10-K 1 d758945d10k.htm 10-K 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014

or

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 001-32582

 

 

 

LOGO

PIKE CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

North Carolina   20-3112047
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

100 Pike Way, Mount Airy, NC   27030
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (336) 789-2171

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.001   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant, as of December 31, 2013, was approximately $307,371,499 based on the closing sales price of the common stock on such date as reported on the New York Stock Exchange.

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding at September 5, 2014 was 31,940,619.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

PIKE CORPORATION

Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014

Index

 

Items            
Part I   

Item 1.

   Business      1   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      10   

Item 1B.

   Unresolved Staff Comments      18   

Item 2.

   Properties      18   

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings      19   

Item 4.

   Mine Safety Disclosures      19   
Part II   

Item 5.

  

Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     20   

Item 6.

  

Selected Financial Data

     22   

Item 7.

  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     23   

Item 7A.

  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     43   

Item 8.

  

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

     44   

Item 9.

  

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

     80   

Item 9A.

  

Controls and Procedures

     80   

Item 9B.

  

Other Information

     80   
Part III   

Item 10.

  

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

     81   

Item 11.

  

Executive Compensation

     85   

Item 12.

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     102   

Item 13.

  

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

     105   

Item 14.

  

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

     106   
Part IV   

Item 15.

   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      107   

Signatures

        108   


Table of Contents

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

Pike Corporation was founded by Floyd S. Pike in 1945 and later incorporated in North Carolina in 1968. We reincorporated in Delaware on July 1, 2005, in connection with our July 2005 initial public offering (“IPO”). On November 5, 2013, Pike Electric Corporation changed its state of incorporation from Delaware to North Carolina (the “Reincorporation”). The Reincorporation was effected by merging Pike Electric Corporation, a Delaware corporation, with and into Pike Corporation, a North Carolina corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiary. In connection with the Reincorporation, Pike Electric Corporation changed its name to “Pike Corporation.” The Reincorporation did not result in any change in the business, management, fiscal year, accounting, location of the principal executive offices or other facilities, capitalization, assets or liabilities of Pike Electric Corporation. We are headquartered in Mount Airy, North Carolina. Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PIKE.”

We are one of the largest providers of construction and engineering services for investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in the United States. Since our founding in 1945, we have evolved from a specialty non-unionized contractor for electric utilities focused on the distribution sector in the southeastern United States to one of the nation’s largest specialty construction and engineering firms servicing over 300 customers. Leveraging our core competencies as a company primarily focused on providing a broad range of electric infrastructure services principally for utility customers, we believe that our experienced management team has positioned us to benefit from the substantial long-term growth drivers in our industry.

Over the past few years, we have reshaped our business platform and service territory significantly from being a distribution construction company based primarily in the southeastern United States to a national energy and communication solutions provider. We have done this organically and through strategic acquisitions of companies with complementary service offerings and geographic footprints. Our acquisition of Shaw Energy Delivery Services, Inc. on September 1, 2008 expanded our operations into engineering, design, procurement and construction management services, including in the renewable energy arena, and significantly enhanced our substation and transmission construction capabilities. This acquisition also extended our geographic presence across the continental United States. Our acquisition of Facilities Planning & Siting, PLLC on June 30, 2009 enabled us to provide siting and planning services to our customers, which positions us to be involved at the conceptual stage of our customers’ projects. On June 30, 2010, we acquired Klondyke Construction LLC (“Klondyke”), based in Phoenix, Arizona, which complemented our existing engineering and design capabilities with construction services related to substation, transmission and renewable energy infrastructure. Our August 1, 2011 acquisition of Pine Valley Power, Inc. (“Pine Valley”), located near Salt Lake City, Utah, further strengthened our substation, transmission and distribution construction service capabilities in the western United States. We believe that our acquisitions of Klondyke and Pine Valley allow us to continue to expand our engineering and construction services in the western United States and better compete in markets with unionized workforces. Our July 2, 2012 acquisition of Synergetic Design Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiary, UC Synergetic, Inc. (together “UCS”), headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, significantly expanded our ability to provide outsourced engineering and design services for distribution powerline, transmission and substation projects and other technical services to our customers and is consistent with our long-term growth strategy. The UCS acquisition also added new engineering and design services for the communications industry as well as storm assessment and inspection services. UCS’s engineering capabilities complement our existing portfolio of companies, add scale and extend our footprint into the Northeast and Midwest.

Our comprehensive suite of energy and communication solutions includes facilities planning and siting, permitting, engineering, design, installation, maintenance and repair of power delivery systems, including renewables (primarily ground-based) and utility-grade solar construction projects, and storm-related services, all as further described in the following table:

 

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Service

  

Revenue Category

  

Description

Planning & Siting    Engineering    Our planning and siting process leverages technology and the collection of environmental, regulatory, economic, cultural, land use and scientific data to facilitate successful right-of-way negotiations, licensing and permitting for powerlines, substations and traditional and renewable electrical generation facilities. We also provide North American Electric Reliability Corporation (“NERC”) reliability studies and renewable generation interconnection studies.
Engineering & Design    Engineering    We provide design, engineering, procurement and construction (“EPC”), owner engineer, project management, material procurement, multi-entity coordination, grid integration, balance-of-plant (“BOP”), training, consulting, Department of Transportation (“DOT”) projects and Thermal Rate solutions for individual or turnkey powerline, substation and renewable energy projects. We also provide engineering and design services for the communication industry for wireline and wireless communication infrastructure.
Transmission and Distribution Construction    Distribution and Transmission   

We provide overhead and underground powerline construction, upgrade, inspection and extension services (predominately single-pole and H-frame wood, concrete or steel poles) for distribution networks and transmission lines with voltages up to 345 kV, and energized maintenance work for voltages up to 500 kV.

 

Overhead services consist of construction, repair and maintenance of wire and components in energized overhead electric distribution and transmission systems.

 

Underground services range from simple residential installations, directional boring, concrete encased duct and manhole installation, to the construction of complete underground distribution facilities.

Substation Construction    Substation   

We provide substation construction and service for voltages up to 500 kV.

 

Substation services include: construction of new substations, existing substation upgrades, relay testing, transformer maintenance and hauling, foundations, commissioning, emergency outage response and Smart Grid component installation. We also specialize in relay metering and control solutions.

Utility-Grade Solar Construction    Distribution and Other    We provide complete direct-hire construction services of utility-scale photovoltaic (“PV”) solar generation facilities including all scopes necessary to deliver power to the grid. We also provide full EPC installations of high voltage (230kV) underground gathering systems in conjunction with concentrated solar power (“CSP”) facilities – “power towers” and full EPC installations for transmission lines and substations up to 500kV required for the interconnection of solar or wind generators to existing utility and transmission resources.
Storm Assessment, Inspection and Restoration Services    Storm-Related Services    Storm assessment, inspection and restoration services involve the assessment and repair or reconstruction of any part of a distribution or sub-500 kV transmission network, including substations, powerlines, utility poles or other components, damaged during snow, ice or wind storms, flash floods, hurricanes, tornadoes or other natural disasters. We are a recognized leader in storm-related services, due to our ability to rapidly mobilize thousands of existing employees and equipment within 24 hours, while maintaining a functional force for unaffected customers.

 

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Segment Overview

As a result of the acquisition of UCS expanding the size and scope of our engineering business, we decided in the first quarter of fiscal 2013 to change our reportable segments. As a result of these changes, we operated our business as two reportable segments: Construction and All Other Operations. On January 1, 2014, as part of the integration of our engineering businesses, Synergetic Design Holdings, Inc. merged with and into Pike Enterprises, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, and UC Synergetic, Inc. merged with and into Pike Energy Solutions, LLC, the surviving entity of which was named UC Synergetic, LLC. In order to properly align our segments with our current financial reporting structure, we changed the name of our All Other Operations segment to Engineering. These segments are organized principally by service category. Each segment has its own management that is responsible for the operations of the segment’s businesses. Prior fiscal year segment information has been revised to conform to the current-year presentation.

Construction includes installation, maintenance and repair of power delivery systems, including storm restoration services. Engineering includes siting, permitting, engineering and design of power and communication delivery systems, including storm assessment and inspection services.

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  
     (in millions)  

Reportable Segment

               

Construction

   $ 656.5         81.0   $ 762.9         83.0   $ 614.6         89.7

Engineering

     154.1         19.0     155.8         17.0     70.6         10.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $   810.6         100.0   $   918.7         100.0   $   685.2         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 19 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further details pertaining to the Company’s reportable segments.

Industry Overview

The electrical industry is comprised of investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities, independent power producers and independent transmission companies, with three distinct functions: generation, transmission and distribution. The electric transmission and distribution infrastructure is the critical network that connects power generation to residential, commercial and industrial end users. Electric transmission refers to powerlines and substations through which electricity is transmitted over long distances at high voltages (over 69 kV) and lower voltage lines that connect high voltage transmission infrastructure to local distribution networks. Electric distribution refers to the local distribution network, including related substations that step down voltages to distribution levels, which provide electricity to end users over shorter distances.

We believe there are significant growth opportunities for our business and the services we provide due to the following factors:

Required Future Investment in Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure. Long-term increases in electricity demand, the increasing age of U.S. electricity infrastructure, the lack of appropriate redundancy and geographic shifts in population have stressed the current electricity infrastructure and increased the need for maintenance, upgrades and expansion. According to NERC, reliability is the primary driver for the addition of new transmission and upgrades of existing transmission infrastructure. Current federal legislation requires the power industry to meet federal reliability standards for its transmission and distribution systems. The issuance of FERC Order No. 1000 also provides potential benefits related to transmission planning and cost allocation for inter-regional projects.

 

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Expanded Development of Energy Sources. We expect to benefit from the development of new sources of electric power generation. Many states have adopted either mandatory Renewable Portfolio Standards (“RPS”) programs that require a certain percentage of electric power come from renewable sources, or have enacted non-binding RPS-like goals. Often these renewable source generation facilities require new substation and transmission infrastructure. The future development of renewable energy sources, as well as new traditional power generation facilities, will require incremental substation and transmission infrastructure to transport power to demand centers.

Increased Outsourcing of Utility Infrastructure Services. Due to cost control initiatives, the ability to improve service levels and aging workforce trends, utilities have increased the outsourcing of their electricity infrastructure maintenance and construction service needs. We believe that a majority of utility infrastructure services are still conducted in-house and that our customers, especially investor-owned electric utilities, will expand outsourcing of utility infrastructure services over time. Outsourced service providers are often able to provide the same services at a lower cost because of their specialization, larger scale and ability to better utilize their workforce and equipment across a larger geographic footprint.

Rebound in Residential Development. We believe residential development, which was negatively impacted during 2008 to 2011, is rebounding. We provide overhead and underground distribution services, including final electricity connections to single and multi-family developments. We also offer distribution services in a broad geographic territory, which due to our diversification strategy, enables us to grow distribution services in multiple regions in the United States.

Our Growth Strategy

Our growth strategy is to expand our broad platform of service offerings across existing and new customers both in the United States and internationally. The key elements of the strategy include:

Leveraging Existing Customer Relationships to Cross-Sell Our Services. As a leading energy solutions provider, we have turnkey capabilities ranging from planning and siting to engineering and design to construction and maintenance. We believe growth in our markets will be driven by bundling services and marketing these offerings to our large and extensive customer base and new customers. By offering these services on a turnkey basis, we believe we enable our customers to achieve economies and efficiencies over separate unbundled services. We believe this should ultimately lead to an expansion of our market share across our existing customer base and provide us the credibility to secure additional opportunities from new customers. Our storm-related service offering also aids in gaining new customers.

Capitalizing Upon the Substantial Expected Spend in Our Markets. We believe that the U.S. electric power system and network reliability will require significant future upkeep given the postponement of maintenance spending in recent years due to the difficult economic conditions, which we expect will drive demand for our services. We believe our leading position in the markets we service will enable us to capitalize on increases in demand for our services.

Possessing a Strong Platform to Participate in the Continued Consolidation of the Energy Solutions Market in the United States. The domestic competitive landscape in our industry includes only a few other large companies that offer a broad spectrum of energy solutions services while the vast majority of our competitors and other market participants are local and regional firms offering only a limited number of services. We believe our existing and potential customers desire a deeper range of service offerings on an ever-increasing scale. Consequently, we believe our broad platform of service offerings will enable us to acquire additional market share and further penetrate our existing markets.

In addition, we believe our broad platform of service offerings will be attractive to local and regional firms looking to consolidate with a larger company offering a more diversified and complete set of services. We have a successful history of identifying and integrating acquisitions. See “Overview” above for information about our recent acquisitions.

Competitive Strengths

We believe that we have a unique and strong competitive position in the markets in which we operate resulting from a number of factors, including:

Our Position as a Leading Provider of Energy and Communication Solutions. We believe that we are one of only a few companies offering a broad spectrum of energy and communication solutions that our current and prospective customers increasingly demand. We differentiate ourselves from many of our competitors based on the size and scale of our turnkey capabilities, from planning and siting to engineering and design, to construction and maintenance. With these capabilities, we can satisfy almost all customer project requirements from inception to commissioning. The ability to perform planning, siting, permitting, engineering, construction and commissioning with in-house resources provides us better control of schedule, cost and quality. In addition, most of our engineering and construction personnel have extensive electrical infrastructure design and operating experience.

Our Attractive, Contiguous Presence in Key Geographic Markets. We are capable of providing services in a contiguous geographic market covering 48 states for siting and engineering and 36 states for construction services. Over the long term, our markets have exhibited population growth and increases in electricity consumption, which have increased demand for our services. Moreover, the contiguous nature of our service territory provides us with significant operating

 

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efficiency and flexibility in responding to our customers’ needs across our full range of energy solutions. Our extensive network of offices enables us to deliver our services in most metropolitan markets of the United States and enhances our opportunity to expand our customer reach. In addition, we believe our customized, well-maintained and extensive fleet and experienced crews provide us with a competitive advantage in our ability to service our customers and respond rapidly to storm-related opportunities. These attributes enable us to effectively deploy our fleet resources of over 5,800 pieces of motorized equipment across our national footprint, unlike many of our competitors who lack such resources.

Our Long-Standing Relationships Across a High-Quality Customer Base. We have a diverse customer base with broad geographic presence throughout the United States that includes over 300 investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities, such as American Electric Power, Dominion Resources, Duke Energy, Duquesne Light, Florida Power & Light, PacifiCorp, South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (“SCE&G”) and The Southern Company. Many of our customer relationships span more than 25 years. We believe these important relationships provide us an advantage in competing for their business and developing new client relationships.

Our Outsourced Services-Based Business Model. We provide vital services to investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities, the vast majority of which are provided under long-term master services agreements (“MSAs”) with our customers. Over time, many of our customers have increased their reliance on outsourcing the maintenance and improvement of their transmission and distribution systems to third-party service providers in an effort to more efficiently and cost effectively manage their core business. We believe this outsourcing trend will continue to be a key growth driver for the leading participants in our industry as electric utilities continue to focus more on power generation.

Our Position as a Recognized Leader in Storm-Related Capabilities. Our construction and engineering footprint includes the areas of the U.S. power grid we believe are the most susceptible to damage caused by severe weather, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms, ice storms and wind storms. Our contiguous geographic footprint enables us to work with our customers to secure the crews from non-affected areas and quickly relocate them to storm-affected areas. Storm-related services do not require dedicated storm teams to be “on call” or any additional storm-specific crew additions. Our flexible business strategy allows us to position crews where they are needed. We maintain a dedicated 24-hour Storm Center that serves as the single command hub. Our storm-related services often solidify existing customer relationships and create opportunities with new customers.

 

Fiscal Year

   Storm-
Related
Revenues
     Total
Revenues
     Storm-Related
Revenues as a
Percentage of
Total Revenues
 
     (In millions)      (In millions)         

2010

   $ 46.6       $   504.1         9.3

2011

   $ 64.5       $ 593.8         10.9

2012

   $ 70.6       $ 685.2         10.3

2013

   $   167.3       $ 918.7         18.2

2014

   $ 67.4       $ 810.6         8.3

 

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The following table sets forth certain information related to selected storm mobilizations in recent years:

 

 

Selected Storm Mobilizations

 

Storm (States Affected)

   Fiscal Year  

Hurricanes / Tropical Storms / Other

  

Sandy (CT, NY, OH, WV, VA, PA, NJ, MD)

     2013   

Isaac (FL, AL, MS, LA)

     2013   

July Derecho (VA, NC, WV, IN, OH, PA, MD)

     2013   

Irene (NC, VA, MD, DE, NJ, NY, RI, PA, CT, NH, MA)

     2012   

April Tornadoes (TX, OK, AR, LA, MS, AL, GA, TN, KY)

     2011   

Winter Storms

  

February Winter Storm (AR, GA, KY, MD, SC, NC, PA)

     2014   

December Winter Storm (AR, OH, MI, TN, WV)

     2014   

February Northeast Snow Storm (CT, PA, NY, MA, RI)

     2013   

November Northeast Snow Storm (CT, PA, NY, NJ, NH)

     2012   

February Winter Storm (IN, OH, PA, VA, MD, Dist. of Columbia, LA, TX)

     2011   

January Winter Storm (VA, WV, Dist. of Columbia, MD)

     2011   

Winter Storm (TX, OK, GA, SC, NC, VA, WV, MD, OH, PA)

     2010   

Winter Storm (KY, NC, VA, TN, WV)

     2010   

Our Experienced Operations Management Team with Extensive Relationships. Our operations management team has served in a variety of roles and senior positions with us, our customers and our competitors. We believe that our management team’s deep industry knowledge, field experience and relationships extend our operating capabilities, improve the quality of our services, facilitate access to clients and enhance our strong reputation in the industry. In addition, our management team has successfully integrated several acquisitions that have broadened our geographic footprint and expanded the portfolio of energy and communication solutions that we provide.

 

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Types of Service Arrangements

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014, approximately 85% of our services were provided under MSAs or similar arrangements that cover transmission and distribution maintenance, upgrade and extension services, as well as some new construction services, including engineering, siting and planning. Work under MSAs is typically billed based on either hourly usage of labor and equipment or unit of work. The unit-based arrangements involve billing for actual units (completed poles, cross arms, specific length of line, etc.) based on prices defined in customers’ MSAs. The remaining 15% of our services were generated under fixed-price agreements.

Initial arrangement awards are usually made on a competitive bid basis; however, extensions are often completed on a negotiated basis. As a result of our track record of quality work and services, a majority of our arrangements are renewed at or before the expiration of their terms.

The terms of our service arrangements are typically one to three years for co-operative and municipal utilities and three to five years for investor-owned utilities, with periodic pricing reviews. Due to the nature of our MSAs, in many instances our customers are not committed to minimum volumes of services, but rather we are committed to perform specific services covered by MSAs if and to the extent requested by the customer. The customer is obligated to obtain these services from us if they are not performed by their employees. Therefore, there can be no assurance as to the customer’s requirements during particular periods, nor are estimations predictive of future revenues. Most of our arrangements, including MSAs, may be terminated by our customers on short notice. Because the majority of our customers are well-capitalized, investment grade-rated electric utilities, we have historically experienced minimal bad debts.

Seasonality

Because our services are performed outdoors, operational results can be subject to seasonal weather variations. These seasonal variations affect both construction and storm-related services. Extended periods of rain can negatively affect deployment of construction crews, particularly with respect to underground work. During the winter months, demand for construction work is generally lower due to inclement weather. Demand for construction work generally increases during the spring and summer months due to improved weather conditions. Due to the unpredictable nature of storms, the level of storm-related revenues fluctuates from period to period.

Competition

We face significant competition. Our competitors vary in size, geographic scope and areas of expertise. We also face competition from in-house service organizations of our existing and prospective customers, which may employ personnel who perform some of the same types of services we provide.

We believe that the principal competitive factors in the end markets in which we operate are:

 

   

diversified services, including the ability to offer turnkey EPC project services;

 

   

experienced management and employees;

 

   

customer relationships and industry reputation;

 

   

responsiveness in emergency restoration situations;

 

   

availability of fleet and specialty equipment;

 

   

adequate financial resources and bonding capacity;

 

   

geographic breadth and presence in customer markets;

 

   

pricing of services, particularly under MSA constraints; and

 

   

safety concerns of our crews, customers and the general public.

We believe that we have a favorable competitive position in our markets due in large part to our ability to execute with respect to each of these factors. Our years of experience, broad spectrum of service offerings, customer service and safety contribute to our competitive advantages.

 

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Small third-party service providers pose a smaller threat to us than national competitors because they are frequently unable to compete for larger, blanket service agreements to provide system-wide coverage. However, some of our competitors are larger, have greater resources and are able to offer a broader range of services (such as higher voltage transmission construction, pipeline construction, and communication infrastructure construction) or offer services in a broader geographic territory. In addition, certain of our competitors may have lower overhead cost structures and may, therefore, be able to provide services at lower rates. Furthermore, if employees leave our employment to work with our competitors, we may lose existing customers who have formed relationships with those former employees. Competitive factors may require us to take future measures, such as price reductions, that could reduce profitability. There are few significant barriers to entry into our industry and, as a result, any organization with adequate financial resources and access to qualified staff may become a competitor.

