10-Q 1 g28049e10vq.htm FORM 10-Q e10vq
Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2011
OR
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _________ to _________
     
   
 
Commission file number: 1-32258
Reynolds American Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
North Carolina
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
  20-0546644
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
401 North Main Street
Winston-Salem, NC 27101

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
(336) 741-2000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed from last report)
 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ    No o
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes þ    No o
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer þ   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company o
        (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o     No þ
     Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date: 582,911,836 shares of common stock, par value $.0001 per share, as of October 7, 2011
 
 

 


 

INDEX
         
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 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
 EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT

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Part I Financial Information
Item 1.   Financial Statements
REYNOLDS AMERICAN INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(Dollars in Millions, Except Per Share Amounts)
(Unaudited)
                                 
    For the Three Months     For the Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
Net sales(1)
  $ 2,063     $ 2,146     $ 6,078     $ 6,141  
Net sales, related party
    137       93       380       329  
 
                       
Net sales
    2,200       2,239       6,458       6,470  
Costs and expenses:
                               
Cost of products sold(1)
    1,148       1,184       3,424       3,437  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    411       387       1,263       1,124  
Amortization expense
    6       6       18       19  
Asset impairment and exit charges
                      38  
 
                       
Operating income
    635       662       1,753       1,852  
Interest and debt expense
    55       55       165       176  
Interest income
    (3 )     (3 )     (9 )     (9 )
Other expense (income), net
    2       (8 )     2       4  
 
                       
Income from continuing operations before income taxes
    581       618       1,595       1,681  
Provision for income taxes
    214       237       571       661  
 
                       
Income from continuing operations
    367       381       1,024       1,020  
Losses from discontinued operations, net of tax
                      (216 )
 
                       
Net income
  $ 367     $ 381     $ 1,024     $ 804  
 
                       
Basic income per share:
                               
Income from continuing operations
  $ 0.63     $ 0.65     $ 1.76     $ 1.75  
Losses from discontinued operations
                      (0.37 )
 
                       
Net income
  $ 0.63     $ 0.65     $ 1.76     $ 1.38  
 
                       
Diluted income per share:
                               
Income from continuing operations
  $ 0.63     $ 0.65     $ 1.75     $ 1.75  
Losses from discontinued operations
                      (0.37 )
 
                       
Net income
  $ 0.63     $ 0.65     $ 1.75     $ 1.38  
 
                       
Dividends declared per share
  $ 0.53     $ 0.45     $ 1.59     $ 1.35  
 
                       
 
(1)   Excludes excise taxes of $1,050 million and $1,130 million for the three months ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and $3,116 million and $3,279 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

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REYNOLDS AMERICAN INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Dollars in Millions)
(Unaudited)
                 
    For the Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010  
Cash flows from (used in) operating activities:
               
Net income
  $ 1,024     $ 804  
Losses from discontinued operations, net of tax
          216  
Adjustments to reconcile to net cash flows from (used in) continuing operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    104       115  
Asset impairment and exit charges
          38  
Deferred income tax expense
    108       143  
Pension and postretirement
    (30 )     (225 )
Tobacco settlement
    (245 )     (224 )
Other, net
    (120 )     151  
 
           
Net cash flows from operating activities
    841       1,018  
 
           
 
               
Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:
               
Capital expenditures
    (142 )     (115 )
Net proceeds from sale of business
    202        
Proceeds from termination of joint venture
    32       28  
Other, net
    13       17  
 
           
Net cash flows from (used in) investing activities
    105       (70 )
 
           
 
               
Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:
               
Dividends paid on common stock
    (903 )     (787 )
Repayment of long-term debt
    (400 )     (300 )
Proceeds from termination of interest rate swaps
    186        
Other, net
    (12 )      
 
           
Net cash flows used in financing activities
    (1,129 )     (1,087 )
 
           
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
    (2 )     (6 )
 
           
Net cash flows related to discontinued operations, net of tax benefit
          (326 )
 
           
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    (185 )     (471 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    2,195       2,723  
 
           
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 2,010     $ 2,252  
 
           
Income taxes paid, net of refunds
  $ 525     $ 438  
Interest paid, net of capitalized interest (2011 — $3; 2010 — $3)
  $ 114     $ 135  
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

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REYNOLDS AMERICAN INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Dollars in Millions)
                 
    September 30,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
    (Unaudited)          
Assets
               
Current assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 2,010     $ 2,195  
Accounts receivable
    88       118  
Accounts receivable, related party
    74       48  
Notes receivable
    33       34  
Other receivables
    18       10  
Inventories
    914       1,055  
Deferred income taxes, net
    963       946  
Prepaid expenses and other
    305       195  
Assets held for sale
          201  
 
           
Total current assets
    4,405       4,802  
Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation (2011 — $1,617; 2010 — $1,600)
    1,052       1,002  
Trademarks and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization (2011 — $690; 2010 — $672)
    2,656       2,675  
Goodwill
    8,010       8,010  
Other assets and deferred charges
    280       589  
 
           
 
  $ 16,403     $ 17,078  
 
           
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 114     $ 179  
Tobacco settlement accruals
    2,341       2,589  
Due to related party
    4       4  
Deferred revenue, related party
    10       53  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    460       400  
Other current liabilities
    1,117       1,147  
 
           
Total current liabilities
    4,046       4,372  
Long-term debt (less current maturities)
    3,212       3,701  
Deferred income taxes, net
    702       518  
Long-term retirement benefits (less current portion)
    1,485       1,668  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    244       309  
Commitments and contingencies:
               
Shareholders’ equity:
               
Common stock (shares issued: 2011 — 582,911,836; 2010 — 583,043,872)
           
Paid-in capital
    8,559       8,535  
Accumulated deficit
    (458 )     (547 )
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (defined benefit pension and postretirement plans: 2011 — $(1,346); 2010 — $(1,446), net of tax)
    (1,387 )     (1,478 )
 
           
Total shareholders’ equity
    6,714       6,510  
 
           
 
  $ 16,403     $ 17,078  
 
           
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)
Note 1 — Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Overview
     The condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) include the accounts of Reynolds American Inc., referred to as RAI, and its wholly owned subsidiaries. RAI’s wholly owned operating subsidiaries include R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company; American Snuff Company, LLC, referred to as American Snuff Co.; Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, Inc., referred to as Santa Fe; and Niconovum AB.
     RAI was incorporated as a holding company in the state of North Carolina in 2004, and its common stock is listed on the NYSE under the symbol “RAI.” RAI was created to facilitate the business combination of the U.S. business of Brown & Williamson Holdings, Inc., referred to as B&W, with R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company on July 30, 2004, with such combination referred to as the B&W business combination.
     References to RJR Tobacco prior to July 30, 2004, relate to R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, a New Jersey corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings, Inc., referred to as RJR. References to RJR Tobacco on and subsequent to July 30, 2004, relate to the combined U.S. assets, liabilities and operations of B&W and R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, a North Carolina corporation.
     RAI’s reportable operating segments are RJR Tobacco and American Snuff. The RJR Tobacco segment consists of the primary operations of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. The American Snuff segment consists of the primary operations of American Snuff Co. and, prior to its sale, Lane, Limited, referred to as Lane. Santa Fe and Niconovum AB, among other RAI subsidiaries, are included in All Other. The segments were identified based on how RAI’s chief operating decision maker allocates resources and assesses performance. RAI’s wholly owned operating subsidiaries have entered into intercompany agreements for products or services with other RAI operating subsidiaries. As a result, certain activities of an operating subsidiary may be included in a different segment of RAI.
     As a result of the B&W business combination, Lane became a wholly owned subsidiary of RAI. On February 28, 2011, RAI completed the sale of all of the capital stock of Lane and certain other assets related to the Lane operations, to an affiliate of Scandinavian Tobacco Group A/S, referred to as STG, for net proceeds of $202 million in cash. The assets and liabilities of the disposal group were classified as held for sale as of December 31, 2010, and its results of operations were included through February 28, 2011, in income from continuing operations in the American Snuff segment.
     RAI’s operating subsidiaries primarily conduct their business in the United States.
Basis of Presentation
     The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, referred to as GAAP, for interim financial information and, in management’s opinion, contain all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring items, necessary for a fair presentation of the results for the periods presented. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. All material intercompany balances have been eliminated. RAI has no investments that are accounted for under the equity or cost methods. For interim reporting purposes, certain costs and expenses are charged to operations in proportion to the estimated total annual amount expected to be incurred primarily based on sales volumes. The results for the interim period ended September 30, 2011, are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2011.
     The condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related footnotes, which appear in RAI’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010. Certain reclassifications were made to conform prior years’ financial statements to the current presentation. All dollar amounts, other than per share amounts, are presented in millions, except for amounts set forth in note 10 and as otherwise noted. All share and per share amounts reflect the two-for-one split of RAI’s common stock on November 15, 2010.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     Cost of products sold includes the expenses for the Master Settlement Agreement, referred to as the MSA, and other settlement agreements with the states of Mississippi, Florida, Texas and Minnesota, which together with the MSA are collectively referred to as the State Settlement Agreements; the federal tobacco quota buyout; and the user fees charged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, referred to as the FDA, as follows:
                                 
    For The Three Months     For The Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
State Settlement Agreements expense
  $628     $650     $1,850     $1,887  
Federal tobacco quota buyout expense
  55       62       173       184    
FDA user fee expense
  28       15       88       45    
Pension and Postretirement
     Pension and postretirement benefits require balance sheet recognition of the net asset or liability for the overfunded or underfunded status of defined benefit pension and other postretirement benefit plans, on a plan-by-plan basis, and recognition of changes in the funded status in the year in which the changes occur. These changes are reported in accumulated other comprehensive loss, as a separate component of shareholders’ equity.
     Recognized gains or losses are annual changes in the amount of either the benefit obligation or the market-related value of plan assets resulting from experience different from that assumed or from changes in assumptions. The minimum amortization of unrecognized gains or losses was included either in pension expense or in the postretirement benefit cost. Prior service costs, which are changes in benefit obligations due to plan amendments, are amortized on a straight-line basis over the average remaining service period for active employees. The market-related value of plan assets recognizes changes in fair value in a systematic and rational manner over five years.
     The components of the pension benefits and the postretirement benefits are set forth below:
                                                                 
    For The Three Months     For The Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    Pension     Postretirement     Pension     Postretirement  
    Benefits     Benefits     Benefits     Benefits  
    2011     2010     2011     2010     2011     2010     2011     2010  
Service cost
  $ 7     $ 7     $ 1     $ 1     $ 20     $ 22     $ 2     $ 3  
Interest cost
    75       80       19       20       225       239       56       60  
Expected return on plan assets
    (93 )     (90 )     (5 )     (5 )     (280 )     (269 )     (14 )     (14 )
Amortization of prior service cost (credit)
    1       1       (7 )     (6 )     3       3       (21 )     (18 )
Amortization of net loss
    35       30       7       5       105       90       22       14  
Curtailment 
                      1                         1  
Settlements 
    3                         3                    
 
                                               
Total benefit cost
  $ 28     $ 28     $ 15     $ 16     $ 76     $ 85     $ 45     $ 46  
 
                                               
Employer Contributions
     RAI disclosed in its financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2010, that it expected to contribute $318 million to its pension plans in 2011. As of September 30, 2011, RAI expects to contribute up to $218 million to its pension plans in 2011, of which $91 million was contributed during the first nine months of 2011.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
     In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, referred to as FASB, amended certain accounting and disclosure requirements related to fair value measurements. For fair value measurements categorized as Level 1 and

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Level 2, requirements have been expanded to include disclosures of transfers between these levels. For fair value measurements categorized as Level 3, a reporting entity should disclose quantitative information of the unobservable inputs and assumptions, a description of the valuation processes and a qualitative discussion about the sensitivity of the fair value measurement to changes in unobservable inputs. The guidance is effective for RAI for interim and annual reporting periods beginning January 1, 2012, and is not expected to have a material impact on RAI’s results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
     In June 2011, the FASB issued amended guidance which requires comprehensive income to be reported in either a single statement or in two consecutive statements reporting net income and other comprehensive income. The amendment eliminates the option to report other comprehensive income and its components in the statement of changes in shareholders’ equity. The guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning January 1, 2012. The adoption of the amendment will not have an impact on RAI’s results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
     In September 2011, the FASB issued amended guidance that permits an entity to make a qualitative assessment of whether it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount before applying the current two-step goodwill impairment test. If an entity concludes that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, it would not be required to perform the two-step impairment test for that reporting unit. The guidance is effective for RAI for interim and annual reporting periods beginning January 1, 2012, and will not have a material impact on RAI’s results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
Note 2 — Fair Value
     RAI determines fair value of assets and liabilities using a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between market participant assumptions based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity, and the reporting entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions based on the best information available in the circumstances.
     Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, essentially an exit price.
     The levels of the fair value hierarchy are:
     Level 1: inputs are quoted prices, unadjusted, in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.
     Level 2: inputs are other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. A Level 2 input must be observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
     Level 3: inputs are unobservable and reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
     Financial assets and liabilities carried at fair value in the condensed consolidated balance sheet (unaudited) as of September 30, 2011, were as follows:
                                 
    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Total  
Cash and cash equivalents:
                               
Cash equivalents
  $1,574     $—     $—     $1,574  
Other assets and deferred charges:
                               
Auction rate securities
              60       60    
Mortgage-backed security
              13       13    
Marketable equity security
  14                   14    
Assets held in grantor trusts
  3                   3    

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     Financial assets and liabilities carried at fair value in the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2010, were as follows:
                                 
    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Total  
Cash and cash equivalents:
                               
Cash equivalents
  $2,136     $—     $—     $2,136  
Other assets and deferred charges:
                               
Auction rate securities
              61       61    
Mortgage-backed security
              14       14    
Marketable equity security
  24                   24    
Assets held in grantor trusts
  12                   12    
Interest rate swaps — fixed to floating rate
        227             227    
Other noncurrent liabilities:
                               
Interest rate swaps — floating to fixed rate
        (22 )           (22 )  
     There were no changes among the levels in the nine months ended September 30, 2011 and year ended December 31, 2010.
     RAI reviews these investments on a quarterly basis to determine if it is probable that RAI will realize some portion of the unrealized loss and to determine the classification of the impairment as temporary or other-than-temporary. For those securities in which RAI does not intend to sell and it is more likely than not that RAI will not be required to sell the securities prior to recovery, RAI recognizes the credit loss component of an other-than-temporary impairment of its debt securities in earnings and the noncredit component in other comprehensive loss.
     In determining if the difference between amortized cost and estimated fair value of the auction rate securities or the mortgage-backed security was deemed either temporary or other-than-temporary impairment, RAI evaluated each type of long-term investment using a set of criteria, including decline in value, duration of the decline, period until anticipated recovery, nature of investment, probability of recovery, financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer, RAI’s intent and ability to retain the investment, attributes of the decline in value, status with rating agencies, status of principal and interest payments and any other issues related to the underlying securities. To assess credit losses, RAI uses historical default rates, debt ratings, credit default swap spreads and assumed recovery rates. RAI has the intent and ability to hold these investments for a period of time sufficient to allow for the recovery in market value.
     The fair value of the interest rate swaps, classified as Level 2, utilized a market approach model using the notional amount of the interest rate swap multiplied by the observable inputs of time to maturity, interest rates and credit spreads.
     The fair value of the auction rate securities, composed of securities of certain financial insurance companies or linked to the longer-term credit risk of a diverse range of corporations, including, but not limited to, manufacturing, financial and insurance sectors, classified as Level 3, utilized an income approach model and was based upon the weighted average present value of future cash payments, given the probability of certain events occurring within the market. RAI considers the market for its auction rate securities to be inactive. The income approach model utilized observable inputs, including LIBOR-based interest rate curves, corporate credit spreads and corporate ratings/market valuations. Additionally, unobservable factors incorporated into the model included default probability assumptions, recovery potential and how these factors changed as ratings on the underlying collateral migrated from one level to another. Maturity dates for the auction rate securities begin in 2017.
     The fair value for the mortgage-backed security, classified as Level 3, utilized a market approach and was based upon the calculation of an overall weighted average valuation, derived from the actual, or modeled, market pricing of the specific collateral. The market approach utilized actual pricing inputs when observable and modeled pricing when unobservable. RAI has deemed the market for its mortgage-backed security to be inactive. The maturity of the mortgage-backed security has been extended to March 2012, with the annual option to extend an additional year.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Given the underlying collateral and RAI’s intent to continue to extend this security, it is classified as a noncurrent asset.
     RAI determined the change in the fair value of the investment in a marketable equity security using quoted market prices as of September 30, 2011.
     Financial assets classified as Level 3 investments were as follows:
                                                 
    September 30, 2011     December 31, 2010  
            Gross                     Gross        
            Unrealized     Estimated             Unrealized     Estimated  
    Cost     (Loss)(1)     Fair Value     Cost     (Loss)(1)     Fair Value  
Auction rate securities
  $ 99     $ (39 )   $ 60     $ 99     $ (38 )   $ 61  
Mortgage-backed security
    26       (13 )     13       27       (13 )     14  
 
                                   
 
  $ 125     $ (52 )   $ 73     $ 126     $ (51 )   $ 75  
 
                                   
 
(1)   Unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, are reported in accumulated other comprehensive loss in RAI’s condensed consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010.
     The changes in the Level 3 investments during the nine months ended September 30, 2011, were as follows:
                         
    Auction Rate Securities  
            Gross        
            Unrealized     Estimated  
    Cost     (Loss)     Fair Value  
Balance as of January 1, 2011
  $ 99     $ (38 )   $ 61  
Unrealized loss
          (1 )     (1 )
 
                 
Balance as of September 30, 2011
  $ 99     $ (39 )   $ 60  
 
                 
                         
    Mortgage-Backed Security  
            Gross        
            Unrealized     Estimated  
    Cost     (Loss)     Fair Value  
Balance as of January 1, 2011
  $ 27     $ (13 )   $ 14  
Redemptions
    (1 )           (1 )
 
                 
Balance as of September 30, 2011
  $ 26     $ (13 )   $ 13  
 
                 
Fair Value of Debt
     The estimated fair value of RAI’s and RJR’s outstanding long-term notes, in the aggregate, was $4.0 billion and $4.3 billion with an effective average annual interest rate of approximately 5.9% and 5.4%, as of September 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively. The fair values are based on available market quotes, credit spreads and discounted cash flows, as appropriate.
Interest Rate Management
     From time to time, RAI and RJR use interest rate swaps to manage interest rate risk on a portion of their respective debt obligations. In 2009, RAI and RJR entered into offsetting floating to fixed interest rate swap agreements in the notional amount of $1.5 billion with maturity dates ranging from June 1, 2012 to June 15, 2017, with the same financial institution that holds a notional amount of $1.5 billion of fixed to floating interest rate swaps and have a legal right of offset. These interest rate swaps effectively reduced net interest costs over the remaining life of the notes. At the same time, RAI and RJR terminated an interest rate swap agreement in the notional amount of $100 million with a maturity date of June 1, 2012. As a result of these actions, RAI and RJR have economically decreased the fixed rate on $1.6 billion of debt to a fixed rate of interest of approximately 4.0%.
     During September 2011, RAI and RJR terminated interest rates swap agreements with a notional amount of $1.5 billion and maturity dates ranging from June 1, 2012 to June 15, 2017. RAI and RJR received a total of $186 million cash in exchange for foregoing the future cash inflows associated with these swaps. These actions did not

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change the effective fixed rate of interest associated with the underlying debt of approximately 4.0%. As of September 30, 2011, RAI and RJR had no outstanding interest rate swaps.
     Interest rate swaps impacted the condensed consolidated statements of income (unaudited) as follows:
                                 
    For the Three Months     For the Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
Interest and debt expense
  $ (12 )   $ (12 )   $ (37 )   $ (36 )
Other expense (income), net
    3       (9 )     4       (4 )
Note 3 — Intangible Assets
     An insignificant change to the carrying amount of goodwill during the nine months ended September 30, 2011, was due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations.
     The carrying amounts and changes therein of trademarks and other intangible assets by segment were as follows:
                                                         
    RJR Tobacco     American Snuff     All Other     Consolidated  
    Trademarks     Other     Trademarks     Trademarks     Other     Trademarks     Other  
Finite-lived:
                                                       
Balance as of December 31, 2010
  $ 11     $ 54     $ 18     $     $     $ 29     $ 54  
Amortization
    (5 )     (11 )     (2 )                 (7 )     (11 )
 
                                         
Balance as of September 30, 2011
  $ 6     $ 43     $ 16     $     $     $ 22     $ 43  
 
                                         
 
                                                       
Indefinite-lived:
                                                       
Balance as of December 31, 2010
  $ 1,152     $ 99     $ 1,136     $ 155     $ 50     $ 2,443     $ 149  
Foreign currency translation
                            (1 )           (1 )
 
                                         
Balance as of September 30, 2011
  $ 1,152     $ 99     $ 1,136     $ 155     $ 49     $ 2,443     $ 148  
 
                                         
     Details of intangible assets as of September 30, 2011, were as follows:
                         
            Accumulated        
    Gross     Amortization     Net  
Finite-lived:
                       
