10-K 1 evr1231201410k.htm 10-K EVR 12.31.2014 10K
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
x    

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2014
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM                  TO                  .
Commission File Number 001-32975
_____________________________________________________
EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 _____________________________________________________
Delaware
 
20-4748747
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York
 
10055
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 857-3100
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, $0.01 par value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in the definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large Accelerated Filer   x   
  
Accelerated Filer ¨
  
Non-Accelerated Filer ¨
  
Smaller Reporting Company ¨
 
  
 
  
(do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
 
Indicate by check whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ¨    No  ý
The aggregate market value of the voting and nonvoting common equity of the registrant held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2014 was approximately $2.1 billion, based on the closing price of the registrant’s Class A common stock reported on the New York Stock Exchange on such date of $57.64 per share and on the par value of the registrant’s Class B common stock, par value $0.01 per share.
The number of shares of the registrant’s Class A common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of February 18, 2015, was 36,887,325. The number of shares of the registrant’s Class B common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of February 18, 2015 was 26 (excluding 74 shares of Class B common stock held by a subsidiary of the registrant).
Documents Incorporated by Reference
Portions of the definitive Proxy Statement of Evercore Partners Inc. to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A of the general rules and regulations under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, for the 2015 annual meeting of stockholders (“Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.



EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
 
Page
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
 
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
 
 
Item 15.



PART I
Available Information
Our website address is www.evercore.com. We make available free of charge on the Investor Relations section of our website (http://ir.evercore.com) our Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Form 10-K”), Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed or furnished with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We also make available through our website other reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our Proxy Statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of that Act, as well as our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics. From time to time we may use our website as a channel of distribution of material company information. Financial and other material information regarding the Company is routinely posted on and accessible at http://ir.evercore.com. In addition, you may automatically receive email alerts and other information about us by enrolling your email by visiting the “Email Alert” section at http://ir.evercore.com. We do not intend for information contained in our website to be part of this Form 10-K.
Any materials we file with the SEC may be read and copied at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC, 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
In this report, references to “Evercore”, the “Company”, “we”, “us” and “our” refer to Evercore Partners Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries. Unless the context otherwise requires, references to (1) “Evercore Partners Inc.” refer solely to Evercore Partners Inc., and not to any of its consolidated subsidiaries and (2) “Evercore LP” refer solely to Evercore LP, a Delaware limited partnership, and not to any of its consolidated subsidiaries. References to the “IPO” refer to our initial public offering on August 10, 2006 of 4,542,500 shares of our Class A common stock, including shares issued to the underwriters of the IPO pursuant to their election to exercise in full their overallotment option.
Forward-Looking Statements
This report contains or incorporates by reference forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, which reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our operations and financial performance. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as “outlook”, “believes”, “expects”, “potential”, “continues”, “may”, “should”, “seeks”, “approximately”, “predicts”, “intends”, “plans”, “estimates”, “anticipates” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties.
Accordingly, there are or will be important factors that could cause actual outcomes or results to differ materially from those indicated in these statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements and, based on various underlying assumptions and expectations, are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions and may include projections of our future financial performance based on our growth strategies and anticipated trends in Evercore’s business. We believe these factors include, but are not limited to, those described under “Risk Factors”. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included or incorporated by reference in this report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. You should, however, consult further disclosures we may make in future filings of our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments thereto or in future press releases or other public statements.
We operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for our management to predict all risks and uncertainties, nor can management assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.



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Item 1.
Business
Overview
Evercore is one of the leading independent investment banking advisory firms in the world based on the dollar volume of announced worldwide merger and acquisition (“M&A”) transactions on which we have advised since 2000. When we use the term independent investment banking advisory firm, we mean an investment banking firm that directly, or through its affiliates, does not engage in commercial banking or significant proprietary trading activities. We were founded on the belief that there is an opportunity within the investment banking industry for a firm free of the potential conflicts of interest created within large, multi-product financial institutions. We believe that maintaining standards of excellence and integrity in our core businesses demands a spirit of cooperation and hands-on participation more commonly found in smaller organizations. Since our inception, we have set out to build—in the employees we choose and in the projects we undertake—an organization dedicated to the highest caliber of professionalism and integrity.
We operate globally through two business segments:
Investment Banking; and
Investment Management.
Our Investment Banking segment includes our advisory services, through which we provide advice to clients on significant mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other strategic corporate transactions, with a particular focus on advising prominent multinational corporations and substantial private equity firms on large, complex transactions. We also provide restructuring advice to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. In addition, we provide our clients with capital markets advice relating to both debt and equity securities, and we underwrite securities offerings and raise funds for financial sponsors.
Our Investment Banking segment also includes services through which we offer equity research and agency-only equity securities trading for institutional investors. During 2014, we increased the scale of these activities through the acquisition of the operating businesses of International Strategy & Investment ("ISI"), a leading independent research-driven equity sales and agency trading firm. We also acquired the noncontrolling interest in our Institutional Equities business that we did not already own. The Company combined ISI's business with the Company's existing Institutional Equities business which now competes as Evercore ISI.
Our Investment Management segment focuses on Institutional Asset Management, through which we manage financial assets for sophisticated institutional investors and provide independent fiduciary services to corporate employee benefit plans; Wealth Management, through which we provide wealth management services for high net-worth individuals; and Private Equity, through which we manage private equity funds. Each of these businesses is led by senior investment professionals with extensive experience in their respective fields.
Investment Banking
At December 31, 2014, our Investment Banking segment had 68 advisory Senior Managing Directors with expertise and client relationships in a wide variety of industry sectors and broad geographic reach, as well as 104 senior research and distribution professionals in Evercore ISI.
In 2014, our Investment Banking segment generated $821.4 million, or 89% of our revenues, excluding Other Revenue, net, ($666.8 million, or 87%, in 2013 and $568.2 million, or 88%, in 2012) and earned advisory fees from 418 clients.
Advisory
We provide confidential, strategic and tactical advice to both public and private companies, with a particular focus on large, multinational corporations, as well as for select institutional investors and government institutions. By virtue of their prominence, size and sophistication, many of our clients are more likely to require expertise relating to larger and more complex situations. We are advising or have advised on numerous noteworthy transactions during the past three years, including:

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•   E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company on the spin-off of its Performance Chemicals business
 
•   Energy Future Holdings on the restructuring of its debt
 
 
 
•   SilverLake Partners on its sale of IPC Systems to Centerbridge Partners
 
•   Old Mutual plc on the IPO of OM Asset Management
 
 
 
•   Cable & Wireless Communications Plc on its acquisition of Columbus International Inc
 
•   Macquarie Infrastructure Fund IV and Wren House Infrastructure on the acquisition of E.ON’s operations in Spain and Portugal
 
 
 
•   AstraZeneca on its successful defense against Pfizer’s unsolicited approach
 
•   The Special Committee of Sirius XM Radio on the sale of its outstanding shares to Liberty Media
 
 
 
•   Occidental Petroleum on the spin-off of its California oil and gas business
 
•   Forstmann Little & Co. on the sale of its ownership stake in IMG Worldwide Holdings, Inc.
 
 
 
•   The Disinterested Directors of the Board of Chrysler Group on the purchase of the VEBA's 41.5% member interests by Fiat
 
•   CLP Holdings on the acquisition, together with China Southern Power Grid, of ExxonMobil's majority stake in its Hong Kong electricity business
 
 
 
•   Kinder Morgan on its acquisition of El Paso and on the subsequent sale of EP Energy to an investor group led by Apollo and Riverstone
 
•   Primaris Retail REIT on its defense from a hostile suitor and ultimate sale to H&R REIT
 
 
 
•   AT&T on its acquisition of Leap Wireless International
 
•   The McGraw-Hill Companies on the sale of its McGraw-Hill Education business to Apollo
 
 
 
•   Bristol-Myers Squibb on its acquisition of Amylin Pharmaceuticals and the sale of half of its interest in Amylin Pharmaceuticals to AstraZeneca
 
•   The Special Committee of the Board of Directors of Dell on its sale to Michael Dell and Silver Lake
 
 
 
•   Advent International and GS Capital Partners VI Fund on their acquisition of TransUnion
 
•   The Special Committee of Kraft Foods on its split into a global snacks-based business called Mondelez International and a North American grocery businesses called Kraft Foods Group
Our approach is to work as a trusted senior advisor to top corporate officers and boards of directors, helping them devise strategies for enhancing shareholder value:
Objective Advice with a Long-Term Perspective. We seek to recommend shareholder value enhancement strategies or other financial strategies that we would pursue ourselves were we acting in management’s capacity. This approach often includes advising our clients against pursuing transactions that we believe do not meet that standard.
Transaction Excellence. Since the beginning of 2000, we have advised on over $1.6 trillion of announced transactions, including acquisitions, sale processes, mergers of equals, special committee advisory assignments, recapitalizations and restructurings.
Senior Level Attention and Experience. The Senior Managing Directors in our advisory business participate in all facets of client interaction, from the initial evaluation phase to the final stage of executing our recommendations.
We advise clients in a number of different situations across many industries and geographies, each of which may require various services:
Mergers and Acquisitions. When we advise companies about the potential acquisition of another company or certain assets, our services include evaluating potential acquisition targets, providing valuation analyses, evaluating and proposing financial and strategic alternatives and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. We also may advise as to the timing, structure, financing and pricing of a proposed acquisition and assist in negotiating and closing the acquisition.
Divestitures and Sale Transactions. When we advise clients that are contemplating the sale of certain businesses, assets or their entire company, our services include evaluating and recommending financial and strategic alternatives

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with respect to a sale, advising on valuation issues and the appropriate sales process for the situation, assisting in preparing an offering memorandum or other appropriate sales materials and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. We also identify and contact selected qualified acquirers and assist in negotiating and closing the sale.
Special Committee and Fairness Opinion Assignments. We are well known for our independence, quality and thoroughness and devoting senior-level attention throughout the project lifecycle. We believe our objectivity, integrity and discretion allow us to provide an unbiased perspective.
Restructuring. We provide financial advice and investment banking services to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. Our services may include reviewing and analyzing the business, financial condition and prospects of the company or providing advice on strategic transactions, capital raising or restructurings. We also may provide advisory services to companies that have sought or are planning to seek protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code or other similar processes in non-U.S. jurisdictions.
Capital Markets. We serve as an objective advisor to corporations and financial sponsors on a broad array of financing issues. We have developed an expertise in assisting clients with respect to the entire spectrum of capital structure decisions. In addition, we act as an underwriter in public offerings and private placements of debt and equity securities in the U.S. and internationally.
Private Funds. We advise fund sponsors in the U.S. and internationally on all aspects of the fundraising process. In 2013, we expanded our platform to focus on secondary transactions for private funds interests.
We strive to earn repeat business from our clients. However, we operate in a highly competitive environment in which there are no long-term contracted sources of revenue. Each revenue-generating engagement is separately negotiated and awarded. To develop new client relationships and to develop new engagements from historical client relationships, we maintain an active dialogue with a large number of clients and potential clients, as well as with their financial and legal advisors, on an ongoing basis. We have gained new clients each year through our business development initiatives, through recruiting additional senior professionals who bring with them client relationships and through referrals from directors, attorneys and other third parties with whom we have relationships.
Equities
On October 31, 2014, following the closing of our acquisition of the operating businesses of ISI, we combined ISI's business with our existing Institutional Equities business and renamed this business Evercore ISI. Evercore ISI's leading analysts and distribution organization provides fundamental, macroeconomic and policy research and transaction execution excellence to the largest and most significant institutional and sovereign investors globally.
Equity Research. Our research analysts perform research to help our clients understand the dynamics that drive the industries and companies under coverage. We seek to differentiate ourselves through originality of perspective, depth of insight and ability to uncover industry trends. Our research analysts cover major industry developments, publish research on industry sectors, provide fundamental, company-specific coverage and identify and evaluate investment opportunities in publicly-traded companies.
Institutional Sales and Trading. Our professionals provide equity and listed option securities sales and trading services to institutional investors and seek to develop strong relationships with the portfolio managers and traders they serve by working closely with our equity research professionals.
Investment Management
Our Investment Management segment includes Institutional Asset Management, in the United States through Evercore Trust Company, N.A. (“ETC”), Atalanta Sosnoff Capital, LLC (“Atalanta Sosnoff”) and ABS Investment Management, LLC (“ABS”) and in Mexico through Evercore Casa de Bolsa, S.A. de C.V. (“ECB”, formerly Protego Casa de Bolsa, S.A. de C.V.); Wealth Management, through Evercore Wealth Management (“EWM”) and G5 Holdings S.A. (“G5 ǀ Evercore”); and Private Equity. Our Investment Management business principally manages and invests capital on behalf of third parties, including a broad range of institutional investors such as corporate and public pension funds, endowments, foundations, insurance companies, family offices and high net-worth individuals. Our Investment Management business is led by highly-experienced Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers. In December 2013, we completed the sale of Evercore Pan-Asset Capital Management (“Pan”), formerly included within Wealth Management.
In 2014, our Investment Management segment generated revenue of $98.8 million or 11% of our revenues, excluding Other Revenue, net, ($95.8 million, or 13%, in 2013 and $79.8 million, or 12%, in 2012). As of December 31, 2014, we had $14.0 billion of assets under management (“AUM”), excluding any AUM from our non-consolidated affiliates, of which $8.1 billion was attributable to Institutional Asset Management, $5.7 billion was attributable to Wealth Management and $0.3 billion was attributable to Private Equity clients.


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Institutional Asset Management
Within our Institutional Asset Management business, ETC provides specialized investment management, independent fiduciary and trustee services, Atalanta Sosnoff manages large-capitalization U.S. equity and balanced products, ABS is an institutionally focused hedge fund-of-funds manager and ECB primarily manages Mexican fixed income products and offers fiduciary and trust services.
Wealth Management
Wealth Management provides services through EWM and G5 ǀ Evercore. EWM targets clients with more than $5 million in investable assets and offers services such as investment policy creation, asset allocation, customized investment management, manager selection, performance reporting and financial planning.
Private Equity
Private Equity manages value-oriented, middle-market private equity funds in both the United States and Mexico. While we do not intend to raise Evercore-sponsored successor funds in the United States or Europe, we maintain a strategic alliance to pursue private equity investment opportunities with Trilantic Capital Partners (“Trilantic”). As part of the agreement, we agreed to use commercially reasonable efforts to source investment opportunities for Trilantic Capital Partners Associates IV L.P. (“Trilantic IV”), and Trilantic agreed to use commercially reasonable efforts to refer to the Company mergers and acquisitions advisory services or restructuring advisory services from time to time with respect to selected portfolio companies of Trilantic IV.
In connection with the issuance of certain limited partnership interests in Trilantic, the Company became a limited partner of Trilantic and is entitled to receive 10% of the aggregate amount of carried interest in respect to all of the portfolio investments made by Trilantic IV, up to $15.0 million. The Company and its affiliates are passive investors and do not participate in the management of any Trilantic-sponsored funds. Trilantic also agreed to pay an annual fee to the Company equal to $2.0 million per year for a period of five years as consideration for services to be performed by the Company. In addition, as part of the strategic alliance, the Company agreed to commit $5.0 million of the total capital commitments of Trilantic Capital Partners V L.P. ("Trilantic V").
Our Strategies for Growth
We intend to continue to grow and diversify our businesses, and to further enhance our profile and competitive position, through the following strategies:
Add Highly Qualified Investment Banking Professionals with Industry and Product Expertise. We hired six new Senior Managing Directors in 2014, expanding our capabilities in the U.S. and Europe, increasing our presence in Technology, Healthcare, Telecom and Oil & Gas, as well as adding a European focused debt advisory business to our advisory practice and expanding our research and distribution capabilities through the formation of Evercore ISI. We intend to continue to recruit high-caliber advisory, capital markets advisory, funds placement, research and distribution professionals to add depth in industry sectors and products and services in areas that we believe we already have strength, and to extend our reach to sectors or new business lines we have identified as particularly attractive.
Achieve Organic Growth and Improved Profitability in Investment Management. We are focused on managing our current Investment Management business towards growth and improved profitability. We also continue to selectively evaluate opportunities to expand Wealth Management.
Expand In New Geographic Markets. We are expanding in new geographic markets where we believe the business environment will be receptive to the strengths of our Investment Banking business model or where we believe our clients have or may develop a significant presence. Our expansion in Canada and Singapore, as well as our advisory affiliates and alliances in Brazil, Argentina, Japan, China, South Korea and India, as well as Australia in the first quarter of 2015, represent important steps in this strategy. We are actively seeking to strengthen, expand and deepen these alliances and to enter into new arrangements in additional geographies. We may hire groups of talented professionals or pursue additional strategic acquisitions or alliances with highly-regarded regional or local firms whose cultures and operating principles are similar to ours.
Results by Segment and Geographic Location
See Note 22 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding our segment results and the geographic areas from which we derive our revenues.



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People
As of December 31, 2014, we employed approximately 1,300 people worldwide. Our senior professionals play a significant role in driving growth and are measured by their productivity either through revenue per Advisory Senior Managing Director or other metrics including asset growth for Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers. None of our employees are subject to any collective bargaining agreements, and we believe we have good relations with our employees.
As a leading independent investment banking firm, our core asset is our professional staff, including their intellectual capital and their dedication to providing the highest quality services to our clients. Prior to joining Evercore, many of our Advisory Senior Managing Directors, Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers and Senior Research and Sales and Trading Professionals held senior level positions with other leading corporations, financial services firms or investment firms.
Competition
The financial services industry is intensely competitive, and we expect it to remain so. Our competitors are other investment banking, financial advisory and investment management firms. We compete both globally and on a regional, product or niche basis. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including transaction execution skills, investment performance, quality of equity research, our range of products and services, innovation, reputation and price.
Evercore is predominantly an independent investment banking advisory firm, and its competitors can be categorized into three main groups: (1) large universal banks and bulge bracket firms such as Bank of America, Barclays, Citigroup, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and UBS, (2) independent advisory firms such as Lazard and Rothschild and (3) boutiques, such as Centerview, Greenhill, Moelis and Perella Weinberg, among others. We believe, and our clients have informed us, that firms which also engage in acquisition financing, significant proprietary trading in clients’ securities and the management of large private equity funds that often compete with clients can cause such firms to develop interests that may be in conflict with the interests of advisory clients. Since Evercore is able to avoid potential conflicts associated with these types of activities, we believe that Evercore is better able to develop more trusted and long-term relationships with its clients than those of its competitors which provide such services. In addition, we have a larger global presence and deeper sector expertise than many of the boutiques. Evercore ISI's business is also subject to competition from investment banks and other large and small financial institutions who offer similar services.
We believe that we face a range of competitors in our Investment Management business, with numerous other firms providing competitive services in each of our sectors. In Institutional Asset Management, each of Atalanta Sosnoff, ABS, ECB and ETC face substantial competition from a large number of asset management and trust companies, many of which are larger, more established firms with greater brand name recognition and more extensive client networks and product offerings. Wealth Management competes with domestic and global private banks, regional broker-dealers, independent broker-dealers, registered investment advisors, commercial banks, trust companies and other financial services firms offering wealth management services to clients, many of which have substantially greater resources and offer a broader range of services. In Private Equity, our competition includes private equity funds of all sizes.
Competition is also intense for the attraction and retention of qualified employees. Our ability to continue to compete effectively in our businesses will depend upon our ability to attract new employees and retain and motivate our existing employees.
Regulation
United States
Our business, as well as the financial services industry generally, is subject to extensive regulation in the United States and elsewhere. As a matter of public policy, regulatory bodies in the United States and the rest of the world are charged with safeguarding the integrity of the securities and other financial markets and with protecting the interests of customers participating in those markets. In the United States, the SEC is the federal agency responsible for the administration of the federal securities laws. Evercore Group L.L.C. (“EGL”) and International Strategy & Investment Group L.L.C. ("ISI L.L.C."), wholly-owned subsidiaries of ours through which we conduct our investment banking business, are registered as broker-dealers with the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), and are registered as broker-dealers in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. EGL and ISI L.L.C. are subject to regulation and oversight by the SEC. FINRA, a self-regulatory organization that is subject to oversight by the SEC, adopts and enforces rules governing the conduct, and examines the activities, of its member firms, including EGL and ISI L.L.C. The SEC, FINRA, and regulators in various non-U.S. jurisdictions impose both conduct-based and disclosure-based requirements with respect to research reports and research analysts. State securities regulators also have regulatory or oversight authority over EGL and ISI L.L.C. PFG is impacted by various state and local regulations that restrict or prohibit the use of placement agents in connection with investments by public