Customers

We are proud of the relationships we have built with our customers, some of which date back over 69 years to when our company was formed. We remain focused on developing and maintaining strong, long-term relationships with investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities and all other customers. Our diverse customer base includes over 300 customers with broad geographic national presence. Our top 10 customers accounted for approximately 55%, 53% and 56% of our total revenues during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Duke Energy, which now includes legacy Progress Energy, was our only customer that represented greater than 10% of our total revenues during that time frame, with approximately 16%, 17% and 22% for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 total revenues (adjusted to include those revenues attributable to Progress Energy), respectively. Subsequent to the merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy, the new corporation requested bids for its distribution, transmission, substation and engineering MSA contracts. We successfully retained the majority of the MSA contracts we chose to bid and which represented our work in fiscal 2014. In the few areas we were unsuccessful in retaining the work, our crews have already been redeployed to growth on surrounding customers. Given the composition of the investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in our geographic market, we expect that a substantial portion of our total revenues will continue to be derived from a limited group of customers. Furthermore, because the majority of our customers are well-capitalized, investment grade-rated electric utilities, we have historically experienced minimal bad debts.

Employees

At June 30, 2014, we employed approximately 5,800 full and part-time employees, of which approximately 5,000 were revenue producing and approximately 800 were non-revenue producing. Approximately 185 of our Klondyke and Pine Valley employees are represented by a union or subject to collective bargaining agreements, requiring us to pay specified wages and provide certain benefits to these employees. We believe that we have a good relationship with our employees.

Training, Quality Assurance and Safety

Performance of our services requires the use of heavy equipment and exposure to potentially dangerous conditions. We emphasize safety at every level of the Company, with safety leadership in senior management, an extensive and required ongoing safety and training program with physical training facilities and on-line courses, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) courses, and lineman training through an accredited four-year program that has grown to be one of the largest powerline training programs in the United States.

As is common in our industry, we regularly have been, and will continue to be, subject to claims by employees, customers and third parties for property damage and personal injuries.

Equipment

As of June 30, 2014, our customized and extensive fleet consisted of over 5,800 pieces of motorized equipment with an average age of approximately seven years as compared to their range of useful lives which is three to 19 years. We own the majority of our fleet and, as a result, believe we have an advantage relative to our competitors in our ability to mobilize, outfit and manage the equipment necessary to perform our construction work.

Our equipment includes standardized trucks and trailers, support vehicles and specialty construction equipment, such as backhoes, excavators, generators, boring machines, cranes, wire pullers and tensioners. The standardization of our trucks and trailers allows us to minimize training, maintenance and parts costs. We service the majority of our fleet and are a final-stage manufacturer for several configurations of our specialty vehicles. We can build components on-site, which reduces reliance on equipment suppliers.

Our maintenance team has the capability to operate 24 hours a day, both at maintenance centers and in the field, and provides high-quality custom repair work and expedient service in maintaining a fleet poised for mobilization. We believe this gives us a competitive advantage, with stronger local presence, lower fuel costs and more efficient equipment maintenance.

 

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Proprietary Rights

We operate under a number of trade names, including Pike, Pike Electric, UC Synergetic, Pike Tanzania, Pine Valley and Klondyke. We have obtained U.S. federal trademark registration for “Pike” and “Pike Electric” and have other federal trademark registrations and pending trademark and patent applications. We also rely on state and common law protection. We have invested substantial time, effort and capital in establishing these names and believe that our trademarks are a valuable part of our business.

Risk Management and Insurance

We maintain insurance arrangements with coverage customary for companies of our type and size, including general liability, automotive and workers’ compensation. We are partially self-insured for our major risks, and our insurance does not cover all types or amounts of liabilities. Our workers’ compensation insurance policy is subject to a $1.0 million per accident/occurrence deductible and our automobile liability and general liability insurance policies are subject to a $1.0 million per occurrence self-insured retention. We also maintain insurance for health insurance claims exceeding $500,000 per person on an annual basis. Workers’ compensation losses are actuarially forecasted and paid to the insurance company over a twelve-month period, then retrospectively adjusted annually based on the difference between the forecasted losses and the actual incurred losses. General liability and automobile liability claims are handled by a third-party claims adjuster and reimbursed by us on a monthly basis. At any given time, we are subject to multiple workers’ compensation and personal injury claims. Losses are accrued based on estimates of the ultimate liability for claims reported and an estimate of claims incurred but not reported. We maintain accruals based on known facts and historical trends. Business insurance programs require collateral currently provided by $4.0 million in standby letters of credit and cash deposits of $0.6 million.

In the ordinary course of business, we are required by certain customers to post surety or performance bonds in connection with services that we provide to them. As of June 30, 2014, we had approximately $106.1 million in surety bonds outstanding. We have never had to reimburse any of our sureties for expenses or outlays incurred under a performance or payment bond.

Government Regulation

Our operations are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations, including licensing requirements, building and electrical codes, permitting and inspection requirements applicable to construction projects, regulations relating to worker safety and health, including those in respect of OSHA, and regulations relating to environmental protection.

We believe that we are in material compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and have all material licenses required to conduct our operations. Our failure to comply with applicable regulations could result in substantial fines and/or revocation of our operating licenses. Many state and local regulations governing electrical construction require permits and licenses to be held by individuals who typically have passed an examination or met other requirements. We have a regulatory compliance group that monitors our compliance with applicable regulations.

Environmental Matters

Our facilities and operations are subject to a variety of environmental laws and regulations which govern, among other things, the use, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes, the discharge of pollutants into the air, land and water, and the cleanup of contamination. In connection with our truck fueling, maintenance, repair, washing and final-stage manufacturing operations, we use regulated substances such as gasoline, diesel and oil, and generate small quantities of regulated waste such as used oil, antifreeze, paint and car batteries. Some of our properties contain, or previously contained, aboveground or underground storage tanks, fuel dispensers, and/or solvent-containing parts washers. In the event we cause, or we or our predecessors have caused, a release of hazardous substances or other environmental damage, whether at our sites, sites where we perform our services, or other locations such as off-site disposal locations or adjacent properties, we could incur liabilities arising out of such releases or environmental damage. Although we have incurred in the past, and we anticipate we will incur in the future, costs to maintain environmental compliance and/or to address environmental issues, such costs have not had, and are not expected to have, a material adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

 

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Available Information

Our website address is www.pike.com. You may obtain free copies of our Annual Report on Form 10-K, our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, our Current Reports on Form 8-K and our proxy statement, any amendments to such reports, and filings under Sections 13 and 16 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), through our website in the “Investor Center” section under the “Corporate Governance” caption. These reports are available on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Our business is subject to a variety of risks, including the risks described below. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected and we may not be able to achieve our goals. This Annual Report on Form 10-K also includes statements reflecting assumptions, expectations, projections, intentions or beliefs about future events that are intended as “forward-looking statements” under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Exchange Act and should be read in conjunction with the section entitled “Forward-Looking Statements.”

Risks related to the Merger

The proposed Merger may not be completed within the expected timeframe, or at all, and the failure to complete the Merger could adversely affect our business and the market price of our common stock. On August 4, 2014, we entered into the Agreement and Plan of Merger with Pioneer Parent, Inc. and Pioneer Merger Sub, Inc., both affiliates of Court Square Capital Partners. The Merger Agreement is an executory contract subject to closing conditions beyond our control, and there is no guarantee that these conditions will be satisfied in a timely manner or at all. Completion of the Merger is subject to various conditions, including the adoption of the Merger Agreement by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of all of the outstanding shares of our common stock entitled to vote and the receipt of regulatory approvals, among other things. If any of the conditions to the proposed Merger are not satisfied (or waived by the other party), the Merger may not be completed. In addition, the Merger Agreement may be terminated under certain specified circumstances, including a change in the recommendation of our board of directors or our termination of the Merger Agreement to enter into an agreement for a superior proposal, as defined in the Merger Agreement. Failure to complete the Merger could adversely affect our business and the market price of our common stock in a number of ways, including the following:

 

   

If the Merger is not completed, and there are no other parties willing and able to acquire the Company at a price of $12.00 per share or higher, on terms acceptable to us, the share price of our common stock likely will decline as our stock has recently traded at prices based on the proposed per share consideration for the Merger.

 

   

We have incurred, and will continue to incur, significant costs, expenses and fees for professional services and other transaction costs in connection with the proposed Merger, for which we will have received little or no benefit if the Merger is not completed. Many of these fees and costs will be payable by us even if the Merger is not completed and may relate to activities that we would not have undertaken other than to complete the Merger.

 

   

A failed Merger may result in negative publicity and/or give a negative impression of us in the investment community or business community generally.

 

   

If the Merger Agreement is terminated under specified circumstances, the Company must pay a termination fee of $9,831,193 or $15,729,910, depending on the circumstances, as well as documented out-of-pocket expenses incurred by Pioneer Parent, Inc. and its affiliates of up to $2 million.

The announcement and pendency of the proposed Merger could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. The announcement and pendency of the proposed Merger could cause disruptions in and create uncertainty surrounding our business, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, regardless of whether the Merger is completed. These risks to our business include the following, all of which could be exacerbated by a delay in the completion of the Merger:

 

   

the diversion of significant management time and resources towards the completion of the Merger;

 

   

the impairment of our ability to attract and retain key personnel;

 

   

difficulties maintaining relationships with employees, customers and other business partners;

 

   

restrictions on the conduct of the Company’s business prior to the completion of the Merger which prevent the taking of specified actions without the prior consent of Pioneer Parent, Inc., which actions the Company might otherwise take in the absence of the pending Merger; and

 

   

litigation relating to the Merger and the costs related thereto.

Risks related to our business

We derive a significant portion of our revenues from a small group of customers. The loss of or a significant decrease in services to one or more of these customers could negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our top 10 customers accounted for approximately 55%, 53% and 56% of our total revenues during fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Duke Energy, which now includes legacy Progress Energy, was our only customer that represented greater than 10% of our total revenues during that time frame, with approximately 16%, 17% and 22% for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012 total revenues (adjusted to include those revenues attributable to Progress Energy), respectively. Subsequent to the merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy, the new corporation requested bids for its distribution, transmission, substation and engineering MSA contracts. We successfully retained the majority of the MSA contracts we chose to bid and which represented our work in fiscal 2014. In the few areas we were unsuccessful in retaining the work, our crews have already been redeployed to growth on surrounding customers. Given the composition of the investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in our geographic market, we expect a substantial portion of our revenues will continue to be derived from a limited group of customers. We may not be able to maintain our relationships with these customers, and the loss of, or substantial reduction of our sales to, any of our major customers could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our customers often have no obligation to assign work to us, and many of our arrangements may be terminated on short notice. As a result, we are at risk of losing significant business on short notice. Most of our customers assign work to us under MSAs. Under these arrangements, our customers generally have no obligation to assign work to us and do not guarantee service volumes. Most of our customer arrangements, including our MSAs, may be terminated by our customers on short notice. In addition, many of our customer arrangements, including our MSAs, are open to competitive bidding at the expiration of their terms. As a result, we may be displaced on these arrangements by competitors from time to time. Our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected if our customers do not assign work to us or if they cancel a number of significant arrangements and we cannot replace them with similar work.

Our industry is highly competitive and we may be unable to compete effectively, retain our customers or win new customers, which could result in reduced profitability and loss of market share. We face intense competition from a variety of national and regional companies, and numerous small, owner-operated private companies. We also face competition from the in-house service organizations of our existing or prospective customers, some of which employ personnel who perform some of the same types of services we provide. We compete primarily on the basis of our reputation and relationships with customers, safety and execution record, geographic presence and our breadth of service offerings, pricing and availability of qualified personnel and required equipment. Certain of our competitors may have lower cost structures and may, therefore, be able to provide their services at lower rates than we can provide. Many of our current and potential competitors, especially our competitors with national scope, also may have significantly greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. In addition, our competitors may succeed in developing the expertise, experience and resources to compete successfully and in marketing and selling new services better than we can. Furthermore, our existing or prospective customers may not continue to outsource services in the future or we may not be able to retain our existing customers or win new customers. The loss of existing customers to our competitors or the failure to win new customers could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our storm-related services are highly volatile and unpredictable, which could result in substantial variations in, and uncertainties regarding, the levels of our financial results from period to period. Revenues derived from our storm-related services are highly volatile and uncertain due to the unpredictable nature of weather-related events. Our annual storm-related revenues have ranged from a low of $46.6 million to a high of $167.3 million during the five fiscal years ended June 30, 2014. During fiscal 2013, we had a large derecho storm impact the Northeast and two large hurricanes

 

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impact the Northeastern and Gulf coasts, which significantly contributed to the $167.3 million of storm-related services revenue. Our storm-related revenues for fiscal year 2013 are not indicative of the revenues that we typically generate in any period or can be expected to generate in any future period. Our historical results of operations have varied between periods due to the volatility of our storm-related revenues. The levels of our future revenues and net income or loss may be subject to significant variations and uncertainties from period to period due to the volatility of our storm-related revenues. In addition, our storm restoration revenues are offset in part by declines in our core services because we staff storm restoration mobilizations in large part by diverting resources from our core services.

We are subject to the risks associated with government construction projects. Our utility customers often engage us to provide services on government construction projects, and we also provide services directly on government construction projects, primarily for state and local governments. We are therefore exposed to the risks associated with government construction projects, including the risks that spending on construction may be reduced, pending projects may be terminated or curtailed and planned projects may not be pursued as expected or at all as a result of economic conditions or otherwise. In addition, government customers typically can terminate or modify any of their contracts at their convenience, and some of these government contracts are subject to renewal or extension annually. If a government customer terminates or modifies a contract, our backlog and revenue may be reduced or we may incur a loss, either of which could impair our financial condition and operating results. A termination due to our unsatisfactory performance could expose us to liability and adversely affect our ability to compete for future projects and orders. In cases where we are a subcontractor, the primary contract under which we subcontract could be terminated, regardless of the quality of our services as a subcontractor or our relationship with the relevant government customer.

The risks of government construction projects also include the increased risk of civil and criminal fines and penalties for violations of applicable regulations and statutes and the risk of public scrutiny of our performance on high profile sites. In addition, our failure to comply with the terms of one or more of our government contracts, other government agreements, or government regulations and statutes could result in our being suspended or barred from future government construction projects for a significant period of time. We could also be indirectly exposed to certain of these risks when we indemnify our customers performing work on government construction projects.

We may incur warranty costs that could adversely affect our profitability. Under almost all of our contracts, we warrant certain aspects of our engineering maintenance and construction services. To the extent we incur substantial warranty claims in any period, our reputation, our ability to obtain future business from our customers and our profitability could be adversely affected. We cannot provide assurance that significant warranty claims will not be made in the future.

We may incur liabilities or suffer negative financial or reputational impacts relating to occupational health and safety matters. Our operations are subject to extensive laws and regulations relating to the maintenance of safe conditions in the workplace. While we have invested, and will continue to invest, substantial resources in our occupational health and safety programs, our industry involves a high degree of operational risk and there can be no assurance that we will avoid significant liability exposure. Although we have taken what we believe are appropriate precautions, our employees have suffered fatalities in the past and may suffer additional fatalities in the future. Serious accidents, including fatalities, may subject us to substantial penalties, civil litigation or criminal prosecution. Claims for damages to persons, including claims for bodily injury or loss of life, could result in substantial costs and liabilities, which could materially and adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. In addition, if our safety record were to substantially deteriorate over time or we were to suffer substantial penalties or criminal prosecution for violation of health and safety regulations, our customers could cancel our contracts and not award us future business.

Our business is subject to numerous hazards that could subject us to substantial monetary and other liabilities. If accidents occur, they could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations. Our business is subject to numerous hazards, including electrocutions, fires, natural gas explosions, mechanical failures, weather-related incidents, transportation accidents and damage to utilized equipment. These hazards could cause personal injury and loss of life, severe damage to or destruction of property and equipment and other consequential damages and could lead to suspension of operations, large damage claims and, in extreme cases, criminal liability. Our safety record is an important consideration for our customers. If serious accidents or fatalities occur, we may be ineligible to bid on certain work, and existing service arrangements could be terminated. In addition, if our safety record was to deteriorate, our ability to bid on certain work could be adversely impacted. Further, regulatory changes implemented by OSHA could impose additional costs on us. Adverse experience with hazards and claims could have a negative effect on our reputation with our existing or potential new customers and our prospects for future work.

Federal and state legislative and regulatory developments that we believe should encourage electric power transmission infrastructure spending may fail to result in increased demand for our services. In recent years, federal and state legislation has been passed and resulting regulations have been adopted that could significantly increase spending on electric power transmission infrastructure. However, much fiscal, regulatory and other uncertainty remains as to the impact this legislation and regulation will ultimately have on the demand for our services. The effect of these regulations is uncertain and may not result in increased spending on the electric power transmission infrastructure. Continued uncertainty regarding certain regulations may result in slower growth in demand for our services.

 

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Renewable energy initiatives may not lead to increased demand for our services. Investments for renewable energy and electric power transmission infrastructure may not occur, may be less than anticipated or may be delayed, may be concentrated in locations where we do not have significant capabilities, and any resulting contracts may not be awarded to us, any of which could negatively impact demand for our services.

Demand for some of our services is cyclical and vulnerable to industry and economic downturns, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. The demand for infrastructure services has been, and will likely continue to be, cyclical in nature and vulnerable to general downturns in the U.S. economy. When the general level of economic activity deteriorates, our customers may delay or cancel expansions, upgrades, maintenance and repairs to their systems. A number of other factors, including the financial condition of the industry, could adversely affect our customers and their ability or willingness to fund capital expenditures in the future. We are also dependent on the amount of work that our customers outsource. During downturns in the economy, our customers may determine to outsource less work resulting in decreased demand for our services. Furthermore, the historical trend toward outsourcing of infrastructure services may not continue as we expect. In addition, consolidation, competition or capital constraints in the electric power industry may result in reduced spending by, or the loss of, one or more of our customers. These fluctuations in demand for our services could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations, particularly during economic downturns. Economic downturns may also adversely affect the pricing of our services.

To be successful, we need to attract and retain qualified personnel, and any inability to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to provide high-quality services on a timely basis requires an adequate supply of engineers, skilled linemen and project managers. Accordingly, our ability to increase our productivity and profitability will be limited by our ability to employ, train and retain skilled personnel necessary to meet our requirements. We may not be able to maintain an adequate skilled labor force necessary to operate efficiently. Our labor expenses may also increase as a result of a shortage in the supply of skilled personnel, or we may have to curtail our planned internal growth as a result of labor shortages. We may also spend considerable resources training employees who may then be hired by our competitors, forcing us to spend additional funds to attract personnel to fill those positions.

In addition, our employees might leave our company and join our competitors. If this happens, we may lose some of our existing clients that have formed relationships with these former employees. In addition, we may lose future clients to a former employee as a competitor. If we are unable to hire and retain qualified personnel in the future, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are dependent on our senior management and other key personnel, the loss of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our operations, including our customer relationships, are dependent on the continued efforts of our senior management and other key personnel. Although we have entered into employment agreements with our key employees, we cannot be certain that any individual will continue in such capacity for any particular period of time. We do not maintain key person life insurance policies on any of our employees. The loss of any member of our senior management or other key personnel, or the inability to hire and retain qualified management and other key personnel, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our unionized workforce could adversely affect our operations and our ability to complete future acquisitions. In addition, we contribute to multi-employer plans that could result in liabilities to us if these plans are terminated or we withdraw. Our acquisitions of Klondyke and Pine Valley introduced a unionized workforce to our operations, as substantially all of their hourly employees are unionized. As of June 30, 2014, approximately 3% of our employees were covered by collective bargaining agreements. This percentage could grow if more of our employees unionize or we expand our services in states that have predominantly unionized workforces in our industry. Any strikes or work stoppages could adversely impact our relationships with our customers, hinder our ability to conduct business and increase costs. Our current workforce could experience an increase in union organizing activity, particularly if legislation that would facilitate such activity becomes law. Increased unionization could increase our costs, and we may not be able to recoup those cost increases by increasing prices for our services.

With the acquisition of Klondyke in June 2010 and Pine Valley in August 2011, we now contribute to several multi-employer pension plans for employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. These plans are not administered by us, and contributions are determined in accordance with provisions of negotiated labor contracts. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended by the Multi-Employer Pension Plan Amendments Act of 1980, imposes certain liabilities upon employers who are contributors to a multi-employer plan in the event of the employer’s withdrawal from, or upon termination of, such plan. We do not routinely review information on the net assets and actuarial present value of the multi-employer pension plans’ unfunded vested benefits allocable to us, if any, and we are not presently aware of any material amounts for which we may be contingently liable if we were to withdraw from any of these plans. In addition, if any of these multi-employer plans enters “critical status” under the Pension Protection Act of 2006, we could be required to make significant additional contributions to those plans.

 

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Our ability to complete future acquisitions could be adversely affected because of our union status for a variety of reasons. For example, our union agreements may be incompatible with the union agreements of a business we want to acquire, and some businesses may or may not want to become affiliated with a company that maintains a significant unionized workforce. Additionally, we may increase our exposure to withdrawal liabilities for underfunded multi-employer pension plans to which an acquired company contributes.

We require subcontractors to assist us in providing certain services and we may be unable to retain the necessary subcontractors to complete certain projects. We use subcontractors to perform portions of our contracts and to manage workflow. Although we are not dependent upon any single subcontractor, general market conditions may limit the availability of subcontractors on which we rely to perform portions of our contracts and this could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our current insurance coverage may not be adequate, and we may not be able to obtain insurance at acceptable rates, or at all. We are partially self-insured for our major risks, and our insurance does not cover all types or amounts of liabilities. Our workers’ compensation insurance policy is subject to a $1.0 million per accident/occurrence deductible and our automobile liability and general liability insurance policies are subject to a $1.0 million per occurrence self-insured retention. Workers’ compensation losses are actuarially forecasted and paid to the insurance company over a twelve-month period, then retrospectively adjusted annually based on the difference between the forecasted losses and the actual incurred losses. General liability and automobile liability claims are handled by a third-party claims adjuster and reimbursed by us on a monthly basis. At any given time, we are subject to multiple workers’ compensation and personal injury claims. Our insurance policies may not be adequate to protect us from liabilities that we incur in our business. In addition, business insurance programs require collateral currently provided by $4.0 million in standby letters of credit and cash deposits of $0.6 million.

