forth the high and low quarterly sales prices of the Company’s common stock for the four quarters in fiscal 2013 and 2012, as reported by Nasdaq.  The Company has not paid any dividends to its stockholders to date.  As of March 10, 2014, the Company had approximately 2,198 holders of record of common stock.

 

2013:

 

High

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

10.30

 

$

9.23

 

Second Quarter

 

$

10.11

 

$

8.40

 

Third Quarter

 

$

10.00

 

$

8.40

 

Fourth Quarter

 

$

11.15

 

$

9.75

 

 

2012:

 

High

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Quarter

 

$

9.23

 

$

8.53

 

Second Quarter

 

$

8.97

 

$

8.39

 

Third Quarter

 

$

9.90

 

$

8.36

 

Fourth Quarter

 

$

10.14

 

$

8.88

 

 

Stock Performance Graph

 

The following graph compares the cumulative total return of the Company’s common stock with the cumulative total return of the SNL Mid-Atlantic Thrift Index and the Index for the Nasdaq Stock Market (U.S. Companies, all Standard Industrial Classification, (“SIC”)).  The graph assumes $100 was invested on December 31, 2008, the first day of trading of the Company’s common stock.  Cumulative total return assumes reinvestment of all dividends.  The performance graph is being furnished solely to accompany this report pursuant to Item 201(e) of Regulation S-K, and is not being filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and is not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of the Company, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing.

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

 

 

Period Ending

 

Index

 

12/31/13

 

09/30/13

 

06/30/13

 

03/31/13

 

12/31/12

 

09/30/12

 

06/30/12

 

03/31/12

 

12/31/11

 

09/30/11

 

Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.

 

109.2

 

99.70

 

84.00

 

103.00

 

95.00

 

95.60

 

86.30

 

87.40

 

83.60

 

74.50

 

NASDAQ Composite

 

154.29

 

139.32

 

125.72

 

120.71

 

111.54

 

115.12

 

108.42

 

114.21

 

96.24

 

89.23

 

SNL Mid-Atlantic Thrift Index

 

77.45

 

70.30

 

66.98

 

65.14

 

61.59

 

62.65

 

55.77

 

59.20

 

53.46

 

49.34

 

 

 

 

06/30/11

 

03/31/11

 

12/31/10

 

09/30/10

 

06/30/10

 

03/31/10

 

12/31/09

 

09/30/09

 

06/30/09

 

03/31/09

 

Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.

 

82.15

 

86.20

 

88.30

 

89.70

 

98.80

 

94.80

 

98.40

 

91.20

 

96.00

 

98.50

 

NASDAQ Composite

 

102.46

 

102.74

 

98.00

 

87.50

 

77.92

 

88.58

 

83.83

 

78.40

 

67.79

 

56.47

 

SNL Mid-Atlantic Thrift Index

 

61.39

 

67.74

 

72.17

 

65.38

 

65.23

 

70.65

 

65.43

 

60.29

 

57.61

 

55.30

 

 

 

 

12/31/08

 

Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc.

 

112.50

 

NASDAQ Composite

 

58.26

 

SNL Mid-Atlantic Thrift Index

 

71.69

 

 

Purchases of Equity Securities

 

The following table sets forth information regarding the Company’s repurchases of its common stock during the fourth quarter of 2013.

 

Period

 

Total Number of
Shares Purchased

 

Average
Price Paid
Per Share

 

Total Number
Of Shares
Purchased

as Part of Publicly
Announced Plans
Or Programs

 

Maximum
Number of Shares
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Plans or
Programs (1)(2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 1-31

 

139,000

 

$

9.91

 

139,000

 

4,090,000

 

November 1-30

 

410,471

 

10.01

 

410,471

 

3,679,529

 

December 1-31

 

436,500

 

10.65

 

436,500

 

3,243,029

 

 


(1)         On September 19, 2011, the Company announced that its Board of Directors had adopted a stock repurchase program that will enable the Company to acquire up to 2,500,000 shares, or 7.0% of the Company’s outstanding common stock not held by Beneficial Savings Bank MHC, the Company’s mutual holding company.  This plan expired in November 2013.

(2)         On October 24, 2013, the Company announced that its Board of Directors had adopted a stock repurchase program that will enable the Company to acquire up to 4,000,000 shares, or 12.0% of the Company’s outstanding common stock not held by Beneficial Savings Bank MHC, the Company’s mutual holding company.

 

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Item 6.                     SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

 

At and For the Year Ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Condition Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

4,583,413

 

$

5,006,404

 

$

4,596,104

 

$

4,929,785

 

$

4,673,680

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

355,683

 

489,908

 

347,956

 

90,299

 

179,701

 

Trading securities

 

 

 

 

6,316

 

31,825

 

Investment securities available-for-sale

 

1,034,180

 

1,267,491

 

875,011

 

1,541,991

 

1,287,106

 

Investment securities held-to-maturity

 

528,829

 

477,198

 

482,695

 

86,609

 

48,009

 

Loans receivable, net

 

2,286,158

 

2,389,655

 

2,521,916

 

2,751,036

 

2,744,264

 

Deposits

 

3,660,016

 

3,927,513

 

3,594,802

 

3,942,304

 

3,509,247

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

195,000

 

140,000

 

100,000

 

113,000

 

169,750

 

Other borrowed funds

 

55,370

 

110,352

 

150,335

 

160,317

 

263,870

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

615,146

 

633,873

 

629,380

 

615,547

 

637,001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

$

149,376

 

$

170,430

 

180,143

 

$

197,514

 

$

192,974

 

Interest expense

 

25,640

 

30,973

 

38,046

 

49,896

 

65,632

 

Net interest income

 

123,736

 

139,457

 

142,097

 

147,618

 

127,342

 

Provision for loan losses

 

13,000

 

28,000

 

37,500

 

70,200

 

15,697

 

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

 

110,736

 

111,457

 

104,597

 

77,418

 

111,645

 

Non-interest income

 

25,125

 

27,606

 

25,236

 

27,220

 

26,847

 

Non-interest expenses

 

120,688

 

123,125

 

120,710

 

128,390

 

119,866

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

 

15,173

 

15,938

 

9,123

 

(23,752

)

18,626

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

2,595

 

1,759

 

(1,913

)

(14,789

)

1,537

 

Net income (loss)

 

$

12,578

 

$

14,179

 

$

11,036

 

$

(8,963

)

$

17,089

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average common shares outstanding — Basic

 

75,841,392

 

76,657,265

 

77,075,726

 

77,593,808

 

77,693,082

 

Average common shares outstanding — Diluted

 

76,085,398

 

76,827,872

 

77,231,303

 

77,593,808

 

77,723,668

 

Net income (loss) earnings per share - Basic

 

$

0.17

 

$

0.18

 

$

0.14

 

$

(0.12

)

$

0.22

 

Net income (loss) earnings per share — Diluted

 

$

0.17

 

$

0.18

 

$

0.14

 

$

(0.12

)

$

0.22

 

Dividends per share

 