Contract manufacturing agreements
  $ 151     $ 108     $ 43  
Trademarks
    101       79       22  
Indefinite-lived
    3,094       503       2,591  
 
                 
 
  $ 3,346     $ 690     $ 2,656  
 
                 

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     The estimated remaining amortization associated with finite-lived intangible assets is expected to be expensed as follows:
         
Year   Amount  
Remainder of 2011
  $ 5  
2012
    22  
2013
    17  
2014
    10  
2015
    1  
Thereafter
    10  
 
     
 
  $ 65  
 
     
Note 4 — Asset Impairment and Exit Charges
     On May 28, 2010, RAI announced that its operating companies were taking steps to optimize cigarette-manufacturing efficiencies, while complying with new regulatory requirements. One of RJR Tobacco’s cigarette factories in Winston-Salem, North Carolina is expected to close by the end of 2011, and a factory in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico has closed. Production from those facilities transferring to RJR Tobacco’s facility in Tobaccoville, North Carolina is expected to be completed in 2011. As a result of these actions, approximately 60 manufacturing positions in Puerto Rico were eliminated, and affected employees received severance benefits. During the nine months ended September 30, 2010, RJR Tobacco recorded an asset impairment of $24 million, and $14 million was recorded in the All Other segment, primarily for asset impairment, and to a lesser extent, severance that was paid during 2010.
Note 5 — Discontinued Operations
     In 1999, RJR and RJR Tobacco sold the international tobacco business to Japan Tobacco Inc., referred to as JTI. Northern Brands International, Inc., referred to as Northern Brands, was part of the international business of R.J. Reynolds International B.V., a former Netherlands subsidiary of RJR Tobacco, which was managed by RJR-Macdonald, Inc., referred to as RJR-MI. Northern Brands ceased being an operating company in 1997 and has been an inactive subsidiary of RJR since that time.
     Effective April 13, 2010, RJR Tobacco entered into a comprehensive agreement with the Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments, referred to as the Comprehensive Agreement, resolving a variety of civil claims related to cigarette smuggling in Canada during the period from 1985 through 1999. The Comprehensive Agreement covers all civil claims related to the movement of contraband tobacco products in Canada during the period 1985 through 1999 that the governments have asserted or could assert against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates. On April 13, 2010, RJR Tobacco paid the governments a total of CAD $325 million to bring this complex, lengthy and costly litigation to an end.
     Separately, on April 13, 2010, Northern Brands entered into a plea agreement with the Ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario. Under the terms of this agreement, Northern Brands pled guilty to a one count violation of the Canadian Criminal Code for conspiring to aid other persons to sell and be in possession of tobacco products that were not packaged and stamped in conformity with the Canadian Excise Act during the period February 18, 1993 through December 31, 1996. The Judge of the Ontario Court of Justice accepted the plea by Northern Brands and required it to pay a fine of CAD $75 million, which was paid on April 13, 2010. By this plea, the criminal charges that were originally commenced against Northern Brands and certain of its affiliates in 2003 and any other charges that could be commenced against Northern Brands and its affiliates by the Canadian governments relating to contraband tobacco activities have now come to an end.
     In addition to the $91 million liability previously accrued by RJR, an adjustment to reflect the impact of the separate RJR Tobacco settlement to resolve civil claims and the separate Northern Brands plea agreement, in the aggregate amount of $307 million, or $216 million after tax, was recorded during the first quarter of 2010.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     This accrual adjustment was included in losses from discontinued operations in the condensed consolidated statement of income (unaudited) for the nine months ended September 30, 2010. Of the aggregate accrual adjustments of $307 million, $303 million, or $213 million after tax, is classified as a loss on discontinued operations, and $4 million, or $3 million after tax, is classified as a loss on the sale of discontinued operations. The payments by RJR Tobacco of $320 million, offset by a realized tax benefit of $68 million as of September 30, 2010, and by Northern Brands of $74 million have been included as net cash flows related to discontinued operations, net of tax benefit, in the condensed consolidated statement of cash flows (unaudited) for the nine months ended September 30, 2010. The remaining tax benefits were realized during the fourth quarter of 2010.
Note 6 — Income Per Share
     The components of the calculation of income per share were as follows:
                                 
    For the Three Months     For the Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
Income from continuing operations
  $ 367     $ 381     $ 1,024     $ 1,020  
Losses from discontinued operations
                      (216 )
 
                       
Net income
  $ 367     $ 381     $ 1,024     $ 804  
 
                       
Basic weighted average shares, in thousands
    582,912       583,052       582,939       582,977  
Effect of dilutive potential shares:
                               
Stock units
    3,170       1,959       2,929       1,661  
 
                       
Diluted weighted average shares, in thousands
    586,082       585,011       585,868       584,638  
 
                       
     The basic income per share calculations include any restricted shares awarded under the RAI Long-Term Incentive Plan, referred to as the LTIP, during the vesting period, as the shares were determined to be participating securities because they had non-forfeitable dividend rights equivalent to common shares.
Note 7 — Inventories
     The major components of inventories were as follows:
                 
    September 30, 2011     December 31, 2010  
Leaf tobacco
  $ 813     $ 997  
Other raw materials
    41       44  
Work in process
    68       64  
Finished products
    157       122  
Other
    25       25  
 
           
Total
    1,104       1,252  
Less LIFO allowance
    190       197  
 
           
 
  $ 914     $ 1,055  
 
           
     RJR Tobacco performs its annual LIFO inventory valuation at December 31. Interim periods represent an estimate of the expected annual valuation.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Note 8 — Income Taxes
     The provision for income taxes from continuing operations was as follows:
                                 
    For the Three Months     For the Nine Months  
    Ended September 30,     Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
Provision for income taxes from continuing operations
  $214     $237     $571     $661  
Effective tax rate
  36.9 %     38.3 %     35.8 %     39.3 %  
     The effective tax rate for the first nine months of 2011 was favorably impacted by a $22 million decrease in tax attributable to the reversal of tax reserves and interest on a state statute expiration. The effective tax rate for the first nine months of 2010 was unfavorably impacted by a $27 million increase in tax attributable to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. The effective tax rate includes the impact of federal and state taxes and certain nondeductible items, offset by the domestic production activities deduction of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004.
Note 9 — Borrowing Arrangements
     On July 29, 2011, RAI entered into a credit agreement, referred to as the Credit Agreement, with a syndicate of lenders, providing for a four-year $750 million senior unsecured revolving credit facility, which may be increased to $1 billion at the discretion of the lenders upon the request of RAI. This agreement replaces RAI’s Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated as of June 28, 2007, as amended.
     The Credit Agreement contains restrictive covenants that (a) limit the ability of RAI and its subsidiaries to (i) pay dividends and repurchase stock, (ii) engage in transactions with affiliates, (iii) create liens, and (iv) engage in sale-leaseback transactions involving a Principal Property, as defined in the Credit Agreement, and (b) limit the ability of RAI and its Material Subsidiaries, as such term is defined in the Credit Agreement, to sell or dispose of all or substantially all of their assets and engage in specified mergers or consolidations. The Credit Agreement also contains a restrictive covenant that limits the amount of debt that may be incurred by non-guarantor subsidiaries, together with certain financial covenants. The restrictive covenants in the Credit Agreement are subject to a number of qualifications and exceptions. The financial covenant levels in the Credit Agreement are 3.00 to 1.00 for the consolidated leverage ratio and 4.00 to 1.00 for the consolidated interest coverage ratio. In addition, the maturity date of the Credit Agreement is July 29, 2015, which date may be extended, with the agreement of the requisite lenders, in two separate one-year increments. The Credit Agreement contains customary events of default, including upon a change in control, as defined therein, that could result in the acceleration of all amounts and cancellation of all commitments outstanding under the Credit Agreement.
     RAI is able to use the revolving credit facility under the Credit Agreement for borrowings and issuances of letters of credit at its option, subject to a $200 million sublimit on the aggregate amount of letters of credit. Issuances of letters of credit reduce availability under such revolving credit facility. As of September 30, 2011, there were no borrowings, and $7 million of letters of credit outstanding, under the Credit Agreement.
     Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, RAI is required to pay a facility fee of between 0.20% and 0.40% per annum, based on the facility’s credit ratings, on the lender commitments in respect of the revolving credit facility thereunder.
     Borrowings under the Credit Agreement bear interest, at the option of RAI, at a rate equal to an applicable margin, based upon the credit ratings assigned to the Credit Agreement, plus:
    the alternate base rate, which is the higher of (1) the federal funds effective rate from time to time plus 0.5%, (2) the prime rate and (3) the reserve adjusted eurodollar rate for a one month interest period plus 1%; or

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
    the eurodollar rate, which is the reserve adjusted rate at which eurodollar deposits for one, two, three or six months are offered in the interbank eurodollar market.
     Overdue principal and, to the extent permitted by law, overdue interest, outstanding under the revolving credit facility under the Credit Agreement bear interest at a rate equal to the rate then in effect with respect to such borrowings, plus 2.0% per annum.
     The obligations of RAI under the Credit Agreement are unsecured. Certain of RAI’s subsidiaries, including its Material Subsidiaries, have guaranteed, on an unsecured basis, RAI’s obligations under the Credit Agreement.
Note 10 — Commitments and Contingencies
Tobacco Litigation — General
Introduction
     Various legal proceedings or claims, including litigation claiming that cancer and other diseases, as well as addiction, have resulted from the use of, or exposure to, RAI’s operating subsidiaries’ products, are pending or may be instituted against RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co. or their affiliates, including RAI and RJR, or indemnitees, including B&W. These pending legal proceedings include claims relating to cigarette products manufactured by RJR Tobacco or certain of its affiliates and indemnitees, as well as claims relating to smokeless tobacco products manufactured by American Snuff Co. A discussion of the legal proceedings relating to cigarette products is set forth below under the heading “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry.” All of the references under that heading to tobacco-related litigation, smoking and health litigation and other similar references are references to legal proceedings relating to cigarette products and are not references to legal proceedings involving smokeless tobacco products, and case numbers under that heading include only cases involving cigarette products. The legal proceedings relating to the smokeless tobacco products manufactured by American Snuff Co. are discussed separately under the heading “— Smokeless Tobacco Litigation” below.
     In connection with the B&W business combination, RJR Tobacco has agreed to indemnify B&W and its affiliates, including its indirect parent, British American Tobacco p.l.c., referred to as BAT, against certain liabilities, costs and expenses incurred by B&W or its affiliates arising out of the U.S. cigarette and tobacco business of B&W. As a result of this indemnity, RJR Tobacco has assumed the defense of pending B&W-specific tobacco-related litigation, has paid the judgments and costs related to certain pre-business combination tobacco-related litigation of B&W, and has posted bonds on behalf of B&W, where necessary, in connection with cases decided since the B&W business combination. In addition, pursuant to this indemnity, RJR Tobacco expensed less than $1 million during the first nine months of 2011 and 2010 for funds to be reimbursed to BAT for costs and expenses incurred arising out of certain tobacco-related litigation.
Certain Terms and Phrases
     Certain terms and phrases used in this disclosure may require some explanation. The term “judgment” or “final judgment” refers to the final decision of the court resolving the dispute and determining the rights and obligations of the parties. At the trial court level, for example, a final judgment generally is entered by the court after a jury verdict and after post-verdict motions have been decided. In most cases, the losing party can appeal a verdict only after a final judgment has been entered by the trial court.
     The term “damages” refers to the amount of money sought by a plaintiff in a complaint, or awarded to a party by a jury or, in some cases, by a judge. “Compensatory damages” are awarded to compensate the prevailing party for actual losses suffered, if liability is proved. In cases in which there is a finding that a defendant has acted willfully, maliciously or fraudulently, generally based on a higher burden of proof than is required for a finding of liability for compensatory damages, a plaintiff also may be awarded “punitive damages.” Although damages may be awarded at the trial court stage, a losing party generally may be protected from paying any damages until all appellate avenues have been exhausted by posting a supersedeas bond. The amount of such a bond is governed by the law of the relevant jurisdiction and generally is set at the amount of damages plus some measure of statutory interest, modified at the discretion of the appropriate court or subject to limits set by court or statute.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     The term “settlement” refers to certain types of cases in which cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, have agreed to resolve disputes with certain plaintiffs without resolving the case through trial. The principal terms of certain settlements entered into by RJR Tobacco and B&W are explained below under “— Accounting for Tobacco-Related Litigation Contingencies.”
Theories of Recovery
     The plaintiffs seek recovery on a variety of legal theories, including negligence, strict liability in tort, design defect, special duty, voluntary undertaking, breach of warranty, failure to warn, fraud, misrepresentation, unfair trade practices, conspiracy, unjust enrichment, medical monitoring, public nuisance and violations of state and federal antitrust laws. In certain of these cases, the plaintiffs claim that cigarette smoking exacerbated injuries caused by exposure to asbestos.
     The plaintiffs seek various forms of relief, including compensatory and punitive damages, treble or multiple damages and statutory damages and penalties, creation of medical monitoring and smoking cessation funds, disgorgement of profits, and injunctive and other equitable relief. Although alleged damages often are not determinable from a complaint, and the law governing the pleading and calculation of damages varies from state to state and jurisdiction to jurisdiction, compensatory and punitive damages have been specifically pleaded in a number of cases, sometimes in amounts ranging into the hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars.
Defenses
     The defenses raised by RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co. and their affiliates and indemnitees include, where applicable and otherwise appropriate, preemption by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act of some or all claims arising after 1969, or by the Comprehensive Smokeless Tobacco Health Education Act for claims arising after 1986, the lack of any defect in the product, assumption of the risk, contributory or comparative fault, lack of proximate cause, remoteness, lack of standing and statutes of limitations or repose. RAI and RJR have asserted additional defenses, including jurisdictional defenses, in many of the cases in which they are named.
Accounting for Tobacco-Related Litigation Contingencies
     In accordance with GAAP, RAI and its subsidiaries, including RJR Tobacco and American Snuff Co., as applicable, record any loss concerning litigation at such time as an unfavorable outcome becomes probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated on an individual case-by-case basis. For the reasons set forth below, RAI’s management continues to conclude that the loss of any particular pending smoking and health tobacco litigation claim against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees, or the loss of any particular claim concerning the use of smokeless tobacco against American Snuff Co., when viewed on an individual basis, is not probable, except for four Engle Progeny cases described below.
     RJR Tobacco and its affiliates believe that they have valid defenses to the smoking and health tobacco litigation claims against them, as well as valid bases for appeal of adverse verdicts against them. RAI, RJR Tobacco and their affiliates and indemnitees have, through their counsel, filed pleadings and memoranda in pending smoking and health tobacco litigation that set forth and discuss a number of grounds and defenses that they and their counsel believe have a valid basis in law and fact. With the exception of Engle Progeny cases, described below, RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees continue to win the majority of smoking and health tobacco litigation claims that reach trial, and a very high percentage of the tobacco-related litigation claims brought against them continue to be dismissed at or before trial. Based on their experience in the smoking and health tobacco litigation against them and the strength of the defenses available to them in such litigation, RJR Tobacco and its affiliates believe that their successful defense of smoking and health tobacco litigation in the past will continue in the future.
     An accrual of $63 million has been recorded in RAI’s condensed consolidated balance sheet (unaudited) as of September 30, 2011 for the four Engle Progeny cases, described below, that have proceeded through the appellate process in the state of Florida. RJR Tobacco will seek further review of these four cases by the U.S. Supreme Court. This amount includes $53 million for compensatory and punitive damages and $10 million for attorneys’ fees and statutory interest through September 30, 2011. No other liabilities for pending smoking and health litigation have been recorded as of September 30, 2011.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     Generally, RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees have not settled, and currently RJR Tobacco and its affiliates do not intend to settle, any smoking and health tobacco litigation claims. It is the policy of RJR Tobacco and its affiliates to vigorously defend all tobacco-related litigation claims.
     The only material settlements of smoking and health tobacco litigation claims reached by RJR Tobacco and B&W involved:
    the State Settlement Agreements and the funding by various tobacco companies of a $5.2 billion trust fund contemplated by the MSA to benefit tobacco growers; and
 
    the original Broin flight attendant case discussed below under “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — Broin II Cases.”
     The circumstances surrounding the State Settlement Agreements and the funding of a trust fund to benefit the tobacco growers are readily distinguishable from the current categories of smoking and health cases involving RJR Tobacco or its affiliates and indemnitees. The claims underlying the State Settlement Agreements were brought on behalf of the states to recover funds paid for health care and medical and other assistance to state citizens suffering from diseases and conditions allegedly related to tobacco use. The State Settlement Agreements settled all the health-care cost recovery actions brought by, or on behalf of, the settling jurisdictions and contain releases of various additional present and future claims. In accordance with the MSA, various tobacco companies agreed to fund a $5.2 billion trust fund to be used to address the possible adverse economic impact of the MSA on tobacco growers. A discussion of the State Settlement Agreements, and a table depicting the related payment schedule, is set forth below under “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases — State Settlement Agreements.”
     The states were a unique set of plaintiffs and are not involved in any of the smoking and health cases remaining against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates and indemnitees. Although RJR Tobacco and certain of its affiliates and indemnitees continue to be defendants in health-care cost recovery cases similar in theory to the state cases but involving other plaintiffs, such as Native American tribes and foreign governments, the vast majority of such cases have been dismissed on legal grounds. RJR Tobacco and its affiliates, including RAI, believe that the same legal principles that have resulted in dismissal of health-care cost recovery cases either at the trial court level or on appeal should compel dismissal of the similar pending cases.
     As with claims that were resolved by the State Settlement Agreements, the other cases settled by RJR Tobacco can be distinguished from existing cases pending against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees. The original Broin case, discussed below under “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — Broin II Cases,” was settled in the middle of trial during negotiations concerning a possible nation-wide settlement of claims similar to those underlying the State Settlement Agreements.
     RJR Tobacco’s Comprehensive Agreement with the Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments resolved all civil claims related to the movement of contraband tobacco products in Canada during the period 1985 through 1999 that the Canadian governments could assert against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates. These claims were separate from any smoking and health tobacco litigation. A discussion of the Canadian matters is set forth below under “— Other Litigation and Developments — Claims for Indemnification,” and additional details regarding the settlement are set forth in note 5.
     Likewise, RJR Tobacco and B&W separately settled the antitrust case DeLoach v. Philip Morris Cos., Inc., which was brought by a unique class of plaintiffs: a class of all tobacco growers and tobacco allotment holders. The plaintiffs asserted that the defendants conspired to fix the price of tobacco leaf and to destroy the federal government’s tobacco quota and price support program. Despite legal defenses they believed to be valid, RJR Tobacco and B&W separately settled this case to avoid a long and contentious trial with the tobacco growers. The DeLoach case and the antitrust case currently pending against RJR Tobacco and B&W involve different types of plaintiffs and different theories of recovery under the antitrust laws than the smoking and health cases pending against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees.
     Finally, as discussed under “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — State Settlement Agreements — Enforcement and Validity; Adjustments,” RJR Tobacco and B&W each has settled certain cases brought by states

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
concerning the enforcement of State Settlement Agreements. Despite legal defenses believed to be valid, these cases were settled to avoid further contentious litigation with the states involved. These enforcement actions involve alleged breaches of State Settlement Agreements based on specific actions taken by particular defendants. Accordingly, any future enforcement actions involving State Settlement Agreements will be reviewed by RJR Tobacco on the merits and should not be affected by the settlement of prior enforcement cases.
     American Snuff Co. also believes that it has valid defenses to the smokeless tobacco litigation against it. American Snuff Co. asserted and will continue to assert some or all of these defenses in each case at the time and in the manner deemed appropriate by American Snuff Co. and its counsel. No verdict or judgment has been returned or entered against American Snuff Co. on any claim for personal injuries allegedly resulting from the use of smokeless tobacco. American Snuff Co. intends to defend vigorously all smokeless tobacco litigation claims asserted against it. No liability for pending smokeless tobacco litigation was recorded in RAI’s condensed consolidated balance sheet (unaudited) as of September 30, 2011.
Cautionary Statement
     Even though RAI’s management continues to conclude that the loss of any particular pending smoking and health tobacco litigation claim (except for the four Engle Progeny cases described below) against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees, or the loss of any particular case concerning the use of smokeless tobacco against American Snuff Co., when viewed on an individual case-by-case basis, is not probable, the possibility of material losses related to such litigation is more than remote. Litigation is subject to many uncertainties, and generally, it is not possible to predict the outcome of any particular litigation pending against RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co. or their affiliates or indemnitees, or to reasonably estimate the amount or range of any possible loss.
     Although RJR Tobacco believes that it has valid bases for appeals of adverse verdicts in its pending cases, and RJR Tobacco and RAI believe they have valid defenses to all actions, and intend to defend all actions vigorously, it is possible that there could be further adverse developments in pending cases, and that additional cases could be decided unfavorably against RAI, RJR Tobacco or their affiliates or indemnitees. Determinations of liability or adverse rulings in such cases or in similar cases involving other cigarette manufacturers as defendants, even if such judgments are not final, could have a material adverse effect on the litigation against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees and could encourage the commencement of additional tobacco-related litigation. In addition, a number of political, legislative, regulatory and other developments relating to the tobacco industry and cigarette smoking have received wide media attention. These developments may negatively affect the outcomes of tobacco-related legal actions and encourage the commencement of additional similar litigation.
     Although it is impossible to predict the outcome of such events on pending litigation and the rate new lawsuits are filed against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees, a significant increase in litigation or in adverse outcomes for tobacco defendants, or difficulties in obtaining the bonding required to stay execution of judgments on appeal, could have a material adverse effect on any or all of these entities. Moreover, notwithstanding the quality of defenses available to RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees in litigation matters, it is possible that RAI’s results of operations, cash flows or financial position could be materially adversely affected by the ultimate outcome of certain pending litigation matters against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees.
     Similarly, smokeless tobacco litigation is subject to many uncertainties. Notwithstanding the quality of defenses available to American Snuff Co., it is possible that RAI’s results of operations, cash flows or financial position could be materially adversely affected by the ultimate outcome of certain pending litigation matters against American Snuff Co.
Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry
Overview
     Introduction. In connection with the B&W business combination, RJR Tobacco agreed to indemnify B&W and its affiliates against, among other things, certain litigation liabilities, costs and expenses incurred by B&W or its affiliates arising out of the U.S. cigarette and tobacco business of B&W. Accordingly, the cases discussed below include cases brought solely against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates, including RAI and RJR; cases brought against

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both RJR Tobacco, its affiliates and B&W; and cases brought solely against B&W and assumed by RJR Tobacco in the B&W business combination.
     During the third quarter of 2011, 19 tobacco-related cases, including 12 Engle Progeny cases, were served against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees. On September 30, 2011, there were 171 cases pending against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees: 160 in the United States; 10 in Canada and one in Israel, as compared with 194 total cases on September 30, 2010. The U.S. case number does not include the 588 individual smoker cases pending in West Virginia state court as a consolidated action, 6,593 Engle Progeny cases (as hereinafter defined), involving approximately 7,899 individual plaintiffs, and 2,586 Broin II cases (as hereinafter defined), pending in the United States against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees. Of the U.S. cases pending on September 30, 2011, 25 are pending in federal court, 135 in state court, primarily in the following states: Florida (30 cases); Missouri (20 cases); New York (17 cases); Louisiana (13 cases); California (9 cases); and Illinois (9 cases).
     The following table lists the categories of the U.S. tobacco-related cases pending against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees as of September 30, 2011, compared with the number of cases pending against RJR Tobacco, its affiliates or indemnitees as of June 30, 2011, as reported in RAI’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2011, filed with the SEC on August 8, 2011, and a cross-reference to the discussion of each case type.
                         