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pension funds, including regulations in New York, Illinois, Ohio, California and New Mexico. Similar measures are being considered or have been implemented in other jurisdictions.
Broker-dealers are subject to regulations that cover all aspects of the securities business, including sales methods, trade practices, use and safekeeping of customers’ funds and securities, capital structure, record-keeping, the financing of customers’ purchases and the conduct and qualifications of directors, officers and employees. In particular, as a registered broker-dealer and member of a self-regulatory organization, we are subject to the SEC’s uniform net capital rule, Rule 15c3-1. Rule 15c3-1 specifies the minimum level of net capital a broker-dealer must maintain and also requires that a significant part of a broker-dealer’s assets be kept in relatively liquid form. The SEC and various self-regulatory organizations impose rules that require notification when net capital falls below certain predefined criteria, limit the ratio of subordinated debt to equity in the regulatory capital composition of a broker-dealer and constrain the ability of a broker-dealer to expand its business under certain circumstances. Additionally, the SEC’s uniform net capital rule imposes certain requirements that may have the effect of prohibiting a broker-dealer from distributing or withdrawing capital and requiring prior notice to the SEC for certain withdrawals of capital. ISI L.L.C. is also subject to the SEC's Market Access Rule, Rule 15c3-5. The Market Access Rule requires ISI L.L.C. to have controls and procedures in place to limit financial exposure caused by having direct market access. Our broker-dealer subsidiaries are also subject to regulations, including the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 (the “Patriot Act”), which impose obligations regarding the prevention and detection of money-laundering activities, including the establishment of customer due diligence and other compliance policies and procedures. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in monetary, regulatory and, in certain cases, criminal penalties.
We are also subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which prohibits offering, promising, giving, or authorizing others to give anything of value, either directly or indirectly, to a non-U.S. government official in order to influence official action or otherwise gain an unfair business advantage, such as to obtain or retain business.
Three of our affiliates, EWM, ABS and Atalanta Sosnoff, are registered as investment advisors with the SEC. Registered investment advisors are subject to the requirements and regulations of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Such requirements relate to, among other things, fiduciary duties to clients, maintaining an effective compliance program, solicitation agreements, conflicts of interest, recordkeeping and reporting requirements, disclosure requirements, limitations on agency cross and principal transactions between an advisor and advisory clients, state and local political contributions, as well as general anti-fraud prohibitions. EWM is also an investment advisor to a mutual fund, which subjects EWM to additional regulations under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). ETC, which is limited to fiduciary activities, is regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), is a member bank of the Federal Reserve System and is subject to the Patriot Act.
Mexico
ECB is authorized by the Mexican Ministry of Finance to act as a broker-dealer and financial advisor in accordance with the Mexican Securities Market Law. ECB is subject to regulation and oversight by the Mexican Ministry of Finance and the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission, including the maintenance of minimum capital requirements. In addition, the Mexican Broker Dealer Association, a self-regulatory organization that is subject to oversight by the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission, adopts and enforces rules governing the conduct, and examines the activities of, its member broker-dealers, including ECB. ECB has been authorized by the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission to act as a trustee and to operate in the equity markets.
United Kingdom
Authorization by the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”). The FCA is responsible for regulating Evercore Partners International LLP (“Evercore UK”) and International Strategy & Investment (UK) Limited (“ISI UK”), the London vehicle of the recently acquired ISI business. The Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (“FSMA”) is the basis for the UK’s financial services regulatory regime. FSMA is supported by secondary legislation and other rules made under FSMA, including the FCA Handbook of Rules and Guidance. A key FSMA provision is section 19, which contains a “general prohibition” against any person carrying on a “regulated activity” (or purporting to do so) in the UK unless he is an authorized or exempt person. It is a criminal offense to breach this general prohibition and certain agreements made in breach may not be enforceable. The “regulated activities” are set out in the FSMA (Regulated Activities) Order 2001 (as amended). Evercore UK is authorized to carry out regulated activities including: advising on investments; arranging (bringing about) deals in investments and making arrangements with a view to transactions in investments. ISI UK is also authorized to carry out these activities and, additionally, is authorized to carry out the regulated activity of dealing in investments as agent. As UK authorized persons, Evercore UK and ISI UK are subject to the FCA’s high level principles for businesses, conduct of business obligations and organizational requirements. The FCA has extensive powers to supervise and intervene in the affairs of the firms. It can take a range of disciplinary enforcement actions, including public censure, restitution, fines or sanctions and the award of compensation.

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FSMA also has a civil penalty regime for market abuse, supplemented by the FCA's Code of Market Conduct, which exists independently of a separate criminal regime for insider dealing. The civil regime implements the Market Abuse Directive (“MAD”) in the UK. MAD is being replaced by a new Markets Abuse Regulation (“MAR”), which will expand and develop the existing EU market abuse regime. MAR will apply from July 3, 2016.
Regulatory Capital. Regulatory capital requirements form an integral part of the FCA’s prudential supervision of FCA authorized firms. The regulatory capital rules oblige firms to hold a certain amount of capital at all times (taking into account the particular risks to which the firm may be exposed given its business activities), thereby helping to ensure that firms can meet their liabilities as they fall due and safeguarding their (and their counterparties’) financial stability. The FCA also expects firms to take a proactive approach to monitoring and managing risks, consistent with its high level requirement for firms to have adequate financial resources. However, as a so-called “exempt-CAD firm”, Evercore UK is subject only to limited minimum capital requirements. ISI UK is a so-called “BIPRU investment firm”. As a result, it is potentially subject to a greater minimum regulatory capital requirement, currently based on its annual fixed expenditure (its “fixed overhead requirement”). The FCA may impose a higher capital requirement than the minimum requirement on BIPRU investment firms.
Anti-Money Laundering, Counter-Terrorist Financing and Anti-Bribery. The Money Laundering Regulations 2007 came into force on December 15, 2007 and implement the Third EU Money Laundering Directive (“MLD 3”). The MLD 3 harmonizes standards across the EU with higher-level, risk-based requirements and require relevant firms to have procedures in place to prevent money laundering and to take a risk-based approach to focus the efforts where they are most needed. This approach includes client due diligence, monitoring, staff training and awareness. Failure to maintain the necessary procedures is a criminal offense. The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and the Terrorism Act 2000 also contain a number of offenses in relation to money laundering and terrorist financing, respectively. Evercore UK, ISI UK (and potentially other Evercore entities with a ‘close connection’ to the UK) are also subject to the UK Bribery Act 2010 which came into force on July 1, 2011. It provides for criminal penalties for bribery of, or receipt of a bribe from, public officials, corporations and individuals, as well as for the failure of an organization to prevent a person with whom it is associated from providing bribes for the organization’s benefit. There are currently proposals for a Fourth EU Money Laundering Directive, which are currently expected to be adopted in March or April 2015 and expected to come into force in 2017.
Regulatory Framework in the European Union. Both Evercore UK and ISI UK have obtained the appropriate European investment services passport rights to provide cross-border services into a number of other members of the European Economic Area (“EEA”). Evercore UK has also obtained a passport to provide specific investment services from a Spanish branch. These “passports” derive from the pan-European regime established by the EU Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (“MiFID”), which regulates the provision of investment services and activities throughout the EEA. MiFID provides investment firms which are authorized in any one EEA member state the right to provide investment services on a cross-border basis, or through the establishment of a branch to clients located in other EEA member states (known as “host member states”) on the basis of their home member state authorization without the need for separate authorization by the competent authorities in the relevant host member state. This practice is known as “passporting”.
MiFID has been recast and replaced with a new directive (“MiFID 2”) and a new Markets in Financial Instruments Regulation (“MiFIR”). Among the measures introduced by MiFID 2 and MiFIR are enhanced investor protection and conduct of business rules. One aspect of the enhanced conduct of business rules is stricter restrictions on investment firms making or receiving so-called “inducements” including dealing (or broker) commissions. MiFID 2 and MiFIR also introduce a harmonized regime for access by non-European firms to the EU investment services market. This could impact the ability of Evercore entities outside of Europe to provide investment services within Europe. Both MiFID 2 and MiFIR entered into force on July 2, 2014 and must generally be applied by member states by January 3, 2017.
Hong Kong
In Hong Kong, the Securities and Futures Commission (“SFC”) regulates our subsidiary, Evercore Asia Limited. The compliance requirements of the SFC include, among other things, net capital requirements and stockholders’ equity requirements. The SFC regulates the activities of the officers, directors, employees and other persons affiliated with Evercore Asia Limited, and require the registration of such persons.
Singapore
We established a Singapore subsidiary, Evercore Asia (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. (“Evercore Singapore”) in August 2013 with the objective of creating a business platform to engage in corporate finance advisory services. In Singapore, corporate finance advisory activities are regulated by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (“MAS”) and subject to licensing requirements. On June 24, 2014, Evercore Singapore obtained a Capital Market Services license issued by the MAS for dealing in securities and advising on corporate finance matters.

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General
Certain of our businesses are subject to compliance with laws and regulations of U.S. federal and state governments, non-U.S. governments, their respective agencies and/or various self-regulatory organizations or exchanges relating to, among other things, the privacy of client information, and any failure to comply with these regulations could expose us to liability and/or reputational damage. Additional legislation, changes in rules promulgated by financial authorities and self-regulatory organizations or changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, either in the United States or elsewhere, may directly affect our mode of operation and profitability.
The U.S. and non-U.S. government agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the United States and Mexican Financial Authorities, are empowered to conduct periodic examinations and initiate administrative proceedings that can result in censure, fine, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or the suspension or expulsion of a regulated entity or its directors, officers or employees.
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Risks Related to Our Business
Difficult market conditions may adversely affect our business in many ways, including reducing the volume of the transactions involving our Investment Banking business and reducing the value of the assets we manage in our Investment Management businesses, which, in each case, may materially reduce our revenue or income.
As a financial services firm, our businesses are materially affected by conditions in the global financial markets and economic conditions throughout the world. Global financial markets and economic conditions are negatively impacted by many factors beyond our control, including the inability to access credit markets, rising interest rates or inflation, terrorism, political uncertainty, uncertainty in the U.S. federal fiscal policy and the fiscal policy of foreign governments and the timing and nature of regulatory reform. Financial market and economic conditions have been volatile in the last several years, and challenging conditions have persisted. Concerns over the rate of economic recovery, the level of U.S. national debt and foreign debt, unemployment, the availability and cost of credit, the global housing market, inflation levels, currency fluctuations, energy costs (including significant declines in oil prices) and geopolitical issues have contributed to increased volatility, uncertainty and diminished expectations for the economy and for the markets. These conditions could reduce the demand for our services and present new challenges. Revenue generated by our Investment Banking business is related to the volume and value of the transactions in which we are involved. During periods of unfavorable market and economic conditions, our operating results may be adversely affected by a decrease in the volume and value of M&A transactions and increasing price competition among financial services companies seeking advisory engagements. Unfavorable market conditions also may lead to a reduction in revenues from our trading, underwriting and placement agent activities. In addition, Europe’s ongoing debt crisis could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition, particularly with respect to our U.K. advisory business. The European sovereign debt crisis has continued to negatively impact economic conditions and global markets. The uncertainty over the outcome of international and the EU’s financial support programs and the possibility that other EU member states may experience similar financial troubles could further disrupt global markets. See “-A portion of our revenues are derived from our international operations, which are subject to certain risks.”
During a market or general economic downturn, our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses would also be expected to generate lower revenue because the management fees we receive are typically based on the market value of the securities that comprise the assets we manage. In addition, due to uncertainty or volatility in the market or in response to difficult market conditions, clients may withdraw funds from these businesses in favor of investments they perceive as offering greater opportunity or lower risk. Difficult market conditions can also materially adversely affect our ability to launch new products or offer new services in our Institutional Asset Management or Wealth Management businesses, which could negatively affect our ability to increase AUM. In each case, management fees based on AUM would be negatively affected. Moreover, difficult market conditions may negatively impact the private equity funds that we manage by further reducing valuations and curtailing opportunities to exit and realize value from their investments.
Certain aspects of our cost structure are largely fixed, and we may incur costs associated with new or expanded lines of business prior to these lines of business generating significant revenue. If our revenue declines or fails to increase commensurately with the expenses associated with new or expanded lines of business, our profitability may be materially adversely affected.
We may incur costs associated with new or expanded lines of business, including guaranteed or fixed compensation costs, prior to these lines of business generating significant revenue. In addition, certain aspects of our cost structure, such as costs for occupancy and equipment rentals, communication and information technology services, and depreciation and amortization are largely fixed, and we may not be able to timely adjust these costs to match fluctuations in revenue. If our revenue declines, or

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fails to increase commensurately with the expenses associated with new or expanded lines of business, our profitability may be materially adversely affected.
We depend on our senior professionals, including our executive officers, and the loss of their services could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our senior leadership team’s reputations and relationships with clients and potential clients are critical elements in maintaining and expanding our businesses. For example, our Investment Banking business, including Advisory and Evercore ISI, is dependent on our senior Investment Banking professionals and on a small number of senior research analysts, traders and executives. In addition, Atalanta Sosnoff, EWM and ETC are dependent on a small number of senior portfolio managers and executives. Further, the operations and performance of G5 ǀ Evercore and ABS are dependent on a small number of senior executives. Our professionals possess substantial experience and expertise and strong client relationships. However, they are not obligated to remain employed with us. If these personnel were to retire, join an existing competitor, form a competing company or otherwise leave us, it could jeopardize our relationships with clients and result in the loss of client engagements and revenues.
If we are unable to successfully identify and hire productive individuals to join our firm or consummate additional acquisitions, alliances or joint ventures on attractive terms, we may not be able to implement our growth strategy successfully.
Our growth strategy is based, in part, on expanding our various businesses through additional acquisitions, entering into joint ventures and strategic alliances, and internally developing new opportunities that are complementary to our existing businesses and where we think we can add substantial value or generate substantial returns. The success of this strategy will depend on, among other things:
the availability of suitable opportunities and capital resources to effect our strategy;
the level of competition from other companies that may have greater financial resources than we do or may not require the same level of disclosure of these activities;
our ability to value acquisition and investment candidates accurately and negotiate acceptable terms for those acquisitions and investments; and
our ability to identify and enter into mutually beneficial relationships with joint venture partners.
Our growth strategy also relies on our ability to attract and retain profitable senior finance professionals across all of our businesses. In connection with the formation of Evercore ISI, we issued to a large number of employees Class G and H limited partnership interests of Evercore LP ("Class G and H Interests") that become exchangeable for common stock only upon the satisfaction of multi-year performance conditions. If business and economic conditions are such that satisfaction of these conditions becomes less likely, the effectiveness of these interests in retaining employees, including key senior employees, may be reduced.
Due to the early stage of development of many of our businesses and competition from other firms, we may face difficulties in recruiting and retaining professionals of a caliber consistent with our business strategy. In particular, many of our competitors may be able to offer more attractive compensation packages or broader career opportunities. Additionally, it may take more than one year for us to determine whether new advisory professionals will be profitable or effective, during which time we may incur significant expenses and expend significant time and resources on training, integration and business development.
If we are not successful in implementing our growth strategy, our business and results and the market price for our Class A common stock may be adversely affected.
Our inability to develop, integrate and manage recently added capabilities, joint ventures, alliances and acquired businesses successfully could have adverse consequences to our business.
Integrating acquired businesses, providing a platform for new businesses and partnering with other firms involve a number of risks and present financial, managerial and operational challenges, including the following factors, among others:
loss of key employees or customers;
possible inconsistencies in or conflicts between standards, controls, procedures and policies and the need to implement company-wide financial, accounting, information technology and other systems;
failure to maintain the quality of services that have historically been provided;
failure to coordinate geographically diverse organizations; and

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the diversion of management’s attention from our day-to-day business as a result of the need to manage any disruptions and difficulties and the need to add management resources to do so.
For example, we are in the process of integrating Evercore ISI fully into our control and other systems, and there can be no assurance that any of the foregoing issues will not arise during this integration process. In addition, acquisitions, start-ups and internally developed initiatives generally result in increased operating and administrative costs as the necessary infrastructure, IT, legal and compliance systems, controls and personnel are put in place. Our inability to develop, integrate and manage acquired companies, joint ventures or other strategic relationships and growth initiatives in an efficient and cost-effective manner, or at all, could have material adverse short- and long-term effects on our operating results, financial condition and liquidity.
We may not realize the cost savings, revenue enhancements or other benefits that we expected from our acquisitions and other growth initiatives.
Our analyses of the benefits and costs of expanding our businesses necessarily involve assumptions as to future events, including general business and industry conditions, the longevity of specific customer engagements and relationships, operating costs and competitive factors, many of which are beyond our control and may not materialize. While we believe our analyses and their underlying assumptions to be reasonable, they are estimates that are necessarily speculative in nature. In addition, new regulatory requirements and conflicts may reduce the synergies that we expect to result from our growth initiatives. Even if we achieve the expected benefits, we may not be able to achieve them within the anticipated time frame. Also, the cost savings and other synergies from these acquisitions may be offset by costs incurred in integrating the companies, increases in other expenses or problems in the business unrelated to these acquisitions. In the case of joint ventures, we are subject to additional risks and uncertainties in that we may be dependent upon, and subject to liability, losses or reputational damage relating to personnel, systems and activities that are not under our direct and sole control, and conflicts and disagreements between us and our joint venture partners may negatively impact our business.
Additionally, acquiring the equity of an existing business or substantially all of the assets of a company may expose us to liability for actions taken by an acquired business and its management before the acquisition. The due diligence we conduct in connection with an acquisition and any contractual guarantees or indemnities that we receive from the sellers of acquired companies may not be sufficient to protect us from, or compensate us for, actual liabilities. A material liability associated with an acquisition, especially where there is no right to indemnification, could adversely affect our operating results, financial condition and liquidity.
Our growth has placed, and will continue to place, significant demands on our administrative, operational and financial resources.
We have experienced significant growth in the past several years, including in our Investment Banking business, by expanding into sales, trading, research and underwriting activities, entering into strategic alliances, acquiring ISI and The Lexicon Partnership LLP ("Lexicon") and the hiring of additional senior professionals in our advisory group, and in our Investment Management business through the acquisitions of Atalanta Sosnoff and Mt. Eden Investment Advisors, LLC ("Mt. Eden") and our investment in ABS. Supporting this growth has placed significant demands on our operational, legal, regulatory and financial systems and resources for integration, training and business development efforts. We are often required to commit additional resources to maintain appropriate operational, legal, regulatory and financial systems to adequately support expansion, even when we only partner, enter into strategic alliances or take minority stakes in other businesses. We expect our growth to continue, which could place additional demands on our resources and increase our expenses. We cannot provide assurance that our financial controls, the level of knowledge of our personnel, our operational abilities, our legal and compliance controls and our other corporate support systems will be adequate to manage our expanding operations effectively. Any failure to do so could adversely affect our ability to pursue our growth strategy, generate revenue and control expenses.
Our revenue and profits are highly volatile, which may make it difficult for us to achieve steady earnings growth on a quarterly basis and may cause the price of our Class A common stock to decline.
Our revenue and profits are highly volatile. We generally derive Investment Banking revenue from engagements that generate significant fees at key transaction milestones, such as closing, and the timing of these milestones is outside of our control. As a result, our financial results will likely fluctuate from quarter to quarter based on the timing of when those fees are earned. It may be difficult for us to achieve steady earnings growth on a quarterly basis, which could, in turn, lead to large adverse movements in the price of our Class A common stock or increased volatility in our stock price generally.