$

0.00

 

$

0.00

 

$

0.00

 

$

0.00

 

$

0.00

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

At and For the Year Ended December 31,

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return (loss) on average assets

 

0.26

%

0.29

%

0.23

%

(0.18

)%

0.40

%

Return (loss) on average equity

 

2.01

 

2.23

 

1.77

 

(1.39

)

2.74

 

Interest rate spread (1)

 

2.70

 

3.01

 

3.07

 

3.13

 

2.99

 

Net interest margin (2)

 

2.81

 

3.13

 

3.22

 

3.32

 

3.28

 

Non-interest expense to average assets

 

2.54

 

2.55

 

2.51

 

2.64

 

2.80

 

Efficiency ratio (3)

 

81.07

 

73.70

 

72.14

 

73.44

 

77.74

 

Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities

 

117.50

 

117.78

 

116.83

 

116.60

 

117.00

 

Average equity to average assets

 

13.15

 

13.10

 

12.94

 

13.30

 

14.57

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Ratios (4):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tier 1 capital to average assets

 

10.22

 

9.53

 

9.67

 

8.89

 

9.81

 

Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets

 

20.57

 

19.23

 

18.09

 

15.69

 

16.71

 

Total risk-based capital to risk-weighted assets

 

21.83

 

20.50

 

19.35

 

16.95

 

17.98

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Quality Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allowance for loan losses as a percent of total loans

 

2.38

 

2.36

 

2.10

 

1.62

 

1.64

 

Allowance for loan losses as a percent of non-performing loans

 

73.05

 

62.37

 

39.77

 

36.66

 

38.06

 

Net charge-offs to average outstanding loans during the period

 

0.63

 

0.96

 

1.05

 

2.53

 

0.25

 

Non-performing loans as a percent of total loans (5)

 

3.25

 

3.78

 

5.29

 

4.42

 

4.32

 

Non-performing assets as a percent of total assets (5)

 

1.79

 

2.08

 

3.35

 

2.85

 

3.49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of offices (6)

 

60

 

62

 

60

 

65

 

68

 

Number of deposit accounts

 

294,718

 

302,196

 

279,675

 

283,870

 

284,531

 

Number of loans

 

47,756

 

51,406

 

55,665

 

60,134

 

64,690

 

 


(1)         Represents the difference between the weighted average yield on average interest-earning assets and the weighted average cost on average interest-bearing liabilities.

(2)         Represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets.

(3)         Represents other non-interest expenses divided by the sum of net interest income and non-interest income.

(4)         Ratios are for Beneficial Bank.

(5)         Non-performing loans and assets include accruing government guaranteed student loans past due 90 days or more.

(6)         During 2012, the Company acquired five branches and consolidated three branches as a result of the merger with SE Financial.

 

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Item 7.              MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL CONDITION

 

Overview

 

The history of the Bank dates back to 1853. The Bank’s principal business is to acquire deposits from individuals and businesses in the communities surrounding our offices and to use those deposits to fund loans.  We also seek to broaden relationships with our customers by offering insurance and investment advisory services.

 

The Bank was established to serve the financing needs of the public and has expanded its services over time to offer personal and business checking accounts, home equity loans and lines of credit, commercial real estate loans and other types of commercial and consumer loans. We also provide insurance services through our wholly owned subsidiary, Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC, and investment and non-deposit services through our wholly owned subsidiary, Beneficial Advisors, LLC.  We focus on providing our products and services to individuals, businesses and non-profit organizations located in our primary market area.  Our retail market focus includes primarily all of the areas surrounding our 60 banking offices located in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties in Pennsylvania and Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties in New Jersey, while our lending market also includes other counties in central and southern New Jersey as well as Delaware.  In addition, Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC operates two offices in Pennsylvania, one in Philadelphia County and one in Delaware County.  We will occasionally consolidate branches based on proximity to other Bank locations, customer activity, financial performance, future market potential and our growth plans.

 

Over the years, we have expanded through organic growth and acquisitions, reaching $4.58 billion in assets at December 31, 2013.  In 2004, the Bank reorganized into the mutual holding company structure, forming Beneficial Mutual Bancorp, Inc. (the “Company” or “Beneficial”), a federally chartered stock holding company, as its holding company and Beneficial Savings Bank MHC (the “MHC”), a federally chartered mutual holding company, as the sole stockholder of the Company.  In July 2007, the Company completed its minority stock offering, raising approximately $236.1 million in proceeds, and simultaneously acquired FMS Financial Corporation, the parent company of Farmers & Mechanics Bank (together, “FMS Financial”), which had total assets of over $1.2 billion.  In October 2007, Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC acquired the business of CLA Agency, Inc. (“CLA”), a full-service property and casualty and professional liability insurance brokerage company headquartered in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania.

 

In April 2012, the Company acquired SE Financial Corp. (“SE Financial”) and St. Edmond’s Federal Savings Bank, a federally chartered stock savings bank, and a wholly-owned subsidiary of SE Corp (“St. Edmond’s”), pursuant to which SE Financial merged with a newly formed subsidiary of the Company and thereby became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company for $29.4 million in cash.  The results of SE Financial’s operations are included in the Company’s unaudited condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the period beginning on April 3, 2012, the date of the acquisition, and all subsequent periods thereafter.  The acquisition of SE Financial and St. Edmond’s increased the Company’s market share in southeastern Pennsylvania, specifically Philadelphia and Delaware Counties.  Additionally, the acquisition provided Beneficial with new branches in Roxborough, Pennsylvania and Deptford, New Jersey.

 

Our primary source of pre-tax income is net interest income.  Net interest income is the difference between the income we earn on our loans and investments and the interest we pay on our deposits and borrowings.  Changes in levels of interest rates affect our net interest income.

 

A secondary source of income is non-interest income, which is revenue we receive from providing products and services.  Traditionally, the majority of our non-interest income has come from service charges (mostly on deposit accounts).

 

The non-interest expenses we incur in operating our business consist of salaries and employee benefits expenses, equity plans, occupancy expenses, depreciation, amortization and maintenance expenses and other miscellaneous expenses, such as loan and owned real estate expenses, advertising, insurance, professional services and printing and supplies expenses. Our largest non-interest expense is salaries and employee benefits, which consist primarily of salaries and wages paid to our employees, payroll taxes, and expenses for health insurance, retirement plans and other employee benefits.

 

Executive Summary for 2013

 

We recorded net income for the year ended December 31, 2013 of $12.6 million, or $0.17 per diluted share, compared to net income of $14.2 million, or $0.18 per diluted share, for the year ended December 31, 2012.  Both the low interest rate environment and lower loan balances caused net interest income to decrease $15.7 million to $123.7 million for 2013 compared to $139.4 million in 2012.

