10-K 1 d475356d10k.htm FORM 10-K Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 30, 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number: 001-33091

 

 

GateHouse Media, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

36-4197635

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

350 WillowBrook Office Park,

Fairport, New York

 

14450

(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Telephone: (585) 598-0030

 

 

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

None

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common stock, $0.01 par value per share

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

    Large accelerated filer    ¨

   Accelerated filer    ¨    Non-accelerated filer    ¨    Smaller reporting company    x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 29, 2012, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $1.7 million. The market value calculation was determined using a per share price of $0.05, the price at which the registrant’s common stock was last sold on the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board System on such date. For purposes of this calculation, shares held by non-affiliates excludes only those shares beneficially owned by the registrant’s executive officers, directors, and stockholders owning 10% or more of the registrant’s outstanding common stock (and, in each case, their immediate family members and affiliates).

As of March 4, 2013, 58,077,031 shares of the registrant’s common stock were outstanding.

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement, to be delivered to stockholders in connection with the registrant’s 2013 annual meeting of stockholders, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the extent described herein.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

GATEHOUSE MEDIA, INC.

FORM 10-K

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 30, 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

          Page  
   PART I   

Item 1

   Business      1   

Item 1A

   Risk Factors      32   

Item 1B

   Unresolved Staff Comments      40   

Item 2

   Properties      40   

Item 3

   Legal Proceedings      40   

Item 4

   Mine Safety Disclosures      41   
   PART II   

Item 5

  

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     42   

Item 6

   Selected Financial Data      43   

Item 7

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      47   

Item 7A

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      63   

Item 8

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      65   

Item 9

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      103   

Item 9A

   Controls and Procedures      103   

Item 9B

   Other Information      103   
   PART III   

Item 10

   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      104   

Item 11

   Executive Compensation      104   

Item 12

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     104   

Item 13

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence      105   

Item 14

   Principal Accountant Fees and Services      105   
   PART IV   

Item 15

   Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules      106   

 

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Unless the context otherwise requires, in this report on Form 10-K:

 

   

“2006 Credit Facility” refers to the first and second lien term loan credit facilities that were entered into on June 6, 2006, as amended;

 

   

“2006 First Lien Facility” refers to the first lien term loan facility, comprising part of the 2006 Credit Facility, remaining after the repayment and termination of the second lien term loan credit facility;

 

   

“2007 Credit Facility” refers to the amendment and restatement of the 2006 First Lien Facility that was entered into on February 27, 2007;

 

   

“2007 Financings” refers to the financing transactions contemplated by the 2007 Credit Facility, the First Amendment and the Bridge Facility;

 

   

“2008 Bridge Facility” refers to the Bridge Credit Agreement entered into with Barclays on February 15, 2008;

 

   

“Agency Amendment” refers to the amendment to the 2007 Credit Facility that was entered into as of March 30, 2011;

 

   

“Agent” refers to the Administrative Agent and Control Agent under the 2007 Credit Facility;

 

   

“Barclays” refers to Barclays Capital;

 

   

“Bridge Facility” refers to the bridge term loan credit facility that was entered into on April 11, 2007;

 

   

“Copley” refers to The Copley Press, Inc.;

 

   

“Copley Acquisition” refers to the acquisition by us of all the stock of certain wholly-owned subsidiaries of Copley and the acquisition by us of certain assets, and the assumption of certain liabilities, of Copley which, taken together, comprised Copley’s midwest (Ohio and Illinois) operations and business;

 

   

“CP Media” refers to CP Media, Inc. and its predecessor entities;

 

   

“Enterprise” refers to Enterprise NewsMedia, LLC and its subsidiaries and predecessor entities;

 

   

“First Amendment” refers to the amendment to the 2007 Credit Facility that was entered into on May 7, 2007;

 

   

“Fortress” refers to Fortress Investment Group LLC and certain of its affiliates, including certain funds managed by it or its affiliates;

 

   

“GAAP” refers to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles;

 

   

“Gannett” refers to Gannett Co., Inc.;

 

   

“Gannett Acquisition” refers to the acquisition by us of substantially all of the assets, and assumption of certain liabilities, of four daily newspapers and related publications and websites owned by Gannett in Rockford, Illinois; Utica, New York; Norwich, Connecticut; and Huntington, West Virginia;

 

   

“GateHouse Media,” “GateHouse,” the “Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” refer to GateHouse Media, Inc. and its subsidiaries and predecessor entities;

 

   

“Gleacher” refers to Gleacher Products Corp.;

 

   

“IPO” refers to our initial public offering of 13,800,000 shares of common stock completed on October 30, 2006 (unless the context otherwise indicates, this does not include the 2,070,000 shares of common stock sold pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares on November 3, 2006);

 

   

“Merger” refers to the June 6, 2005 merger pursuant to which FIF III Liberty Holdings LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Fortress, merged with and into the Company, with the Company surviving the merger and Fortress becoming our principal and controlling stockholder;

 

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“Morris” refers to Morris Publishing Group;

 

   

“Pro forma” refers to GateHouse after giving effect to (i) for the year ended December 31, 2007, the Copley Acquisition, the Gannett Acquisition and the 2007 Financings; (ii) for the year ended December 31, 2006, the Massachusetts Acquisitions, the Copley Acquisition, the Gannett Acquisition and the 2007 Financings;

 

   

“Second Amendment” refers to the amendment to the 2007 Credit Facility that was entered into on February 3, 2009;

 

   

“Second Waiver and Amendment” refers to the waiver of compliance with the leverage ratio covenant and amendment of 2008 Bridge Facility entered into on February 12, 2009;

 

   

“SureWest” refers to SureWest Directories; and

 

   

“SureWest Acquisition” refers to the acquisition by us of all the equity interests of SureWest.

 

   

“Wells Fargo Bank” refers to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (successor-by-merger to Wachovia Bank, National Association).

Any data set forth anywhere in this report on Form 10-K regarding the number of our products, circulation, facilities, markets or employees is as of December 30, 2012, unless otherwise indicated.

 

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD LOOKING INFORMATION

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our historical consolidated financial statements and notes to those statements appearing in this report. The discussion and analysis below includes certain forward-looking statements that are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors described in this report, including under the heading “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this report, that could cause actual future growth, results of operations, performance and business prospects and opportunities to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, such forward looking information.

Certain statements in this report on Form 10-K may constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that reflect our current views regarding, among other things, our future growth, results of operations, performance and business prospects and opportunities, as well as other statements that are other than historical fact. Words such as “anticipate(s),” “expect(s)”, “intend(s)”, “plan(s)”, “target(s)”, “project(s)”, “believe(s)”, “will”, “aim”, “would”, “seek(s)”, “estimate(s)” and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements.

Forward-looking statements are based on management’s current expectations and beliefs and are subject to a number of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could lead to actual results materially different from those described in the forward-looking statements. We can give no assurance that our expectations will be attained. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations include, but are not limited, to the risks identified by us under the heading “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this report. Such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made. Except to the extent required by law, we expressly disclaim any obligation to release publicly any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in our expectations with regard thereto or change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any statement is based.

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

General Overview

We are one of the largest publishers of locally based print and online media in the United States as measured by number of daily publications. We were incorporated in Delaware in 1997 for purposes of acquiring a portion of the daily and weekly newspapers owned by American Publishing Company. Our business model is to be the preeminent provider of local content, advertising and digital marketing services to the small and midsize markets we serve. Our portfolio of products, which includes 406 community publications, 342 related websites, 339 mobile sites and six yellow page directories, serves over 128,000 business advertising accounts and reaches approximately 10 million people on a weekly basis. All data contained in this report regarding the number of our products, circulation, facilities or employees is as of December 30, 2012, unless otherwise indicated.

Our core products include:

 

   

78 daily newspapers with total paid circulation of approximately 597,000;

 

   

237 weekly newspapers (published up to three times per week) with total paid circulation of approximately 307,000 and total free circulation of approximately 684,000;

 

   

91 “shoppers” (generally advertising-only publications) with total circulation of approximately 1.5 million;

 

   

342 locally focused websites and 339 mobile sites, which extend our franchises onto the internet and mobile devices with approximately 97 million page views per month; and

 

   

six yellow page directories, with a distribution of approximately 488,000, that covers a population of approximately 1.2 million people.

In addition to our core products, we also opportunistically produce niche publications that address specific local market interests such as recreation, sports, healthcare and real estate. During the last twelve months, we created approximately 42 niche publications.

Our print and online products focus on the local community from both a content and advertising standpoint. As a result of our focus on small and midsize markets, we are usually the primary, and sometimes, the sole provider of comprehensive and in-depth local market news and information in the communities we serve. Our content is primarily devoted to topics that we believe are highly relevant and of interest to our audience such as local news and politics, community and regional events, youth sports, opinion and editorial pages, and local schools.

More than 86% of our daily newspapers have been published for more than 100 years and 100% have been published for more than 50 years. We believe that the longevity of our publications demonstrates the value and relevance of the local information that we provide and has created a strong foundation of reader loyalty and a highly recognized media brand name in each community we serve. As a result of these factors, we believe that our publications have high local audience penetration rates in our markets, thereby providing advertisers with strong local market reach.

We have a history of growth through acquisitions and new product launches. Since our inception, we have acquired 420 daily and weekly newspapers, shoppers and directories. Due to the weak economic backdrop over the past several years and tough financing market we have not done an acquisition since 2009 and instead have focused on transforming our business to a multi-media content and advertising business while maintaining our local orientation and pursuing cost reductions and de-levering opportunities. As part of our cost reduction efforts, we have engaged in a series of individual restructuring programs, designed primarily to right size our employee base, consolidate facilities and improve operations.

 

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We operate in 330 markets across 21 states. A key element of our business strategy is geographic clustering of publications to realize operating efficiencies and provide consistent management practices. We share best practices across our organization, giving each publication the benefit of proven and executable revenue producing and cost saving initiatives. We regionally cluster functions such as ad composition, accounting and production and give each publication in a cluster access to top quality production equipment, which we believe enables us to cost-efficiently provide superior products and service to our customers. We are also centralizing certain functions across the entire company, particularly in the ad production and content areas in an effort to become more efficient and better serve our publications and customers. In addition, we believe that our size allows us to achieve economies of scale.

We believe that below average industry advertising revenue volatility is a result of our geographic diversity combined with our concentration of small markets. We have revenues coming from markets across 21 states, the large number of products we publish and our fragmented, diversified local advertising customer base. We also believe that local advertising tends to be less sensitive to economic cycles than national advertising because local businesses generally have fewer advertising channels in which to reach the local audience. We believe we are also less reliant than large metropolitan newspapers upon classified advertising, particularly the recruiting and real estate categories, which are generally more sensitive to economic conditions.

Industry Overview

We operate in what is sometimes referred to as the “hyper-local” or community market within the media industry. Media companies that serve this segment provide highly focused local content and advertising that is generally unique to each market they serve and is not readily obtainable from other sources. Local publications include community newspapers, websites, shoppers, traders, real estate guides, special interest magazines and directories. Due to the unique nature of their content, community publications compete for advertising customers with other forms of traditional media, including: direct mail, directories, radio, television, and outdoor advertising. We also compete with new digital and social media businesses for advertising customers. We believe that local print and online publications are the most effective medium for local retail advertising, which emphasizes the price of goods in an effort to move inventory on a regular basis, in contrast to radio, broadcast and cable, television, and the internet, which are generally used for image or branding advertising. In addition, we believe local print and online publications generally have the highest local audience penetration rates, which allows local advertisers to get their message to a large portion of the local audience.

Locally focused media in small and midsize communities is distinct from national and urban media delivered through outlets such as television, radio, metropolitan and national newspapers and the internet. Larger media outlets tend to offer broad based information to a geographically scattered audience, which tends to be more of a commodity. In contrast, locally focused media delivers a highly focused product that is often the only source of local news and information in the market it serves. Our segment of the media industry is also characterized by high barriers to entry, both economic and social. Small and midsize communities can generally only sustain one newspaper. Moreover, the brand value associated with long-term reader and advertiser loyalty, and the high start-up costs associated with developing and distributing content and selling advertisements, help to limit competition.

Advertising Market

The primary sources of advertising revenue for local publications are small businesses, corporations, government agencies and individuals who reside in the market that a publication serves. By combining paid circulation publications with total market coverage publications such as shoppers and other specialty publications (tailored to the specific attributes of a local community), local publications are able to reach nearly 100% of the households in a distribution area. As macroeconomic conditions in advertising change due to increasing internet and mobile usage and the wide array of available information sources, we have seen advertisers shift their focus to have a digital component to their local advertising strategy. To that end, in addition to printed products, the majority of our local publications have an online presence that further leverages the local brand, ensures higher penetration into the market, and provides a digital alternative for local advertisers.

 

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Digital Media

The time spent online and on mobile devices each day by media consumers continues to grow and newspaper web and mobile sites offer a wide variety of content providing comprehensive, in-depth and up to the minute coverage of news and current events. The ability to generate, publish and archive more news and information than most other sources has allowed newspapers to produce some of the most visited sites on the internet. Newspaper websites have shown to be some of the most visited websites by online media news consumers.

We believe that our local publications are well positioned to capitalize on their existing market franchises and grow their total audience base by publishing proprietary local content digitally; via the internet, mobile websites and mobile applications. Local digital media include traditional classifieds, directories of business information, local advertising, databases, audience-contributed content and mobile applications. We believe this additional community-specific content will further extend and expand both the reach and the brand of our publications with readers and advertisers. We believe that building a strong local digital business extends the core audience of a local publication.

The opportunity created by the digital extension of the core audience makes local digital advertising an attractive complement for existing print advertisers, while opening up opportunities to attract new local advertisers that have never advertised with local publications. In addition, we believe that national advertisers have an interest in reaching buyers on a hyper-local level and, although they historically have not been significant advertisers in community publications, we believe the digital media offers them a powerful medium to reach local audiences. This opportunity is further enhanced by our behavioral targeting products which allow advertisers to reach specific demographics of our audience. We also plan to hire a new digital only sales force to focus on digital growth in key market DMAs.

Circulation

Overall daily newspaper print circulation, including national and urban newspapers, has been declining steadily over the past several years. Small and midsize local market newspapers have generally had smaller declines and more stability in their paid print circulation volumes due to the relevant and unique hyper-local news they produce. In addition, this unique and valuable hyper-local content allows smaller market newspapers to continue to raise prices, leading to stable circulation revenues.

Our Strategy

We plan to maximize our revenue and cash flow potential in the existing economic and industry climate through a combination of (i) organic growth in our existing portfolio, especially in our digital based products, (ii) taking advantage of cost reductions and de-leveraging opportunities, and (iii) the realization of economies of scale and operating efficiencies. Our goal is to transform from print centric to a truly multi-media business. The key elements of our strategy are:

Maintain Our Dominance in the Delivery of Proprietary Content in Our Communities. We seek to maintain our position as a leading provider of local content in the markets we serve and to leverage this position to strengthen our relationships with both readers and advertisers, thereby increasing penetration rates and market share. A critical aspect of this approach is to continue to provide local content that is not readily obtainable elsewhere and to be able to deliver that content to our customers across multiple print and digital platforms. We believe it is very important for us to protect the content from unauthorized users who use it for their own commercial purposes. We also believe it is important for us to develop subscription revenue streams from our digital content.

Strengthening our Balance Sheet and Managing our Operations. Our focus continues to be on strengthening our balance sheet and managing our operations. From an operations standpoint, we intend to continue to stabilize our core business, grow our digital business, and leverage our key assets and strengths to find new opportunities to grow. We will continue to invest in recruitment and training of our sales executives in order to train them to become multi-media sales staff as well as capture new or additional revenues and market

 

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share. With our revolving credit facility balance at zero and no amortization on our long term credit facility that matures in 2014, we believe that we have increased flexibility to use available cash generated from operations to invest in growing our business organically, strengthening our balance sheet and building liquidity.

In addition, we intend to continue to pursue permanent cost reductions on our controllable expenses and look for ways to manage inflationary pressures and to become more efficient.

Leverage Benefits of Scale and Clustering to Increase Cash Flows and Operating Profit Margins. Last year we changed our organizational structure to be more vertical by functional area in order to create greater focus and accountability. We intend to continue to take advantage of geographic clustering and company wide centralization of key functions to realize operating and economic efficiencies in areas such as labor, production, overhead, raw materials and distribution costs. We believe we will be able to increase our cash flows and expand our operating profit margins as we streamline and further centralize ad production and content purchasing, copy editing and other newsroom functions as well as administrative functions, and other duplicative functions completed in the field.

Increase Sales Force Productivity. We aim to continue to increase the productivity of our sales force and, in turn, help maximize advertising revenues. We also aim to create a multi-media sales culture and feel that is critical to our long term success. Our approach includes ongoing company-wide training of sales representatives and sales managers that focuses on strengthening their ability to gather relevant demographic information, to understand multi-media and product portfolio sales, to design effective customer presentations, price and package our product mixes appropriately, more effectively utilize time and improve close ratio on sales calls. Our training includes sharing “best practices” of our most successful account representatives. We regularly evaluate the performance of our sales representatives and sales management and implement contests and other incentive compensation programs. Our sales compensation structure emphasizes key digital growth areas and new customer generation. We also regularly evaluate our advertising rates to ensure we are maximizing revenue opportunities. We believe better accountability and measurement of our sales force, when combined with training and access to better demographic and marketing information, will lead to greater productivity and revenue from our sales force.

Introduce New Products or Modify Our Products to Enhance the Value Proposition for Our Advertisers. We believe that our established positions in local markets, combined with our publishing and distribution capabilities, allow us to develop and customize new products to address the evolving interests and needs of our readers and advertisers. These products are often specialty publications, print and digital, that address specific interests such as employment, healthcare, hobbies and real estate. In addition, we intend to capitalize upon our unique position in local markets to introduce other marketing oriented products such as directories, magazines, shoppers and other niche publications in both online and print to further enhance our value to advertisers. We are actively developing web and mobile products, including deal platforms, digital service offerings, mobile websites and applications, and continue to expand the number of locations offering behavioral targeted advertising. We are also looking at developing new businesses by leveraging our core strengths that have the potential to grow beyond our existing markets.

Pursue a Content-Driven Digital Strategy. We believe that we are well-positioned to increase our digital penetration and generate additional online audience and revenues due to both our ability to deliver unique local content and our relationships with readers and advertisers. We believe this presents an opportunity to increase our overall audience penetration rates and drive additional subscription revenues in each of the communities we serve. We expect that centralizing our technology and building a network of websites will allow us to aggregate classified advertisements and build online classified products in areas such as real estate, automotive and recruitment. We also have the ability to sell online display advertising and online video advertising locally and nationally. Finally, we intend to share resources across our organization in order to give each of our publications access to technology, online management expertise, content and advertisers that they may not have been able to obtain or afford if they were operating independently.

 

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Products

Our product mix consists of four publication types: (i) daily newspapers, (ii) weekly newspapers, (iii) shoppers and (iv) niche publications. Most of these publications have a digital presence as discussed in the following table. Some of the key characteristics of each of these types of publications are also summarized in the table below.

 

    

Daily Newspapers

  

Weekly Newspapers

  

Shoppers

  

Niche Publications

Cost:

   Paid    Paid and free    Paid and free    Paid and free

Distribution:

   Distributed four to seven days per week    Distributed one to three days per week    Distributed weekly    Distributed weekly, monthly or on annual basis

Format:

   Printed on newsprint, folded    Printed on newsprint, folded    Printed on newsprint, folded or booklet    Printed on newsprint or glossy, folded, booklet, magazine or book

Content:

   50% editorial (local news and coverage of community events, some national headlines) and 50% ads (including classifieds)    50% editorial (local news and coverage of community events, some national headlines for smaller markets which cannot support a daily newspaper) and 50% ads (including classifieds)    Almost 100% ads, primarily classifieds, display and inserts    Niche content and targeted ads (e.g., Chamber of Commerce city guides, tourism guides and special interest publications such as, seniors, golf, real estate, calendars and directories)

Income:

   Revenue from advertisers, subscribers, rack/box sales    Paid: Revenue from advertising, subscribers, rack/box sales    Paid: Revenue from advertising, rack/box sales    Paid: Revenue from advertising, rack/box sales
      Free: Advertising revenue only, provide 100% market coverage.    Free: Advertising revenue only, provide 100% market coverage    Free: Advertising revenue only
Internet Availability:    Maintain locally oriented websites, mobile sites and mobile apps, for select locations    Major publications maintain locally oriented websites and mobile sites for select locations    Major publications maintain locally oriented websites    Selectively available online

Overview of Operations

We operate in three publication groups: Small Community Newspapers, Metros and Large Daily Newspapers. A list of our dailies, weeklies, shoppers and websites in each of our publication groups is included under “List of Our Dailies, Weeklies, Shoppers, Websites and Directories” in this report. We also operate over 342 related websites and 339 mobile sites.

 

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The following table sets forth information regarding our publications.

 

     Number of Publications      Circulation (1)  

Operating Group

   Dailies      Weeklies      Shoppers      Paid      Free      Total
Circulation
 

Small Community Newspapers

     59         106         72         342,771         1,193,197         1,535,968   

Metro Newspapers

     7         127         7         284,921         493,720         778,641   

Large Daily Newspapers

     12         4         12         276,668         501,782         778,450   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     78         237         91         904,360         2,188,699         3,093,059   

 

(1) Circulation statistics are estimated by our management as of December 30, 2012, except that audited circulation statistics, to the extent available, are utilized as of the audit date.

Small Community Newspaper Group. Our Small Community Newspaper group encompasses publications typically located in communities have a population less than 35,000 people, in the states of Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Michigan, California, Minnesota, Arkansas, New York, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, North Dakota, Tennessee, and Iowa. There are a total of 59 daily newspapers, 106 weekly newspapers and 72 shoppers. In addition to a good geographic mix, we benefit from a diverse economic and employment base across this group.