            Change in        
            Number of        
    RJR Tobacco’s     Cases Since        
    Case Numbers as     June 30, 2011     Page  
Case Type   of September 30, 2011     Increase/(Decrease)     Reference  
Individual Smoking and Health
  93       -46       28    
West Virginia IPIC (Number of Plaintiffs)*
  1(588)     (-12 )     30    
Engle Progeny (Number of Plaintiffs)**
  6,593 (7,899 )     -38 (-64 )     30    
Broin II
  2,586       -2       38    
Class-Action
  15       No Change       39    
Health-Care Cost Recovery
  3       No Change       44    
State Settlement Agreements-Enforcement and Validity; Adjustments
  33       No Change       50    
Antitrust
  1       No Change       54    
Other Litigation and Developments
  15       -2       54    
 
*   Includes as one case the 588 cases pending as a consolidated action In Re: Tobacco Litigation Individual Personal Injury Cases, sometimes referred to as West Virginia IPIC cases, described below. The West Virginia IPIC cases have been separated from the Individual Smoking and Health cases for reporting purposes.
 
**   The Engle Progeny cases have been separated from the Individual Smoking and Health cases for reporting purposes. The number of cases may decrease as the result of many of the multiple plaintiff federal court cases either being dismissed or consolidated.
     The following cases against RJR Tobacco and B&W have attracted significant attention: the Florida state court class-action case, Engle v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and the related Engle Progeny cases, the Louisiana state court class-action case, Scott v. American Tobacco Co., and the case brought by the U.S. Department of Justice under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, referred to as RICO.
     In 2000, a jury in Engle rendered a punitive damages verdict in favor of the “Florida class” of approximately $145 billion against all defendants. In July 2006, the Florida Supreme Court, among other things, affirmed an appellate court’s reversal of the punitive damages award, decertified the class going forward, preserved several class-wide findings from the trial, including that nicotine is addictive and cigarettes are defectively designed, and authorized class members to avail themselves of these findings in individual lawsuits under certain conditions. After subsequent motions were resolved, the Florida Supreme Court issued its mandate on January 11, 2007, thus beginning a one-year period in which former class members were permitted to file individual lawsuits. In October 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the defendants’ petition for writ of certiorari.

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     Individual Engle Progeny cases are pending in both federal and state court in Florida. As of September 30, 2011, 3,246 cases were pending in federal court, and 3,347 cases were pending in state court. These cases include approximately 7,899 plaintiffs. The number of cases will likely change due to individual plaintiffs being severed from multi-plaintiff cases and multi-plaintiff federal cases being dismissed or consolidated. In addition, as of September 30, 2011, RJR Tobacco was aware of 33 additional cases that had been filed but not served (with 306 plaintiffs). Fifty-three trials have occurred in Florida state court since 2009, and numerous state court trials are scheduled for the remainder of 2011 and 2012.
     As Engle Progeny litigation has progressed, the federal and state courts have adopted different rules to govern those cases. For example, in Bernice Brown v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, referred to as the Eleventh Circuit, held that the preserved Engle findings establish only those issues “actually adjudicated” in the Engle class trial. In other words, based on the decision in Bernice Brown, the Engle findings would not prevent RJR Tobacco and other defendants from raising issues and defenses that were not, or may not have been, resolved against them in Engle. The court further held that an Engle Progeny plaintiff bears the burden of showing, to a “reasonable degree of certainty,” that any issue the plaintiff seeks to treat as established in his favor was, in fact, actually raised and resolved in Engle. The court held that these standards were required by Florida preclusion law, and it reserved judgment on the question of whether the same standards were also required by the Due Process Clause of the U. S. Constitution. Prior to the Eleventh Circuit decision in Bernice Brown, three federal district court judges (including the judge in Bernice Brown) concluded that any broader use of the preserved Engle findings would violate both Florida preclusion law and federal due process.
     The state courts in Florida, however, have taken two entirely different approaches. In Martin v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the First District Court of Appeal, referred to as the First DCA, held that the Engle findings establish not only facts that were “actually adjudicated” in favor of the class in Engle, but also all facts that could have been decided in favor of the class. The court in Martin thus held that, “no matter the wording of the findings” in Engle, individual Engle Progeny plaintiffs need not “demonstrate the relevance of the findings to their lawsuits” in order to prevent litigation on otherwise contested issues of misconduct. The court in Martin expressly disagreed with the Eleventh Circuit decision in Bernice Brown on this point.
     In Jimmie Lee Brown v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the Fourth District Court of Appeal, referred to as the Fourth DCA, expressly disagreed with both Bernice Brown and Martin on the proper use of the Engle findings. Like Martin but unlike Bernice Brown, the court in Jimmie Lee Brown held that the Engle findings establish certain issues of misconduct in every Engle progeny case. Unlike Martin, however, the court in Jimmie Lee Brown held that class membership was not sufficient to establish claims for strict liability and negligence. The court held that, in addition to proving that addiction caused an injury to the smoker, the plaintiff also was required to prove that a product defect or negligence caused that injury. RJR Tobacco will seek further review of Jimmie Lee Brown in the Florida Supreme Court.
     The Florida Supreme Court, the First DCA, and the Fourth DCA thus far have failed to address the due process argument. The First DCA in Martin did not mention due process, despite it being one of RJR Tobacco’s central contentions on appeal. Moreover, in Campbell, Gray and Hall, three subsequent individual Engle Progeny appeals, the First DCA refused to issue any opinion; instead, it affirmed the plaintiffs’ verdicts by per curiam orders citing Martin with no explanation. The First DCA has twice refused to certify the question of the proper use of the Engle findings as one of exceptional importance warranting review by the Florida Supreme Court, even though that question affects every Engle Progeny case and notwithstanding the explicit disagreement between the state and federal courts on this issue. Moreover, on July 19, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court refused to exercise its discretionary jurisdiction to review Martin and issued summary denial of petitions in Campbell, Gray and Hall, which are discussed specifically below in “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases.”
     The Fourth DCA in Jimmie Lee Brown recognized RJR Tobacco’s due process argument as an important issue, but held that until the Florida Supreme Court addresses the issue, it is bound to follow the Florida Supreme Court’s opinion in Engle. To date, no other Florida District Court of Appeal has addressed the issues on which the Bernice Brown, Martin and Jimmie Lee Brown courts were divided, but RJR Tobacco has pending appeals presenting these issues in the Second, Third and Fifth Florida District Courts of Appeal. RJR Tobacco intends to seek review of its due process claims in the U.S. Supreme Court, sometimes referred to as the USSC, in Martin, as well as in Campbell, Gray and Hall.

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     In the third quarter of 2011, based on its evaluation of the Martin, Campbell, Gray and Hall cases, RJR Tobacco reflected an accrual for loss of $63 million on these cases ($53 million for compensatory and punitive damages and $10 million for attorneys’ fees and statutory interest through September 30, 2011). The following chart reflects the details related to these verdicts:
                                 
            Compensatory              
    RJR Tobacco     Damages (as              
Plaintiff Case Name   Allocation of Fault     adjusted)*     Punitive Damages     Appeal Status  
Martin
    66 %   $ 3,300,000     $ 25,000,000     USSC petition to be filed
Campbell
    39 %     3,040,000           USSC petition to be filed
Gray
    60 %     4,200,000       2,000,000     USSC petition to be filed
Hall
    65 %     3,250,000       12,500,000     USSC petition to be filed
 
                           
Totals
          $ 13,790,000     $ 39,500,000          
     The following chart reflects the verdicts in the individual Engle Progeny cases that have been tried and remain pending as of September 30, 2011, in which a verdict has been returned in favor of the plaintiffs and against RJR Tobacco or B&W, or both, for which RJR Tobacco has reflected no liability as of September 30, 2011. It does not include the mistrials or verdicts returned in favor of RJR Tobacco or B&W, or both.
                                 
            Compensatory              
    RJR Tobacco     Damages (as              
Plaintiff Case Name   Allocation of Fault     adjusted)*     Punitive Damages     Appeal Status  
Sherman
    50 %   $ 775,000     $     Pending - Fourth DCA
Brown
    50 %     600,000           Fourth DCA affirmed; Motion for Certification Pending
Douglas
    5 %     250,000           Pending - Second DCA
Cohen
    33.3 %     3,300,000       10,000,000     Pending - Fourth DCA
Clay
    60 %     2,100,000       17,000,000     Pending - First DCA
Townsend
    51 %     5,500,000       40,800,000     Pending - First DCA
Putney
    30 %     4,500,000       2,500,000     Pending - Fourth DCA
Grossman
    25 %     484,000           Pending - Fourth DCA
Buonomo
    77.5 %     4,060,000       15,700,000     Pending - Fourth DCA
Alexander
    51 %     1,275,000       2,500,000     Pending - First DCA
Piendle
    27.5 %     1,100,000       180,000     Pending - Fourth DCA
Koballa
    30 %     300,000           Pending - Fifth DCA***
Webb
    90 %     7,200,000       72,000,000     Pending - First DCA
Kirkland
    10 %     10,000       250,000     Pending - Second DCA
Huish
    25 %     188,000       1,500,000     Pending - First DCA
Mack
    51 %     510,000           Pending - First DCA
Andy Allen
    45 %     2,700,000       8,100,000     Post-trial motions pending**
Jewett
    20 %     219,000           Pending - First DCA
Reese
    30 %     1,100,000           Pending - Third DCA
Soffer
    40 %     2,000,000           Pending - First DCA
Ciccone
    30 %     1,000,000       50,000     Post-trial motions denied**
Bowman
    30 %     450,000           Post-trial motion denied**
 
                           
Totals
          $ 39,621,000     $ 170,580,000          
 
                           
 
*   Compensatory damages are adjusted to reflect the reduction required by the allocation of fault. Punitive damages are not adjusted and reflect the amount of the final judgment(s) signed by the trial court judge(s). The amounts listed above do not include attorneys’ fees or statutory interest that may apply to the judgments should they ever have to be paid.
 
**   Should the pending post-trial motions be denied, RJR Tobacco will file a notice of appeal with the DCA in which the cases are pending.

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***   The court in Koballa found RJR Tobacco not liable for the plaintiff’s injuries, but awarded damages. For a detailed description of the case, see “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
     As of September 30, 2011, jury verdicts in favor of the Engle Progeny plaintiffs had been entered against RJR Tobacco in the total amount of $53,410,000 in compensatory damages (as adjusted) and $210,080,000 in punitive damages, for a total of $263,490,000. All of these verdicts are at various stages in the appellate process, including Martin, Campbell, Gray and Hall, which RJR Tobacco will seek review by the USSC. Except for those four cases, no liability for pending smoking and health litigation related to Engle Progeny cases was recorded in RAI’s consolidated balance sheet (unaudited) as of September 30, 2011. RJR Tobacco continues to believe that it has valid defenses in these cases, including the state preclusion law and federal due process issues that impact all Engle Progeny cases. RJR Tobacco will petition the USSC to review its due process claims in the Martin, Campbell, Gray and Hall cases, and additionally in other cases. Should RJR Tobacco not prevail in any particular individual Engle Progeny case or determine that in any individual Engle Progeny case an unfavorable outcome has become probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated, a loss would be recognized, which could have a material adverse effect on earnings and cash flows of RAI in a particular fiscal quarter or fiscal year.
     This recognition of Engle Progeny cases as of September 30, 2011, is consistent with RAI’s and RJR Tobacco’s historic recognition related to such smoking and health litigation claims. It is the policy of RJR Tobacco and its affiliates to vigorously defend all such claims, including Engle Progeny cases. It is also the policy of RJR Tobacco to record any loss concerning litigation at such time as an unfavorable outcome becomes probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated on an individual case-by-case basis. Accordingly, although RJR Tobacco intends to seek review by the USSC in the Martin, Campbell, Gray and Hall cases, RJR Tobacco recognized a liability for each of these cases as of September 30, 2011.
     In 2004, a jury in Scott returned a verdict in favor of the “Louisiana class” for $591 million to establish a state-wide smoking cessation program. In 2007, the Louisiana Court of Appeal upheld class certification, significantly reduced the scope of recovery, and remanded the case for further proceedings. The Louisiana and U.S. Supreme Courts denied the defendants’ applications for writ of certiorari. In July 2008, the trial court entered an amended judgment in favor of the class for approximately $263 million plus interest from June 30, 2004. In April 2010, the Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal amended the final judgment, and as amended, affirmed the judgment. Pursuant to the judgment, the defendants were required to deposit with the court $242 million with judicial interest from July 21, 2008, until paid. In September 2010, the defendants’ application for writ of certiorari with the Louisiana Supreme Court and emergency motion to stay execution of judgment in the Supreme Court of Louisiana were denied. The U.S. Supreme Court also granted the application to stay the judgment pending applicants’ timely filing, and the Court’s disposition, of a petition for writ of certiorari. The defendants’ petition for writ of certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court was denied on June 27, 2011. RJR Tobacco accrued $139 million, the portion of the judgment allocated to RJR Tobacco and B&W, in the second quarter of 2011. RJR Tobacco paid the judgment in August 2011.
     In the U.S. Department of Justice case, brought in 1999 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the government sought, among other forms of relief, the disgorgement of profits pursuant to the civil provisions of RICO. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled in 2005 that disgorgement is not an available remedy in the case. The bench trial ended in June 2005, and the court, in August 2006, issued its ruling, among other things, finding certain defendants, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, liable for the RICO claims, imposing no direct financial penalties on the defendants, but ordering the defendants to make certain “corrective communications” in a variety of media and enjoining the defendants from using certain brand descriptors. Both sides appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. In May 2009, the U.S. Court of Appeals largely affirmed the findings against the tobacco company defendants and remanded to the trial court for further proceedings. The U.S. Supreme Court denied the parties’ petitions for writ of certiorari in June 2010. Post-remand proceedings are underway.
     For a detailed description of these cases, see “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases,” “— Class-Action Suits — Medical Monitoring and Smoking Cessation Case” and “— Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases — Department of Justice Case” below.
     In November 1998, the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, entered into the MSA with 46 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and certain U.S. territories and possessions. These cigarette

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manufacturers previously settled four other cases, brought on behalf of Mississippi, Florida, Texas and Minnesota, by separate agreements with each state. These State Settlement Agreements:
    settled all health-care cost recovery actions brought by, or on behalf of, the settling jurisdictions;
 
    released the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers from various additional present and potential future claims;
 
    imposed future payment obligations in perpetuity on RJR Tobacco, B&W and other major U.S. cigarette manufacturers; and
 
    placed significant restrictions on their ability to market and sell cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products.
     Payments under the State Settlement Agreements are subject to various adjustments for, among other things, the volume of cigarettes sold, relevant market share and inflation. See “— Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases — State Settlement Agreements” below for a detailed discussion of the State Settlement Agreements, including RAI’s operating subsidiaries’ monetary obligations under these agreements. RJR Tobacco records the allocation of settlement charges as products are shipped.
     Scheduled Trials. Trial schedules are subject to change, and many cases are dismissed before trial. It is likely, however, that RJR Tobacco and other cigarette manufacturers will continue to face an increased number of tobacco-related trials when compared to recent years. There are 8 cases, exclusive of Engle Progeny cases, scheduled for trial as of September 30, 2011 through September 30, 2012, for RJR Tobacco or its affiliates and indemnitees: West Virginia IPIC, five individual smoking and health cases, two other non-smoking and health cases and one class action. There are 68 Engle Progeny cases against RJR Tobacco and/or B&W set for trial through September 30, 2012, but it is not known how many of these cases will actually be tried.
     Trial Results. From January 1, 2008 through September 30, 2011, 60 smoking and health and health-care cost recovery cases in which RJR Tobacco or B&W were defendants were tried. Verdicts in favor of RJR Tobacco, B&W and, in some cases, RJR Tobacco, B&W and other defendants, were returned in 32 cases, including 17 mistrials, tried in Florida (28), Missouri (2) and West Virginia (2). Verdicts in favor of the plaintiffs were returned in 26 cases tried in Florida and one in Connecticut. One case in Florida was dismissed during trial.
     In the third quarter of 2011, five Engle Progeny cases in which RJR Tobacco was a defendant were tried:
    In Ciccone v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found the decedent, George Ciccone, to be 70% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault, and awarded approximately $3.2 million in compensatory damages and $50,000 in punitive damages.
 
    In Weingart v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff; however, they refused to award compensatory or punitive damages and found the plaintiff to be 91% at fault.
 
    In Kaplan v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the court declared a mistrial on September 12, 2011 due to the inability to seat a jury.
 
    In Ojeda v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco on September 15, 2011.
 
    In Bowman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found the decedent, Michael Bowman, to be 70% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault, and awarded $1.5 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages on September 23, 2011.
     For a detailed description of the above-described cases, see “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
    In addition, since the end of the third quarter of 2011, jurors returned a verdict in the following Engle Progeny case:

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    In Junious v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants on October 20, 2011.
 
    In Szymanski v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants on October 20, 2011.
     For a detailed description of the above-described case, see “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
     In the third quarter of 2011, no non-Engle Progeny individual smoking and health cases in which RJR Tobacco was a defendant was tried.
     The following chart reflects the verdicts in the smoking and health cases or health-care cost recovery cases that have been tried and remain pending as of September 30, 2011, in which verdicts have been returned in favor of the plaintiffs and against RJR Tobacco or B&W, or both.
                 
                Cross-Reference to
Date of Verdict   Case Name/Type   Jurisdiction   Verdict   Post-Trial Status
 
December 18, 2003
  Frankson v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. [Individual]   Supreme Court,
Kings County
(Brooklyn, NY)
  $350,000 in compensatory damages; 50% fault assigned to B&W; $20 million in punitive damages, of which $6 million was assigned to B&W, and $2 million to a predecessor company.   See “— Individual Smoking and Health Cases” below.
 
               
February 2, 2005
  Smith v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. [Individual]   Circuit Court,
Jackson County
(Independence, MO)
  $2 million in compensatory damages; 25% of fault assigned to B&W, which reduced the award to $500,000; $20 million in punitive damages. In August 2009, a new trial on punitive damages was conducted, and the jury awarded $1.5 million.   See “— Individual Smoking and Health Cases” below.
 
               
August 17, 2006
  United States v. Philip Morris USA, Inc. [Governmental Health-Care Cost Recovery]   U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington, DC)   RJR Tobacco and B&W were found liable for civil RICO claims; were enjoined from using certain brand descriptors and from making certain misrepresentations; and were ordered to make corrective communications on five subjects, including smoking and health and addiction, to reimburse the U.S. Department of Justice appropriate costs associated with the lawsuit, and to maintain document web sites.   See “— Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases — Department of Justice Case” below.