 

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The Federal Reserve Board continues to hold short term interest rates at historic lows and expects rates to remain low throughout 2015.  The low rate environment has impacted the yield on our investment portfolio as maturing investments and liquidity generated by prepayments and pay-offs of our loan portfolio were re-invested at lower interest rates.  Elevated unemployment, slow economic growth, and continued economic uncertainty has resulted in a slow recovery and limited consumer consumption. Additionally, capital spending and investing by businesses has remained sluggish given the slow and uneven economic recovery.  This resulted in low loan demand throughout 2013 and was a driver of our loan portfolio decreasing $105.5 million, or 4.3%, to $2.3 billion at December 31, 2013 from $2.4 billion at December 31, 2012.

 

During 2013, our asset quality metrics showed continued signs of improvement. Our non-performing loans, including loans 90 days past due and still accruing, decreased to $76.2 million at December 31, 2013, compared to $92.4 million at December 31, 2012.  Net charge-offs during the year ended December 31, 2013 were $15.0 million compared to $24.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. As a result of the improvement our asset quality metrics, we were able to reduce our provision for loan losses during 2013 compared to the prior year. At December 31, 2013, the Bank’s allowance for loan losses totaled $55.6 million, or 2.38% of total loans, compared to $57.6 million, or 2.36% of total loans, at December 31, 2012.

 

During 2013, our Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program that enabled us to acquire up to 4,000,000 shares, or 12.0%, of the Company’s publicly held common stock outstanding. The shares may be purchased in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions from time to time depending upon market conditions. We repurchased 2,193,652 shares of our outstanding common during the year ended December 31, 2013, which increased total treasury shares to 5,175,681.

 

We continue to maintain strong levels of capital and our capital ratios are well in excess of the levels required to be considered well-capitalized under applicable federal regulations. The Bank’s tier 1 leverage ratio increased to 10.22% at December 31, 2013 compared to 9.53% at December 31, 2012 and the Bank’s total risk based capital ratio increased to 21.83% at December 31, 2013 compared to 20.50% at December 31, 2012.

 

We believe that our strong capital profile positions us to advance our growth strategy by working with our customers to help them save and use credit wisely. It also allows us to continue to dedicate financial and human capital to support organizations that share our sense of responsibility to do what’s right for the communities we serve. We remain committed to the financial responsibility we have practiced throughout our 160 year history, and we are dedicated to providing financial education opportunities to our customers by providing the tools necessary to make wise financial decisions.

 

In order to further improve our operating returns, we continue to leverage our position as one of the largest and oldest banks headquartered in the Philadelphia metropolitan area.  We are focused on acquiring and retaining customers, and then educating them by aligning our products and services to their financial needs.  We also intend to deploy some of our excess capital to grow the Bank in our markets.

 

Department of Justice Investigation

 

In the first quarter of 2013, we received notice that we were being investigated by the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) for potential violations of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and Fair Housing Act relating to our home-mortgage lending practices from January 1, 2008 to the present.  Specifically, the DOJ indicated to us that it was looking for statistical and other indicators of a pattern and practice of persistent disparities with regard to our home-mortgage lending practices.

 

In December 2012, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) referred us to the DOJ as a result of a regularly scheduled fair housing examination that included a statistical analysis of our denial rates of both minority and non-minority loan applicants for a five year period.  That statistical analysis showed a higher rejection rate for minority applicants, but only considered limited information related to our credit standards that we apply to all applicants in our decision making process.  It was on the basis of this statistical analysis that the DOJ announced its investigation.

 

In response to the DOJ’s investigation, we hired outside counsel and economists to conduct an internal investigation.  At this time, and to the best of our knowledge, we are not aware of any wrongdoing.

 

In late January 2014, we received correspondence from the DOJ indicating that the DOJ had completed its review and determined that the matter did not require enforcement action by the DOJ and was being referred back to the FDIC.  We are not able to determine whether further action will be taken at this point with respect to the ultimate resolution of this matter and we are in discussions with the FDIC Staff. Until this matter is resolved, it is unlikely that we will be filing any regulatory applications related to strategic expansion or regarding a second step conversion.

 

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Our non-interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2013 includes $711 thousand of costs associated with a second step transaction that we were evaluating directly before the DOJ fair lending investigation.

 

We remain focused on improving profitability and we are making a number of investments in brand, technology and our compliance and business control teams to drive future growth.  Although these investments may result in lower profitability in the short-term, we believe that ultimately they will drive future profitability and value for our shareholders.

 

Business Strategy

 

Our business strategy is to continue to operate and grow a profitable community-oriented financial institution.  We plan to achieve this by executing our strategy of:

 

·                                          Differentiating Beneficial Bank as a community bank that educates its customers to “do the right thing” financially by providing them with the tools necessary to make wise financial decisions;

 

·                                          Promoting the “Beneficial Conversation” with our customers, in which we endeavor to learn more about their life stage, needs and goals and educate them on our products and services that can allow them to achieve their financial needs and goals;

 

·                                          Expanding our franchise by selectively pursuing acquisition opportunities in or adjacent to our market area;

 

·                                          Pursuing opportunities to grow our commercial banking and small business lending by offering an enhanced product set through integrated delivery channels;

 

·                                          Using what we believe are consistent, disciplined underwriting practices to maintain the quality of our loan portfolio; and

 

·                                          Investing in talent, brand and technology to drive future growth.

 

Differentiating Beneficial Bank as a community bank that educates its customers to “do the right thing” financially by providing them with the tools necessary to make wise financial decisions

 

We are committed to educating our customers to “do the right thing” financially by providing them with the tools necessary to make wise financial decisions. During 2013, we launched a new marketing campaign and brand refresh designed to highlight the Bank’s commitment to financial education. Along with the introduction of a new “Your Knowledge Bank” tagline, the campaign was part of an ambitious communications initiative rooted in what has always been the core mission of Beneficial Bank — to provide customers with the tools, knowledge and guidance to help them do what’s right and make wise financial decisions. We continue to build conversations and financial plans around customers’ needs, life stages and priorities. We also successfully introduced the New BenMobile application, which brings the features of online banking to our mobile banking customers, making it easier to access account information and perform transactions including balance transfers and remote deposit capture.  This new channel is being adopted rapidly by our customer base.

 

Promoting the “Beneficial Conversation” with our customers, which enables us to learn more about their life stage, needs and goals and educate them on our products and services that can allow them to achieve their goals

 

We seek to understand our customers’ financial needs and goals through a conversational approach known as the “Beneficial Conversation.”  We have developed a sophisticated training program centered around the Beneficial Conversation in an effort to familiarize our employees with our broad array of financial products, including the cash management, insurance and other related retail services we provide.  We require that all of our employees become fluent and certified in this conversational approach to customer interaction, and we have implemented the “Beneficial Conversation” in our branch offices as well as through digital social media outlets.  The Beneficial Conversation is a continuous, multi-step process that enables us to better understand a customer’s current financial state, future financial goals and the best path towards achieving those goals. Once we develop such an understanding, we then educate the customer on the products and services we offer that best help them attain their financial goals. We believe that this approach to understanding our customers’ financial needs will distinguish us from other regional and local community banks and that we can increase services to our existing customers and acquire new customers through the implementation of the Beneficial Conversation by our employees.