From the western shore of Lake Michigan to the eastern shore of the Mississippi River and running over 400 miles north to south, Illinois is a picture of manufacturing, agricultural and recreational diversity. Coupled with major daily newspapers from our Large Daily Newspaper Group in Rockford, Peoria, and the state capital of Springfield, we are the largest publishing company in Illinois. 20 paid daily newspapers, 31 paid weekly newspapers, and 20 shoppers provide inclusive coverage across the state which are further supported by four print production facilities.

La Junta in the southeastern part of the state represents the Colorado properties. Along with La Junta we also serve Bent County and Fowler and produce the weekly agricultural newspaper, The Ag Journal.

We are represented in California by two daily newspapers in Ridgecrest and Yreka, five paid weekly papers in Dunsmuir, Mt. Shasta, Weed, Gridley and Taft, and five shoppers in Gridley, Mt. Shasta, Ridgecrest and Yreka. These publications reach from northern California through the southern desert and China Lake naval base in Ridgecrest.

The greatest concentration of circulation and market presence in Missouri is in the northern part of the state where we operate seven daily newspapers and four weekly newspapers and five shoppers. We serve the 22,000 square mile area from Hannibal, on the state’s eastern border, to the western border and from Columbia in the south to the Iowa border in the north. Local employers include the University of Missouri and other colleges, local and federal governments, State Farm Insurance and 3M.

Our southern Missouri operations are clustered around Lake of the Ozarks and Joplin. Located midway between Kansas City and St. Louis and approximately 90 miles from Springfield, Missouri, our three daily newspapers, seven weekly newspapers and three shoppers that serve the Lake of the Ozarks area reach approximately 165,000 people.

Located in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas is our Joplin cluster with three daily and four weekly newspapers and four shoppers, serving a population of approximately 170,000. There are several colleges and universities in the area, a National Guard Fort, several large medical centers and a diverse mix of retail businesses, including the 120-store Northpark Mall.

This group also includes our Kansas City cluster with six publications (two daily and two weekly newspapers and two shoppers) located in the eastern Kansas cities of Leavenworth and Lansing and on the

 

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Missouri side, Independence and Blue Springs. The Leavenworth Times was one of our original daily newspapers and the balance of the cluster was acquired afterward. In addition, we secured the military publication, The Fort Leavenworth Lamp, in Fort Leavenworth. The Kansas City cluster is home to several prominent companies, including Hallmark, H&R Block, Interstate Bakeries, and the University of Kansas.

The Wichita cluster consists of three dailies, six weeklies and three shoppers in the towns of Andover, Augusta, El Dorado, Pratt, Wellington, Newton and McPherson near Wichita, Kansas. The clustering of the small dailies in this area allows the group to sell advertisers a package providing access to multiple communities. Major aircraft manufacturers Boeing, Bombardier, Cessna and Raytheon have facilities nearby and McConnell Air Force Base is a major component of the local economy.

We also have clusters in and around Grand Forks, North Dakota (home to the Grand Forks Air Force Base and the University of North Dakota) and near Mason City, Iowa, where Cargill, ConAgra, Kraft, Winnebago and Fort Dodge Animal Health, a division of Wyeth, each maintain significant operations.

We are represented in southwestern Minnesota through seven paid weekly newspapers and four shoppers. St. James, Redwood Falls, Sleepy Eye, Granite Falls, Cottonwood, Wabasso, and Montevideo are all communities with populations of 10,000 and under. These papers represent the primary local news and information source for these communities.

In Louisiana, we have an operating cluster in the southwestern part of the state, located between Lake Charles and Alexandria. This cluster consists of five publications located in the cities of Leesville, Sulpher, DeRidder and Vinton. Local employers include major manufacturers such as Alcoa, Firestone, International Paper and Proctor & Gamble.

Our Baton Rouge cluster consists of four weeklies and three shoppers in the southeastern Louisiana cities of Donaldsville, Gonzales, and Plaquemine. Numerous petrochemical companies such as BASF, Exxon Mobil and Dow Chemical, plus universities including Louisiana State, support the local economies.

In southwestern New York, our operations are centered around five publications based in Steuben County. In Corning, The Leader, a 7,709 circulation daily newspaper, dominates the eastern half of the county and shares its hometown namesake with Corning Incorporated. The Hornell Evening Tribune circulates daily throughout the western half of the county. Situated directly between these two dailies in the county seat of Bath is the 10,850 circulation Steuben Courier, a free-distribution weekly. The Pennysaver Plus, a standalone shopper, solidifies this flagship group.

We also have a strong presence in the print advertising markets in three other New York counties that surround Steuben. In Allegany County to the west, the Wellsville Daily Reporter and its shopper, the Pennysaver Plus, cover most households. In Livingston County to the north, the Pennysaver Plus and the Genesee Country Express complement one another with combined circulation of 11,814. In Yates County to the north and east, The Chronicle-Express and Chronicle Ad-Visor shopper distribute weekly to over 15,000 households centered around the county seat of Penn Yan.

In nearby Chemung County, the 20,000 circulation Horseheads Shopper anchors our presence in this area. The majority of the southwestern New York cluster parallels Interstate 86 across the central southern tier of New York State, which is benefiting from continued improvement and expansion under an omnibus federal highway appropriations bill. Moreover, the cluster has several colleges and universities nearby, including Cornell University, Ithaca College, Elmira College and Houghton College.

Our Honesdale cluster, approximately 30 miles from Scranton, Pennsylvania, consists of seven publications in the cities of Carbondale, Honesdale and Hawley, Pennsylvania, along with Liberty, New York, located just across the Delaware River to the east. The cluster was created from our daily and shopper operations in

 

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Honesdale and later supplemented by our acquisition of weeklies and shoppers in Carbondale and Liberty. Local employers include General Dynamics, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Commonwealth Telephone and various colleges and universities, medical centers and governmental agencies.

Our Pennsylvania/West Virginia cluster includes dailies in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, Keyser and Ripley, West Virginia. We also have two weeklies throughout the group and a commercial printing operation in Ravenswood, West Virginia.

We have a strong presence in southern Michigan where five of our dailies, Adrian, Coldwater, Holland, Hillsdale and Sturgis, along with two weeklies and seven shoppers blanket the southern tier of the state and into Indiana. The 14,237 circulation Holland Sentinel is the flagship publication of the group. This area has several large employers, including Delphi, ConAgra, Tecumseh Products, Kellogg, JCI, Herman Miller, Hayworth, Gentex, Jackson State Prison, and a number of colleges and universities.

The communities we serve in the Small Community Newspaper group are largely rural but also support educational institutions, government agencies (including prisons and military bases), tourism, veterinary medicine and ethanol and agricultural chemical manufacturing. The area also maintains automotive (including recreational vehicles), boat, home construction products and furniture manufacturing sectors.

The following table sets forth information regarding the number of publications and production facilities in the Small Community Newspaper Group:

 

     Publications      Production
Facilities
 

State of Operations

   Dailies      Weeklies      Shoppers         

Illinois

     15         31         13         2   

Missouri

     13         15         12         5   

Kansas

     5         10         7         1   

Michigan

     8         2         10         4   

California

     2         5         5         1   

Minnesota

     1         8         6         0   

Arkansas

     3         11         0         2   

New York

     3         4         7         0   

Louisiana

     1         8         4         1   

Pennsylvania

     2         4         2         2   

West Virginia

     1         2         2         2   

Colorado

     1         3         0         1   

Nebraska

     0         2         2         0   

Oklahoma

     2         0         1         2   

North Dakota

     1         0         1         1   

Tennessee

     1         0         0         0   

Iowa

     0         1         0         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     59         106         72         24   

Metro Newspaper Group. Our Metro Newspaper Group includes publications that are typically within 50 miles of a metropolitan area with total population greater than 1.0 million people in the states of Massachusetts, New York, and Delaware. We are one of the largest community newspaper publishers in Massachusetts by number of daily publications and quite a large concentration of weekly newspapers, serving 113 communities in markets across eastern Massachusetts. The three largest daily newspapers in this region are: The Patriot Ledger (founded in 1837 with circulation of 33,903), the Enterprise (founded in 1880 with circulation of 19,942) and the MetroWest Daily News (founded in 1897 with circulation of 16,022). We also have over 160 web sites, with more than 3.5 million average combined monthly unique visitors in Massachusetts.

 

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Many of the towns within our Massachusetts were founded in the 1600s and our daily and weekly newspapers in the region have long been institutions within these communities. In fact, our Massachusetts publications have 31 daily and weekly newspapers that are over 100 years old. The Boston DMA is the seventh largest market in the United States with 2.4 million households and 6.2 million people, and ranks first nationally in concentration of colleges and universities. Massachusetts has more than one million households in the region earning greater than $75,000, and a substantial homeownership rate. We reach 1.7 million readers in the eastern Massachusetts market. Eastern Massachusetts is also an employment center for technology, biotechnology, healthcare and higher education.

In New York we maintain a combination of 16 publications in Suburban Rochester that span four counties and have a combined circulation of 121,533. This market has a tourism industry and is known for boutique wineries and recreational activities. The flagship of Messenger Post Media is the 6,878 circulation Daily Messenger in Canandaigua.

The Delaware cluster publishes six weekly newspapers, one shopper, and various specialty papers that cover most of the state of Delaware, and range from suburban Wilmington in the north to Georgetown, Delaware at the south end of the state. The weekly Express shopper serves nearly all of lower Delaware and a good portion of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Circulation for the cluster is primarily free, and totals approximately 80,645 weekly.

The following table sets forth information regarding the number of publications and production facilities in the Metro Newspaper Group:

 

     Publications      Production
Facilities
 

State of Operations

   Dailies      Weeklies      Shoppers         

Massachusetts

     6         110         2         2   

New York

     1         11         4         1   

Delaware

     0         6         1         1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     7         127         7         4   

Large Daily Newspaper Group. Our Large Daily Newspaper Group includes publication clusters in communities that typically have more than 35,000 people and are greater than 50 miles from a major metropolitan area. These publications are in Illinois, New York, Ohio, and Connecticut with a total of 12 daily newspapers, 4 weekly newspapers and 12 shoppers. In addition to a good geographic mix, we benefit from a diverse economic and employment base across this group.

Approximately 85 miles to the west of Chicago, Illinois is the Rockford Register Star supported by its 41,532 daily paid circulation base and its TMC product The Weekly, with six zoned editions. The Rockford Register Star operates successful web sites that have more than 747,000 average monthly unique visitors.

The Journal (Freeport, IL) Standard is published Tuesdays through Sundays. The newspaper’s coverage area includes Caroll, Jo Daviess, Ogle and Stephenson counties. The newspaper has a daily circulation of 7,713 and a Sunday circulation of 9,177. The Journal Standard also publishes a website journalstandard.com and receives a monthly average of 1.1 million page views and monthly unique visitors over 105,000.

The Peoria Journal Star with its daily paid circulation of 58,319 is the dominant newspaper in Peoria, Tazewell and Woodford Counties and is also distributed in an additional 17 surrounding counties. There are two shoppers – JS Shopper and Pekin Extra – which have a combined weekly circulation of 64,973. The Peoria facility provides print services to our neighboring GateHouse Media publications and commercial printing for Lee Enterprises’ The Pantagraph. The market includes manufacturing facilities for Caterpillar and Komatsu, and higher education at Bradley University, Illinois Central College and Midstate College. Peoria has a large medical community including OSF Healthcare, Methodist Medical Center, Proctor Hospital, University Of Illinois

 

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College Of Medicine and St. Jude Children’s Hospital Midwest Affiliate. It has agricultural facilities Archer Daniels Midland, LG Seeds and the USDA Ag Lab. The Journal Star has pjstar.com and pjstar.mobi with combined page views of over 9.1 million per month. The combined average monthly unique visitors are over 705,000.

The Springfield State Journal-Register with a daily paid circulation of 43,093 and a Sunday paid circulation of 35,861 covers the state capital of Illinois. The daily paid circulation includes a branded edition of 3,343 of the Lincoln Courier. The State Journal-Register also has successful web sites with monthly unique visitors of more than 1.1 million.

The Ohio cluster is anchored in Canton, Ohio and covers Stark and Tuscarawas Counties. It is comprised of three daily newspapers, one weekly publication and two shoppers. The Repository is a 53,338 daily newspaper that covers the entire area of Stark County. The Dover New Philadelphia Times Reporter is a 17,271 daily publication located 40 miles south of Canton in Tuscarawas County. The Massillon Independent is an 8,849 circulation daily that circulates in western Stark County. The Suburbanite is a 32,600 weekly publication that circulates in the affluent northern Stark County area. The Ohio cluster has very successful web sites with more than 1.4 million combined monthly unique visitors. Together the newspapers and web sites dominate their local markets.

The Central New York cluster is anchored by the Observer-Dispatch in Utica New York which has circulation of 29,883 Daily and 34,887 Sunday subscribers. The Utica operations include one daily and two shoppers and a weekly newspaper in Hamilton. Utica also has web sites with combined monthly unique visitors of more than 454,000. Other dailies in this group are located in Herkimer and Little Falls. The Utica and Herkimer County operations take advantage of numerous synergies in printing, circulation, and advertising.

Our Norwich, Connecticut publication diversifies the Large Daily Newspapers as the eastern Connecticut economy differs from the nation and New England markedly. Primary economic drivers include casinos, military submarine manufacture and pharmaceutical research. Major industrial employers in the region include General Dynamics, Pfizer, Dow Chemical, Dominion Resources and the United States Navy.

The following table sets forth information regarding the number of publications and production facilities in the Large Daily Newspaper Group:

 

     Publications      Production
Facilities
 

State of Operations

   Dailies      Weeklies      Shoppers         

Illinois

     5         0         7         2   

New York

     3         2         2         0   

Ohio

     3         1         2         2   

Connecticut

     1         1         1         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     12         4         12         4   

Directories

The core of our directory portfolio is comprised of the three yellow page directories, which are located in and around the Sacramento, California area, primarily in Roseville, California. The three directories have an aggregate circulation of approximately 408,000 and service Roseville, Auburn/Grass Valley/Nevada City and Folsom/El Dorado/Placerville, reaching four counties within the Sacramento region.

Our SureWest portfolio is highlighted by the Roseville directory. The Roseville directory is the incumbent (with a circulation of approximately 250,000) and has served the local Roseville community for over 95 years and has achieved more than 50% market share.

 

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We also own three additional directories including two Michigan and Indiana phone guides servicing St. Joseph County, Michigan and LaGrange County, Indiana, and Branch County, Michigan and Steuben County, Indiana, respectively, and a yellow page directory based in Mt. Shasta, California.

Revenue

Our operations generate three primary types of revenue: (i) advertising, (ii) circulation (including home delivery subscriptions, single copy sales and digital subscriptions) and (iii) other (primarily commercial printing). In 2012, these revenue streams accounted for approximately 68%, 27% and 5%, respectively, of our total revenue. The contribution of advertising, circulation and other revenue to our total revenue in 2012, 2011 and 2010 was as follows:

 

     Year Ended
December 30, 2012
     Year Ended
January 1,
2012
     Year Ended
December 31,
2010
 
     (In thousands)  

Revenue:

        

Advertising

   $ 331,419       $ 357,629       $ 386,069   

Circulation

     133,358         133,571         135,691   

Commercial printing and other

     26,187         25,763         26,057   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 490,964       $ 516,963       $ 547,817   

Advertising

Advertising revenue, which includes revenue generated from online and mobile products, is the largest component of our revenue, accounting for approximately 68%, 69% and 70% of our total revenue in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. We categorize advertising as follows:

 

   

Local Retail—local retailers, local stores for national retailers, grocers, drug stores, department and furniture stores, local financial institutions, niche shops, restaurants and other consumer related businesses.

 

   

Local Classified—local employment, automotive, real estate, legal, obituaries and other advertising.

 

   

Online—banner, display, classified, behavioral targeting, audience extension, search and other advertising on websites or mobile devices.

 

   

National—national and major accounts such as wireless communications companies, airlines and hotels.

We believe that our advertising revenue tends to be less volatile than the advertising revenue of large metropolitan and national print media because we rely primarily on local, rather than national, advertising and we have less exposure to classified revenue than others within our industry. We generally derive 95% or more of our advertising revenue from local advertising (local retail, local classified and online) and less than 5% from national advertising. We believe that local advertising tends to be less sensitive to economic cycles than national advertising because local businesses generally have fewer effective advertising channels through which they may reach their customers. We are also less reliant than large metropolitan newspapers upon classified advertising, particularly the recruiting and real estate categories, which are generally more sensitive to economic conditions.

Our advertising rate structures vary among our publications and are a function of various factors, including local market conditions, competition, circulation, readership and demographics. Our corporate management works with our local newspaper management to approve advertising rates and a portion of our publishers’ incentive compensation is based upon growing advertising revenue. Our sales compensation program emphasizes digital and new business growth. We share advertising concepts throughout our network of publishers and advertising directors including periodic special section programs, enabling them to utilize advertising products and sales strategies that are successful in other markets we serve.

 

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Substantially all of our advertising revenue is derived from a diverse group of local retailers and local classified advertisers, resulting in very limited customer concentration. No single advertiser accounted for more than 1% of our total revenue in 2010, 2011 or 2012 and our 20 largest advertisers account for less than 5% of total revenue.

Our advertising revenue tends to follow a seasonal pattern, with higher advertising revenue in months containing significant events or holidays. Accordingly, our first quarter, followed by our third quarter, historically are our weakest quarters of the year in terms of revenue. Correspondingly, our second fiscal quarter, and fourth fiscal quarter, historically are our strongest quarters. We expect that this seasonality will continue to affect our advertising revenue in future periods.

We have experienced declines in advertising revenue over the past few years, due primarily to a combination of the economic recession and secular pressures on the business. We continue to search for organic growth opportunities, specifically in our digital advertising and ways to stabilize print revenue declines through new product launches and pricing.

Circulation

Our circulation revenue is derived from home delivery sales to subscribers, single copy sales at retail stores and vending racks and boxes, and digital subscriptions. We own 78 paid daily publications that range in circulation from approximately 500 to over 61,000 and 188 paid weekly publications that range in circulation from approximately 100 to 19,000. Circulation revenue accounted for approximately 27%, 26% and 25% of our total revenue in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Subscriptions are typically sold for three to twelve-month terms and often include promotions to extend the average subscription period or convert someone to become a subscriber. We also provide bundled print and digital subscriptions and employ pay meters at most of our daily publications. We implement marketing programs to increase readership through subscription and single copy sales, including company-wide and local circulation contests, direct mail programs, door-to-door sales and strategic alliances with local schools in the form of “Newspapers in Education” programs. In addition, since the adoption of the Telemarketing Sales Rule by the Federal Trade Commission in 2003, which created a national “do not call” registry, we have increased our use of “EZ Pay” programs, direct mail campaigns, door to door sales, kiosks, sampling programs, in-paper promotions and online promotions to increase our circulation.

We encourage subscriber use of EZ Pay, a monthly credit card charge or direct bank debit payment program, which has led to higher retention rates for subscribers. We also use an active stop-loss program for all expiring subscribers. Additionally, in order to improve our circulation revenue and circulation trends, we periodically review the need for quality enhancements, such as:

 

   

Increasing the amount of unique hyper-local content;

 

   

Increasing the use of color and color photographs;

 

   

Improving graphic design, including complete redesigns;

 

   

Developing creative and interactive promotional campaigns; and

 

   

Improving customer service and company wide customer retention efforts.

 

   

Better use of demographic data to specifically target pricing and customer acquisition opportunities.

We believe that our unique and valuable hyper-local content allows us to continue to produce products of great relevance to our local market audiences. This allows us to be able to periodically raise prices, both for home delivery and on a single copy basis, resulting in increased circulation revenues. We also believe this hyper-local unique content will allow us to find ways to grow circulation revenues from our wide array of digital products.

 

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Other

We provide commercial printing services to third parties on a competitive bid basis as a means to generate incremental revenue and utilize excess printing capacity. These customers consist primarily of other publishers that do not have their own printing presses and do not compete with our publications. We also print other commercial materials, including flyers, business cards and invitations. Other sources of revenue, including commercial printing, accounted for approximately 5%, 5% and 5% of our total revenue in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Printing and Distribution

We own and operate 32 print facilities. Our print facilities produce 10 publications on average and are generally located within 60 miles of the communities served. By clustering our production resources or outsourcing where cost beneficial, we are able to reduce the operating costs of our publications while increasing the quality of our small and midsize market publications that would typically not otherwise have access to high quality production facilities. We also believe that we are able to reduce future capital expenditure needs by having fewer overall pressrooms and buildings. We believe our superior production quality is critical to maintaining and enhancing our position as the leading provider of local news coverage in the markets we serve.

The distribution of our daily newspapers is typically outsourced to independent, locally based, third-party distributors that also distribute a majority of our weekly newspapers and non-newspaper publications. We continuously evaluate lower cost options for newspaper delivery. In addition, certain of our shopper and weekly publications are delivered via the U.S. Postal Service.

Newsprint

We are a member of a consortium which enables our local publishers to obtain favorable pricing when investing in newsprint by going to local mills at reduced rates negotiated by the consortium. As a result, we have generally been able to purchase newsprint at a price of $10 to $12 per metric ton below the market price. In addition we have an agreement with a newsprint vendor to supply certain of our properties with all their newsprint requirements at a fixed price. We generally maintain a 45 to 55 day inventory of newsprint. Newsprint is a readily available commodity.

Historically, the market price of newsprint has been volatile, reaching a high of approximately $823 per metric ton in 2008 and a low of $410 per metric ton in 2002. The average market price of newsprint during 2012 was approximately $667 per metric ton.

In 2012 we consumed approximately 41,400 metric tons of newsprint (inclusive of commercial printing) and the cost of our newsprint consumption totaled approximately $27.7 million. Our newsprint expense typically averages less than 10% of total revenue, which we believe generally compares favorably to larger, metropolitan newspapers.

For our 2011and 2012 purchases of newsprint we negotiated a fixed price for approximately 75% of our newsprint tons which allowed us to eliminate some of the volatility of the market price.