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                Cross-Reference to
Date of Verdict   Case Name/Type   Jurisdiction   Verdict   Post-Trial Status
 
May 5, 2009
  Sherman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $1.55 million in compensatory damages; 50% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $775,000. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
May 22, 2009
  Brown v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $1.2 million in compensatory damages; 50% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $600,000. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
May 29, 2009
  Martin v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Escambia County,
(Pensacola, FL)
  $5 million in compensatory damages; 66% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $3.3 million; $25 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
August 19, 2009
  Campbell v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Escambia County,
(Pensacola, FL)
  $7.8 million in compensatory damages; 39% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $3.04 million. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
February 8, 2010
  Gray v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Escambia County,
(Pensacola, FL)
  $7 million in compensatory damages; 60% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $4.2 million; $2 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
March 10, 2010
  Douglas v. Philip Morris USA, Inc. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Hillsborough County,
(Tampa, FL)
  $5 million in compensatory damages; 5% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $250,000. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
March 11, 2010
  Hall v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $5 million in compensatory damages; 65% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $3.25 million; $12.5 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
                 
                Cross-Reference to
Date of Verdict   Case Name/Type   Jurisdiction   Verdict   Post-Trial Status
 
               
March 10, 2010
  Cohen v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $10 million in compensatory damages; 33.3% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $3.3 million; $20 million in punitive damages, of which $10 million was assigned to RJR Tobacco.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
April 13, 2010
  Clay v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Escambia County,
(Pensacola, FL)
  $3.5 million in compensatory damages; 60% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $2.1 million; $18 million in punitive damages, of which $17 million was assigned to RJR Tobacco.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
April 21, 2010
  Townsend v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $10.8 million in compensatory damages and $80 million punitive damages; 51% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $5.5 million in compensatory damages; $40.8 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
April 26, 2010
  Putney v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $15.1 million in compensatory damages; 30% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $4.5 million; $5 million in punitive damages, of which $2.5 million was assigned to RJR Tobacco.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
April 29, 2010
  Grossman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $1.9 million in compensatory damages; 25% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $484,000. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
May 20, 2010
  Buonomo v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $5.2 million in compensatory damages; 77.5% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $4.06 million; $25 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.

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                Cross-Reference to
Date of Verdict   Case Name/Type   Jurisdiction   Verdict   Post-Trial Status
 
               
 
               
May 26, 2010
  Izzarelli v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Individual S&H]   U.S. District Court, District of Connecticut, (Bridgeport, CT)   $13.9 million in compensatory damages; 58% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $8.08 million against RJR Tobacco; $3.97 million in punitive damages.   See “— Individual Smoking and Health Cases” below.
 
               
June 18, 2010
  Alexander v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $2.5 million in compensatory damages; 51% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $1.275 million; $2.5 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
August 5, 2010
  Piendle v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Palm Beach County,
(West Palm Beach,
FL)
  $4 million in compensatory damages; 27.5% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $1.1 million; $180,000 in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
November 15, 2010
  Webb v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Levy County,
(Bronson, FL)
  $8 million in compensatory damages; 90% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $7.2 million; $72 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
February 10, 2011
  Kirkland v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Hillsborough County,
(Tampa, FL)
  $100,000 in compensatory damages; 10% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $10,000; $250,000 in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
February 22, 2011
  Huish v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $750,000 in compensatory damages; 25% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $187,500; $1.5 million in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
March 18, 2011
  Mack v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $1 million in compensatory damages; 51% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $510,000; No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.

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                Cross-Reference to
Date of Verdict   Case Name/Type   Jurisdiction   Verdict   Post-Trial Status
 
             
 
               
April 26, 2011
  Andy Allen v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Duval County,
(Jacksonville, FL)
  $6 million in compensatory damages; 45% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $2.7 million; $17 million in punitive damages against each defendant awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
May 20, 2011
  Jewett v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Duval County,
(Jacksonville, FL)
  $1.1 million in compensatory damages; 20% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $218,600. No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
May 20, 2011
  Reese v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Miami-Dade County,
(Miami, FL)
  $3.6 million in compensatory damages; 30% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $1.1 million; No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
June 16, 2011
  Soffer v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Alachua County,
(Gainesville, FL)
  $5 million in compensatory damages; 40% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $2 million; No punitive damages awarded.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
July 15, 2011
  Ciccone v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court, Broward County, (Ft. Lauderdale, FL)   $3.2 million in compensatory damages; 30% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $1 million; $50,000 in punitive damages.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
July 19, 2011
  Weingart v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court Palm Beach County (West Palm Beach, FL)   Jury did not award damages; however, the plaintiff was awarded $150,000 on September 16, 2011.   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
 
               
September 23, 2011
  Bowman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. [Engle Progeny]   Circuit Court,
Duval County,
(Jacksonville, FL)
  $1.5 million in compensatory damages; 30% of fault assigned to RJR Tobacco, which reduced the award to $450,000; No punitive damages awarded   See “— Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” below.
Individual Smoking and Health Cases
     As of September 30, 2011, 93 individual cases were pending in the United States against RJR Tobacco, B&W, as its indemnitee, or both. This category of cases includes smoking and health cases alleging personal injury brought by or on behalf of individual plaintiffs, but does not include the Broin II, Engle Progeny or West Virginia IPIC cases

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discussed below. A total of 90 of the individual cases are brought by or on behalf of individual smokers or their survivors, while the remaining three cases are brought by or on behalf of individuals or their survivors alleging personal injury as a result of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, referred to as ETS.
     Below is a description of the individual smoking and health cases against RJR Tobacco or B&W, or both, which went to trial or were decided during the period from January 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011, or remained on appeal as of September 30, 2011.
     On August 15, 2003, the jury returned a verdict in favor of B&W in Eiser v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., a case filed in March 1999 in the Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. The plaintiff, Lois Eiser, sought compensatory and punitive damages in an amount in excess of $50,000, together with interest, costs and attorneys’ fees in this wrongful death action against B&W. In January 2006, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania affirmed the verdict. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court granted the plaintiff’s petition to appeal, and on December 28, 2007, remanded the case to the Superior Court for further review of certain issues. In August 2010, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania entered a memorandum affirming the final judgment. In November 2010, the plaintiff filed a petition for permission to appeal to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. A decision is pending.
     On December 18, 2003, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff in Frankson v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., a case filed in August 2000 in Supreme Court, Kings County, New York, awarded $350,000 in compensatory damages and eventually returned a verdict of $20 million in punitive damages against the defendants in an action brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco, who was dismissed prior to trial, and B&W. Other manufacturers were dismissed before trial. The plaintiff, Gladys Frankson, alleged that Mr. Frankson became addicted to nicotine, was unable to cease smoking, developed lung cancer and died as a result. The defendants as a group and the deceased smoker were each found to be 50% at fault. On January 9, 2004, the jury awarded $20 million in punitive damages, assigning $6 million to B&W and $2 million to American Tobacco, a predecessor company to B&W. In June 2004, the parties’ post-trial motions were denied by the trial judge, except that the trial judge granted a new trial unless the parties consented to an increase in compensatory damages to $500,000 and a decrease in punitive damages to $5 million, of which $4 million would be assigned to B&W. The plaintiff stipulated to the reduction in punitive damages in January 2005. Defendants filed a notice of appeal of the orders on post-trial motions in January 2005. In July 2006, the Appellate Division, New York Supreme Court, Second Department, directed that the plaintiffs’ claims for design defect be dismissed, but otherwise affirmed the orders denying defendants’ post-trial motions. Following remand from this appellate decision, the plaintiff withdrew her request for additur of the compensatory damages, and in December 2006, the trial judge granted this request, and reinstated the original $350,000 compensatory damages jury verdict.
     In June 2007, final judgment was entered against the defendants in the amount of approximately $6.8 million, including interest and costs. The defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Appellate Division, New York Supreme Court, Second Department. Pursuant to its agreement to indemnify B&W, RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $8.018 million. In September 2009, the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, affirmed the compensatory damages award, set aside the punitive damages award and remanded the case to the Kings County Supreme Court for a new trial on punitive damages. No date has been set for the punitive damages retrial.
     On February 1, 2005, the jury returned a split verdict in Smith v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., a case filed in May 2003 in Circuit Court, Jackson County, Missouri, finding in favor of B&W on two counts, fraudulent concealment and conspiracy, and finding in favor of the plaintiffs on negligence, which incorporates failure to warn and product defect claims. The plaintiff, Lincoln Smith, claimed that the defendant’s tobacco products caused Mrs. Smith’s death from lung cancer. The plaintiffs were awarded $2 million in compensatory damages and $20 million in punitive damages; however, the jury found the plaintiff to be 75% at fault, and B&W 25% at fault, and thus the compensatory award was reduced to $500,000. B&W appealed to the Missouri Court of Appeals, and in July 2007, the court affirmed the compensatory damages and ordered a new trial on punitive damages. In December 2008, the Missouri Court of Appeals issued an opinion that affirmed in part, reversed in part, and remanded the case for further proceedings on the issue of punitive damages. Trial on the issue of punitive damages began in July 2009. On July 29, 2009, RJR Tobacco, on behalf of B&W, paid the compensatory damages verdict, plus interest, in the amount of approximately $700,000. In August 2009, the jury returned a verdict for the plaintiffs, finding B&W liable for damages for aggravating circumstances, and on August 20, 2009, awarded the plaintiffs $1.5 million in

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punitive damages. The court denied the plaintiffs’ and the defendant’s post-trial motions. B&W and the plaintiffs filed notices of appeal in December 2009. Oral argument occurred on September 28, 2011. A decision is pending.
     On May 26, 2010, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff in Izzarelli v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 1999 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut. The plaintiff sought to recover damages for personal injuries that the plaintiff alleges she sustained as a result of unsafe and unreasonably dangerous cigarette products and for economic losses she sustained as a result of unfair trade practices of the defendant. The jury found RJR Tobacco to be 58% at fault and the plaintiff to be 42% at fault, awarded $13.9 million in compensatory damages and found the plaintiff to be entitled to punitive damages. In December 2010, the court awarded the plaintiff $3.97 million in punitive damages. Final judgment was entered on December 30, 2010, in the amount of $11.95 million. The court granted the plaintiff’s motion for offer of judgment interest, and awarded the plaintiff $15.8 million for the period of December 6, 1999 up to and including December 5, 2010, and approximately $4,000 per day thereafter until an amended judgment was entered. The amended judgment was entered in the amount of approximately $28.1 million on March 4, 2011. The court denied RJR Tobacco’s motion for a new trial in August 2011, and RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal in September 2011. Briefing is underway.
     On May 19, 2011, a jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco in Hargroves v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2005 in the Circuit Court, Hillsborough County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of using the defendant’s products, the decedent, Debra Hargroves, suffered from lung cancer, emphysema, heart disease and other smoking-related diseases and/or conditions. Final judgment was entered, and the plaintiff filed a motion for a new trial. At a hearing in June 2011, the court denied the plaintiff’s motion. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal, and RJR Tobacco filed a notice of cross appeal in August 2011. Briefing is underway.
West Virginia IPIC
     In West Virginia, as of September 30, 2011, 588 individual claims remain pending in a consolidated action, In re: Tobacco Litigation Individual Personal Injury Cases. The defendants are Philip Morris, Lorillard and RJR Tobacco (including claims concerning The American Tobacco Company and B&W). The Case Management Order currently calls for these cases to be resolved in a two phase procedure — a common issue trial in Phase I, and, if plaintiffs prevail on one or more issues, a Phase II, consisting of individual trials of liability, medical causation, compensatory damages and punitive damages for each of the individual plaintiffs. The Phase I trial will focus on whether defendants manufactured defective products, whether their conduct was tortious and whether their conduct meets the standard for a potential award of punitive damages under West Virginia law. There will be no lump sum award of punitive damages and the Phase I jury will not be asked to set a punitive multiplier. Instead, if the jury finds that a defendant’s conduct meets the punitive standard, then plaintiffs in their individual trials in Phase II will have the chance to ask Phase II juries to consider awarding punitive damages to each plaintiff on a case-by-case basis. Phase I trials were initiated twice in 2010 in Kanawha County (Charleston), resulting in mistrials in February and June 2010, due to an inability to find a sufficient number of impartial jurors from which to select a jury. The Court has now moved the case to Ohio County (Wheeling) with a new Phase I trial having commenced on October 19, 2011.
Engle and Engle Progeny Cases
     Trial began in July 1998 in Engle v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in May 1994, in Circuit Court, Miami-Dade County, Florida, in which a class consisting of Florida residents, or their survivors, alleged diseases or medical conditions caused by their alleged “addiction” to cigarettes. The action was brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, seeking actual damages and punitive damages in excess of $100 billion each and the creation of a medical fund to compensate individuals for future health-care costs. In July 1999, the jury found against RJR Tobacco, B&W and the other cigarette-manufacturer defendants in the initial phase, which included common issues related to certain elements of liability, general causation and a potential award of, or entitlement to, punitive damages.
     On July 14, 2000, in the second phase of the trial, the jury returned a punitive damages verdict in favor of the “Florida class” of approximately $145 billion against all the defendants, with approximately $36.3 billion and $17.6 billion being assigned to RJR Tobacco and B&W, respectively.

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     In November 2000, the trial judge denied all post-trial motions and entered judgment. The Florida Third District Court of Appeal, referred to as Third DCA, reversed the trial court’s final judgment and remanded the case to the Miami-Dade County Circuit Court with instructions to decertify the class. The class appealed, and the Florida Supreme Court accepted the case in May 2004.
     In July 2006, the court affirmed the dismissal of the punitive damages award and decertified the class, on a going-forward basis. The court preserved a number of class-wide findings from Phase I of the trial, including that cigarettes can cause certain diseases, that nicotine is addictive and that defendants placed defective and unreasonably dangerous cigarettes on the market, and authorized former class members to avail themselves of those findings under certain conditions in individual lawsuits, provided they commence those lawsuits within one year of the date the court’s decision became final. The court specified that the eligible plaintiffs are confined to those Florida citizen residents who suffered or died from smoking-related illnesses that “manifested” themselves on or before November 21, 1996, and that were caused by an addiction to cigarettes that contain nicotine.
     In August 2006, RJR Tobacco and the other defendants filed a rehearing motion arguing, among other things, that the findings from the Engle trial were not sufficiently specific to serve as the basis for further proceedings and that the Florida Supreme Court’s decision denied the defendants due process. The plaintiffs also filed a rehearing motion arguing that some smokers who became sick after November 21, 1996, and who were therefore not class members, should nevertheless have the statute of limitations tolled since they may have refrained from filing suit earlier in the mistaken belief that they were Engle class members. In December 2006, the Florida Supreme Court withdrew its July 2006, decision and issued a revised opinion, in which it set aside the jury’s findings of a conspiracy to misrepresent and clarified that the Engle jury’s finding on express warranty were preserved for use by eligible plaintiffs. The court also denied the plaintiffs’ motion and confirmed that the eligible plaintiffs were limited to those individuals who developed alleged smoking-related illnesses that manifested themselves on or before November 21, 1996.
     In the fourth quarter of 2007, the defendants’ petition for writ of certiorari and petition for rehearing with the U.S. Supreme Court were both denied.
     Pursuant to the Florida Supreme Court’s July 2006, ruling in Engle v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., which decertified the class, eligible plaintiffs had one year from January 11, 2007, in which to file individual lawsuits. In addition, some individuals who filed suit prior to January 11, 2007, and who claim they meet the conditions in Engle, also are attempting to avail themselves of the Engle ruling. Lawsuits by individuals requesting the benefit of the Engle ruling, whether filed before or after the January 11, 2007, mandate, are referred to as the Engle Progeny cases. As of September 30, 2011, RJR Tobacco had been served in 6,593 Engle Progeny cases in both state and federal courts in Florida. These cases include approximately 7,899 plaintiffs. The number of cases will likely change due to individual plaintiffs being severed from multi-plaintiff cases. Many of these cases are in active discovery or nearing trial.
     Three federal district courts ruled that the findings in the first phase of the Engle proceedings cannot be used to satisfy elements of plaintiffs’ claims, and two of those rulings, in Bernice Brown v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and Burr v. Philip Morris USA, Inc., were certified by the trial court for interlocutory review. In July 2010, the Eleventh Circuit held, as a matter of Florida law, that the findings from the first phase of the Engle proceedings cannot be given greater effect than what the Engle jury found. Because it rejected plaintiffs’ approach on state-law grounds, the court did not find it necessary to consider whether that approach would violate the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
     On December 14, 2010, the First DCA rejected the Eleventh Circuit’s holding and concluded, in the Martin v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. case, that the Engle findings “establish the conduct of elements” of plaintiffs’ claims. On July 19, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court denied RJR Tobacco’s request to review the decision of the intermediate state appellate court. On September 21, 2011, the Fourth DCA in Jimmie Lee Brown disagreed on state-law grounds with the First DCA’s decision in Martin as well as the Eleventh Circuit and in Bernice Brown . RJR Tobacco will seek review of Jimmie Lee Brown with the Florida Supreme Court. The defendants also have asked the federal district courts in Jacksonville and Tampa to rule on their constitutional due process objection to the

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use of the Engle findings to satisfy elements of plaintiffs’ claims. The federal district court in Jacksonville heard argument on this issue on September 7, 2011. A decision is pending.
     In June 2009, Florida amended its existing bond cap statute by adding a $200 million bond cap that applied to all Engle Progeny cases in the aggregate. In May, 2011, Florida removed the provision that allowed it to expire on December 31, 2012. The bond cap for any given individual Engle Progeny case varies depending on the number of judgments in effect at a given time, but never exceeds $5 million per case. The legislation, which became effective in June 2009 and 2011, applies to judgments entered after the original 2009 effective date. The plaintiffs have challenged the constitutionality of the bond cap in four of the cases discussed below. The Alachua County court upheld the bond cap in three of those cases. The plaintiffs have appealed to the First DCA. Argument in the fourth case took place in a trial court in Escambia County in January 2011; in that case, Clay v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the trial court upheld the bond cap. The First DCA affirmed the trial court’s decision on April 12, 2011. The First DCA issued a written opinion in Hall v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., on July 12, 2011, explaining why the statute is constitutional. The court also stated that the issues are likely to continue until they are definitively resolved by the Florida Supreme Court. As a result, the court certified to the Florida Supreme Court the question of whether the bond cap violates the Florida Constitution by limiting the amount of the bond necessary to obtain an automatic stay of the judgment against a signatory to the tobacco settlement agreement with the State of Florida. The Florida Supreme Court has not yet decided whether it will accept jurisdiction over the issue. Briefing is complete, and a decision is pending.
     Below is a description of the Engle Progeny cases against RJR Tobacco or B&W, or both, which went to trial or were decided during the period from January 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011, or remained on appeal as of September 30, 2011.
     On May 5, 2009, in Sherman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in September 2007 in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The plaintiff, Melba Sherman, alleged that as a result of using the defendant’s products, the decedent, John Sherman, developed lung cancer and died. The plaintiff sought compensatory damages and an unspecified amount of punitive damages. On May 8, 2009, the jury awarded compensatory damages of $1.55 million and found the decedent to be 50% at fault. No punitive damages were awarded. The court entered final judgment in the amount of $775,000 in June 2009. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA, and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $900,000. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal of the final judgment in July 2009. Oral argument occurred on May 10, 2011. A decision is pending.
     On May 20, 2009, in Jimmie Lee Brown v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in March 2007, in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, Roger Brown, developed smoking related diseases, which resulted in his death. The plaintiff sought compensatory damages and an unspecified amount of punitive damages. The jury later returned a verdict that the decedent was 50% at fault for his injuries and awarded compensatory damages of $1.2 million. No punitive damages were awarded. In June 2009, RJR Tobacco’s post-trial motions were denied, and the court entered final judgment in the amount of $600,000. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $700,000 in July 2009. In September 2011, the Fourth DCA affirmed the trial court’s judgment. RJR Tobacco filed a motion for certification to the Florida Supreme Court, which was denied on October 21, 2011. RJR Tobacco will seek review with the Florida Supreme Court.
     On May 29, 2009, in Martin v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in October 2007 in the Circuit Court, Escambia County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 66% at fault for the decedent’s injuries, and awarded $5 million in compensatory damages. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of Benny Martin’s use of the defendant’s tobacco products, he developed lung cancer and other medical conditions and died. The plaintiff, Mathilde Martin, sought an unspecified amount of compensatory and punitive damages. On June 1, 2009, the jury returned a punitive damages award of $25 million. In September 2009, the court entered final judgment, awarding the plaintiff the sum of $3.3 million in compensatory damages and $25 million in punitive damages, and RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA. In October 2009, RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $5 million, and the plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal of the final judgment. The First DCA affirmed the final judgment in December 2010. RJR Tobacco asked the Florida Supreme Court to accept jurisdiction and review the decision of the First DCA. On July 19, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court denied RJR Tobacco’s request to review the decision. RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $15 million in July 2011. The bond will replace the original bond that was posted and stay execution