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We earn a majority of our revenue from advisory engagements, and, in many cases, we are not paid until the successful consummation of the transactions. As a result, our Investment Banking revenue is highly dependent on market conditions and the decisions and actions of our clients, interested third parties and governmental authorities. For example, a client could delay or terminate an acquisition transaction because of a failure to agree upon final terms with the counterparty, failure to obtain necessary regulatory consents or board or stockholder approvals, failure to secure necessary financing, adverse market conditions or because the target’s business is experiencing unexpected operating or financial problems. Anticipated bidders for assets of a client during a restructuring transaction may not materialize or our client may not be able to restructure its operations or indebtedness due to a failure to reach agreement with its principal creditors. In these circumstances, we often do not receive any advisory fees other than the reimbursement of certain out-of-pocket expenses, despite the fact that we have devoted considerable resources to these transactions.
In Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management, our revenue includes management fees from assets we manage. These revenues are dependent upon the amount of AUM, which can decline as a result of market depreciation, withdrawals or otherwise, as well as the performance of the assets. The timing of flows, contributions and withdrawals are often out of our control, can occur on short notice, and may be inconsistent from quarter to quarter. See “—The amount and mix of our AUM are subject to significant fluctuations.” In addition, a portion of our Institutional Asset Management revenue is derived from performance fees, which vary depending on the performance of the investments we select for the funds and clients we manage, which could cause our revenue and profits to fluctuate. Even in the absence of a market downturn, below-market investment performance by our funds and portfolio managers could reduce AUM and asset management revenues.
In Private Equity, we record revenue from performance fees, or carried interest, when the returns on the private equity funds’ investments exceed certain minimum thresholds. In addition, if a fund performs poorly, we may be obligated to reverse previously recorded performance fee revenue under “claw-back” provisions. The claw-back provisions of an Evercore private equity fund remain in effect until the final distribution of the proceeds from such fund. Our Private Equity revenue also includes our allocable share, based on our investments in the funds managed by our Private Equity business, of unrealized (“mark-to-market”) as well as realized gains and losses reported by such funds. As a result, because the investment returns of our Private Equity funds are uncertain and difficult to predict, the revenue we derive from our Private Equity business can be volatile from quarter to quarter and year to year.
Our failure to deal appropriately with conflicts of interest could damage our reputation and materially adversely affect our business.
As we have expanded the scope of our businesses and client base, we increasingly confront actual and potential conflicts of interest relating to our Investment Banking and Investment Management businesses. It is possible that actual, potential or perceived conflicts could give rise to client dissatisfaction, litigation or regulatory enforcement actions. Appropriately identifying and managing actual or perceived conflicts of interest is complex and difficult, and our reputation could be damaged if we fail, or appear to fail, to deal appropriately with one or more potential or actual conflicts of interest. Regulatory scrutiny of, or litigation in connection with, conflicts of interest would have a material adverse effect on our reputation which would materially adversely affect our business in a number of ways, including an inability to raise additional assets and a reluctance of potential clients and counterparties to do business with us. Additionally, client-imposed conflicts requirements could place additional limitations on us, for example, by limiting our ability to accept Investment Banking advisory engagements or provide fiduciary services to our Investment Management clients.
Policies, controls and procedures that we may be required to implement to address additional regulatory requirements, including as a result of Evercore ISI's business and our expansion into underwriting activities, or to mitigate actual or potential conflicts of interest, may result in increased costs, including for additional personnel and infrastructure and IT improvements, as well as limit our activities and reduce the positive synergies that we seek to cultivate across our businesses. For example, due to our expanded equity research activities through Evercore ISI, we face an increased potential for conflicts of interest, including situations where our provision or publication of research conflicts with the interests of a client, or allegations that research objectivity is being inappropriately impacted by client considerations. Such conflicts may also arise if our Investment Banking advisory business has access to material non-public information that may not be shared with our equity research business or vice versa. In addition, ETC may seek independent fiduciary assignments which might present an actual or perceived conflict with our Advisory business.
Certain of our executive officers and employees responsible for managing Discovery Americas I, L.P. (the "Discovery Fund") have invested their own capital in side-by-side investments in specific portfolio companies along with the Discovery Fund. These side-by-side investments are not subject to management fees or carried interest. As a result, some of our executive officers and private equity portfolio managers have a different economic interest in the performance of investments in certain

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portfolio companies compared to the interests of investors in our private equity funds. This lack of a total alignment of interests and incentives could result in our executive officers and private equity portfolio managers devoting a disproportionate amount of time and attention to certain investments, and could result in the underperformance of our private equity fund as a whole.
Employee misconduct, which is difficult to detect and deter, could harm us by impairing our ability to attract and retain clients while subjecting us to significant legal liability and reputational harm.
There have been a number of highly-publicized cases involving fraud or other misconduct by employees in the financial services industry, and there is a risk that our employees could engage in misconduct that adversely affects our business. For example, one of our former Senior Managing Directors was found guilty of insider trading. Our Investment Banking business also often requires that we deal with confidential matters of great significance to our clients. If our employees were to improperly use or disclose confidential information provided by our clients, we could be subject to regulatory sanctions and suffer serious harm to our reputation, financial position, current client relationships and ability to attract future clients and employees. We are also subject to a number of obligations and standards arising from our Investment Management business and our authority over the assets managed by our Investment Management business. The violation of these obligations and standards by any of our employees would adversely affect our clients and us. It is not always possible to deter employee misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in all cases. If our employees engage in misconduct, our business may be adversely affected.
The financial services industry faces substantial litigation risks, and we may face damage to our professional reputation and legal liability if our services are not regarded as satisfactory or for other reasons.
As a financial services firm, we depend to a large extent on our relationships with our clients and our reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services to attract and retain clients. As a result, if a client is not satisfied with our services or if there are allegations of improper conduct by private litigants or regulators, whether the ultimate outcome is favorable or unfavorable to us, as well as negative publicity and press speculation about us, whether or not valid, may harm our reputation and may be more damaging to our business than to other types of businesses. Moreover, our role as advisor to our clients on important mergers and acquisitions or restructuring transactions often involves complex analysis and the exercise of professional judgment, including, if appropriate, rendering fairness opinions in connection with mergers and other transactions.
In recent years, the volume of claims and amount of damages claimed in litigation and regulatory proceedings against M&A financial advisors has been increasing. Our M&A advisory activities may subject us to the risk of significant legal liability to our clients and third parties, including our clients’ stockholders, under securities or other laws for materially false or misleading statements made in connection with securities and other transactions and potential liability for the fairness opinions and other advice provided to participants in corporate transactions. In addition, a portion of our M&A advisory fees are obtained from restructuring clients, and often these clients do not have sufficient resources to indemnify us for costs and expenses associated with third-party subpoenas and, to the extent claims are not barred as part of the reorganization process, direct claims. Our engagements typically include broad indemnities from our clients and provisions designed to limit our exposure to legal claims relating to our services, but these provisions may not protect us or may not be adhered to in all cases. As a result, we may incur significant legal expenses in defending against litigation. In our Investment Management business, we make investment decisions on behalf of our clients that could result in substantial losses. This also may subject us to the risk of legal liability or actions alleging negligent misconduct, breach of fiduciary duty or breach of contract. These risks often may be difficult to assess or quantify and their existence and magnitude often remain unknown for substantial periods of time. Substantial legal liability or legal expenses incurred in defending against litigation could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results or liquidity or cause significant reputational harm to us, which could seriously harm our business.
Extensive and evolving regulation of our businesses exposes us to the potential for significant penalties and fines due to compliance failures, increases our costs and limits our ability to engage in certain activities.
The financial services industry is subject to extensive regulation, as described further under "Business - Regulation" above. We are subject to regulation by governmental and self-regulatory organizations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Our failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations could result in adverse publicity and reputational harm as well as fines, suspensions of personnel or other sanctions, including revocation of the registration of us or any of our subsidiaries as an investment adviser or broker-dealer. For example, we are subject to extensive bribery and anti-corruption regulation, which can present heightened risks for us due to certain jurisdictions in which we operate and our significant client relationships with governmental entities and certain businesses that receive support from government agencies. Our businesses are subject to periodic examination by various regulatory authorities, and we cannot predict the outcome of any such examinations or

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estimate the amount of monetary fines or penalties which could be assessed. In addition, adverse regulatory scrutiny of any of our strategic partners could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation.
In recent years, the U.S. and other governments have taken actions, and may continue to take further actions, including expanding current or enacting new standards, requirements and rules that may be applicable to us and our subsidiaries and in particular our Investment Management business. For example, several states and municipalities in the United States have recently adopted “pay-to-play” rules, which could limit our ability to charge advisory fees, and could therefore affect the profitability of that portion of our business. In addition, the use of “soft dollars,” where a portion of commissions paid to broker-dealers in connection with the execution of trades also pays for research and other services provided to advisors, is periodically reexamined and may in the future be limited or modified. Although a substantial portion of the research relied on by our Investment Management business in the investment decision-making process is generated internally by our investment analysts, external research, including external research paid for with soft dollars, is important to the process. This external research generally is used for information gathering or verification purposes, and includes broker-provided research, as well as third-party provided databases and research services. If the use of soft dollars is limited, we may have to bear some of these costs. Furthermore, new regulations regarding the management of hedge funds and the use of certain investment products may impact our Investment Management business and result in increased costs. For example, many regulators around the world adopted disclosure and reporting requirements relating to the hedge fund businesses or other businesses, and changes to the laws, rules and regulations in the U.S. related to the over-the-counter swaps and derivatives markets require additional registration, recordkeeping and reporting obligations.
Over the last several years, global financial markets have experienced extraordinary disruption and volatility, and there have been a number of highly-publicized financial scandals involving misconduct by financial market participants and their employees. As a result, various U.S. and foreign government agencies and regulatory bodies have taken, and may take further, actions to expand laws, rules, regulations and standards that may be applicable to our activities. Our ability to conduct business and our operating results, including compliance costs, may be adversely affected as a result of any new requirements imposed by the SEC, other U.S. or foreign governmental regulatory authorities or self-regulatory organizations that regulate financial services firms or supervise financial markets. We also may be adversely affected by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules by these governmental authorities and self-regulatory organizations. In addition, some of our clients or prospective clients may adopt policies that exceed regulatory requirements and impose additional restrictions. For example, certain public pension funds will not invest in funds where a placement agent or other solicitor was involved.
The full extent of the effects of governmental economic and regulatory involvement in the wake of disruption and volatility in global financial markets remains uncertain.
As a result of market volatility and disruption in the last several years, the U.S. and other governments have taken unprecedented steps to try to stabilize the financial system, including investing in financial institutions and taking certain regulatory actions. The full extent of the effects of these actions and legislative and regulatory initiatives (including the Dodd-Frank Act) effected in connection with, and as a result of, such extraordinary disruption and volatility is uncertain, both as to the financial capital markets and participants in general, and as to us in particular. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that governmental or other measures to aid economic recovery, including economic stimulus legislation, will be effective. As these conditions persist, our business, financial condition, results of operation and ability to make distributions to our stockholders could be materially adversely affected.
Our business is subject to various operational risks.
We face various operational risks related to our businesses on a day-to-day basis. We rely heavily on financial, accounting, communication and other data processing systems. These systems, including the systems of third parties on whom we rely, may fail to operate properly or become disabled as a result of tampering or a breach of our network security systems or otherwise, including for reasons beyond our control. In addition, our systems and those of third parties on which we rely have been, and we expect they will continue to be, subject to cyberattacks. Breaches of our network security systems could involve attacks that are intended to obtain unauthorized access to our proprietary information, destroy data or disable, degrade or sabotage our systems, often through the introduction of computer viruses, cyberattacks and other means and could originate from a wide variety of sources, including state actors or other unknown third parties outside the firm. The increased use of mobile technologies can heighten these and other operational risks. Although we take various measures to ensure the integrity of our systems, there can be no assurance that these measures will provide adequate protection, and we expect to incur significant costs in maintaining and enhancing appropriate protections to keep pace with developing methods of attack. Although cyber attacks have not, to date, had a material impact on our operations, if our systems are compromised, do not

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operate properly or are disabled, we could suffer a disruption of our business, financial losses, liability to clients, regulatory sanctions and damage to our reputation.
We operate in businesses that are highly dependent on information systems and technology. In our Evercore ISI, Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses in particular, we must consistently and reliably obtain securities pricing information, properly execute and process client transactions and provide reports and other customer service to our clients. The expansion of our equities business has increased the size and scope of our trading activities and, accordingly, increased the opportunities for trade errors and other operational errors in connection with the processing of transactions. The occurrence of trade or other operational errors or the failure to keep accurate books and records can render us liable to disciplinary action by governmental and self-regulatory authorities, as well as to claims by our clients. We also rely on third-party service providers for certain aspects of our business. Any interruption or deterioration in the performance of these third parties or failures of their information systems and technology could impair our operations, affect our reputation and adversely affect our businesses.
In providing services to clients, we may manage, utilize and store sensitive or confidential client or employee data, including personal data. As a result, we may be subject to numerous laws and regulations designed to protect this information, such as the U.S. federal and state laws governing the protection of health or other personally identifiable information and international laws. These laws and regulations are increasing in complexity and number. If any person, including any of our employees, negligently disregards or intentionally breaches our established controls with respect to client or employee data, or otherwise mismanages or misappropriates that data, we could be subject to significant monetary damages, regulatory enforcement actions, fines and/or criminal prosecution. In addition, unauthorized disclosure of sensitive or confidential client or employee data, whether through systems failure, employee negligence, fraud or misappropriation, could damage our reputation and cause us to lose clients and their related revenue in the future. Potential liability in the event of a security breach of client data could be significant and depending on the circumstances giving rise to the breach, this liability may not be subject to a contractual limit of liability or an exclusion of consequential or indirect damages.
In addition, if we were to experience a disaster or other business continuity problem, such as a pandemic, other man-made or natural disaster or disruption involving electronic communications or other services used by us or third parties with whom we conduct business, our continued success will depend, in part, on the availability of our personnel and office facilities and the proper functioning of our computer, telecommunications, transaction processing and other related systems and operations, as well as those of third parties on whom we rely. Such events could lead us to experience operational challenges, and our inability to timely and successfully recover could materially disrupt our businesses and cause material financial loss, regulatory actions, reputational harm or legal liability.
We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of our indebtedness.
Our ability to make scheduled payments on or to refinance our debt obligations depends on our financial condition and operating performance. We cannot provide assurance that we will maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit us to pay the principal of, and interest on, our indebtedness, including the $120.0 million principal amount of senior unsecured notes issued to Mizuho Corporate Bank, Ltd. (“Mizuho”) due 2020 with a 5.20% coupon (the “Senior Notes”) and $22.6 million principal amount of subordinated borrowings with an executive officer of the Company due 2019 with a 5.5% coupon. If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, including the principal noted above and semi-annual interest payments of $3.1 million and our contingent obligations to fund our redeemable noncontrolling interest of $4.0 million as of December 31, 2014, we may be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures, or to sell assets, seek additional capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness, including the Senior Notes, subordinated borrowings and other contractual commitments.
Goodwill and other intangible assets represent a significant portion of our assets, and an impairment of these assets could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation.
Goodwill and other intangible assets represent a significant portion of our assets. We may need to perform impairment tests more frequently if events occur or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of these assets may not be recoverable. These events or circumstances could include a significant change in the business climate, attrition of key personnel, a prolonged decline in our stock price and market capitalization, legal factors, operating performance indicators, competition, sale or disposition of a significant portion of one of our businesses and other factors. The valuation of the reporting units requires judgment in estimating future cash flows, discount rates and other factors. In making these judgments, we evaluate the financial health of our reporting units, including such factors as market performance, changes in our client base and projected growth

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rates. Because these factors are ever changing, due to market and general business conditions, we cannot predict whether, and to what extent, our goodwill and long-lived intangible assets may be impaired in future periods.
A change in relevant income tax laws, regulations or treaties or an adverse interpretation of these items by tax authorities could result in an audit adjustment or revaluation of our net deferred tax assets that may cause our effective tax rate and tax liability to be higher than what is currently presented in the consolidated financial statements.

As part of the process of preparing our consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Significant management judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our net deferred tax assets. This process requires us to estimate our actual current tax liability and to assess temporary differences resulting from differing book versus tax treatment of items, such as deferred revenue, compensation and benefits expense, unrealized gains and losses on long-term investments and depreciation. Our effective tax rate and tax liability is based on the application of current income tax laws, regulations and treaties. These laws, regulations and treaties are complex, and the manner which they apply to our facts and circumstances is sometimes open to interpretation. Management believes its application of current laws, regulations and treaties to be correct and sustainable upon examination by the tax authorities. However, the tax authorities could challenge our interpretation resulting in additional tax liability or adjustment to our income tax provision that could increase our effective tax rate. In addition, tax laws, regulations or treaties enacted in the future may cause us to revalue our net deferred tax assets and have a material change to our effective tax rate.
Risks Related to Our Investment Banking Business
A majority of our revenue is derived from advisory assignments for Investment Banking clients, which are not long-term contracted sources of revenue and are subject to intense competition, and declines in these engagements could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.
We historically have earned a substantial portion of our revenue from fees paid to us by our Investment Banking clients for advisory services. These fees are typically payable upon the successful completion of a particular transaction or restructuring. Investment Banking services accounted for 90%, 87% and 88% of Net Revenues in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, a substantial portion of which represents fees generated by our advisory services. We expect that we will continue to rely on Investment Banking fees from advisory services for a substantial portion of our revenue for the foreseeable future. Accordingly, a decline in our Investment Banking advisory engagements or the market for advisory services would adversely affect our business.
In addition, our Advisory professionals operate in a highly-competitive environment where typically there are no long-term contracted sources of revenue. Each revenue-generating engagement typically is separately solicited, awarded and negotiated. In addition, many businesses do not routinely engage in transactions requiring our services. As a consequence, our fee-paying engagements with many clients are not likely to be predictable and high levels of revenue in one quarter are not necessarily predictive of continued high levels of revenue in future periods. We also lose clients each year as a result of the sale or merger of a client, a change in a client’s senior management, competition from other financial advisors and financial institutions and other causes. As a result, our advisory fees could decline materially due to such changes in the volume, nature and scope of our engagements.
A high percentage of our net revenue is derived from a small number of Investment Banking clients, and the termination of any one advisory engagement could reduce our revenue and harm our operating results.
Our top five Investment Banking clients accounted for 14%, 14% and 13% of Net Revenues in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The composition of the group comprising our largest Investment Banking clients varies significantly from year to year, and a relatively small number of clients may account for a significant portion of our Investment Banking Revenues. As a result, our operating results, financial condition and liquidity may be significantly affected by even one lost mandate or the failure of one advisory assignment to be completed, however, no clients accounted for more than 10% of our Net Revenues for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012.



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We face strong competition from other financial advisory firms, many of which have the ability to offer clients a wider range of products and services than we can offer, which could cause us to fail to win advisory mandates and subject us to pricing pressures that could materially adversely affect our revenue and profitability.
The financial advisory industry is intensely competitive, and we expect it to remain so. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including the quality of our employees, transaction execution, our products and services, innovation, reputation and price. We have experienced intense competition over obtaining advisory mandates in recent years, and we may experience pricing pressures in our Investment Banking business in the future as some of our competitors seek to obtain increased market share by reducing fees.
We also face increased competition due to a trend toward consolidation. In recent years, there has been substantial consolidation and convergence among companies in the financial services industry. This trend was amplified in connection with the unprecedented disruption and volatility in the financial markets during the past several years and, as a result, a number of financial services companies have merged, been acquired or have fundamentally changed their respective business models. Many of these firms may have the ability to support investment banking, including financial advisory services, with commercial banking, insurance and other financial services in an effort to gain market share, which could result in pricing pressure in our businesses.
Evercore ISI's business relies on non-affiliated third-party service providers.
Evercore ISI has entered into service agreements with third-party service providers for client order management and the execution and settlement of client securities transactions. This business faces the risk of operational failure of any of our clearing agents, the exchanges, clearing houses or other intermediaries we use to facilitate our securities transactions. Our senior management and officers oversee and manage these relationships. Poor oversight and control or inferior performance or service on the part of the service provider could result in loss of customers and violations of applicable rules and regulations. Any such failure could adversely affect our ability to effect transactions and to manage our exposure to risk.
Underwriting and trading activities expose us to risks.
We may incur losses and be subject to reputational harm to the extent that, for any reason, we are unable to sell securities we purchased as an underwriter at the anticipated price levels. As an underwriter, we also are subject to liability for material misstatements or omissions in prospectuses and other offering documents relating to offerings we underwrite. In addition, through indemnification provisions in our agreement with our clearing organization, customer activities may expose us to off-balance sheet credit risk. Securities may have to be purchased or sold at prevailing market prices in the event a customer fails to settle a trade on its original terms. We seek to manage the risks associated with customer trading activities through customer screening and trading procedures.
If the number of debt defaults or bankruptcies declines or other factors affect demand for our restructuring services, our restructuring revenue could be adversely affected.