In addition, due to a variety of factors such as increases in claims and projected increases in medical costs and wages, insurance carriers may be unwilling to provide the current levels of coverage without a significant increase in collateral requirements to cover our deductible obligations. Furthermore, our insurance premiums may increase in the future and we may not be able to obtain similar levels of insurance on reasonable terms, or at all. Any such inadequacy of, or inability to obtain, insurance coverage at acceptable rates, or at all, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Fuel costs could materially and adversely affect our operating results. We have a large fleet of vehicles and equipment that primarily use diesel fuel. Our fuel and oil expenses have ranged from approximately 3% to 5% of our total revenues over the last three fiscal years. Fuel costs have been very volatile over the last several years. Fuel prices and supplies are influenced by a variety of international, political and economic circumstances. In addition, weather and other unpredictable events may significantly affect fuel prices and supplies. These or other factors could result in higher fuel prices which, in turn, would increase our costs of doing business and lower our gross profit. We do not utilize hedge accounting treatment for financial reporting purposes and, as a result, we have experienced volatility in our mark-to-market adjustment on our diesel hedging program. Such adjustments caused a $0.4 million and $1.3 million decrease in our cost of operations during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, and a $2.5 million increase in our cost of operations during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

A portion of our business depends on our ability to provide surety bonds or letters of credit and we may be unable to compete for or work on certain projects if we are not able to obtain the necessary surety bonds or letters of credit. A portion of our contracts require and we expect that a portion of our future contracts will require that we provide our customers with security for the performance of their projects. This security may be in the form of a “performance bond” (a bond whereby a commercial surety provides for the benefit of the customer a bond insuring completion of the project) or a letter of credit. Further, under standard terms in the surety market, sureties issue or continue bonds on a project-by-project basis and can decline to issue bonds at any time or require the posting of additional collateral as a condition to issuing or renewing any bonds.

Current or future market conditions, including losses incurred in the construction industry, decreases in lending activity and increases in our debt, and ultimately our performance on contracts, may have a negative effect on surety providers. These market conditions, as well as changes in our surety providers’ assessment of our operating and financial risk, could also cause our surety providers to decline to issue or renew, or substantially reduce the amount of, bonds for our work and could increase our bonding costs. These actions could be taken on short notice. If our surety providers were to limit or eliminate our access to bonding, our alternatives would include seeking bonding capacity from other sureties, finding more business that does not require bonds and posting other forms of collateral for project performance, such as letters of credit or cash. We may be unable to secure these alternatives in a timely manner, on acceptable terms, or at all. Accordingly, if we were to experience an interruption or reduction in our availability of bonding capacity, we may be unable to compete for or work on certain projects and such interruption or reduction could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If we are not able to obtain letters of credit, we may be unable to provide the requested terms or amounts to our customers based upon the terms of our revolving credit facility.

 

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We extend credit to customers for purchases of our services. In the past we have had, and in the future we may have, difficulty collecting receivables from customers that are subject to protection under bankruptcy or insolvency laws, are otherwise experiencing financial difficulties or dispute the amount owed to us. We grant credit, generally without collateral, to our customers located throughout the United States and abroad. Consequently, we are subject to potential credit risk related to changes in the electric power and gas utility industries and their performance. Please refer to Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Concentration of Credit Risk” for additional information regarding the concentration of our credit risk among our larger customers. If any of our large customers, some of which are highly leveraged, file for bankruptcy or experience financial difficulties, we could suffer reduced cash flows and losses in excess of current allowances provided. We could also experience adverse financial effects if our customers dispute or refuse to pay the amounts owed to us for various reasons, such as disagreement as to the terms of the governing contract, or dissatisfaction with the quality or timing of the work we performed. Our allowance for doubtful accounts was approximately 5% of accounts receivable at June 30, 2014. We cannot provide assurance that this estimate will be realized or that the allowance will be sufficient.

Weather conditions can adversely affect our operations and, consequently, revenues. The electric infrastructure servicing business is subject to seasonal variations, which may cause our operating results to vary significantly from period to period and could cause the market price of our stock to fallDue to the fact that a significant portion of our business is performed outdoors, our results of operations are subject to seasonal variations. These seasonal variations affect our core activities of substation and renewable project work and maintaining, upgrading and extending electrical distribution and transmission powerlines and not only our storm-related services. Sustained periods of rain, especially when widespread throughout our service area, can negatively affect our results of operations for a particular period. In addition, during periods of El Niño conditions, typically more rainfall than average occurs over portions of the U.S. Gulf Coast and Florida, which includes a significant portion of our service territory. Generally, during the winter months, demand for new work and maintenance services may be lower due to reduced construction activity during inclement weather. As a result, operating results may vary significantly from period to period.

Our financial results are based upon estimates and assumptions that may differ from actual results. In preparing our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”), several estimates and assumptions are used by management in determining the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses recognized during the periods presented and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities known to exist as of the date of the financial statements. These estimates and assumptions must be made because certain information that is used in the preparation of our financial statements is dependent on future events, cannot be calculated with a high degree of precision from data available or is not capable of being readily calculated based on generally accepted methodologies. In some cases, these estimates are particularly difficult to determine and we must exercise significant judgment. Estimates are primarily used in our assessment of the allowance for doubtful accounts, valuation of inventory, useful lives and salvage values of property and equipment, fair value assumptions in analyzing goodwill and long-lived asset impairments, self-insured claims liabilities, forfeiture estimates relating to stock-based compensation, revenue recognition and provision for income taxes. Actual results for all estimates could differ materially from the estimates and assumptions that we use, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and stock price. According to requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the related rules of the SEC, we must assess our ability to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting. If we are unable to maintain adequate internal controls, our business and operating results could be harmed. If our management or our independent registered public accounting firm were to conclude in their reports that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information and the trading price of our stock could drop significantly.

We have incurred indebtedness under a revolving credit facility, which may restrict our business and operations, and restrict our future access to sufficient funding to finance desired growth. On August 24, 2011, we replaced our prior credit facility with a new $200.0 million revolving credit facility, which matures in August 2015. On June 27, 2012, we exercised the accordion loan feature of the new revolving credit facility and entered into a commitment increase agreement with our lenders thereby increasing the lenders’ commitments by $75.0 million, from $200.0 million to $275.0 million. The increased commitments have been and will be used to support our general corporate purposes, including funding the UCS acquisition. See Note 3, “Acquisitions,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for additional information regarding the UCS acquisition. As of June 30, 2014, we had $197.0 million of borrowings outstanding and $74.0 million of availability under the $275.0 million revolving credit facility (after giving effect to outstanding standby letters of credit of $4.0 million). Our borrowing availability is subject to, and potentially limited by, our compliance with the covenants of our revolving credit facility.

 

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We typically dedicate a portion of our cash flow to debt service. If we do not ultimately have sufficient earnings to service our debt, we would need to refinance all or part of our existing debt, sell assets, borrow more money or sell securities, which we may not be able to do on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

All of our outstanding indebtedness consists of borrowings under our revolving credit facility with a group of financial institutions, which are secured by substantially all of our assets. The terms of our revolving credit facility include customary events of default and covenants that limit us from taking certain actions without obtaining the consent of the lenders. In addition, our revolving credit facility requires us to maintain certain financial ratios and restricts our ability to incur additional indebtedness. The restrictions and covenants in our revolving credit facility may limit our ability to respond to changing business and economic conditions and may prevent us from engaging in transactions that might otherwise be considered beneficial to us.

A breach of our revolving credit facility, including any inability to comply with the required financial ratios, could result in a default. In the event of any default, the lenders thereunder would be entitled to accelerate the repayment of amounts outstanding, plus accrued and unpaid interest. Moreover, these lenders would have the option to terminate any obligation to make further extensions of credit under our revolving credit facility. In the event of a default under our revolving credit facility, the lenders thereunder could also proceed to foreclose against the assets securing such obligations. In the event of a foreclosure on all or substantially all of our assets, we may not be able to continue to operate as a going concern. Outstanding letters of credit issued under our revolving credit facility would need to be replaced with other forms of collateral. Cross defaults may also occur on other agreements including surety and lease agreements.

We may be unsuccessful at acquiring companies or at integrating companies that we acquire and, as a result, we may not achieve the expected benefits and our profitability could materially suffer. One of our growth strategies is to acquire companies that will allow us to continue to expand our energy and communication solutions platform and geographic footprint, when attractive opportunities arise. We expect to face competition for acquisition candidates, which may limit the number of acquisition opportunities and may lead to higher acquisition prices. We may not be able to identify, acquire or profitably manage additional businesses or to integrate successfully any acquired businesses without substantial costs, delays or other operational or financial problems. Further, acquisitions involve a number of special risks, including failure of the acquired business to achieve expected results, diversion of management’s attention, difficulties integrating the operations and personnel of acquired businesses, failure to retain key personnel of the acquired business, risks arising from the prior operations of acquired companies and risks associated with unanticipated events or liabilities, some or all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and may disrupt the day to day operations during any implementation of various information systems. In addition, we may not be able to obtain the necessary acquisition financing or we may have to increase our indebtedness in order to finance an acquisition. If we finance acquisitions by issuing convertible debt or equity securities, our existing shareholders may be diluted, which could adversely affect the market price of our stock. Our future business, financial condition and results of operations could suffer if we fail to successfully implement our acquisition strategy.

Our use of percentage-of-completion accounting could result in a reduction or elimination of previously reported profits. As discussed in “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Critical Accounting Policies” and in the notes to our consolidated financial statements included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” a significant portion of our revenues are recognized using the percentage-of-completion method of accounting, utilizing the cost-to-cost method. This method is used because management considers expended costs to be the best available measure of progress on these contracts. This accounting method is generally accepted for fixed-price contracts. The percentage-of-completion accounting practice we use results in our recognizing contract revenues and earnings ratably over the contract term in proportion to our incurrence of contract costs. The earnings or losses recognized on individual contracts are based on estimates of contract revenues, costs and profitability. Changes in job performance, job conditions, estimated profitability and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and their effects are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. Contract losses are recognized in full when determined to be probable and reasonably estimable, and contract profit estimates are adjusted based on ongoing reviews of contract profitability. Further, a substantial portion of our contracts contain various cost and performance incentives. Penalties are recorded when known or finalized, which generally occurs during the latter stages of the contract. In addition, we record cost recovery claims when we believe recovery is probable and the amounts can be reasonably estimated. Actual collection of claims could differ from estimated amounts and could result in a reduction or elimination of previously recognized earnings. In certain circumstances, it is possible that such adjustments could be significant.

Our inability to enforce non-competition agreements with former principals and key management of the businesses we acquire could materially and adversely affect our operating results, cash flows and liquidity. In connection with our acquisitions, we generally require that key management and the former principals of the businesses we acquire enter into non-competition agreements in our favor. The laws of each state differ concerning the enforceability of non-competition agreements. Generally, state courts will examine all of the facts and circumstances at the time a party seeks to enforce a non-competition agreement; consequently, we cannot predict with certainty whether, if challenged, a court will enforce any

 

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particular non-competition agreement. If one or more former principals or members of key management of the businesses we acquire violate or seek to violate these non-competition agreements, and the courts refuse to enforce the non-compete agreement entered into by such person or persons, we might be subject to increased competition, which could materially and adversely affect our operating results, cash flows and liquidity.

During the ordinary course of our business, we may become subject to lawsuits or indemnity claims, which could materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations. We have in the past been, and may in the future be, named as a defendant in lawsuits, claims and other legal proceedings during the ordinary course of our business. These actions may seek, among other things, compensation for alleged personal injury, workers’ compensation, employment discrimination, breach of contract, property damage, punitive damages, civil penalties or other losses, consequential damages or injunctive or declaratory relief. In addition, pursuant to our service arrangements, we generally indemnify our customers for claims related to the services we provide thereunder. Furthermore, our services are integral to the operation and performance of the electric distribution and transmission infrastructure. As a result, we may become subject to lawsuits or claims for any failure of the systems that we work on, even if our services are not the cause for such failures. In addition, we may incur civil and criminal liabilities to the extent that our services contributed to any property damage. With respect to such lawsuits, claims, proceedings and indemnities, we have and will accrue reserves in accordance with U.S. GAAP. In the event that such actions or indemnities are ultimately resolved unfavorably at amounts exceeding our accrued reserves, or at material amounts, the outcome could materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, payments of significant amounts, even if reserved, could adversely affect our liquidity position.

Our participation in partnerships or alliances exposes us to liability and/or harm to our reputation for failures of our partners. As part of our business, we enter into partnership or alliance arrangements. The purpose of these agreements is typically to combine skills and resources to allow for the performance of particular projects. Success on these jointly performed projects depends in large part on whether our partners satisfy their contractual obligations. We and our partners generally will be jointly and severally liable for all liabilities and obligations. If a partner fails to perform or is financially unable to bear its portion of required capital contributions or other obligations, including liabilities stemming from claims or lawsuits, we could be required to make additional investments, provide additional services or pay more than our proportionate share of a liability to make up for our partner’s shortfall. Further, if we are unable to adequately address our partner’s performance issues, the customer may terminate the project, which could result in legal liability to us, harm our reputation and reduce our profit on a project.

Our failure to comply with, or the imposition of liability under, environmental laws and regulations could result in significant costs. Our facilities and operations, including fueling and truck maintenance, repair, washing and final-stage manufacturing, are subject to various environmental laws and regulations relating principally to the use, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes and the discharge of pollutants into the air, water and land. Violations of these requirements, or of any permits required for our operations, could result in significant fines or penalties or other sanctions. We are also subject to laws and regulations that can impose liability, sometimes without regard to fault, for investigating or cleaning up contamination, as well as for damages to property or natural resources and for personal injury arising out of such contamination. Such liabilities may also be joint and several, meaning that we could be held responsible for more than our share of the liability involved, or even the entire amount. The presence of environmental contamination could also interfere with ongoing operations or adversely affect our ability to sell or lease our properties. In the event we fail to obtain or comply with any permits required for our activities, or our activities cause any environmental damage, we could incur significant liability. We have incurred costs in connection with environmental compliance, remediation and/or monitoring, and we anticipate that we will continue to do so. Discovery of additional contamination for which we are responsible, the enactment of new laws and regulations, which are becoming increasingly more stringent, or changes in how existing requirements are enforced, could require us to incur additional costs for compliance or subject us to unexpected liabilities.

Our results of operations could be adversely affected as a result of the impairment of goodwill or other intangibles. When we acquire a business, we record an asset called “goodwill” equal to the excess amount we pay for the business, including liabilities assumed, over the fair value of the tangible and identified intangible assets of the business we acquire. In accordance with U.S. GAAP, we must identify and value intangible assets that we acquire in business combinations, such as customer arrangements, customer relationships and non-compete agreements, that arise from contractual or other legal rights or that are capable of being separated or divided from the acquired entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged. The fair value of identified intangible assets is based upon an estimate of the future economic benefits expected to result from ownership, which represents the amount at which the assets could be bought or sold in a current transaction between willing parties, that is, other than in a forced or liquidation sale.

U.S. GAAP provides that goodwill and other intangible assets that have indefinite useful lives not be amortized, but instead must be tested at least annually for impairment, and intangible assets that have finite useful lives should be amortized over their useful lives. U.S. GAAP also provides specific guidance for testing goodwill and other non-amortized intangible assets for impairment. U.S. GAAP requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions to allocate goodwill to reporting units and to determine the fair value of reporting unit net assets and liabilities, including, among other

 

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things, an assessment of market conditions, projected cash flows, investment rates, cost of capital and growth rates, which could significantly impact the reported value of goodwill and other intangible assets. Fair value is determined using a combination of the discounted cash flow, market multiple and market capitalization valuation approaches. Absent any impairment indicators, we perform our impairment tests annually during the fourth quarter, or more frequently if impairment indicators are present.

We review our intangible assets with finite lives for impairment when events or changes in business conditions indicate the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable, as required by U.S. GAAP. An impairment of intangible assets with finite lives exists if the sum of the undiscounted estimated future cash flows expected is less than the carrying value of the assets. If this measurement indicates a possible impairment, we compare the estimated fair value of the asset to the net book value to measure the impairment charge, if any.

We cannot predict the occurrence of certain future events that might adversely affect the reported value of goodwill and other intangible assets that totaled $221.1 million at June 30, 2014. Such events include strategic decisions made in response to economic and competitive conditions, the impact of the economic environment on our customer base, material negative changes in our relationships with material customers and other parties breaching their contractual obligations under non-compete agreements. Any material decline in our market capitalizations or material increase in discount rates could also result in an impairment of our goodwill. Future impairments, if any, will be recognized as operating expenses.

Risks associated with operating in international markets could restrict our ability to expand globally and harm our business and prospects, and we could be adversely affected by our failure to comply with the laws applicable to our foreign activities, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other similar worldwide anti-bribery laws. We continue to pursue international opportunities. We believe that there will be large and financially attractive projects to pursue in international markets over the next few years as developing regions install or develop their electric infrastructure. Economic conditions, including those resulting from wars, civil unrest, acts of terrorism and other conflicts or volatility in the global markets, may adversely affect our customers, their demand for our services and their ability to pay for our services. Furthermore, we anticipate our ability to provide construction services in these countries would be heavily reliant on local workforces to perform the non-management labor. These workforces will be susceptible to local labor issues, some of which we may be unaware. Consequently, we could have difficulty performing under our agreements in these countries if the local workforce is incapable, uncooperative or unwilling to contract with us. In addition, there are numerous risks inherent in conducting our business internationally, including, but not limited to, potential instability in international markets, changes in regulatory requirements applicable to international operations, currency fluctuations in foreign countries, political, economic and social conditions in foreign countries and complex U.S. and foreign laws and treaties, including tax laws and the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, as amended (the “FCPA”). These risks could restrict our ability to provide services to international customers or to operate our international business profitably, and our overall business and results of operations could be negatively impacted by our foreign activities.

The FCPA and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions prohibit U.S.-based companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to non-U.S. officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. We have policies and procedures designed to ensure that we, our employees and our agents comply with the FCPA and other anti-bribery laws. However, there is no assurance that such policies or procedures will protect us against liability under the FCPA or other laws for actions taken by our agents, employees and intermediaries. If we are found to be liable for FCPA violations (either due to our own acts or our inadvertence, or due to acts or inadvertence of others), we could suffer from severe criminal or civil penalties or other sanctions, which could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, detecting, investigating, and resolving actual or alleged FCPA violations is expensive and can consume significant time and attention of our senior management.

We may incur additional healthcare costs arising from federal healthcare reform legislation. In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 were signed into law in the United States. This legislation expands health care coverage to many uninsured individuals and expands coverage to those already insured. The changes required by this legislation could cause us to incur additional healthcare and other costs, although we do not expect any material short-term impact on our financial results as a result of the legislation. We are currently assessing the extent of any long-term impact from the legislation, including any potential changes to this legislation.

 

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Risks related to our common stock

The market price of our stock may be influenced by many factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors include the various risks described in this section as well as the following:

 

   

the failure of securities analysts to continue to cover our common stock or changes in financial estimates or recommendations by analysts;

 

   

announcements by us or our competitors of significant contracts, acquisitions or capital commitments;

 

   

changes in market valuation or earnings of our competitors;

 

   

variations in quarterly operating results;

 

   

availability of capital;

 

   

general economic conditions;

 

   

terrorist acts;

 

   

legislation;

 

   

future sales of our common stock; and

 

   

investor perception of us and the electric utility industry.

Additional factors that do not specifically relate to our company or the electric utility industry may also materially reduce the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance.

Shares eligible for future sale may cause the market price of our common stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well. The market price of our common stock could decline as a result of sales of a large number of shares of our common stock in the market or the perception that these sales could occur. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate. As of June 30, 2014, there were 31,938,800 shares of our common stock outstanding. Of this amount, 29,116,251 shares of common stock were freely tradeable without restriction or further registration under the Securities Act, by persons other than our affiliates within the meaning of Rule 144 under the Securities Act.

Anti-takeover provisions of our charter and bylaws may reduce the likelihood of any potential change of control or unsolicited acquisition proposal that shareholders might consider favorable. Provisions of our charter and bylaws could deter, delay or prevent a third-party from acquiring us, even if doing so would benefit our shareholders. These provisions include: the authority of the board to issue preferred stock with terms as the board may determine, the absence of cumulative voting in the election of directors, limitations on who may call special meetings of shareholders and advance notice requirements for shareholder proposals.

We do not intend to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Since our IPO, we have not paid quarterly dividends on our common stock and have paid only one special cash dividend on our common stock, which we paid in December 2012 (see Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for additional information regarding the special dividend). We currently intend to continue to retain any future earnings to finance the growth, development and expansion of our business and service debt. Accordingly, we do not intend to declare or pay any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. The declaration, payment and amount of future cash dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors after taking into account various factors, including our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows from operations, current and anticipated capital requirements and expansion plans, any contractual restrictions, the income tax laws then in effect and the requirements of North Carolina law. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our common stock will be your sole source of potential gain for the foreseeable future.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Our headquarters and primary fleet facility are located in Mount Airy, North Carolina. As of June 30, 2014, we owned nine facilities and leased 87 properties throughout our service territory. Most of our properties are used as offices or for fleet operations and engineering services. We have pledged our owned properties as collateral under our revolving credit facility. We continuously review our property needs and, as a result, may consolidate or eliminate certain facilities in the future.