 

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Expanding our franchise by selectively pursuing acquisition opportunities in or adjacent to our market area

 

In recent years, we have executed our growth strategy by acquiring other financial institutions and financial service corporations primarily in or adjacent to our existing market areas.  In July 2007, in connection with the consummation of its initial public offering, Beneficial Mutual Bancorp acquired FMS Financial Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiary, Farmers & Mechanics Bank.  In April 2012, Beneficial Mutual Bancorp acquired SE Financial Corp. and its wholly owned subsidiary, St. Edmond’s Federal Savings Bank. These acquisitions increased our market share and solidified our position as the largest Philadelphia-based bank operating solely in the greater Philadelphia metropolitan area.  In 2005, Beneficial Insurance Services LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Beneficial Bank, acquired the assets of a Philadelphia-based insurance brokerage firm, Paul Hertel & Co., Inc., which provided property, casualty, life, health and benefits insurance services to individuals and businesses. In 2007, Beneficial Insurance Services acquired the business of CLA Agency, Inc., a full-service property and casualty and professional liability insurance brokerage company headquartered in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania.  We believe that changes in the regulatory environment as well as continued economic challenges for the banking industry have created and will create acquisition opportunities for us.  We also believe that we are well positioned to execute on our growth strategies and to continue to pursue selective acquisitions of other financial institutions and financial services companies primarily in and adjacent to our existing market area due to our strong capital position.

 

Pursuing opportunities to grow our commercial banking and small business lending by offering an enhanced product set through integrated delivery channels

 

We have a diversified loan portfolio which includes commercial real estate and commercial and industrial loans made to middle market and small business customers.  We are focused on improving the mix of our loan portfolio by increasing the amount of our commercial loans.  Commercial loan customers provide us with an opportunity to offer a full range of our products and services including cash management, insurance, loans, and deposits.  We have added resources with significant experience in our marketplace to our commercial lending group over the past year and are committed to growing our commercial banking businesses.  We are also focused on small business lending.  At December 31, 2013, we had $108.3 million in small business loans, which represented approximately 4.6% of total loans.  Small business loans provide diversification to our loan portfolio and, because these loans are based upon rate indices that are higher than those used for one-to four-family loans, they improve the interest sensitivity of our assets.  We currently offer a wide array of lending and deposit products that we can effectively market to our small business customers to increase our small business market share.  To better capitalize on these opportunities, in recent years, we restructured our lending department and created a dedicated team of small business lenders who work with our branches and focus solely on small business lending.  We intend to expand our team of small business lenders in order to increase our small business loan portfolio in future years.

 

Using what we believe are consistent, disciplined underwriting practices to maintain the quality of our loan portfolio

 

We believe that maintaining high asset quality is a key to long-term financial success.  In recent years, weaknesses in the local commercial real estate market have had a significant impact on our financial results.  Over the past several years, in an effort to improve asset quality, we have strengthened and added additional resources to our lending and credit teams and, have continued to apply underwriting standards that are prudent and disciplined and have continued to diligently monitor collection efforts.  As a result of these efforts, we have improved our asset quality over the past three years.  Accordingly, a provision for loan losses of $13.0 million was recorded for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to provisions of $28.0 million and $37.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.  Non-performing assets have decreased from a high of $162.9 million at December 31, 2009 to $82.0 million at December 31, 2013. We maintain our philosophy of managing large loan exposures through our consistent, disciplined approach to lending, and our proactive approach to managing existing credits.

 

Investing in talent, brand and technology to drive future growth

 

We are committed to investing in highly qualified employees in key areas of the Bank such as the build out of our lending team to focus on the growth of our loan portfolio as well as compliance and business control teams to ensure compliance with current and future regulations. We continue to invest in the Beneficial brand to position ourselves as the “Knowledge Bank”. We will also invest in advances in technology and systems to position us for future growth and opportunities.

 

Recent Industry Consolidation

 

The banking industry has experienced consolidation in recent years, which is likely to continue in future periods. Consolidation may affect the markets in which we operate as competitors integrate newly acquired businesses, adopt

 

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new business and risk management practices or change products and pricing as they attempt to maintain or grow market share and maximize profitability.  Merger activity involving national, regional and community banks and specialty finance companies in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, has and will continue to impact the competitive landscape in the markets we serve. We believe that there are opportunities to continue to grow via acquisition in our markets and expect that acquisitions will continue to be a key part of our future growth strategy.  Management continually monitors our primary market areas and assesses the impact of industry consolidation, as well as the practices and strategies of our competitors, including loan and deposit pricing and customer behavior.

 

Current Regulatory Environment

 

The current risk-based capital guidelines that apply to the Bank are based on the 1988 capital accord of the International Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (“Basel Committee”), a committee of central banks and bank supervisors, as implemented by the Federal Reserve Board. In 2004, the Basel Committee published a new capital accord, which is referred to as “Basel II,” to replace Basel I. Basel II provides two approaches for setting capital standards for credit risk: an internal ratings-based approach tailored to individual institutions’ circumstances and a standardized approach that bases risk weightings on external credit assessments to a much greater extent than permitted in existing risk-based capital guidelines, which became effective in 2008 for large international banks (total assets of $250 billion or more or consolidated foreign exposure of $10 billion or more). Other U.S. banking organizations can elect to adopt the requirements of this rule (if they meet applicable qualification requirements), but they are not required to apply them. Basel II emphasizes internal assessment of credit, market and operational risk, as well as supervisory assessment and market discipline in determining minimum capital requirements.

 

In December 2010 and January 2011, the International Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, a committee of central banks and bank supervisors, published the final texts of reforms on capital and liquidity, which is referred to as “Basel III.” On July 2, 2013, the Federal Reserve Board approved the final Basel III capital rules, establishing unique standards for all depository institutions, top-tier bank holding companies with total consolidated assets of $500 million or more, and top-tier savings and loan holding companies (such as the Company). The effective date of the implementation of Basel III is January 1, 2015 for the Bank.  When fully phased-in on January 1, 2019, Basel III will require banks to maintain: (i) 4.5% Common Equity Tier 1 to risk-weighted assets; (ii) 6.0% Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets; and (iii) 8.0% Total capital to risk-weighted assets.  Each of these ratios will also require an additional 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets “capital conservation buffer” on top of the minimum requirements.

 

As of December 31, 2013, our current capital levels exceed the required capital amounts to be considered “well capitalized” and we believe they also meet the fully-phased in minimum capital requirements, including the related capital conservation buffers, as required by the Basel III capital rules.

 

On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed the Dodd—Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”).  In addition to eliminating the Office of Thrift Supervision and creating the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Dodd-Frank Act, among other things, repealed non-payment of interest on commercial demand deposits, requires changes in the way that institutions are assessed for deposit insurance, mandates the imposition of consolidated capital requirements on savings and loan holding companies, forces originators of securitized loans to retain a percentage of the risk for the transferred loans, requires regulatory rate-setting for certain debit card interchange fees and contains a number of reforms related to mortgage origination.  Many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to delayed effective dates and require the issuance of implementing regulations.  Their impact on operations cannot yet be fully assessed by management.  However, there is a significant possibility that the Dodd-Frank Act will, at a minimum, result in increased regulatory burden, compliance costs and interest expense as well as potential reduced fee income for the Bank, the Company and the MHC.