We provide financial advice and investment banking services to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. Our services may include reviewing and analyzing the business, financial condition and prospects of the company or providing advice on strategic transactions, capital raising or restructurings. We also may provide advisory services to companies that have sought or are planning to seek protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code or other similar processes in non-U.S. jurisdictions. A number of factors affect demand for these advisory services, including general economic conditions, the availability and cost of debt and equity financing, governmental policy and changes to laws, rules and regulations, including those that protect creditors. In addition, providing restructuring advisory services entails the risk that the transaction will be unsuccessful or take considerable time and be subject to a bankruptcy court’s authority to disallow or discount our fees. If the number of debt defaults or bankruptcies declines or other factors affect the demand for our restructuring advisory services, our restructuring business would be adversely affected.
Risks Relating to Our Investment Management Business
The amount and mix of our AUM are subject to significant fluctuations.
The revenues and profitability of our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses are derived from providing investment management and related services. The level of our revenues depends largely on the level and mix of AUM. Fluctuations in the amount and mix of our AUM may be attributable in part to market conditions outside of our control that have had, and in the future could have, a negative impact on our revenues and income. Any decrease in the value or amount

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of our AUM because of market volatility or other factors negatively impacts our revenues and income. We are subject to an increased risk of asset volatility from changes in the global financial and equity markets. Individual financial and equity markets may be adversely affected by economic, political, financial, or other instabilities that are particular to the country or regions in which a market is located, including without limitation local acts of terrorism, health emergencies, economic crises or other business, social or political crises. Declines in these markets have caused in the past, and may cause in the future, a decline in our revenues and income. Global economic conditions, exacerbated by war or terrorism, health emergencies or financial crises, changes in the equity market place, currency exchange rates, commodity prices, interest rates, inflation rates, the yield curve, and other factors that are difficult to predict affect the mix, market values and levels of our AUM. A decline in the price of stocks or bonds, or in particular market segments, or in the securities market generally, could cause the value and returns on our AUM to decline, resulting in a decline in our revenues and income. Moreover, changing market conditions may cause a shift in our asset mix between international and U.S. assets, potentially resulting in a decline in our revenue and income depending upon the nature of our AUM and the level of management fees we earn based on them. Additionally, changing market conditions may cause a shift in our asset mix towards fixed-income products and a related decline in our revenue and income, as in the U.S. we generally derive higher fee revenues and income from equity assets than from fixed-income products we manage.
If the investments we make on behalf of our funds and clients perform poorly, we will suffer a decline in our investment management revenue and earnings, and our Investment Management business may be adversely affected.
Revenue from our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses is derived from fees earned for the management of client assets, generally based on the market value of AUM. Poor investment performance by these businesses, on an absolute basis or as compared to third-party benchmarks or competitors, could stimulate higher redemptions, thereby lowering AUM and reducing the fees we earn, even in periods when securities prices are generally rising. In addition, if the investments we make on behalf of our funds and clients perform poorly, it may be more difficult for us to attract new investors, launch new products or offer new services in our Institutional Asset Management or Wealth Management businesses. Furthermore, if the volatility in the U.S. and global markets cause a decline in the price of securities that constitutes a significant portion of our AUM, our clients could withdraw funds from, or be hesitant to invest in, our Investment Management business due to the uncertainty or volatility in the market or in favor of investments they perceive as offering greater opportunity or lower risk, which would also result in lower investment management revenue. In our Private Equity business, our revenues include management fees based on committed or invested capital and performance fees. If our private equity investments perform poorly, whether on a realized or unrealized basis, our revenues and earnings will suffer. Poor performance by our private equity investments may also make it more difficult for us to raise any new funds in the future, may result in such fundraising taking longer to complete than anticipated or may prevent us from raising such funds. In addition, to the extent that, over the life of the funds, we have received an amount of carried interest that exceeds a specified percentage of distributions made to the third-party investors in our funds, we may be obligated to repay the amount of this excess to the third-party investors.
Our Investment Management business’ reliance on non-affiliated third-party service providers subjects the Company to operational risks.
We have entered into services agreements with third-party service providers for custodial services and trust and investment administration processing and reporting services. Our officers oversee and manage these relationships; however, poor oversight and control on our part or inferior performance or service on the part of the service providers could result in loss of customers, violation of applicable rules and regulations, including, but not limited to, privacy and anti-money laundering laws and otherwise adversely affect our business and operations.
Our agreements with the OCC require us to maintain and segregate certain assets, and our failure to comply with these agreements (including if we are required to access these assets for other purposes) could adversely affect us.
In connection with the organization of ETC, the OCC required the Company and Evercore LP to enter into a Capital and Liquidity Support Agreement, a Capital and Liquidity Maintenance Agreement and other related agreements (collectively, the “OCC Agreements”). The OCC Agreements require the Company’s and Evercore LP’s continuing obligation to provide ETC necessary capital and liquidity support in order to ensure that ETC continues to operate safely and soundly and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. In particular, the OCC Agreements require that the Company and Evercore LP (1) maintain at least $5 million in Tier 1 capital in ETC or such other amount as the OCC may require, (2) maintain liquid assets in ETC in an amount at least equal to the greater of $3.5 million or 90 days coverage of ETC’s operating expenses and (3) provide at least $10 million of certain collateral held in a segregated account at a third-party depository institution.

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If we fail to comply with any of the OCC Agreements, we could become subject to civil money penalties, regulatory enforcement actions, payment of damages and, if the OCC deems it likely that we are unable to fulfill our obligations or breach the OCC Agreements, a forced disposition of ETC. The occurrence of any of these events or the disclosure that these events are probable or under consideration may cause reputational harm and erosion of client trust, due to a perception that we are unable to comply with applicable regulatory requirements, unable to successfully launch new initiatives and businesses, or that our reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services is no longer valid, any of which could adversely affect our business and operations.
Valuation methodologies for certain assets in our private equity funds can be subject to significant subjectivity, and the values of assets established pursuant to such methodologies may never be realized, which could result in significant losses for our funds. In addition, certain of our redeemable noncontrolling interests are based on fair value estimates and assumptions which may significantly differ from the value if redeemed.
We have made principal investments in Evercore Capital Partners II, L.P. ("ECP II"), Evercore Mexico Capital Partners II, L.P. (“EMCP II”), Evercore Mexico Capital Partners III, L.P. (“EMCP III”), the Discovery Fund, CITIC Securities International Partners, LTD, Trilantic IV and Trilantic V. These funds generally invest in relatively high-risk, illiquid assets. In addition, some of these investments are, or may in the future be, in industries or sectors which are unstable, in distress or undergoing some uncertainty. Such investments may be subject to rapid changes in value caused by sudden company-specific or industry-wide developments. Contributing capital to these funds is risky, and we may lose some or all of the principal amount of our investments. There are no regularly quoted market prices for a number of investments in our funds. The value of the investments of our funds is determined using fair value methodologies described in the funds’ valuation policies, which may consider, among other things, the nature of the investment, the expected cash flows from the investment, bid or ask prices provided by third parties for the investment and the trading price of recent sales of securities (in the case of publicly-traded securities), restrictions on transfer and other recognized valuation methodologies. The methodologies we use in valuing individual investments are based on estimates and assumptions specific to the particular investments. Therefore, the value of our investments does not necessarily reflect the prices that would actually be obtained by us on behalf of the fund when such investments are sold. Realizations at values significantly lower than the values at which investments have been reflected in fund values would result in losses for the applicable fund and the loss of potential incentive income and principal investments. We also have commitments related to our redeemable noncontrolling interests, which are initially recorded at fair value and may be subject to periodic adjustments as a result of a change in the estimated fair value of the associated capital interests. The methodologies we use in valuing these interests are based on estimates and assumptions specific to the particular commitment. Therefore, the value of our redeemable noncontrolling interest may not necessarily reflect the value that would actually be obtained by the noncontrolling interest holders when such capital interests are redeemed.
The limited partners of the private equity funds we manage may terminate their relationship with us at any time.
The limited partnership agreements of the funds we manage provide that the limited partners of each fund may terminate their relationship with us without cause with a simple majority vote of each fund’s limited partners. If the limited partners of the funds we manage terminate their relationship with us, we would lose fees earned for our management of the funds and carried interest from those funds.
Risks Related to Our International Operations
A portion of our revenues are derived from our international operations, which are subject to certain risks.
In 2014, we earned 34% of our Total Revenues, excluding Other Revenue, from clients and private equity funds located outside of the United States. We intend to grow our non-U.S. business, and this growth is critical to our overall success. In addition, many of our larger clients for our Investment Banking business are non-U.S. entities seeking to enter into transactions involving U.S. businesses. Our international operations carry special financial and business risks, which could include the following:
greater difficulties managing and staffing foreign operations;
language and cultural differences;
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates that could adversely affect our results;
unexpected and costly changes in trading policies, regulatory requirements, tariffs and other barriers;
greater difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;
longer transaction cycles;
higher operating costs;
adverse consequences or restrictions on the repatriation of earnings;

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potentially adverse tax consequences, such as trapped foreign losses;
less stable political and economic environments, including the sovereign debt crisis in Europe; and
civil disturbances or other catastrophic events that reduce business activity.
If our international business increases relative to our total business, these factors could have a more pronounced effect on our operating results. See also “—Difficult market conditions may adversely affect our business in many ways, including reducing the volume of the transactions involving our Investment Banking business and reducing the value of the assets we manage in our Investment Management businesses, which, in each case, may materially reduce our revenue or income.”
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could adversely affect our results.
Because our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars and we receive a portion of our net revenue from continuing operations in other currencies, predominantly in Mexican pesos, Euros, British pounds, Brazilian real, Canadian dollars, Singapore dollars and Hong Kong dollars, we are exposed to fluctuations in foreign currencies. In addition, we pay certain of our expenses in such currencies. We have not entered into any transactions to hedge our exposure to these foreign exchange fluctuations through the use of derivative instruments or otherwise. An appreciation or depreciation of any of these currencies relative to the U.S. dollar would result in an adverse or beneficial impact, respectively, to our financial results. Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates may also affect the levels of our AUM and, as a result, our investment advisory fees.
Adverse economic conditions and political events in Mexico may result in disruptions to our business operations and adversely affect our revenue.
Our Mexican company has all of its assets located in Mexico and most of its revenue derived from operations in Mexico. As a financial services firm, our businesses in Mexico are materially affected by Mexico’s financial markets and economic conditions. For example, for our ECB business, a lack of liquidity in Mexican government bonds could have a material adverse effect on ECB’s business. Historically, interest rates in Mexico have been volatile, particularly in times of economic unrest and uncertainty. Mexico has had, and may continue to have, high real and nominal interest rates. In addition, because the Mexican government exercises significant influence over many aspects of the Mexican economy, political events in Mexico, including a change in state and municipal political leadership, may result in disruptions to our business operations and adversely affect its revenue. Any action by the government, including changes in the regulation of Mexico’s financial sector, could have an adverse effect on the operations of our Mexican business, especially on its asset management business.
Our Mexican business derives a significant portion of its revenue from advisory contracts with state and local governments in Mexico. The term limit system in Mexico may prevent us from maintaining relationships with the same clients in the same political positions beyond these periods. After an election takes place, there is no guarantee that we will be able to remain as advisors of the new government, even if the new administration is of the same political party as the previous one.
The cost of compliance with international broker dealer, employment, labor, benefits and tax regulations may adversely affect our business and hamper our ability to expand internationally.
Since we operate our business both in the United States and internationally, we are subject to many distinct broker dealer, employment, labor, benefits and tax laws in each country in which we operate, including regulations affecting our employment practices and our relations with our employees and service providers. If we are required to comply with new regulations or new interpretations of existing regulations, or if we are unable to comply with these regulations or interpretations, our business could be adversely affected or the cost of compliance may make it difficult to expand into new international markets. Additionally, our competitiveness in international markets may be adversely affected by regulations requiring, among other things, the awarding of contracts to local contractors, the employment of local citizens and/or the purchase of services from local businesses or that favor or require local ownership.
Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure
We are required to pay some of our Senior Managing Directors for most of the benefits relating to any additional tax depreciation or amortization deductions we may claim as a result of the tax basis step-up we received in connection with exchanges of Evercore LP partnership units (“LP Units”) for shares and related transactions.
As of December 31, 2014, there were 4,503,041 vested Class A LP Units held by some of our Senior Managing Directors that may in the future be exchanged for shares of our Class A common stock. The exchanges may result in increases in the tax basis of the assets of Evercore LP that otherwise would not have been available. These increases in tax basis may reduce the

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amount of tax that we would otherwise be required to pay in the future, although the IRS may challenge all or part of that tax basis increase, and a court could sustain such a challenge.
We have entered into a tax receivable agreement with some of our Senior Managing Directors that provides for the payment by us to these Senior Managing Directors of 85% of the amount of cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax or franchise tax that we actually realize as a result of these increases in tax basis. While the actual increase in tax basis, as well as the amount and timing of any payments under this agreement, will vary depending upon a number of factors, including the timing of exchanges, the price of shares of our Class A common stock at the time of the exchange, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable, and the amount and timing of our income, we expect that, as a result of the size of the increases in the tax basis of the tangible and intangible assets of Evercore LP attributable to our interest in Evercore LP, during the expected term of the tax receivable agreement, the payments that we may make to our Senior Managing Directors could be substantial.
Although we are not aware of any issue that would cause the IRS to challenge a tax basis increase, Senior Managing Directors who receive payments will not reimburse us for any payments that may previously have been made under the tax receivable agreement. As a result, in certain circumstances we could make payments to some of the Senior Managing Directors under the tax receivable agreement in excess of our cash tax savings. Our ability to achieve benefits from any tax basis increase, and the payments to be made under this agreement, will depend upon a number of factors, as discussed above, including the timing and amount of our future income.
Our only material asset is our interest in Evercore LP, and we are accordingly dependent upon distributions from Evercore LP to pay dividends and taxes and other expenses.
The Company is a holding company and has no material assets other than its ownership of partnership units in Evercore LP. The Company has no independent means of generating revenue. We intend to cause Evercore LP to make distributions to its partners in an amount sufficient to cover all applicable taxes payable, other expenses and dividends, if any, declared by us.
Payments of dividends, if any, will be at the sole discretion of the Company’s board of directors after taking into account various factors, including:
economic and business conditions;
our financial condition and operating results;
our available cash and current and anticipated cash needs;
our capital requirements;
applicable contractual, legal, tax and regulatory restrictions;
implications of the payment of dividends by us to our stockholders or by our subsidiaries (including Evercore LP) to us; and
such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant.
In addition, Evercore LP is generally prohibited under Delaware law from making a distribution to a partner to the extent that, at the time of the distribution, after giving effect to the distribution, liabilities of Evercore LP (with certain exceptions) exceed the fair value of its assets. Furthermore, certain subsidiaries of Evercore LP may be subject to similar legal limitations on their ability to make distributions to Evercore LP. Moreover, our regulated subsidiaries may be subject to regulatory capital requirements that limit the distributions that may be made by those subsidiaries.
Deterioration in the financial condition, earnings or cash flow of Evercore LP and its subsidiaries for any reason could limit or impair their ability to pay such distributions. Additionally, to the extent that the Company requires funds and Evercore LP is restricted from making such distributions under applicable law or regulation or under the terms of financing arrangements, or is otherwise unable to provide such funds, our liquidity and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.
As of December 31, 2014, Evercore LP and its consolidated subsidiaries had approximately $301.0 million in cash and cash equivalents available for distribution without prior regulatory approval.
If Evercore Partners Inc. were deemed an “investment company” under the 1940 Act as a result of its ownership of Evercore LP, applicable restrictions could make it impractical for us to continue our business as contemplated and could have a material adverse effect on our business.
If Evercore Partners Inc. were to cease participation in the management of Evercore LP, its interest in Evercore LP could be deemed an “investment security” for purposes of the 1940 Act. Generally, a person is deemed to be an “investment

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company” if it owns investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items), absent an applicable exemption. Evercore Partners Inc. will have no material assets other than its equity interest in Evercore LP. A determination that this interest was an investment security could result in Evercore Partners Inc. being an investment company under the 1940 Act and becoming subject to the registration and other requirements of the 1940 Act.
The 1940 Act and the rules thereunder contain detailed parameters for the organization and operations of investment companies. Among other things, the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder limit or prohibit transactions with affiliates, impose limitations on the issuance of debt and equity securities, prohibit the issuance of stock options, and impose certain governance requirements. We intend to conduct our operations so that Evercore Partners Inc. will not be deemed to be an investment company under the 1940 Act. However, if anything were to happen which would cause Evercore Partners Inc. to be deemed to be an investment company under the 1940 Act, requirements imposed by the 1940 Act, including limitations on our capital structure, ability to transact business with affiliates and ability to compensate key employees, could make it impractical for us to continue our business as currently conducted, impair the agreements and arrangements between and among Evercore Partners Inc., Evercore LP or our Senior Managing Directors, or any combination thereof and materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Certain of our affiliates and businesses operate with relative autonomy, which limits our ability to alter their management practices and policies.
Although we are represented on the management committees of G5 ǀ Evercore and ABS, we are not able to exercise significant operational control over these affiliates and are not directly involved in managing their day-to-day activities, including investment management policies and procedures, fee levels, marketing and product development and client relationships. Moreover, the founders of these affiliates have certain protective and participating rights, including the ability to block certain major corporate actions and approval of the annual budget and compensation arrangements. In addition, while we control the management committee of Atalanta Sosnoff, responsibility for its day-to-day operations is vested with the management of Atalanta Sosnoff, including managing client relationships and making discretionary investment decisions. Similarly, the executive committee of Evercore ISI is responsible for conducting the day-to-day business and guiding the strategic direction of Evercore ISI, and is controlled by senior management of that business, with representation on the committee by senior management of Evercore. As a consequence, our reputation, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by problems arising from the day-to-day operations of one of these businesses, or from other matters regarding one of these businesses over which we cannot exercise full control. Future acquisitions of, and investments in, investment management or investment banking businesses may be structured in a similar manner.
Risks Related to Our Class A Common Stock
Our Senior Managing Directors control a significant portion of the voting power in Evercore Partners Inc., which may give rise to conflicts of interests.
Our Senior Managing Directors own shares of our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock. Our certificate of incorporation provides that the holders of the shares of our Class B common stock are entitled to a number of votes that is determined pursuant to a formula that relates to the number of LP Units held by such holders. Each holder of Class B common stock is entitled, without regard to the number of shares of Class B common stock held by such holder, to one vote for each partnership unit in Evercore LP held by such holder. Our Senior Managing Directors, and certain trusts benefiting their families, collectively have a significant portion of the voting power in Evercore Partners Inc. As a result, our Senior Managing Directors have the ability to exercise influence over the election of the members of our board of directors and, therefore, influence over our management and affairs, including determinations with respect to acquisitions, dispositions, borrowings, issuances of common stock or other securities, and the declaration and payment of dividends. In addition, they are able to exercise influence over the outcome of all matters requiring stockholder approval. This concentration of ownership could deprive our Class A stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a sale of our company and might ultimately affect the market price of our Class A common stock.
Our share price may decline due to the large number of shares eligible for future sale and for exchange.
The market price of our Class A common stock could decline as a result of sales of a large number of shares of Class A common stock in the market or the perception that such sales could occur. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.

22


On August 21, 2008, we entered into a Purchase Agreement with Mizuho pursuant to which Mizuho purchased from us Senior Notes along with warrants to purchase 5,454,545 shares of Evercore Class A common stock at $22.00 per share (the “Warrants”) expiring in 2020.
At December 31, 2014, we had a total of 36,255,124 shares of our Class A common stock outstanding. In addition, our current and former Senior Managing Directors own an aggregate of 4,503,041 Class A partnership units in Evercore LP, which were all fully vested as of December 31, 2014. Further, in conjunction with our acquisition of the operating businesses of ISI and our acquisition of the noncontrolling interest in our Institutional Equities business that we did not already own, we issued consideration in the form of vested and unvested Class E limited partnership units of Evercore LP ("Class E LP Units") and vested and unvested Class G and H Interests (which convert into Class E partnership units based on the satisfaction of multi-year performance goals). At December 31, 2014, there were 2,332,709 vested and unvested Class E LP Units and 5,425,091 vested and unvested Class G and H Interests outstanding. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation allows the exchange of Class A and Class E partnership units in Evercore LP (other than those held by us) for shares of our Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and reclassifications. The shares of Class A common stock issuable upon exchange of the partnership units that are held by our Senior Managing Directors and certain other employees of the Company are eligible for resale from time to time, subject to certain contractual and Securities Act restrictions.
As of February 18, 2015, we had a total of 49,137,983 shares of Class A common stock outstanding and units and interests which were convertible, or potentially convertible, into Class A common stock. This is comprised of 36,887,325 shares of our Class A common stock outstanding, 4,492,858 Class A partnership units in Evercore LP, 2,332,709 Class E LP Units and 5,425,091 Class G and H Interests.
Also, as of December 31, 2014, 5,584,955 restricted stock units (“RSUs”) issued pursuant to the Evercore Partners Inc. 2006 Stock Incentive Plan were outstanding. Of these RSUs, 224,373 were fully vested and 5,360,582 were unvested. We also had 460,225 restricted shares of Class A common stock outstanding at December 31, 2014 as partial consideration for the Lexicon acquisition.
Some of our Senior Managing Directors are parties to registration rights agreements with us. Under these agreements, these persons have the ability to cause us to register the shares of our Class A common stock they could acquire.
The market price of our Class A common stock may be volatile, which could cause the value of our Class A common stock to decline.
Securities markets worldwide experience significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market or political conditions, could reduce the market price of our Class A common stock in spite of our operating performance. In addition, our operating results could be below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, and in response, the market price of our Class A common stock could decrease significantly.
Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law could delay or prevent a change in control.
Our certificate of incorporation and by-laws may delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that a stockholder may consider favorable by permitting our board of directors to issue one or more series of preferred stock, requiring advance notice for stockholder proposals and nominations and placing limitations on convening stockholder meetings. In addition, we are subject to provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law that restrict certain business combinations with interested stockholders. These provisions may also discourage acquisition proposals or delay or prevent a change in control, which could harm our stock price.
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2.
Properties
Our principal offices are located in leased office space at 55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York, at 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York, at Blvd. Manuel A. Camacho 36-22, Col. Lomas de Chapultepec in Mexico City, Mexico and at 15 Stanhope Gate in London, UK. We do not own any real property.