Competition

Each of our publications competes for advertising revenue to varying degrees with traditional media outlets such as direct mail, yellow pages, radio, outdoor advertising, broadcast and cable television, magazines, local, regional and national newspapers, shoppers and other print and online media sources, including local blogs. We also increasingly compete with new digital and social media companies for advertising revenue. However, we believe that barriers to entry remain high in many of the markets we serve in terms of being the preeminent source for local news and information therein, because our markets are generally not large enough to support a

 

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second newspaper and because our local news gathering infrastructures, sales networks and relationships would be time consuming and costly to replicate. We also have highly recognized local brand names and long histories in the towns we serve.

We also provide our readers with community-specific content, which is generally not available from other media sources. We believe that our direct and focused coverage of the market and our cost effective advertising rates relative to more broadly circulated metropolitan newspapers allow us to tailor an approach for our advertisers. As a result, our publications generally capture a large share of local advertising in the markets they serve.

The level of competition and the primary competitors we face vary from market to market. Competition tends to be based on market penetration, demographic and quality factors, as opposed to price factors. The competitive environment in each of our operating regions is discussed in greater detail below.

Small Community Newspaper Group. The Small Community Newspaper Group operates in 165 markets and we believe our publications are the dominant print advertising media in the vast majority of these markets. There are radio stations in or within 20 miles of every market in which we operate, but we do not believe that any of these radio station operators pose a significant competitive threat to our publications. Yellow page advertising is prevalent in all of our markets with either a local phone book or a regional phone book. We believe that, in most cases, yellow page advertising is geared more towards the professional services advertisers such as attorneys and doctors and not the local retail advertisers, as is the focus with our non-directory publications. Lee Enterprises has the Southern Illinoisan that is located in Carbondale. This is a regional newspaper that competes with our dailies in Marion, Benton, West Frankfort and DuQuoin. In all four of these cases, we believe our publications are the dominant local daily, but do compete on a regional basis with the larger dailies. We also compete with shoppers or weekly newspapers. This competition comes from small independent operators and is not significant. We have very little television competition in this group because of our geographic location in relation to major markets. There are no local television affiliates in our markets.

In the southern regions of this group we believe our publications are generally the dominant media in those markets. Our major competition comes from regional daily newspapers, specifically: The Advocate in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; The American Press in Lake Charles, Louisiana; The Joplin Globe; and the Wichita Eagle. We also face competition from numerous other daily and weekly papers, local radio stations, shopping guides, directories and niche publications.

In the Northeast market we believe our publications are generally the dominant media. The competition we face in this region are from major newspaper companies: daily newspapers owned by Gannett Company, Inc. (The Star-Gazette in Elmira, NY and the Chambersburg (PA) Public-Opinion); Times-Shamrock Company’s Scranton (PA) The Times-Tribune and Towanda Daily/Sunday Review; Community Newspaper Holdings, Inc.’s (“CNHI”) Sunbury Daily Item; and Ogden-Nutting’s Williamsport Sun-Gazette. We believe our publications tend to be the dominant local publication in those markets.

In our Great Lakes markets we believe our publications are generally the dominant media in those markets. Our only significant competition comes from regional television stations in Adrian, Michigan. We also face competition from dozens of other competitors such as other local daily and weekly papers and niche publications, as well as radio and television stations, directories, direct mail and non-local internet websites, but none of these have proven to be significant.

Metro Newspaper Group. In the Metro Newspaper Group, the Boston Globe and boston.com, a metropolitan daily and website, respectively, owned by the New York Times Company, compete with us throughout eastern Massachusetts. In addition, we compete in Massachusetts with more than 30 other weekly or daily newspaper companies (that publish a combined total of approximately 16 dailies and 50 weeklies), three major radio station operators, five local network television broadcasters, one cable company and numerous niche publications for advertising revenues. We believe that our publications generally deliver the highest household coverage in their respective markets.

 

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Large Daily Newspaper Group. In our Large Daily Newspaper Group we believe our publications are generally the dominant media in those markets. Daily newspapers owned by Gannett Company, Inc. (Daily Sentinel in Rome, NY and The Dispatch in Oneida, NY) compete with in the New York market. We also face competition from other major newspaper companies in other regional markets such as Newhouse Newspaper’s Syracuse Post-Standard. Our competitors also include numerous other daily and weekly newspapers, local radio stations, shopping guides, directories and niche publications. We believe our publications, many of which have an extensive history in the market, tend to be the dominant local publication.

Management and Employees

The 14 members of our executive management team have an average of 17 years of industry experience and a long history of identifying, acquiring and improving the operations of acquired publications. Our executive management team has managed community newspapers in various economic cycles. We also have a seasoned team of managers at the local level, where our 40 publishers have an average of approximately 28 years of industry experience.

As of December 30, 2012, we had approximately 4,131 full time equivalent employees, consisting of hourly and salaried employees. We employ union personnel at a number of our core publications representing approximately 612 full-time equivalent employees. As of December 30, 2012 there were 23 collective bargaining agreements covering union personnel. Three of these agreements, representing employees in Massachusetts, Ohio and Illinois, expire in 2013. We believe that relations with our employees are generally good and we have had no work stoppages at any of our publications.

Environmental Matters

We believe that we are substantially in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations for the protection of the environment and the health and safety of our employees based upon existing facts presently known to us. Compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations relating to the discharge of substances into the environment, the disposal of hazardous wastes and other related activities has had, and will continue to have, an impact on our operations, but has, since our incorporation in 1997, been accomplished without having a material adverse effect on our operations. While it is difficult to estimate the timing and ultimate costs to be incurred due to uncertainties about the status of laws, regulations and technology, based on information currently known to us and insurance procured with respect to certain environmental matters, we do not expect environmental costs or contingencies to be material or to have a material adverse effect on our financial performance. Our operations involve risks in these areas, however, and we cannot assure you that we will not incur material costs or liabilities in the future which could adversely affect us.

Corporate Governance and Public Information

The address of our website is www.gatehousemedia.com. Stockholders can access a wide variety of information on our website, including news releases, Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) filings, information we are required to post online pursuant to applicable SEC rules, newspaper profiles and online links. We make available via our website, all filings we make under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K, and related amendments, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. All such filings are available free of charge. Neither the content of our corporate website nor any other website referred to in this report are incorporated by reference into this report unless expressly noted. The public may read and copy any information we file with the SEC at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the public reference room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains a website (http://www.sec.gov) where our filings filed with the SEC are available free of charge.

 

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List of Our Dailies, Weeklies, Shoppers, Websites and Directories

Our dailies, weeklies, shoppers, websites and directories are listed below. We maintain registered trademarks in many of the masthead names listed below. Maintaining such trademarks allows us to exclusively use the masthead name to the exclusion of third parties.

 

 

Small Community Newspaper Group

 

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

Illinois    Benton   

Benton Evening News

www.bentoneveningnews.com

   Daily
   Canton   

Daily Ledger

www.cantondailyledger.com

   Daily
   Carmi   

The Carmi Times

www.carmitimes.com

   Daily
   Du Quoin   

Du Quoin Evening Call

www.duquoin.com

   Daily
   El Dorado    El Dorado Daily Journal    Daily
   Galesburg   

The Register-Mail

www.galesburg.com

   Daily
   Harrisburg   

Harrisburg Daily Register

www.dailyregister.com

   Daily
   Kewanee   

Star-Courier

www.starcourier.com

   Daily
   Macomb   

McDonough County Voice

www.mcdonoughvoice.com

   Daily
   Marion   

The Daily Republican

www.dailyrepublicannews.com

   Daily
   Monmouth   

Daily Review Atlas

www.reviewatlas.com

   Daily
   Olney   

The Olney Daily Mail

www.olneydailymail.com

   Daily
   Pekin   

Pekin Daily Times

www.pekintimes.com

   Daily
   Pontiac   

Daily Leader

www.pontiacdailyleader.com

   Daily
   West Frankfort   

Daily American

www.dailyamericannews.com

   Daily
   Abingdon   

Abingdon Argus-Sentinel

www.eaglepublications.com

   Paid Weekly
   Aledo   

The Times Record

www.aledotimesrecord.com

   Paid Weekly
   Augusta   

Augusta Eagle-Scribe

www.eaglepublicatons.com

   Paid Weekly
   Cambridge   

Cambridge Chronicle

www.cambridgechron.com

   Paid Weekly
   Carmi    The Weekly Times    Paid Weekly
   Chester   

Randolph County Herald Tribune

www.randolphcountyheraldtribune.com

   Paid Weekly
   Christopher    The Progress    Paid Weekly
   Downers Grove    Pro-Football Weekly    Paid Weekly

 

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State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Du Quoin    Du Quoin News    Paid Weekly
   Du Quoin    Ashley News    Paid Weekly
   Fairbury    The Blade    Paid Weekly
   Flora   

Clay County Advocate Press

www.advocatepress.com

   Paid Weekly
   Galva   

Galva News

www.galvanews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Geneseo   

The Geneseo Republic

www.geneseorepublic.com

   Paid Weekly
   Murphysboro   

Murphysboro American

www.murphysboroamerican.com

   Paid Weekly
   Newton   

Newton Press Mentor

www.pressmentor.com

   Paid Weekly
   Oquawka    Oquawka Current    Paid Weekly
   Orion   

Orion Gazette

www.oriongazette.com

   Paid Weekly
   Roseville   

Roseville Independent

www.eaglepublications.com

   Paid Weekly
   Shawneetown    Ridgway News    Paid Weekly
   Shawneetown    Gallatin Democrat    Paid Weekly
   Steelville    The Steelville Ledger    Paid Weekly
   Teutopolis   

Teutopolis Press-Deiterich Gazette

www.teutopolispress.com

   Paid Weekly
   West Frankfort   

SI Trader

www.sitraders.com

   Paid Weekly
   Chillicothe   

Chillicothe Times Bulletin

www.chillicothetimesbulletin.com

   Free Weekly
   East Peoria   

East Peoria Times-Courier

www.eastpeoriatimescourier.com

   Free Weekly
   Galesburg   

Knox County Neighbors

www.galesburg.com

   Free Weekly
   Macomb    Daily Brief    Free Weekly
   Metamora   

Woodford Times

www.woodfordtimes.com

   Free Weekly
   Morton   

Morton Times News

www.mortontimesnews.com

   Free Weekly
   Washington   

Washington Times Reporter

www.washingtontimesreporter.com

   Free Weekly
   Aledo    Town Crier Advertiser    Shopper
   Canton    Fulton County Shopper    Shopper
   Carmi    White County Shopper News    Shopper
   Flora    CCAP Special    Shopper
   Galatia   

Money Stretcher

www.galatiamoneystretcher.com

   Shopper
   Geneseo    Henry County Advertizer/Shopper    Shopper
   Macomb    McDonough County Choice    Shopper
   Marion    This Week in Williamson County    Shopper
   Monmouth    Pennysaver    Shopper
   Olney    Richland County Shopper    Shopper
   Olney    Jasper County News Eagle    Shopper

 

17


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Pontiac    Livingston Shopping News    Shopper
   West Frankfort    Free Press    Shopper
Missouri    Camdenton   

Lake Sun Leader

www.lakenewsonline.com

   Daily
   Carthage   

The Carthage Press

www.carthagepress.com

   Daily
   Chillicothe   

Constitution Tribune

www.chillicothenews.com

   Daily
   Hannibal   

Hannibal Courier Post

www.hannibal.net

   Daily
   Independence   

The Examiner

www.examiner.net

   Daily
   Kirksville   

Kirksville Daily Express & News

www.kirksvilledailyexpress.com

   Daily
   Macon   

Chronicle Herald

www.maconch.com

   Daily
   Maryville   

Maryville Daily Forum

www.maryvilledailyforum.com

   Daily
   Mexico   

The Mexico Ledger

www.mexicoledger.com

   Daily
   Moberly   

Moberly Monitor Index

www.moberlymonitor.com

   Daily
   Neosho   

Neosho Daily News

www.neoshodailynews.com

   Daily
   Rolla   

Rolla Daily News

www.therolladailynews.com

   Daily
   Waynesville   

The Daily Guide

www.waynesvilledailyguide.com

   Daily
   Aurora   

Aurora Advertiser

www.auroraadvertiser.net

   Paid Weekly
   Boonville   

Boonville Daily News

www.boonvilledailynews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Brookfield   

The Linn County Leader

www.linncountyleader.com

   Paid Weekly
   Greenfield   

The Vedette

www.greenfieldvedette.com

   Paid Weekly
   St James   

St James Leader Journal

www.leaderjournal.com

   Paid Weekly
   Boonville    Weekly    Free Weekly
   Camdenton   

West Side Star

www.lakenewsonline.com

   Free Weekly
   Carthage    The Carthage Press Wednesday TMC    Free Weekly
   Hannibal    Salt River Journal    Free Weekly
   Neosho    The Neighborhood Showcase    Free Weekly
   Osage Beach    Lake Area News Focus    Free Weekly
   Osage Beach    Lake of the Ozarks Real Estate    Free Weekly
   Osage Beach    Tube Tab    Free Weekly
   Osage Beach    Vacation News    Free Weekly
   Rolla    Rolla Daily News “Plus”    Free Weekly
   Aurora    Big AA Shopper    Shopper
   Brookfield    Sho-Me Shopper    Shopper

 

18


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Camdenton    Penny Saver    Shopper
   Chillicothe    Chillicothe C-T Shopper    Shopper
   Greenfield    Lake Stockton Shopper    Shopper
   Joplin    Big Nickel    Shopper
   Kirksville    Nemo Trader    Shopper
   Kirksville    Kirksville Crier    Shopper
   Macon   

Macon Journal

www.maconch.com

   Shopper
   Moberly    The Shopper    Shopper
   Osage Beach    Lake of the Ozarks Boats    Shopper
   Waynesville    Pulaski County Weekly    Shopper
Kansas    Dodge City   

Dodge City Daily Globe

www.dodgeglobe.com

   Daily
   Leavenworth   

The Leavenworth Times

www.leavenworthtimes.com

   Daily
   McPherson   

McPherson Sentinel

www.mcphersonsentinel.com

   Daily
   Newton   

The Newton Kansan

www.thekansan.com

   Daily
   Pittsburg   

The Morning Sun

www.morningsun.net

   Daily
   Andover   

Andover America

www.andoveramerican.com

   Paid Weekly
   Augusta   

Augusta Daily Gazette

www.augustagazette.com

   Paid Weekly
   El Dorado   

The El Dorado Times

www.eldoradotimes.com

   Paid Weekly
   Greensburg   

Kiowa County Signal

www.kiowacountysignal.com

   Paid Weekly
   Pratt   

The Pratt Tribune

www.pratttribune.com

   Paid Weekly
   St John   

St John News

www.sjnewsonline.com

   Paid Weekly
   Wellington   

Wellington Daily News

www.wellingtondailynews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Dodge City    La Estrella    Free Weekly
   Leavenworth    Lansing This Week    Free Weekly
   Leavenworth   

The Fort Leavenworth Lamp

www.ftleavenworthlamp.com

   Free Weekly
   Dodge City    Shoppers Weekly    Shopper
   El Dorado    Shoppers Guide    Shopper
   Hiawatha    Penny Press 4    Shopper
   Leavenworth    Chronicle Shopper    Shopper
   McPherson/Newton    South Central Kansas Shoppers Guide    Shopper
   Pittsburg    The Sunland Shopper    Shopper
   Pratt    Sunflower Shopper    Shopper
Michigan    Adrian   

The Daily Telegram

www.lenconnect.com

   Daily
   Cheboygan   

Cheboygan Daily Tribune

www.cheboygannews.com www.mackinacjournal.com

   Daily

 

19


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Coldwater   

The Daily Reporter

www.thedailyreporter.com

   Daily
   Hillsdale   

Hillsdale Daily News

www.hillsdale.net

   Daily
   Holland   

The Holland Sentinel

www.hollandsentinel.com

   Daily
   Ionia   

Sentinel-Standard

www.sentinel-standard.com

   Daily
   Sault Ste Marie   

The Evening News

www.sooeveningnews.com

   Daily
   Sturgis   

Sturgis Journal

www.sturgisjournal.com

   Daily
   Coldwater   

Bronson Journal

www.thebronsonjournal.com

   Paid Weekly
   Coldwater    Jonesville Independent    Paid Weekly
   Adrian   

Adrian Access Shopper

www.accessshoppersguide.com

   Shopper
   Allegan   

Flashes Shopping Guide (Allegan/Lakeshore)

www.flashespublishers.com

   Shopper
   Cheboygan    Shopper Fair    Shopper
   Coldwater    The Reporter Extra    Shopper
   Coldwater    Coldwater Shoppers Guide    Shopper
   Hillsdale   

Tip Off Shopping Guide

www.tipoffonline.com

   Shopper
   Holland   

Flashes Shopping Guide (Holland/Zeeland)

www.flashespublishers.com

   Shopper
   Ionia    Sentinel-Standard TMC    Shopper
   Sault Ste Marie    Tri County Buyers Guide    Shopper
   Sturgis    Sturgis Gateway Shopper    Shopper
California    Ridgecrest   

The Daily Independent

www.ridgecrestca.com

   Daily
   Yreka   

Siskiyou Daily News

www.siskiyoudaily.com

   Daily
   Gridley   

Gridley Herald

www.gridleyherald.com

   Paid Weekly
   Mt Shasta   

Weed Press

www.mtshastanews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Mt Shasta   

Dunsmuir News

www.mtshastanews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Mt Shasta   

Mt Shasta Herald

www.mtshastanews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Taft   

Midway Driller

www.taftmidwaydriller.com

   Paid Weekly
   Gridley   

Gidley Shopping News

www.gridleyherald.com

   Shopper
   Mt Shasta    Spotlight    Shopper
   Mt Shasta    Super Saver Advertiser    Shopper
   Ridgecrest    Super Tuesday    Shopper
   Yreka   

Siskiyou Seen

www.siskiyoudaily.com

   Shopper

 

20


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

Minnesota    Crookston   

Crookston Daily Times

www.crookstontimes.com

   Daily
   Cottonwood    Tri-County News    Paid Weekly
   Granite Falls   

Granite Falls Advocate-Tribune

www.granitefallsnews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Montevideo   

Montevideo American News

www.montenews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Redwood Falls   

Redwood Gazette

www.redwoodfallsgazette.com

   Paid Weekly
   Sleepy Eye   

Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch

www.sleepyeyenews.com

   Paid Weekly
   St James   

St James Plaindealer

www.stjamesnews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Wabasso    The Wabasso Standard    Paid Weekly
   Halstad    The Valley Journal    Free Weekly
   Crookston    Crookston Valley Shopper    Shopper
   Halstad    The Shopper    Shopper
   Montevideo   

The Star Advisor

www.montenews.com

   Shopper
   Redwood Falls    Redwood Falls Livewire    Shopper
   Sleepy Eye    Brown County Reminder    Shopper
   St James    Town and Country Shopper    Shopper
Arkansas    Arkadelphia   

Daily Siftings Herald

www.siftingsherald.com

   Daily
   Hope   

Hope Star

www.hopestar.com

   Daily
   Stuttgart   

Stuttgart Daily Leader

www.stuttgartdailyleader.com

   Daily
   Gurdon   

Gurdon Times

www.thegurdontimes.com

   Paid Weekly
   Heber Springs   

The Sun Times

www.thesuntimes.com

   Paid Weekly
   Helena   

The Daily World

www.helena-arkansas.com

   Paid Weekly
   Hope   

Nevada County Picayune

www.picayune-times.com

   Paid Weekly
   Newport   

Newport Independent

www.newportindependent.com

   Paid Weekly
   White Hall   

The White Hall Journal

www.whitehalljournal.com

   Paid Weekly
   Arkadelphia   

Arkadelphia Extra

www.siftingsherald.com

   Free Weekly
   Helena   

Daily World TMC

www.helena-arkansas.com

   Free Weekly
   Hope   

Star Extra

www.hopestar.com

   Free Weekly
   Stuttgart   

The Xtra

www.stuttgartdailyleader.com

   Free Weekly
   White Hall    The Arsenel Sentinel    Free Weekly

 

21


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

New York    Corning   

The Leader

www.the-leader.com

   Daily
   Hornell   

Evening Tribune

www.eveningtribune.com

   Daily
   Wellsville   

Wellsville Daily Reporter

www.wellsvilledaily.com

   Daily
   Dansville   

Genesee Country Express

www.dansvilleonline.com

   Paid Weekly
   Penn Yan   

The Chronicle-Express

www.chronicle-express.com

   Paid Weekly
   Saugerties   

Saugerties Post Star

www.poststarnews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Bath   

Steuben Courier-Advocate

www.steubencourier.com

   Free Weekly
   Corning    Corning Pennysaver    Shopper
   Hornell    Pennysaver Plus    Shopper
   Horseheads    The Shopper    Shopper
   Liberty    Catskill Shopper    Shopper
   Penn Yan    Chronicle Ad-Visor    Shopper
   Saugerties    Saugerties Pennysaver    Shopper
   Saugerties    Mountain Pennysaver    Shopper
Louisiana    Bastrop   

The Bastrop Daily Enterprise

www.bastropenterprise.com

   Daily
   DeRidder   

Beauregard Daily News

www.beauregarddailynews.net

   Paid Weekly
   Donaldsonville   

The Donaldsonville Chief

www.donaldsonvillechief.com

   Paid Weekly
   Gonzales   

Gonzales Weekly Citizen

www.weeklycitizen.com

   Paid Weekly
   Leesville   

Leesville Daily Leader

www.leesvilledailyleader.com

   Paid Weekly
   Plaquemine   

Post South

www.postsouth.com

   Paid Weekly
   Sulphur   

Southwest Daily News

www.sulphurdailynews.com

   Paid Weekly
   Sulphur    Vinton News    Paid Weekly
   Sterlington    North Quachita Weekly    Free Weekly
   Gonzales   