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of the judgment to allow RJR Tobacco to seek review with the U.S. Supreme Court. The deadline for RJR Tobacco to file a writ of certiorari is December 16, 2011.
     On August 19, 2009, in Campbell v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Escambia County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found the decedent, Betty Campbell, to be 57% at fault, RJR Tobacco to be 39% at fault and the remaining defendants to be 4% at fault, and awarded $7.8 million in compensatory damages. No punitive damages were awarded. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of Mrs. Campbell’s addiction to cigarettes, she suffered and died from various smoking related diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The plaintiff sought judgment against each defendant for an amount in excess of $15,000, taxable costs, punitive damages and interest. In September 2009, the court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $3.04 million. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $3 million in January 2010. In March 2011, the Florida First DCA affirmed the trial court’s decision based on its prior ruling in Martin. RJR Tobacco moved the First DCA to certify the case as one of great public importance, which is the first step in seeking review by the Florida Supreme Court, but the court denied the motion. The defendants filed a notice to invoke discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. On July 19, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court denied RJR Tobacco’s petition to review the decision. The deadline for RJR Tobacco to file a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court is December 16, 2011.
     On February 5, 2010, in Gray v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in November 2007 in the Circuit Court, Escambia County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, Carolyn Gray. The jury found the decedent, Charles Gray, to be 40% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 60% at fault for Mr. Gray’s injuries, and awarded $7 million in compensatory damages. On February 8, 2010, the jury awarded $2 million in punitive damages. Mrs. Gray alleged that as a result of her husband’s addiction and use of RJR Tobacco’s products, he died from lung cancer. Mrs. Gray sought an unspecified amount of compensatory and punitive damages. In March 2010, the court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $4.2 million in compensatory damages and $2 million in punitive damages. In July 2010, RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $5 million. In June 2011, the First DCA affirmed per curiam the trial court’s order. The defendants filed a notice to invoke discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. On July 20, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court denied RJR Tobacco’s petition to review the decision. RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $6.2 million in July 2011. The bond will replace the original bond that was posted and stay execution of the judgment to allow RJR Tobacco to seek review with the U.S. Supreme Court. The deadline for RJR Tobacco to file a writ of certiorari is December 17, 2011.
     On February 25, 2010, in Grossman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, the court declared a mistrial due to the jury’s inability to reach a decision. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the decedent, Laura Grossman’s, addiction to cigarettes, she developed lung cancer and died. The plaintiff sought damages in excess of $15,000 and all taxable costs and interest. Retrial began in March 2010. On April 21, 2010, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff in Phase I, finding that the decedent was addicted to cigarettes containing nicotine and the addiction was the legal cause of her death by lung cancer. On April 29, 2010, the jury awarded $1.9 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The jury also found RJR Tobacco to be 25% at fault, the decedent to be 70% at fault and the decedent’s spouse to be 5% at fault. Final judgment was entered in June 2010, in the amount of $483,682. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $484,000 in July 2010. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. Briefing is underway.
     On March 10, 2010, in Douglas v. Philip Morris USA, Inc., a case filed in October 2007 in Circuit Court, Hillsborough County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff, found the decedent, Charlotte Douglas, to be 50% at fault, RJR Tobacco to be 5% at fault and the remaining defendants to be 45% at fault, and awarded $5 million in compensatory damages. No punitive damages were awarded. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the decedent’s addiction to smoking the defendants’ cigarettes, she suffered bodily injury and died. In March 2010, the court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $250,000. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Second District Court of Appeal, referred to as the Second DCA, and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $250,000. Oral argument occurred on October 4, 2011. A decision is pending.

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     In Hall v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff on March 11, 2010. The jury also found the decedent, Arthur Hall, to be 35% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 65% at fault, and awarded $5 million in compensatory damages. On March 12, 2010, the jury returned a $12.5 million punitive damages award. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the decedent’s use of the defendant’s products he suffered from lung cancer and died. In March 2010, the court entered final judgment in the amount of $3.25 million in compensatory damages and $12.5 million in punitive damages. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $5 million in May 2010. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. In May 2011, the First DCA affirmed per curiam the trial court’s decision. RJR Tobacco filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. On July 19, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court denied RJR Tobacco’s petition to review the decision. RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $15 million in July 2011. The bond will replace the original bond that was posted and stay execution of the judgment to allow RJR Tobacco to seek review with the U.S. Supreme Court. The deadline for RJR Tobacco to file a writ of certiorari is December 17, 2011.
     On March 10, 2010, in Cohen v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in May 2007 in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, Nathan Cohen, developed lung cancer as a result of using the defendants’ products, and sought in excess of $15,000 compensatory damages and unspecified punitive damages. On March 24, 2010, the jury awarded the plaintiff $10 million in compensatory damages, and found the decedent to be 33.3% at fault, RJR Tobacco to be 33.3% at fault and the remaining defendant to be 33.3% at fault. The jury also awarded $20 million in punitive damages, of which $10 million was assigned to RJR Tobacco. In July 2010, the court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $3.33 million in compensatory damages and $10 million in punitive damages and the plaintiff filed a motion to amend or alter the final judgment. The court entered an amended judgment in September 2010 to include interest from the date of the verdict. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $2.5 million in October 2010. Briefing is underway.
     On April 13, 2010, in Clay v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Escambia County, Florida, a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found the decedent, Janie Mae Clay, to be 30% at fault, RJR Tobacco to be 60% at fault and the remaining defendant to be 10% at fault, and awarded $3.5 million in compensatory damages. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent developed addiction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other conditions and diseases as a result of using the defendants’ products. On April 14, 2010, the jury awarded $18 million in punitive damages, of which $17 million was assigned to RJR Tobacco. The court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $2.1 million in compensatory damages and $17 million in punitive damages in September 2010. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $4.7 million. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. Briefing is complete. Oral argument has not been scheduled.
     On April 26, 2010, in Putney v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, finding the decedent, Margot Putney, to be 35% at fault, RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault and the remaining defendants to be 35% at fault, and awarded $15.1 million in compensatory damages and $2.5 million in punitive damages each against RJR Tobacco and the remaining defendants. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, Margot Putney, suffered from nicotine addiction and lung cancer as a result of using the defendants’ products. In August 2010, final judgment was entered against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $4.5 million in compensatory damages, and $2.5 million in punitive damages. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal and the plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. In December 2010, the court entered an amended final judgment to provide that interest would run from April 26, 2010. The defendants filed a joint notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA of the amended final judgment, and RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $2.4 million. Briefing is underway.
     On April 21, 2010, in Townsend v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 51% at fault and the decedent, Frank Townsend, to be 49% at fault, and awarded $10.8 million in compensatory damages and $80 million in punitive damages. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent suffered from lung cancer and other conditions and diseases as a result of smoking the defendant’s products. Final judgment was entered on April 29, 2010, in the amount of $5.5 million in compensatory damages and $40.8 million in punitive damages, which

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represents 51% of the original damages awards. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $5 million. Oral argument occurred on October 19, 2011. A decision is pending.
     On May 20, 2010, in Buonomo v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in October 2007 in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 77.5% at fault and the decedent, Matthew Buonomo, to be 22.5% at fault, and awarded $5.2 million in compensatory damages and $25 million in punitive damages. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent was addicted to cigarettes and as a result developed one or more smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. Post-trial motions were denied, but the court, in accordance with the Florida statutory limitation on punitive damage awards, ordered the punitive damage award of $25 million be reduced to $15.7 million — three times the compensatory damages award of $5.2 million. In August 2010, the court entered final judgment in the amount of $4.06 million in compensatory damages and $15.7 million in punitive damages. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $5 million. The plaintiff also filed a notice of appeal. Briefing is underway.
     In Frazier v. Philip Morris USA Inc., a case filed in December 2007 in the Circuit Court, Miami-Dade County, Florida, the court declared a mistrial on May 14, 2010, due to the inability to seat a jury. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking defendants’, including RJR Tobacco’s, products she developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Retrial began on September 20, 2010. In October 2010, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants. The plaintiff’s post-trial motions were denied and final judgment was entered in February 2011. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the Third DCA, and the defendants filed a cross appeal. Briefing is underway.
     On June 18, 2010, in Alexander v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in January 2008, in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 51% at fault and the defendant to be 49% at fault, and awarded $2.5 million in compensatory damages and $2.5 million in punitive damages. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking the defendant’s products, the decedent suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and emphysema. In July 2010, the court entered final judgment in the amount of $1.275 million in compensatory damages and $2.5 million in punitive damages. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $3.8 million in September 2010. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. Briefing is underway.
     On August 5, 2010, in Piendle v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in November 2007, in the Circuit Court, Palm Beach County, Florida, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 27.5% at fault, the defendant to be 45% at fault and the remaining defendants to be 27.5% at fault, and awarded $4 million in compensatory damages. On August 19, 2010, the jury returned a punitive damages verdict in the amount of $180,000 against RJR Tobacco. The plaintiff’s motion for new trial as to the amount of the punitive damages was denied. In September 2010, the court entered final judgment against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $1.1 million in compensatory damages and $180,000 in punitive damages. The defendants have filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA. In February 2011, RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $1.28 million. Briefing is underway.
     On August 26, 2010, in Budnick v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, Leonard Budnick, was addicted to cigarettes manufactured by the defendants, and as a result, developed one or more smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. In September 2010, the court denied the motion for a new trial and entered final judgment pursuant to the jury’s verdict. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA. Briefing is underway.
     On October 29, 2010, in Koballa v. Philip Morris USA Inc., the court declared a mistrial after the jury informed the court that they were unable to reach a verdict. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Volusia County, Florida against tobacco industry defendants, including RJR Tobacco. The plaintiff alleges that as a result of the use of the defendants’ defective and unreasonably dangerous tobacco products, she suffers from, or has suffered from, nicotine addiction, lung cancer and other smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. Retrial began on March 21, 2011, and on March 31, 2011, the jury returned an inconsistent verdict. The jury found that RJR Tobacco was not liable for the plaintiff’s injuries, but found that her past injuries were worth $1 million with the plaintiff being 70% at fault and RJR Tobacco 30% at fault. Post-trial motions were filed, and RJR Tobacco included a request to enter judgment in favor of RJR Tobacco. In August 2011, the court denied RJR Tobacco’s

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post-trial motions and entered final judgment. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Fifth DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $300,000. Briefing is underway.
     On November 4, 2010, in Vasko v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco. The jury found that the plaintiff’s claim was barred by the statute of limitations. The case was filed in January 2008, in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, John Vasko, was addicted to cigarettes manufactured by the defendants, and as a result, developed one or more smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases, including lung cancer. Final judgment was entered, and the plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA. Briefing is underway.
     On November 15, 2010, in Webb v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 90% at fault and the decedent, James Horner, to be 10% at fault, and awarded $8 million in compensatory damages and $72 million in punitive damages. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Levy County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking the defendant’s products, the decedent developed one or more smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. The court entered final judgment in November 2010. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $5 million. The plaintiff filed a notice of cross appeal. Oral argument occurred on October 12, 2011. A decision is pending.
     On January 5, 2011, in Smith v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the court declared a mistrial due to the inability to seat a jury. The case was filed in January 2008 in the Circuit Court, Jackson County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that he was addicted to cigarettes manufactured by the defendants, and as a result, developed lung cancer. Retrial is scheduled to begin on November 28, 2011.
     On February 10, 2011, in Kirkland v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 10% at fault and the plaintiff to be 90% at fault, and awarded $100,000 in compensatory damages. The jury also awarded the plaintiff $250,000 in punitive damages. The case was filed in January 2008, in the Circuit Court, Hillsborough County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that he was addicted to cigarettes, and as a result, developed larynx cancer and other smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. The plaintiff’s post-trial motions were denied, and final judgment was entered in March 2011. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the Second DCA on April 12, 2011. RJR Tobacco filed a motion to dismiss the appeal as premature due to the trial court not ruling on RJR Tobacco’s post-trial motions. The motion to dismiss the appeal was denied, however, the appellate court relinquished jurisdiction for 45 days to allow the trial court to address the outstanding post-trial motions. RJR Tobacco’s post-trial motions were denied in July 2011. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of cross appeal and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $260,000. Briefing is underway.
     On February 22, 2011, in Huish v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 25% at fault, the decedent, John Huish, to be 50% at fault and the remaining defendant to be 25% at fault, and awarded $750,000 in compensatory damages and $3 million in punitive damages, $1.5 million to each defendant. The case was filed in January 2008, in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking the defendants’ products, the decedent suffered from lung cancer and other smoking related medical conditions and/or diseases. Final judgment was entered in the amount of $1.69 million against each defendant. Post-trial motions were denied, and the defendants filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $1.69 million. Briefing is underway.
     On March 18, 2011, in Mack v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 51% at fault and the decedent, Peter Mack, Sr., to be 49% at fault, and awarded $1 million in compensatory damages. No punitive damages were awarded. The case was filed in June 2008, in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that due to the decedent’s addiction to cigarettes, he developed bronchitis and lung cancer. Post-trial motions were denied, and final judgment was entered in April 2011. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $510,000 in May 2011. Briefing is underway.
     On March 28, 2011, in Oliva v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants, including RJR Tobacco. The case was filed in November 2007, in the Circuit Court, Duval County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking the defendants’ cigarettes, he developed chronic obstructive pulmonary

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disease and other smoking related diseases. Final judgment was entered, and the plaintiff’s motion for a new trial was denied. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and the defendants filed a notice of cross appeal in June 2011. Briefing is underway.
     On April 13, 2011, in Tullo v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco and the plaintiff, but against the remaining defendants. The jury awarded $4.5 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The jury found the decedent, Dominick Tullo, to be 45% at fault and the remaining defendants cumulatively to be 55% at fault. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Palm Beach County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent was addicted to cigarettes manufactured by the defendants, and as a result, developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other smoking related illnesses and/or diseases. The plaintiff sought in excess of $15,000 against each defendant, taxable costs and interest. The court denied the plaintiff’s motion for a new trial against RJR Tobacco and denied the remaining defendants’ post-trial motions in June 2011. The remaining defendants have filed an appeal to the Fourth DCA, and the plaintiff filed a cross appeal. The plaintiff also filed a notice of appeal of the order denying the plaintiff’s motion for new trial against RJR Tobacco. RJR Tobacco filed a cross appeal of the same order.
     On April 26, 2011, in Andy Allen v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 45% at fault, the decedent, Patricia Allen, to be 40% at fault and the remaining defendant to be 15% at fault, and awarded $6 million in compensatory damages and $17 million in punitive damages against each defendant. The case was filed in September 2007, in the Circuit Court, Duval County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as result of smoking the defendants’ products, the decedent developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Final judgment was entered against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $19.7 million in May 2011. Post-trial motions are currently pending. On October 17, 2011, the court entered a remittance of the punitive damages to $8.1 million. RJR Tobacco will file a notice of appeal.
     On May 20, 2011, in Reese v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault, and awarded $3.6 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The case was filed in September 2007, in the Circuit Court, Miami-Dade County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of smoking the defendant’s products, she became addicted and developed laryngeal cancer, peripheral vascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The court entered final judgment on May 25, 2011. In September 2011, the court denied RJR Tobacco’s post-trial motions. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the Third DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $1.07 million. Briefing is underway.
     On May 20, 2011, in Jewett v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 20% at fault, the decedent, Barbara Jewett, to be 70% at fault and the remaining defendant to be 10% at fault, and awarded $1.1 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Duval County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent, Barbara Jewett, was addicted to cigarettes and as a result of her addiction, developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema and respiratory failure. The defendants’ post-trial motions were denied in May 2011 and July 2011. Final judgment was entered in June 2011. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $218,600. Briefing is underway.
     On June 16, 2011, in Soffer v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found RJR Tobacco to be 40% at fault, the decedent, Maurice Soffer, to be 60% at fault, and awarded $5 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The case was filed in December 2007, in the Circuit Court, Alachua County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that the decedent was addicted to cigarettes and, as a result,

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developed lung cancer and other smoking-related conditions and/or diseases. Post-trial motions were denied. Final judgment was entered against RJR Tobacco in the amount of $2 million. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the First DCA in July 2011. RJR Tobacco filed a notice of cross appeal and posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of $2 million. Briefing is underway.
     On July 15, 2011, in Ciccone v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict finding the plaintiff is a member of the Engle class. The case was filed in August 2004, in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the use of the defendant’s tobacco products, the decedent, George Ciccone, suffered from nicotine addiction and one or more smoking related diseases and/or medical conditions. On July 21, 2011, the jury awarded approximately $3.2 million in compensatory damages and $50,000 in punitive damages. The jury found the plaintiff to be 70% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault. In August 2011, the court denied RJR Tobacco’s post-trial motions. Final judgment was entered, and RJR Tobacco filed a notice of appeal. RJR Tobacco posted a supersedeas bond in the amount of approximately $1 million on October 17, 2011. Briefing is underway.
     On July 19, 2011, in Weingart v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff; however, they refused to award compensatory or punitive damages and found the plaintiff to be 91% at fault. The case was filed in November 2007, in the Circuit Court, Palm Beach County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of using the defendants’ tobacco products, the decedent, Claire Weingart, developed lung cancer and other smoking related diseases and/or medical conditions. In September 2011, the court granted the plaintiff’s motion for additur or new trial. The plaintiff was awarded $150,000 as an additur for pain and suffering damages. If the additur is rejected by the defendants, the plaintiff will be granted a new trial on damages only. The defendants filed an objection to the order on the motion for additur or new trial. On October 17, 2011, the defendants filed a joint notice of appeal to the Fourth DCA. The defendants’ objection to the order on the motion for addition or new trial was withdrawn on October 19, 2011.
     On September 12, 2011, in Kaplan v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the court declared a mistrial due to the inability to seat a jury. The case was filed in October 2007, in the Circuit Court, Broward County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of using the defendants’ products she suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other smoking-related medical conditions and/or diseases which was caused by her addiction to cigarettes. This is the second mistrial in the case.
     On September 15, 2011, in Ojeda v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco. The case was filed in October 2007, in the Circuit Court, Miami-Dade County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the use of the defendant’s products, the decedent, Juan Ojeda, suffered from one or more smoking-related medical conditions and/or diseases. The plaintiff filed a motion for a new trial, and a hearing is scheduled for March 7, 2012. Final judgment was entered September 26, 2011.
     On September 23, 2011, in Bowman v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff, found the decedent to be 70% at fault and RJR Tobacco to be 30% at fault, and awarded $1.5 million in compensatory damages and no punitive damages. The case was filed in November 2007, in the Circuit Court, Duval County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the use of the defendant’s products, the decedent, Michael Bowman, suffered from esophageal cancer. The court denied the defendant’s post-trial motions in October 2011. The deadline to file a notice of appeal is November 2, 2011.
     On October 20, 2011, in Junious v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants. The case was filed in July 2007, in the Circuit Court, Miami-Dade County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the use of the defendants’ products, the decedent, Annie Ingraham, suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
     On October 20, 2011, in Szymanski v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants. The case was filed in November 2007, in the Circuit Court, Lee County, Florida. The plaintiff alleged that as a result of the use of the defendants’ products, the plaintiff suffers from various smoking-related conditions and diseases.
Broin II Cases
     RJR Tobacco, B&W and other cigarette manufacturer defendants settled Broin v. Philip Morris, Inc. in October 1997. This case had been brought in Florida state court on behalf of flight attendants alleged to have suffered from diseases or ailments caused by exposure to ETS in airplane cabins. The settlement agreement required the participating tobacco companies to pay a total of $300 million in three annual $100 million installments, allocated among the companies by market share, to fund research on the early detection and cure of diseases associated with