23


Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
In the normal course of business, from time to time the Company and its affiliates are involved in other judicial or regulatory proceedings, arbitration or mediation concerning matters arising in connection with the conduct of its businesses, including contractual and employment matters. In addition, Mexican, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Singapore, Canadian and United States government agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the United States, conduct periodic examinations and initiate administrative proceedings regarding the Company’s business, including, among other matters, accounting and operational matters, that can result in censure, fine, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or the suspension or expulsion of a broker-dealer, investment advisor, or its directors, officers or employees. In view of the inherent difficulty of determining whether any loss in connection with such matters is probable and whether the amount of such loss can be reasonably estimated, particularly in cases where claimants seek substantial or indeterminate damages or where investigations and proceedings are in the early stages, the Company cannot estimate the amount of such loss or range of loss, if any, related to such matters, how or if such matters will be resolved, when they will ultimately be resolved, or what the eventual settlement, fine, penalty or other relief, if any, might be. Subject to the foregoing, the Company believes, based on current knowledge and after consultation with counsel, that it is not currently party to any material pending proceedings, individually or in the aggregate, the resolution of which would have a material effect on the Company. Provisions for losses are established in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 450, “Contingencies” when warranted. Once established, such provisions are adjusted when there is more information available or when an event occurs requiring a change.
In January 2015, Donna Marie Coburn filed a proposed class action complaint against ETC in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, in which she purports to represent a class of participants in the J.C. Penney Corporation Inc. Savings, Profit-Sharing and Stock Ownership Plan whose participant accounts held J.C. Penney stock at any time between May 15, 2012 and the present.  The complaint alleges that ETC  breached its fiduciary duties under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act by causing the plan to invest in J.C. Penney stock during that period and claims the plan suffered losses of approximately $300 million due to declines in J.C. Penney stock.  The plaintiff seeks the recovery of alleged plan losses, attorneys’ fees, other costs, and other injunctive and equitable relief.  The Company believes that it has meritorious defenses against these claims and intends to vigorously defend against them. ETC is indemnified by J.C. Penney for reasonable attorneys’ fees and other legal expenses, which would be refunded to J.C. Penney should ETC not prevail.
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.


24


PART II

Item 5.
Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Price Range of Evercore Class A Common Stock
Our Class A common stock is listed on the NYSE and is traded under the symbol “EVR.” At the close of business on February 18, 2015, there were 16 Class A common stockholders of record.
The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low reported intra-day sale prices per share for the Class A common stock, as reported on the NYSE:
 
2014
 
2013
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
First Quarter
$
63.66

 
$
51.71

 
$
44.53

 
$
30.88

Second Quarter
$
59.43

 
$
48.61

 
$
42.36

 
$
34.75

Third Quarter
$
58.50

 
$
45.43

 
$
52.80

 
$
37.36

Fourth Quarter
$
54.54

 
$
44.67

 
$
61.07

 
$
45.16

There is no trading market for the Evercore Partners Inc. Class B common stock. As of February 18, 2015, there were 26 holders of record of the Class B common stock.
Dividend Policy
The Company paid quarterly cash dividends of $0.28 per share of Class A common stock for the quarter ended December 31, 2014, $0.25 per share for the quarters ended September 30, 2014, June 30, 2014, March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, and $0.22 per share of Class A common stock for the quarters ended September 30, 2013, June 30, 2013 and March 31, 2013.
We pay dividend equivalents, in the form of unvested RSU awards, concurrently with the payment of dividends to the holders of Class A common shares, on all unvested RSU grants awarded in conjunction with annual bonuses and new hire awards granted after April 2012, as well as awards issued in conjunction with the acquisition of Lexicon in 2011. The dividend equivalents have the same vesting and delivery terms as the underlying RSU award.
The declaration and payment of any future dividends will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors. Our board of directors will take into account: general economic and business conditions; our financial condition and operating results; our available cash and current and anticipated cash needs; capital requirements; contractual, legal, tax and regulatory restrictions and implications on the payment of dividends by us to our stockholders or by our subsidiaries (including Evercore LP) to us; and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant.
We are a holding company and have no material assets other than our ownership of partnership units in Evercore LP. We intend to cause Evercore LP to make distributions to us in an amount sufficient to cover dividends, if any, declared by us and tax distributions. If Evercore LP makes such distributions, the limited partners of Evercore LP will be entitled to receive equivalent distributions from Evercore LP on their partnership units.
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
None









25


Share Repurchases for the period October 1, 2014 through December 31, 2014
2014
 
Total Number of
Shares (or Units)
Purchased(1)
 
Average Price
Paid Per Share
 
Total Number of Shares (or Units) Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs(2)
 
Maximum Number (or Approximate Dollar Value) of Shares (or Units) that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs(2)
October 1 to October 31
 
98,753

  
$
49.08

  
67,907

  
6,932,093

November 1 to November 30
 
32,446

  
50.19

  
23,500

  
6,908,593

December 1 to December 31
 
25,110

  
49.29

  
16,123

  
6,892,470

Total
 
156,309

 
$
49.35

 
107,530

 
6,892,470

(1)
These include treasury transactions arising from net settlement of equity awards to satisfy minimum tax obligations.
(2)
In October 2014, our Board authorized the repurchase of additional Class A Shares and/or LP Units so that we will be able to repurchase an aggregate of 7 million Class A Shares and/or LP Units for up to $350.0 million. Under this share repurchase program, shares may be repurchased from time to time in open market transactions, in privately-negotiated transactions or otherwise. The timing and the actual amount of shares repurchased will depend on a variety of factors, including legal requirements, price and economic and market conditions. This program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and does not have a specified expiration date.


26


Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
The following table sets forth the historical selected financial data for the Company for all periods presented. For more information on our historical financial information, see Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment Banking Revenue
$
821,359

 
$
666,806

 
$
568,238

 
$
430,597

 
$
301,931

Investment Management Revenue
98,751

 
95,759

 
79,790

 
99,161

 
74,610

Other Revenue
11,292

 
16,868

 
9,646

 
13,897

 
22,205

Total Revenues
931,402

 
779,433

 
657,674

 
543,655

 
398,746

Interest Expense
15,544

 
14,005

 
15,301

 
19,391

 
22,841

Net Revenues
915,858

 
765,428

 
642,373

 
524,264

 
375,905

Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses
719,474

 
598,806

 
523,386

 
427,155

 
316,016

Other Expenses
25,437

 
36,447

 
53,452

 
61,297

 
23,029

Total Expenses
744,911

 
635,253

 
576,838

 
488,452

 
339,045

Income before Income from Equity Method Investments and Income Taxes
170,947

 
130,175

 
65,535

 
35,812

 
36,860

Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments
5,180

 
8,326

 
4,852

 
919

 
(557
)
Income before Income Taxes
176,127

 
138,501

 
70,387

 
36,731

 
36,303

Provision for Income Taxes
68,756

 
63,689

 
30,908

 
22,724

 
16,177

Net Income from Continuing Operations
107,371

 
74,812

 
39,479

 
14,007

 
20,126

Net Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

 
(2,790
)
 

 
(3,476
)
 
(2,321
)
Net Income
107,371

 
72,022

 
39,479

 
10,531

 
17,805

Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest
20,497

 
18,760

 
10,590

 
3,579

 
8,851

Net Income Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.
$
86,874

 
$
53,262

 
$
28,889

 
$
6,952

 
$
8,954

Dividends Declared per Share
$
1.03

 
$
0.91

 
$
0.82

 
$
0.74

 
$
0.63

Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share
Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.
Common Shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From Continuing Operations
$
2.08

 
$
1.42

 
$
0.89

 
$
0.27

 
$
0.41

From Discontinued Operations

 
(0.04
)
 

 
(0.04
)
 
(0.02
)
Net Income Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders
$
2.08

 
$
1.38

 
$
0.89

 
$
0.23

 
$
0.39

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Assets
$
1,446,556

 
$
1,180,783

 
$
1,145,218

 
$
1,043,592

 
$
898,085

Long-term Liabilities
$
345,229

 
$
296,661

 
$
283,836

 
$
252,602

 
$
218,465

Total Long-term Debt
$
127,776

 
$
103,226

 
$
101,375

 
$
99,664

 
$
98,082

Total Liabilities
$
730,309

 
$
580,820

 
$
604,742

 
$
555,499

 
$
505,438

Noncontrolling Interest
$
164,966

 
$
97,382

 
$
111,970

 
$
80,429

 
$
91,948

Total Equity
$
712,233

 
$
563,158

 
$
490,749

 
$
465,826

 
$
367,241



27


Item 7.
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with Evercore Partners Inc.’s consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this Form 10-K.
Key Financial Measures
Revenue
Total revenues reflect revenues from our Investment Banking and Investment Management business segments that include fees for services, transaction-related client reimbursements plus other revenue. Net revenues reflect total revenues less interest expense related to repurchase agreements, the Senior Notes and other financing arrangements.
Investment Banking. Our Investment Banking business earns fees from our clients for providing advice on mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, leveraged buyouts, restructurings and similar corporate finance matters, and from underwriting and private placement activities, as well as commissions from our sales and trading activities. The amount and timing of the fees paid vary by the type of engagement or services provided. In general, advisory fees are paid at the time we sign an engagement letter, during the course of the engagement or when an engagement is completed. The majority of our investment banking revenue consists of advisory fees that are dependent on the successful completion of a transaction. A transaction can fail to be completed for many reasons, including failure of parties to agree upon final terms with the counterparty, to secure necessary board or shareholder approvals, to secure necessary financing or to achieve necessary regulatory approvals. In the case of bankruptcy engagements, fees are subject to approval of the court. Underwriting fees are recognized when the offering has been deemed to be completed, placement fees are generally recognized at the time of the client’s acceptance of capital or capital commitments. Commissions and Related Fees includes commissions, which are recorded on a trade-date basis or, in the case of payments under commission sharing arrangements, on the date earned. Commissions and Related Fees also include subscription fees for the sales of research. Cash received before the subscription period ends is initially recorded as deferred revenue and recognized as revenue over the remaining subscription period.
Revenue trends in our advisory business generally are correlated to the volume of M&A activity and/or restructuring activity, which tends to be counter-cyclical to M&A. However, deviations from this trend can occur in any given year or quarter for a number of reasons. For example, changes in our market share or the ability of our clients to close certain large transactions can cause our revenue results to diverge from the level of overall M&A or restructuring activity. Revenue trends in our equities business are correlated to market volumes, which generally decrease in periods of unfavorable market or economic conditions.
Investment Management. Our Investment Management business includes operations related to the management of the Institutional Asset Management, Wealth Management and Private Equity businesses. Revenue sources primarily include management fees, which include fees earned from portfolio companies, fiduciary and consulting fees, performance fees (including carried interest) and gains (or losses) on our investments.
Management fees for third party clients generally represent a percentage of AUM. Fiduciary and consulting fees, which are generally a function of the size and complexity of each engagement, are individually negotiated. Management fees from private equity operations are generally a percentage of committed capital or invested capital at rates agreed with the investment funds we manage or with the individual client. Performance fees, or carried interest, from private equity funds are earned when specified benchmarks are exceeded. In certain circumstances, such fees are subject to “claw-back” provisions. During the second quarter of 2014, the Company changed its method of recording performance fees such that the Company records performance fees upon the earlier of the termination of the investment fund or when the likelihood of clawback is mathematically improbable. Portfolio company fees include monitoring, director and transaction fees associated with services provided to the portfolio companies of the private equity funds we manage. Gains and losses include both realized and unrealized gains and losses on principal investments, including those arising from our equity interest in investment partnerships.
Transaction-Related Client Reimbursements. In both our Investment Banking and Investment Management segments, we make various transaction-related expenditures, such as travel and professional fees, on behalf of our clients. Pursuant to the engagement letters with our advisory clients or the contracts with the limited partners in the private equity funds we manage, these expenditures may be reimbursable. We define these expenses as transaction-related expenses and record such expenditures as incurred and record revenue when it is determined that clients have an obligation to reimburse us for such transaction-related expenses. Client expense reimbursements are recorded as revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations on the later of the date an engagement letter is executed or the date we pay or accrue the expense.

28


Other Revenue and Interest Expense. Other Revenue and Interest Expense is derived primarily from investing customer funds in financing transactions. These transactions are principally repurchases and resales of Mexican government and government agency securities. Revenue and expenses associated with these transactions are recognized over the term of the repurchase or resale transaction. Other Revenue includes income earned on marketable securities, cash and cash equivalents and assets segregated for regulatory purposes, as well as adjustments to amounts due pursuant to our tax receivable agreements, subsequent to its initial establishment, related to changes in state and local tax rates. Interest Expense includes interest expense associated with the Senior Notes and other financing arrangements.
Operating Expenses
Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense. We include all payments for services rendered by our employees, as well as profits interests in our businesses that have been accounted for as compensation, in employee compensation and benefits expense.
We maintain compensation programs, including base salary, cash, deferred cash and equity bonus awards and benefits programs and manage compensation to estimates of competitive levels based on market conditions and performance. Our level of compensation reflects our plan to maintain competitive compensation levels to retain key personnel, and it reflects the impact of newly-hired senior professionals, including related grants of equity awards which are generally valued at their grant date.
Increasing the number of high-caliber, experienced senior level employees is critical to our growth efforts. In our advisory businesses, these hires generally do not begin to generate significant revenue in the year they are hired.
Our annual compensation program includes share-based compensation awards and deferred cash awards as a component of the annual bonus awards for certain employees. These awards are generally subject to annual vesting requirements over a four-year period beginning at the date of grant, which occurs in the first quarter of each year; accordingly, the expense is generally amortized over the stated vesting period. With respect to the annual awards granted in February 2012 and thereafter, the Company adopted new retirement eligibility criteria, which stipulates that if an employee has at least five years of continuous service, is at least 55 years of age and has a combined age and years of service of at least 65 years, the employee is eligible for retirement (prior year’s awards required combined years of service and age of at least 70 years). Retirement eligibility allows for continued vesting of awards after employees depart from the Company, provided they give the minimum advance notice, which is generally one year. As a consequence of these changes, a greater number of employees will become retirement eligible and the related requisite service period over which we will expense these awards will be shorter than the stated vesting period.
Non-Compensation Expenses. The balance of our operating expenses includes costs for occupancy and equipment rental, professional fees, travel and related expenses, communications and information technology services, depreciation and amortization and other operating expenses. We refer to all of these expenses as non-compensation expenses.
Other Expenses
Other Expenses include the following:
Amortization of LP Units and Certain Other Awards - Includes amortization costs associated with the modification and vesting of Class A LP Units and certain other awards, and the vesting of Class E LP Units issued in conjunction with the acquisition of ISI. In conjunction with the acquisition of the operating businesses of ISI, the Company issued Evercore LP Class E Units and Class G and H Interests which will be treated as compensation going forward, including vested units/interests, which will become exchangeable into Class A common shares of the Company subject to certain liquidated damages and, in the case of Class G and H Interests, the achievement of certain earnings targets. The Company also issued unvested units/interests, which will vest ratably and will become exchangeable into Class A common shares of the Company subject to continued employment and, in the case of Class G and H Interests, the achievement of certain performance targets.
Other Acquisition Related Compensation Charges - Includes compensation charges associated with deferred consideration, retention awards and related compensation for Lexicon employees.
Special Charges - Includes expenses primarily related to separation benefits and certain exit costs related to combining the equities business upon the ISI acquisition during 2014, a provision recorded in 2014 against contingent consideration due on the 2013 disposition of Pan, the write-off of intangible assets in 2013 from the Company’s acquisition of Morse, Williams and Company, Inc. and charges incurred in connection with exiting facilities in the UK in 2012.

29


Intangible Asset and Other Amortization - Includes amortization of intangible assets and other purchase accounting-related amortization associated with certain acquisitions.
Professional Fees - Includes professional fees associated with share-based awards resulting from an increase in share price, which is required upon change in employment status.
Acquisition and Transition Costs - Includes professional fees for legal and other services incurred during 2014 related to the Company’s acquisition of all of the outstanding equity interests of the operating businesses of ISI.
Income from Equity Method Investments
Our share of the income (loss) from our equity interests in G5 ǀ Evercore, ABS and Pan (consolidated on March 15, 2013 and sold on December 3, 2013) are included within Income from Equity Method Investments, as a component of Income Before Income Taxes, on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Provision for Income Taxes
We account for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, “Income Taxes” (“ASC 740”), which requires the recognition of tax benefits or expenses on temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of our assets and liabilities.
Discontinued Operations
We completed the sale of Pan in December 2013. Accordingly, the historical results of Pan have been included within Discontinued Operations on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Noncontrolling Interest
We record noncontrolling interest relating to the ownership interests of our current and former Senior Managing Directors and other officers, their estate planning vehicles and Trilantic (through October 2013) in Evercore LP, as well as the portions of our operating subsidiaries not owned by Evercore. As described in Note 15 to our consolidated financial statements herein, Evercore Partners Inc. is the sole general partner of Evercore LP and has a majority economic interest in Evercore LP. As a result, Evercore Partners Inc. consolidates Evercore LP and records a noncontrolling interest for the economic interest in Evercore LP held by the limited partners.
We generally allocate net income or loss to noncontrolling interests held at Evercore LP and at the operating entity level, where required, by multiplying the relative ownership interest of the noncontrolling interest holders for the period by the net income or loss of the entity to which the noncontrolling interest relates. In circumstances where the governing documents of the entity to which the noncontrolling interest relates require special allocations of profits or losses to the controlling and noncontrolling interest holders, then the net income or loss of these entities will be allocated based on these special allocations.
Results of Operations
The following is a discussion of our results from continuing operations for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012. For a more detailed discussion of the factors that affected the revenue and operating expenses of our Investment Banking and Investment Management business segments in these periods, see the discussion in “Business Segments” below.