The Marketeer

www.weeklycitizen.com

   Shopper
   Gonzales   

Nickel Ads

www.weeklycitizen.com

   Shopper
   Plaquemine   

West Bank Shopper

www.postsouth.com

   Shopper
   Sulphur    Calcasieu Shopper    Shopper
Pennsylvania    Honesdale   

The Wayne Independent

www.wayneindependent.com

   Daily
   Waynesboro   

The Record Herald

www.therecordherald.com

   Daily
   Carbondale    The Villager    Paid Weekly
   Carbondale   

Carbondale News

www.thecarbondalenews.com

   Paid Weekly

 

22


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Greencastle   

The Echo Pilot

www.echo-pilot.com

   Paid Weekly
   Hawley   

News Eagle

www.neagle.com

   Paid Weekly
   Hawley    The Pike Pennysaver    Shopper
   Honesdale    The Independent Extra    Shopper
West Virginia    Keyser   

Mineral Daily News Tribune

www.newstribune.info

   Daily
   Ripley   

The Jackson Herald

www.jacksonnewspapers.com

   Paid Weekly
   Ripley   

The Jackson Star News

www.jacksonnewspapers.com

   Paid Weekly
   Keyser    Today’s Shopper    Shopper
   Ravenswood   

Star Herald Weekender

www.jacksonnewspapers.com

   Shopper
Colorado    LaJunta   

LaJunta Tribune Democrat

www.lajuntatribunedemocrat.com

   Daily
   LaJunta   

Ag Journal

www.agjournalonline.com

   Paid Weekly
   LaJunta   

Fowler Tribune

www.fowlertribune.com

   Paid Weekly
   Las Pimas   

Bent County Democrat

www.bcdemocratonline.com

   Paid Weekly
Nebraska    Nebraska City   

Nebraska City News Press

www.ncnewspress.com

   Paid Weekly
   Syracuse   

Syracuse Journal Democrat

www.journaldemocrat.com

   Paid Weekly
   Nebraska City    Penny Press 1    Shopper
   Syracuse    Penny Press 2    Shopper
Oklahoma    Ardmore   

The Daily Ardmoreite

www.ardmoreite.com

   Daily
   Shawnee   

The Shawnee News-Star

www.news-star.com

   Daily
   Ardmore    Entertainment Spotlight    Shopper
North Dakota    Devils Lake   

Devils Lake Daily Journal

www.devilslakejournal.com

   Daily
   Devils Lake    The Country Peddler    Shopper
Tennessee    Oak Ridge   

The Oak Ridger

www.oakridger.com

   Daily
Iowa    Hamburg   

Hamburg Reporter

www.hamburgreporter.com

   Paid Weekly

 

23


Table of Contents

 

Metro Newspaper Group

 

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

Massachusetts    Brockton   

The Enterprise

www.enterprisenews.com

   Daily
   Fall River   

The Herald News

www.heraldnews.com

   Daily
   Framingham   

The Metrowest Daily News

www.metrowestdailynews.com

   Daily
   Milford   

The Milford Daily News

www.milforddailynews.com

   Daily
   Quincy   

Patriot Ledger

www.patriotledger.com

   Daily
   Taunton   

Taunton Daily Gazette

www.tauntongazette.com

   Daily
   Abington   

Abington Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/abington

   Paid Weekly
   Acton/Roxborough   

The Beacon

www.wickedlocal.com/acton

   Paid Weekly
   Allston   

Allston/Brighton Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/allston

   Paid Weekly
   Amesbury   

Amesbury News

www.wickedlocal.com/amesbury

   Paid Weekly
   Arlington   

The Arlington Advocate

www.wickedlocal.com/arlington

   Paid Weekly
   Ashland   

Ashland Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/ashland

   Paid Weekly
   Bedford   

Bedford Minuteman

www.wickedlocal.com/bedford

   Paid Weekly
   Belmont   

Belmont Citizen-Herald

www.wickedlocal.com/belmont

   Paid Weekly
   Beverly   

Beverly Citizen

www.wickedlocal.com/beverly

   Paid Weekly
   Billerica   

Billerica Minuteman

www.wickedlocal.com/billerica

   Paid Weekly
   Bolton   

The Bolton Common

www.wickedlocal.com/bolton

   Paid Weekly
   Boxford   

Tri-Town Transcript

www.wickedlocal.com/boxford

   Paid Weekly
   Braintree   

Braintree Forum

www.wickedlocal.com/braintree

   Paid Weekly
   Brewster   

The Cape Codder

www.wickedlocal.com/capecod

   Paid Weekly
   Burlington   

Burlington Union

www.wickedlocal.com/burlington

   Paid Weekly
   Cambridge   

Cambridge Chronicle & Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/cambridge

   Paid Weekly
   Canton   

Canton Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/canton

   Paid Weekly
   Carver   

Carver Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/carver

   Paid Weekly

 

24


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Chelmsford   

Chelmsford Independent

www.wickedlocal.com/chelmsford

   Paid Weekly
   Clinton   

The Lancaster Times & Clinton Courier

www.wickedlocal.com/clinton

   Paid Weekly
   Cohasset   

Cohasset Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/cohasset

   Paid Weekly
   Concord   

The Concord Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/concord

   Paid Weekly
   Danvers   

Danvers Herald

www.wickedlocal.com/danvers

   Paid Weekly
   Dedham   

Dedham Transcript

www.wickedlocal.com/dedham

   Paid Weekly
   Dover   

Dover/Sherborn Press

www.wickedlocal.com/dover

   Paid Weekly
   Easton   

Easton Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/easton

   Paid Weekly
   Framingham   

Westwood Press

www.wickedlocal.com/westwood

   Paid Weekly
   Georgetown   

Georgetown Record

www.wickedlocal.com/georgetown

   Paid Weekly
   Halifax   

Halifax/Plympton Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/halifax

   Paid Weekly
   Hamilton   

Hamilton-Wenham Chronicle

www.wickedlocal.com/hamilton

   Paid Weekly
   Hanover   

Hanover Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/hanover

   Paid Weekly
   Harvard   

Harvard Post

www.wickedlocal.com/harvard

   Paid Weekly
   Harwich   

Harwich Oracle

www.wickedlocal.com/harwich

   Paid Weekly
   Hingham   

The Hingham Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/hingham

   Paid Weekly
   Holbrook   

Holbrook Sun

www.wickedlocal.com/holbrook

   Paid Weekly
   Holliston   

Holliston Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/holliston

   Paid Weekly
   Hopkinton   

Hopkinton Crier

www.wickedlocal.com/hopkinton

   Paid Weekly
   Hudson   

Hudson Sun

www.wickedlocal.com/hudson

   Paid Weekly
   Hyannis   

The Register

www.wickedlocal.com/barnstable

   Paid Weekly
   Ipswich   

Ipswich Chronicle

www.wickedlocal.com/ipswich

   Paid Weekly
   Kingston   

Kingston Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/kingston

   Paid Weekly
   Lexington   

Lexington Minuteman

www.wickedlocal.com/lexington

   Paid Weekly
   Lincoln   

Lincoln Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/lincoln

   Paid Weekly

 

25


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Littleton   

Littleton Independent

www.wickedlocal.com/littleton

   Paid Weekly
   Malden   

Malden Observer

www.wickedlocal.com/malden

   Paid Weekly
   Mansfield   

Mansfield News

www.wickedlocal.com/mansfield

   Paid Weekly
   Marblehead   

Marblehead Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/marblehead

   Paid Weekly
   Marion   

The Sentinel

www.wickedlocal.com/marion

   Paid Weekly
   Marlborough   

Marlborough Enterprise

www.wickedlocal.com/marlborough

   Paid Weekly
   Marshfield   

Marshfield Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/marshfield

   Paid Weekly
   Maynard/Stow   

The Beacon-Villager

www.wickedlocal.com/maynard

   Paid Weekly
   Medfield   

Medfield Press

www.wickedlocal.com/medfield

   Paid Weekly
   Medford   

Medford Transcript

www.wickedlocal.com/medford

   Paid Weekly
   Melrose   

Melrose Free Press

www.wickedlocal.com/melrose

   Paid Weekly
   Natick   

Natick Bulletin & Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/natick

   Paid Weekly
   North Andover   

North Andover Citizen

www.wickedlocal.com/northandover

   Paid Weekly
   Northborough/Southborough   

The Northborough/Southborough Villager

www.wickedlocal.com/northborough

   Paid Weekly
   Norton   

Norton Mirror

www.wickedlocal.com/norton

   Paid Weekly
   Norwell   

Norwell Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/norwell

   Paid Weekly
   Norwood   

Norwood Transcript & Bulletin

www.wickedlocal.com/norwood

   Paid Weekly
   Pembroke   

Pembroke Mariner & Express

www.wickedlocal.com/pembroke

   Paid Weekly
   Plymouth   

Old Colony Memorial

www.wickedlocal.com/plymouth

   Paid Weekly
   Provincetown   

The Provincetown Banner

www.wikedlocal.com/provincetown

   Paid Weekly
   Reading   

The Reading Advocate

www.wickedlocal.com/reading

   Paid Weekly
   Rockland   

Rockland Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/rockland

   Paid Weekly
   Roslindale   

Roslindale Transcript

www.wickedlocal.com/roslindale

   Paid Weekly
   Saugus   

Saugus Advertiser

www.wickedlocal.com/saugus

   Paid Weekly
   Scituate   

Scituate Mariner

www.wickedlocal.com/scituate

   Paid Weekly

 

26


Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Sharon   

Sharon Advocate

www.wickedlocal.com/sharon

   Paid Weekly
   Shrewsbury   

Shrewsbury Chronicle

www.wickedlocal.com/shrewsbury

   Paid Weekly
   Somerville   

Somerville Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/somerville

   Paid Weekly
   Stoughton   

Stoughton Journal

www.wickedlocal.com/stoughton

   Paid Weekly
   Sudbury   

The Sudbury Town Crier

www.wickedlocal.com/sudbury

   Paid Weekly
   Swampscott   

Swampscott Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/swampscott

   Paid Weekly
   Tewksbury   

Tewksbury Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/tewksbury

   Paid Weekly
   Wakefield   

Wakefield Observer

www.wickedlocal.com/wakefield

   Paid Weekly
   Walpole   

The Walpole Times

www.wickedlocal.com/walpole

   Paid Weekly
   Waltham   

Waltham News Tribune

www.wickedlocal.com/waltham

   Paid Weekly
   Wareham   

Wareham Courier

www.wickedlocal.com/wareham

   Paid Weekly
   Watertown   

Watertown Tab & Press

www.wickedlocal.com/watertown

   Paid Weekly
   Wayland   

The Wayland Town Crier

www.wickedlocal.com/wayland

   Paid Weekly
   Wellesley   

The Wellesley Townsman

www.wickedlocal.com/wellesley

   Paid Weekly
   West Roxbury   

West Roxbury Transcript

www.wickedlocal.com/west-roxbury

   Paid Weekly
   Westborough   

Westborough News

www.wickedlocal.com/westborough

   Paid Weekly
   Westford   

Westford Eagle

www.wickedlocal.com/westford

   Paid Weekly
   Weston   

The Weston Town Crier

www.wickedlocal.com/weston

   Paid Weekly
   Weymouth   

Weymouth News

www.wickedlocal.com/weymouth

   Paid Weekly
   Winchester   

The Winchester Star

www.wickedlocal.com/winchester

   Paid Weekly
   Bellingham   

County Gazette

www.wickedlocal.com/franklin

   Free Weekly
   Boston   

Boston Homes

www.linkbostonhomes.com

   Free Weekly
   Bourne   

Bourne Courier

www.wickedlocal.com/bourne

   Free Weekly
   Bridgewater   

Bridgewater Independent

www.wickedlocal.com/bridgewater

   Free Weekly
   Brookline   

Brookline Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/brookline

   Free Weekly
   Danvers    North Shore Sunday    Free Weekly

 

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Table of Contents

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Duxbury   

Duxbury Reporter

www.wickedlocal.com/duxbury

   Free Weekly
   Fall River   

OJornal

www.ojournal.com

   Free Weekly
   Falmouth   

Falmouth Bulletin

www.wickedlocal.com/falmouth

   Free Weekly
   Framingham   

Framingham Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/framingham

   Free Weekly
   Gloucester    Cape Ann Beacon    Free Weekly
   Needham   

Needham Times

www.wickedlocal.com/needham

   Free Weekly
   Newburyport   

The Newburyport Current

www.wickedlocal.com/newburyport

   Free Weekly
   Newton   

Newton Tab

www.wickedlocal.com/newton

   Free Weekly
   North Attleborough   

The North Attleborough Free Press

www.wickedlocal.com/northattleborough

   Free Weekly
   Randolph   

Randolph Herald

www.wickedlocal.com/randolph

   Free Weekly
   Raynham   

Raynham Call

www.wickedlocal.com/raynham

   Free Weekly
   Salem   

Salem Gazette

www.wickedlocal.com/salem

   Free Weekly
   Sandwich    Sandwich Broadsider    Free Weekly
   Stoneham   

Stoneham Sun

www.wickedlocal.com/stoneham

   Free Weekly
   Wilmington   

Wilmington Advocate

www.wickedlocal.com/wilmington

   Free Weekly
   Woburn   

Woburn Advocate

www.wickedlocal.com/woburn

   Free Weekly
   Fall River    South Coast Life    Shopper
   Taunton    Yellow Jacket    Shopper
   Avon    www.wickedlocal.com/avon    On-line Only
   Bellingham    www.wickedlocal.com/bellingham    On-line Only
   Berkley    www.wickedlocal.com/berkley    On-line Only
   Boxborough    www.wickedlocal.com/boxborough    On-line Only
   Brewster    www.wickedlocal.com/brewster    On-line Only
   Brockton    www.wickedlocal.com/brockton    On-line Only
   Chatham    www.wickedlocal.com/chatham    On-line Only
   Dennis    www.wickedlocal.com/dennis    On-line Only
   Dighton    www.wickedlocal.com/dighton    On-line Only
   East Bridgewater    www.wickedlocal.com/bridgewatereast    On-line Only
   Eastham    www.wickedlocal.com/eastham    On-line Only
   Essex    www.wickedlocal.com/essex    On-line Only
   Fall River    www.wickedlocal.com/fall-river    On-line Only
   Foxborough    www.wickedlocal.com/foxborough    On-line Only
   Gloucester    www.wickedlocal.com/gloucester    On-line Only
   Hanson    www.wickedlocal.com/hanson    On-line Only
   Hopedale    www.wickedlocal.com/hopedale    On-line Only
   Hull    www.wickedlocal.com/hull    On-line Only
   Lakeville    www.wickedlocal.com/lakeville    On-line Only

 

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State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Lancaster    www.wickedlocal.com/lancaster    On-line Only
   Manchester    www.wickedlocal.com/manchester    On-line Only
   Mashpee    www.wickedlocal.com/mashpee    On-line Only
   Mattapoisett    www.wickedlocal.com/mattapoisett    On-line Only
   Medway    www.wickedlocal.com/medway    On-line Only
   Mendon    www.wickedlocal.com/mendon    On-line Only
   Middleborough    www.wickedlocal.com/middleborough    On-line Only
   Middleton    www.wickedlocal.com/middleton    On-line Only
   Milford    www.wickedlocal.com/milford    On-line Only
   Millis    www.wickedlocal.com/millis    On-line Only
   Milton    www.wickedlocal.com/milton    On-line Only
   Nantucket    www.wickedlocal.com/nantucket    On-line Only
   Norfolk    www.wickedlocal.com/norfolk    On-line Only
   North Boston    www.wickedlocal.com/northofboston    On-line Only
   Orleans    www.wickedlocal.com/orleans    On-line Only
   Plainville    www.wickedlocal.com/plainville    On-line Only
   Plympton    www.wickedlocal.com/plympton    On-line Only
   Quincy    www.wickedlocal.com/quincy    On-line Only
   Rehoboth    www.wickedlocal.com/rehoboth    On-line Only
   Rochester    www.wickedlocal.com/rochester    On-line Only
   Rockport    www.wickedlocal.com/rockport    On-line Only
   Sandwich    www.wickedlocal.com/sandwich    On-line Only
   Sherborn    www.wickedlocal.com/sherborn    On-line Only
   Somerset    www.wickedlocal.com/somerset    On-line Only
   Southborough    www.wickedlocal.com/southborough    On-line Only
   Stow    www.wickedlocal.com/stow    On-line Only
   Swansea    www.wickedlocal.com/swansea    On-line Only
   Taunton    www.wickedlocal.com/taunton    On-line Only
   Topsfield    www.wickedlocal.com/topsfield    On-line Only
   Truro    www.wickedlocal.com/truro    On-line Only
   Upton    www.wickedlocal.com/upton    On-line Only
   Wellfleet    www.wickedlocal.com/wellfleet    On-line Only
   Wenham    www.wickedlocal.com/wenham    On-line Only
   West Bridgewater    www.wickedlocal.com/bridgewaterwest    On-line Only
   West Port    www.wickedlocal.com/westport    On-line Only
   Whitman    www.wickedlocal.com/whitman    On-line Only
   Wrentham    www.wickedlocal.com/wrentham    On-line Only
   Yarmouth    www.wickedlocal.com/yarmouth    On-line Only
New York    Canandaigua   

Daily Messenger

www.mpnnow.com

www.mpnnow.com/commercialprinting

   Daily
   Newark/Palmyra   

Wayne Post

www.waynepost.com

   Paid Weekly
   Brighton/Pittsford   

Brighton-Pittsford Post

www.brightonpittsfordpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Canandaigua    Canandaigua Community Post    Free Weekly
   Fairport   

Fairport-ER Post

www.fairport-erpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Gates/Chili   

Gates-Chili Post

www.gateschilipost.com

   Free Weekly

 

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State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

   Greece   

Greece Post

www.greecepost.com

   Free Weekly
   Henrietta   

Henrietta Post

www.henriettapost.com

   Free Weekly
   Irondequoit   

Irondequoit Post

www.irondequiotpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Penfield   

Penfield Post

www.penfieldpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Victor   

Victor Post

www.victorpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Webster   

Webster Post

www.websterpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Lyons    Lyons Shopping Guide    Shopper
   Newark    Newark Pennysaver    Shopper
   Sodus    Sodus Pennysaver    Shopper
   Wayne County    Timesaver    Shopper
Delaware    Dover   

Smyrna/Clayton Sun Times

www.scsuntimes.com

   Paid Weekly
   Dover   

The Middletown Transcript

www.middletowntranscript.com

   Paid Weekly
   Dover   

The Sussex Countian

www.sussexcountian.com

   Paid Weekly
   Dover   

Dover Post

www.doverpost.com

   Free Weekly
   Dover   

Community Publication

www.communitypub.com

   Free Weekly
   Dover   

Milford Beacon

www.milfordbeacon.com

   Free Weekly
   Dover   

The Express

www.delmarvaexpress.com

   Shopper

 

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Large Daily Newspapers

 

State

  

City

  

Masthead

  

Circulation Type

Illinois    Freeport   

The Journal Standard

www.journalstandard.com

   Daily
   Lincoln   

The Courier

www.lincolncourier.com

   Daily
   Peoria   

Journal Star

www.pjstar.com

   Daily
   Rockford   

Rockford Register Star

www.rrstar.com

www.rockfordwoman.com

   Daily
   Springfield   

The State Journal-Register

www.sj-r.com

   Daily
   Freeport    The Scene    Shopper
   Lincoln    Logan County Shopper    Shopper
   Peoria    JS Shopper    Shopper
   Peoria    Pekin Extra    Shopper
   Rockford    The Weekly    Shopper
   Springfield    Springfield Advertiser    Shopper
   Springfield    Springfield Shopper    Shopper
New York    Herkimer   

The Evening Telegram

www.herkimertelegram.com

   Daily
   Little Falls   

The Evening Times

www.littlefallstimes.com

   Daily
   Utica   

Utica Observer-Dispatch

www.uticaod.com

   Daily
   Hamilton    Mid-York Weekly    Free Weekly
   Utica    The Pennysaver    Free Weekly
   Herkimer    Your Valley    Shopper
   Rome    Rome Pennysave    Shopper
Ohio    Canton   

The Repository

www.cantonrep.com

   Daily
   Dover/New Philadelphia   

The Times-Reporter

www.timesreporter.com

   Daily
   Massillon   

The Independent

www.indeonline.com

   Daily
   Green   

The Suburbanite

www.thesuburbanite.com

   Free Weekly
   Canton    Stark Values    Shopper
   Dover/New Philadelphia    TMC-ExTRa    Shopper
Connecticut    Norwich   

The Bulletin

www.norwichbulletin.com

   Daily
   Colchester   

Colchester Bulletin

www.norwichbulletin.com/mysource/colchesterbulletin

   Free Weekly
   Norwich    Bulletin Deals    Shopper

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our business and operations are subject to numerous risks. Such risks, to the extent material, are described below.

Risks Related to Our Business

We depend to a great extent on the economies and the demographics of the local communities that we serve and we are also susceptible to general economic downturns, like the one currently being experienced, which has had, and could continue to have, a material and adverse impact on our advertising and circulation revenues and on our profitability.

Our advertising revenues and, to a lesser extent, circulation revenues, depend upon a variety of factors specific to the communities that our publications serve. These factors include, among others, the size and demographic characteristics of the local population, local economic conditions in general and the economic condition of the retail segments of the communities that our publications serve. If the local economy, population or prevailing retail environment of a community we serve experiences a downturn, our publications, revenues and profitability in that market could be adversely affected. Our advertising revenues are also susceptible to negative trends in the general economy, like the one currently being experienced, that affect consumer spending. The advertisers in our newspapers and other publications and related websites are primarily retail businesses, which can be significantly affected by regional or national economic downturns and other developments. Continuing or deepening softness in the U.S. economy could also significantly affect key advertising revenue categories, such as help wanted, real estate and automotive.

Uncertainty and adverse changes in the general economic conditions of markets in which we participate may negatively affect our business.

Current and future conditions in the economy have an inherent degree of uncertainty. As a result, it is difficult to estimate the level of growth or contraction for the economy as a whole. It is even more difficult to estimate growth or contraction in various parts, sectors and regions of the economy, including the markets in which we participate. Adverse changes may occur as a result of soft global economic conditions, rising oil prices, wavering consumer confidence, unemployment, declines in stock markets, contraction of credit availability, declines in real estate values, or other factors affecting economic conditions in general. These changes may negatively affect the sales of our products, increase exposure to losses from bad debts, increase the cost and decrease the availability of financing, or increase costs associated with publishing and distributing our publications.