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tobacco smoke. It also required those companies to pay a total of $49 million for the plaintiffs’ counsel’s fees and expenses. RJR Tobacco’s portion of these payments was approximately $86 million; B&W’s portion of these payments was approximately $57 million. The settlement agreement bars class members from bringing aggregate claims or obtaining punitive damages and also bars individual claims to the extent that they are based on fraud, misrepresentation, conspiracy to commit fraud or misrepresentation, RICO, suppression, concealment or any other alleged intentional or willful conduct. The defendants agreed that, in any individual case brought by a class member, the defendant will bear the burden of proof with respect to whether ETS can cause certain specifically enumerated diseases, referred to as “general causation.” With respect to all other issues relating to liability, including whether an individual plaintiff’s disease was caused by his or her exposure to ETS in airplane cabins, referred to as “specific causation,” the individual plaintiff will have the burden of proof. On September 7, 1999, the Florida Supreme Court approved the settlement. The Broin II cases arose out of the settlement of this case.
     On October 5, 2000, the Broin court entered an order applicable to all Broin II cases that the terms of the Broin settlement agreement do not require the individual Broin II plaintiffs to prove the elements of strict liability, breach of warranty or negligence. Under this order, there is a rebuttable presumption in the plaintiffs’ favor on those elements, and the plaintiffs bear the burden of proving that their alleged adverse health effects actually were caused by exposure to ETS in airplane cabins, that is, specific causation.
     As of September 30, 2011, there were 2,586 Broin II lawsuits pending in Florida. There have been no Broin II trials since 2007.
Class-Action Suits
     Overview. As of September 30, 2011, 15 class-action cases, exclusive of one antitrust class action, were pending in the United States against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees. In 1996, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Castano v. American Tobacco Co. overturned the certification of a nation-wide class of persons whose claims related to alleged addiction to tobacco products. Since this ruling by the Fifth Circuit, most class-action suits have sought certification of state-wide, rather than nation-wide, classes. Class-action suits based on claims similar to those asserted in Castano or claims that class members are at a greater risk of injury or injured by the use of tobacco or exposure to ETS are pending against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates and indemnitees in state or federal courts in California, Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, West Virginia, New Mexico and Arizona. All pending class-action cases are discussed below.
     The pending class actions against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees include nine cases alleging that the use of the term “lights” constitutes unfair and deceptive trade practices under state law or violates the federal RICO statute. Such suits are pending in state or federal courts in Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, California and Arizona and are discussed below under “— ‘Lights’ Cases.”
     Finally, certain third-party payers have filed health-care cost recovery actions in the form of class actions. These cases are discussed below under “— Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases.”
     Few smoker class-action complaints have been certified or, if certified, have survived on appeal. Eighteen federal courts, including two courts of appeals, and most state courts that have considered the issue have rejected class certification in such cases. Apart from the Castano case discussed above, only two smoker class actions have been certified by a federal court — In re Simon (II) Litigation, and Schwab [McLaughlin] v. Philip Morris USA, Inc., discussed below under “— ‘Lights’ Cases,” both of which were filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York and ultimately decertified.
     Medical Monitoring and Smoking Cessation Case. On November 5, 1998, in Scott v. American Tobacco Co., a case filed in District Court, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, the trial court certified a medical monitoring or smoking cessation class of Louisiana residents who were smokers on or before May 24, 1996, in an action brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, seeking to recover an unspecified amount of compensatory and punitive damages. In July 2003, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendants on the plaintiffs’ claim for medical monitoring and found that cigarettes were not defectively designed. However, the jury also made certain findings against the defendants on claims relating to fraud, conspiracy, marketing to minors and smoking cessation. Notwithstanding these findings, this portion of the trial did not determine liability as to any class

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member or class representative. What primarily remained in the case was a class-wide claim that the defendants pay for a program to help people stop smoking.
     In May 2004, the jury returned a verdict in the amount of $591 million on the class’s claim for a smoking cessation program. In September 2004, the defendants posted a $50 million bond, pursuant to legislation that limits the amount of the bond to $50 million collectively for MSA signatories, and noticed their appeal. RJR Tobacco posted $25 million (the portions for RJR Tobacco and B&W) towards the bond. In February 2007, the Louisiana Court of Appeals upheld the class certification and found the defendants responsible for funding smoking cessation for eligible class members. The appellate court also ruled, however, that the defendants were not liable for any post-1988 claims, rejected the award of prejudgment interest, struck eight of the 12 components of the smoking cessation program and remanded the case for further proceedings. In particular, the appellate court ruled that no class member, who began smoking after September 1, 1988, could receive any relief, and that only those smokers, whose claims accrued on or before September 1, 1988, would be eligible for the smoking cessation program. The plaintiffs have expressly represented to the trial court that none of their claims accrued before 1988 and that the class claims did not accrue until around 1996, when the case was filed. The defendants’ application for writ of certiorari with the Louisiana Supreme Court was denied in January 2008. The defendants’ petition for writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court was denied in June 2008. In July 2008, the trial court entered an amended judgment in the case, finding that the defendants are jointly and severally liable for funding the cost of a court-supervised smoking cessation program and ordered the defendants to deposit approximately $263 million together with interest from June 30, 2004, into a trust for the funding of the program. The court also stated that it would favorably consider a motion to return to defendants a portion of unused funds at the close of each program year in the event the monies allocated for the preceding program year were not fully expended because of a reduction in class size or underutilization by the remaining plaintiffs.
     In December 2008, the trial court judge signed an order granting the defendants an appeal from the amended judgment. In April 2010, the court of appeals amended but largely affirmed the trial court’s July 2008 judgment and ordered the defendants to deposit with the court $242 million with judicial interest from July 21, 2008, until paid. The defendants’ motion for rehearing was denied. In September 2010, the defendants’ application for writ of certiorari or review and their emergency motion to stay execution of judgment with the Louisiana Supreme Court were denied. In September 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court granted the defendant’s motion to stay the judgment pending applicants’ timely filing, and the Court’s disposition, of a petition for writ of certiorari. The defendants filed a petition for writ of certiorari in the U.S. Supreme Court in December 2010. The court denied the petition on June 27, 2011. RJR Tobacco accrued $139 million, the portions of the judgment allocated to RJR Tobacco and B&W, in the second quarter of 2011. RJR Tobacco paid the judgment in August 2011.
     California Business and Professions Code Cases. On April 11, 2001, in Brown v. American Tobacco Co., Inc., a case filed in June 1997 in Superior Court, San Diego County, California, the court granted in part the plaintiffs’ motion for certification of a class composed of residents of California who smoked at least one of the defendants’ cigarettes from June 10, 1993 through April 23, 2001, and who were exposed to the defendants’ marketing and advertising activities in California. The action was brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, seeking to recover restitution, disgorgement of profits and other equitable relief under California Business and Professions Code § 17200 et seq. and § 17500 et seq. Certification was granted as to the plaintiffs’ claims that the defendants violated § 17200 of the California Business and Professions Code pertaining to unfair competition. The court, however, refused to certify the class under the California Legal Remedies Act and on the plaintiffs’ common law claims. In March 2005, the court granted the defendants’ motion to decertify the class, and in September 2006, the California Court of Appeal affirmed the order decertifying the class. In November 2006, the plaintiffs’ petition for review with the California Supreme Court was granted, and in May 2009, the court reversed the decision of the trial court, and the California Court of Appeal that decertified the class and remanded the case to the trial court for further proceedings. In March 2010, the trial court found that the plaintiffs’ “lights” claims were not preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act and denied the defendants’ second motion for summary judgment. The plaintiffs filed a tenth amended complaint in September 2010. RJR Tobacco and B&W filed their answers to the complaint, and discovery is underway. Subsequently, on February 24, 2011, the court found that the named class representatives were not adequate, were not typical, and lacked standing. The plaintiffs’ motion for reconsideration was denied. The court tentatively granted the plaintiffs’ motion to amend the complaint by adding new class representatives and denied the defendants’ motion to dismiss. The plaintiffs filed an eleventh amended complaint adding new class representatives in July 2011. Trial is scheduled for September 14, 2012.

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     In Sateriale v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a class action filed in November 2009 in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all persons who tried unsuccessfully to redeem Camel Cash certificates from 1991 through March 31, 2007, or who held Camel Cash certificates as of March 31, 2007. The plaintiffs allege that in response to the defendants’ action to discontinue redemption of Camel Cash as of March 31, 2007, customers, like the plaintiffs, attempted to exchange their Camel Cash for merchandise and that the defendants, however, did not have any merchandise to exchange for Camel Cash. The plaintiffs allege unfair business practices, deceptive practices, breach of contract and promissory estoppel. The plaintiffs seek injunctive relief, actual damages, costs and expenses. In January 2010, the defendants filed a motion to dismiss, which prompted the plaintiffs to file an amended complaint in February 2010. The class definition changed to a class consisting of all persons who reside in the U.S. and tried unsuccessfully to redeem Camel Cash certificates, from October 1, 2006 (six months before the defendant ended the Camel Cash program) or who held Camel Cash certificates as of March 31, 2007. The plaintiffs also brought the class on behalf of a proposed California subclass, consisting of all California residents meeting the same criteria. In May 2010, RJR Tobacco’s motion to dismiss the amended complaint for lack of jurisdiction over subject matter and, alternatively, for failure to state a claim was granted with leave to amend. The plaintiffs filed a second amended complaint. In July 2010, RJR Tobacco’s motion to dismiss the second amended complaint was granted with leave to amend. The plaintiffs filed a third amended complaint, and RJR Tobacco filed a motion to dismiss it in September 2010. In December 2010, the court granted RJR Tobacco’s motion to dismiss with prejudice. Final judgment was entered by the court and the plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal in January 2011. Briefing is underway.
     “Lights” Cases. As noted above, “lights” class-action cases are pending against RJR Tobacco or B&W in Illinois (3), Missouri (2), Minnesota (2), New Mexico (1) and Arizona (1). The classes in these cases generally seek to recover $50,000 to $75,000 per class member for compensatory and punitive damages, injunctive and other forms of relief, and attorneys’ fees and costs from RJR Tobacco and/or B&W. In general, the plaintiffs allege that RJR Tobacco or B&W made false and misleading claims that “lights” cigarettes were lower in tar and nicotine and/or were less hazardous or less mutagenic than other cigarettes. The cases typically are filed pursuant to state consumer protection and related statutes.
     Many of these “lights” cases were stayed pending review of the Good v. Altria Group, Inc. case by the U.S. Supreme Court. In that “lights” class-action case pending against Altria Group, Inc. and Philip Morris USA, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that these claims are not preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act or by the Federal Trade Commission’s, referred to as FTC, historic regulation of the industry. Since this decision in December 2008, a number of the stayed cases have become active again.
     The seminal “lights” class-action case involves RJR Tobacco’s competitor, Philip Morris, Inc. Trial began in Price v. Philip Morris, Inc. in January 2003. In March 2003, the trial judge entered judgment against Philip Morris in the amount of $7.1 billion in compensatory damages and $3 billion in punitive damages to the State of Illinois. Based on Illinois law, the bond required to stay execution of the judgment was set initially at $12 billion. Philip Morris pursued various avenues of relief from the $12 billion bond requirement. On December 15, 2005, the Illinois Supreme Court reversed the lower court’s decision and sent the case back to the trial court with instructions to dismiss the case. On December 5, 2006, the trial court granted the defendant’s motion to dismiss and for entry of final judgment. The case was dismissed with prejudice the same day. In December 2008, the plaintiffs filed a petition for relief from judgment, stating that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Good v. Altria Group, Inc. rejected the basis for the reversal. The trial court granted the defendant’s motion to dismiss the plaintiffs’ petition for relief from judgment in February 2009. In March 2009, the plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal to the Illinois Appellate Court, Fifth Judicial District, requesting a reversal of the February 2009 order and remand to the circuit court. On February 24, 2011, the appellate court entered an order, concluding that the two-year time limit for filing a petition for relief from a final judgment began to run when the trial court dismissed the plaintiffs’ lawsuit on December 18, 2006. The appellate court therefore found that the petition was timely, reversed the order of the trial court, and remanded the case for further proceedings. On May 5, 2011, Philip Morris filed a petition for leave to appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court. On September 28, 2011, the Illinois Supreme Court denied Philip Morris’ petition for leave to appeal and returned the case to the trial court for further proceedings.
     In Turner v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in February 2000 in Circuit Court, Madison County, Illinois, a judge certified a class in November 2001. In June 2003, RJR Tobacco filed a motion to stay the case pending

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Philip Morris’s appeal of the Price v. Philip Morris Inc. case mentioned above, which the judge denied in July 2003. In October 2003, the Illinois Fifth District Court of Appeals denied RJR Tobacco’s emergency stay/supremacy order request. In November 2003, the Illinois Supreme Court granted RJR Tobacco’s motion for a stay pending the court’s final appeal decision in Price. On October 11, 2007, the Illinois Fifth District Court of Appeals dismissed RJR Tobacco’s appeal of the court’s denial of its emergency stay/supremacy order request and remanded the case to the circuit court. There is currently no activity in the case.
     In Howard v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., another case filed in February 2000 in Circuit Court, Madison County, Illinois, a judge certified a class in December 2001. In June 2003, the trial judge issued an order staying all proceedings pending resolution of the Price v. Philip Morris, Inc. case mentioned above. The plaintiffs appealed this stay order to the Illinois Fifth District Court of Appeals, which affirmed the Circuit Court’s stay order in August 2005. There is currently no activity in the case.
     A “lights” class-action case is pending against each of RJR Tobacco and B&W in Missouri. In Collora v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in May 2000 in Circuit Court, St. Louis County, Missouri, a judge in St. Louis certified a class in December 2003. In April 2007, the court granted the plaintiffs’ motion to reassign Collora and the following cases to a single general division: Craft v. Philip Morris Companies, Inc. and Black v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., discussed below. In April 2008, the court stayed the case pending U.S. Supreme Court review in Good v. Altria Group, Inc. A nominal trial date of January 10, 2011 was scheduled, but it did not proceed at that time. There is currently no activity in the case.
     In Black v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., a case filed in November 2000 in Circuit Court, City of St. Louis, Missouri, B&W removed the case to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. The plaintiffs filed a motion to remand, which was granted in March 2006. In April 2008, the court stayed the case pending U.S. Supreme Court review in Good v. Altria Group, Inc. A nominal trial date of January 10, 2011, was scheduled, but it did not proceed at that time. There is currently no activity in the case.
     In Dahl v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in April 2003, and pending in District Court, Hennepin County, Minnesota, a judge dismissed the case in May 2005, ruling the “lights” claims are preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act. In July 2005, the plaintiffs appealed to the Minnesota Court of Appeals for the Fourth Judicial District. During the pendency of the appeal, RJR Tobacco removed the case to the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota. In February 2007, the Eighth Circuit remanded the case to the Minnesota Court of Appeals, which in December 2007, reversed the judgment and remanded the case to the District Court. In January 2009, the Minnesota Supreme Court issued an order vacating the February 2008 order that granted RJR Tobacco’s petition for review. In July 2009, the plaintiffs in this case and in Thompson v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., discussed below, filed a motion to consolidate for discovery and trial. In October 2009, the court companioned the two cases and reserved its ruling on the motion to consolidate, which it said will be reevaluated as discovery progresses. In February 2010, a stipulation and order was entered to stay proceedings in this case, and in Thompson until completion of all appellate review in Curtis v. Altria Group, Inc. There is currently no activity in the case.
     In Thompson v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in February 2005 in District Court, Hennepin County, Minnesota, RJR Tobacco removed the case to the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota. In October 2007, the U.S. District Court remanded the case to state district court. In May 2009, the court entered an agreed scheduling order that bifurcates merits and class certification discovery. The parties are engaged in class certification discovery. In July 2009, the plaintiffs in this case and in Dahl v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. filed a motion to consolidate for discovery and trial. In October 2009, the court companioned the two cases and reserved its ruling on the motion to consolidate, which it said will be reevaluated as discovery progresses. In February 2010, a stipulation and order was entered to stay proceedings in this case, and in Dahl above until completion of all appellate review in Curtis v. Altria Group, Inc. There is currently no activity in the case.
     In Cleary v. Philip Morris, Inc., a case filed in June 1998, and pending in Circuit Court, Cook County, Illinois, the plaintiffs filed their motion for class certification in December 2001, in an action brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W. The case was brought on behalf of persons who have allegedly been injured by (1) the defendants’ purported conspiracy pursuant to which defendants concealed material facts regarding the addictive nature of nicotine, (2) the defendants’ alleged acts of targeting their advertising and marketing to minors, and (3) the defendants’ claimed breach of the public right to defendants’ compliance with the

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laws prohibiting the distribution of cigarettes to minors. The plaintiffs requested that the defendants be required to disgorge all profits unjustly received through their sale of cigarettes to plaintiffs and the class, which in no event will be greater than $75,000 per each class member, inclusive of punitive damages, interest and costs. In March 2006, the court dismissed count V, public nuisance, and count VI, unjust enrichment. The plaintiffs filed an amended complaint in March 2009, to add a claim of unjust enrichment and, to include in the class, individuals who smoked “light” cigarettes. RJR Tobacco and B&W answered the amended complaint in March 2009. In July 2009, the plaintiffs filed an additional motion for class certification. In September 2009, the court granted the defendants’ motion for summary judgment on the pleadings concerning the “lights” claims as to all defendants other than Philip Morris. In February 2010, the court denied the plaintiffs’ motion for class certification of all three putative classes. However, the court ruled that the plaintiffs may reinstate the class dealing with the conspiracy to conceal the addictive nature of nicotine if they identify a new class representative. In April 2010, the court granted the plaintiffs’ motion to file a fourth amended complaint and withdraw the motion to reinstate count I by identifying a new plaintiff. The defendants filed a motion to dismiss the plaintiffs’ fourth amended complaint, which was granted in June 2010. The court denied the plaintiffs’ motion to reconsider, and in August 2010, the plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. In August 2011, the Seventh Circuit affirmed the trial court’s judgment. The plaintiffs filed a petition for rehearing with a suggestion for rehearing en banc.
     In VanDyke v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in August 2009 in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Mexico against RJR Tobacco and RAI, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all New Mexico residents who from July 1, 2004, to the date of judgment, purchased, not for resale, the defendants’ cigarettes labeled as “lights” or “ultra-lights.” The plaintiffs allege fraudulent misrepresentation, breach of express warranty, breach of implied warranties of merchantability and of fitness for a particular purpose, violations of the New Mexico Unfair Practices Act, unjust enrichment, negligence and gross negligence. The plaintiffs seek a variety of damages, including actual, compensatory and consequential damages to the plaintiff and the class but not damages for personal injury or health-care claims. Discovery is underway. On October 21, 2011, a stipulation of dismissal was filed by both parties.
     In Shaffer v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a case filed in October 2009 in the Superior Court of Pima County, Arizona against RJR Tobacco, RAI and other defendants, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all persons residing in Arizona who purchased, not for resale, defendants’ cigarettes labeled as “light” or “ultra-light” from the date of the defendants’ first sales of such cigarettes in Arizona to the date of judgment. The plaintiffs allege consumer fraud, concealment, non-disclosure, negligent misrepresentation and unjust enrichment. The plaintiffs seek a variety of damages, including compensatory, restitutionary and punitive damages. In November 2009, the defendants removed the case to the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, and RJR Tobacco and RAI filed their answers to the complaint. Discovery is underway. The case was referred to mediation in May 2011 to determine whether the case might be suitable for mediation. A decision is pending.
     As referred to in the “Cautionary Statements,” in the event RJR Tobacco and its affiliates or indemnitees lose one or more of the pending “lights” class-action suits, RJR Tobacco could face bonding difficulties depending upon the amount of damages ordered, if any, which could have a material adverse effect on RJR Tobacco’s, and consequently RAI’s, results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
     Other Class Actions. In Young v. American Tobacco Co., Inc., a case filed in November 1997 in Circuit Court, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, the plaintiffs brought an ETS class action against U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, and parent companies of U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR, on behalf of all residents of Louisiana who, though not themselves cigarette smokers, have been exposed to secondhand smoke from cigarettes which were manufactured by the defendants, and who allegedly suffered injury as a result of that exposure. The plaintiffs seek to recover an unspecified amount of compensatory and punitive damages. In October 2004, the trial court stayed this case pending the outcome of the appeal in Scott v. American Tobacco Co., Inc., discussed above under “— Medical Monitoring and Smoking Cessation Case.”
     In Parsons v. A C & S, Inc., a case filed in February 1998 in Circuit Court, Ohio County, West Virginia, the plaintiff sued asbestos manufacturers, U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, and parent companies of U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR, seeking to recover $1 million in compensatory and punitive damages individually and an unspecified amount for the class in both compensatory and punitive damages. The class was brought on behalf of persons who allegedly have personal injury claims arising from their exposure to respirable asbestos fibers and cigarette smoke. The plaintiffs allege that Mrs. Parsons’ use of tobacco products and exposure to asbestos products caused her to develop lung cancer and to become addicted to tobacco. In

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December 2000, three defendants, Nitral Liquidators, Inc., Desseaux Corporation of North American and Armstrong World Industries, filed bankruptcy petitions in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware, In re Armstrong World Industries, Inc. Pursuant to section 362(a) of the Bankruptcy Code, Parsons is automatically stayed with respect to all defendants.
     Finally, in Jones v. American Tobacco Co., Inc., a case filed in December 1998 in Circuit Court, Jackson County, Missouri, the defendants removed the case to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri in February 1999. The action was brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, and parent companies of U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR, by tobacco product users and purchasers on behalf of all similarly situated Missouri consumers. The plaintiffs allege that their use of the defendants’ tobacco products has caused them to become addicted to nicotine. The plaintiffs seek to recover an unspecified amount of compensatory and punitive damages. The case was remanded to the Circuit Court in February 1999. There has been limited activity in this case.
Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases
     Health-care cost recovery cases have been brought by a variety of plaintiffs. Other than certain governmental actions, these cases largely have been unsuccessful on remoteness grounds, which means that one who pays an injured person’s medical expenses is legally too remote to maintain an action against the person allegedly responsible for the injury.
     As of September 30, 2011, three health-care cost recovery cases were pending in the United States against RJR Tobacco, B&W, as its indemnitee, or both, as discussed below after the discussion of the State Settlement Agreements. A limited number of claimants have filed suit against RJR Tobacco, its current or former affiliates, B&W and other tobacco industry defendants to recover funds for health care, medical and other assistance paid by foreign provincial governments in treating their citizens. For more information on these cases, see “— International Cases” below.
     State Settlement Agreements. In June 1994, the Mississippi Attorney General brought an action, Moore v. American Tobacco Co., against various industry members, including RJR Tobacco and B&W. This case was brought on behalf of the state to recover state funds paid for health care and other assistance to state citizens suffering from diseases and conditions allegedly related to tobacco use. Most other states, through their attorneys general or other state agencies, sued RJR Tobacco, B&W and other U.S. cigarette manufacturers based on similar theories. The cigarette manufacturer defendants, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, settled the first four of these cases scheduled for trial — Mississippi, Florida, Texas and Minnesota — by separate agreements with each such state.
     On November 23, 1998, the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, entered into the Master Settlement Agreement with attorneys general representing the remaining 46 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa and the Northern Marianas. Effective on November 12, 1999, the MSA settled all the health-care cost recovery actions brought by, or on behalf of, the settling jurisdictions and released various additional present and future claims.
     In the settling jurisdictions, the MSA released RJR Tobacco, B&W, and their affiliates and indemnitees, including RAI, from:
    all claims of the settling states and their respective political subdivisions and other recipients of state health-care funds, relating to past conduct arising out of the use, sale, distribution, manufacture, development, advertising, marketing or health effects of, the exposure to, or research, statements or warnings about, tobacco products; and
 
    all monetary claims of the settling states and their respective political subdivisions and other recipients of state health-care funds, relating to future conduct arising out of the use of or exposure to, tobacco products that have been manufactured in the ordinary course of business.
     Set forth below are tables depicting the unadjusted tobacco industry settlement payment schedule and the settlement payment schedule for RAI’s operating subsidiaries under the State Settlement Agreements, and related information for 2009 and beyond:

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Unadjusted Original Participating Manufacturers’ Settlement Payment Schedule
                         
                    2011 and  
    2009     2010     thereafter  
First Four States’ Settlements:(1)
                       
Mississippi Annual Payment
  $ 136     $ 136     $ 136  
Florida Annual Payment
    440       440       440  
Texas Annual Payment
    580       580       580  
Minnesota Annual Payment
    204       204       204  
Remaining States’ Settlement:
                       
Annual Payments(1)
    8,004       8,004       8,004  
Base Foundation Funding
                 
Growers’ Trust(2)
    295       295        
Offset by federal tobacco buyout(2)
    (295 )     (295 )      
 
                 
Total
  $ 9,364     $ 9,364     $ 9,364  
 
                 
RAI’s Operating Subsidiaries’ Settlement Expenses and Payment Schedule
                         
Settlement expenses
  $2,540     $2,496        
Settlement cash payments
  $2,249     $2,519        
Projected settlement expenses
                  $>2,500  
Projected settlement cash payments
                  $>2,500  
 
(1)   Subject to adjustments for changes in sales volume, inflation and other factors. All payments are to be allocated among the companies on the basis of relative market share. For further information, see “— State Settlement Agreements-Enforcement and Validity; Adjustments” below.
 