 

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However, no specific future eliminations or consolidations have been identified. We believe that our facilities are adequate for our current operations.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are from time to time a party to various lawsuits, claims and other legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business. These actions typically seek, among other things, (i) compensation for alleged personal injury, workers’ compensation, employment discrimination, breach of contract, or property damages, (ii) punitive damages, civil penalties or other damages, or (iii) injunctive or declaratory relief. With respect to all such lawsuits, claims and proceedings, we record reserves when it is probable a liability has been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. We do not believe that any of these proceedings, individually or in the aggregate, would be expected to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) on July 27, 2005 at the time of our IPO and can now be found under the symbol “PIKE.” The table below presents the high and low sales prices per share of our common stock as reported on the NYSE for the periods indicated:

 

     Fiscal 2014      Fiscal 2013  
     High      Low      High      Low  

First Quarter

   $ 13.36       $ 10.25       $ 9.19       $ 7.72   

Second Quarter

     11.38         8.72         10.98         7.75   

Third Quarter

     11.46         9.72         15.18         9.40   

Fourth Quarter

     11.00         8.52         15.93         11.52   

As of September 5, 2014, there were 38 shareholders of record of our common stock.

Dividend Policy

Since our IPO, we have not paid quarterly dividends on our common stock and have paid only one special cash dividend on our common stock, which we paid in December 2012 (see Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for additional information regarding the special dividend). We currently intend to continue to retain any future earnings to finance the growth, development and expansion of our business and service debt. Accordingly, we do not intend to declare or pay any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. The declaration, payment and amount of future cash dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors after taking into account various factors, including our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows from operations, current and anticipated capital requirements and expansion plans, any contractual restrictions, the income tax laws then in effect and the requirements of North Carolina law.

Performance Graph

The following Performance Graph and related information shall not be deemed to be “filed” with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.

Presented below is a line graph comparing the total returns (assuming the reinvestment of dividends) of our common stock, the S&P 500 Index, the Russell 2000 Index, and the Peer Group. The “Peer Group” is comprised of Aegion Corporation; Comfort Systems USA, Inc.; Dycom Industries, Inc.; Integrated Electrical Services, Inc.; MasTec, Inc.; Matrix Service Company; Michael Baker Corporation; MYR Group Inc.; Quanta Services, Inc.; Sterling Construction Company, Inc.; Tetra Tech, Inc.; UniTek Global Services, Inc.; and Willbros Group, Inc.

The line graph assumes that $100 was invested in our common stock, each of the indices and the Peer Group on June 30, 2009. Returns for the companies included in the Peer Group have been weighted on the basis of the total market capitalization for each company. Returns include reinvestment of dividends.

 

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COMPARISON OF 5-YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN*

Among Pike Corporation, the S&P 500 Index, the Russell 2000 Index, and a Peer Group

 

LOGO

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables set forth selected consolidated financial data of Pike Corporation for each of the fiscal years in the five-year period ended June 30, 2014. The selected consolidated financial data for each of the five fiscal years in the period ended June 30, 2014 and as of June 30, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011 and 2010, was derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of Pike Corporation.

The consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” included elsewhere herein.

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  
     (in thousands, except per share amounts)  

Statement of Operations Data (1):

          

Core revenues

   $ 743,229      $ 751,364      $ 614,623      $ 529,335      $ 457,448   

Storm-related revenues

     67,431        167,327        70,546        64,523        46,636   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     810,660        918,691        685,169        593,858        504,084   

Cost of operations (2)

     706,929        771,475        593,478        525,915        456,317   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     103,731        147,216        91,691        67,943        47,767   

General and administrative expenses (3)

     74,894        75,579        66,219        57,675        51,994   

Secondary offering and other related costs (4)

     —          4,138        —          —          —     

(Gain) loss on sale and impairment of property and equipment

     (1,968     (584     (626     751        1,239   

Restructuring expenses (5)

     —          —          —          —          8,945   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

     30,805        68,083        26,098        9,517        (14,411

Other expense (income):

          

Interest expense

     8,187        7,384        7,304        6,608        7,908   

Other, net

     (349     (127     (63     (55     (298
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense

     7,838        7,257        7,241        6,553        7,610   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

     22,967        60,826        18,857        2,964        (22,021

Income tax expense (benefit)

     9,304        24,633        7,974        1,563        (8,562
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

   $ 13,663      $ 36,193      $ 10,883      $ 1,401      $ (13,459
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings (loss) per share:

          

Basic

   $ 0.43      $ 1.04      $ 0.31      $ 0.04      $ (0.41
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.42      $ 1.03      $ 0.31      $ 0.04      $ (0.41
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average shares used in computing earnings (loss) per share:

          

Basic

     31,830        34,777        34,678        33,399        33,132   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

     32,191        35,057        35,111        33,996        33,132   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dividends per share:

   $ —        $ 1.00      $ —        $ —        $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     As of June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012     2011     2010  
           (in thousands)  

Balance Sheet Data:

          

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 989      $ 2,578      $ 1,601      $ 311      $ 11,133   

Working capital

     124,802        123,209        113,842        84,342        73,530   

Property and equipment, net

     177,743        179,928        174,655        177,682        194,885   

Total assets

     616,152        623,774        538,148        493,609        505,378   

Total current liabilities

     88,306        88,232        79,303        78,488        78,532   

Total long-term liabilities

     269,152        293,707        181,920        160,732        177,378   

Total stockholders’ equity

     258,694        241,835        276,925        254,389        249,468   

 

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(1) Statement of operations data includes the results of each acquired operation since the date of acquisition: Shaw Energy Delivery Services, Inc.—September 1, 2008; Facilities Planning & Siting, PLLC—June 30, 2009; Klondyke Construction LLC— June 30, 2010; Pine Valley Power, Inc.—August 1, 2011 and Synergetic Design Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiary, UC Synergetic, Inc.—July 2, 2012.
(2) Cost of operations for fiscal 2010 includes $3.3 million of costs related to the cleanup of certain petroleum-related products on an owned property in Georgia. The remediation of the site is complete.
(3) In fiscal 2014, we incurred approximately $1.0 million in fees and expenses in connection with an Agreement and Plan of Merger that we entered into on August 4, 2014. Approximately $0.7 million of these costs were non-deductible for income tax purposes. See Note 21, “Subsequent Event,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.
(4) In fiscal 2013, we incurred approximately $4.1 million in fees and expenses for a secondary equity offering and concurrent share repurchase, both of which closed on May 21, 2013. Approximately $2.5 million of these costs were non-deductible for income tax purposes. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.
(5) Restructuring expenses for fiscal 2010 of $8.9 million relate to the implementation of cost restructuring measures in distribution operations and support services. The pre-tax restructuring charge consisted of $1.0 million for severance and other termination benefits and $7.9 million for the non-cash writedown of fleet and other fixed assets to be disposed.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our historical consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” The discussion below contains forward-looking statements that are based upon our current expectations and are subject to uncertainty and changes in circumstances. Actual results may differ materially from these expectations due to inaccurate assumptions and known or unknown risks and uncertainties, including those identified in “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

Overview

Pike Corporation was founded by Floyd S. Pike in 1945 and later incorporated in North Carolina in 1968. We reincorporated in Delaware on July 1, 2005, in connection with our July 2005 initial public offering. On November 5, 2013, Pike Electric Corporation changed its state of incorporation from Delaware to North Carolina. The Reincorporation was effected by merging Pike Electric Corporation, a Delaware corporation, with and into Pike Corporation, a North Carolina corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiary. In connection with the Reincorporation, Pike Electric Corporation changed its name to “Pike Corporation.” The Reincorporation did not result in any change in the business, management, fiscal year, accounting, location of the principal executive offices or other facilities, capitalization, assets or liabilities of Pike Electric Corporation. We are headquartered in Mount Airy, North Carolina. Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PIKE.”

We are one of the largest providers of construction and engineering services for investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in the United States. Since our founding in 1945, we have evolved from a specialty non-unionized contractor for electric utilities focused on the distribution sector in the southeastern United States to one of the nation’s largest specialty construction and engineering firms servicing over 300 customers. Leveraging our core competencies as a company primarily focused on providing a broad range of electric infrastructure services principally for utility customers, we believe that our experienced management team has positioned us to benefit from the substantial long-term growth drivers in our industry.

 

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Services

Over the past few years, we have reshaped our business platform and service territory significantly from being a distribution construction company based primarily in the southeastern United States to a national energy and communication solutions provider. We have done this organically and through strategic acquisitions of companies with complementary service offerings and geographic footprints. Our comprehensive suite of energy and communication solutions includes facilities planning and siting, permitting, engineering, design, installation, maintenance and repair of power delivery systems, including renewables (primarily ground-based) and utility-grade solar construction projects, and storm-related services. Our planning and siting process leverages technology and the collection of environmental, regulatory, economic, cultural, land use and scientific data to facilitate successful right-of-way negotiations, licensing and permitting for powerlines, substations and traditional and renewable electrical generation facilities. Our engineering and design capabilities include designing, providing EPC services, owner engineering, project management, material procurement, multi-entity coordination, grid integration, BOP, training, consulting, DOT projects, and Thermal Rate solutions for individual or turnkey powerline, substation and renewable energy projects. We also provide engineering and design services for the communication industry for wireline and wireless communication infrastructure. Our construction and maintenance capabilities include substation, distribution networks (underground and overhead) and transmission lines with voltages up to 345 kV. We are also a recognized leader in storm-related services due to our ability to rapidly mobilize thousands of existing employees and equipment within 24 hours, while maintaining a functional workforce for unaffected customers.

 

Service

  

Revenue Category

  

Description

Planning & Siting    Engineering    Our planning and siting process leverages technology and the collection of environmental, regulatory, economic, cultural, land use and scientific data to facilitate successful right-of-way negotiations, licensing and permitting for powerlines, substations and traditional and renewable electrical generation facilities. We also provide NERC reliability studies and renewable generation interconnection studies.
Engineering & Design    Engineering    We provide design, EPC, owner engineer, project management, material procurement, multi-entity coordination, grid integration, BOP, training, consulting, DOT projects and Thermal Rate solutions for individual or turnkey powerline, substation and renewable energy projects. We also provide engineering and design services for the communication industry for wireline and wireless communication infrastructure.
Transmission and
Distribution Construction
   Distribution and Transmission   

We provide overhead and underground powerline construction, upgrade, inspection and extension services (predominately single-pole and H-frame wood, concrete or steel poles) for distribution networks and transmission lines with voltages up to 345 kV, and energized maintenance work for voltages up to 500 kV.

 

Overhead services consist of construction, repair and maintenance of wire and components in energized overhead electric distribution and transmission systems.

 

Underground services range from simple residential installations, directional boring, concrete encased duct and manhole installation, to the construction of complete underground distribution facilities.

Substation Construction    Substation   

We provide substation construction and service for voltages up to 500 kV.

 

Substation services include: construction of new substations, existing substation upgrades, relay testing, transformer maintenance and hauling, foundations, commissioning, emergency outage response and Smart Grid component installation. We also specialize in relay metering and control solutions.

Utility-Grade Solar
Construction
   Distribution and Other    We provide complete direct-hire construction services of utility-scale PV solar generation facilities including all scopes necessary to deliver power to the grid. We also provide full EPC installations of high voltage (230kV) underground gathering systems in

 

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      conjunction with CSP facilities – “power towers” and full EPC installations for transmission lines and substations up to 500kV required for the interconnection of solar or wind generators to existing utility and transmission resources.
Storm Assessment, Inspection
and Restoration Services
   Storm-Related Services    Storm assessment, inspection and restoration services involve the assessment and repair or reconstruction of any part of a distribution or sub-500 kV transmission network, including substations, powerlines, utility poles or other components, damaged during snow, ice or wind storms, flash floods, hurricanes, tornadoes or other natural disasters. We are a recognized leader in storm-related services, due to our ability to rapidly mobilize thousands of existing employees and equipment within 24 hours, while maintaining a functional force for unaffected customers.

While storm-related services can generate significant revenues, their unpredictability is demonstrated by comparing our revenues from those services in the last five fiscal years which have ranged from 8.3% to 18.2% of total revenues. During periods with significant storm restoration work, we generally see man-hours diverted from core work, which decreases core revenues. The table below sets forth our revenues by category of service for the fiscal years indicated:

 

Fiscal Year

   Core
Revenues
     Percentage
of Total
Revenues
    Storm-Related
Revenues
     Percentage
of Total
Revenues
    Total
Revenues
 
     (in millions)            (in millions)            (in millions)  

2010

   $ 457.5         90.7   $ 46.6         9.3   $ 504.1   

2011

   $ 529.3         89.1   $ 64.5         10.9   $ 593.8   

2012

   $ 614.6         89.7   $ 70.6         10.3   $ 685.2   

2013

   $ 751.4         81.8   $ 167.3         18.2   $ 918.7   

2014

   $ 743.2         91.7   $ 67.4         8.3   $ 810.6   

Seasonality and Fluctuations of Results

Our services are performed outdoors and, as a result, our results of operations can be subject to seasonal variations due to weather conditions. These seasonal variations affect both our construction and engineering storm-related services. Extended periods of rain can negatively affect the deployment of our construction crews, particularly with respect to underground work. During the winter months, demand for construction work is generally lower due to inclement weather. Demand for construction work generally increases during the spring and summer months due to improved weather conditions. Due to the unpredictable nature of storms, the level of our storm-related revenues fluctuates from period to period.

Inflation

Due to relatively low levels of inflation experienced in recent years, inflation has not had a significant effect on our results. However, we have experienced fuel cost volatility during recent fiscal years.

Basis of Reporting

Revenues. We derive our revenues from two reportable segments, Construction and Engineering, through two service categories – core services and storm-related services. Our core services include facilities planning and siting, permitting, engineering, design, installation, maintenance and repair of power delivery systems, including renewables (primarily ground-based) and utility-grade solar construction projects. Our storm-related services involve the rapid deployment of our highly-trained crews and related equipment to restore power on transmission and distribution systems during crisis situations, such as hurricanes, tropical storms, ice storms or wind storms.

Cost of Operations. Our cost of operations consists primarily of compensation and benefits to employees, insurance, fuel, specialty equipment rental, operating and maintenance expenses relating to vehicles and equipment, materials and tools and supplies. Our cost of operations also includes depreciation, primarily relating to our vehicles and heavy equipment.

 

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General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses include costs not directly associated with performing work for our customers. These costs consist primarily of compensation and related benefits of management and administrative personnel, facilities expenses, professional fees and administrative overhead.

Interest Expense. In addition to cash interest expense, interest expense includes amortization of deferred loan costs, deferred compensation accretion and the write-off of unamortized deferred loan costs resulting from prepayments of debt.

Critical Accounting Policies

The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions for financial information that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate these estimates and assumptions, including those related to revenue recognition for work in progress, allowance for doubtful accounts, self-insured claims liability, valuation of goodwill and other intangible assets, asset lives and salvage values used in computing depreciation and amortization, including amortization of intangibles, accounting for income taxes, contingencies, litigation and stock-based compensation. Application of these estimates and assumptions requires the exercise of judgment as to future uncertainties and, as a result, actual results could differ from these estimates. We believe the following to be our most important accounting policies, including those that use significant judgments and estimates in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition. Revenues from service arrangements are recognized when services are performed. We recognize revenue from hourly services based on actual labor and equipment time completed and on materials when billable to our customers. We recognize revenue on unit-based services as the units are completed. We recognize the full amount of any estimated loss on site-specific unit projects if estimated costs to complete the remaining units for the project exceed the revenue to be received from such units.

Revenues for fixed-price contracts are recognized using the percentage-of-completion method, measured by the percentage of costs incurred to date to total estimated costs for each contract. Contract costs include all direct material, labor and subcontract costs, as well as indirect costs related to contract performance, such as indirect labor, tools, repairs and depreciation. The cost estimation process is based on the professional knowledge and experience of our engineers, project managers, field construction supervisors, operations management and financial professionals. Changes in job performance, job conditions, estimated profitability and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and their effects are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. At the time a loss on a contract becomes known, the entire amount of the estimated ultimate loss is accrued.

The current asset “Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts” represents revenues recognized in excess of amounts billed. The current liability “Billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts” represents billings in excess of revenues recognized.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts. We provide an allowance for doubtful accounts that represents an estimate of uncollectible accounts receivable. The determination of the allowance includes certain judgments and estimates including our customers’ willingness or ability to pay and our ongoing relationship with the customer. In certain instances, primarily relating to storm-related work and other high-volume billing situations, billed amounts may differ from ultimately collected amounts. We incorporate our historical experience with our customers into the estimation of the allowance for doubtful accounts. These amounts are continuously monitored as additional information is obtained. Accounts receivable are primarily due from customers located within the United States. Any material change in our customers’ business or cash flows could affect our ability to collect amounts due.

Property and Equipment. We capitalize property and equipment as permitted or required by applicable accounting standards, including replacements and improvements when costs incurred for those purposes extend the useful life of the asset. We charge maintenance and repairs to expense as incurred. Depreciation on capital assets is computed using the straight-line method based on the useful lives of the assets, which range from three to 39 years. Our management makes assumptions regarding future conditions in determining estimated useful lives and potential salvage values based on dealer black book valuations. These assumptions impact the amount of depreciation expense recognized in the period and any gain or loss once the asset is disposed.

We review our property and equipment for impairment when events or changes in business conditions indicate the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable, as required by U.S. GAAP. An impairment of assets classified as “held and used” exists if the sum of the undiscounted estimated future cash flows expected is less than the carrying value of the assets. If this measurement indicates a possible impairment, we compare the estimated fair value of the asset to the net book value to measure the impairment charge, if any. If the criteria for classifying an asset as “held for sale” have been met, we record the asset at the lower of carrying value or fair value, less estimated selling costs. We continually evaluate the depreciable lives and salvage values of our equipment.

 

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Valuation of Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets. We test our goodwill for impairment annually or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate impairment may exist. Examples of such events or circumstances could include a significant change in business climate or a loss of significant customers. We complete our annual analysis of our reporting units as of the first day of our fourth fiscal quarter. For purposes of our fiscal 2014 analysis, we had four reporting units: non-union construction, union construction, energy delivery engineering and telecom engineering. In evaluating reporting units, we first consider our operating segments and related components in accordance with U.S. GAAP. We allocate goodwill to the reporting units that are expected to benefit from the synergies of the business combinations generating the goodwill. We apply a two-step fair value-based test to assess goodwill for impairment. The first step compares the fair values of the reporting units to their carrying amounts, including goodwill. If the carrying amount of any reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step is then performed. The second step compares the carrying amount of the reporting unit’s goodwill to the implied fair value of the goodwill. If the implied fair value of the goodwill is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss would be recorded.

We determined the fair value of our reporting units based on the income approach, using a discounted cash flow model. The income approach was used because it has a more direct correlation to the specific economics of the reporting units than the market approach, which considers comparable companies and transactions that are comparable to the Company as a whole, but are not as comparable to the individual reporting units in terms of size, operational diversity, and geographic diversity. Under the income approach, the discounted cash flow model determines fair value based on the present value of projected cash flows over a specific projection period and a residual value related to future cash flows beyond the projection period. Both values are discounted using a rate which reflects our best estimate of the weighted-average cost of capital of a market participant, and is adjusted for appropriate risk factors. We perform sensitivity tests with respect to growth rates and discount rates used in the income approach.

For our annual impairment analysis, we relied solely on the income approach. The income approach was used because it has a more direct correlation to the specific economics of the reporting units than the market approach which is based on multiples of companies that, although comparable to the Company as a whole, may not have the exact same risk factors as our reporting units and are not as comparable to the individual reporting units in terms of size, operational diversity and geographic diversity. The analysis indicated that, as of the first day of our fourth fiscal quarter, the fair values of each of our reporting units exceeded their respective carrying values in excess of 10%. For our analysis, we also considered various elements of an implied control premium in assessing the reasonableness of the reconciliation of the summation of the fair values of the invested capital of our four reporting units (with appropriate consideration of the interest bearing debt) to the Company’s overall market capitalization and our net book value. This analysis included (i) the current control premium being paid for companies with a similar market capitalization and within similar industries and (ii) certain synergies that a market participant buyer could realize, such as the elimination of potentially redundant costs. Based on this analysis, management determined that the resulting control premium implied in the annual impairment analysis was approximately 10%, which was within a reasonable range of current market conditions. Based on our annual impairment analysis, we concluded that goodwill was not impaired.

In addition to goodwill, we identify and value other intangible assets that we acquire in business combinations, such as customer arrangements, customer relationships, intellectual property and non-compete agreements, that arise from contractual or other legal rights or that are capable of being separated or divided from the acquired entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged. The fair value of identified intangible assets is based upon an estimate of the future economic benefits expected to result from ownership, which represents the amount at which the assets could be bought or sold in a current transaction between willing parties, that is, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. For customers with whom we have an existing relationship prior to the date of the transaction, we utilize assumptions that a marketplace participant would consider in estimating the fair value of customer relationships that an acquired entity had with our pre-existing customers in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The inputs into goodwill and intangible asset fair value calculations reflect our market assumptions and are not observable. Consequently, the inputs are considered to be Level 3 as specified in the fair value accounting guidance.

Intangible assets with definite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are also reviewed for impairment if events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be realizable. We have no intangibles with indefinite lives other than goodwill.

Inherent in valuation determinations related to goodwill and other intangible assets are significant judgments and estimates, including assumptions about our future revenue, profitability and cash flows, our operational plans, current economic indicators and market valuations. To the extent these assumptions are incorrect or there are declines in our business outlook, impairment charges may be recorded in future periods.