Our indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health and reduce the funds available to us for corporate purposes.

We have a significant amount of indebtedness. At December 30, 2012, we had total indebtedness of approximately $1.2 billion under our 2007 Credit Facility. Our interest expense for the year ended December 30, 2012 was $57.9 million.

Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health in the following ways:

 

   

a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations must be dedicated to the payment of interest on our outstanding indebtedness, thereby reducing the funds available to us for other purposes;

 

   

our flexibility to react to further deterioration in our industry and economic conditions generally may be limited because of the covenants and other restrictions in the 2007 Credit Facility and our inability to incur additional indebtedness;

 

   

our substantial degree of leverage could make us more vulnerable in the event of additional deterioration in general economic conditions or other adverse events in our business or the geographic

 

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markets that we serve because further reductions in our revenue may make it difficult for us to fulfill our obligation under the 2007 Credit Facility;

 

   

our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or general corporate purposes may be impaired, limiting our ability to maintain the value of our assets and operations; and

 

   

there would be a material and adverse effect on our business and financial condition if we are unable to continue to service our indebtedness (including any payments on maturity) or obtain additional financing, as needed.

In addition, our 2007 Credit Facility contains financial and other restrictive covenants, ratios and tests that limit our ability to incur additional debt and engage in other activities that we believe may be in our long-term best interests. Our ability to comply with the covenants, ratios or tests contained in our 2007 Credit Facility may be affected by events beyond our control, including prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. In addition, events of default, if not waived or cured, could result in the acceleration of the maturity of our indebtedness under our 2007 Credit Facility. If we are unable to repay those amounts, the lenders under our 2007 Credit Facility could proceed against the security granted to them to secure that indebtedness. If the lenders accelerate the payment of our indebtedness under our 2007 Credit Facility, our assets may not be sufficient to repay in full such indebtedness.

In addition, a portion of our 2007 Credit Facility is unhedged, which means we are subject to the risk of interest rate fluctuations on such portion of our long-term debt. If the interest rate on such portion of the 2007 Credit Facility increases, it may have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

We may not generate a sufficient amount of cash or generate sufficient funds from operations to fund our operations or repay our indebtedness at maturity or otherwise.

Our ability to make payments on our indebtedness as required depends on our ability to generate cash flow from operations in the future. This ability, to a certain extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.

There can be no assurance that our business will generate cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us in amounts sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. Currently we do not have the ability to draw upon our revolving credit facility which limits our immediate and short-term access to funds. If we are unable to repay our indebtedness at maturity we may be forced to liquidate or reorganize our operations and business under the federal bankruptcy laws.

The collectability of accounts receivable under current adverse economic conditions could deteriorate to a greater extent than provided for in our financial statements and in our projections of future results.

Adverse economic conditions in the United States have increased our exposure to losses resulting from financial distress, insolvency and the potential bankruptcy of our advertising customers. Our accounts receivable are stated at net estimated realizable value and our allowance for doubtful accounts has been determined based on several factors, including receivable agings, significant individual credit risk accounts and historical experience. If such collectability estimates prove inaccurate, adjustments to future operating results could occur.

Further declines in our credit ratings significantly impact our ability to obtain new financing to fund our operations and strategic initiatives or to refinance our existing debt at reasonable rates as it matures.

Our long-term debt is rated by Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service. We are currently rated below-investment grade by both rating agencies, and any future long-term borrowing or the extension of our short-term borrowing will reflect the negative impact of these ratings, increasing our borrowing costs, limiting

 

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our financing options and subjecting us to more restrictive covenants than our existing debt arrangements. Additional down grades in our credit ratings could further increase our borrowing costs, subject us to more onerous terms and reduce or eliminate our borrowing flexibility in the future. Such limitations on our financing options may affect our ability to refinance existing debt when it becomes due.

If there is a significant increase in the price of newsprint or a reduction in the availability of newsprint, our results of operations and financial condition may suffer.

The basic raw material for our publications is newsprint. We generally maintain only a 45 to 55-day inventory of newsprint, although our participation in a newsprint-buying consortium has helped ensure adequate supply. In addition we have an agreement with a newsprint vendor to supply certain of our properties, representing approximately 95% of our newsprint, with all their newsprint requirements for calendar year 2013 at a fixed price. An inability to obtain an adequate supply of newsprint at a favorable price or at all in the future could have a material adverse effect on our ability to produce our publications. Historically, the price of newsprint has been volatile, reaching a high of approximately $823 per metric ton in 2008 and dropping to a low of almost $410 per metric ton in 2002. The average price of newsprint for 2012 was approximately $667 per metric ton. Recent and future consolidation of major newsprint suppliers may adversely affect price competition among suppliers. Significant increases in newsprint costs for properties and periods not covered by our newsprint vendor agreement could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We compete with a large number of companies in the local media industry; if we are unable to compete effectively, our advertising and circulation revenues may decline.

Our business is concentrated in newspapers and other print publications located primarily in small and midsize markets in the United States. Our revenues primarily consist of advertising and paid circulation. Competition for advertising revenues and paid circulation comes from direct mail, directories, radio, television, outdoor advertising, other newspaper publications, the internet and other media. For example, as the use of the internet and mobile devices has increased, we have lost some classified advertising and subscribers to online advertising businesses and our free internet sites that contain abbreviated versions of our publications. Competition for advertising revenues is based largely upon advertiser results, advertising rates, readership, demographics and circulation levels. Competition for circulation is based largely upon the content of the publication and its price and editorial quality. Our local and regional competitors vary from market to market and many of our competitors for advertising revenues are larger and have greater financial and distribution resources than us. We may incur increased costs competing for advertising expenditures and paid circulation. We may also experience a decline of circulation or print advertising revenue due to alternative media, such as the internet. If we are not able to compete effectively for advertising expenditures and paid circulation, our revenues may decline.

We are undertaking a strategic re-alignment of our business that could have a material adverse financial impact if unsuccessful.

We are undertaking a strategic re-alignment of our business. Among other things we are implementing the standardization and centralization of systems and process, the outsourcing of certain financial processes and the use of new software for our circulation, advertising and editorial systems. As a result of ongoing strategic evaluation and analysis, we have made and will continue to make changes that, if unsuccessful, could have a material adverse financial impact.

We have invested in growing our digital business, but such investments may not be as successful as expected which could adversely affect our results of operations.

We continue to evaluate our business and how we intend to grow our digital business. Internal resources and effort are put towards this business and key partnerships have been entered into to assist with our digital business. There can be no assurances that the partnerships we have entered into or the internal strategy being employed will result in generating or increasing digital revenues.

 

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If we are unable to retain and grow our digital audience and advertiser base, our digital businesses will be adversely affected.

Given the ever-growing and rapidly changing number of digital media options available on the internet, we may not be able to increase our online traffic sufficiently and retain or grow a base of frequent visitors to our websites and applications on mobile devices.

Accordingly, we may not be able to create sufficient advertiser interest in our digital businesses and to maintain or increase the advertising rates of the inventory on our websites.

Technological developments and any changes we make to our business model may require significant capital investments. Due to restrictions in our 2007 Credit Facility, we are limited in our ability to invest funds and resources in digital opportunities and our ability to undertake research and development in building and maintain the necessary and continually evolving technology infrastructure.

Our business is subject to seasonal and other fluctuations, which affects our revenues and operating results.

Our business is subject to seasonal fluctuations that we expect to continue to be reflected in our operating results in future periods. Our first fiscal quarter of the year tends to be our weakest quarter because advertising volume is at its lowest levels following the December holiday season. Correspondingly, our second and fourth fiscal quarters tend to be our strongest because they include heavy holiday and seasonal advertising. Other factors that affect our quarterly revenues and operating results may be beyond our control, including changes in the pricing policies of our competitors, the hiring and retention of key personnel, wage and cost pressures, distribution costs, changes in newsprint prices and general economic factors.

We could be adversely affected by continued declining circulation.

Overall daily newspaper circulation, including national and urban newspapers, has declined in recent years. There can be no assurance that our circulation will not continue to decline in the future. We have been able to maintain our annual circulation revenue from existing operations in recent years through, among other things, increases in our per copy prices. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to increase prices to offset any declines in circulation. Further declines in circulation could impair our ability to maintain or increase our advertising prices, cause purchasers of advertising in our publications to reduce or discontinue those purchases and discourage potential new advertising customers, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

The increasing popularity of digital media could also adversely affect circulation of our newspapers, which may decrease circulation revenue and cause more marked declines in print advertising. If we are not successful in offsetting such declines in revenues from our print products, our business, financial condition and prospects will be adversely affected.

We have a history of losses and may not be able to achieve or maintain profitable operations in the future.

We experienced losses from continuing operations of approximately $28.7 million, $22.5 million and $27.4 million in 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Our results of operations in the future will depend on many factors, including our ability to execute our business strategy and realize efficiencies through our clustering strategy. Our failure to achieve profitability in the future could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock and our ability to raise additional capital and, accordingly, our ability to grow or maintain our business.

The value of our intangible assets may become impaired, depending upon future operating results.

As of December 30, 2012, goodwill and other intangible assets were approximately $232.7 million, or 49.5% of our total assets. To determine whether all or a portion of the carrying values of our goodwill and other intangible assets are no longer recoverable, which may require a charge to our earnings, we periodically evaluate

 

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such assets. During the first quarter of 2012, the Company reorganized its management structure to align with its publication types. The fair value of goodwill was allocated to each of the new reporting units: Small Community Newspapers, Large Daily Newspapers and Metro Newspapers. The Company determined that impairment indicators were present for the Metro Newspaper reporting unit, which had a goodwill balance of $0.2. As of April 1, 2012 the Company performed a Step 1 analysis for this reporting unit and determined that its carrying value exceeded fair value. As a result of the Step 2 analysis, the entire $0.2 of goodwill was impaired and this amount was subsequently reclassified to discontinued operations. The Company performed further analysis of this reporting unit’s intangible assets and determined that additional impairments were not present. A review of impairment indicators was performed for the Company’s other reporting units and it was determined that financial results and forecast had not changed materially since the June 26, 2011 impairment test and it was determined that indicators of impairment were not present.

We are subject to environmental and employee safety and health laws and regulations that could cause us to incur significant compliance expenditures and liabilities.

Our operations are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations pertaining to the environment, storage tanks and the management and disposal of wastes at our facilities. Under various environmental laws, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be liable for contamination resulting from the release or threatened release of hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum at that property. Such laws often impose liability on the owner or operator without regard to fault and the costs of any required investigation or cleanup can be substantial. Although in connection with certain of our acquisitions we have rights to indemnification for certain environmental liabilities, these rights may not be sufficient to reimburse us for all losses that we might incur if a property acquired by us has environmental contamination.

Our operations are also subject to various employee safety and health laws and regulations, including those pertaining to occupational injury and illness, employee exposure to hazardous materials and employee complaints. Environmental and employee safety and health laws tend to be complex, comprehensive and frequently changing. As a result, we may be involved from time to time in administrative and judicial proceedings and investigations related to environmental and employee safety and health issues. These proceedings and investigations could result in substantial costs to us, divert our management’s attention and adversely affect our ability to sell, lease or develop our real property. Furthermore, if it is determined that we are not in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, or if our properties are contaminated, it could result in significant liabilities, fines or the suspension or interruption of the operations of specific printing facilities.

Future events, such as changes in existing laws and regulations, new laws or regulations or the discovery of conditions not currently known to us, may give rise to additional compliance or remedial costs that could be material.

Sustained increases in costs of employee health and welfare benefits may reduce our profitability. Moreover, our pension plan obligations are currently unfunded, and we may have to make significant cash contributions to our plans, which could reduce the cash available for our business.

In recent years, we have experienced significant increases in the cost of employee medical benefits because of economic factors beyond our control, including increases in health care costs. At least some of these factors may continue to put upward pressure on the cost of providing medical benefits. Although we have actively sought to control increases in these costs, there can be no assurance that we will succeed in limiting cost increases, and continued upward pressure could reduce the profitability of our businesses.

Our pension and post retirement plans were underfunded (accumulated benefit obligation) by $15.5 million at December 30, 2012. Our pension plan invests in a variety of equity and debt securities, many of which were affected by the recent disruptions in the credit and capital markets in 2009 and 2010. Future volatility and disruption in the stock markets could cause further declines in the asset values of our pension plans. In addition, a

 

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decrease in the discount rate used to determine minimum funding requirements could result in increased future contributions. If either occurs, we may need to make additional pension contributions above what is currently estimated, which could reduce the cash available for our businesses.

We may not be able to protect intellectual property rights upon which our business relies and, if we lose intellectual property protection, our assets may lose value.

Our business depends on our intellectual property, including, but not limited to, our content and services, which we attempt to protect through patents, copyrights, trade laws and contractual restrictions, such as confidentiality agreements. We believe our proprietary and other intellectual property rights are important to our continued success and our competitive position.

Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized third parties may attempt to copy or otherwise obtain and use our content, services and other intellectual property, and we cannot be certain that the steps we have taken will prevent any misappropriation or confusion among consumers and merchants, or unauthorized use of these rights. If we are unable to procure, protect and enforce our intellectual property rights, we may not realize the full value of these assets, and our business may suffer. If we must litigate to enforce our intellectual property rights or determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of third parties, such litigation may be costly and divert the attention of our management from day-to-day operations.

We depend on key personnel and we may not be able to operate or grow our business effectively if we lose the services of any of our key personnel or are unable to attract qualified personnel in the future.

The success of our business is heavily dependent on our ability to retain our current management and other key personnel and to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future. Competition for senior management personnel is intense and we may not be able to retain our personnel. Although we have entered into employment agreements with certain of our key personnel, these agreements do not ensure that our key personnel will continue in their present capacity with us for any particular period of time. We do not have key man insurance for any of our current management or other key personnel. The loss of any key personnel would require our remaining key personnel to divert immediate and substantial attention to seeking a replacement. An inability to find a suitable replacement for any departing executive officer on a timely basis could adversely affect our ability to operate or grow our business.

A shortage of skilled or experienced employees in the media industry, or our inability to retain such employees, could pose a risk to achieving improved productivity and reducing costs, which could adversely affect our profitability.

Production and distribution of our various publications requires skilled and experienced employees. A shortage of such employees, or our inability to retain such employees, could have an adverse impact on our productivity and costs, our ability to expand, develop and distribute new products and our entry into new markets. The cost of retaining or hiring such employees could exceed our expectations which could adversely affect our results of operations.

A number of our employees are unionized, and our business and results of operations could be adversely affected if labor negotiations or contracts were to further restrict our ability to maximize the efficiency of our operations.

As of December 30, 2012, we employed approximately 4,565 employees, of whom approximately 691 (or approximately 15%) were represented by 23 unions. 95% of the unionized employees are represented by three of the 23 unions. These three unions are located in our Massachusetts, Illinois and Ohio locations and represent 27%, 38% and 30% of all employees in each of the locations, respectively. Most of our unionized employees work under collective bargaining agreements that expire in 2014.

 

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Although our newspapers have not experienced a union strike in the recent past nor do we anticipate a union strike occurring, we cannot preclude the possibility that a strike may occur at one or more of our newspapers at some point in the future. We believe that, in the event of a newspaper strike, we would be able to continue to publish and deliver to subscribers, which is critical to retaining advertising and circulation revenues, although there can be no assurance of this.

Our potential inability to successfully execute cost control measures could result in greater than expected total operating costs.

We have implemented general cost control measures, and expect to continue such cost control efforts in the future. If we do not achieve expected savings as a result of such measures or if our operating costs increase as a result of our growth strategy, our total operating costs may be greater than expected. In addition, reductions in staff and employee benefits could affect our ability to attract and retain key employees.

Our common stock trades in the over-the-counter market, which makes it less liquid, more volatile and harder for us to raise capital.

Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board under the trading symbol “GHSE”. No assurance can be given that our common stock will continue to be traded on any stock market, that any broker will make a market in our common stock, or that any active trading market in our common stock will exist. Broker-dealers often decline to trade in “pink sheet” stocks given that (i) the market for such securities is often limited, (ii) such securities are generally more volatile, and (iii) the risk to investors is generally greater. Moreover, additional requirements pertaining to broker-dealers generally makes it more difficult for such broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy securities traded on the “pink sheets.” Consequently, selling our common stock can be difficult because smaller quantities of shares can be bought and sold, transactions can be delayed and securities analyst and media coverage of our Company is reduced. These factors could result in lower prices and larger spreads in the bid and ask prices for shares of our common stock as well as lower trading volume. We cannot provide any assurance that, even if our common stock continues to be listed or quoted on the pink sheets or another market or system, the market for our common stock will be as liquid. This lack of liquidity also could make it even more difficult for us to raise capital in the future, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our business.

Companies that are quoted on the pink sheets are not subject to corporate governance requirements in order for their shares to be quoted. As a result, our stockholders have less protection from conflicts of interest, related party transactions and similar matters.

Our common stock currently trades as an over-the-counter security on the “pink sheets.” Corporate governance requirements are not imposed on companies quoted on the pink sheets. As a result of our delisting from the NYSE, we are not required to comply with any, and our stockholders no longer have the protection of, various NYSE corporate governance requirements, including among others:

 

   

the requirement that a majority of our board of directors consist of independent directors;

 

   

the requirement that a minimum of three members of our board of directors consist of independent directors;

 

   

the requirement that we have an audit committee, a nominating committee and a compensation committee, in each case that is composed entirely of independent directors with a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities;

 

   

the requirement for an annual performance evaluation of the audit, nominating and compensation committees; and

 

   

the requirement that our stockholders must be given the opportunity to vote on equity-compensation plans and material revisions thereto.

 

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We do not anticipate paying any dividends for the foreseeable future.

We suspended the payment of quarterly cash dividends commencing with the second quarter of 2008 and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on, or making repurchases of, our common stock in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain future earnings, if any, to reduce leverage and increase liquidity, finance the expansion of our operations and for general corporate purposes. In addition, covenants in our 2007 Credit Facility restrict our ability to pay dividends and make certain other payments.

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

If the ownership of our common stock continues to be highly concentrated, it may prevent stockholders from influencing significant corporate decisions. Moreover, the interests of our principal stockholder may conflict with interests of our other stockholders.

As of December 30, 2012, Fortress beneficially owned approximately 39.6% of our outstanding common stock. As a result, Fortress will continue to have effective control over fundamental and significant corporate matters and transactions, including but not limited to: the election of directors; mergers, consolidations or acquisitions; the sale of all or substantially all of our assets (or any portion thereof) and other decisions affecting our capital structure; the amendment of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated by-laws; and our dissolution. The interests of Fortress may not always coincide with our interests or the interest of our other stockholders. For example, Fortress could delay, deter or prevent acts that may be favored by our other stockholders such as hostile takeovers, changes in control and changes in management. As a result of such actions, the market price of our common stock could decline or stockholders might not receive a premium for their shares in connection with a change of control transaction.

Fortress has the right to, and has no duty to abstain from exercising such right to, engage or invest in the same or similar business as us.

Fortress, together with its affiliates, has other business activities in addition to their ownership of us. Under our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, Fortress has the right to, and has no duty to abstain from exercising such right to, engage or invest in the same or similar business as us, do business with any of our clients, customers or vendors or employ or otherwise engage any of our officers, directors or employees. If Fortress or any of its affiliates or any of their respective officers, directors or employees acquire knowledge of a potential transaction that could be a corporate opportunity, they have no duty to offer such corporate opportunity to us, our stockholders or our affiliates.

In the event that any of our directors and officers who is also a director, officer or employee of Fortress acquires knowledge of a corporate opportunity or is offered a corporate opportunity, provided that this knowledge was not acquired solely in such person’s capacity as our director or officer and such person acted in good faith, such person is deemed to have fully satisfied such person’s fiduciary duty and is not liable to us if Fortress pursues or acquires such corporate opportunity or if such person did not present the corporate opportunity to us.

Anti-takeover provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated by-laws may discourage, delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that stockholders may consider favorable or prevent the removal of our current board of directors and management.

Certain provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated by-laws may discourage, delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that stockholders may consider favorable or prevent the removal of our current board of directors and management. We have a number of anti-takeover devices in place that can hinder takeover attempts, including:

 

   

a staggered board of directors consisting of three classes of directors, each of whom serves a three-year term;

 

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removal of directors only for cause and only with the affirmative vote of at least 80% of the voting interest of stockholders entitled to vote;

 

   

blank-check preferred stock;

 

   

provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws preventing stockholders from calling special meetings or acting by written consent in lieu of a meeting (with the exception of Fortress, so long as Fortress beneficially owns at least 50% of our issued and outstanding common stock);

 

   

advance notice requirements for stockholders with respect to director nominations and actions to be taken at annual meetings; and

 

   

no provision in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation for cumulative voting in the election of directors, which means that the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock can elect all the directors standing for election.

Our 2007 Credit Facility currently limits our ability to enter into certain change of control transactions, the occurrence of which would constitute an event of default. However, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which restricts certain business combinations with interested stockholders in certain situations, will not apply to us. This may make it easier for a third party to acquire an interest in some or all of our Company with Fortress’ approval, even though our other stockholders may not deem such an acquisition beneficial to their interests.

We are a holding company and our access to the cash flow of our subsidiaries is subject to restrictions imposed by our indebtedness.

We are a holding company with no material direct operations. Our principal assets are the equity interests we own in our direct subsidiary, GateHouse Media Holdco, Inc. (“Holdco”), through which we indirectly own equity interests in our operating subsidiaries. As a result, we are dependent on loans, dividends and other payments from our subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet our financial obligations. Our subsidiaries are legally distinct from us and have no obligation to make funds available to us. Holdco and certain of its subsidiaries are parties to our 2007 Credit Facility, which imposes restrictions on their ability to make loans, dividend payments or other payments to us. Any payments of dividends to us are subject to the satisfaction of certain financial conditions set forth in our 2007 Credit Facility. Our ability to comply with these conditions may be affected by events that are beyond our control. We expect future borrowings by our subsidiaries to contain restrictions or prohibitions on the payment of dividends to us.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

Item 2. Properties

We own and operate 32 print facilities across the United States. Our print facilities range in size from approximately 500 to 55,000 square feet. Our executive offices are located in Fairport, New York, where we lease approximately 15,000 square feet under a lease terminating in June 2014.