 

Effective July 21, 2011, we began offering interest on certain commercial checking accounts as permitted by the Dodd-Frank Act. We have been actively marketing full service commercial checking accounts that include interest earned on these funds. Interest paid on commercial checking accounts will increase our interest expense in the future.

 

Current Interest Rate Environment

 

Net interest income represents a significant portion of our revenues.  Both the low interest rate environment, which has reduced the yields on our investment and loan portfolios, and lower loan balances, as a result of high commercial loan repayments and continued weak loan demand, caused net interest income to decrease. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we reported net interest income of $123.7 million, a decrease of $15.7 million, or 11.3%, from the year ended December 31, 2012. The decrease in net interest income during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the same period last year was primarily the result of a decline in the average rate on interest earning assets, partially offset by a reduction in the average cost of our liabilities, particularly municipal deposits. Net interest margin decreased 32 basis points, totaling 2.81% for the year ended December 31, 2013 as compared to 3.13% for

 

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the year ended December 31, 2012. We have been able to lower the average cost of our liabilities to 0.69% for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to 0.82% for the year ended December 31, 2012 by re-pricing higher cost deposits. The reduction in deposit costs has been primarily due to decreasing rates on our municipal deposits and money market accounts. We expect that the persistently low interest rate environment will continue to lower yields on our investment and loan portfolios to a greater extent than we can reduce rates on deposits and other interest bearing liabilities, which will put pressure on net interest margin in future periods. Net interest margin in future periods will be impacted by several factors such as, but not limited to, our ability to grow and retain low cost core deposits, the future interest rate environment, loan and investment prepayment rates, loan growth and changes in non-accrual loans.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

In the preparation of our consolidated financial statements, we have adopted various accounting policies that govern the application of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report.

 

Certain accounting policies involve significant judgments and assumptions by us that have a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets and liabilities.  We consider these accounting policies to be critical accounting policies.  The judgments and assumptions we use are based on historical experience and other factors, which we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances.  Actual results could differ from these judgments and estimates under different conditions, resulting in a change that could have a material impact on the carrying values of our assets and liabilities and our results of operations.

 

Allowance for Loan LossesWe consider the allowance for loan losses to be a critical accounting policy.  The allowance for loan losses is determined by management based upon portfolio segment, past experience, evaluation of estimated loss and impairment in the loan portfolio, current economic conditions and other pertinent factors.  Management also considers risk characteristics by portfolio segments including, but not limited to, renewals and real estate valuations.  The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level that management considers appropriate to provide for estimated losses and impairment based upon an evaluation of known and inherent risk in the loan portfolio.  Loan impairment is evaluated based on the fair value of collateral or estimated net realizable value. While management uses the best information available to make such evaluations, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if economic conditions differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the evaluations.

 

The allowance for loan losses is established through a provision for loan losses charged to expense which is based upon past loan loss experience and an evaluation of estimated losses in the current loan portfolio, including the evaluation of impaired loans. Determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Among the material estimates or judgments required to establish the allowance are: overall economic conditions; value of collateral; strength of guarantors; loss exposure at default; the amount and timing of future cash flows on impaired loans; and determination of loss factors to be applied to the various elements of the portfolio.  All of these estimates are susceptible to significant change.  Management regularly reviews the level of loss experience, current economic conditions and other factors related to the collectability of the loan portfolio.  Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if economic conditions differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the evaluation.  In addition, the FDIC and the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities (“the Department”), as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review our allowance for loan losses.  Such agencies may require us to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination.

 

Our financial results are affected by the changes in and the absolute level of the allowance for loan losses. The establishment of the allowance for loan losses involves our analysis of complex internal and external variables, and it requires that we exercise judgment to estimate an appropriate allowance for loan losses. As a result of the uncertainty associated with this subjectivity, we cannot assure the precision of the amount reserved, should we experience sizeable loan losses in any particular period. For example, changes in the financial condition of individual borrowers, economic conditions, or the condition of various markets in which collateral may be sold could require us to significantly increase the level of the allowance for loan losses. Such an adjustment could materially affect net income as a result of the change in provision for credit losses. For example, a change in the estimate resulting in a 10% to 20% difference in the allowance would have resulted in an additional provision for credit losses of $1.3 million to $2.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. We also have approximately $82.0 million in non-performing assets consisting of non-performing loans and other real estate owned.  Most of these assets are collateral dependent loans where we have incurred significant credit losses to write the assets down to their current appraised value less selling costs.  We continue to assess the realizability of these loans and update our appraisals on these loans each year.  To the extent the property values continue to decline, there could be additional losses on these non-performing assets which may be material.  For example, a 10% decrease in the collateral value supporting the non-performing assets could result in additional credit losses of $8.2 million.  During the year ended December 31, 2013, we began to experience a decline in levels of delinquencies, net charge-offs and non-performing assets.

 

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Management considered these market conditions in deriving the estimated allowance for loan losses; however, the ultimate amount of loss could vary from that estimate.

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets.  The acquisition method of accounting for business combinations requires us to record assets acquired, liabilities assumed and consideration paid at their estimated fair values as of the acquisition date.  The excess of consideration paid over the fair value of net assets acquired represents goodwill. Goodwill totaled $122.0 at December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012.

 

Goodwill and other indefinite lived intangible assets are not amortized on a recurring basis, but rather are subject to periodic impairment testing. During the quarter ended December 31, 2011, we adopted the amendments included in Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2011-08, which allow an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test.

 

During 2013, management reviewed qualitative factors for the Bank, which represents $112.7 million of our goodwill balance, including financial performance, market changes and general economic conditions and noted there was not a significant change in any of these factors as compared to 2012.  Accordingly, it was determined that it was more likely than not that the fair value of the Banking unit continued to be in excess of its carrying amount as of December 31, 2013.  Additionally during 2013, we assessed the qualitative factors related to Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC, which represents $9.3 million of our goodwill balance and determined that the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test was warranted.  Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC has experienced declining revenues and profitability over the past few years.  We performed a two-step quantitative goodwill impairment for Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC based on estimates of the fair value of equity using discounted cash flow analyses as well as guideline company and guideline transaction information. The inputs and assumptions are incorporated in the valuations including projections of future cash flows, discount rates, the fair value of tangible and intangible assets and liabilities, and applicable valuation multiples based on the guideline information. Based on our latest annual impairment assessment of Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC and their current and projected financial results, we believe that the fair value is in excess of the carrying amount.  As a result, management concluded that there was no impairment of goodwill as of December 31, 2013.  Although, we concluded that no impairment of goodwill existed for Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC, any further declines in financial performance for Beneficial Insurance Services, LLC could result in potential goodwill impairment in future periods.