 

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Insurance and Claims Accruals. In the ordinary course of our business, we are subject to individual workers’ compensation, vehicle, general liability and health insurance claims for which we are partially self-insured. We maintain commercial insurance for individual workers’ compensation and vehicle and general liability claims exceeding $1.0 million. We also maintain commercial insurance for health insurance claims exceeding $500,000 per person on an annual basis. We determine the amount of our loss reserves and loss adjustment expenses for self-insured claims based on analyses prepared quarterly that use both company-specific and industry data, as well as general economic information. Our estimates for insurance loss exposures require us to monitor and evaluate our insurance claims throughout their life cycles. Using this data and our assumptions about the emerging trends, we estimate the size of ultimate claims. Our most significant assumptions in forming our estimates include the trend in loss costs, the expected consistency with prior fiscal year claims of the frequency and severity of claims incurred but not yet reported, changes in the timing of the reporting of losses from the loss date to the notification date and expected costs to settle unpaid claims. We also monitor the reasonableness of the judgments made in the prior fiscal year’s estimates and adjust current year assumptions based on that analysis.

While the final outcome of claims may vary from estimates due to the type and severity of the injury, costs of medical claims and uncertainties surrounding the litigation process, we believe that none of these items, when finally resolved, will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or liquidity. However, should a number of these items occur in the same period, it could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations in a particular quarter or fiscal year.

Stock-Based Compensation. In accordance with U.S. GAAP, we recognize the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments in the financial statements over the period the employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively the vesting period). We measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award.

The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury rate for the expected term of the option at the time of grant. We use our historical volatility as a basis for our expected volatility. We are using the “simplified method” to calculate the expected terms of the options as allowed under U.S. GAAP, which represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding. Forfeitures are estimated based on certain historical data. We will continue to use this method until we have sufficient historical exercise experience to give us confidence that our calculations based on such experience will be reliable. It is our current intent not to issue dividends and none are contemplated when estimating fair value for our option awards.

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth selected statement of operations data as percentages of revenues for the fiscal years indicated (dollars in millions):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Revenues:

            

Core revenues

   $ 743.2        91.7   $ 751.4        81.8   $ 614.6        89.7

Storm-related revenues

     67.4        8.3     167.3        18.2     70.6        10.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     810.6        100.0     918.7        100.0     685.2        100.0

Cost of operations

     706.9        87.2     771.5        84.0     593.5        86.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     103.7        12.8     147.2        16.0     91.7        13.4

General and administrative expenses

     74.9        9.2     75.6        8.2     66.2        9.7

Secondary offering and other related costs

     —          —          4.1        0.5     —          —     

Gain on sale and impairment of property and equipment

     (2.0     -0.2     (0.6     -0.1     (0.6     -0.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

     30.8        3.8     68.1        7.4     26.1        3.8

Interest expense and other, net

     7.8        1.0     7.3        0.8     7.2        1.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income tax

     23.0        2.8     60.8        6.6     18.9        2.8

Income tax expense

     9.3        1.1     24.6        2.7     8.0        1.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 13.7        1.7   $ 36.2        3.9   $ 10.9        1.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013

Revenues. Revenues decreased 12%, or $108.1 million, to $810.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $918.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The decrease was attributable to a $99.9 million decrease in storm-related revenues and an $8.2 million decrease in core revenues.

Our storm-related revenues are highly volatile and unpredictable. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014, storm-related revenues totaled $67.4 million. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013, storm-related revenues totaled $167.3 million, which was primarily attributable to a large derecho storm in the Northeast, Hurricane Isaac and Hurricane Sandy.

In addition, our core revenues declined approximately $8.2 million in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013 due to the completion of our distribution project in Tanzania during fiscal 2013 and a reduction in utility-grade solar projects primarily in California.

Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased 30%, or $43.5 million, to $103.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $147.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Gross profit as a percentage of revenues decreased to 12.8% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from 16.0% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Our gross profit was negatively impacted by a significantly lower mix of storm revenue. Our storm restoration services typically generate a higher profit margin than core services. During a storm response, our storm-assigned crews and equipment are fully utilized. In addition, the overtime typically worked on storm events lowers the ratio of fixed costs to revenue. Storm gross profit margins can vary greatly depending on the geographic area, customer mix and amount of overtime worked. In addition, we experienced losses on five specific jobs in California for two customers at our western subsidiary companies for the three months ended September 30, 2013, which had a negative impact on our gross profit during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses decreased 1% to $74.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $75.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. As a percentage of revenues, general and administrative expenses increased to 9.2% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from 8.2% for the prior fiscal year. The decrease in general and administrative expenses was primarily due to significantly less incentive bonuses accrued for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 compared to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. This decrease was partially offset by costs to expand our engineering and western operations totaling approximately $1.8 million. In addition, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014, we incurred approximately $1.0 million in fees and expenses in connection with an Agreement and Plan of Merger that we entered into on August 4, 2014. See Note 21, “Subsequent Event,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

Costs of Secondary Offering and Concurrent Share Repurchase. In fiscal 2013, we incurred approximately $4.1 million in fees and expenses for a secondary equity offering and concurrent share repurchase, both of which closed on May 21, 2013, and included fees and expenses associated with a special committee of our board of directors. Offering costs totaling approximately $2.5 million are non-deductible for income tax purposes. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details. These costs were not allocated to our Construction or Engineering segments for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

Interest Expense and Other, Net. Interest expense and other, net increased 7% to $7.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $7.3 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The increase was primarily attributable to maintaining a higher outstanding revolving line credit balance during most of the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.

Income Tax Expense. Income tax expense was $9.3 million and $24.6 million for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Effective income tax rate of 40.5% for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 varied from the statutory federal income tax rate of 35% due to several factors, including state income and gross margin taxes, changes in permanent differences primarily related to non-deductibility of certain secondary offering costs for fiscal 2013, the Internal Revenue Code Section 199 deduction, non-deductibility of certain merger costs for fiscal 2014, and Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) deduction limitations for compensation, meals and entertainment, and the relative size of our consolidated income before income taxes. In addition, North Carolina enacted new legislation on July 23, 2013, which lowered its corporate tax rate in 2014 and will lower it again in 2015.

 

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Operating Results by Segment – Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013  

Revenues:

        

Construction core services

   $ 592.1        73.0   $ 605.6        66.0

Intersegment eliminations

     (0.4     0.0     (0.6     -0.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Construction core services, net

     591.7        73.0     605.0        65.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Engineering core services

     184.1        22.7     183.8        20.0

Intersegment eliminations

     (32.6     -4.0     (37.4     -4.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Engineering core services, net

     151.5        18.7     146.4        15.9

Total core services, net

     743.2        91.7     751.4        81.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Construction storm restoration

     64.8        8.0     157.9        17.2

Engineering storm assessment and inspection

     2.6        0.3     9.4        1.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total storm-related revenue

     67.4        8.3     167.3        18.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 810.6        100.0   $ 918.7        100.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Income (Loss):

        

Construction

   $ 27.5        89.3   $ 69.1        101.5

Engineering

     3.8        12.3     5.1        7.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     31.3        101.6     74.2        109.0

Other

     (0.5     -1.6     (6.1     -9.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating income

   $ 30.8        100.0   $ 68.1        100.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Construction

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
       
     2014     2013     % Change  

Construction revenue

   $   656.9      $   763.5     

Intersegment eliminations

     (0.4     (0.6  

Total revenues, net

   $ 656.5      $ 762.9        -13.9

Segment income from operations

   $ 27.5      $ 69.1        -60.2

Revenues. Construction revenues decreased 13.9%, or $106.4 million, to $656.5 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $762.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

The following table contains supplemental information on construction revenue and percentage changes by category for the fiscal years indicated:

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
        

Category of Revenue

   2014      2013      % Change  

Distribution and other

   $   434.5       $   449.2         -3.3

Transmission and substation

     157.2         155.8         0.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total core revenue

   $ 591.7       $ 605.0         -2.2

Storm restoration services

     64.8         157.9         -59.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 656.5       $ 762.9         -13.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

   

Distribution and Other Revenues. Our combined revenues for overhead and underground distribution services and other revenue decreased 3.3% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from the prior fiscal year. Our distribution services experienced an increase in the current year due to significantly less storm restoration revenues compared to the prior fiscal year, as storm restoration work generally diverts man-hours from core work. This increase was more than offset by lower volume large solar construction projects in California during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 as compared to the prior fiscal year. In addition, there were no Tanzania project revenues for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 compared to $6.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 due to substantial completion of this project at December 31, 2012.

 

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Subsequent to the merger of Duke Energy and Progress Energy, the new corporation requested bids for its distribution, transmission, substation and engineering MSA contracts. We successfully retained the majority of the MSA contracts we chose to bid and which represented our work in fiscal 2014. In the few areas we were unsuccessful in retaining the work, our crews have already been redeployed to growth on surrounding customers.

The majority of our distribution services are provided to investor-owned, municipal and co-operative utilities under MSAs. Services provided under these MSAs include both overhead and underground powerline distribution services. Our MSAs do not guarantee a minimum volume of work. The MSAs provide a framework for core and storm restoration pricing and provide an outline of the service territory in which we will work or the percentage of overall outsourced distribution work we will provide for the customer. Our MSAs also provide a platform for multi-year relationships with our customers. We can easily increase or decrease staffing for a customer without exhaustive contract negotiations.

Other revenues in this category include primarily solar construction projects primarily in California.

 

   

Transmission and Substation Revenues. Transmission and substation revenues increased 0.9% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from the prior fiscal year. A significant amount of our transmission and substation projects are fixed price, site specific projects and revenues can vary based on start dates of the projects and mobilization time. The substation construction market remains very competitive especially in the southeastern United States.

Segment Income from Operations. Segment income from operations decreased 60.2% to $27.5 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $69.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Segment income from operations as a percentage of revenues decreased to 4.2% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from 9.1% for the prior fiscal year. Segment income from operations was negatively impacted from the factors discussed above under “Gross Profit” with respect to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014. We benefited from a mark-to-market adjustment on our diesel hedging program that provided a $0.4 million and $1.3 million decrease in our cost of operations during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Engineering

 

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
       
     2014     2013     % Change  

Engineering core revenue

   $ 184.1      $ 183.8     

Intersegment eliminations

     (32.6     (37.4  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total core revenue, net

   $ 151.5      $ 146.4        3.5

Storm assessment and inspection revenue

     2.6        9.4     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues, net

   $ 154.1      $ 155.8        -1.1

Segment income from operations

   $ 3.8      $ 5.1        -25.5

Revenues. Engineering revenues decreased 1.1%, or $1.7 million, to $154.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $155.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Engineering revenues were negatively impacted by less storm assessment and inspection revenues compared to the prior fiscal year. In addition, engineering revenues may fluctuate due to the timing of material procurement revenues. Material procurement services, if they are provided, are typically on our EPC projects that are administered by Engineering. As a result, our revenue will fluctuate due to the level of material procurement associated with our EPC projects.

Segment Income from Operations. Segment income from operations decreased 25.5% to $3.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $5.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Segment income from operations as a percentage of revenues decreased to 2.5% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from 3.3% for the prior fiscal year. Segment income from operations was negatively impacted by a significantly lower mix of storm assessment and inspection revenue compared to the prior fiscal year and specific project-related receivable reserves totaling approximately $1.4 million adjusted for one customer as part of our on-going collection efforts.

 

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Other

Other represents certain corporate general and administrative costs not allocated to the segments. Other loss from operations decreased 91.8% to $0.5 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $6.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The decrease in loss from the prior fiscal year was primarily attributable to the $4.1 million in fees and expenses in connection with the secondary equity offering and concurrent share repurchase not being allocated to the segments for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2012

Revenues. Revenues increased 34%, or $233.5 million, to $918.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $685.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The increase was attributable to a $136.8 million increase in core revenues and a $96.7 million increase in storm-related revenues. Our acquisition of UCS on July 2, 2012 accounted for $77.3 million in revenues ($67.9 million core services and $9.4 million storm assessment and inspection services) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

Our storm-related revenues are highly volatile and unpredictable. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013, storm-related revenues totaled $167.3 million, which was primarily attributable to a large derecho storm in the Northeast, Hurricane Isaac and Hurricane Sandy. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, storm-related revenues totaled $70.6 million, which was primarily attributable to Hurricane Irene and a large snow storm that occurred in the Northeast during November 2011.

Gross Profit. Gross profit increased 61%, or $55.5 million, to $147.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $91.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Gross profit as a percentage of revenues increased to 16.0% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from 13.4% for the prior fiscal year. Our gross profit was positively impacted by our higher storm-related revenues and improving margins in construction and engineering services and the UCS acquisition.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses increased 14% to $75.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $66.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. As a percentage of revenues, general and administrative expenses decreased to 8.2% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from 9.7% for the prior fiscal year. The increase in general and administrative expenses was primarily due to approximately $3.6 million of overhead costs related to UCS, $3.5 million in compensation, benefits, recruiting and travel to support geographic expansion and revenue growth, $1.2 million for additional incentive expense, and $0.6 million in severance.

Costs of Secondary Offering and Concurrent Share Repurchase. In fiscal 2013, we incurred approximately $4.1 million in fees and expenses for a secondary equity offering and concurrent share repurchase, both of which closed on May 21, 2013, and included fees and expenses associated with a special committee of our board of directors. Offering costs totaling approximately $2.5 million are non-deductible for income tax purposes. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details. These costs were not allocated to our Construction or Engineering segments for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

Interest Expense and Other, Net. Interest expense and other, net increased 1% to $7.3 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $7.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Fiscal 2012 includes the write-off of approximately $1.7 million of unamortized deferred loan costs as additional interest expense related to our prior credit facility in August 2011. In fiscal 2013, our interest expense increased due to additional borrowings for the UCS acquisition and the fourth quarter stock repurchase. See Note 6, “Debt,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details on our revolving credit facility.

Income Tax Expense. Income tax expense was $24.6 million and $8.0 million for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Effective income tax rates of 40.5% and 42.3% for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively, varied from the statutory federal income tax rate of 35% due to several factors, including state income and gross margin taxes, changes in permanent differences primarily related to non-deductibility of certain secondary offering costs and deductibility of certain costs related to the UCS acquisition, Internal Revenue Code Section 199 deduction for production activities, Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) deduction limitations for compensation, meals and entertainment, and the relative size of our consolidated income before income taxes.

 

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Operating Results by Segment – Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2012

 

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2013     2012  

Revenues:

        

Construction core services

   $ 605.6        66.0   $ 552.0        80.6

Intersegment eliminations

     (0.6     -0.1     (8.0     -1.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Construction core services, net

     605.0        65.9     544.0        79.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Engineering core services

     183.8        20.0     78.6        11.5

Intersegment eliminations

     (37.4     -4.1     (8.0     -1.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Engineering core services, net

     146.4        15.9     70.6        10.3

Total core services, net

     751.4        81.8     614.6        89.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Construction storm restoration

     157.9        17.2     70.6        10.3

Engineering storm assessment and inspection

     9.4        1.0              
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total storm-related revenue

     167.3        18.2     70.6        10.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 918.7        100.0   $ 685.2        100.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Income (Loss):

        

Construction

   $ 69.1        101.5   $ 25.9        99.3

Engineering

     5.1        7.5     2.2        8.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     74.2        109.0     28.1        107.7

Other

     (6.1     -9.0     (2.0     -7.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating income

   $ 68.1        100.0   $ 26.1        100.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Construction

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
       
     2013     2012     % Change  

Construction revenue

   $ 763.5      $ 622.7     

Intersegment eliminations

     (0.6     (8.1  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues, net

   $ 762.9      $ 614.6        24.1

Segment income from operations

   $ 69.1      $ 25.9        166.8

Revenues. Construction revenues increased 24.1%, or $148.3 million, to $762.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $614.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

The following table contains supplemental information on construction revenue and percentage changes by category for the fiscal years indicated:

 

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
        

Category of Revenue

   2013      2012      % Change  

Distribution and other

   $ 449.2       $ 418.8         7.3

Transmission and substation

     155.8         125.2         24.4
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total core revenue

   $ 605.0       $ 544.0         11.2

Storm restoration services

     157.9         70.6         123.7
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 762.9       $ 614.6         24.1
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

   

Distribution and Other Revenues. Our revenues for distribution services and other revenue increased 7.3% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from the prior fiscal year, due to a general increase in demand for distribution

 

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maintenance services for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. We experienced some additional displacement in distribution revenue during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 due to the increased diversion of work crews to perform incremental storm services compared to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

The majority of our distribution services are provided to investor-owned, municipal and co-operative utilities under MSAs. Services provided under these MSAs include both overhead and underground powerline distribution services. Our MSAs do not guarantee a minimum volume of work. The MSAs provide a framework for core and storm restoration pricing and provide an outline of the service territory in which we will work or the percentage of overall outsourced distribution work we will provide for the customer. Our MSAs also provide a platform for multi-year relationships with our customers. We can easily increase or decrease staffing for a customer without exhaustive contract negotiations.

Other revenues in this category include primarily solar construction projects in California.

 

   

Transmission and Substation Revenues. Transmission and substation revenues increased 24.4% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from the prior fiscal year. A significant amount of our transmission projects are fixed price, site specific projects and revenues can vary based on start dates of the projects and mobilization time. Transmission revenues were positively impacted by new projects in California and timing of the SCE&G EPC project which commenced construction in January 2012. A significant amount of our substation projects are fixed price, site specific projects and revenues can vary based on start dates of the projects and mobilization time. The substation construction market remains very competitive especially in the southeastern United States.

Segment Income from Operations. Segment income from operations increased 166.8% to $69.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $25.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Segment income from operations as a percentage of revenues increased to 9.1% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from 4.2% for the prior fiscal year. Our segment income from operations was positively impacted by our higher storm restoration revenues and improving margins in core construction services. We also benefited from a mark-to-market adjustment on our diesel hedging program that provided a $1.3 million decrease in our cost of operations during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. We were negatively impacted by the mark-to-market adjustment during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 that caused a $2.5 million increase in our cost of operations for that fiscal year.

Engineering

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
       
     2013     2012     % Change  

Engineering revenue

   $ 183.8      $ 78.6     

Intersegment eliminations

     (37.4     (8.0  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues, net

   $ 146.4      $ 70.6        107.4

Storm assessment and inspection revenue

     9.4            
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues, net

   $ 155.8      $ 70.6        120.7

Segment income from operations

   $ 5.1      $ 2.2        131.8

Revenues. Engineering revenues increased 120.7%, or $85.2 million, to $155.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $70.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The acquisition of UCS on July 2, 2012 contributed $77.3 million of revenue (including $9.4 million in storm assessment and inspection services) during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Engineering revenues were also positively impacted by increased activity on the SCE&G EPC project which commenced construction around January 2012. Engineering revenues may fluctuate, especially on a quarterly basis, due to the timing of material procurement revenues. Material procurement services, if they are provided, are typically on our EPC projects that are administered by engineering. As a result, our revenue will fluctuate due to material procurement associated with our EPC projects.

Segment Income from Operations. Segment income from operations increased 131.8% to $5.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $2.2 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Segment income from operations as a percentage of revenues increased to 3.3% for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from 3.1% for the prior fiscal year. Our segment income from operations was positively impacted by the acquisition of UCS, which benefits from higher margin engineering services, including storm assessment and inspection services. UCS does not provide material procurement services that lower overall margin percentages. In addition, engineering services were positively impacted by increased activity on the SCE&G EPC project which commenced construction in January 2012. Our segment income from operations was negatively impacted from severance costs totaling $1.1 million and non-productive start-up paid time incurred on a new large telecom project with an existing customer during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

 

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Other

Other represents certain corporate general and administrative costs not allocated to the segments. Other loss from operations increased 205% to $6.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $2.0 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The increase in loss from the prior fiscal year was primarily attributable to the $4.1 million in fees and expenses in connection with the secondary equity offering and concurrent share repurchase not being allocated to the segments for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our primary cash needs have been working capital, capital expenditures, payments under our revolving credit facility and acquisitions. In fiscal 2013, our cash needs also included a special dividend and a repurchase of common stock totaling $75.0 million. Our primary source of cash for fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013 was cash from operations and borrowings under our revolving credit facility. Our primary source of cash for fiscal 2012 was cash provided by operations. We had $4.7 million and $8.1 million in accounts receivable and costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts from storm-related jobs at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

We need working capital to support seasonal variations in our business, primarily due to the impact of weather conditions on the electric infrastructure and the corresponding spending by our customers on electric service and repairs. The increased service activity during storm-related events temporarily causes an excess of customer billings over customer collections, leading to increased accounts receivable during those periods. In the past, we have utilized borrowings under the revolving portion of our credit facility and cash on hand to satisfy normal cash needs during these periods.

On August 24, 2011, we entered into a $200.0 million revolving credit facility that replaced our prior credit facility. Our revolving credit facility matures in August 2015. We repaid outstanding term loans and borrowings on the revolver of our prior credit facility upon entering into our revolving credit facility. The obligations under our revolving credit facility are unconditionally guaranteed by us and each of our existing and subsequently acquired or organized domestic and first-tier foreign subsidiaries and secured on a first-priority basis by security interests (subject to permitted liens) in substantially all assets owned by us and each of our subsidiaries, subject to limited exceptions. On June 27, 2012, we exercised the accordion feature of the revolving credit facility and entered into a commitment increase agreement with our lenders thereby increasing the lenders’ commitments by $75.0 million, from $200.0 million to $275.0 million.

As of June 30, 2014, we had $197.0 million in borrowings and our availability under our revolving credit facility was $74.0 million (after giving effect to $4.0 million of outstanding standby letters of credit). This borrowing availability is subject to, and potentially limited by, our compliance with the covenants of our revolving credit facility, which are discussed below.