(2)   The Growers’ Trust payments expired December 2010 and were offset by certain obligations resulting from the federal tobacco buyout legislation, not included in this table, signed in October 2004. See “—Tobacco Buyout Legislation and Related Litigation” below.
     The State Settlement Agreements also contain provisions restricting the marketing of tobacco products. Among these provisions are restrictions or prohibitions on the use of cartoon characters, brand-name sponsorships, apparel and other merchandise, outdoor and transit advertising, payments for product placement, free sampling and lobbying. Furthermore, the State Settlement Agreements required the dissolution of three industry-sponsored research and trade organizations.
     The State Settlement Agreements have materially adversely affected RJR Tobacco’s shipment volumes. RAI believes that these settlement obligations may materially adversely affect the results of operations, cash flows or financial position of RAI and RJR Tobacco in future periods. The degree of the adverse impact will depend, among other things, on the rate of decline in U.S. cigarette sales in the premium and value categories, RJR Tobacco’s share of the domestic premium and value cigarette categories, and the effect of any resulting cost advantage of manufacturers not subject to the State Settlement Agreements.
     Department of Justice Case. On September 22, 1999, the U.S. Department of Justice brought an action against RJR Tobacco, B&W and other tobacco companies in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The government initially sought to recover federal funds expended by the federal government in providing health care to smokers who developed diseases and injuries alleged to be smoking-related, based on several federal statutes. In addition, the government sought, pursuant to the civil provisions of RICO, disgorgement of profits the government contends were earned as a consequence of a RICO racketeering “enterprise.” In September 2000, the court dismissed the government’s claims asserted under the Medical Care Recovery Act as well as those under the Medicare Secondary Payer provisions of the Social Security Act, but did not dismiss the RICO claims. In February 2005, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled that disgorgement is not an available remedy in this case. The government’s petition for writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court was denied in October 2005. The non-jury, bench trial began in September 2004, and closing arguments concluded in June 2005.
     On August 17, 2006, the court found certain defendants, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, liable for the RICO claims, but did not impose any direct financial penalties. The court instead enjoined the defendants from committing future racketeering acts, participating in certain trade organizations, making misrepresentations concerning smoking and health and youth marketing, and using certain brand descriptors such as “low tar,” “light,” “ultra light,” “mild”

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and “natural.” The court also ordered defendants to issue “corrective communications” on five subjects, including smoking and health and addiction, and to comply with further undertakings, including maintaining web sites of historical corporate documents and disseminating certain marketing information on a confidential basis to the government. In addition, the court placed restrictions on the ability of the defendants to dispose of certain assets for use in the United States, unless the transferee agrees to abide by the terms of the court’s order, and ordered the defendants to reimburse the U.S. Department of Justice its taxable costs incurred in connection with the case.
     Certain defendants, including RJR Tobacco, filed notices of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in September 2006. The government filed its notice of appeal in October 2006. In addition, the defendants, including RJR Tobacco, filed joint motions asking the district court to clarify and to stay its order pending the defendants’ appeal. On September 28, 2006, the district court denied the defendants’ motion to stay. On September 29, 2006, the defendants, including RJR Tobacco, filed a motion asking the court of appeals to stay the district court’s order pending the defendants’ appeal. The court granted the motion in October 2006.
     In November 2006, the court of appeals stayed the appeals pending the trial court’s ruling on the defendants’ motion for clarification. The defendants’ motion was granted in part and denied in part. The defendants’ motion as to the meaning and applicability of the general injunctive relief of the August 2006 order was denied. The request for clarification as to the scope of the provisions in the order prohibiting the use of descriptors and requiring corrective statements at retail point of sale was granted. The court also ruled that the provisions prohibiting the use of express or implied health messages or descriptors do apply to the actions of the defendants taken outside of the United States.
     In May 2009, the U.S. Court of Appeals largely affirmed the finding of liability against the tobacco defendants and remanded to the trial court for dismissal of the trade organizations. The court also largely affirmed the remedial order, including the denial of additional remedies, but vacated the order and remanded for further proceedings as to the following four discrete issues:
    the issue of the extent of Brown & Williamson Holdings’ control over tobacco operations was remanded for further fact finding and clarification;
 
    the remedial order was vacated to the extent that it binds all defendants’ subsidiaries and was remanded to the lower court for determination as to whether inclusion of the subsidiaries and which of the subsidiaries satisfy Rule 65(d) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure;
 
    the court held that the provision found in paragraph four of the injunction, concerning the use of any express or implied health message or health descriptor for any cigarette brand, should not be read to govern overseas sales. The issue was remanded to the lower court with instructions to reformulate it so as to exempt foreign activities that have no substantial, direct and foreseeable domestic effects; and
 
    the remedial order was vacated regarding “point of sale” displays and remanded for the district court to evaluate and make due provisions for the rights of innocent persons, either by abandoning this part of the remedial order or re-crafting a new version reflecting the rights of third parties.
     RJR Tobacco, B&W and the Department of Justice filed petitions for writ of certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court in February 2010. In June 2010, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the parties’ petitions for writ of certiorari. Post-remand proceedings are underway to determine the extent to which the original order will be implemented. The defendants filed a motion to vacatur, in which they moved to vacate the trial court’s injunctions and factual findings and dismiss the case in its entirety, on March 3, 2011. The court denied the motion on June 1, 2011. The defendants have filed a notice of appeal.
     International Cases. Five health-care reimbursement cases are pending against RJR Tobacco, its current or former affiliates, or B&W outside the United States, four in Canada and one in Israel. In these actions, foreign governments are seeking to recover for health care, medical and other assistance paid in treating their citizens for tobacco-related disease. No such actions are pending in the United States. Pursuant to the terms of the 1999 sale of RJR Tobacco’s international tobacco business, RJR Tobacco has tendered the defense of these actions to JTI. Subject to a reservation of rights, JTI has assumed the defense of RJR Tobacco and its current or former affiliates in these actions.

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    British Columbia - In 1997, British Columbia enacted a statute, subsequently amended, which created a civil cause of action for the government to recover the costs of health-care benefits incurred for insured populations of British Columbia residents resulting from tobacco-related disease. An action brought on behalf of the Province of British Columbia pursuant to the statute against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and certain of its affiliates, was dismissed in February 2000 when the British Columbia Supreme Court ruled that the legislation was unconstitutional and set aside service ex juris against the foreign defendants for that reason. British Columbia then enacted a revised statute, pursuant to which an action was filed in January 2001 against many of the same defendants, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in Supreme Court, British Columbia. In that action, the British Columbia government seeks to recover the present value of its total expenditures for health-care benefits provided for insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease caused by alleged breaches of duty by the manufacturers, the present value of its estimated total expenditures for health-care benefits that reasonably could be expected to be provided for those insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease in the future, court ordered interest, and costs, or in the alternative, special or increased costs. The government alleges that the defendants are liable under the British Columbia statute by reason of their “tobacco related wrongs,” which are alleged to include: selling defective products, failure to warn, sale of cigarettes to children and adolescents, illegal importation, strict liability, deceit and misrepresentation, violation of trade practice and competition acts, concerted action, and joint liability. RJR Tobacco and its affiliate filed statements of defense in January 2007. In February 2010, the trial date was adjourned, and no new date has been set.
 
    New Brunswick - In March 2008, a case was filed on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen in Right of the Province of New Brunswick, Canada, against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in the Trial Division in the Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick. The claim is brought pursuant to New Brunswick legislation enacted in 2008, which is substantially similar to the revised British Columbia statute described above. In this action, the New Brunswick government seeks to recover essentially the same types of damages that are being sought in the British Columbia action described above based on analogous theories of liability. RJR Tobacco and its affiliate filed statements of defense in March 2010.
 
    Ontario - In September 2009, a case was filed on behalf of the Province of Ontario, Canada, against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice. The claim is brought pursuant to Ontario legislation enacted in 2009, which is substantially similar to the revised British Columbia statute described above. In this action, the Ontario government seeks to recover essentially the same types of damages that are being sought in the British Columbia and New Brunswick actions described above based on analogous theories of liability, although the government also asserted claims based on the illegal importation of cigarettes, which claims were deleted in an amended statement of claim filed in August 2010. RJR Tobacco and its affiliate have brought a motion challenging the jurisdiction of the Ontario court. A decision is pending.
 
    Newfoundland and Labrador - In February 2011, a case was filed on behalf of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, hereinafter Newfoundland, against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in the General Trial Division of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador. The claim is brought pursuant to legislation passed in Newfoundland in 2001 and proclaimed in February 2011, which is substantially similar to the revised British Columbia statute described above. In this action, the Newfoundland government seeks to recover essentially the same types of damages that are being sought in the British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario actions described above based on analogous theories of liability. RJR and its affiliate have brought a motion challenging the jurisdiction of the Newfoundland court. A decision is pending.
 
    Israel - In September 1998, the General Health Services, Israel’s second largest health fund, filed a statement of claim against certain cigarette manufacturers and distributors, including RJR Tobacco, RJR Nabisco and B&W, in the District Court of Jerusalem, Israel. The plaintiff seeks to recover the present value of the total expenditure by the government for health-care benefits provided for insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease caused by alleged breaches of duty by the manufacturers, the present value of the estimated total expenditure by the government for

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      health-care benefits that reasonably could be expected to be provided for those insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease in the future, court ordered interest, and costs, or in the alternative, special or increased costs. The plaintiff alleges that the defendants are liable under the following theories: defective product, failure to warn, sale of cigarettes to children and adolescents, strict liability, deceit and misrepresentation and violation of trade practice and competition acts. In 2002, the plaintiff obtained leave to serve RJR Tobacco and B&W outside the jurisdiction. On behalf of RJR Tobacco, JTI filed a motion challenging the grant of leave, which was denied. JTI appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of Israel alongside other defendants’ applications for a strike out of the claim. A decision is pending.
     The following six putative Canadian class actions were filed against various Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in courts in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan, although the plaintiffs’ counsel have been actively pursuing only the action pending in Saskatchewan at this time:
    In Adams v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, a case filed in July 2009 in the Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals who were alive on July 10, 2009, and who have suffered, or who currently suffer, from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, heart disease or cancer, after having smoked a minimum of 25,000 cigarettes designed, manufactured, imported, marketed or distributed by the defendants.
 
    In Dorion v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, a case filed in June 2009, in the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals, including their estates, dependents and family members, who purchased or smoked cigarettes designed, manufactured, marketed or distributed by the defendants.
 
    In Kunka v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, a case filed in 2009 in the Court of Queen’s Bench of Manitoba against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals, including their estates, and their dependents and family members, who purchased or smoked cigarettes manufactured by the defendants.
 
    In Semple v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, a case filed in June 2009 in the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals, including their estates, dependents and family members, who purchased or smoked cigarettes designed, manufactured, marketed or distributed by the defendants for the period of January 1, 1954, to the expiry of the opt out period as set by the court.
 
    In Bourassa v. Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited, a case filed in June 2010 in the Supreme Court of British Columbia against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals, including their estates, who were alive on June 12, 2007, and who have suffered, or who currently suffer from chronic respiratory diseases, after having smoked a minimum of 25,000 cigarettes designed, manufactured, imported, marketed, or distributed by the defendants.
 
    In McDermid v. Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited, a case filed in June 2010 in the Supreme Court of British Columbia against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, the plaintiffs brought the case on behalf of all individuals, including their estates, who were alive on June 12, 2007, and who have suffered, or who currently suffer from heart disease, after having smoked a minimum of 25,000 cigarettes designed, manufactured, imported, marketed, or distributed by the defendants.
     In each of these six cases, the plaintiffs allege fraud, fraudulent concealment, breach of warranty, breach of warranty of merchantability and of fitness for a particular purpose, failure to warn, design defects, negligence,

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breach of a “special duty” to children and adolescents, conspiracy, concert of action, unjust enrichment, market share liability, joint liability, and violations of various trade practices and competition statutes. The plaintiffs seek compensatory and aggravated damages; punitive or exemplary damages; the right to waive the torts described above and claim disgorgement of the amount of revenues or profits the defendants received from the sale of tobacco products to putative class members; interest pursuant to the Pre-judgment Interest Act and other similar legislation; and other relief the court deems just. Pursuant to the terms of the 1999 sale of RJR Tobacco’s international tobacco business, RJR Tobacco has tendered the defense of these six actions to JTI. Subject to a reservation of rights, JTI has assumed the defense of RJR Tobacco and its current or former affiliates in these actions.
     Native American Tribe Cases. As of September 30, 2011, one Native American tribe case was pending before a tribal court against RJR Tobacco and B&W, Crow Creek Sioux Tribe v. American Tobacco Co., a case filed in September 1997 in Tribal Court, Crow Creek Sioux, South Dakota. The plaintiffs seek to recover actual and punitive damages, restitution, funding of a clinical cessation program, funding of a corrective public education program, and disgorgement of unjust profits from sales to minors. The plaintiffs claim that the defendants are liable under the following theories: unlawful marketing and targeting of minors, contributing to the delinquency of minors, unfair and deceptive acts or practices, unreasonable restraint of trade and unfair method of competition, negligence, negligence per se, conspiracy and restitution of unjust enrichment. The case is dormant.
Other Cases
     In August 2009, RJR Tobacco and American Snuff Co. joined other tobacco manufacturers and a tobacco retailer in filing a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky (Commonwealth Brands, Inc., v. United States of America), challenging certain provisions of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, referred to as the FDA Tobacco Act, that severely restricts the few remaining channels available to communicate with adult tobacco consumers. RAI believes these provisions cannot be justified on any basis consistent with the demands of the First Amendment. The suit does not challenge the U.S. Congress’s decision to give the FDA regulatory authority over tobacco products, nor does it challenge the vast majority of the provisions of the new law. In November 2009, the court denied certain plaintiffs’ motion for preliminary injunction as to the modified risk tobacco products provision of the FDA Tobacco Act. The parties finished briefing their respective cross-motions for summary judgment in December 2009, and in January 2010, the court granted summary judgment for the plaintiffs so as to allow the continued use of color and imagery in labeling and advertising and the right to make statements that their products conform to FDA regulatory requirements. The court granted summary judgment to the U.S. Government as to all other challenged provisions. In March 2010, each side filed a notice of appeal with the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. Oral argument occurred July 27, 2011. A decision is pending.
     On February 25, 2011, RJR Tobacco, Lorillard Inc., and Lorillard Tobacco Company jointly filed a lawsuit, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging the composition of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee, referred to as the TPSAC, which had been established by the FDA. The complaint alleges that certain members of the TPSAC and certain members of its Constituents Subcommittee have financial and appearance conflicts of interest that are disqualifying under federal ethics law and regulations, and that the TPSAC is not “fairly balanced,” as required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act, referred to as FACA. In March 2011, the plaintiffs filed an amended complaint, which added an additional claim, based on a nonpublic meeting of members of the TPSAC, in violation of the FACA. The defendants filed a motion to dismiss in April 2011. A hearing date has not been scheduled. The court granted the plaintiffs’ unopposed motion to file a second amended complaint adding a count addressing the FDA’s refusal to produce all documents generated by the TPSAC and its subcommittee in preparation of the menthol report. The FDA filed a motion to dismiss the second amended complaint and briefing is underway.
     On August 16, 2011, RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Company, Inc. joined other tobacco manufacturers in a lawsuit, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging the final regulation specifying nine new graphic “warnings” pursuant to the FDA Tobacco Act violates the plaintiffs’ rights under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the Administrative Procedure Act, referred to as the APA. The court heard oral argument on the motion for preliminary injunction on September 21, 2011 and will issue a decision on the motion by early November 2011. The Government’s brief in opposition to the plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment as well as its own dispositive motion was filed on October 21, 2011.

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     For a detailed description of the FDA Tobacco Act, see “— Governmental Activity” in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” in Item 7.
     Finally, RJR Tobacco and others brought suit against the City of Worcester, Massachusetts to enjoin enforcement of an ordinance prohibiting all outdoor advertising of tobacco products and any indoor advertising that is visible from the street. The suit, National Association of Tobacco Outlets, Inc. v. City of Worcester, was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central Division of Massachusetts on June 17, 2011. The City and the other defendants agreed to stay enforcement of the ordinance until after a ruling on the plaintiffs’ motion for preliminary injunction.
State Settlement Agreements-Enforcement and Validity; Adjustments
     As of September 30, 2011, there were 33 cases concerning the enforcement, validity or interpretation of the State Settlement Agreements in which RJR Tobacco or B&W is a party. This number includes those cases, discussed below, relating to disputed payments under the State Settlement Agreements.
     The Vermont Attorney General filed suit in July 2005, in the Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden County, alleging that certain advertising for the Eclipse cigarette brand violated both the MSA and the Vermont Consumer Fraud Statute. The State of Vermont is seeking declaratory, injunctive, and monetary relief. The bench trial in this action began on October 6, 2008, and lasted a total of five weeks. Closing arguments occurred on March 11, 2009. On March 10, 2010, the court issued its opinion, finding that three of the advertising claims made by RJR Tobacco were not supported by the appropriate degree of scientific evidence. The court did, however, rule that the remaining six advertising claims challenged by the State of Vermont were not actionable. The court indicated that remedies and any damages to be awarded, as well as the issue of attorney’s fees and litigation expenses, will be addressed in additional proceedings. On March 22, 2010, RJR Tobacco filed a motion to amend findings of fact that it believes are demonstrably contrary to, or unsupported by, the record. On December 14, 2010, the court issued an order granting in part and denying in part RJR Tobacco’s motion. On August 2, 2011, a scheduling order was entered, leading to a December 4, 2011 trial ready date on the remaining issues.
     In April 2005, the Mississippi Attorney General notified B&W of its intent to seek approximately $3.9 million in additional payments under the Mississippi Settlement Agreement. The Mississippi Attorney General asserts that B&W failed to report in its net operating profit or its shipments, cigarettes manufactured by B&W under contract for Star Tobacco or its parent, Star Scientific, Inc. B&W advised the state that it did not owe the state any money. In August 2005, the Mississippi Attorney General filed in the Chancery Court of Jackson County, Mississippi, a Notice of Violation, Motion to Enforce Settlement Agreement, and Request for an Accounting by Defendant Brown & Williamson Holdings, Inc., formerly known as Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation. In this filing, Mississippi estimated that its damages exceeded $5.0 million. On August 24, 2011, the court entered an order finding in favor of the State on the Star contract manufacturing issue, that the total amount of the underpayment from B&W was approximately $3.8 million and that interest on the underpayment was approximately $4.3 million. The court appointed a special master to undertake an accounting of the benefit received by B&W for failure to include its profits from Star contract manufacturing in its net operating profits reported to the State. Finally, the court awarded the State attorneys’ fees and costs in an amount to be determined.
     In addition, in February 2010, the Mississippi Attorney General filed a motion alleging that RJR Tobacco had improperly failed to report shipments of certain categories of cigarette volumes, and for certain years had improperly reported its net operating profit. As a result, the State alleges that settlement payments to it were improperly reduced. RJR Tobacco disputes these allegations and is vigorously defending against them. On August 24, 2011, B&W filed a motion to alter or amend the court’s order, to enter final judgment as to the findings related to the Star issue and the monetary award, and to stay operation of the remainder of the order. The motion is pending.
     In May 2006, the State of Florida filed a motion, in the Circuit Court of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Palm Beach County, Florida, to enforce the Settlement Agreement, for an Accounting by Brown & Williamson Holdings, Inc., and for an Order of Contempt, raising substantially the same issues as raised by the Mississippi Attorney General and seeking approximately $12.4 million in additional payments under the Florida Settlement Agreement, as well as $17.0 million in interest payments. This matter is currently in the discovery phase.