We maintain our properties in good condition and believe that our current facilities are adequate to meet the present needs of our business. We do not believe any individual property is material to our financial condition or results of operations.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

We become involved from time to time in claims and lawsuits incidental to the ordinary course of our business, including such matters as libel, invasion of privacy, intellectual property infringement, wrongful

 

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termination actions, and complaints alleging discrimination. In addition, we are involved from time to time in governmental and administrative proceedings concerning employment, labor, environmental and other claims. Insurance coverage mitigates potential loss for certain of these matters. Historically, such claims and proceedings have not had a material adverse effect upon our consolidated results of operations or financial condition. While we are unable to predict the ultimate outcome of any currently outstanding legal actions, we believe that it is not a likely possibility that the disposition of these matters would have a material adverse effect upon our consolidated results of operations, financial condition or cash flow.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”) under the trading symbol “GHSE”. The following table shows the high and low sale bid information of our common stock as reported on the OTCBB for the periods indicated. Reported prices from the OTCBB reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

     High      Low  

Year Ended December 30, 2012

     

Fourth Quarter

   $ 0.10       $ 0.03   

Third Quarter

   $ 0.09       $ 0.05   

Second Quarter

   $ 0.06       $ 0.04   

First Quarter

   $ 0.10       $ 0.03   

Year Ended January 1, 2012

     

Fourth Quarter

   $ 0.10       $ 0.03   

Third Quarter

   $ 0.14       $ 0.04   

Second Quarter

   $ 0.20       $ 0.10   

First Quarter

   $ 0.19       $ 0.08   

The closing sale price for our common stock as reported on the over-the-counter market on March 4, 2013 was $0.06 per share. From the most recent available Company information, there were approximately 22 holders of record and approximately 3,390 beneficial owners registered in nominee and street name.

Dividends

We suspended the payment of quarterly dividends commencing with the second quarter of 2008 and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. In addition, covenants in our 2007 Credit Facility and other credit facilities restrict our ability to pay dividends or make certain other payments.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following table presents our selected historical financial data as of and for each of the years in the five year period ended December 30, 2012. The information in this table should be read in conjunction with the information under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”, “Business” and our historical consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this report.

 

     Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January 1,
2012(2)
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
    Year Ended
December 31,
2009
    Year Ended
December 31,
2008
 
     (In Thousands, Except Per Share Data)  

Statement of Operations Data:

          

Revenues:

          

Advertising

   $ 331,419      $ 357,629      $ 386,069      $ 399,442      $ 478,437   

Circulation

     133,358        133,571        135,691        141,249        144,712   

Commercial printing and other

     26,187        25,763        26,057        31,059        37,711   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     490,964        516,963        547,817        571,750        660,860   

Operating costs and expenses:

          

Operating costs

     270,749        284,864        300,127        327,454        370,643   

Selling, general and administrative

     145,997        147,459        156,253        161,160        180,776   

Depreciation and amortization

     40,033        42,583        45,137        54,294        69,923   

Integration and reorganization costs and management fees paid to prior owner

     4,401        5,884        2,324        1,857        7,011   

Impairment of long-lived assets

           1,733        430        193,503        123,717   

(Gain) loss on sale of assets

     1,238        455        1,551        (418     337   

Goodwill and mastheads impairment

           385              274,138        488,543   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income (loss)

     28,546        33,600        41,995        (440,238     (580,090

Interest expense, amortization of deferred financing costs, gain on early extinguishment of debt, (gain) loss on derivative instruments and other

     57,500        57,914        69,533        72,519        100,535   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes

     (28,954     (24,314     (27,538     (512,757     (680,625

Income tax expense (benefit)

     (207     (1,803     (155     342        (21,139
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

     (28,747     (22,511     (27,383     (513,099     (659,486

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

     (1,592     283        743        (17,513     (13,820
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (30,339     (22,228     (26,640     (530,612     (673,306

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

     536        579        596        510         
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to GateHouse Media

   $ (29,803   $ (21,649   $ (26,044   $ (530,102   $ (673,306
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic net loss from continuing operations attributable to GateHouse Media per share

   $ (0.49   $ (0.38   $ (0.46   $ (8.93   $ (11.56

Diluted loss from continuing operations attributable to GateHouse Media per share

   $ (0.49   $ (0.38   $ (0.46   $ (8.93   $ (11.56

Basic net loss attributable to GateHouse Media common stockholders per share

   $ (0.51   $ (0.37   $ (0.45   $ (9.24   $ (11.80

Diluted net loss attributable to GateHouse Media common stockholders per share

   $ (0.51   $ (0.37   $ (0.45   $ (9.24   $ (11.80

Other Data:

          

Adjusted EBITDA (1)

   $ 68,627      $ 79,150      $ 87,700      $ 81,046      $ 102,152   

Cash interest paid

   $ 55,976      $ 58,225      $ 59,317      $ 67,950      $ 89,677   

 

(1)

We define Adjusted EBITDA as net income (loss) from continuing operations before income tax expense (benefit), interest/financing expense, depreciation and amortization and non-cash impairments. Adjusted EBITDA is not a measurement of financial performance under GAAP and should not be considered in isolation or as an alternative to income from operations, net income (loss), cash flow from continuing

 

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  operating activities or any other measure of performance or liquidity derived in accordance with GAAP. We believe this non-GAAP measure, as we have defined it, is helpful in identifying trends in our day-to-day performance because the items excluded have little or no significance in our day-to-day operations. This measure provides an assessment of controllable expenses and affords management the ability to make decisions which are expected to facilitate meeting current financial goals as well as achieve optimal financial performance. Adjusted EBITDA provides an indicator for management to determine if adjustments to current spending decisions are needed.

Adjusted EBITDA provides us with a measure of financial performance, independent of items that are beyond the control of management in the short-term, such as depreciation and amortization, taxation and interest expense associated with our capital structure. This metric measures our financial performance based on operational factors that management can impact in the short-term, namely our cost structure or expenses of the organization. Adjusted EBITDA is one of the metrics used by senior management and the board of directors to review the financial performance of our business on a monthly basis.

Not all companies calculate Adjusted EBITDA using the same methods; therefore, the Adjusted EBITDA figures set forth herein may not be comparable to Adjusted EBITDA reported by other companies. A substantial portion of our Adjusted EBITDA must be dedicated to the payment of interest on our outstanding indebtedness and to service other commitments, thereby reducing the funds available to us for other purposes. Accordingly, Adjusted EBITDA does not represent an amount of funds that is available for management’s discretionary use. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 of this report.

 

(2)

The year ended January 1, 2012 included a 53rd week of operations for approximately 60% of the business.

 

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The table below shows the reconciliation of income (loss) from continuing operations to Adjusted EBITDA for the periods presented:

 

     Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January 1,
2012(3)
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
    Year Ended
December 31,
2009
    Year Ended
December 31,
2008
 
     (In Thousands)  

Loss from continuing operations

   $ (28,747   $ (22,511   $ (27,383   $ (513,099   $ (659,486

Income tax expense (benefit)

     (207     (1,803     (155     342        (21,139

(Gain) loss on derivative instruments (1)

     (1,635     (913     8,277        12,672        10,119   

Gain on early extinguishment of debt (2)

     —         —         —         (7,538     —    

Amortization of deferred financing costs

     1,255        1,360        1,360        1,360        1,845   

Write-off of financing costs

     —         —         —         743        —    

Interest expense

     57,928        58,316        60,034        64,631        88,630   

Impairment of long-lived assets

     —         1,733        430        193,503        123,717   

Depreciation and amortization

     40,033        42,583        45,137        54,294        69,923   

Goodwill and mastheads impairment

     —         385       —         274,138        488,543   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations

   $ 68,627 (a)    $ 79,150 (b)    $ 87,700 (c)    $ 81,046 (d)    $ 102,152 (e) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(a) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 30, 2012 included net expenses of $11,017, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $11,017 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $6,274, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(896), integration and reorganization costs of $4,401 and a $1,238 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $1,386 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(b) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended January 1, 2012 included net expenses of $9,461, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $9,461 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $4,226, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(1,104), integration and reorganization costs of $5,884 and an $455 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $1,829 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(c) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2010 included net expenses of $8,231, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $8,231 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $5,005, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(649), integration and reorganization costs of $2,324 and a $1,551 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $2,274 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(d) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2009 included net expenses of $9,291, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $9,291 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $8,634, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(782), integration and reorganization costs of $1,857 and a $418 gain on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $668 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(e) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2008 included net expenses of $24,047, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $24,047 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $18,198, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(1,499), integration and reorganization costs of $7,011 and $337 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $5,175 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

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(1) Non-cash (gain) loss on derivative instruments is related to interest rate swap agreements which are financing related and are excluded from Adjusted EBITDA.
(2) Non-cash write-off of deferred financing costs are similar to interest expense and amortization of financing fees and are excluded from Adjusted EBITDA.
(3)

The year ended January 1, 2012 included a 53rd week of operations for approximately 60% of the business.

 

     As of  
     December 30,
2012
    January 1,
2012
    December 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
    December 31,
2008
 
     (In Thousands)  

Balance Sheet Data:

          

Total assets

   $ 469,766      $ 510,802      $ 546,327      $ 591,929      $ 1,149,621   

Total long-term obligations, including current maturities

     1,177,298        1,185,212        1,197,347        1,222,102        1,242,075   

Stockholders’ equity (deficit)

     (834,159     (805,632     (792,121     (753,576     (229,078

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our historical consolidated financial statements and notes to those statements and pro forma results of operations appearing in this report. The discussion and analysis below includes certain forward-looking statements that are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors under the heading “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this report that could cause our actual future growth, results of operations, performance and business prospects and opportunities to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, such forward-looking statements. See “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Information” at the beginning of this report.

Overview

We are one of the largest publishers of locally based print and digital media in the United States as measured by number of daily publications. Our business model is to be the preeminent provider of local content and advertising in the small and midsize markets that we serve. Our portfolio of products, which includes 406 community publications, 342 related websites, 339 mobile sites and six yellow page directories, serves over 128,000 business advertising accounts and reaches approximately 10 million people on a weekly basis.

Our core products include:

 

   

78 daily newspapers with total paid circulation of approximately 597,000;

 

   

237 weekly newspapers (published up to three times per week) with total paid circulation of approximately 307,000 and total free circulation of approximately 684,000;

 

   

91 “shoppers” (generally advertising-only publications) with total circulation of approximately 1.5 million;

 

   

342 locally focused websites and 339 mobile sites, which extend our franchises onto the internet and mobile devices with approximately 97 million page views per month; and

 

   

six yellow page directories, with a distribution of approximately 488,000, that covers a population of approximately 1.2 million people.

In addition to our core products, we also opportunistically produce niche publications that address specific local market interests such as recreation, sports, healthcare and real estate. Over the last twelve months, we created approximately 42 niche publications. We are also focused on developing online and mobile products, including digital marketing services, deal platforms, mobile websites and applications.

We were incorporated in Delaware in 1997 for purposes of acquiring a portion of the daily and weekly newspapers owned by American Publishing Company. On May 9, 2005, FIF III Liberty Holdings LLC, an affiliate of Fortress, entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger with us pursuant to which a wholly-owned subsidiary of FIF III Liberty Holdings LLC merged with and into us (the “Merger”). The Merger was effective on June 6, 2005, thus making FIF III Liberty Holdings LLC our principal and controlling stockholder. As of December 30, 2012, Fortress beneficially owned approximately 39.6% of our outstanding common stock.

Since 1998, we have launched numerous new products and acquired 416 daily and weekly newspapers and shoppers, including 17 dailies, 120 weeklies and 22 shoppers acquired in the acquisitions of CP Media and Enterprise NewsMedia, LLC, the Copley Press, Inc. newspapers and the Gannett Co., Inc. newspapers. Due to the economic environment and our lack of available financing, we discontinued our acquisition strategy in 2009.

We generate revenues from advertising, circulation and commercial printing. Advertising revenue is recognized upon publication of the advertisements. Circulation revenue from subscribers, which is typically billed to customers at the beginning of the subscription period, is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the related subscription. The revenue for commercial printing is recognized upon delivery of the printed product to our customers. Directory revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis over the period in which the corresponding directory is distributed and in use in the market.

 

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Our advertising revenue tends to follow a seasonal pattern, with higher advertising revenue in months containing significant events or holidays. Accordingly, our first quarter, followed by our third quarter, historically are our weakest quarters of the year in terms of revenue. Correspondingly, our second and fourth fiscal quarters, historically, are our strongest quarters. We expect that this seasonality will continue to affect our advertising revenue in future periods.

We have experienced declines in print advertising revenue streams from continuing operations, despite our geographic diversity, well-balanced portfolio of products, strong local franchises, broad customer base and reliance on smaller markets. We believe the declines in print advertising revenue we have experienced are primarily the result of general economic weakness, fewer local businesses that were traditional newspaper advertisers, as a result of being acquired or closing due to the national big box retailer expansion, and the secular pressure which has resulted in a shift of advertising dollars from print media to digital media. We believe our local advertising tends to be less sensitive to economic cycles than national advertising because local businesses generally have fewer advertising channels through which to reach their target audience. We also believe some of the decline is due to a secular shift from print media to digital media. The Company continues to invest in digital platforms, such as online, mobile and applications, to support its print publications in order to lessen the impact of this shift.

Our operating costs consist primarily of labor, newsprint, and delivery costs. Our selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of labor costs.

Labor represents just over 50% of our operating expenses. Beginning in 2008 we initiated an effort to drive efficiencies and centralization of work throughout the organization.

Newsprint prices rose from the later part of 2009 through 2010 and remained flat from the latter part of 2010 through 2012. We expect 2013 prices to decline about 5%. We have taken steps to mitigate risk of potential price increases through a fixed price agreement for approximately 95% of our 2013 purchases combined with consumption control. In addition, we are a member of a newsprint-buying consortium which enables our local publishers to obtain favorable pricing as compared to the general market. Additionally, we have taken steps to cluster our operations thereby increasing the usage of facilities and equipment while increasing the productivity of our labor force. We expect to continue to employ these steps as part of our business and clustering strategy.

Recent Developments

The newspaper industry and our Company have experienced declining same store revenue and profitability over the past several years. These trends have eliminated the availability to us of additional borrowings under our 2007 Credit Facility. As a result, we previously implemented plans to reduce costs, preserve cash flow and strengthen liquidity. This includes the suspension of the payment of cash dividends, the continued implementation of cost reduction programs, and the sale of non-core assets. We believe these initiatives will provide the financial resources necessary to invest in the business and ensure our future success and provide sufficient cash flow to enable us to meet our commitments for the next year.

General economic conditions, including declines in consumer confidence, continued high unemployment levels, declines in real estate values, and other trends, have also impacted the markets in which we operate. Additionally, media companies continue to be impacted by the migration of consumers and businesses to an internet and mobile-based, digital medium. These conditions may continue to negatively impact print advertising and other revenue sources as well as increase operating costs in the future. Management believes that we have adequate capital resources and liquidity to meet our working capital needs, borrowing obligations and all required capital expenditures for at least the next twelve months.

We periodically perform testing for impairment of goodwill and newspaper mastheads in which the fair value of our reporting units for goodwill impairment testing and individual newspaper mastheads were estimated using the expected present value of future cash flows and recent industry transaction multiples, using estimates,

 

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judgments and assumptions, that we believe were appropriate in the circumstances. Should general economic, market or business conditions decline, and have a negative impact on estimates of future cash flow and market transaction multiples, we may be required to record additional impairment charges in the future.

During 2008, our credit rating was downgraded to be rated below-investment grade by both Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service and was further downgraded in 2009 and 2010. Any future long-term borrowing or the extension or replacement of our short-term borrowing will reflect the negative impact of these ratings, increase our borrowing costs, limit our financing options and subject us to more restrictive covenants than our existing debt arrangements. Additional downgrades in our credit ratings could further increase our borrowing cost, subject us to more onerous borrowing terms and reduce or eliminate our borrowing flexibility in the future.

The current economic environment in our industry and its resulting impact on us has limited our ability to grow further through acquisitions in the near-term. We are highly focused on our business transformational strategy which includes; a) driving permanent cost reduction and cost realignment towards growth opportunities, b) accelerate digital growth in terms of both revenue and audience, c) grow consumer revenues, including circulation, in both print and digital, largely through new products, services, and pricing initiatives, d) preserve the power of print by improving the quality of our content and stabilize our advertising revenues, and e) develop and grow new businesses through GateHouse Ventures by leveraging our core strengths and assets and expanding beyond our existing geographical footprints.

During the first quarter of 2012, we reorganized our management structure to align with our publication types. The resulting operating segments are: Large Community Newspapers, Small Community Newspapers, and Directories. These operating segments are aggregated into one reportable business segment.

In February 2013, the US Postal Service announced that it will end Saturday delivery beginning in August 2013. The Company is evaluating the impact of this change, but does not expect it to be material.

Critical Accounting Policy Disclosure

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and other assumptions that we find reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from such estimates under different conditions. The following accounting policies require significant estimates and judgments.

Goodwill and Long-Lived Assets

We assess the potential impairment of goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives on an annual basis in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 350 “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other” (“ASC 350”). We perform our impairment analysis on each of our reporting units, represented by our six regions. The regions have discrete financial information and are regularly reviewed by management. The fair value of the applicable reporting unit is compared to its carrying value. Calculating the fair value of a reporting unit requires us to make significant estimates and assumptions. We estimate fair value by applying third-party market value indicators to projected cash flows and/or projected earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. In applying this methodology, we rely on a number of factors, including current operating results and cash flows, expected future operating results and cash flows, future business plans, and market data. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds the estimate of fair value, we calculate the impairment as the excess of the carrying value of goodwill over its implied fair value.

We account for long-lived assets in accordance with the provisions of FASB ASC Topic 360, “Property, Plant and Equipment” (“ASC 360”). We assess the recoverability of our long-lived assets, including property,

 

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plant and equipment and definite lived intangible assets, whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate the carrying amount of the assets, or related group of assets, may not be fully recoverable. Factors leading to impairment include significant under-performance relative to historical or projected results, significant changes in the manner of use of the acquired assets or the strategy for our overall business and significant negative industry or economic trends. The assessment of recoverability is based on management’s estimates. If undiscounted projected future operating cash flows do not exceed the net book value of the long-lived assets, then a permanent impairment has occurred. We would record the difference between the net book value of the long-lived asset and the fair value of such asset as a charge against income in our consolidated statements of operations if such a difference arose.

The fair values of our reporting units for goodwill impairment testing and individual newspaper mastheads are estimated using the expected present value of future cash flows, recent industry transaction multiples and using estimates, judgments and assumptions that management believes are appropriate in the circumstances.

The sum of the fair values of the reporting units are reconciled to our current market capitalization (based upon the stock market price) plus an estimated control premium.

Significant judgment is required in determining the fair value of our goodwill and long-lived assets to measure impairment, including the determination of multiples of revenue and Adjusted EBITDA and future earnings projections. The estimates and judgments that most significantly affect the future cash flow estimates are assumptions related to revenue, and in particular, potential changes in future advertising (including the impact of economic trends and the speed of conversion of advertising and readership to online products from traditional print products); trends in newsprint prices; and other operating expense items.

We performed annual impairment testing of goodwill and indefinite lived intangible assets during the second quarter of 2012, 2011 and 2010. Additionally, we performed impairment testing of goodwill and indefinite lived intangibles during the first quarter of 2012 and the fourth quarter of 2011 due to operational management changes. As a result, impairment charges related to goodwill were recorded in fiscal 2012 and 2011, see additional information in Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Newspaper mastheads (newspaper titles and website domain names) are not subject to amortization and are tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. The impairment test consists of a comparison of the fair value of each group of mastheads with their carrying amount. We used a relief from royalty approach which utilizes a discounted cash flow model to determine the fair value of each newspaper masthead. Our judgments and estimates of future operating results in determining the reporting unit fair values are consistently in determining the fair value of mastheads. We performed impairment tests on newspaper mastheads as of July 1, 2012, April 1, 2012, January 1, 2012, June 26, 2011 and June 30, 2010. See Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion of the impairment charges taken.

Intangible assets subject to amortization (primarily advertiser and subscriber lists) are tested for recoverability whenever events or change in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. The carrying amount of each asset group is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of such asset group. We performed impairment tests on long lived assets (including intangible assets subject to amortization) as of July 1, 2012, June 26, 2011 and June 30, 2010. See Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion of the impairment charges taken.

The newspaper industry and our Company have experienced declining same store revenue and profitability over the past several years. Should general economic, market or business conditions decline, and have a negative impact on estimates of future cash flow and market transaction multiples, we may be required to record additional impairment charges in the future.

 

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Derivative Instruments

We record all of our derivative instruments on our balance sheet at fair value pursuant to FASB ASC Topic 815, “Derivatives and Hedging” (“ASC 815”) and FASB ASC Topic 820 “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” (“ASC 820”). Fair value is based on counterparty quotations adjusted for our credit related risk. Our derivative instruments are measured using significant unobservable inputs and they represent all liabilities measured at fair value. To the extent a derivative qualifies as a cash flow hedge under ASC 815, unrealized changes in the fair value of the derivative are recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income. However, any ineffective portion of a derivative’s change in fair value is recognized immediately in earnings. Fair values of derivatives are subject to significant variability based on market conditions, such as future levels of interest rates. This variability could result in a significant increase or decrease in our accumulated other comprehensive income and/or earnings but will generally have no effect on cash flows, provided the derivative is carried through to full term. We also assess the capabilities of our counterparties to perform under the terms of the contracts. A change in the assessment could have an impact on the accounting and economics of our derivatives.