We believe that our cash flows from operations, available cash and cash equivalents, and borrowings available under our revolving credit facility will be adequate to meet our liquidity needs in the ordinary course of business for the foreseeable future. However, our ability to satisfy our obligations or to fund planned capital expenditures will depend on our future performance, which to a certain extent is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. In addition, if we fail to comply with the covenants contained in our revolving credit facility, we may be unable to access our revolving credit facility upon which we depend for letters of credit and other short-term borrowings. This would have a negative impact on our liquidity and require us to obtain alternative short-term financing.

 

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Changes in Cash Flows: Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013

 

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $     48.9      $     82.8   

Net cash used in investing activities

   $ (26.5   $ (105.9

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

   $ (24.0   $ 24.1   

Net cash provided by operating activities decreased to $48.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $82.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The decrease in operating cash flows was primarily due to timing of working capital requirements and the significant decrease in income related to lower storm activity during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 compared to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.

We received a refund and made a payment to the commercial insurance carrier that administers our partially self-insured individual workers’ compensation, vehicle and general liability insurance programs for retrospective premium payment adjustments of $9.2 million in refunds in June 2014 and $1.6 million in payments in July 2013, which are included in net cash provided by operating activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014. These refunds and payments are included in changes in insurance and claims accruals. Retrospective adjustments have historically been prepared annually on a “paid-loss” basis by our commercial insurance carrier. The last retrospective premium adjustment for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from our commercial insurance carrier resulted in a refund totaling $5.5 million that was received in December 2012.

Net cash used in investing activities decreased to $26.5 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $105.9 million for the fiscal year June 30, 2013. This decrease was primarily due to cash used for the acquisition of UCS in July 2012 totaling $69.7 million (net of cash acquired totaling $0.7 million) and decreased capital expenditures during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014. Capital expenditures for both periods consisted primarily of purchases of vehicles and equipment used to service our customers.

Net cash used in financing activities was $24.0 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 compared to $24.1 million of net cash provided by financing activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. We borrowed $70.0 million to finance the UCS acquisition during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. On December 4, 2012, we announced that our board of directors declared a special cash dividend of $1.00 per share on our common stock totaling approximately $35.2 million. The dividend was payable to shareholders of record as of December 14, 2012 and was paid on December 21, 2012. The funds for the dividend were initially borrowed from our revolving credit facility but were repaid before December 31, 2012 from cash received from customers related to storm activity. In May 2013, we repurchased 3,661,327 shares of our common stock at a price of $10.925 per share, or $40 million, from LGB Pike II LLC. We funded the share repurchase with available cash and borrowings under our revolving credit facility, and the shares were repurchased and cancelled on May 21, 2013. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

Changes in Cash Flows: Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
     2013     2012  
     (in millions)  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $     82.8      $     25.7   

Net cash used in investing activities

   $ (105.9   $ (45.5

Net cash provided by financing activities

   $ 24.1      $ 21.1   

Net cash provided by operating activities increased to $82.8 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $25.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The increase in operating cash flows was primarily due to improvement of net income by $25.3 million and our ability to decrease the rate of our working capital growth as the business grew in 2013.

We received a refund from the commercial insurance carrier that administers our partially self-insured individual workers’ compensation, vehicle and general liability insurance programs for retrospective premium payment adjustments of $5.5 million in December 2012, which is included in net cash provided by operating activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. These refunds are included in changes in insurance and claims accruals. Retrospective adjustments have historically been prepared annually on a “paid-loss” basis by our commercial insurance carrier. The prior fiscal year retrospective premium payment adjustment from our commercial insurance carrier resulted in a refund totaling $3.5 million that was received in August 2011.

 

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Net cash used in investing activities increased to $105.9 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 from $45.5 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. This increase was primarily due to cash used for the acquisition of UCS in July 2012 totaling $69.7 million (net of cash acquired totaling $0.7 million), and increased capital expenditures. Capital expenditures for both years consisted primarily of purchases of vehicles and equipment used to service our customers.

Net cash provided by financing activities increased to $24.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 compared to $21.1 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. On August 24, 2011, we entered into a $200.0 million revolving credit facility that replaced our prior credit facility of which $113.0 million was outstanding under our prior credit facility and accrued interest totaling $0.3 million was paid off at that time. Total costs associated with the existing revolving credit facility were approximately $1.8 million which are being capitalized and amortized over the term of the agreement using the effective interest method. On June 27, 2012, we exercised the accordion feature of the revolving credit facility and entered into a commitment increase agreement with our lenders thereby increasing the lenders’ commitments by $75.0 million, from $200.0 million to $275.0 million. We borrowed $70.0 million to finance the UCS acquisition during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. On December 4, 2012, we announced that our board of directors had declared a special cash dividend of $1.00 per share on our common stock totaling $35.2 million. The dividend was payable to shareholders of record as of December 14, 2012 and was paid on December 21, 2012. In May 2013, we repurchased 3,661,327 shares of our common stock at a price of $10.925 per share, or $40 million, from LGB Pike II LLC. We funded the share repurchase with available cash and borrowings under our revolving credit facility, and the shares were repurchased and cancelled on May 21, 2013. See Note 7, “Shareholders’ Equity,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

Capital Expenditures

We routinely invest in vehicles, equipment and technology. The timing and volume of such capital expenditures in the future will be affected by the addition of new customers or expansion of existing customer relationships. Capital expenditures were $32.4 million, $40.3 million and $33.9 million for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Capital expenditures for all periods consisted primarily of purchases of vehicles and equipment used to service our customers. As of June 30, 2014, we had no material outstanding commitments for capital expenditures.

EBITDA U.S. GAAP Reconciliation

EBITDA is a non-U.S. GAAP financial measure that represents the sum of net income, income tax expense, interest expense, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA is used internally when evaluating our operating performance and management believes that EBITDA allows investors to make a more meaningful comparison between our core business operating results on a consistent basis over different periods of time, as well as with those of other similar companies. Management believes that EBITDA, when viewed with our results under U.S. GAAP and the accompanying reconciliation, provides additional information that is useful for evaluating the operating performance of our business without regard to potential distortions. Additionally, management believes that EBITDA permits investors to gain an understanding of the factors and trends affecting our ongoing cash earnings, from which capital investments are made and debt is serviced. This non-U.S. GAAP measure excludes certain cash expenses that we are obligated to make. In addition, other companies in our industry may calculate this non-U.S. GAAP measure differently than we do or may not calculate it at all, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure. The table below provides a reconciliation between net income and EBITDA.

 

     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
     2014      2013  
     (in millions)  

Net income

   $ 13.7       $ 36.2   

Adjustments:

     

Interest expense

     8.2         7.4   

Income tax expense

     9.3         24.6   

Depreciation and amortization

     39.5         41.4   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

EBITDA

   $ 70.7       $ 109.6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

EBITDA decreased 35.5% to $70.7 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 from $109.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The decreased EBITDA was primarily due to a significantly lower level of storm activity compared to the prior fiscal year.

 

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Credit Facility

On August 24, 2011, we entered into a new $200.0 million revolving credit facility that replaced our prior credit facility. Our revolving credit facility matures in August 2015. On June 27, 2012, we exercised the accordion feature of the revolving credit facility and entered into a commitment increase agreement with our lenders thereby increasing the lenders’ commitments by $75.0 million, from $200.0 million to $275.0 million.

We repaid outstanding term loans and borrowings on the revolver of our prior credit facility upon entering into our existing revolving credit facility. As of August 24, 2011, we had $115.0 million in borrowings and our availability under our revolving credit facility was $61.9 million (after giving effect to $23.1 million of outstanding standby letters of credit). The obligations under our revolving credit facility are unconditionally guaranteed by us and each of our existing and subsequently acquired or organized domestic and first-tier foreign subsidiaries and secured on a first-priority basis by security interests (subject to permitted liens) in substantially all assets owned by us and each of our subsidiaries, subject to limited exceptions.

Our revolving credit facility contains a number of other affirmative and restrictive covenants, including limitations on dissolutions, sales of assets, investments, and indebtedness and liens. On December 17, 2013, we entered into an amendment to our revolving credit facility to restate the leverage covenant ratio. Total costs associated with this amendment were approximately $419,000, which are capitalized and being amortized over the term of the debt using the effective interest method. Our revolving credit facility includes a requirement that we maintain (i) a leverage ratio, which is the ratio of total debt to adjusted EBITDA (as defined in our revolving credit facility; measured on a trailing four-quarter basis), of no more than 4.00 to 1.00 as of the last day of each fiscal quarter, declining to 3.75 on June 30, 2014 and declining to 3.50 on September 30, 2014 and thereafter, and (ii) a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in our revolving credit facility) of at least 1.25 to 1.00. At June 30, 2014, we were in compliance with such covenants with a leverage ratio and a fixed charge coverage ratio of 2.69 and 1.90, respectively.

Contractual Obligations and Other Commitments

As of June 30, 2014, our contractual obligations and other commitments were as follows:

                                                                            
     Payment Obligations by Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     Total      2015      2016      2017      2018      2019      Thereafter  
     (in millions)  

Long-term debt obligations (1)

   $ 197.0       $ —         $ 197.0       $ —         $ —         $ —         $ —     

Interest payment obligations (2)

     8.1         7.0         1.1         —           —           —           —     

Operating lease obligations

     81.5         18.9         17.5         14.9         13.0         8.9         8.3   

Purchase obligations (3)

     30.3         30.3         —           —           —           —           —     

Deferred compensation (4)

     6.6         —           —           2.1         —           —           4.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 323.5       $ 56.2       $ 215.6       $ 17.0       $ 13.0       $ 8.9       $ 12.8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Includes only obligations to pay principal, not interest expense.

 

(2) Represents estimated interest payments to be made on our variable rate debt. All interest payments assume that principal payments are made as originally scheduled. Interest rates utilized to determine interest payments for variable rate debt are based upon our current interest rate and include the impact of our interest rate swaps. For more information, see Note 6, “Debt,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details.

 

(3) Represents purchase obligations related to materials and subcontractor services for customer contracts.

 

(4) For a description of the deferred compensation obligation, see Note 15, “Deferred Compensation,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of Part II of this Annual Report for further details

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As is common in our industry, we have entered into certain off-balance sheet arrangements in the ordinary course of business that result in risks not directly reflected in our balance sheets. Our significant off-balance sheet transactions include liabilities associated with non-cancelable operating leases, including sale-leaseback arrangements, letter of credit obligations and surety guarantees entered into in the normal course of business. We have not engaged in any off-balance sheet financing arrangements through special purpose entities.

 

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Leases

In the ordinary course of business, we enter into non-cancelable operating leases for certain of our facility, vehicle and equipment needs. These leases allow us to conserve cash by paying a monthly lease rental fee for use of the related facilities, vehicles and equipment rather than purchasing them. The terms of these agreements vary from lease to lease, including with renewal options and escalation clauses. We may decide to cancel or terminate a lease before the end of its term, in which case we are typically liable to the lessor for the remaining lease payments under the term of the lease.

Letters of Credit

Certain of our vendors require letters of credit to ensure reimbursement for amounts they are disbursing on our behalf. In addition, from time to time some customers require us to post letters of credit to ensure payment to our subcontractors and vendors under those contracts and to guarantee performance under our contracts. Such letters of credit are generally issued by a bank or similar financial institution. The letter of credit commits the issuer to pay specified amounts to the holder of the letter of credit if the holder claims that we have failed to perform specified actions. If this were to occur, we would be required to reimburse the issuer of the letter of credit. Depending on the circumstances of such a reimbursement, we may also have to record a charge to earnings for the reimbursement. We do not believe that it is likely that any material claims will be made under a letter of credit in the foreseeable future. We use our revolving credit facility to issue letters of credit. As of June 30, 2014, we had $4.0 million of standby letters of credit issued under our revolving credit facility primarily for insurance and bonding purposes. Our ability to obtain letters of credit under the revolving portion of our revolving credit facility is conditioned on our continued compliance with the affirmative and negative covenants of our revolving credit facility.

Performance Bonds and Parent Guarantees

In the ordinary course of business, we are required by certain customers to post surety or performance bonds in connection with services that we provide to them. These bonds provide a guarantee to the customer that we will perform under the terms of a contract and that we will pay subcontractors and vendors. If we fail to perform under a contract or to pay subcontractors and vendors, the customer may demand that the surety make payments or provide services under the bond. We must reimburse the surety for any expenses or outlays it incurs. As of June 30, 2014, we had $106.1 million in surety bonds outstanding. To date, we have not been required to make any reimbursements to our sureties for bond-related costs. We believe that it is unlikely that we will have to fund significant claims under our surety arrangements in the foreseeable future.

Pike Corporation, from time to time, guarantees the obligations of its wholly-owned subsidiaries, including obligations under certain contracts with customers.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Revenue Recognition

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standards update (“ASU”) related to revenue from contracts with customers which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance when it becomes effective. The new standard is effective for the Company on January 1, 2017. Early application is not permitted. The standard permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. The Company is evaluating the effect the ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. The Company has not yet selected a transition method nor has it determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.

Presentation of Comprehensive Income

In February 2013, the FASB issued final guidance related to the reporting of amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income that requires entities to report, either on their income statement or in a footnote to their financial statements, the effects on earnings from items that are reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income. The guidance was effective prospectively for our interim period ended September 30, 2013. The adoption of this guidance only affected presentation and did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities

In December 2011, the FASB issued an accounting standards update regarding disclosures about offsetting assets and liabilities, which requires entities to disclose information about offsetting and related arrangements of financial instruments and derivative instruments. The amendment was effective retrospectively for our interim period ended September 30, 2013. The adoption of this guidance only affected presentation and did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains statements that are intended to be “forward-looking statements” under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about us and the industry in which we operate and management’s beliefs and assumptions. Such statements include, in particular, statements about our plans, strategies and prospects under the headings “Business—Overview,” “- Industry Overview,” “- Our Growth Strategy,” “- Competitive Strengths,” “-Competition,” “- Customers,” “- Employees,” “- Equipment,” “- Proprietary Rights,” “- Government Regulation,” “- Environmental Matters,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Words such as “may,” “should,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate,” variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions which are difficult to predict. Such risks include, without limitation, those identified under the heading “Risk Factors.” Therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements relating to:

 

   

our belief that our experienced management team has positioned us to benefit from the substantial long-term growth drivers in our industry by leveraging our core competencies as a company primarily focused on providing a broad range of electric infrastructure services principally for utility customers;

 

   

our belief that our acquisitions of Klondyke and Pine Valley allow us to continue to expand our engineering and construction services in the western United States and better compete in markets with unionized workforces;

 

   

our belief that there are significant growth opportunities for our business and the services we provide due to the required future investment in transmission and distribution infrastructure, the expanded development of energy sources, the increased outsourcing of utility infrastructure services and the rebound in residential development;

 

   

our expectation that we will benefit from the development of new sources of electric power generation;

 

   

our belief that a majority of utility infrastructure services are still conducted in-house and that our customers, especially investor-owned electric utilities, will expand outsourcing of utility infrastructure services over time;

 

   

our belief that residential development, which was negatively impacted during 2008 to 2011, is rebounding;

 

   

our belief that growth in our markets will be driven by bundling services and marketing these offerings to our large and extensive customer base and new customers and that by offering these services on a turnkey basis, we enable our customers to achieve economies and efficiencies over separate unbundled services, which should ultimately lead to an expansion of our market share across our existing customer base and provide us the credibility to secure additional opportunities from new customers;

 

   

our belief that the U.S. electric power system and network reliability will require significant future upkeep given the postponement of maintenance spending in recent years due to the difficult economic conditions, that such upkeep will drive demand for our services and that our leading position in the markets we service will enable us to capitalize on increases in demand for our services;

 

   

our belief that our existing and potential customers desire a deeper range of service offerings on an ever-increasing scale and that our broad platform of service offerings will enable us to acquire additional market share and further penetrate our existing markets;

 

   

our belief that our broad platform of service offerings will be attractive to local and regional firms looking to consolidate with a larger company offering a more diversified and complete set of services;

 

   

our belief that there will be large and financially attractive projects to pursue in international markets over the next few years as developing regions install or develop their electric infrastructure;

 

   

our belief that we have a unique and strong competitive position in the markets in which we operate resulting from a number of factors, including: (i) our position as a leading provider of energy and communication solutions; (ii) our attractive, contiguous presence in key geographic markets; (iii) our long-standing relationships across a high-quality customer base; (iv) our outsourced services-based business model; (v) our position as a recognized leader in storm-related capabilities; and (vi) our experienced operations management team with extensive relationships;

 

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our belief that we are one of only a few companies offering a broad spectrum of energy and communication solutions that our current and prospective customers increasingly demand;

 

   

our belief that our customized, well-maintained and extensive fleet and experienced crews provide us with a competitive advantage in our ability to service our customers and respond rapidly to storm-related opportunities;

 

   

our belief that our important customer relationships provide us an advantage in competing for their business and developing new client relationships;

 

   

our belief that the trend of many of our customers increasing their reliance on outsourcing the maintenance and improvement of their transmission and distribution systems to third-party service providers will continue to be a key growth driver for the leading participants in our industry as electric utilities continue to focus more on power generation;

 

   

our belief that our construction and engineering footprint includes the areas of the U.S. power grid that are the most susceptible to damage caused by severe weather, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, tropical storms, ice storms and wind storms;

 

   

our belief that our management team’s deep industry knowledge, field experience and relationships extend our operating capabilities, improve the quality of our services, facilitate access to clients and enhance our strong reputation in the industry;

 

   

our belief that we have a favorable competitive position in our markets due in large part to our ability to execute with respect to each of the following factors, which are the principal competitive factors in the end markets in which we operate: (i) diversified services, including the ability to offer turnkey EPC project services; (ii) experienced management and employees; (iii) customer relationships and industry reputation; (iv) responsiveness in emergency restoration situations; (v) availability of fleet and specialty equipment; (vi) adequate financial resources and bonding capacity; (vii) geographic breadth and presence in customer markets; (viii) pricing of services, particularly under MSA constraints; and (ix) safety concerns of our crews, customers and the general public;

 

   

our expectation that a substantial portion of our total revenues will continue to be derived from a limited group of customers given the composition of the investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in our geographic market;

 

   

our belief that we have a good relationship with our employees;

 

   

our belief that we have an advantage relative to our competitors in our ability to mobilize, outfit and manage the equipment necessary to perform our construction work, given that we own the majority of our fleet;

 

   

our belief that the capability of our maintenance team to operate 24 hours a day, both at maintenance centers and in the field, and provide high-quality custom repair work and expedient service in maintaining a fleet poised for mobilization gives us a competitive advantage, with stronger local presence, lower fuel costs and more efficient equipment maintenance;

 

   

our belief that our trademarks are a valuable part of our business;

 

   

our belief that we are in material compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and have all material licenses required to conduct our operations;

 

   

our expectation that costs to maintain environmental compliance and/or to address environmental issues will not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows or financial condition;

 

   

our intention to continue to retain any future earnings in the foreseeable future to finance the growth, development and expansion of our business and service debt, rather than declaring or paying cash dividends on our common stock;

 

   

our belief that our facilities are adequate for our current operations;

 

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our belief that the lawsuits, claims and other legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business will not be expected to have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial position or cash flows;

 

   

our belief that variances in the final outcome of self-insured claims from estimates due to the type and severity of the injury, costs of medical claims and uncertainties surrounding the litigation process will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or liquidity;

 

   

our belief that our cash flow from operations, available cash and cash equivalents, and borrowings available under our revolving credit facility will be adequate to meet our liquidity needs in the ordinary course of business for the foreseeable future;

 

   

our expectation that our ability to satisfy our obligations or to fund planned capital expenditures will depend on our future performance, and our belief that this is subject to a certain extent to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control;

 

   

the possibility that if we fail to comply with the covenants contained in our revolving credit facility, we may be unable to access our revolving credit facility upon which we depend for letters of credit and other short-term borrowings, and that this would have a negative impact on our liquidity and require us to obtain alternative short-term financing;

 

   

our belief that it is unlikely that any material claims will be made under a letter of credit in the foreseeable future;

 

   

our belief that it is unlikely that we will have to fund significant claims under our surety arrangements in the foreseeable future;

 

   

our expectation that, if diesel prices rise, our gross profit and operating income could be negatively affected due to additional costs that may not be fully recovered through increases in prices to customers;

 

   

our belief that the financial institutions with whom we maintain substantially all of our cash investments are high credit quality financial institutions;

 

   

our expectation that the net amount of the existing losses in OCI at June 30, 2014 reclassified into net income over the next twelve months will be approximately $119,000; and

 

   

our belief that any future indemnity claims against us would not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

Except as required under the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the SEC, we do not have any intention or obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements after we file this Annual Report on Form 10-K, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

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ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest Rate Risk

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates on borrowings under our revolving credit facility, which bears interest based on the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), plus an applicable margin dependent upon our total leverage ratio. We use derivative financial instruments to manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates on our revolving credit facility. These derivative financial instruments, which are currently all swap agreements, are not entered into for trading or speculative purposes. A swap agreement is a contract to exchange a floating rate for a fixed rate without the exchange of the underlying notional amount.

We periodically enter into interest rate swaps to decrease our exposure to interest rate volatility. We currently have five active interest rate swaps with notional amounts totaling $95 million each ranging from $10 million to $25 million. Fixed rates range from 0.40% to 0.45%. Based on our leverage ratio and the one-month LIBOR rate at June 30, 2014, these swap agreements effectively fix the interest rate at 3.46% for $95 million of our revolving credit facility. The fair value of the interest rate swaps at June 30, 2014 was reflected on the balance sheet in accrued expenses and other for $0.2 million.

Diesel Fuel Risk

We have a large fleet of vehicles and equipment that primarily use diesel fuel. As a result, we have market risk for changes in diesel fuel prices. If diesel prices rise, our gross profit and operating income could be negatively affected due to additional costs that may not be fully recovered through increases in prices to customers.