30


 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2014 v. 2013
 
2013 v. 2012
 
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment Banking Revenue
$
821,359

 
$
666,806

 
$
568,238

 
23
%
 
17
%
Investment Management Revenue
98,751

 
95,759

 
79,790

 
3
%
 
20
%
Other Revenue
11,292

 
16,868

 
9,646

 
(33
%)
 
75
%
Total Revenues
931,402

 
779,433

 
657,674

 
19
%
 
19
%
Interest Expense
15,544

 
14,005

 
15,301

 
11
%
 
(8
%)
Net Revenues
915,858

 
765,428

 
642,373

 
20
%
 
19
%
Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses
719,474

 
598,806

 
523,386

 
20
%
 
14
%
Other Expenses
25,437

 
36,447

 
53,452

 
(30
%)
 
(32
%)
Total Expenses
744,911

 
635,253

 
576,838

 
17
%
 
10
%
Income Before Income from Equity Method Investments and Income Taxes
170,947

 
130,175

 
65,535

 
31
%
 
99
%
Income from Equity Method Investments
5,180

 
8,326

 
4,852

 
(38
%)
 
72
%
Income Before Income Taxes
176,127

 
138,501

 
70,387

 
27
%
 
97
%
Provision for Income Taxes
68,756

 
63,689

 
30,908

 
8
%
 
106
%
Net Income from Continuing Operations
107,371

 
74,812

 
39,479

 
44
%
 
89
%
Discontinued Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

 
(4,260
)
 

 
NM

 
NM

Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes

 
(1,470
)
 

 
NM

 
NM

Net Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

 
(2,790
)
 

 
NM

 
NM

Net Income
107,371

 
72,022

 
39,479

 
49
%
 
82
%
Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest
20,497

 
18,760

 
10,590

 
9
%
 
77
%
Net Income Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.
$
86,874

 
$
53,262

 
$
28,889

 
63
%
 
84
%
Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders


 


 
 
 


 
 
From Continuing Operations
$
2.08

 
$
1.42

 
$
0.89

 
46
%
 
60
%
From Discontinued Operations

 
(0.04
)
 

 
NM

 
NM

Net Income Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders
$
2.08

 
$
1.38

 
$
0.89

 
51
%
 
55
%
2014 versus 2013
Net Revenues were $915.9 million in 2014, an increase of $150.4 million, or 20%, versus Net Revenues of $765.4 million in 2013. Investment Banking Revenue increased 23% and Investment Management Revenue increased 3% compared to 2013. Investment Banking Revenue includes the results of ISI following its acquisition on October 31, 2014. See the segment discussion below for further information. Other Revenue in 2014 was 33% lower than in 2013 primarily as a result of changes in state and local tax rates in 2013, which resulted in a $6.9 million adjustment in amounts due pursuant to tax receivable agreements during 2013. Net Revenues include interest expense on our Senior Notes.
Total Operating Expenses were $719.5 million in 2014, as compared to $598.8 million in 2013, an increase of $120.7 million, or 20%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $538.2 million in 2014, an increase of $88.4 million, or 20%, versus expense of $449.8 million in 2013. The increase was primarily due to increased compensation costs resulting from the expansion of our businesses and higher costs from share-based and other deferred compensation arrangements. Non-compensation expenses as a component of Operating Expenses were $181.3 million in 2014, an increase of $32.3 million, or 22%, over non-compensation operating expenses of $149.0 million in 2013. Non-

31


compensation operating expenses increased compared to 2013 primarily as a result of the addition of personnel, increased new business costs associated with higher levels of global transaction activity and higher professional fees associated with a limited number of investment bankers serving under consulting contracts.
Total Other Expenses of $25.4 million in 2014 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $3.4 million, other acquisition related compensation costs of $7.9 million, special charges of $4.9 million, professional fees of $1.7 million, acquisition and transition costs of $4.7 million and intangible asset and other amortization of $2.8 million. Total Other Expenses of $36.4 million in 2013 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $20.0 million, other acquisition related compensation costs of $15.9 million, special charges of $0.2 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million.
As a result of the factors noted above, Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense as a percentage of Net Revenues was 60% for the year ended December 31, 2014, compared to 63% for the year ended December 31, 2013.
Income from Equity Method Investments was $5.2 million in 2014, as compared to $8.3 million in 2013. The decrease was primarily a result of a decrease in earnings from G5 ǀ Evercore and ABS.
The provision for income taxes in 2014 was $68.8 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 39%. The provision was impacted by the noncontrolling interest associated with LP Units, state, local and foreign taxes and other adjustments. The provision for income taxes in 2013 was $63.7 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 46%.  The provision was impacted by the vesting of LP Units, which were fully vested as of December 31, 2013, as well as the noncontrolling interest associated with LP Units and the release of valuation allowances for certain deferred tax assets.
Noncontrolling Interest was $20.5 million in 2014 compared to $18.8 million in 2013 (which included noncontrolling interest related to discontinued operations of ($1.2) million).
2013 versus 2012
Net Revenues were $765.4 million in 2013, an increase of $123.0 million, or 19%, versus Net Revenues of $642.4 million in 2012. Investment Banking Revenue increased 17% and Investment Management Revenue increased 20% compared to 2012. See the segment discussion below for further information. Other Revenue in 2013 was higher than in 2012 primarily as a result of changes in state and local tax rates, which resulted in a $6.9 million adjustment in amounts due pursuant to tax receivable agreements during 2013. Net Revenues include interest expense on our Senior Notes.
Total Operating Expenses were $598.8 million in 2013 as compared to $523.4 million in 2012, a 14% increase. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $449.8 million in 2013, an increase of $68.3 million, or 18%, versus expense of $381.5 million in 2012. The increase was primarily due to higher discretionary incentive compensation, consistent with the overall increase in revenues, the expansion of our existing businesses and our new businesses and increased share-based compensation costs. Non-compensation expenses as a component of Operating Expenses were $149.0 million in 2013, an increase of $7.2 million, or 5%, over non-compensation operating expenses of $141.8 million in 2012. Non-compensation operating expenses increased compared to 2012 primarily as a result of the expansion of our existing businesses.
Total Other Expenses of $36.4 million in 2013 related to compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $20.0 million, acquisition related compensation costs of $15.9 million, Special Charges of $0.2 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million. Total Other Expenses of $53.5 million in 2012 related to compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $20.9 million, acquisition related compensation costs of $28.2 million, Special Charges of $0.7 million and amortization of intangibles of $3.7 million.
As a result of the factors noted above, Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense as a percentage of Net Revenues was 63% for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 67% for the year ended December 31, 2012.
Income from Equity Method Investments was $8.3 million in 2013, as compared to $4.9 million in 2012. The increase was primarily a result of an increase in earnings from ABS and G5 ǀ Evercore.
The provision for income taxes in 2013 was $63.7 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 46%.  The provision was impacted by the vesting of LP Units, which are not deductible for income tax purposes, as well as the noncontrolling interest associated with LP Units and other adjustments. The provision for income taxes in 2012 was $30.9 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 44%.  The provision was impacted by the vesting of LP Units, as well as the noncontrolling interest associated with LP Units and the release of valuation allowances for certain deferred tax assets. The increase in the effective tax rate of the provision for income taxes in 2013 was also attributable to a write down of the deferred tax assets resulting from a change in the distribution of earnings between foreign and state and local jurisdictions.

32


Noncontrolling Interest was $18.8 million in 2013 (which included noncontrolling interest related to discontinued operations of ($1.2) million) compared to $10.6 million in 2012. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements for further information.
Impairment of Assets
At November 30, 2014, in accordance with ASC 350, “Intangibles - Goodwill and Other” ("ASC 350"), we performed our annual Goodwill impairment assessment.  We concluded that the fair value of our reporting units substantially exceeded their carrying values, with the exception of our Institutional Asset Management reporting unit, which exceeded its carrying value by 11% as of November 30, 2014, in comparison to 24% as of November 30, 2013.  The decrease in excess fair value from prior year primarily reflects lower forecasted earnings for our Institutional Asset Management businesses.
The amount of Goodwill allocated to the Institutional Asset Management reporting unit was $94.7 million as of November 30, 2014, of which a portion is related to noncontrolling interest. In determining the fair value of this reporting unit, we utilized both a market multiple approach and a discounted cash flow methodology based on the adjusted cash flows from operations. The market multiple approach included applying the average earnings multiples of comparable public companies, multiplied by the forecasted earnings of the reporting unit, to yield an estimate of fair value. The discounted cash flow methodology began with the forecasted cash flows of the reporting unit and applied a discount rate of 15%, which reflected the weighted average cost of capital adjusted for the risks inherent in the future cash flows. The forecast inherent in the valuation assumes a stabilization of AUM flows by the end of 2014, with AUM from client flows beginning to increase in the first half of 2015 and, over the longer term, assumes a compound annual growth rate in revenues of 10% from the trailing twelve month period ended November 30, 2014.
We used our best judgment and the information available to us at the time to perform this valuation. Because assumptions and estimates are used in projecting future earnings as part of the valuation, actual results could differ. We estimate that an assumed 13% decrease in forecasted AUM and related revenue throughout the entire forecasted period, would result in the fair value of the Institutional Asset Management reporting unit to be below its book value. Deterioration in these assumptions, including a period of sustained decline in the equity markets, would cause the estimated fair value of the reporting unit to decline, which may result in an impairment charge to earnings in a future period related to some portion of the associated goodwill. If a charge for impairment of goodwill in the Institutional Asset Management reporting unit were required in a future period, it would be allocated, in part, to noncontrolling interest.




















33


Business Segments
The following data presents revenue, expenses and contributions from our equity method investments included within continuing operations, by business segment.
Investment Banking
The following table summarizes the operating results of the Investment Banking segment.
 
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2014 v. 2013
 
2013 v. 2012
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment Banking Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Advisory Fees
$
727,678

 
$
602,256

 
$
538,142

 
21
%
 
12
%
Commissions and Related Fees
65,580

 
30,741

 
21,450

 
113
%
 
43
%
Underwriting Fees
28,101

 
33,809

 
8,646

 
(17
%)
 
291
%
Total Investment Banking Revenue (1)
821,359

 
666,806

 
568,238

 
23
%
 
17
%
Other Revenue, net (2)
(1,722
)
 
3,979

 
(3,019
)
 
NM

 
NM

Net Revenues
819,637

 
670,785

 
565,219

 
22
%
 
19
%
Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses
632,927

 
516,921

 
444,510

 
22
%
 
16
%
Other Expenses
25,109

 
33,740

 
50,774

 
(26
%)
 
(34
%)
Total Expenses
658,036

 
550,661

 
495,284

 
19
%
 
11
%
Operating Income (3)
161,601

 
120,124

 
69,935

 
35
%
 
72
%
Income from Equity Method Investments
495

 
2,906

 
2,258

 
(83
%)
 
29
%
Pre-Tax Income from Continuing Operations
$
162,096

 
$
123,030

 
$
72,193

 
32
%
 
70
%
 
(1)
Includes client related expenses of $17.7 million, $15.2 million and $15.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
(2)
Includes interest expense on the Senior Notes of $4.5 million, $4.4 million and $4.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
(3)
Includes Noncontrolling Interest of ($2.9) million, $0.1 million and ($1.7) million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.












34


For 2014, the dollar value of North American announced and completed M&A activity increased 50% and 29%, respectively, compared to 2013, while the dollar value of Global announced and completed M&A activity for 2014 increased 47% and 16%, respectively, compared to 2013:
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2014 v. 2013
 
2013 v. 2012
Industry Statistics ($ in billions) *
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Value of North American M&A Deals Announced
$
1,599

 
$
1,068

 
$
1,040

 
50
%
 
3
%
Value of North American M&A Deals Completed
$
1,235

 
$
957

 
$
999

 
29
%
 
(4
%)
Value of Global M&A Deals Announced
$
3,414

 
$
2,316

 
$
2,490

 
47
%
 
(7
%)
Value of Global M&A Deals Completed
$
2,421

 
$
2,096

 
$
2,102

 
16
%
 
%
Evercore Statistics **
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Number of Fee Paying Advisory Clients
418

 
358

 
324

 
17
%
 
10
%
Investment Banking Fees of at Least $1 million from Advisory Clients
173

 
132

 
125

 
31
%
 
6
%
 
*
Source: Thomson Reuters January 2, 2015
**
Includes revenue generating clients only
Investment Banking Results of Operations
2014 versus 2013
Net Investment Banking Revenues were $819.6 million in 2014 compared to $670.8 million in 2013, which represented an increase of 22%. We earned advisory fees from 418 clients in 2014 compared to 358 in 2013, representing a 17% increase. We had 173 fees in excess of $1.0 million in 2014, compared to 132 in 2013, representing a 31% increase. The increase in revenues from 2013 primarily reflects an increase in Advisory Fees in 2014 in our U.S. and U.K. businesses. Commissions and Related Fees increased 113% from 2013 primarily from our acquisition of ISI, which closed on October 31, 2014. Underwriting Fees decreased 17% from 2013 primarily due to a decrease in underwriting deals in our Mexico business.
Operating Expenses were $632.9 million in 2014 compared to $516.9 million in 2013, an increase of $116.0 million, or 22%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $481.3 million in 2014, as compared to $396.8 million in 2013, an increase of $84.5 million, or 21%. The increase was primarily due to increased compensation costs resulting from the expansion of our businesses, including our acquisition of ISI, and higher costs from share-based and other deferred compensation arrangements. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $151.6 million in 2014, as compared to $120.1 million in 2013, an increase of $31.5 million, or 26%. Non-compensation operating expenses increased from the prior year primarily driven by the addition of personnel within the business, increased new business costs associated with high levels of global transaction activity and higher professional fees associated with a limited number of investment bankers serving under consulting contracts.
Other Expenses of $25.1 million in 2014 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $3.4 million, other acquisition related compensation costs of $7.9 million, special charges of $4.9 million, intangible asset and other amortization of $2.5 million, professional fees of $1.7 million and acquisition and transition costs of $4.7 million. Other Expenses of $33.7 million in 2013 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $17.8 million and other acquisition related compensation costs of $15.9 million.
2013 versus 2012
Net Investment Banking Revenues were $670.8 million in 2013 compared to $565.2 million in 2012, which represented an increase of 19%. We earned advisory fees from 358 clients in 2013 compared to 324 in 2012, representing a 10% increase. We had 132 fees in excess of $1.0 million in 2013, compared to 125 in 2012, representing a 6% increase. The increase in revenues from 2012 reflects the expansion of our existing businesses, including the addition of Senior Managing Directors, and a higher number of fee paying clients and large fees. Underwriting Fees in 2013 were higher than in 2012 primarily as a result of an increased number of underwriting transactions during 2013, including at-the-market ("ATM") offerings, which were executed for the first time in 2013. Commissions and Related Fees in 2013 was higher than in 2012 primarily as a result of increased volume in our U.S. business. Other Revenue in 2013 was higher than in 2012 primarily as a result of changes in state and local tax rates, which resulted in a $5.5 million adjustment in amounts due pursuant to tax receivable agreements during 2013.

35


Operating Expenses were $516.9 million in 2013, as compared to $444.5 million in 2012, an increase of $72.4 million, or 16%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $396.8 million in 2013, as compared to $331.8 million in 2012, an increase of $65.0 million, or 20%. The increase was primarily due to higher discretionary incentive compensation, consistent with the overall increase in revenues, the expansion of our existing businesses and our new businesses and increased share-based compensation costs. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $120.1 million in 2013, as compared to $112.7 million in 2012, an increase of $7.4 million, or 7%. Non-compensation operating expenses increased from the prior year primarily driven by growth in the business. The increase in Investment Banking headcount has also led directly and indirectly to cost increases relating to travel, professional and regulatory fees.
Other Expenses of $33.7 million in 2013 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $17.8 million and acquisition related compensation costs of $15.9 million. Other Expenses of $50.8 million in 2012 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $18.6 million, acquisition related compensation costs of $28.2 million, Special Charges of $0.7 million and amortization of intangibles of $3.3 million.
Investment Management
The following table summarizes the operating results of the Investment Management segment.
 
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2014 v. 2013
 
2013 v. 2012
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment Advisory and Management Fees:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Wealth Management
$
30,827

 
$
27,179

 
$
19,823

 
13
%
 
37
%
Institutional Asset Management
45,872

 
43,971

 
47,910

 
4
%
 
(8
%)
Private Equity
8,127

 
10,622

 
7,798

 
(23
%)
 
36
%
Total Investment Advisory and Management Fees
84,826

 
81,772

 
75,531

 
4
%
 
8
%
Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Institutional Asset Management
6,067

 
5,927

 
4,465

 
2
%
 
33
%
Private Equity
7,858

 
8,060

 
(206
)
 
(3
%)
 
NM

Total Realized and Unrealized Gains
13,925

 
13,987

 
4,259

 
%
 
228
%
Investment Management Revenue (1)
98,751

 
95,759

 
79,790

 
3
%
 
20
%
Other Revenue, net (2)
(2,530
)
 
(1,116
)
 
(2,636
)
 
(127
%)
 
58
%
Net Investment Management Revenues
96,221

 
94,643

 
77,154

 
2
%
 
23
%
Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating Expenses
86,547

 
81,885

 
78,876

 
6
%
 
4
%
Other Expenses
328

 
2,707

 
2,678

 
(88
%)
 
1
%
Total Expenses
86,875

 
84,592

 
81,554

 
3
%
 
4
%
Operating Income (Loss) (3)
9,346

 
10,051

 
(4,400
)
 
(7
%)
 
NM

Income from Equity Method Investments (4)
4,685

 
5,420

 
2,594

 
(14
%)
 
109
%
Pre-Tax Income (Loss) from Continuing Operations
$
14,031

 
$
15,471

 
$
(1,806
)
 
(9
%)
 
NM

 
(1)
Includes transaction-related client reimbursements of $0.05 million, $0.1 million and $0.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
(2)
Includes interest expense on the Senior Notes of $3.8 million, $3.7 million, and $3.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
(3)
Includes Noncontrolling Interest of $4.0 million, $1.1 million and $0.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
(4)
Equity in G5 ǀ Evercore, ABS and Pan is classified as Income from Equity Method Investments. The Company's investment in Pan was consolidated during the first quarter of 2013 and sold during the fourth quarter of 2013.

36


Investment Management Results of Operations
Our Wealth Management business includes the results of EWM. Our Institutional Asset Management business includes the results of ETC, ECB and Atalanta Sosnoff. Fee-based revenues from EWM, Atalanta Sosnoff and ECB are primarily earned on a percentage of AUM, while ETC primarily earns fees from negotiated trust services and fiduciary consulting arrangements.
In 2013, the Company held a fourth and final closing on EMCP III, a private equity fund focused on middle market investments in Mexico.  See Note 9 of our consolidated financial statements for further information.
ECP II earned management fees of 1% of invested capital through December 21, 2013, the technical termination of the fund. No management fees were earned by the Company in 2013 or 2014. We earn management fees on EMCP II and EMCP III of 2.0% per annum of committed capital during its investment period, and 2.0% per annum on net funded capital thereafter. In addition, the general partner of the private equity funds earns carried interest of 20% based on the fund’s performance, provided it exceeds preferred return hurdles to its limited partners. We owned 8%-9% of the carried interest earned by the general partner of ECP II. A significant portion of any gains recognized related to ECP II, EMCP II and EMCP III, and any carried interest recognized by them, are distributed to certain of our private equity professionals.
In the event the funds perform below certain thresholds we may be obligated to repay certain carried interest previously distributed. As of December 31, 2014, we had no previously received carried interest that may be subject to repayment.
We made investments accounted for under the equity method of accounting in G5 ǀ Evercore and ABS during the fourth quarters of 2010 and 2011, respectively, the results of which are included within Income from Equity Method Investments.
Assets Under Management
AUM for our Investment Management business of $14.0 billion at December 31, 2014 increased from $13.6 billion at December 31, 2013. The amounts of AUM presented in the table below reflect the assets for which we charge a management fee. These assets reflect the fair value of assets managed on behalf of Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management clients, and the amount of either the invested or committed capital of the Private Equity funds. As defined in ASC 820, "Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures" ("ASC 820"), valuations performed for Level I investments are based on quoted prices obtained from active markets generated by third parties and Level II investments are valued through the use of models based on either direct or indirect observable inputs in the use of models or other valuation methodologies performed by third parties to determine fair value. For both the Level I and Level II investments, we obtain both active quotes from nationally recognized exchanges and third-party pricing services to determine market or fair value quotes, respectively. Wealth Management maintained 66% and 63% of Level I investments and 34% and 37% of Level II investments as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, and Institutional Asset Management maintained 87% and 91% of Level I investments and 13% and 9% of Level II investments as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. As noted above, Private Equity AUM is not presented at fair value, but reported at either invested or committed capital in line with fee arrangements.
The fees that we receive for providing investment advisory and management services are primarily driven by the level and composition of AUM. Accordingly, client flows, market movements, foreign currency fluctuations and changes in our product mix will impact the level of management fees we receive from our investment management businesses. Fees vary with the type of assets managed and the channel in which they are managed, with higher fees earned on equity assets, alternative investment funds, such as hedge funds and private equity funds, and lower fees earned on fixed income and cash management products. Clients will increase or reduce the aggregate amount of AUM that we manage for a number of reasons, including changes in the level of assets that they have available for investment purposes, their overall asset allocation strategy, our relative performance versus competitors offering similar investment products and the quality of our service. The fees we earn are also impacted by our investment performance, as the appreciation or depreciation in the value of the assets that we manage directly impacts our fees.