Revenue Recognition

Advertising revenue is recognized upon publication of the advertisement. Circulation revenue from subscribers is billed to customers at the beginning of the subscription period and is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the related subscription. Circulation revenue from single copy sales is recognized at the time of sale. Revenue for commercial printing is recognized upon delivery. Directory revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis over the period in which the corresponding directory is distributed.

Income Taxes

We account for income taxes under the provisions of FASB ASC Topic 740, “Income Taxes” (“ASC 740”). Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. The assessment of the realizability of deferred tax assets involves a high degree of judgment and complexity. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amounts that are expected to be realized. When we determine that it is more likely than not that we will be able to realize our deferred tax assets in the future in excess of our net recorded amount, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset would be made and reflected either in income or as an adjustment to goodwill. This determination will be made by considering various factors, including our expected future results, that in our judgment will make it more likely than not that these deferred tax assets will be realized.

Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, an interpretation of SFAS No. 109” (“FIN 48”) and now codified as ASC 740. ASC 740 prescribes a comprehensive model for how a company should recognize, measure, present and disclose in its financial statements uncertain tax positions that a company has taken or expects to take on a tax return. Under ASC 740, the financial statements will reflect expected future tax consequences of such positions presuming the taxing authorities’ full knowledge of the position and all relevant facts, but without considering time values.

Pension and Postretirement Liabilities

FASB ASC Topic 715, “Compensation—Retirement Benefits” (“ASC 715”) requires recognition of an asset or liability in the consolidated balance sheet reflecting the funded status of pension and other postretirement benefit plans such as retiree health and life, with current-year changes in the funded status recognized in the statement of stockholders’ equity.

The determination of pension plan obligations and expense is based on a number of actuarial assumptions. Two critical assumptions are the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets and the discount rate applied to pension plan obligations. For other postretirement benefit plans, which provide for certain health care and life insurance benefits for qualifying retired employees and which are not funded, critical assumptions in determining other postretirement benefit obligations and expense are the discount rate and the assumed health care cost-trend rates.

 

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Our only pension plan has assets valued at $18.2 million and the plans benefit obligation is $27.1 million resulting in the plan being 67% funded.

To determine the expected long-term rate of return on pension plan assets, we consider the current and expected asset allocations, as well as historical and expected returns on various categories of plan assets, input from the actuaries and investment consultants, and long-term inflation assumptions. We used an assumption of 7.75% for its expected return on pension plan assets for 2012. If we were to reduce its rate of return by 50 basis points then the expense for 2012 would have increased approximately $0.1 million.

We developed our discount rate for our other postretirement benefit plans using the same methodology as that described for the pension. The assumed health care cost-trend rate also affects other postretirement benefit liabilities and expense. A 100 basis point increase in the health care cost trend rate would result in an increase of approximately $0.4 million in the December 30, 2012 postretirement benefit obligation and a 100 basis point decrease in the health care cost trend rate would result in a decrease of approximately $0.4 million in the December 30, 2012 postretirement benefit obligation.

Self-Insurance Liability Accruals

We maintain self-insured medical and workers’ compensation programs. We purchase stop loss coverage from third parties which limits our exposure to large claims. We record a liability for healthcare and workers’ compensation costs during the period in which they occur as well as an estimate of incurred but not reported claims.

Results of Operations

The following table summarizes our historical results of operations for the years ended December 30, 2012, January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010.

 

     Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January 1,
2012
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
 
     (In Thousands)  

Revenues:

      

Advertising

   $ 331,419      $ 357,629      $ 386,069   

Circulation

     133,358        133,571        135,691   

Commercial printing and other

     26,187        25,763        26,057   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     490,964        516,963        547,817   

Operating costs and expenses:

      

Operating costs

     270,749        284,864        300,127   

Selling, general and administrative

     145,997        147,459        156,253   

Depreciation and amortization

     40,033        42,583        45,137   

Integration and reorganization costs

     4,401        5,884        2,324   

Impairment of long-lived assets

     —         1,733        430   

Loss on sale of assets

     1,238        455        1,551   

Goodwill and mastheads impairment

     —         385        —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     28,546        33,600        41,995   

Interest expense

     57,928        58,316        60,034   

Amortization of deferred financing costs

     1,255        1,360        1,360   

(Gain) loss on derivative instruments

     (1,635     (913     8,277   

Other income

     (48     (849     (138
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes

     (28,954     (24,314     (27,538

Income tax benefit

     (207     (1,803     (155
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

   $ (28,747   $ (22,511   $ (27,383
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Year Ended December 30, 2012 Compared To Year Ended January 1, 2012

Comparisons to the prior year were impacted by two factors around the number of days in the reporting period. First, there was a 53rd week in 2011 for approximately 60% of the business already on a 52 week (5-4-4 quarterly) reporting cycle. Also in 2011, the remaining 40% of the Company changed its reporting cycle from a calendar year to a 52 week reporting cycle in order to be consistent with the rest of the Company. We estimate the 53rd week in 2011 resulted in $4.8 million of revenue and $3.8 million of operating and selling, general and administrative expense. Comparisons below have not been adjusted for this calendar change.

Revenue. Total revenue for the year ended December 30, 2012 decreased by $26.0 million, or 5.0%, to $491.0 million from $517.0 million for the year ended January 1, 2012. The difference between same store revenue and GAAP revenue for the current period is immaterial, therefore, further revenue discussions will be limited to GAAP results. The decrease in total revenue was comprised of a $26.2 million, or 7.3%, decrease in advertising revenue and a $0.2 million, or 0.2%, decrease in circulation revenue which was partially offset by a $0.4 million, or 1.6%, increase in commercial printing and other revenue. Advertising revenue declines were primarily driven by declines on the print side of our business in the local retail and classified categories, which were partially offset by growth in digital advertising. The local retail print declines reflect both secular pressures and an uncertain and weak economic environment. These secular trends and economic conditions have also led to a decline in our print circulation volumes which have been offset by price increases in select locations. Our circulation revenue was also impacted by approximately $1.5 million for a net to gross accounting change due to a change from a carrier to a distributor model at one of our largest locations. The $0.4 million increase in commercial printing and other revenue is primarily the result of the launch of our small business marketing services and the stabilizing of our commercial printing operations during 2012.

Operating Costs. Operating costs for the year ended December 30, 2012 decreased by $14.1 million, or 5.0%, to $270.7 million from $284.8 million for the year ended January 1, 2012. The decrease in operating costs was primarily due to a decrease in compensation expenses, newsprint and ink, delivery and utility expenses of $12.6 million, $6.5 million, $3.4 million and $0.8 million, respectively, which were partially offset by an increase in outside services of $9.0 million. This decrease is the result of permanent cost reductions as we continue to work to consolidate operations and improve the productivity of our labor force.

Selling, General and Administrative. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 30, 2012 decreased by $1.5 million, or 1.0%, to $146.0 million from $147.5 million for the year ended January 1, 2012. The decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily due to a decrease in compensation of $1.7 million. We expect that the majority of these reductions will be permanent in nature.

Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense for the year ended December 30, 2012 decreased by $2.6 million to $40.0 million from $42.6 million for the year ended January 1, 2012. The decrease in depreciation and amortization expense was primarily due to the sale and disposal of assets in 2011 and 2012, which reduced depreciation expense.

Integration and Reorganization Costs. During the years ended December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, we recorded integration and reorganization costs of $4.4 million and $5.9 million, respectively, primarily resulting from severance costs related to the consolidation of certain print and other operations.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. During the year ended January 1, 2012 we incurred an impairment charge of $1.7 million related to the consolidation of our print operations and property, plant and equipment which were classified as held for sale. There were no such charges during the year ended December 30, 2012.

Goodwill and Mastheads Impairment. During the year ended January 1, 2012, we recorded a $0.4 million impairment on our goodwill due to an operational management change in the fourth quarter of 2011 which transferred a goodwill balance of $0.4 million to a reporting unit that previously did not have a goodwill balance. A similar operational change occurred in the first quarter of 2012 and resulted in a $0.2 million impairment that was subsequently reclassified to discontinued operations.

 

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Interest Expense. Total interest expense for the year ended December 30, 2012 decreased by $0.4 million, or 0.7%, to $57.9 million from $58.3 million for the year ended January 1, 2012. The decrease was due to declines in interest rates and their related impact on the unhedged position or our debt and a slight decrease in our total outstanding debt.

(Gain) Loss on Derivative Instruments. During the years ended December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, we recorded a net gain of $1.6 million and $0.9 million, respectively, which was comprised of reclassifications of accumulated other comprehensive income amortization related to swaps terminated in 2008 that were partially offset by the impact of the ineffectiveness of our remaining swap agreements.

Income Tax Benefit. During the year ended December 30, 2012, we recorded an income tax benefit of $0.2 million due to a reduction in uncertain tax positions which was partially offset by a tax expense due to the elimination of the tax effect related to the expiration of a previously terminated swap that could be fully recognized for tax purposes in the current year. During the year ended January 1, 2012, we recorded an income tax benefit of $1.8 million primarily due to the elimination of the tax effect related to the expiration of a previously terminated swap that could be fully recognized for tax purposes in the current year.

Net Loss from Continuing Operations. Net loss from continuing operations for the year ended December 30, 2012 was $28.7 million. Net loss from continuing operations for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $22.5 million. Our net loss from continuing operations increased due to the factors noted above.

Year Ended January 1, 2012 Compared To Year Ended December 31, 2010

Comparisons to the prior year were impacted by two factors around the number of days in the reporting period. First, there was a 53rd week in 2011 for approximately 60% of the business already on a 52 week (5-4-4 quarterly) reporting cycle. Also in 2011, the remaining 40% of the Company changed its reporting cycle from a calendar year to a 52 week reporting cycle in order to be consistent with the rest of the Company, which resulted in a one additional day for the year. The discussion of our results of operations that follows is based upon our historical results of operations for the years ended January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010.

Revenue. Total revenue for the year ended January 1, 2012 decreased by $30.8 million, or 5.6%, to $517.0 million from $547.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The difference between same store revenue and GAAP revenue for the current period is immaterial, therefore, further revenue discussions will be limited to GAAP results. We estimate the impact of the 53rd week to be $4.8 million on total revenue, comparisons below have not been adjusted for this impact. The decrease in total revenue was comprised of a $28.4 million, or 7.4%, decrease in advertising revenue, a $2.1 million, or 1.6%, decrease in circulation revenue and a $0.3 million, or 1.1%, decrease in commercial printing and other revenue. Advertising revenue declines were primarily driven by declines on the print side of our business in the local retail and classified categories which were partially offset by growth in digital. The print declines reflect an uncertain economic environment, which continued to put pressure on our local advertisers. These economic conditions have also led to a decline in our circulation volumes which have been partially offset by price increases in select locations. Our circulation revenue was also impacted by approximately $0.5 million for a net to gross accounting change implemented at the beginning of the fourth quarter of 2011 at one of our largest locations which puts it more in line with the Company as a whole. The decrease in commercial printing and other revenue was due to declines in printing projects as a result of continued weak economic conditions as well as the strategic closure of certain of our print facilities.

Operating Costs. Operating costs for the year ended January 1, 2012 decreased by $15.3 million, or 5.1%, to $284.8 million from $300.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The decrease in operating costs was primarily due to a decrease in compensation, newsprint and ink, delivery and postage expenses of $9.5 million, $2.6 million, $2.0 million and $0.9 million, respectively. The majority of these decreases were the result of permanent cost reductions and were implemented as we continue to work to consolidate operations and improve the productivity of our labor force. We estimate the impact of the 53rd week to be $3.8 million on operating costs and selling, general and administrative expenses.

 

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Selling, General and Administrative. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended January 1, 2012 decreased by $8.8 million, or 5.6%, to $147.5 million from $156.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily due to a decrease in compensation of $10.4 million offset by an increase in professional and consulting fees of $2.0 million. We believe the majority of these reductions are also permanent in nature.

Depreciation and Amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense for the year ended January 1, 2012 decreased by $2.5 million to $42.6 million from $45.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The decrease in depreciation and amortization expense was primarily due to the sale and disposal of assets in 2010 and 2011, which reduced depreciation expense.

Integration and Reorganization Costs. During the years ended January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010, we recorded integration and reorganization costs of $5.9 million and $2.3 million, respectively, primarily resulting from severance costs related to the consolidation of certain print operations.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. During the year ended January 1, 2012 we incurred an impairment charge of $1.7 million related to the consolidation of certain print operations and property, plant and equipment which were classified as held for sale. There was a $0.4 million of long-lived asset impairment charge during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Goodwill and Mastheads Impairment. During the year ended January 1, 2012, we recorded a $0.4 million impairment on our goodwill due to an operational management change in the fourth quarter of 2011 which transferred a goodwill balance of $0.4 million to a reporting unit that previously did not have a goodwill balance. There were no such charges during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Interest Expense. Total interest expense for the year ended January 1, 2012 decreased by $1.7 million, or 2.9%, to $58.3 million from $60.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The decrease was due to declines in interest rates and their related impact on the unhedged position or our debt and a slight decrease in our total outstanding debt.

(Gain) Loss on Derivative Instruments. During the years ended January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010, we recorded a net gain of $0.9 million and a net loss of $8.3 million, respectively, comprised of accumulated other comprehensive income amortization related to swaps terminated in 2008 partially offset by the impact of the ineffectiveness of our remaining swap agreements.

Income Tax Benefit. Income tax benefit for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $1.8 million compared to $0.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The change of $1.6 million was primarily due to the elimination of the tax effect related to the expiration of a previously terminated swap that could be fully recognized for tax purposes in the current year.

Net Loss from Continuing Operations. Net loss from continuing operations for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $22.5 million. Net loss from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $27.4 million. Our net loss from continuing operations decreased due to the factors noted above.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our primary cash requirements are for working capital, debt obligations and capital expenditures. We have no material outstanding commitments for capital expenditures. Our principal sources of funds have historically been, and will be, cash provided by operating activities.

As a holding company, we have no operations of our own and accordingly we have no independent means of generating revenue, and our internal sources of funds to meet our cash needs, including payment of expenses,

 

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are dividends and other permitted payments from our subsidiaries. Our 2007 Credit Facility imposes upon us certain financial and operating covenants, including, among others, requirements that we satisfy certain financial tests, including a total leverage ratio if there are outstanding extensions of credit under the revolving facility, a minimum fixed charge ratio, and restrictions on our ability to incur debt, pay dividends or take certain other corporate actions. As of December 30, 2012 we were in compliance with all applicable covenants.

On February 27, 2007, we entered into the 2007 Credit Facility with a syndicate of financial institutions with Wells Fargo Bank as administrative agent, referred to as the 2007 Credit Facility. The 2007 Credit Facility provides for a $670.0 million term loan facility which matures in August, 2014, a delayed draw term loan of up to $250.0 million which matures in August 2014 and a revolving credit agreement with a $40.0 million aggregate loan commitment available, including a $15.0 million sub-facility for letters of credit and a $10.0 million swingline facility, which matures in February 2014.

On April 11, 2007, we entered into the Bridge Agreement with a syndicate of financial institutions with Wachovia Investment Holdings LLC as administrative agent. The Bridge Agreement provided a $300.0 million term loan facility which matures on April 11, 2015.

On May 7, 2007, we amended our 2007 Credit Facility and increased our borrowing by $275.0 million. This incremental borrowing has an interest rate of LIBOR + 2.25% or the Alternate Base Rate + 1.25%, depending upon the designation of the borrowing.

In accordance with the First Amendment, the rate on the previously existing borrowings of $920.0 million was changed to bear interest at LIBOR + 2.00% or the Alternate Base Rate + 1.00% depending upon the designation of the borrowing. The terms of the previously outstanding borrowings were also modified to include a 1.00% premium if the debt is called within one year and an interest feature that grants the previously outstanding debt an interest rate of 0.25% below the highest rate of any borrowing under the 2007 Credit Facility.

On February 15, 2008, we entered into our 2008 Bridge Facility with Barclays, as syndication agent, sole arranger and book runner. The 2008 Bridge Facility provided for a $20.6 million term loan facility. The 2008 Bridge Facility was paid in full on June 7, 2010.

On August 21, 2008, FIF III Liberty Holdings LLC (“FIF III”) purchased an aggregate of $11.5 million in 10% cumulative preferred stock of GateHouse Media Macomb Holdings, Inc. (“Macomb”), an operating subsidiary of ours. Macomb, an Unrestricted Subsidiary under the terms of the 2007 Credit Facility, used the proceeds from such sale of preferred stock to make an $11.5 million cash investment in Holdco non-voting 10% cumulative preferred stock. On December 7, 2010, FIF III exercised its right to require us to purchase its Macomb preferred stock. During the five-year period following the full repayment by us of the 2008 Bridge Facility, which repayment occurred in the second quarter of 2010, FIF III had the right to require us to purchase the preferred stock. We paid the purchase price of $14.1 million on December 8, 2010, which represented the sum of original purchase price of $11.5 million paid by FIF III for the Macomb preferred stock and accrued but unpaid dividends of $2.6 million. FIF III is an affiliate of Fortress Investment Group, LLC, the owner of approximately 39.6% of our outstanding common stock.

On February 3, 2009, we again amended our 2007 Credit Facility and reduced the amounts available under the credit agreement, as follows: (i) for revolving loans, from $40.0 million to $20.0 million; (ii) for the letter of credit subfacility, from $15.0 million to $5.0 million; and (iii) for the swingline loan subfacility, from $10.0 million to $5.0 million.

As required by the 2007 Credit Facility, as amended, on March 15, 2012 and March 2, 2011, we made a principal payment of $4.6 million and $11.2 million, respectively, which represented 50% of our Excess Cash Flow (as defined under the 2007 Credit Facility) related to the fiscal years ended January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010, respectively.

 

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Effective March 30, 2011 we further amended our 2007 Credit Facility to appoint Gleacher as the successor Agent and to provide that the lenders holding a majority of the outstanding term loans and loan commitments under the 2007 Credit Facility may remove the Agent and may make certain decisions and exercise certain powers previously within the discretion of the Agent.

Although we are currently in compliance with all of our covenants and obligations under the 2007 Credit Facility, due to restrictive covenants and conditions within each of this facility, we currently do not have the ability to draw upon the revolving credit facility portion of the 2007 Credit Facility for any immediate short-term funding needs or to incur additional long-term debt.

Future compliance with our financial and operating covenants will depend on the future performance of the business and our ability to curtail the negative revenue trend experience and our ability to address other risks and challenges set forth herein. We believe that we have adequate capital resources and liquidity to meet our working capital needs, borrowing obligations and all required capital expenditures for at least the next twelve months.

Our leverage may adversely affect our business and financial performance and may restrict our operating flexibility. The level of our indebtedness and our on-going cash flow requirements may expose us to a risk that a substantial decrease in operating cash flows due to, among other things, continued or additional adverse economic developments or adverse developments in our business, could make it difficult for us to meet the financial and operating covenants contained in our credit facilities. In addition, our leverage may limit cash flow available for general corporate purposes such as capital expenditures and our flexibility to react to competitive, technological and other changes in our industry and economic conditions generally.

Cash Flows

The following table summarizes our historical cash flows.

 

     Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January 1,
2012
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
 
     (in thousands)  

Cash provided by operating activities

   $ 23,499      $ 22,439      $ 26,453   

Cash used in investing activities

     (1,044     (731     (624

Cash used in financing activities

     (7,140     (11,249     (22,010

Cash Flows from Operating Activities. Net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 30, 2012 was $23.5 million. The net cash provided by operating activities resulted from a depreciation and amortization of $40.6 million, a net increase in cash provided by working capital of $10.8 million, an impairment of long-lived assets of $2.1 million, a $1.3 million loss on the sale of assets, amortization of deferred financing costs of $1.2 million, a goodwill impairment charge of $0.2 million, and non-cash compensation of $0.1 million, partially offset by a net loss of $30.3 million, a gain of $1.6 million on derivative instruments, and an increase funding of pension and other post-retirement obligations of $0.9 million. The increase in cash provided by working capital primarily resulted from a decrease in prepaid expenses related to a newsprint pricing agreement that required a prepayment of $10 million in fiscal 2011. No such prepayment was required in fiscal 2012.

Net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $22.4 million. The net cash provided by operating activities resulted from a depreciation and amortization of $43.4 million, an impairment of long-lived assets of $2.1 million, amortization of deferred financing costs of $1.4 million, a $0.8 million loss on the sale of assets, non-cash compensation of $0.5 million, a goodwill impairment charge of $0.4 million, partially offset by a net loss of $22.2 million, an increase funding of pension and other post-retirement obligations of $1.9 million, a net decrease in cash provided by working capital of $1.0 million, and a gain of $0.9 million on derivative instruments. The decrease in cash provided by working capital primarily resulted from a decrease in

 

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accrued expenses and an increase in prepaid expenses related to a newsprint pricing agreement that allowed for fixed pricing in 2012 below market rates from December 31, 2010 to January 1, 2012 offset by a decrease in accounts receivable and an increase in accounts payable.

Net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $26.5 million. The net cash provided by operating activities resulted from a depreciation and amortization of $46.1 million, a loss of $8.3 million on derivative instruments, non-cash compensation of $1.7 million, a $1.5 million loss on the sale of assets, amortization of deferred financing costs of $1.4 million, an impairment of long-lived assets of $0.8 million, partially offset by a net loss of $26.6 million, a net decrease in cash provided by working capital of $5.4 million, an increase funding of pension and other post-retirement obligations of $1.4 million. The decrease in cash provided by working capital primarily resulted from an increase in prepaid expenses related to a newsprint pricing agreement that allowed for fixed pricing in 2011 below market rates from December 31, 2009 to December 31, 2010.

Cash Flows from Investing Activities. Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 30, 2012 was $1.0 million. During the year ended December 30, 2012, we used $4.6 million for capital expenditures, which was offset by $3.6 million received from the sale of publications, other assets and insurance proceeds.

Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $0.7 million. During the year ended January 1, 2012, we used $3.3 million for capital expenditures, which was offset by $2.6 million received from the sale of publications, other assets and insurance proceeds.

Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $0.6 million. During the year ended December 31, 2010, we used $4.8 million for capital expenditures, which was offset by $4.2 million received from the collection of a receivable due from a previous real estate sale and the sale of other real property.

Cash Flows from Financing Activities. Net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 30, 2012 was $7.1 million due to repayments under the 2007 Credit Facility.

Net cash used in financing activities for the year ended January 1, 2012 was $11.2 million due to a repayment under the 2007 Credit Facility.

Net cash used in financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $22.0 million, which primarily resulted from a $2.5 million repayment under the 2007 Credit Facility, the repurchase of subsidiary preferred stock of $11.5 million and an $8.0 million repayment under the 2008 Bridge Facility.

Changes in Financial Position

The discussion that follows highlights significant changes in our financial position and working capital from December 30, 2012 to January 1, 2012.

Accounts Receivable. Accounts receivable decreased $4.5 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, which relates to the timing of cash collections and lower revenue recognized in 2012 compared to 2011. An additional $1.4 million relates to assets sold during the current year.

Prepaid Expenses. Prepaid expenses decreased $9.7 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to a $10.0 million prepayment during the year ended January 1, 2012 which related to a newsprint pricing agreement that allowed for fixed pricing in 2012 at below market rates. The pricing agreement for fiscal 2013 did not require a prepayment at December 30, 2012.

Property, Plant, and Equipment. Property, plant, and equipment decreased $14.4 million during the period from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, of which $16.6 million relates to depreciation and $2.3 million relates to assets sold and held for sale, which was partially offset by $4.6 million that was used for capital expenditures.

 

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Goodwill. Goodwill decreased $0.2 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to an impairment charge included in income (loss) from discontinued operations.

Intangible Assets. Intangible assets decreased $27.7 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to amortization of $24.0 million, $1.9 million due to an impairment of assets sold during the current year, which is included in income (loss) from discontinued operations, and $1.8 million which was sold during the current year.

Others Assets. Other assets increased $0.7 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to an investment in joint ventures where our ownership is less than 10%.

Long-term Assets Held for Sale. Long-term assets held for sale decreased $0.5 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to proceeds of $0.3 million and a $0.2 million impairment of assets classified as held for sale as of January 1, 2012. Assets held for sale as of December 30, 2012 consist of real estate in Winter Haven, FL.

Current Portion of Long-term Debt. Current portion of long-term debt increased $2.0 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012 due to an increase in the estimated payment as required by the 2007 Credit Facility, which represented 50% of the Excess Cash Flow related to the year ended December 30, 2012. This amount increased from $4.6 million at January 1, 2012 to $6.6 million at December 30, 2012.

Accounts Payable. Accounts payable increased $1.2 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, which was primarily attributable to the timing of vendor payments.

Accrued Interest. Accrued interest increased $1.8 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, which was primarily attributable to the timing of interest payments.

Long-term Debt. Long-term debt decreased $9.2 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012 due to a $6.6 million reclassification to current portion of long-term debt of a principal payment due in 2013 as required by the 2007 Credit Facility, which represented 50% of the Excess Cash Flow related to the year ended December 30, 2012 and a $2.5 million repayment under the 2007 Credit Facility from the proceeds of the sale of our Suburban Chicago publications.

Derivative Instruments. Derivative instrument liability decreased $5.9 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to changes in the fair value measurement of our interest rate swaps.

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss. Accumulated other comprehensive loss decreased $1.7 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, which resulted from the change in fair value of the interest rate swaps of $5.9 million, which was offset by a $2.6 million change to the Company’s pension and post retirement plans, a gain on derivative instruments due to amortization of $1.6 million, and a $0.1 million reclassification of income tax benefit from accumulated other comprehensive loss.

Accumulated Deficit. Accumulated deficit increased $30.3 million from January 1, 2012 to December 30, 2012, due to a net loss of $30.3 million.

Indebtedness

As of December 30, 2012, a total of $1.2 billion was outstanding under the 2007 Credit Facility; consisting of $658.3 million under the term loan facility, $245.6 million under the delayed draw term loan facility, $270.2 million under the incremental term loan facility. No amounts were outstanding under the revolving credit facility. Refer to Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion on our indebtedness.

Summary Disclosure About Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments

 

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The following table reflects a summary of our contractual cash obligations, including estimated interest payments where applicable, as of December 30, 2012:

 

     2013      2014      2015      2016      2017      Thereafter      Total  
     (In Thousands)  

2007 Credit Facility

   $ 63,324       $ 1,204,780       $ —        $      $      $ —        $ 1,268,104   

Noncompete payments

     421         286         250         200         200         200         1,557   

Operating lease obligations

     4,640         4,616         3,447         2,523         2,203         2,551         19,980   

Letters of credit

     5,182         —           —          —          —          —          5,182   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 73,567       $ 1,209,682       $ 3,697       $ 2,723       $ 2,403       $ 2,751       $ 1,294,823   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The table above excludes future cash requirements for pension and postretirement obligations. The periods in which these obligations will be settled in cash are not readily determinable and are subject to numerous future events and assumptions. We estimate cash requirements for these obligations in 2013 totaling approximately $1,577. See Note 13 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, included herein.

On February 27, 2007, we entered into the 2007 Credit Facility with a syndicate of financial institutions with Wells Fargo Bank as administrative agent. The 2007 Credit Facility provides for a $670.0 million term loan facility which matures in August 2014, a delayed draw term loan of up to $250.0 million available until August 2007 which matures in August, 2014 and a revolving credit agreement with a $40.0 million aggregate loan commitment available, including a $15.0 million sub-facility for letters of credit and a $10.0 million swingline facility, which matures in February 2014.

On May 7, 2007, we amended our 2007 Credit Facility and increased our borrowings by $275.0 million.

On February 3, 2009, we again amended our 2007 Credit Facility and reduced the amounts available under the credit agreement, as follows: (i) for revolving loans, from $40,000,000 to $20,000,000; (ii) for the letter of credit subfacility, from $15,000,000 to $5,000,000; and (iii) for the swingline loan subfacility, from $10,000,000 to $5,000,000.

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial statements.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In July 2012, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standard Update (ASU) 2012-02, “Intangibles- Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment.” The amendments in this update allow companies the option to perform a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that an indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired. An entity is not required to calculate the fair value of an indefinite-lived intangible asset and perform the quantitative impairment test unless the entity determines that it is more likely than not the asset is impaired. The changes to the ASC as a result of this update are effective for annual and interim impairment test performed for fiscal years beginning after September 15, 2012. The adoption of ASU No. 2012-02 will not have a material effect on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

In February 2013, the FASB issued ASC Update No. 2013-02 “Comprehensive Income Reporting of Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Topic 220)”, which amends ASC Topic 220. The amendments require an entity to provide information about the amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) by component. In addition an entity is required to present either on the face of the Statement of Income or in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements significant amounts reclassified out of AOCI and should be provided by the respective line items of net income but only if the amount reclassified is required under GAAP to be reclassified in its entirety to net income in the same reporting period. For other amounts that are not required under GAAP to be reclassified in their entirety to net income, an entity is required to cross-reference to other disclosures require under GAAP that provide additional

 

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detail about these amounts. The changes to the ASC as a result of this updated guidance are effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012. The adoption of ASU No. 2013-02 will not have a material effect on the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

A non-GAAP financial measure is generally defined as one that purports to measure historical or future financial performance, financial position or cash flows, but excludes or includes amounts that would not be so adjusted in the most comparable GAAP measure. In this report, we define and use Adjusted EBITDA, a non-GAAP financial measure, as set forth below.

Adjusted EBITDA

We define Adjusted EBITDA as follows:

Income (loss) from continuing operations before:

 

   

Income tax expense (benefit);

 

   

interest/financing expense;

 

   

depreciation and amortization; and

 

   

non-cash impairments.

Management’s Use of Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA is not a measurement of financial performance under GAAP and should not be considered in isolation or as an alternative to income from operations, net income (loss), cash flow from continuing operating activities or any other measure of performance or liquidity derived in accordance with GAAP. We believe this non-GAAP measure, as we have defined it, is helpful in identifying trends in our day-to-day performance because the items excluded have little or no significance on our day-to-day operations. This measure provides an assessment of controllable expenses and affords management the ability to make decisions which are expected to facilitate meeting current financial goals as well as achieve optimal financial performance. We believe that it also provides an indicator for management to determine if adjustments to current spending decisions are needed.

Adjusted EBITDA provides us with a measure of financial performance, independent of items that are beyond the control of management in the short-term, such as depreciation and amortization, taxation and interest expense associated with our capital structure. This metric measures our financial performance based on operational factors that management can impact in the short-term, namely the cost structure or expenses of the organization. Adjusted EBITDA is one of the metrics used by senior management and the board of directors to review the financial performance of the business on a monthly basis.

Limitations of Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool. It should not be viewed in isolation or as a substitute for GAAP measures of earnings or cash flows. Material limitations in making the adjustments to our earnings to calculate Adjusted EBITDA and using this non-GAAP financial measure as compared to GAAP net income (loss), include: the cash portion of interest/financing expense, income tax (benefit) provision and charges related to gain (loss) on sale of facilities represent charges (gains), which may significantly affect our financial results.

Readers of our financial statements may find this item important in evaluating our performance, results of operations and financial position. We use non-GAAP financial measures to supplement our GAAP results in order to provide a more complete understanding of the factors and trends affecting our business.

 

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Adjusted EBITDA is not an alternative to net income, income from operations or cash flows provided by or used in operations as calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. Readers of our financial statements should not rely on Adjusted EBITDA as a substitute for any such GAAP financial measure. We strongly urge readers of our financial statements to review the reconciliation of income (loss) from continuing operations to Adjusted EBITDA, along with our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. We also strongly urge readers of our financial statements to not rely on any single financial measure to evaluate our business. In addition, because Adjusted EBITDA is not a measure of financial performance under GAAP and is susceptible to varying calculations, the Adjusted EBITDA measure, as presented in this report, may differ from and may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies.

We use Adjusted EBITDA as a measure of our core operating performance, which is evidenced by the publishing and delivery of news and other media and excludes certain expenses that may not be indicative of our core business operating results. We consider the unrealized (gain) loss on derivative instruments and the (gain) loss on early extinguishment of debt to be financing related costs associated with interest expense or amortization of financing fees. Accordingly, we exclude financing related costs such as the early extinguishment of debt because they represent the write-off of deferred financing costs and we believe these non-cash write-offs are similar to interest expense and amortization of financing fees, which by definition are excluded from Adjusted EBITDA. Additionally, the non-cash gains (losses) on derivative contracts, which are related to interest rate swap agreements to manage interest rate risk, are financing costs associated with interest expense. Such charges are incidental to, but not reflective of, our core operating performance and it is appropriate to exclude charges related to financing activities such as the early extinguishment of debt and the unrealized (gain) loss on derivative instruments which, depending on the nature of the financing arrangement, would have otherwise been amortized over the period of the related agreement and does not require a current cash settlement.

The table below shows the reconciliation of income (loss) from continuing operations to Adjusted EBITDA for the periods presented:

 

    Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January  1,
2012(3)
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
    Year Ended
December 31,
2009
    Year Ended
December 31,
2008
 
    (In Thousands)  

Loss from continuing operations

  $ (28,747   $ (22,511   $ (27,383   $ (513,099   $ (659,486

Income tax expense (benefit)

    (207     (1,803     (155     342        (21,139

(Gain) loss on derivative instruments (1)

    (1,635     (913     8,277        12,672        10,119   

Gain on early extinguishment of debt (2)

    —         —         —         (7,538     —    

Amortization of deferred financing costs

    1,255        1,360        1,360        1,360        1,845   

Write-off of financing costs

    —         —         —         743        —    

Interest expense

    57,928        58,316        60,034        64,631        88,630   

Impairment of long-lived assets

    —         1,733        430        193,503        123,717   

Depreciation and amortization

    40,033        42,583        45,137        54,294        69,923   

Goodwill and mastheads impairment

    —         385       —         274,138        488,543   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations

  $ 68,627 (a)    $ 79,150 (b)    $ 87,700 (c)    $ 81,046 (d)    $ 102,15 (e) 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(a) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 30, 2012 included net expenses of $11,017, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $11,017 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $6,274, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(896), integration and reorganization costs of $4,401 and a $1,238 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $1,386 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(b)

Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended January 1, 2012 included net expenses of $9,461, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $9,461 are non-cash compensation

 

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  and other expenses of $4,226, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(1,104), integration and reorganization costs of $5,884 and an $455 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $1,829 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(c) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2010 included net expenses of $8,231, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $8,231 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $5,005, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(649), integration and reorganization costs of $2,324 and a $1,551 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $2,274 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(d) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2009 included net expenses of $9,291, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $9,291 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $8,634, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(782), integration and reorganization costs of $1,857 and a $418 gain on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $668 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(e) Adjusted EBITDA for the year ended December 31, 2008 included net expenses of $24,047, which are one time in nature or non-cash compensation. Included in these net expenses of $24,047 are non-cash compensation and other expenses of $18,198, non-cash portion of post-retirement benefits expense of $(1,499), integration and reorganization costs of $7,011 and $337 loss on the sale of assets.

Adjusted EBITDA also does not include $5,175 of EBITDA generated from our discontinued operations.

 

(1) Non-cash (gain) loss on derivative instruments is related to interest rate swap agreements which are financing related and are excluded from Adjusted EBITDA.

 

(2) Non-cash write-off of deferred financing costs are similar to interest expense and amortization of financing fees and are excluded from Adjusted EBITDA.

 

(3)

The year ended January 1, 2012 included a 53rd week of operations for approximately 60% of the business.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

We are exposed to market risk from changes in interest rates and commodity prices. Changes in these factors could cause fluctuations in earnings and cash flow. In the normal course of business, exposure to certain of these market risks is managed as described below.

Interest Rates

On August 18, 2008, we terminated interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $570.0 million. At December 30, 2012, after consideration of the interest rate swaps described below, $570.0 million of the remaining principal amount of our term loans are subject to floating interest rates.

Our debt structure and interest rate risks are managed through the use of floating rate debt and interest rate swaps. Our primary exposure is to LIBOR. A 100 basis point change in LIBOR would change our income from continuing operations before income taxes on an annualized basis by approximately $5.6 million, based on average pro forma floating rate debt outstanding during 2012, after consideration of the interest rate swaps of $625.0 million described below, and average amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility during 2012.

On February 27, 2007, we executed an interest rate swap in the notional amount of $100.0 million with a forward starting date of February 28, 2007. The interest rate swap has a term of seven years. Under this swap, we pay an amount to the swap counterparty representing interest on a notional amount at a rate of 5.14% and receive an amount from the swap counterparty representing, interest on the notional amount at a rate equal to the one month LIBOR.

 

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On April 4, 2007, we executed an additional interest rate swap in the notional amount of $250.0 million with a forward starting date of April 13, 2007. The interest rate swap has a term of seven years. Under this swap, we pay an amount to the swap counterparty representing interest on a notional amount at a rate of 4.971% and receive an amount from the swap counterparty representing interest on the notional amount at a rate equal to one month LIBOR.

On April 13, 2007, we executed an additional interest rate swap in the notional amount of $200.0 million with a forward starting date of April 30, 2007. The interest rate swap has a term of seven years. Under this swap, we pay an amount to the swap counterparty representing interest on a notional amount at a rate of 5.079% and receive an amount from the swap counterparty representing interest on the notional amount at a rate equal to one month LIBOR.

On September 18, 2007, we executed an additional interest rate swap based on a notional amount of $75.0 million with a forward starting date of September 18, 2007. The interest rate swap has a term of seven years. Under the swap, we pay an amount to the swap counterparty representing interest on a notional amount at a rate of 4.941% and receive an amount from the swap counterparty representing interest on the notional amount at a rate equal to one month LIBOR.

Commodities

Certain materials we use are subject to commodity price changes. We manage this risk through instruments such as purchase orders, membership in a buying consortium, fixed pricing agreements for certain newsprint purchases and continuing programs to mitigate the impact of cost increases through identification of sourcing and operating efficiencies. Primary commodity price exposures are newsprint, energy costs and, to a lesser extent, ink.

A $10 per metric ton newsprint price change would result in a corresponding annualized change in our income from continuing operations before income taxes of $0.4 million based on newsprint usage for the year ended December 30, 2012 of approximately 41,400 metric tons. In 2013, 95% of the companies’ newsprint is fixed through a pricing agreement, therefore only 5% of the usage would be impacted by a price increase.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

GATEHOUSE MEDIA, INC.

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page  

Consolidated Financial Statements:

  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     66   

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012

     67   

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the years ended December  30, 2012, January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010

     68   

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the years ended December  30, 2012, January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2010

     69   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 30, 2012, January  1, 2012 and December 31, 2010

     70   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     71   

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of

GateHouse Media, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of GateHouse Media, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss), stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 30, 2012. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. We were not engaged to perform an audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of GateHouse Media, Inc. and subsidiaries at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 30, 2012, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

 

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Rochester, New York
March 7, 2013

 

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GATEHOUSE MEDIA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share data)

 

     December 30,
2012
    January 1,
2012
 
ASSETS     

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 34,527      $ 19,212   

Restricted Cash

     6,467        6,167   

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $2,456 and $2,976 at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, respectively

     54,692        59,236   

Inventory

     6,019        6,017   

Prepaid expenses

     5,815        15,483   

Other current assets

     8,215        7,347   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     115,735        113,462   

Property, plant, and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $128,208 and $116,780 at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, respectively

     116,510        130,937   

Goodwill

     13,742        13,958   

Intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $196,878 and $179,327 at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012, respectively

     218,981        246,661   

Deferred financing costs, net

     1,719        2,974   

Other assets

     2,605        1,876   

Assets held for sale

     474        934   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 469,766      $ 510,802   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT     

Current liabilities:

    

Current portion of long-term liabilities

   $ 853      $ 1,039   

Current portion of long-term debt

     6,648        4,600   

Accounts payable

     9,396        8,216   

Accrued expenses

     26,258        27,625   

Accrued interest

     4,665        2,876   

Deferred revenue

     25,217        27,171   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     73,037        71,527   

Long-term liabilities:

    

Long-term debt

     1,167,450        1,176,638   

Long-term liabilities, less current portion

     2,347        2,935   

Derivative instruments

     45,724        51,576   

Pension and other postretirement benefit obligations

     15,367        13,758   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,303,925        1,316,434   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ deficit:

    

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 150,000,000 shares authorized at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012; 58,313,868 issued, and 58,077,031 outstanding at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012

     568        568   

Additional paid-in capital

     831,344        831,249   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (52,642     (54,359

Accumulated deficit

     (1,610,917     (1,581,114

Treasury stock, at cost, 236,837 shares at December 30, 2012 and January 1, 2012

     (310     (310
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total GateHouse Media stockholders’ deficit

     (831,957     (803,966

Noncontrolling interest

     (2,202     (1,666
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ deficit

     (834,159     (805,632
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit

   $ 469,766      $ 510,802   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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GATEHOUSE MEDIA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

    Year Ended
December 30,
2012
    Year Ended
January 1,
2012
    Year Ended
December 31,
2010
 

Revenues:

     

Advertising

  $ 331,419      $ 357,629      $ 386,069   

Circulation

    133,358        133,571        135,691   

Commercial printing and other

    26,187        25,763        26,057   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

    490,964        516,963        547,817   

Operating costs and expenses:

     

Operating costs

    270,749        284,864        300,127   

Selling, general, and administrative

    145,997        147,459        156,253   

Depreciation and amortization

    40,033        42,583        45,137   

Integration and reorganization costs

    4,401        5,884        2,324   

Impairment of long-lived assets

    —          1,733        430   

Loss on sale of assets

    1,238        455        1,551   

Goodwill impairment

    —          385        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

    28,546        33,600        41,995   

Interest expense

    57,928        58,316        60,034   

Amortization of deferred financing costs

    1,255        1,360        1,360   

(Gain) loss on derivative instruments

    (1,635     (913     8,277   

Other income

    (48     (849     (138
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before income taxes

    (28,954     (24,314     (27,538

Income tax benefit

    (207     (1,803     (155
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

    (28,747     (22,511     (27,383

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

    (1,592     283        743   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

    (30,339     (22,228     (26,640

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

    536        579        596   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to GateHouse Media

  $ (29,803   $ (21,649   $ (26,044
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss per share:

     

Basic and diluted:

     

Loss from continuing operations attributable to GateHouse Media

  $ (0.49   $ (0.38   $ (0.46

Net loss attributable to GateHouse Media

  $ (0.51   $ (0.37   $ (0.45

Other comprehensive income (loss):

     

Gain (loss) on derivative instruments, net of income taxes of $0

  $ 4,364      $ 11,052      $ (12,691

Pension and other postretirement benefit items:

     

Net actuarial loss

    (2,530     (2,663     (662

Amortization of net actuarial loss

    383        83        112   

Amortization of prior service credit

    (457     (457     (457

Other adjustment

    (43     240        —     
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total pension and other postretirement benefit items, net of income taxes of $0

    (2,647     (2,797     (1,007
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

    1,717        8,255        (13,698
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

    (28,622     (13,973     (40,338

Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

    (536     (579     (596
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss attributable to GateHouse Media

  $ (28,086   $ (13,394   $ (39,742
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

68


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GATEHOUSE MEDIA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

(In thousands, except share data)

 

    Common stock     Additional
paid-in capital
    Accumulated other
comprehensive
loss
    Accumulated
deficit
    Treasury stock     Non-
controlling
interest
in
subsidiary
       
    Shares     Amount           Shares     Amount       Total  

Balance at December 31, 2009

    58,313,868      $ 568      $ 829,009      $ (48,916   $ (1,533,421     209,859      $ (306   $ (510   $ (753,576

Net loss

    —          —          —          —          (26,044     —          —          (596     (26,640

Loss on derivative instruments, net of income taxes of $0

    —          —          —          (12,691     —          —          —          —