 

Other intangible assets subject to amortization are evaluated for impairment in accordance with authoritative guidance. An impairment loss will be recognized if the carrying amount of the intangible asset is not recoverable and exceeds fair value. The carrying amount of the intangible is not considered recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset.  During 2013, management reviewed qualitative factors for its intangible assets and determined that it was more likely than not that the fair value of the intangible assets was greater than their carrying amount.  During 2012, management recorded an impairment charge of $773 thousand related to the customer list intangible due to the fact that the expected cash flows from the customer list intangible were less than the carrying amount of the customer list intangible.  The impairment charge was determined by the difference between the fair value of the customer list intangible and the carrying amount of the customer list intangible.

 

Income Taxes.  We are subject to the income tax laws of the various jurisdictions where we conduct business and estimate income tax expense based on amounts expected to be owed to these various tax jurisdictions. The estimated income tax expense (benefit) is reported in the Consolidated Statements of Income. The evaluation pertaining to the tax expense and related tax asset and liability balances involves a high degree of judgment and subjectivity around the ultimate measurement and resolution of these matters.

 

Accrued taxes represent the net estimated amount due to or to be received from tax jurisdictions either currently or in the future and are reported in other assets on the Company’s consolidated statements of financial condition. We assess the appropriate tax treatment of transactions and filing positions after considering statutes, regulations, judicial precedent and other pertinent information and maintain tax accruals consistent with our evaluation. Changes in the estimate of accrued taxes occur periodically due to changes in tax rates, interpretations of tax laws, the status of examinations by the tax authorities and newly enacted statutory, judicial and regulatory guidance that could impact the relative merits of tax positions. These changes, when they occur, impact accrued taxes and can materially affect our operating results. We regularly evaluate our uncertain tax positions and estimate the appropriate level of reserves related to each of these positions.

 

As of December 31, 2013, the Bank had net deferred tax assets totaling $48.6 million. These deferred tax assets can only be realized if the Bank generates taxable income in the future.  The Bank regularly evaluates the realizability of deferred tax asset positions. In determining whether a valuation allowance is necessary, the Bank considers the level of taxable income in prior years to the extent that carrybacks are permitted under current tax laws, as well as estimates of future pre-tax and taxable income and tax planning strategies that would, if necessary, be implemented. The Bank currently maintains a valuation allowance for certain state net operating losses, other-than-temporary

 

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impairments, and a charitable contribution carryover that, if not fully utilized, will expire in 2015, that management believes it is more likely than not that such deferred tax assets will not be realized.  The Bank expects to realize the remaining deferred tax assets over the allowable carryback and/or carryforward periods. Therefore, no valuation allowance is deemed necessary against its remaining federal or state deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2013.  However, if an unanticipated event occurred that materially changed pre-tax book income and taxable income in future periods, an increase in the valuation allowance may become necessary and it could be material to the Bank’s financial statements.

 

Postretirement Benefits. Several variables affect the annual cost for our defined benefit retirement programs. The main variables are: (1) size and characteristics of the employee population, (2) discount rate, (3) expected long-term rate of return on plan assets, (4) recognition of actual asset returns, and (5) other actuarial assumptions. Below is a brief description of these variables and the effect they have on our pension costs.

 

Size and Characteristics of the Employee Population.  Pension cost is directly related to the number of employees covered by the plans, and other factors including salary, age, years of employment, and benefit terms. Effective June 30, 2008, plan participants ceased to accrue additional benefits under the existing pension benefit formula and their accrued benefits were frozen.

 

Discount Rate.  The discount rate is used to determine the present value of future benefit obligations. The discount rate for each plan is determined by matching the expected cash flows of each plan to a yield curve based on long-term, high quality fixed income debt instruments available as of the measurement date, December 31, 2013. The discount rate for each plan is reset annually or upon occurrence of a triggering event on the measurement date to reflect current market conditions.

 

If we were to assume a 0.25% increase/decrease in the discount rate for all retirement and other postretirement plans, and keep all other assumptions constant, the benefit cost would decrease/increase by approximately $164 thousand.

 

Expected Long-term Rate of Return on Plan Assets.  Based on historical experience, market projections, and the target asset allocation set forth in the investment policy for the retirement plans, the pre-tax expected rate of return on plan assets was 7.45% for 2013 compared to 8.0% for 2012. This expected rate of return is dependent upon the asset allocation decisions made with respect to plan assets.  Annual differences, if any, between expected and actual returns are included in the unrecognized net actuarial gain or loss amount. We generally amortize any unrecognized net actuarial gain or loss in excess of 10% in net periodic pension expense over the average future service of active employees, which is approximately seven years, or average future lifetime for plans with no active participants that are frozen. For details on changes in the pension benefit obligation and the fair value of plan assets, see Note 17 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report.

 

If we were to assume a 0.25% increase/decrease in the expected long-term rate of return for the retirement and other postretirement plans, and all other actuarial assumptions remained constant, the benefit cost would decrease/increase by approximately $209 thousand.

 

Recognition of Actual Asset Returns.  Accounting guidance allows for the use of an asset value that smoothes investment gains and losses over a period up to five years. However, we have elected to use a preferable method in determining pension cost. This method uses the actual market value of the plan assets. Therefore, we will experience more variability in the annual pension cost, as the asset values will be more volatile than companies who elected to “smooth” their investment experience.

 

Other Actuarial Assumptions.  To estimate the projected benefit obligation, actuarial assumptions are required with respect to factors such as mortality rate, turnover rate, retirement rate and disability rate. These factors do not tend to change significantly over time, so the range of assumptions, and their impact on pension cost, is generally limited. We annually review the assumptions used based on historical and expected future experience.

 

In addition to our defined benefit programs, we offer a defined contribution plan (“401(k) Plan”) covering substantially all of our employees. During 2008, in conjunction with freezing benefit accruals under the defined benefit program, we enhanced our 401(k) Plan and combined it with a recently formed Employee Stock Ownership Plan (“ESOP”) to form the Beneficial Mutual Savings Bank Employee Savings and Stock Ownership Plan (“KSOP”). While the KSOP is one plan, the two separate components of the 401(k) Plan and ESOP remain. Under the KSOP, we make basic and matching contributions as well as additional contributions for certain employees based on age and years of service. We may also make discretionary contributions. Each participant’s account is credited with shares of the Company’s stock or cash based on compensation earned during the year. For additional information, refer to Note 18 to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report.

 

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Balance Sheet Analysis

 

Securities

 

At December 31, 2013, our investment portfolio, excluding Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) stock, was $1.56 billion, or 34.1% of total assets. At December 31, 2013, 93.4% of the investment portfolio was comprised of mortgage-backed securities issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), including collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMO”) securities issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. At December 31, 2013, our investment portfolio also included 4.5% of municipal bonds and 0.8% of government-sponsored enterprise (“GSE”) and government agency notes. The remaining 1.3% of our investment portfolio consisted primarily of foreign bonds, mutual funds and money market funds. During 2013, we invested primarily into other mortgage-backed securities (GSEs) issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. The GSE mortgage-backed securities amortize over their estimated life and therefore provide a constant source of liquidity.