37


The following table summarizes AUM activity for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013:
 
Wealth
Management
 
Institutional
Asset
Management
 
Private
Equity
 
Total
 
(dollars in millions)
Balance at December 31, 2012
$
4,547

 
$
7,090

 
$
438

 
$
12,075

Inflows
641

 
2,160

 
105

 
2,906

Outflows
(790
)
 
(2,223
)
 
(158
)
 
(3,171
)
Market Appreciation
476

 
1,347

 

 
1,823

Balance at December 31, 2013
$
4,874

 
$
8,374

 
$
385

 
$
13,633

Inflows
936

 
2,920

 

 
3,856

Outflows
(534
)
 
(3,525
)
 
(69
)
 
(4,128
)
Market Appreciation
389

 
298

 

 
687

Balance at December 31, 2014
$
5,665

 
$
8,067

 
$
316

 
$
14,048

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unconsolidated Affiliates - Balance at December 31, 2014:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
G5 ǀ Evercore
$
2,117

 
$

 
$

 
$
2,117

ABS
$

 
$
4,632

 
$

 
$
4,632


The following table represents the composition of our AUM for Wealth Management and Institutional Asset Management as of December 31, 2014:
 
Wealth Management
 
Institutional Asset Management
Equities
60
%
 
64
%
Fixed Income
33
%
 
32
%
Liquidity (1)
6
%
 
3
%
Alternatives
1
%
 
1
%
Total
100
%
 
100
%
(1) Includes cash and cash equivalents and U.S. Treasury securities.
Our Wealth Management business serves individuals, families and related institutions delivering customized investment management, financial planning, and trust and custody services. Investment portfolios are tailored to meet the investment objectives of individual clients and reflect a blend of equity, fixed income and other products. Fees charged to clients reflect the composition of the assets managed and the services provided. Investment performance in the Wealth Management businesses is measured against appropriate indices based on the AUM, most frequently the S&P 500 and a composite fixed income index principally reflecting BarCap and MSCI indices.
In 2014, AUM for Wealth Management increased 16%, reflecting an 8% increase due to flows and an 8% increase due to market appreciation. Wealth Management outperformed the S&P 500 on a 1 and 3 year basis by 3% and 2%, respectively, during the period and outperformed the fixed income composite by 30 bps. For the period, the S&P 500 was up 14%, while the fixed income composite increased by 4%.
In 2013, AUM for Wealth Management increased 7%, reflecting a 10% increase due to market appreciation partially offset by a 3% decrease due to flows. Wealth Management outperformed the S&P 500 on a 1 and 3 year basis by 8% and 1%, respectively, during the period and tracked the fixed income composite. For the period, the S&P 500 was up 32%, while the fixed income composite declined by 1%.
Our Institutional Asset Management business reflects assets managed by Atalanta Sosnoff and ECB. Atalanta Sosnoff manages large-capitalization U.S. equity and balanced products, while, ECB primarily manages Mexican Government and Corporate fixed income securities. ECB also manages equity products.
Atalanta Sosnoff principally utilizes the S&P 500 Index as a benchmark in reviewing their performance and managing their investment decisions, while ECB utilizes the IPC Index, which is a capitalization weighted index of leading equities traded on the Mexican Stock Exchange and the Cetes 28 Index, which is an index of Treasury Bills issued by the Mexican Government.

38


In 2014, AUM for Institutional Asset Management decreased 4%, reflecting a 7% decrease due to flows partially offset by a 3% increase due to market appreciation. This reflects a decrease in AUM for Atalanta Sosnoff and ECB. ECB's AUM decrease primarily reflects market depreciation. AUM for Atalanta Sosnoff decreased primarily related to negative flows, as their three year performance continued to lag the benchmarks.
In 2013, AUM for Institutional Asset Management increased 18%, reflecting a 19% increase for market appreciation partially offset by a 1% decrease due to flows. The increase in AUM driven by market appreciation principally reflects the significant increase in the S&P 500 for the period and Atalanta Sosnoff’s outperformance versus the index by 3%. Market appreciation for the period also reflects ECB outperforming the indices in all strategies. Negative flows of $0.1 billion primarily relate to equity products. While AUM for Atalanta Sosnoff decreased, as their three year performance continued to lag the benchmark and equity, AUM for ECB increased, reflecting strong investment performance and the continued marketing efforts to expand the market share of the business.
Our Private Equity business includes the assets of funds which our Private Equity professionals manage. These funds include ECP II, the Discovery Fund, EMCP II and EMCP III. AUM for Private Equity decreased 18% in 2014 from outflows related to the continued wind-down of the U.S. Private Equity business.
AUM from our unconsolidated affiliates increased from 2013 primarily related to positive performance in ABS.
2014 versus 2013
Net Investment Management Revenues were $96.2 million in 2014, compared to $94.6 million in 2013. Investment Advisory and Management Fees earned from the management of client portfolios and other investment advisory services increased 4% from 2013, primarily reflecting an increase in AUM in Wealth Management, partially offset by a decrease in Private Equity fees. Fee-based revenues included $0.2 million of revenues from performance fees during 2014 compared to $0.5 million during 2013. Realized and Unrealized Gains were flat from the prior year primarily resulting from increased gains in Institutional Asset Management, which were partially offset by decreased gains in our private equity funds. Income from Equity Method Investments decreased from 2013 primarily as a result of a decrease in earnings from our investment in ABS.
Operating Expenses were $86.5 million in 2014, as compared to $81.9 million in 2013, an increase of $4.7 million, or 6%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $56.9 million in 2014, as compared to $53.1 million in 2013, an increase of $3.8 million, or 7%. The increase was due primarily to higher costs from share-based and other deferred compensation arrangements. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $29.7 million in 2014, as compared to $28.8 million in 2013, an increase of $0.9 million, or 3%.
Other Expenses of $0.3 million in 2014 were related to amortization of intangibles. Other Expenses of $2.7 million in 2013 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $2.2 million, special charges of $0.2 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million.
2013 versus 2012
Net Investment Management Revenues were $94.6 million in 2013, compared to $77.2 million in 2012. Fee-based revenues earned from the management of client portfolios and other investment advisory services increased 8% from 2012, primarily reflecting an increase in AUM in Wealth Management, which includes our acquisition of Mt. Eden in December 2012 and higher fees from Private Equity. Fee-based revenues included $0.5 million of revenues from performance fees during 2013 compared to $0.5 million in 2012. Realized and Unrealized Gains increased from the prior year primarily resulting from gains in our private equity funds, which were principally driven by realized and unrealized gains on portfolio companies in Mexico, as well as additional carried interest earned from Trilantic Fund IV, and increased gains in Institutional Asset Management. Income from Equity Method Investments increased from 2012 primarily as a result of an increase in earnings from our investment in ABS. Other Revenue in 2013 was higher than in 2012 primarily as a result of changes in state and local tax rates, which resulted in a $1.4 million adjustment in amounts due pursuant to tax receivable agreements during 2013.
Operating Expenses were $81.9 million in 2013, as compared to $78.9 million in 2012, an increase of $3.0 million, or 4%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $53.1 million in 2013, as compared to $49.7 million in 2012, an increase of $3.4 million, or 7%. The increase was due primarily to higher discretionary incentive compensation, consistent with the overall increase in revenues and our acquisition of Mt. Eden in December 2012. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $28.8 million in 2013, as compared to $29.2 million in 2012, a decrease of $0.4 million, or 1%.
Other Expenses of $2.7 million in 2013 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $2.2 million, Special Charges of $0.2 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million. Other Expenses

39


of $2.7 million in 2012 included compensation costs associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards of $2.4 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million.
Cash Flows
Our operating cash flows are primarily influenced by the timing and receipt of investment banking and investment management fees, and the payment of operating expenses, including bonuses to our employees and interest expense on our Senior Notes. Investment Banking advisory fees are generally collected within 90 days of billing. However, placement fees may be collected within 180 days of billing, with certain fees being collected in a period exceeding one year. Management fees from our private equity investment management activities are generally billed in advance but collected at the end of a half year period from billing. Fees from our Wealth Management and Institutional Asset Management businesses are generally billed and collected within 90 days. We traditionally pay a substantial portion of incentive compensation to personnel in the Investment Banking business and to executive officers during the first three months of each calendar year with respect to the prior year’s results. Our investing and financing cash flows are primarily influenced by activities to deploy capital to fund investments and acquisitions, raise capital through the issuance of stock or debt, repurchase of outstanding Class A shares, and/or noncontrolling interest in Evercore LP, as well as our other subsidiaries, payment of dividends and other periodic distributions to our stakeholders. We generally make dividend payments and other distributions on a quarterly basis. A summary of our operating, investing and financing cash flows is as follows:
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
(dollars in thousands)
Cash Provided By (Used In)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
107,371

 
$
72,022

 
$
39,479

Non-cash charges
147,857

 
149,933

 
126,336

Other operating activities
(39,256
)
 
(23,241
)
 
(5,657
)
Operating activities
215,972

 
198,714

 
160,158

Investing activities
25,035

 
(8,864
)
 
24,917

Financing activities
(179,595
)
 
(149,796
)
 
(110,012
)
Effect of exchange rate changes
(7,705
)
 
(1,032
)
 
1,463

Net Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents
53,707

 
39,022

 
76,526

Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
 
 
 
 
Beginning of Period
298,453

 
259,431

 
182,905

End of Period
$
352,160

 
$
298,453

 
$
259,431

2014. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $352.2 million at December 31, 2014, an increase of $53.7 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $298.5 million at December 31, 2013. Operating activities resulted in a net inflow of $216.0 million, primarily related to earnings. Cash of $25.0 million was provided by investing activities primarily related to cash acquired from acquisitions and net proceeds from maturities and sales of our marketable securities, partially offset by investments purchased and purchases of furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements. Financing activities during the period used cash of $179.6 million, primarily for the payment of dividends and distributions to noncontrolling interest holders, as well as treasury stock and noncontrolling interest purchases.
2013. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $298.5 million at December 31, 2013, an increase of $39.0 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $259.4 million at December 31, 2012. Operating activities resulted in a net inflow of $198.7 million, primarily related to earnings. Cash of $8.9 million was used in investing activities primarily related to net purchases of marketable securities and investments and purchases of furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements. Financing activities during the period used cash of $149.8 million, primarily for the payment of dividends and distributions to noncontrolling interest holders, as well as treasury stock and noncontrolling interest purchases.
2012. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $259.4 million at December 31, 2012, an increase of $76.5 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $182.9 million at December 31, 2011. Operating activities resulted in a net inflow of $160.2 million, primarily related to earnings. Cash of $24.9 million was provided by investing activities primarily related to net proceeds from maturities and sales of our marketable securities, offset by fixed assets purchased, primarily related to new office space in the UK, and cash paid for acquisitions. Financing activities during the period used cash of $110.0 million, primarily for the payment of dividends, distributions to noncontrolling interest holders and treasury stock purchases.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources
General
Our current assets include Cash and Cash Equivalents, Marketable Securities and Accounts Receivable relating to Investment Banking and Investment Management revenues. Our current liabilities include accrued expenses and accrued employee compensation. We traditionally have made payments for employee bonus awards and year-end distributions to partners in the first quarter of the year with respect to the prior year’s results. Cash distributions related to partnership tax allocations are made to the partners of Evercore LP in accordance with our corporate estimated payment calendar; these payments are made prior to the end of each calendar quarter. In addition, dividends on Class A Shares are paid when and if declared by the Board of Directors, which is generally quarterly.
We regularly monitor our liquidity position, including cash, other significant working capital, current assets and liabilities, long-term liabilities, lease commitments and related fixed assets, principal investment commitments related to our Investment Management business, dividends on Class A Shares, partnership distributions and other capital transactions, as well as other matters relating to liquidity and compliance with regulatory requirements. Our liquidity is highly dependent on our revenue stream from our operations, principally from our Investment Banking business, which is a function of closing transactions and earning success fees, the timing and realization of which is irregular and dependent upon factors that are not subject to our control. Our revenue stream funds the payment of our expenses, including annual bonus payments, a portion of which are guaranteed, interest expense on our Senior Notes and other financing arrangements and income taxes. Payments made for income taxes may be reduced by deductions taken for the increase in tax basis of our investment in Evercore LP. These tax deductions, when realized, require payment under our long-term liability, Amounts Due Pursuant to Tax Receivable Agreements. We intend to fund these payments from cash and cash equivalents on hand, principally derived from cash flows from operations. These tax deductions, when realized, will result in cash otherwise required to satisfy tax obligations becoming available for other purposes. Our Management Committee meets regularly to monitor our liquidity and cash positions against our short and long-term obligations, as well as our capital requirements and commitments. The result of this review contributes to management’s recommendation to the Board of Directors as to the level of quarterly dividend payments, if any.
As a financial services firm, our businesses are materially affected by conditions in the global financial markets and economic conditions throughout the world. Revenue generated by our advisory activities is related to the number and value of the transactions in which we are involved. In addition, revenue related to our equities business is driven by market volumes. During periods of unfavorable market or economic conditions, the number and value of M&A transactions, as well as market volumes in equities, generally decrease, and they generally increase during periods of favorable market or economic conditions. Restructuring activity generally is counter-cyclical to M&A activity. In addition, during periods of unfavorable market conditions our Investment Management business may be impacted by reduced equity valuations and generate relatively lower revenue because fees we receive typically are in part based on the market value of underlying publicly-traded securities. Our profitability may also be adversely affected by our fixed costs and the possibility that we would be unable to scale back other costs within a time frame and in an amount sufficient to match any decreases in revenue relating to changes in market and economic conditions. Reduced equity valuations resulting from future adverse economic events and/or market conditions may impact our performance and may result in future net redemptions of AUM from our clients, which would generally result in lower revenues and cash flows. These adverse conditions could also have an impact on our goodwill impairment assessment, which is done annually, as of November 30th, or more frequently if circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred. For a further discussion of risks related to our business, refer to “Risk Factors” elsewhere in this Form 10-K.
We periodically repurchase Class A Shares and/or LP Units into Treasury in order to reduce the dilutive effect of equity awards granted. In addition, we may from time to time, purchase noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries.
In October 2014 our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of additional Class A Shares and/or LP Units so that going forward Evercore will be able to repurchase an aggregate of 7 million Class A Shares and/or LP Units for up to $350.0 million. Under this share repurchase program, shares may be repurchased from time to time in open market transactions, in privately-negotiated transactions or otherwise. The timing and the actual amount of shares repurchased will depend on a variety of factors, including legal requirements, price and economic and market conditions. This program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and does not have a specified expiration date. During 2014, we repurchased 1,060,458 shares for $53.8 million pursuant to our repurchase program.
In addition, periodically, we buy shares into treasury from our employees in order to allow them to satisfy their minimum tax requirements for share deliveries under our share equity plan. During 2014, we repurchased 1,660,816 shares for $89.0 million primarily related to minimum tax withholding requirements of share deliveries.

41


On August 21, 2008, we entered into a Purchase Agreement with Mizuho pursuant to which Mizuho purchased from us $120.0 million principal amount of Senior Notes and Warrants to purchase 5,454,545 Class A Shares at $22.00 per share expiring in 2020. The holder of the Senior Notes may require us to purchase, for cash, all or any portion of the holder’s Senior Notes upon a change of control of the Company for a price equal to the Accreted Amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest. Senior Notes held by Mizuho will be redeemable at the Accreted Amount at our option at any time within 90 days following the date on which Mizuho notifies us that it is terminating their Strategic Alliance Agreement. Senior Notes held by any holder other than Mizuho will be redeemable at the Accreted Amount (plus accrued and unpaid interest) at our option at any time. In the event of a default under the indenture, the trustee or holders of 33 1/3% of the Senior Notes may declare that the Accreted Amount is immediately due and payable.
Pursuant to the agreement, Mizuho may transfer (A) the Senior Notes (i) with the Company’s consent, (ii) to a permitted transferee, or (iii) to the extent that such transfer does not result in any holder or group of affiliated holders directly or indirectly owning more than 15% of the aggregate principal amount of the Senior Notes, and (B) the Warrants (i) with the Company’s consent, (ii) to a permitted transferee, (iii) pursuant to a tender or exchange offer, or a merger or sale transaction involving the Company that has been recommended by the Company’s Board of Directors, or (iv) to the extent that such transfer is made pursuant to a widely distributed public offering or does not result in any holder or group of affiliated holders directly or indirectly owning more than 2% of the Company’s voting securities and the total shares of Class A common stock transferred, together with any shares of Class A common stock (on an as-converted basis) transferred during the preceding 12 months, is less than 25% of the Company’s outstanding Class A common stock. The Company has a right of first offer on any proposed transfer by Mizuho of the Warrants, Common Stock purchased in the open market or acquired by exercise of the Warrants and associated Common Stock issued as dividends.
The exercise price for the Warrants is payable, at the option of the holder of the Warrants, either in cash or by tender of Senior Notes at the Accreted Amount, at any point in time.
Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement with Mizuho, Evercore is subject to certain nonfinancial covenants. As of December 31, 2014, we were in compliance with all of these covenants.
As of December 31, 2014, the Company had $22.6 million in subordinated borrowings with an executive officer of the Company, due on October 31, 2019. These borrowings had a coupon of 5.5%, payable semi-annually.
We have made certain capital commitments, with respect to our investment activities, as well as commitments related to redeemable noncontrolling interest and contingent consideration from our acquisitions, which are included in the Contractual Obligations section below.
In 2014, we increased our line of credit with First Republic Bank for funding working capital and other corporate activities, including, but not limited to, the repurchase of the Company's stock from time to time, to $50.0 million. This facility is secured with certain of our Accounts Receivable outstanding from the date of the agreement and/or restricted cash included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.  The interest rate on this facility is the U.S. prime rate and the maturity date is June 27, 2015. During 2014, the Company made three drawings of $25.0 million on this facility, each of which was repaid as of December 31, 2014. On February 5, 2015, the Company drew down $45.0 million.
ECB maintains a line of credit with BBVA Bancomer to fund its trading activities on an intra-day and overnight basis. The intra-day facility is approximately $10.2 million and is secured with trading securities when used on an overnight basis. No interest is charged on the intra-day facility. The overnight facility is charged the Inter-Bank Balance Interest Rate plus 10 basis points and is secured with trading securities. There have been no significant monies drawn on ECB’s line of credit since August 10, 2006. The line of credit is renewable annually.
Pursuant to deferred compensation and deferred consideration arrangements, we are obligated to make cash payments in future periods. For further information see Note 17 to our consolidated financial statements.
Certain of our subsidiaries are regulated entities and are subject to capital requirements. For further information see Note 19 to our consolidated financial statements.
Collateralized Financing Activity at ECB
ECB enters into repurchase agreements with clients seeking overnight money market returns whereby ECB transfers to the clients Mexican government securities in exchange for cash and concurrently agrees to repurchase the securities at a future date for an amount equal to the cash exchanged plus a stipulated premium or interest factor. ECB deploys the cash received

42


from, and acquires the securities deliverable to, clients under these repurchase arrangements by purchasing securities in the open market or by entering into reverse repurchase agreements with unrelated third parties. We account for these repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements as collateralized financing transactions. We record a liability on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition in relation to repurchase transactions executed with clients as Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase. We record as assets on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value (where we have acquired the securities deliverable to clients under these repurchase arrangements by purchasing securities in the open market) and Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell (where we have acquired the securities deliverable to clients under these repurchase agreements by entering into reverse repurchase agreements with unrelated third parties). These Mexican government securities included in Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition have an estimated average time to maturity of approximately 1.4 years, as of December 31, 2014, and are pledged as collateral against repurchase agreements, which are collateralized financing agreements. Generally, collateral is posted equal to the contract value at inception and is subject to market changes. These repurchase agreements are primarily with institutional customer accounts managed by ECB, generally mature within one business day and permit the counterparty to pledge the securities. Increases and decreases in asset and liability levels related to these transactions are a function of growth in ECB’s AUM, as well as clients’ investment allocations requiring positioning in repurchase transactions.
ECB has procedures in place to monitor the daily risk limits for positions taken, as well as the credit risk based on the collateral pledged under these agreements against their contract value from inception to maturity date. The daily risk measure is Value at Risk (“VaR”), which is a statistical measure, at a 98% confidence level, of the potential daily losses from adverse market movements in an ordinary market environment based on a historical simulation using the prior year’s historical data. ECB’s Risk Management Committee (the “Committee”) has established a policy to maintain VaR at levels below 0.1% of the value of the portfolio. If at any point in time the threshold is exceeded, ECB personnel are alerted by an automated interface with ECB’s trading systems and begin to make adjustments in the portfolio in order to mitigate the risk and bring the portfolio in compliance. Concurrently, ECB personnel must notify the Committee of the variance and the actions taken to reduce the exposure to loss.
In addition to monitoring VaR, ECB periodically performs discrete stress tests (“Stress Tests”) to assure that the level of potential losses that would arise from extreme market movements that may not be anticipated by VaR measures are within acceptable levels. The table below includes a key stress test monitored by the Committee, noted as the sensitivity to a 100 basis point change in interest rates. This analysis assists ECB in understanding the impact of an extreme move in rates, assuring the Collateralized Financing portfolio is structured to maintain risk at an acceptable level, even in extreme circumstances.
The Committee meets monthly to analyze the overall market risk exposure based on positions taken, as well as the credit risk, based on the collateral pledged under these agreements against the contract value from inception to maturity date. In these meetings the Committee evaluates risk from an operating perspective, VaR, and an exceptional perspective, Stress Tests, to determine the appropriate level of risk limits in the current environment.
We periodically assess the collectability or credit quality related to securities purchased under agreements to resell.