We periodically enter into diesel fuel swaps and fixed-price forward contracts to decrease our price volatility. As of June 30, 2014, approximately 56% of our diesel fuel usage was hedged primarily over the next twelve months with prices ranging from $3.86 to $3.99 per gallon at a weighted-average price of $3.90 per gallon. Our goal is to maintain our hedged positions at 40% to 60% of our annual volumes on a rolling basis. The fair value of the diesel fuel swaps at June 30, 2014 was reflected on the balance sheet in prepaid expenses and other for $0.1 million.

Based on our projected fuel usage for fiscal 2015 and after including the impact of our active diesel fuel swaps, a $0.50 change in the price per gallon of diesel fuel would change our annual cost of operations by approximately $1.5 million. Actual changes in costs of operations may differ materially from the hypothetical assumptions used in computing this exposure.

Concentration of Credit Risk

We are subject to concentrations of credit risk related primarily to our cash and cash equivalents and accounts receivable. We maintain substantially all of our cash equivalents with what we believe to be high credit quality financial institutions. We grant credit under normal payment terms, generally without collateral, to our customers, which include electric power companies, governmental entities, general contractors and builders, and owners and managers of commercial and industrial properties located in the United States. Consequently, we are subject to potential credit risk related to changes in business and economic factors throughout the United States. However, we generally have certain statutory lien rights with respect to services provided.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page  

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

     45   

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on:

  

Consolidated Financial Statements

     46   

Internal Control over Financial Reporting

     48   

Consolidated Balance Sheets

     49   

Consolidated Statements of Income

     50   

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

     51   

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity

     52   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     53   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     54   

 

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Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Our internal control over financial reporting includes policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect transactions and dispositions of assets; (2) provide reasonable assurances that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and the board of directors of Pike; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2014. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (1992 framework) (COSO) in Internal Control—Integrated Framework. Based on our assessment and those criteria, management has concluded that we maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2014.

Our independent registered public accounting firm, KPMG LLP, audited the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. KPMG LLP has issued their report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, which is included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of Pike Corporation

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Pike Corporation as of June 30, 2013, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended June 30, 2013. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule for each of the two years in the period ended June 30, 2013 listed in the Index at Item 15(a)(2). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Pike Corporation at June 30, 2013, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended June 30, 2013, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information for each of the two years ended June 30, 2013 set forth therein.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Charlotte, North Carolina

September 4, 2013,

except for Note 19, as to which the date is

September 12, 2014

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

Pike Corporation:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Pike Corporation and subsidiaries as of June 30, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year ended June 30, 2014. In connection with our audit of the consolidated financial statements, we also have audited financial statement schedule “Valuation and Qualifying Accounts”. These consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Pike Corporation and subsidiaries as of June 30, 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the year ended June 30, 2014, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedules, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, present fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Pike Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated September 12, 2014, expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ KPMG LLP

Greensboro, North Carolina

September 12, 2014

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

Pike Corporation:

We have audited Pike Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (1992) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Pike Corporation’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, Pike Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2014, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (1992) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheet of Pike Corporation and subsidiaries as of June 30, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year ended June 30, 2014, and our report dated September 12, 2014 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

/s/ KPMG LLP

Greensboro, North Carolina

September 12, 2014

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except par value amounts)

 

     June 30,  
     2014     2013  
ASSETS     

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 989      $ 2,578   

Accounts receivable from customers, net

     96,850        104,585   

Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts

     85,563        71,248   

Inventories

     12,373        14,396   

Prepaid expenses and other

     7,029        9,914   

Deferred income taxes

     10,304        8,720   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     213,108        211,441   

Property and equipment, net

     177,743        179,928   

Goodwill

     153,668        153,668   

Other intangibles, net

     67,463        74,841   

Deferred loan costs, net

     1,111        1,561   

Other assets

     3,059        2,335   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 616,152      $ 623,774   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY     

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable

   $ 34,961      $ 33,500   

Accrued compensation

     26,697        30,468   

Billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts

     6,007        6,235   

Accrued expenses and other

     10,269        5,908   

Current portion of insurance and claim accruals

     10,372        12,121   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     88,306        88,232   

Revolving credit facility

     197,000        221,000   

Insurance and claim accruals, net of current portion

     4,720        4,958   

Deferred compensation, net of current portion

     7,415        6,431   

Deferred income taxes

     56,392        58,402   

Other liabilities

     3,625        2,916   

Commitments and contingencies

    

Shareholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share; 100,000 authorized shares; no shares issued and outstanding

     —          —     

Common stock, par value $0.001 per share; 100,000 authorized shares; 31,939 and 31,719 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013, respectively

     6,425        6,424   

Additional paid-in capital

     180,255        176,988   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of taxes

     (119     (47

Retained earnings

     72,133        58,470   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

     258,694        241,835   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   $ 616,152      $ 623,774   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Revenues

   $ 810,660      $ 918,691      $ 685,169   

Cost of operations

     706,929        771,475        593,478   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     103,731        147,216        91,691   

General and administrative expenses

     74,894        75,579        66,219   

Secondary offering and other related costs

     —          4,138        —     

Gain on sale of property and equipment

     (1,968     (584     (626
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

     30,805        68,083        26,098   

Other expense (income):

      

Interest expense

     8,187        7,384        7,304   

Other, net

     (349     (127     (63
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense

     7,838        7,257        7,241   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     22,967        60,826        18,857   

Income tax expense

     9,304        24,633        7,974   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 13,663      $ 36,193      $ 10,883   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per share:

      

Basic

   $ 0.43      $ 1.04      $ 0.31   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.42      $ 1.03      $ 0.31   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average shares used in computing earnings per share:

      

Basic

     31,830        34,777        34,678   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

     32,191        35,057        35,111   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dividends per share:

   $ —        $ 1.00      $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(in thousands)

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Net income

   $ 13,663      $ 36,193      $ 10,883   

Other comprehensive (loss) income:

      

Interest rate cash flow hedges:

      

Change in fair value arising during the year, net of income taxes of ($131), ($82) and ($11), respectively

     (205     (129     (17

Reclassification adjustments included in net income, net of income taxes of $85, $52 and $125, respectively

     133        82        195   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive (loss) income

     (72     (47     178   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

   $ 13,591      $ 36,146      $ 11,061   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in thousands)

 

      Common
Stock
Shares
    Common
Stock
    Additional
Paid-In
Capital
     Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Retained
Earnings
    Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 

Balance, June 30, 2011

     33,666      $ 6,427      $ 161,586       $ (178   $ 86,554      $ 254,389   

Employee stock compensation plans, net

     403        —          3,212         —          —          3,212   

Issuance of common stock in connection with Pine Valley Power, Inc. acquisition

     983        1        8,262         —          —          8,263   

Comprehensive income:

             

Net income

     —          —          —           —          10,883        10,883   

Gain on derivative instruments, net of income taxes of $114

     —          —          —           178        —          178   
             

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     —          —          —           178        10,883        11,061   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2012

     35,052      $ 6,428      $ 173,060       $ —        $ 97,437      $ 276,925   

Employee stock compensation plans, net

     328        —          3,928         —          —          3,928   

Special cash dividend declared and paid

     —          —          —           —          (35,164     (35,164

Repurchase and retirement of common stock

     (3,661     (4     —           —          (39,996     (40,000

Comprehensive income:

             

Net income

     —          —          —           —          36,193        36,193   

Loss on derivative instruments, net of income taxes of ($30)

     —          —          —           (47     —          (47
             

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     —          —          —           (47     36,193        36,146   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2013

     31,719      $ 6,424      $ 176,988       $ (47   $ 58,470      $ 241,835   

Employee stock compensation plans, net

     220        1        3,267         —          —          3,268   

Comprehensive income:

             

Net income

     —          —          —           —          13,663        13,663   

Loss on derivative instruments, net of income taxes of ($46)

     —          —          —           (72     —          (72
             

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     —          —          —           (72     13,663        13,591   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, June 30, 2014

     31,939      $ 6,425      $ 180,255       $ (119   $ 72,133      $ 258,694   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Cash flows from operating activities:

      

Net income

   $ 13,663      $ 36,193      $ 10,883   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

      

Depreciation and amortization

     39,503        41,431        38,254   

Non-cash interest expense

     1,123        994        2,698   

Deferred income taxes

     (3,470     (1,150     (952

Gain on sale of property and equipment

     (1,968     (584     (626

Equity compensation expense

     3,481        3,684        3,925   

Excess tax benefit from stock-based compensation

     (123     (117     (696

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

      

Accounts receivable and costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts

     (6,580     (5,083     (24,047

Inventories, prepaid expenses and other

     3,626        264        388   

Insurance and claim accruals

     (1,987     1,598        (3,666

Accounts payable and other

     1,618        5,555        1,197   

Deferred compensation

     —          —          (1,659
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     48,886        82,785        25,699   

Cash flows from investing activities:

      

Purchases of property and equipment

     (32,224     (40,355     (33,852

Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     —          (69,654     (16,806

Net proceeds from sale of property and equipment

     5,704        4,088        5,110   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (26,520     (105,921     (45,548

Cash flows from financing activities:

      

Principal payments on long-term debt

     —          —          (99,000

Borrowings under prior revolving credit facility

     —          —          37,700   

Repayments under prior revolving credit facility

     —          —          (37,700

Borrowings under existing revolving credit facility

     149,500        370,000        217,420   

Repayments under existing revolving credit facility

     (173,500     (272,000     (94,420

Special cash dividend declared and paid

     —          (35,164     —     

Repurchase of common stock

     —          (40,000     —     

Stock option and employee stock purchase activity, net

     341        1,297        (1,001

Excess tax benefit from stock-based compensation

     123        117        696   

Deferred loan costs

     (419     (137     (2,556
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

     (23,955     24,113        21,139   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

     (1,589     977        1,290   

Cash and cash equivalents beginning of year

     2,578        1,601        311   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents end of year

   $ 989      $ 2,578      $ 1,601   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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PIKE CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

For the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

1. Organization and Business

On November 5, 2013, Pike Electric Corporation changed its state of incorporation from Delaware to North Carolina (the “Reincorporation”). The Reincorporation was effected by merging Pike Electric Corporation, a Delaware corporation, with and into Pike Corporation, a North Carolina corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiary. In connection with the Reincorporation, Pike Electric Corporation changed its name to “Pike Corporation.” The Reincorporation did not result in any change in the business, management, fiscal year, accounting, location of the principal executive offices or other facilities, capitalization, assets or liabilities of Pike Electric Corporation.

As used in this section, unless the context requires otherwise, the terms “Pike,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Pike Corporation and its subsidiaries and all predecessors of Pike Corporation and its subsidiaries.

We are one of the largest providers of construction and engineering services for investor-owned, municipal and co-operative electric utilities in the United States. Since our founding in 1945, we have evolved from a specialty non-unionized contractor for electric utilities focused on the distribution sector in the southeastern United States to one of the nation’s largest specialty construction and engineering firms servicing over 300 customers. Our comprehensive suite of energy and communication solutions includes facilities planning and siting, permitting, engineering, design, installation, maintenance and repair of power delivery systems, including renewables (primarily ground-based) and utility-grade solar construction projects, and storm-related services. As a result of the acquisition of Synergetic Design Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiary UC Synergetic, Inc. (together “UCS”) expanding the size and scope of our engineering business, we decided in the first quarter of fiscal 2013 to change our reportable segments. As a result of these changes, we operated our business as two reportable segments: Construction and All Other Operations. On January 1, 2014, as part of the integration of our engineering businesses, Synergetic Design Holdings, Inc. merged with and into Pike Enterprises, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, and UC Synergetic, Inc. merged with and into Pike Energy Solutions, LLC, the surviving entity of which was named UC Synergetic, LLC. In order to properly align our segments with our current financial reporting structure, we changed the name of our All Other Operations segment to Engineering. Prior fiscal year segment information has been revised to conform to the current-year presentation. See Note 19 for further information on our segments.

We monitor revenue by two categories of services: core and storm-related. We use this breakdown because core services represent ongoing service revenues, most of which are generated by our customers’ recurring maintenance needs, and storm-related revenues represent additional revenue opportunities that depend on weather conditions.

The following table sets forth our revenue by type of service for the fiscal years indicated:

 

     Fiscal Year Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2012  

Core services

   $ 743,229         91.7   $ 751,364         81.8   $ 614,623         89.7

Storm-related services

     67,431         8.3     167,327         18.2     70,546         10.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 810,660         100.0   $ 918,691         100.0   $ 685,169         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Pike Corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany amounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Reclassifications

Certain reclassifications have been made to the amounts reported in these notes to consolidated financial statements for the prior years to conform to the current year presentation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include the allowance for doubtful accounts; recognition of revenue for costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts; future cash flows associated with long-lived assets; useful lives and salvage values of fixed assets for depreciation purposes; workers’ compensation and employee benefit liabilities; purchase price allocations; fair value assumptions in analyzing goodwill; income taxes; and fair values of financial instruments. Due to the subjective nature of these estimates, actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

We consider all highly-liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less at the date of purchase to be cash equivalents.

Revenue Recognition

Revenues from service arrangements are recognized when services are performed. We recognize revenue from hourly services based on actual labor and equipment time completed and on materials when billable to our customers. We recognize revenue on unit-based services as the units are completed. We recognize the full amount of any estimated loss on site-specific unit projects if estimated costs to complete the remaining units for the project exceed the revenue to be received from such units.

Revenues for fixed-price contracts are recognized using the percentage-of-completion method, measured by the percentage of costs incurred to date to total estimated costs for each contract. Contract costs include all direct material, labor and subcontract costs, as well as indirect costs related to contract performance, such as indirect labor, tools, repairs and depreciation. The cost estimation process is based on the professional knowledge and experience of our engineers, project managers, field construction supervisors, operations management and financial professionals. Changes in job performance, job conditions, estimated profitability and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and their effects are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. At the time a loss on a contract becomes known, the entire amount of the estimated ultimate loss is accrued.

The current asset “Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts” represents revenues recognized in excess of amounts billed. The current liability “Billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts” represents billings in excess of revenues recognized.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We provide an allowance for doubtful accounts that represents an estimate of uncollectible accounts receivable. The determination of the allowance includes certain judgments and estimates including our customers’ willingness or ability to pay and our ongoing relationship with the customer. In certain instances, primarily relating to storm-related work and other high-volume billing situations, billed amounts may differ from ultimately collected amounts. We incorporate our historical experience with our customers into the estimation of the allowance for doubtful accounts. These amounts are continuously monitored as additional information is obtained. Accounts receivable are primarily due from customers located within the United States and include balances billed to customers pursuant to retainage provisions in certain contracts that are due upon completion of the contracts and acceptance by the

 

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customer. These amounts are generally collected within one year. Any material change in our customers’ business or cash flows could affect our ability to collect amounts due. Receivable amounts pertaining to retainage provisions with customers totaled $2,458 and $7,527 at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Accounts receivable from customers, net and costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts included allowances for doubtful accounts of $5,531 and $1,894 at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We recorded bad debt expense (recovery) of $1,251, ($54) and 43 for fiscal 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Inventories

Inventories consist of equipment in process to be sold under sale-leaseback arrangements, unbilled materials purchased for engineering, procurement and construction (“EPC”) projects, machine parts, supplies, small tools and other materials used in the ordinary course of business and are stated at the lower of average cost or market.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is carried at cost. Replacements and improvements are capitalized when costs incurred for those purposes extend the useful life of the asset. Maintenance and repairs are expensed as incurred. Depreciation on capital assets is computed using the straight-line method. Internal and external costs incurred to acquire and create internal use software are capitalized and amortized over the useful life of the software. Capitalized software is included in property and equipment on the consolidated balance sheets. Our management makes assumptions regarding future conditions in determining estimated useful lives and potential salvage values, and reviews these assumptions at least annually. These assumptions impact the amount of depreciation expense recognized in the period and any gain or loss recognized once the asset is disposed of or classified as “held for sale.”

We review our property and equipment for impairment when events or changes in business conditions indicate the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable. An impairment of assets classified as “held and used” exists if the sum of the undiscounted estimated future cash flows expected is less than the carrying value of the assets. If this measurement indicates a possible impairment, we compare the estimated fair value of the asset to the net book value to measure the impairment charge, if any. If the criteria for classifying an asset as “held for sale” have been met, we record the asset at the lower of carrying value or fair value, less estimated selling costs.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

We test our goodwill for impairment annually or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate impairment may exist. Examples of such events or circumstances could include a significant change in business climate or a loss of significant customers. We complete our annual analysis of our reporting units as of the first day of our fourth fiscal quarter. For purposes of our fiscal 2014 analysis, we had four reporting units: non-union construction, union construction, energy delivery engineering and telecom engineering. In evaluating reporting units, we first consider our operating segments and related components in accordance with U.S. GAAP. We allocate goodwill to the reporting units that are expected to benefit from the synergies of the business combinations generating the goodwill. We apply a two-step fair value-based test to assess goodwill for impairment. The first step compares the fair values of the reporting units to their carrying amounts, including goodwill. If the carrying amount of any reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step is then performed. The second step compares the carrying amount of the reporting unit’s goodwill to the implied fair value of the goodwill. If the implied fair value of the goodwill is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss would be recorded.

We determined the fair value of our reporting units based on the income approach, using a discounted cash flow model. The income approach was used because it has a more direct correlation to the specific economics of the reporting units than the market approach, which considers comparable companies and transactions that are comparable to the Company as a whole, but are not as comparable to the individual reporting units in terms of size, operational diversity, and geographic diversity. Under the income approach, the discounted cash flow model determines fair value based on the present value of projected cash flows over a specific projection period and a residual value related to future cash flows beyond the projection period. Both values are discounted using a rate which reflects our best estimate of the weighted-average cost of capital of a market participant, and is adjusted for appropriate risk factors. We perform sensitivity tests with respect to growth rates and discount rates used in the income approach.

 

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For our annual impairment analysis, we relied solely on the income approach. The income approach was used because it has a more direct correlation to the specific economics of the reporting units than the market approach which is based on multiples of companies that, although comparable to the Company as a whole, may not have the exact same risk factors as our reporting units and are not as comparable to the individual reporting units in terms of size, operational diversity and geographic diversity. The analysis indicated that, as of the first day of our fourth fiscal quarter, the fair values of each of our reporting units exceeded their respective carrying values in excess of 10%. For our analysis, we also considered various elements of an implied control premium in assessing the reasonableness of the reconciliation of the summation of the fair values of the invested capital of our four reporting units (with appropriate consideration of the interest bearing debt) to the Company’s overall market capitalization and our net book value. This analysis included (i) the current control premium being paid for companies with a similar market capitalization and within similar industries and (ii) certain synergies that a market participant buyer could realize, such as the elimination of potentially redundant costs. Based on this analysis, management determined that the resulting control premium implied in the annual impairment analysis was approximately 10%, which was within a reasonable range of current market conditions. Based on our annual impairment analysis, we concluded that goodwill was not impaired.

In addition to goodwill, we identify and value other intangible assets that we acquire in business combinations, such as customer arrangements, customer relationships, intellectual property and non-compete agreements, that arise from contractual or other legal rights or that are capable of being separated or divided from the acquired entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged. The fair value of identified intangible assets is based upon an estimate of the future economic benefits expected to result from ownership, which represents the amount at which the assets could be bought or sold in a current transaction between willing parties, that is, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. For customers with whom we have an existing relationship prior to the date of the transaction, we utilize assumptions that a marketplace participant would consider in estimating the fair value of customer relationships that an acquired entity had with our pre-existing customers in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The inputs into goodwill and intangible asset fair value calculations reflect our market assumptions and are not observable. Consequently, the inputs are considered to be Level 3 as specified in the fair value accounting guidance.

Intangible assets with definite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are also reviewed for impairment if events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be realizable. We have no intangibles with indefinite lives other than goodwill.

Inherent in valuation determinations related to goodwill and other intangible assets are significant judgments and estimates, including assumptions about our future revenue, profitability and cash flows, our operational plans, current economic indicators and market valuations. To the extent these assumptions are incorrect or there are declines in our business outlook, impairment charges may be recorded in future periods.

Insurance and Claim Accruals

The insurance and claim accruals are based on known facts, actuarial estimates and historical trends. We are partially self-insured for individual workers’ compensation, vehicle and general liability, and health insurance claims. To mitigate a portion of these risks, we maintain commercial insurance for individual workers’ compensation and vehicle and general liability claims exceeding $1,000. We also maintain commercial insurance for health insurance claims exceeding $500 per person on an annual basis. We determine the amount of our loss reserves and loss adjustment expenses for self-insured claims based on analyses prepared quarterly that use both company-specific and industry data, as well as general economic information. Our estimates for insurance loss exposures require us to monitor and evaluate our insurance claims throughout their life cycles. Using this data and our assumptions about the emerging trends, we estimate the size of ultimate claims. Our most significant assumptions in forming our estimates include the trend in loss costs, the expected consistency with prior fiscal year claims of the frequency and severity of claims incurred but not yet reported, changes in the timing of the reporting of losses from the loss date to the notification date, and expected costs to settle unpaid claims. We also monitor the reasonableness of the judgments made in the prior fiscal year’s estimates and adjust current year assumptions based on that analysis.

For the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, health care and casualty insurance and claims expense was $31,839, $33,313 and $32,545, respectively, and was included in cost of operations and general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of income.