 

In order to mitigate the credit risk related to the Company’s held-to-maturity and available-for-sale portfolios, the Company monitors the ratings of its securities. As of December 31, 2013, approximately 94.2% of the Company’s portfolio consisted of direct government obligations, government sponsored enterprise obligations or securities rated AAA by Moody’s and/or S&P. In addition, at December 31, 2013, approximately 4.3% of the investment portfolio was rated below AAA but rated investment grade by Moody’s and/or S&P and approximately 1.5% of the investment portfolio was not rated. Securities not rated consist primarily of short-term municipal anticipation notes, private placement municipal bonds, equity securities, mutual funds and bank certificates of deposit.

 

The following table sets forth the cost and fair value of investment securities at December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011.

 

 

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

December 31,
(Dollars in thousands)

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair
Value

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair
Value

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair
Value

 

Securities available-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GSE and agency notes

 

$

12,968

 

$

12,917

 

$

26,085

 

$

26,367

 

$

204

 

$

203

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GNMA guaranteed mortgage certificates

 

5,815

 

6,019

 

6,732

 

6,986

 

7,874

 

8,106

 

GSE mortgage-backed securities

 

840,787

 

833,098

 

940,452

 

965,682

 

509,434

 

536,451

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

98,708

 

96,429

 

157,581

 

158,467

 

180,029

 

182,395

 

Total mortgage-backed securities

 

945,310

 

935,546

 

1,104,765

 

1,131,135

 

697,337

 

726,952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Municipal and other bonds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Municipal bonds

 

65,593

 

67,429

 

75,534

 

80,013

 

85,503

 

90,154

 

Pooled trust preferred securities

 

 

 

10,382

 

8,722

 

13,433

 

11,153

 

Total municipal and other bonds

 

65,593

 

67,429

 

85,916

 

88,735

 

98,936

 

101,307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity securities

 

 

 

 

 

2,478

 

3,139

 

Money market, mutual funds and CDs

 

18,337

 

18,288

 

21,110

 

21,254

 

43,399

 

43,410

 

Total securities available-for-sale

 

1,042,208

 

1,034,180

 

1,237,876

 

1,267,491

 

842,354

 

875,011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities held-to-maturity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GNMA guaranteed mortgage certificates

 

 

 

536

 

537

 

589

 

559

 

GSE mortgage-backed securities

 

502,556

 

488,817

 

430,256

 

440,037

 

422,011

 

425,989

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

20,863

 

20,270

 

38,909

 

39,044

 

47,620

 

47,819

 

Total mortgage-backed securities

 

523,419

 

509,087

 

469,701

 

479,618

 

470,220

 

474,367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Municipal bonds

 

3,410

 

3,535

 

5,497

 

5,679

 

11,975

 

12,157

 

Foreign bonds

 

2,000

 

2,011

 

2,000

 

2,010

 

500

 

499

 

Total municipal and other bonds

 

5,410

 

5,546

 

7,497

 

7,689

 

12,475

 

12,656

 

Total securities held-to-maturity

 

528,829

 

514,633

 

477,198

 

487,307

 

482,695

 

487,023

 

Total investment securities

 

$

1,571,037

 

$

1,548,813

 

$

1,715,074

 

$

1,754,798

 

$

1,325,049

 

$

1,362,034

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities are a type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage, or a collection of mortgages. These securities usually pay periodic payments that are similar to coupon payments. Furthermore, the mortgage must have originated from regulated and authorized financial institutions. The contractual cash flows of investments in government sponsored enterprises’ mortgage-backed securities are debt obligations of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, both of which are currently under the conservatorship of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”). The cash flows related to GNMA securities are direct obligations of the U.S. Government. Mortgage-backed securities are also known as mortgage pass-throughs. CMOs are a type of mortgage-backed security that

 

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create separate pools of pass-through rates for different classes of bondholders with varying cash flow structures, called tranches. The repayments from the pool of pass-through securities are used to retire the bonds in the order specified by the bonds’ prospectuses. At December 31, 2013, we had no investments in a single company or entity (other than United States government sponsored enterprise securities) that had an aggregate book value in excess of 10% of our equity.

 

At December 31, 2013 and 2012, securities totaling $1.2 billion and $101.5 million, respectively, were in an unrealized loss position and the unrealized losses on these securities totaled $34.7 million and $2.2 million, respectively. The increase in unrealized losses on securities was primarily due to an increase in intermediate and long-term interest rates in the second half of 2013. When evaluating for impairment, we consider the duration and extent to which fair value is less than cost, the credit worthiness and near-term prospects of the issuer, the likelihood of recovering our investment, whether we have the intent to sell the investment, or whether it is more likely than not that we will be required to sell the investment before recovery, and other available information to determine the nature of the decline in market value of the securities.

 

At December 31, 2013, the unrealized losses in the portfolio were mainly attributed to its GSEs mortgage-backed securities and its GSE CMOs.  The unrealized losses are due to current interest rate levels relative to our cost and not credit quality.  As we do not intend to sell the investments, and it is not likely we will be required to sell the investments prior to recovery, we do not consider the investments to be other than temporarily impaired at December 31, 2013. During 2013 and 2012, we did not record any impairment charges for securities.

 

During 2013, we sold $6.2 million of pooled trust securities that resulted in a $1.2 million loss due to the uncertainty regarding banking institutions being allowed to hold pooled trust preferred securities under the Volcker Rule that was issued in December 2013. These securities were in a $740 thousand unrealized loss position at the time of the sale.

 

The following table sets forth the stated maturities and weighted average yields of investment securities at December 31, 2013. Certain securities have adjustable interest rates and may reprice monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually within the various maturity ranges. Mutual funds and money market funds are not included in the table based on lack of a maturity date. The investment portfolio consists of $1.5 billion of fixed rate securities and $26.5 million in adjustable rate securities at December 31, 2013.