43


As of December 31, 2014 and 2013, a summary of ECB’s assets, liabilities and risk measures related to its collateralized financing activities is as follows:
 
December 31, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
Amount
 
Market Value of Collateral Received or (Pledged)
 
Amount
 
Market Value of Collateral Received or (Pledged)
 
(dollars in thousands)
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value
$
98,688

 
 
 
$
56,311

 
 
Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell
7,669

 
$
7,671

 
19,134

 
$
19,112

Total Assets
106,357

 
 
 
75,445

 
 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase
(106,499
)
 
$
(106,632
)
 
(75,563
)
 
$
(75,708
)
Net Liabilities
$
(142
)
 
 
 
$
(118
)
 
 
Risk Measures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VaR
$
29

 
 
 
$
7

 
 
Stress Test:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Portfolio sensitivity to a 100 basis point increase in the interest rate
$
(70
)
 
 
 
$
(35
)
 
 
Portfolio sensitivity to a 100 basis point decrease in the interest rate
$
70

 
 
 
$
35

 
 

Contractual Obligations
 
Payment Due by Period
 
Total
 
Less than 1 year
 
1-3 years
 
3-5 years
 
More than
5 years
 
(dollars in thousands)
Operating Lease Obligations
$
192,572

 
$
26,915

 
$
53,397

 
$
47,754

 
$
64,506

Tax Receivable Agreements
202,081

 
10,828

 
22,424

 
23,967

 
144,862

Notes Payable and Subordinated Borrowings, Including Interest
185,838

 
7,450

 
14,900

 
37,248

 
126,240

Investment Banking Commitments
42,658

 
32,569

 
10,083

 
6

 

Investment Management Commitments
8,711

 
8,711

 

 

 

Total
$
631,860

 
$
86,473

 
$
100,804

 
$
108,975

 
$
335,608

We had total commitments (not reflected on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition) relating to future capital contributions to private equity funds of $8.7 million and $9.9 million as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We expect to fund these commitments with cash flows from operations. We may be required to fund these commitments at any time through June 2022, depending on the timing and level of investments by our private equity funds.
We also have commitments related to our redeemable noncontrolling interests. The value of our redeemable noncontrolling interests, which principally included noncontrolling interests held by the principals of EWM and Atalanta Sosnoff, decreased from $36.8 million as of December 31, 2013 to $4.0 million as of December 31, 2014, as recorded on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The decrease primarily resulted from a $32.5 million decrease related to noncontrolling interests held by the principals of EWM. In April 2014, the Company entered into a commitment to purchase 3,332 units, or 22%, of the aggregate amount of the outstanding EWM Class A units held by members of EWM for Class A Shares and LP Units of the Company, for a fair value of $7.1 million. This transaction settled on May 22, 2014 and increased the Company's ownership in EWM to 62%. In conjunction with this purchase, the Company amended the Amended and Restated Limited Liability Company Agreement of EWM. Per the amended agreement, the holders of certain EWM interests no longer have the option to redeem these capital interests for cash upon the event of the death or disability of the holder. Accordingly, the value of these interests has been reclassified from Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest to Noncontrolling

44


Interest on the Consolidated Statement of Financial Condition as of June 30, 2014. See Note 15 to our consolidated financial statements for further information. The remaining $0.3 million decrease in redeemable noncontrolling interests from December 31, 2013 was related to a decrease in the fair value of our capital interests in Atalanta Sosnoff.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We do not invest in any off-balance sheet vehicles that provide liquidity, capital resources, market or credit risk support, or engage in any leasing activities that expose us to any liability that is not reflected in our consolidated financial statements.
Market Risk and Credit Risk
We, in general, are not a capital-intensive organization and as such, are not subject to significant market or credit risks. Nevertheless, we have established procedures to assess both the market and credit risk, as well as specific investment risk, exchange rate risk and credit risk related to receivables.
Market and Investment Risk
Institutional Asset Management
We invest in funds managed by EWM. These funds principally hold readily-marketable investment securities. As of December 31, 2014, the fair value of our investments with these products, based on closing prices, was $4.2 million.
We estimate that a hypothetical 10% adverse change in the market value of the investments would have resulted in a decrease in pre-tax income of approximately $0.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014.
See “-Liquidity and Capital Resources” above for a discussion of collateralized financing transactions at ECB.
Private Equity Funds
Through our principal investments in our private equity funds and our ability to earn carried interest from these funds, we face exposure to changes in the estimated fair value of the companies in which these funds invest. Our professionals devote considerable time and resources to work closely with the portfolio company’s management to assist in designing a business strategy, allocating capital and other resources and evaluating expansion or acquisition opportunities. On a quarterly basis, we perform a comprehensive analysis and valuation of all of the portfolio companies. Our analysis includes reviewing the current market conditions and valuations of each portfolio company. Valuations and analysis regarding our investments in CSI Capital and Trilantic are performed by their respective professionals, and thus we are not involved in determining the fair value for the portfolio companies of such funds.
We estimate that a hypothetical 10% adverse change in the value of the private equity funds would have resulted in a decrease in pre-tax income of approximately $1.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2014.
Exchange Rate Risk
We have foreign operations, through our subsidiaries and affiliates, primarily in Mexico and the United Kingdom, as well as provide services to clients in other jurisdictions, which creates foreign exchange rate risk. We have not entered into any transactions to hedge our exposure to these foreign exchange fluctuations through the use of derivative instruments or otherwise. An appreciation or depreciation of any of these currencies relative to the U.S. dollar would result in an adverse or beneficial impact to our financial results. A significant portion of our Latin American revenues have been, and will continue to be, derived from contracts denominated in Mexican pesos and Evercore Partners Limited's revenue and expenses are denominated primarily in British pounds sterling and euro. Historically, the value of these foreign currencies has fluctuated relative to the U.S. dollar. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the net impact of the fluctuation of foreign currencies recorded in Other Comprehensive Income within the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income was ($9.5) million. It is currently not our intention to hedge our foreign currency exposure, and we will reevaluate this policy from time to time.
Credit Risks
We maintain cash and cash equivalents with financial institutions with high credit ratings. At times, we may maintain deposits in federally insured financial institutions in excess of federally insured (“FDIC”) limits or enter into sweep arrangements where banks will periodically transfer a portion of the Company's excess cash position to a money market fund.

45


However, we believe that we are not exposed to significant credit risk due to the financial position of the depository institution or investment vehicles in which those deposits are held.
Accounts Receivable consists primarily of advisory fees and expense reimbursements billed to our clients. Receivables are reported net of any allowance for doubtful accounts. We maintain an allowance for bad debts to provide coverage for probable losses from our customer receivables and derive the estimate through specific identification for the allowance for doubtful accounts and an assessment of the client’s creditworthiness. As of December 31, 2014 and 2013, total receivables amounted to $136.3 million and $83.3 million, respectively, net of an allowance. The Investment Banking and Investment Management receivables collection periods generally are within 90 days of invoice, with the exception of placement fees, which are generally collected within 180 days of invoice. The collection period for restructuring transactions and private equity fee receivables may exceed 90 days. We recorded minimal bad debt expense for each of the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013.
With respect to our Marketable Securities portfolio, which is comprised primarily of highly-rated corporate and municipal bonds, mutual funds and securities investments, we manage our credit risk exposure by limiting concentration risk and maintaining investment grade credit quality. As of December 31, 2014, we had Marketable Securities of $38.0 million, of which 78% were corporate and municipal securities, primarily with S&P ratings ranging from AAA to BB+.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The consolidated financial statements included in this report are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S. GAAP"), which requires management to make estimates and assumptions regarding future events that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and their notes, including reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We base these estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. We believe that the following discussion addresses our most critical accounting policies, which are those that are most important to the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations and require management’s most difficult, subjective and complex judgments.
Revenue Recognition
Investment Banking Revenue
We earn investment banking fees from our clients for providing advisory services on mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, leveraged buyouts, restructurings and similar corporate finance matters. It is our accounting policy to recognize revenue when (i) there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement with a client, (ii) fees are fixed or determinable, (iii) the agreed-upon services have been completed and delivered to the client or the transaction or events contemplated in the engagement letter are determined to be substantially completed and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured. We record Investment Banking Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations for the following:
In general, advisory fees are paid at the time we sign an engagement letter, during the course of the engagement or when an engagement is completed. In some circumstances, and as a function of the terms of an engagement letter, we may receive retainer fees for financial advisory services concurrent with, or soon after, the execution of the engagement letter where the engagement letter will specify a future service period associated with that fee. In such circumstances, these retainer fees are initially recorded as deferred revenue, which is recorded within Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and subsequently recognized as revenue during the applicable time period within which the service is rendered. Revenues related to fairness or valuation opinions are recognized when the opinion has been rendered and delivered to the client and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. Success fees for advisory services, such as M&A advice, are recognized when the transaction(s) or event(s) are determined to be completed or substantially completed and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. In the event the Company were to receive an opinion or success fee in advance of the completion conditions noted above, such fee would initially be recorded as deferred revenue and subsequently recognized as advisory fee revenue when the conditions of completion have been satisfied.
Placement fee revenues are attributable to capital raising on both a primary and secondary basis. We recognize placement advisory fees at the time of the client’s acceptance of capital or capital commitments in accordance with the terms of the engagement letter.
Underwriting fees are attributable to public and private offerings of equity and debt securities and are recognized when the offering has been deemed to be completed by the lead manager of the underwriting group, pursuant to applicable regulatory

46


rules. When the offering is completed, we recognize the applicable management fee, selling concession and underwriting fee, the latter net of estimated offering expenses.
Commissions and Related Fees include commissions received from customers on agency-based brokerage transactions in listed and over-the-counter equities and are recorded on a trade-date basis or, in the case of payments under commission sharing arrangements, when earned. Commissions and Related Fees also include subscription fees for the sales of research. Cash received before the subscription period ends is initially recorded as deferred revenue and recognized as revenue over the remaining subscription period.
Investment Management Revenue
Our Investment Management business generates revenues from the management of client assets and the private equity funds.
Investment management fees generated for third-party clients are generally based on the value of the AUM and any performance fees that may be negotiated with the client. These fees are generally recognized over the period that the related services are provided, based upon the beginning, ending or average value of the assets for the relevant period. Fees paid in advance of services rendered are initially recorded as deferred revenue, which is recorded in Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and is recognized in Investment Management Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations ratably over the period in which the related service is rendered. Generally, to the extent performance fee arrangements have been negotiated, these fees are earned when the return on assets exceeds certain benchmark returns. 
Management fees for private equity funds are contractual and are typically based on committed capital during the private equity funds’ investment period, and on invested capital thereafter. Management fees are recognized ratably over the period during which services are provided. We also record performance fee revenue from the private equity funds when the returns on the private equity funds’ investments exceed certain threshold minimums. These performance fees, or carried interest, are computed in accordance with the underlying private equity funds’ partnership agreements and are based on investment performance over the life of each investment partnership. Historically, the Company recorded performance fee revenue from its managed private equity funds when the private equity funds’ investment values exceeded certain threshold minimums. During 2014, the Company changed its method of recording performance fees such that the Company records performance fees upon the earlier of the termination of the investment fund or when the likelihood of clawback is mathematically improbable. This method is considered the more preferable of the two methods accepted under ASC 605-20-S99-1. This change in accounting policy had no effect on the prior period information included on the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition in this Form 10-K, or the Company’s 2013 Form 10-K.
Fees for serving as an independent fiduciary and/or trustee are either based on a flat fee or are based on the value of assets under administration. For ongoing engagements, fees are billed quarterly either in advance or in arrears. Fees paid in advance of services rendered are initially recorded as deferred revenue in Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and are recognized in Investment Management Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations ratably over the period in which the related services are rendered.
Net Interest revenue is derived from investing customer funds in financing transactions. These transactions are primarily repurchases and resales of Mexican government securities. Revenue and expenses associated with these transactions are recognized over the term of the repurchase or resale transaction.
Valuation
The valuation of our investments in securities and of our financial investments in the funds we manage impacts both the carrying value of direct investments and the determination of management and performance fees, including carried interest. Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted ASC 820, which among other things requires enhanced disclosures about financial instruments carried at fair value. See Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements for further information. Level I investments include financial instruments owned and pledged as collateral and readily-marketable equity securities. Level II investments include our investments in corporate and municipal bonds and other debt securities. We did not have any Level III investments as of December 31, 2014.
We adopted ASC 825, “Financial Instruments”, which permits entities the option to measure most financial instruments and certain other items at fair value at specified election dates and to report related unrealized gains and losses in earnings. We have not elected to apply the fair value option to any specific financial assets or liabilities.

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Certain of our commitments related to our redeemable noncontrolling interests, included within Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, are initially recorded at fair value and may be subject to periodic adjustment to reflect changes in the estimate of the amount due.
Marketable Securities
Investments in corporate and municipal bonds and other debt securities are accounted for as available-for-sale under ASC 320-10, “Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities”. These securities are carried at fair value on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. Unrealized gains and losses are reported as net increases or decreases to Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net of tax, while realized gains and losses on these securities are determined using the specific identification method and are included in Other Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. We invest in readily-marketable debt and equity securities which are managed by EWM and G5 ǀ Evercore. These securities are valued using quoted market prices on applicable exchanges or markets. The realized and unrealized gains and losses on these securities are included in the Consolidated Statements of Operations in Investment Management Revenue. Marketable Securities also include investments in municipal bonds and mutual funds, which are carried at fair value, with changes in fair value recorded in Other Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Marketable Securities transactions are recorded as of the trade date.
Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value
Our Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value consist principally of foreign government obligations, which are recorded on a trade-date basis and are stated at quoted market values. Related gains and losses are reflected in Other Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. We pledge our Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value to collateralize certain financing arrangements which permits the counterparty to pledge the securities.
Equity Compensation
Share-Based Payments – We account for share-based payments in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASC 718, “Compensation – Stock Compensation” ("ASC 718"). We grant employees performance-based awards that vest upon the occurrence of certain performance criteria being achieved. Compensation cost is accrued if it is probable that the performance condition will be achieved and is not accrued if it is not probable that the performance condition will be achieved. Significant judgment is required in determining the probability that the performance criteria will be achieved. The fair value of awards that vest from one to five years are amortized over the vesting period or requisite substantive service period, as required by ASC 718. See Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements for more information.
Income Taxes
As part of the process of preparing our consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Significant management judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our net deferred tax assets. This process requires us to estimate our actual current tax liability and to assess temporary differences resulting from differing book versus tax treatment of items, such as deferred revenue, compensation and benefits expense, unrealized gains and losses on long-term investments and depreciation. These temporary differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. We must then assess the likelihood that deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income, and, to the extent we believe that recovery is not more-likely-than-not, we must establish a valuation allowance. The ultimate realization of the deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the level of historical taxable income, scheduled reversals of deferred taxes, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies that can be implemented by us in making this assessment. If actual results differ from these estimates or we adjust these estimates in future periods, we may need to adjust our valuation allowance, which could materially impact our consolidated financial condition and results of operations.
In addition, in order to determine the quarterly tax rate, we are required to estimate full year pre-tax income and the related annual income tax expense in each jurisdiction. Changes in the geographic mix or estimated level of annual pre-tax income can affect our overall effective tax rate. Furthermore, our interpretation of complex tax laws may impact our measurement of current and deferred income taxes.

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ASC 740 provides a benefit recognition model with a two-step approach consisting of “more-likely-than-not” recognition criteria, and a measurement attribute that measures the position as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. This standard also requires the recognition of liabilities created by differences between tax positions taken in a tax return and amounts recognized in the financial statements. See Note 20 to our consolidated financial statements herein in regard to the impact of the adoption of this standard on the consolidated financial statements.
The majority of the deferred tax assets relate to the U.S. operations of the Company. The realization of the deferred tax assets is primarily dependent on the amount of the Company’s historic and projected future taxable income for its U.S. and foreign operations. In 2014 and 2013, we performed an assessment of the ultimate realization of our deferred tax assets and determined that the Company should have sufficient future taxable income in the normal course of business to fully realize the portion of the deferred tax assets associated with its U.S. operations and management has concluded that it is more-likely-than-not the deferred tax assets will be realized.
The Company estimates that Evercore Partners Inc. must generate approximately $716.0 million of future taxable income to realize the U.S. deferred tax asset balance of approximately $279.0 million. The deferred tax balance is expected to reverse over a period ranging of 5 to 15 taxable years. The Company evaluated Evercore Partners Inc.’s historical U.S. taxable income, which has averaged approximately $29.6 million per year, as well as the current anticipated profitability of approximately $37.1 million and taxable income in the future, which indicates sufficient taxable income to support the realization of these deferred tax assets. To the extent enough taxable income is not generated in the 15 year estimated reversal period, the Company will have an additional 20 years to utilize any net operating loss carry forwards created, as well as the relevant net operating loss carry back period in effect at the time of a taxable loss.
Impairment of Assets
In accordance with ASC 350, we test Goodwill for impairment annually, as of November 30th, or more frequently if circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred. In this process, we make estimates and assumptions in order to determine the fair value of our reporting units and to project future earnings using valuation techniques. We use our best judgment and information available to us at the time to perform this review. Because our assumptions and estimates are used in projecting future earnings as part of the valuation, actual results could differ. Intangible assets with finite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives which are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable as prescribed by ASC 360, “Property, Plant, and Equipment”.
We test goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level. In determining the fair value for each reporting unit, we utilize either a market multiple approach and/or a discounted cash flow methodology based on the adjusted cash flows from operations. The market multiple approach includes applying the average earnings multiples of comparable public companies for their respective reporting segment multiplied by the forecasted earnings of the respective reporting unit to yield an estimate of fair value. The discounted cash flow methodology begins with the adjusted cash flows from each of the reporting units and uses a discount rate that reflects the weighted average cost of capital adjusted for the risks inherent in the future cash flows.
As of November 30, 2014 and 2013, we concluded that the fair value of our Institutional Asset Management reporting unit exceeded its carrying value by 11% and 24%, respectively, and the fair values of our other reporting units substantially exceeded their carrying values. For further information see “Impairment of Assets” in “Results of Operations”.
In addition to Goodwill and Intangible Assets, we annually assess our Equity Method Investments for impairment (or more frequently if circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred) per ASC 323-10-35 “Subsequent Measurement”. We concluded there was no impairment of Goodwill, Intangible Assets and Equity Method Investments during the year ended December 31, 2014. We recorded impairment charges of $2.9 million for Goodwill and Intangible Assets during 2013. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements for further information.
Recently Issued Accounting Standards
For a discussion of recently issued accounting standards and their impact or potential impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements, see Note 3 to our consolidated financial statements.





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Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Market Risk and Credit Risk.” We do not believe we face any material interest rate risk, foreign currency exchange risk, equity price risk or other market risk except as disclosed in Item 7 “ – Market Risk and Credit Risk” above.


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Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplemental Data



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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
Evercore Partners Inc.
New York, New York

We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of financial condition of Evercore Partners Inc. and subsidiaries (the "Company") as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, changes in equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Evercore Partners Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2014, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014, based on the criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 27, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion on the Company's internal control over financial reporting.


/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP
New York, New York
February 27, 2015


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EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
(dollars in thousands, except share data)
 
December 31,
 
2014
 
2013
Assets
 
 
 
Current Assets
 
 
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
$
352,160

 
$
298,453

Marketable Securities
37,985

 
43,407

Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value
98,688

 
56,311

Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell
7,669

 
19,134

Accounts Receivable (net of allowances of $1,362 and $2,436 at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively)
136,280

 
83,347

Receivable from Employees and Related Parties
17,327

 
9,233

Deferred Tax Assets - Current
13,096

 
11,271

Other Current Assets
19,751

 
16,703

Total Current Assets
682,956

 
537,859

Investments
126,587

 
114,084

Deferred Tax Assets - Non-Current
265,901

 
251,613

Furniture, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements (net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $33,980 and $25,992 at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively)
42,527

 
27,832

Goodwill
218,232

 
189,274

Intangible Assets (net of accumulated amortization of $33,735 and $27,538 at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively)
69,544

 
26,731

Assets Segregated for Bank Regulatory Requirements
10,200

 
10,200

Other Assets
30,609

 
23,190

Total Assets
$
1,446,556

 
$
1,180,783

Liabilities and Equity
 
 
 
Current Liabilities
 
 
 
Accrued Compensation and Benefits
$
212,334

 
$
157,856

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses
37,104

 
18,365

Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase
106,499

 
75,563