 

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Collective Bargaining Agreements

Several of our subsidiaries are party to collective bargaining agreements with unions representing craftworkers performing field construction operations. The collective bargaining agreements expire at various times and have typically been renegotiated and renewed on terms similar to the ones contained in the expiring agreements. The agreements require those subsidiaries to pay specified wages, provide certain benefits to their respective union employees and contribute certain amounts to multi-employer pension plans and employee benefit trusts. These subsidiaries’ multi-employer pension plan contribution rates generally are specified in the collective bargaining agreements (usually on an annual basis), and contributions are made to the plans on a “pay-as-you-go” basis based on its union employee payrolls, which cannot be determined for future periods because the location and number of union employees that any such subsidiary employs at any given time and the plans in which they may participate vary depending on the projects we have ongoing at any time and the need for union resources in connection with those projects. If any of these subsidiaries withdrew from, or otherwise terminated its participation in, one or more multi-employer pension plans or if the plans were to otherwise become underfunded, we could be assessed liabilities for additional contributions related to the underfunding of these plans. We are not aware of any material amounts of withdrawal liability that have been incurred as a result of a withdrawal by any of our subsidiaries from any multi-employer defined benefit pension plans.

Stock-Based Compensation

Share-based payments are recognized in the consolidated financial statements based on their grant date fair values. Share-based compensation expense is recognized over the period the recipient is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively the vesting period). We value awards with graded vesting as single awards and recognize the related compensation expense using a straight-line attribution method. U.S. GAAP requires that excess tax benefits be reported as financing cash inflows, rather than as a reduction of taxes paid, which is included within operating cash flows.

Advertising and Promotion Costs

We expense advertising and promotion costs as incurred and these costs are included as a component of general and administrative expenses. Advertising and promotion costs for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 were $505, $659 and $813, respectively.

Earnings Per Share

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income or loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income or loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period and potentially dilutive common stock equivalents. Potential common stock equivalents that have been issued by us relate to both outstanding stock options and restricted stock awards and are determined using the treasury stock method.

Deferred Loan Costs

Deferred loan costs are being amortized over the term of the related debt using the effective-interest method. Accumulated amortization was $2,002 and $1,133 at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Amortization expense was $869, $751 and $2,386 for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. We also wrote-off approximately $1,700 of unamortized deferred loan costs as additional interest expense related to the prior credit facility in August 2011. Total deferred loan costs associated with entering into our existing revolving credit facility were approximately $1,800. We also capitalized deferred loan costs totaling approximately $138 and $823 for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively, relating to our accordion loan feature of our existing revolving credit facility exercised on June 27, 2012 and amounts borrowed to fund the UCS acquisition on July 2, 2012. On December 17, 2013, we entered into an amendment to our revolving credit facility to restate the leverage covenant ratio. Total costs associated with this amendment were approximately $419 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.

 

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Derivative Instruments

We use certain derivative instruments to manage risk relating to diesel fuel and interest rate exposure. Our use of derivative instruments is currently limited to interest rate swaps and diesel fuel swaps. These instruments are generally structured as hedges of forecasted transactions or the variability of cash flows to be paid related to a recognized asset or liability (cash flow hedges). We do not enter into derivative instruments for trading or speculative purposes. However, we have entered into diesel fuel swaps to economically hedge future purchases of diesel fuel, for which we have not applied hedge accounting. All derivatives are recognized on the balance sheet at fair value. For those derivative instruments for which we intend to elect hedge accounting, on the date the derivative contract is entered into, we document all relationships between hedging instruments and hedged items, as well as our risk-management objective and strategy for undertaking the various hedge transactions. This process includes linking all derivatives designated as cash flow hedges to specific assets and liabilities on the consolidated balance sheet or to specific forecasted transactions. We also formally assess, both at the hedge’s inception and on an ongoing basis, whether the derivatives used in hedging transactions are highly effective in offsetting changes in cash flows of hedged items.

Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are highly effective, and are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges are recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) until earnings are affected by the variability in cash flows of the designated hedged item. Any changes in the fair value of a derivative where hedge accounting has not been elected or where there is ineffectiveness are recognized immediately in earnings. Cash flows related to derivatives are included in operating activities. See Note 8 for additional information.

Income Taxes

The liability method is used in accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Revenue Recognition

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standards update (“ASU”) related to revenue from contracts with customers which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance when it becomes effective. The new standard is effective for the Company on January 1, 2017. Early application is not permitted. The standard permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. The Company is evaluating the effect the ASU will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. The Company has not yet selected a transition method nor has it determined the effect of the standard on its ongoing financial reporting.

Presentation of Comprehensive Income

In February 2013, the FASB issued final guidance related to the reporting of amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income that requires entities to report, either on their income statement or in a footnote to their financial statements, the effects on earnings from items that are reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income. The guidance was effective prospectively for our interim period ended September 30, 2013. The adoption of this guidance only affected presentation and did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities

In December 2011, the FASB issued an accounting standards update regarding disclosures about offsetting assets and liabilities, which requires entities to disclose information about offsetting and related arrangements of financial instruments and derivative instruments. The amendment was effective retrospectively for our interim period ended September 30, 2013. The adoption of this guidance only affected presentation and did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

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3. Acquisitions

UC Synergetic

On July 2, 2012, we completed the acquisition of UCS, a privately-held company headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, for $69,654, net of cash acquired of $666. The funding for the acquisition consisted of cash borrowed from the $75,000 accordion loan feature of our existing revolving credit facility that was finalized on June 27, 2012. UCS provides engineering and consulting services focusing on (i) energy distribution, transmission and substation infrastructure, including storm assessment and inspection, and (ii) wireline and wireless communications. This acquisition extended our footprint in the Northeast and Midwest and resulted in our being one of the largest utility infrastructure engineering and design firms in the United States.

We completed our analysis of the valuation of the acquired assets and liabilities assumed of UCS during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. In June 2013, we recorded additional adjustments increasing goodwill and deferred income taxes totaling $11 to accurately reflect the amounts recognized as of the acquisition date. The purchase price of $69,654 has been allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the effective date of the acquisition based on estimated fair values as summarized in the following table:

 

Current assets

   $ 13,632   

Property and equipment

     1,760   

Intangible assets

     39,800   

Goodwill

     30,736   

Other

     100   
  

 

 

 

Total assets acquired

     86,028   

Current liabilities

     (3,009

Deferred income taxes

     (13,365
  

 

 

 

Total liabilities assumed

     (16,374
  

 

 

 

Net assets

   $ 69,654   
  

 

 

 

The intangible assets recognized are attributable to customer relationships totaling $34,000, non-compete agreements with the seller totaling $1,800 and a trademark totaling $4,000, and are being amortized over twelve, three and twenty years, respectively. The allocation of the purchase price, which primarily used a discounted cash flow approach with respect to identified intangible assets, was based upon Level 3 fair value inputs and a discount rate consistent with the inherent risk of each of the acquired assets. The goodwill recognized is attributable primarily to expected synergies and $5,357 is amortizable for tax purposes.

The financial results of the operations of UCS have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of the acquisition and represent revenue of $77,253 and net income of $3,469 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. The following unaudited pro forma condensed statement of income data gives effect to the acquisition of UCS as if it had occurred on July 1, 2011. The pro forma results are not necessarily indicative of what actually would have occurred had the acquisition been in effect for the fiscal years presented. Pro forma results for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 excludes non-recurring charges primarily related to seller transaction expenses prior to the acquisition totaling approximately $2,900.

 

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     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
     2013      2012  

Revenues

   $ 918,691       $ 757,855   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 36,193       $ 13,761   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per common share

   $ 1.04       $ 0.40   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per common share

   $ 1.03       $ 0.39   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Pine Valley

On August 1, 2011, we acquired Pine Valley, a privately-held company located near Salt Lake City, Utah, for $25,068, net of cash acquired of $465. The funding for the purchase consisted of cash from operations and cash borrowed under our revolving credit facility totaling $7,271 and $10,000, respectively, and the issuance of approximately 983 shares of our common stock having an estimated fair value of $8,262 on the issuance date. Pine Valley provides construction and maintenance services to the transmission and distribution, renewable energy, industrial water and mining industries.

We completed our analysis of the valuation of the acquired assets and liabilities of Pine Valley during the quarter ended December 31, 2011. The purchase price of $25,068 has been allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the effective date of the acquisition based on estimated fair values as summarized in the following table:

 

Current assets

   $ 3,278   

Property and equipment

     1,251   

Intangible assets

     10,072   

Goodwill

     12,039   
  

 

 

 

Total assets acquired

     26,640   

Current liabilities

     (1,572
  

 

 

 

Total liabilities assumed

     (1,572
  

 

 

 

Net assets

   $ 25,068   
  

 

 

 

The intangible assets recognized are attributable to customer relationships totaling $8,005, non-compete agreements with the seller totaling $1,829 and a trademark totaling $238, and are being amortized over fifteen, five and five years, respectively. All changes in goodwill for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 are related to purchase price allocation adjustments for Pine Valley. The goodwill recognized is attributable primarily to expected synergies and is amortizable for tax purposes over a period of 15 years.

The financial results of the operations of Pine Valley have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the date of the acquisition and represent revenue of $18,851 and net loss of $3 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The following unaudited pro forma condensed statement of income data gives effect to the acquisition of Pine Valley as if it had occurred on July 1, 2010. The pro forma results are not necessarily indicative of what actually would have occurred had the acquisition been in effect for the fiscal years presented.

 

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     Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
     2012      2011  

Revenues

   $ 686,980       $ 618,980   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 10,994       $ 6,251   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per common share

   $ 0.32       $ 0.19   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per common share

   $ 0.31       $ 0.18   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

4. Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is comprised of the following:

 

     Estimated Useful
Lives in Years
   June 30,  
        2014     2013  

Land

   —      $ 2,705      $ 2,964   

Buildings

   15-39      27,269        27,415   

Vehicles

   5-12      244,029        237,127   

Machinery and equipment

   3-19      72,895        79,055   

Office equipment, furniture and software

   3-7      39,665        30,540   
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

        386,563        377,101   

Accumulated depreciation

        (208,820     (197,173
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

      $ 177,743      $ 179,928   
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Depreciation expense for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was $32,125, $32,855 and $33,445, respectively.

Expenses for maintenance and repairs of property and equipment were $36,990, $36,302 and $34,510 for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Amounts reported as gain on sale and impairment of property and equipment relate primarily to the sale of aging, damaged or excess fleet equipment. Assets held for sale are recorded at the lower of carrying value or fair value, less selling costs. Fair value for this purpose is generally determined based on prices in the used equipment market. The carrying value of assets held for sale was $72 and $175 at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, and is included in prepaid expenses and other in the consolidated balance sheets. All of the assets held for sale are expected to be sold within twelve months.

 

5. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for fiscal year 2014 and 2013 are as follows:

 

     Construction      Engineering      Total
Goodwill
 

Goodwill at June 30, 2012

   $ 113,110       $ 9,822       $ 122,932   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Acquisition of UCS

     —           30,736         30,736   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Goodwill at June 30, 2013

   $ 113,110       $ 40,558       $ 153,668   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Goodwill at June 30, 2014

   $ 113,110       $ 40,558       $ 153,668   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See Note 19 for details pertaining to the Company’s reportable segments.

 

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We have recorded no impairment losses related to goodwill and have no intangible assets with indefinite lives other than goodwill.

Other amortizable intangible assets are comprised of:

 

     Customer
Relationships
    Non-Compete
Agreements
    Trademarks     Total  
     June 30,     June 30,     June 30,     June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013     2014     2013     2014     2013  

Gross carrying value

   $ 92,711      $ 92,711      $ 3,629      $ 11,719      $ 4,838      $ 4,838      $ 101,178      $ 109,268   

Accumulated amortization

     (30,427     (24,382     (2,269     (9,393     (1,019     (652     (33,715     (34,427
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net intangible assets

   $ 62,284      $ 68,329      $ 1,360      $ 2,326      $ 3,819      $ 4,186      $ 67,463      $ 74,841   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average useful life (years)

     20.6        20.6        4.0        6.1        17.4        17.4        19.9        18.9   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Amortization expense related to intangible assets for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 was $7,378, $8,576 and $4,809, respectively.

Estimated future amortization expense related to intangible assets is as follows:

 

Fiscal Year Ended June 30,

   Amount  

2015

   $ 7,268   

2016

     6,415   

2017

     5,705   

2018

     5,482   

2019

     5,383   

Thereafter

     37,210   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 67,463   
  

 

 

 

 

6. Debt

On August 24, 2011, we entered into a $200,000 revolving credit facility that replaced our prior credit facility. Our revolving credit facility matures in August 2015. We repaid outstanding term loans and borrowings on the revolver of our prior credit facility upon entering into our revolving credit facility. The obligations under our revolving credit facility are unconditionally guaranteed by us and each of our existing and subsequently acquired or organized domestic and first-tier foreign subsidiaries and secured on a first-priority basis by security interests (subject to permitted liens) in substantially all assets owned by us and each of our subsidiaries, subject to limited exceptions. Total costs associated with entering into our revolving credit facility were approximately $1,800, including the commitment fee, which are capitalized and being amortized over the term of the debt using the effective interest method.

Borrowings under our revolving credit facility bear interest at a variable rate at our option of either (i) the Base Rate, defined as the greater of the Prime Rate (as defined in our revolving credit facility), the Federal Funds Effective Rate (as defined in our revolving credit facility) plus 0.50% or LIBOR plus 1.00%, plus a margin ranging from 0.50% to 1.50% or (ii) LIBOR plus a margin ranging from 2.00% to 3.00%. The margins are applied based on our leverage ratio, which is computed quarterly. The margins are applied based on our leverage ratio, which is computed quarterly. At June 30, 2014 and 2013, the Base Rate margin was 1.50% and 0.75% and the LIBOR margin was 3.00% and 2.25%, respectively. At June 30, 2014 and 2013, our Base Rate was 4.75% and 4.00% and the adjusted LIBOR rate was 3.19% and 2.5%, respectively.

 

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We are subject to a commitment fee ranging from 0.375% to 0.625% and letter of credit fees between 2.00% and 3.00% based on our leverage ratio. We are also subject to letter of credit fronting fees of 0.125% per annum for amounts available to be withdrawn.

Our revolving credit facility contains a number of other affirmative and restrictive covenants, including limitations on dissolutions, sales of assets, investments, and indebtedness and liens. On December 17, 2013, we entered into an amendment to our revolving credit facility to restate the leverage covenant ratio. Our revolving credit facility includes a requirement that we maintain (i) a leverage ratio, which is the ratio of total debt to adjusted EBITDA (as defined in our revolving credit facility; measured on a trailing four-quarter basis), of no more than 4.00 to 1.00 as of the last day of each fiscal quarter, declining to 3.75 on June 30, 2014 and declining to 3.50 on September 30, 2014 and thereafter, and (ii) a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in our revolving credit facility) of at least 1.25 to 1.00.

On June 27, 2012, we exercised the accordion feature of our revolving credit facility and entered into a commitment increase agreement with our lenders thereby increasing the lenders’ commitments by $75,000, from $200,000 to $275,000. Total costs associated with the new accordion commitment were approximately $800, which are capitalized and being amortized over the term of the debt using the effective interest method.

As of June 30, 2014, we had $197,000 in borrowings and our availability under our revolving credit facility was $74,000 (after giving effect to $4,000 of outstanding standby letters of credit).

Cash paid for interest expense totaled $6,763, $6,389 and $4,285 for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Interest costs capitalized for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012 were $12, $12 and $47, respectively.

 

7. Shareholders’ Equity

Special Dividend

On December 4, 2012, we announced that our board of directors declared a special cash dividend of $1.00 per share on our common stock totaling $35,164. The dividend was payable to shareholders of record as of December 14, 2012 and was paid on December 21, 2012.

Secondary Offering and Concurrent Share Repurchase

On May 13, 2013, we entered into a share repurchase agreement with LGB Pike II LLC (the “Selling Shareholder”), pursuant to which we agreed to purchase $40,000 of our common stock from the Selling Shareholder concurrently with the closing of an underwritten public offering by the Selling Shareholder of 8,000 shares of our common stock at the price at which the shares of common stock were sold to the public in the offering, less the underwriting discount, or $10.925 per share (the “Repurchase Agreement”). We funded the share repurchase with available cash and borrowings under our revolving credit facility, and the shares were repurchased and cancelled on May 21, 2013. The excess of the repurchase price over our common stock par value was charged against retained earnings. We did not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares in the secondary offering and were obligated to conduct such offering and pay the expenses related thereto pursuant to that certain Stockholders Agreement, dated April 18, 2002, as amended, among the Company and certain shareholders. We incurred fees and expenses totaling $4,138 in connection with the secondary equity offering, the concurrent share repurchase and a special committee of our board of directors. This amount is shown as a separate operating expense in the consolidated statements of income for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013; $2,464 of the offering expenses are non-deductible for income tax purposes.

 

8. Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities

All derivative instruments are recorded on the consolidated balance sheets at their respective fair values. Changes in fair value are recognized either in income or other comprehensive income (loss) (“OCI”), depending on

 

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whether the transaction qualifies for hedge accounting and, if so, the nature of the underlying exposure being hedged and how effective the derivatives are at offsetting price movements in the underlying exposure. The effective portions recorded in OCI are recognized in the statement of operations when the hedged item affects earnings.

We have used certain derivative instruments to manage risk relating to diesel fuel and interest rate exposure. Derivative instruments are not entered into for trading or speculative purposes. We document all relationships between derivative instruments and related items, as well as our risk-management objectives and strategies for undertaking various derivative transactions.

Interest Rate Risk

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates on borrowings under our revolving credit facility, which bears interest based on LIBOR, plus an applicable margin dependent upon our total leverage ratio. We use derivative financial instruments to manage exposure to fluctuations in interest rates on our revolving credit facility.

Effective January 2013, we entered into an interest rate swap agreement (the “January 2013 Swap”), with a notional amount of $10,000, to help manage a portion of our interest risk related to our floating-rate debt. Under the January 2013 Swap, we pay a fixed rate of 0.42% and receive a rate equivalent to the 30-day LIBOR, adjusted monthly. The January 2013 Swap qualified for hedge accounting and is designated as a cash flow hedge. There was no hedge ineffectiveness for the January 2013 Swap for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. The swap will expire in June 2015.

Effective December 2012, we entered into two interest rate swap agreements (the “December 2012 Swaps”), with notional amounts of $10,000 and $25,000, respectively, to help manage a portion of our interest risk related to our floating-rate debt. Under the December 2012 Swaps, we pay fixed rates of 0.42% and 0.45%, respectively, and receive a rate equivalent to the 30-day LIBOR, adjusted monthly. The December 2012 Swaps qualified for hedge accounting and are designated as cash flow hedges. There was no hedge ineffectiveness for the December 2012 Swaps for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. These swaps will expire in June 2015.

Effective September 2012, we entered into two interest rate swap agreements (the “September 2012 Swaps”), each with notional amounts of $25,000, to help manage a portion of our interest risk related to our floating-rate debt. Under the September 2012 Swaps, we pay fixed rates of 0.40% and 0.42%, respectively, and receive a rate equivalent to the 30-day LIBOR, adjusted monthly. The September 2012 Swaps qualified for hedge accounting and are designated as cash flow hedges. There was no hedge ineffectiveness for the September 2012 Swaps for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. These swaps will expire in February and March 2015, respectively.

Effective May 2010, we entered into an interest rate swap agreement (the “May 2010 Swap”), with a notional amount of $20,000, to help manage a portion of our interest risk related to our floating-rate debt. The May 2010 Swap expired in May 2012. Under the May 2010 Swap, we paid a fixed rate of 1.1375% and received a rate equivalent to the 30-day LIBOR, adjusted monthly. The May 2010 Swap qualified for hedge accounting and was designated as a cash flow hedge. There was no hedge ineffectiveness for the May 2010 Swap for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

Effective June 2010, we entered into an interest rate swap agreement (the “June 2010 Swap”), with a notional amount of $20,000, to help manage a portion of our interest risk related to our floating-rate debt. The June 2010 Swap expired in June 2012. Under the June 2010 Swap, we paid a fixed rate of 1.0525% and received a rate equivalent to the 30-day LIBOR, adjusted monthly. The June 2010 Swap qualified for hedge accounting and was designated as a cash flow hedge. There was no hedge ineffectiveness for the June 2010 Swap for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

The net derivative income (loss) recorded in OCI will be reclassified into earnings over the term of the underlying cash flow hedge. The amount that will be reclassified into earnings will vary depending upon the movement of the underlying interest rates. As interest rates decrease, the charge to earnings will increase. Conversely, as interest rates increase, the charge to earnings will decrease.

 

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Diesel Fuel Risk

We have a large fleet of vehicles and equipment that primarily uses diesel fuel. As a result, we have market risk for changes in diesel fuel prices. If diesel prices rise, our gross profit and operating income could be negatively affected due to additional costs that may not be fully recovered through increases in prices to customers.

We periodically enter into diesel fuel swaps and fixed-price forward contracts to decrease our price volatility. We currently hedge approximately 56% of our diesel fuel usage primarily over the next twelve months with prices ranging from $3.86 to $3.99 per gallon at a weighted-average price of $3.90 per gallon. We are not currently utilizing hedge accounting for any active diesel fuel derivatives.

Balance Sheet and Statement of Operations Information

The fair value of derivatives at June 30, 2014 and 2013 is summarized in the following table:

 

          Asset Derivatives at June 30, 2014      Liability Derivatives at June 30, 2014  
     Balance Sheet Location    Gross
Fair Value
of
Recognized
Assets
     Gross
Fair Value
Offset
    Net
Fair Value
     Gross
Fair Value
of
Recognized
Liabilities
    Gross
Fair Value
Offset
     Net
Fair Value
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:

                  

Interest rate swaps

   Accrued expenses and other    $ —         $ —        $ —         $ (195   $ —         $ (195
     

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total derivatives designated as hedging instruments

      $ —         $ —        $ —         $ (195