 

 

 

One Year or Less

 

More than One Year to
Five Years

 

More than Five Years
to Ten Years

 

More than Ten Years

 

Total

 

December 31, 2013
(Dollars in thousands)

 

Carrying
Value

 

Weighted
Average
Yield

 

Carrying
Value

 

Weighted
Average
Yield

 

Carrying
Value

 

Weighted
Average
Yield

 

Carrying
Value

 

Weighted
Average
Yield

 

Carrying
Value

 

Weighted
Average
Yield

 

Securities available-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GSE and agency notes

 

$

144

 

8.1

%

 

 

$

12,773

 

1.9

%

$

 

 

$

12,917

 

2.0

%

Mortgage-backed securities & CMOs

 

 

 

143,814

 

1.1

 

440,784

 

2.2

 

350,948

 

2.8

 

935,546

 

2.3

 

Municipal and other bonds

 

4,129

 

4.5

 

8,328

 

3.7

 

37,887

 

4.1

 

17,085

 

4.5

 

67,429

 

4.2

 

Pooled trust preferred

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificates of Deposit

 

12

 

0.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

0.5

 

Total available-for-sale

 

4,285

 

4.6

 

152,142

 

1.3

 

491,444

 

2.3

 

368,033

 

2.9

 

1,015,904

 

2.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities held to maturity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities & CMOs

 

2

 

6.0

 

2,611

 

4.3

 

113,229

 

2.1

 

407,577

 

2.7

 

523,419

 

2.6

 

Foreign bonds

 

 

 

2,000

 

1.7

 

 

 

 

 

2,000

 

1.7

 

Municipal bonds

 

2,540

 

3.2

 

490

 

4.8

 

380

 

5.7

 

 

 

3,410

 

3.7

 

Total held to maturity

 

2,542

 

3.2

 

5,101

 

3.3

 

113,609

 

2.1

 

407,577

 

2.7

 

528,829

 

2.6

 

Total

 

$

6,827

 

4.1

%

$

157,243

 

1.3

%

$

605,053

 

2.3

%

$

775,610

 

2.8

%

$

1,544,733

 

2.5

%

 

Loans

 

At December 31, 2013, total loans were $2.29 billion, or 51.1% of total assets, compared to $2.39 billion, or 48.9% of total assets, at December 31, 2012. Total loans decreased $105.5 million, or 4.3%, during the year ended December 31, 2013.  Despite total loan originations of $560.4 million during the year ended December 31, 2013, our loan portfolio decreased as a result of high commercial loan repayments and continued weak loan demand. The increase in intermediate and long term interest rates during the year also resulted in lower mortgage loan originations. Throughout 2013, we held in portfolio the majority of our agency eligible mortgage production as the yields on these mortgages were attractive compared to the rates available on investment securities.

 

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Table of Contents

 

The following table shows the loan portfolio at the dates indicated:

 

December 31,

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

2010

 

2009

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Commercial Loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial real estate

 

$

584,133

 

24.9

%

$

639,557

 

26.1

%

$

547,010

 

21.2

%

$

600,734

 

21.5

%

$

599,849

 

21.5

%

Commercial business loans

 

378,663

 

16.2

 

332,169

 

13.6

 

429,266

 

16.7

 

441,881

 

15.8

 

438,778

 

15.7

 

Commercial construction

 

38,067

 

1.6

 

105,047

 

4.3

 

233,545

 

9.1

 

268,314

 

9.6

 

264,734

 

9.5

 

Total commercial loans

 

1,000,863

 

42.7

 

1,076,773

 

44.0

 

1,209,821

 

47.0

 

1,310,929

 

46.9

 

1,303,361

 

46.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential Loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate

 

683,700

 

29.2

 

665,246

 

27.2

 

623,955

 

24.2

 

687,565

 

24.6

 

647,687

 

23.3

 

Residential construction

 

277

 

 

2,094

 

0.1

 

5,581

 

0.2

 

11,157

 

0.4

 

11,938

 

0.4

 

Total residential loans

 

683,977

 

29.2

 

667,340

 

27.3

 

629,536

 

24.4

 

698,722

 

25.0

 

659,625

 

23.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer Loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home equity & lines of credit

 

234,154

 

10.0

 

258,499

 

10.5

 

268,793

 

10.5

 

288,875

 

10.3

 

314,467

 

11.3

 

Personal

 

40,892

 

1.8

 

55,850

 

2.3

 

73,094

 

2.8

 

94,036

 

3.4

 

112,142

 

4.0

 

Education

 

206,521

 

8.8

 

217,896

 

8.9

 

234,844

 

9.1

 

249,696

 

8.9

 

257,021

 

9.2

 

Automobile

 

175,400

 

7.5

 

170,946

 

7.0

 

160,041

 

6.2

 

154,144

 

5.5

 

143,503

 

5.1

 

Total consumer loans

 

656,967

 

28.1

 

703,191

 

28.7

 

736,772

 

28.6

 

786,751

 

28.1

 

827,133

 

29.6

 

Total loans

 

2,341,807

 

100.0

%

2,447,304

 

100.0

%

2,576,129

 

100.0

%

2,796,402

 

100.0

%

2,790,119

 

100.0

%

Allowance for losses

 

(55,649

)

 

 

(57,649

)

 

 

(54,213

)

 

 

(45,366

)

 

 

(45,855

)

 

 

Loans, net

 

$

2,286,158

 

 

 

$

2,389,655

 

 

 

$

2,521,916

 

 

 

$

2,751,036

 

 

 

$

2,744,264

 

 

 

 

Loan Maturity

 

The following table sets forth certain information at December 31, 2013 regarding the dollar amount of loan principal repayments becoming due during the periods indicated.  The tables do not include any estimate of prepayments which significantly shorten the average life of all loans and may cause our actual repayment experience to differ from that shown below.  Demand loans having no stated schedule of repayments and no stated maturity are reported as due in one year or less.  Our adjustable-rate mortgage loans generally do not provide for downward adjustments below the initial discounted contract rate.  When market interest rates rise, the interest rates on these loans may increase based on the contract rate (the index plus the margin) exceeding the initial interest rate floor.

 

December 31, 2013
(Dollars in thousands)

 

Commercial
Real Estate

 

Commercial
Business

 

Commercial
Construction

 

Residential
Real
Estate

 

Residential
Construction

 

Home
Equity &
Lines of
Credit

 

Personal

 

Education

 

Auto

 

Total
Loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amounts due in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One year or less

 

$

18,939

 

$

9,843

 

$

2,518

 

$

812

 

$

131

 

$

47,795

 

$

1,587

 

$

14

 

$

18

 

$

81,657

 

More than 1-5 years

 

149,692

 

125,260

 

24,104

 

8,295

 

146

 

14,769

 

5,462

 

2,299

 

69,083

 

399,110

 

More than 5-10 years

 

134,594

 

102,948

 

11,445

 

38,586

 

 

53,734

 

14,980

 

14,733

 

106,299

 

477,319

 

More than 10 years

 

280,908

 

140,612

 

 

636,007

 

 

117,856

 

18,863

 

189,475

 

 

1,383,721

 

Total

 

$

584,133

 

$

378,663

 

$

38,067

 

$

683,700

 

$

277

 

$

234,154

 

$

40,892

 

$

206,521

 

$

175,400

 

$

2,341,807

 

 

38



Table of Contents

 

The following table sets forth all loans at December 31, 2013 that are due after December 31, 2014 and have either fixed interest rates or floating or adjustable interest rates:

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Fixed Rates

 

Floating or
Adjustable Rates

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial real estate

 

$

251,815

 

$

276,152

 

$

527,967

 

Commercial business

 

130,224

 

185,248

 

315,472

 

Commercial construction

 

9,919

 

16,636

 

26,555

 

Residential real estate

 

632,301

 

49,991

 

682,292

 

Home equity and lines of credit

 

166,324

 

18,949

 

185,273

 

Personal

 

39,018

 

 

39,018

 

Education

 

194,807

 

11,700