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     In October 2008, Vibo Corporation, Inc. d/b/a General Tobacco, referred to as General, filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky against RJR Tobacco and other participating manufacturers, referred to as PMs, under the MSA, and the Attorneys General of the 52 states and territories that are parties to the MSA. General sought, among other things, to enjoin enforcement of certain provisions of the MSA and an order relieving it of certain of its payment obligations under the MSA and, in the event such relief was not granted, rescission of General’s 2004 agreement to join the MSA. General also moved for a preliminary injunction that, among other things, would have enjoined the states from enforcing certain of General’s payment obligations under the MSA. In November 2008, RJR Tobacco and the other defendants moved to dismiss General’s complaint. In January 2009, the court issued a memorandum opinion and order granting the defendants’ motions and dismissing General’s lawsuit. Final judgment was entered on January 5, 2010. On January 13, 2010, General noticed its appeal of this decision. Briefing is complete. Oral argument has not been scheduled.
     In December 2007, nine states (California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Washington) sued RJR Tobacco claiming that an advertisement published in Rolling Stone magazine the prior month violated the MSA’s ban on the use of cartoons. The states asserted that the magazine’s content adjacent to a Camel gatefold advertisement included cartoon images prohibited by the MSA and that certain images used in the Camel ad itself were prohibited cartoons. In addition, three states (Connecticut, New York and Maryland) also claimed that a direct mail piece distributed by RJR Tobacco violated the MSA prohibition against distributing utilitarian items bearing a tobacco brand name. Each state sought injunctive relief and punitive monetary sanctions. Eight of the nine courts have since ruled that the states are not entitled to the punitive sanctions being sought. The issue has not been resolved definitively by the other court at this time.
     Six of these magazine advertisement cases have been ruled upon following bench trials:
    In Maine, RJR Tobacco received a complete defense ruling.
 
    In Washington, the Washington Court of Appeals reversed, in part, a favorable ruling in favor of RJR Tobacco at the trial court, holding that some of the images used in the RJR Tobacco advertisement were cartoons, and remanded the case for further proceedings. The Washington Supreme Court declined to review the decision by the Court of Appeals. The case was settled in the second quarter of 2011 for a non-material amount.
 
    In Ohio, the court agreed that the Camel advertisement did not use any cartoons, but ruled that the company should have prevented the use of cartoons in magazine-created content next to the RJR Tobacco advertisement. No monetary sanctions were awarded. RJR Tobacco appealed this decision, and the Court of Appeals reversed the trial court’s ruling regarding RJR Tobacco’s duty to prevent the use of cartoons in adjacent magazine-created content. The State petitioned the Ohio Supreme Court for review, and that petition was denied.
 
    The court in California ruled that the company was not liable for preventing the use of cartoons in magazine-created content next to the RJR Tobacco advertisement, but that a few of the images in the RJR Tobacco advertisement itself were “technical” and unintentional cartoons. No monetary sanctions were awarded by the California court. The parties’ appeals are ongoing. The California Court of Appeals affirmed the judgment on the merits. In April 2011, the California Court of Appeals reversed the trial court’s award of attorneys’ fees to the State and remanded the case to the trial court with instructions to use the correct legal standard and prevailing market rates in determining the award of fees to either party. Oral argument occurred in October 2011. A final order was issued on October 6, 2011, finding the State to be the prevailing party for purposes of entitlement to attorneys’ fees. Discovery will ensue regarding hours and rates. No hearing date has been set.
 
    The Pennsylvania court ruled against RJR Tobacco on both claims, agreeing with the Commonwealth that the RJR Tobacco advertisement contained unspecified cartoons and that RJR Tobacco was responsible for the cartoons included in the magazine-created content, regardless of whether the company was aware of it in advance. In addition, the Pennsylvania court ordered RJR Tobacco to pay for the creation of a single page youth smoking prevention advertisement in Rolling Stone issues in Pennsylvania within a year, or pay a penalty of approximately $302,000, if it fails to do so. RJR Tobacco appealed. In August 2010, the

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      Pennsylvania Court of Appeals reversed the trial court on both claims. The Commonwealth filed a motion for reargument, which was denied in October 2010. In November 2010, the Commonwealth filed a petition for leave to appeal, which was denied in April 2011.
 
    In Illinois, RJR Tobacco received a complete defense ruling. The State requested reconsideration of the court’s ruling, and the court reaffirmed its ruling in favor of RJR Tobacco. The State filed an appeal. On June 30, 2011, the appellate court affirmed in part and reversed in part and remanded the case to the trial court to determine the State’s attorneys’ fees and costs. The appellate court reversed the ruling that found that RJR Tobacco did not use some images that were cartoons under the consent decree in its advertisement in Rolling Stone. The appellate court affirmed the ruling that RJR Tobacco did not “cause” Rolling Stone to “use” cartoons in the editorial portion of the gatefold and affirmed the ruling that the State was not entitled to any monetary sanctions for violating the consent decree. The parties settled the case with RJR Tobacco agreeing to reimburse the State its attorneys’ fees in the amount of $250,000.
     The three remaining cases — in Maryland, New York and Connecticut — were individually settled in the first quarter of 2010 for a non-material amount.
     NPM Adjustment. The MSA includes an adjustment, referred to as an NPM Adjustment, that potentially reduces the annual payment obligations of RJR Tobacco and the other PMs. Certain requirements, collectively referred to as the Adjustment Requirements, must be satisfied before the NPM Adjustment for a given year is available:
    an independent auditor designated under the MSA must determine that the PMs have experienced a market share loss beyond a triggering threshold to those manufacturers that do not participate in the MSA, such non-participating manufacturers referred to as NPMs; and
 
    in a binding arbitration proceeding, a firm of independent economic consultants must find that the disadvantages of the MSA were a significant factor contributing to the loss.
     When the Adjustment Requirements are satisfied, the MSA provides that the NPM Adjustment applies to reduce the annual payment obligation of the PMs. However, an individual settling state may avoid its share of the NPM Adjustment if it had in place and diligently enforced during the entirety of the relevant year a “Qualifying Statute” that imposes escrow obligations on NPMs that are comparable to what the NPMs would have owed if they had joined the MSA. In such event, the state’s share of the NPM Adjustment is reallocated to other settling states, if any, that did not have in place and diligently enforce a Qualifying Statute.
     NPM Adjustment Claim for 2003. For 2003, the Adjustment Requirements were satisfied. As a result, in April 2006, RJR Tobacco placed approximately $647 million of its MSA payment into a disputed payments account, in accordance with a procedure established by the MSA. That amount represented RJR Tobacco’s share of the 2003 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the MSA independent auditor. In March 2007, the independent auditor issued revised calculations that reduced RJR Tobacco’s share of the NPM Adjustment for 2003 to approximately $615 million. As a result, in April 2007, RJR Tobacco instructed the independent auditor to release to the settling states approximately $32 million from the disputed payments account.
     Following RJR Tobacco’s payment of a portion of its 2006 MSA payment into the disputed payments account, 37 of the settling states filed legal proceedings in their respective MSA courts seeking declaratory orders that they diligently enforced their Qualifying Statutes during 2003 and/or orders compelling RJR Tobacco and the other PMs that placed money in the disputed payments account to pay the disputed amounts to the settling states. In response, RJR Tobacco and other PMs, pursuant to the MSA’s arbitration provisions, moved to compel arbitration of the parties’ dispute concerning the 2003 NPM Adjustment, including the States’ diligent enforcement claims, before a single, nationwide arbitration panel of three former federal judges. The settling states opposed these motions, arguing, among other things, that the issue of diligent enforcement must be resolved by MSA courts in each of the 52 settling states and territories.
     As of September 30, 2011, 47 of the 48 courts that had addressed the question whether the dispute concerning the 2003 NPM Adjustment is arbitrable had ruled that arbitration is required under the MSA. The orders compelling

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arbitration in these states are now final and/or non-appealable. The Montana Supreme Court ruled that the state of Montana did not agree to arbitrate the question of whether it diligently enforced a qualifying statute.
     As of January 2009, RJR Tobacco and certain other PMs entered into an Agreement Regarding Arbitration, referred to as the Arbitration Agreement, with 45 of the settling states, representing approximately 90% of the allocable share of the settling states. Pursuant to the Arbitration Agreement, signing states will have their ultimate liability (if any) with respect to the 2003 NPM Adjustment reduced by 20%, and RJR Tobacco and the other PMs that placed their share of the disputed 2005 NPM Adjustment (discussed below) into the disputed payments account have, without releasing or waiving any claims, authorized the release of those funds to the settling states.
     Montana is one of the settling states that signed the Arbitration Agreement. Thus, notwithstanding the ruling of the Montana Supreme Court with respect to the arbitrability of the diligent enforcement issue, Montana is contractually obligated to participate with the other states in the arbitration that will address all remaining issues related to the dispute pertaining to the 2003 NPM Adjustment.
     The arbitration panel contemplated by the MSA and the Arbitration Agreement has been selected and proceedings before the panel with respect to the 2003 NPM Adjustment Claim have begun. An initial administrative conference was held in July 2010, and subsequent proceedings have been held since then. It is anticipated that it will be 12 to 18 months before a decision on the merits with respect to the 2003 NPM Adjustment is reached.
     Other NPM Adjustment Claims. From 2006 to 2008, proceedings were initiated with respect to an NPM Adjustment for 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Adjustment Requirements were satisfied with respect to the NPM Adjustment for each of 2004, 2005 and 2006. As a result:
    in April 2007, RJR Tobacco placed approximately $561 million of its 2007 MSA payment (representing its share of the 2004 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the MSA independent auditor), and in April 2008, placed approximately $431 million of its 2008 MSA payment (representing its share of the 2005 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the independent auditor, net of certain slight adjustments to reflect revised independent auditor calculations of RJR Tobacco’s share of the 2003 and 2004 NPM Adjustments) into the disputed payments account. In 2009 and 2010, revised independent auditor calculations resulted in increases in RJR Tobacco’s 2005 NPM Adjustment, bringing the total amount of the adjustment to approximately $445 million; and
 
    in April 2009, RJR Tobacco retained approximately $406.5 million of its 2009 MSA payment to reflect its share of the 2006 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the independent auditor. Based on revised calculations by the MSA independent auditor, in April 2010, RJR Tobacco withheld an additional amount, bringing the total amount withheld with respect to the 2006 NPM Adjustment to approximately $420 million. Again based on revised calculations by the MSA independent auditor, in April 2011, RJR Tobacco paid approximately $1 million extra to account for a downward adjustment in its share of the 2006 NPM Adjustment.
     The MSA permits PMs to retain disputed payment amounts pending resolution of the dispute. If the resolution of the dispute ultimately requires a PM to pay some or all of the disputed amount, then the amount deemed to be due includes interest calculated from the date the payment was originally due at the prime rate plus three percent.
     In June 2009, RJR Tobacco, certain other PMs and the settling states entered into an agreement with respect to the 2007, 2008 and 2009 significant factor determinations. This agreement provides that the settling states will not contest that the disadvantages of the MSA were “a significant factor contributing to” the market share loss experienced by the PMs in those years. The stipulation pertaining to each of the three years will become effective in February of the year a final determination by the firm of independent economic consultants would otherwise have been expected (2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively), if the issue had been arbitrated on the merits. RJR Tobacco and the PMs will pay a total amount of $5 million into the States’ Antitrust/Consumer Protection Tobacco Enforcement Fund established under Section VIII(c) of the MSA for each year covered by that agreement, with RJR Tobacco paying approximately 47% of such amounts.
     Based on the payment calculations of the MSA independent auditor and the agreement described above regarding in pertinent part the 2007 and 2008 significant factor determinations, the Adjustment Requirements were satisfied with respect to the NPM Adjustments for 2007 and 2008. As a result, in April 2010, RJR Tobacco placed

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approximately $448 million of its 2010 MSA payment (representing its share of the 2007 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the MSA independent auditor) into the disputed payments account, and in April 2011, it placed approximately $477 million of its 2011 MSA payment (representing its share of the 2008 NPM Adjustment as calculated by the MSA independent auditor) into the disputed payments account. RJR Tobacco’s 2011 payment into the disputed payments account was reduced by approximately $1.1 million to adjust for a downward revision by the independent auditor to RJR Tobacco’s share of the 2007 NPM Adjustment.
     The table below summarizes the information discussed above with respect to the disputed portions of RJR Tobacco’s MSA payment obligations from 2003 through 2008 — the years as to which the Adjustment Requirements have been met:
                                                 
Year for which NPM Adjustment Calculated
    2003       2004       2005       2006       2007       2008  
Year in which deduction from NPM may be taken
    2006       2007       2008       2009       2010       2011  
 
RJR Tobacco’s approximate share of disputed NPM Adjustment (millions)
  $ 615     $ 562     $ 445     $ 419     $ 447     $ 477  
     In addition to the NPM Adjustment claims described above, RJR Tobacco has filed dispute notices with respect to its 2009 and 2010 annual MSA payments relating to the NPM Adjustments potentially applicable to those years. The amount at issue for those two years is approximately $937 million.
     Due to the uncertainty over the final resolution of the NPM Adjustment claims asserted by RJR Tobacco, no assurances can be made related to the amounts, if any, that will be realized or any amounts (including interest) that will be owed.
     Separately, on August 19, 2011, Idaho sent a letter on behalf of itself and 31 other states, stating their intent to initiate arbitration with respect to whether amounts used to measure the domestic cigarette market and to calculate Participating Manufacturer payment obligations under the MSA should be the adjusted gross or the net number of cigarettes on which federal excise tax (including arbitrios de cigarillos) is paid.
Antitrust Cases
     A number of tobacco wholesalers and consumers have sued U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, in federal and state courts, alleging that cigarette manufacturers combined and conspired to set the price of cigarettes in violation of antitrust statutes and various state unfair business practices statutes. In these cases, the plaintiffs asked the court to certify the lawsuits as class actions on behalf of other persons who purchased cigarettes directly or indirectly from one or more of the defendants. As of September 30, 2011, all of the federal and state court cases on behalf of indirect purchasers had been dismissed, except for one state court case pending in Kansas.
     In Smith v. Philip Morris Cos., Inc., a case filed in February 2000, and pending in District Court, Seward County, Kansas, the court granted class certification in November 2001, in an action brought against the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR Tobacco and B&W, and the parent companies of the major U.S. cigarette manufacturers, including RJR, seeking to recover an unspecified amount in actual and punitive damages. The plaintiffs allege that the defendants participated in a conspiracy to fix or maintain the price of cigarettes sold in the United States. The parties are currently engaged in discovery. In November 2010, RJR Tobacco and B&W filed a motion for summary judgment. A decision is pending.
Other Litigation and Developments
     Claims for Indemnification. By purchase agreement dated May 12, 1999, referred to as the 1999 Purchase Agreement, RJR and RJR Tobacco sold the international tobacco business to JTI. RJR and RJR Tobacco retained certain liabilities relating to the activities of Northern Brands, including those relating to a 1998 guilty plea entered in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York, as well as an investigation conducted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, referred to as RCMP, for possible violations of Canadian law related to the activities that led to the Northern Brands guilty plea and certain conduct by Stanley Smith, a former executive of RJR-Macdonald, Inc., referred to as RJR-MI, which led to the termination of his severance agreement. Under its reading of the

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indemnification provisions of the 1999 Purchase Agreement, JTI requested indemnification for any damages arising out of the matters described below:
    JTI sought indemnification for criminal charges filed by the RCMP in the Province of Ontario alleging fraud and conspiracy to defraud Canada and the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec in connection with the purchase, sale, export, import and/or re-export of cigarettes and/or fine-cut tobacco against the following: JTI Macdonald Corp., referred to as JTI-MC, Northern Brands, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco International, Inc., referred to as RJR-TI, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Puerto Rico, referred to as RJR-PR and eight individuals associated with RJR-MI and/or RJR-TI during the period of January 1, 1991, through December 31, 1996. These claims were resolved with respect to Canadian governmental entities when, on April 13, 2010, Northern Brands entered into a plea agreement with the Ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario, under which Northern Brands pled guilty to a one-count violation of the Canadian Criminal Code for conspiring to aid other persons to sell and be in possession of tobacco products that were not packaged and stamped in conformity with the Canadian Excise Act during the period February 18, 1993 through December 31, 1996. That plea was accepted and resulted in Northern Brands being required to pay a CAD $75 million fine, which fine was paid on April 13, 2010. Further, and through a Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release between RJR and JTI dated as of April 13, 2010, referred to as the SA-MR, the parties resolved, by mutual release, JTI’s request for indemnification of the claims referenced above by, among other things, (1) RJR Tobacco agreeing to give up its reservation of rights with respect to all moneys already advanced to JTI for certain attorneys’ fees, expenses and costs in the criminal proceedings and to pay for any additional fees, expenses and costs of like kind incurred in those proceedings up to a specified date; (2) JTI agreeing to pay for all (i) Canadian Goods and Services Taxes incurred to date, and (ii) such taxes incurred in the future in connection with the foregoing attorney services already provided or to be provided in the criminal proceedings; (3) the parties agreeing to split evenly the payment of certain other attorneys’ fees already incurred in connection with the Canadian matters; and (4) the parties resolving other issues related to these matters.
 
    JTI also sought indemnification relating to the following civil claims: (1) a Statement of Claim filed by the Attorney General of Canada in the Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, Canada against, among others, JTI and a number of its affiliates, seeking to recover taxes and duties allegedly not paid as a result of cigarette smuggling and related activities; and (2) a tax assessment against JTI-MC by the Quebec Ministry of Revenue for the period from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1998, for alleged unpaid duties, penalties, and interest resulting from cigarette smuggling and related activities. Following the tax assessment by the Quebec Ministry of Revenue, JTI-MC sought protection under the Companies’ Creditor Arrangement Act in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, which proceedings are referred to as the CCAA Proceedings. In the CCAA Proceedings, Canada and the Provinces of Ontario, New Brunswick, Quebec, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Manitoba submitted civil claims relating to the movement of contraband tobacco products in Canada for the period before 2000. These claims were resolved with respect to the governmental entities when, effective April 13, 2010, RJR Tobacco entered into the Comprehensive Agreement with the Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments. The Comprehensive Agreement covers all civil claims related to the movement of contraband tobacco products in Canada during the period 1985 through 1999 that the governments have asserted or could assert against RJR Tobacco and its affiliates. Pursuant to the Comprehensive Agreement, RJR Tobacco has paid the governments a total of CAD $325 million. Should RJR Tobacco or its affiliates decide in the future to sell tobacco products in Canada, they have also agreed to adopt packaging, marking and other measures that will assist the Canadian governments in their efforts to combat the movement of contraband tobacco products in Canada. Further, and pursuant to the SA-MR, JTI’s indemnification claims with respect to the matters described in this paragraph also have been resolved by mutual release.
 
    In a letter dated March 31, 2006, counsel for JTI stated that JTI would be seeking indemnification under the 1999 Purchase Agreement for any damages it may incur or may have incurred arising out of a Southern District of New York grand jury investigation, a now-terminated Eastern District of North Carolina grand jury investigation, and various actions filed by the European Community and others in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York, referred to as the EDNY, against RJR Tobacco and certain of its affiliates on November 3, 2000, August 6, 2001, and (as discussed in greater detail below) October 30, 2002, and against JTI on January 11, 2002.

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    JTI also has sought indemnification relating to a Statement of Claim filed on April 23, 2010, against JTI-MC by the Ontario Flue-Cured Tobacco Growers’ Marketing Board, referred to as the Board, Andy J. Jacko, Brian Baswick, Ron Kichler, and Aprad Dobrenty, proceeding on their own behalf and on behalf of a putative class of Ontario tobacco producers that sold tobacco to JTI-MC during the period between January 1, 1986 and December 31, 1996, referred to as the Class Period, through the Board pursuant to certain agreements. The Statement of Claim seeks recovery for damages allegedly incurred by the class representatives and the putative class for tobacco sales during the Class Period made at the contract price for duty free or export cigarettes with respect to cigarettes that, rather than being sold duty free or for export, purportedly were sold in Canada, which allegedly breached one or more of a series of contracts dated between June 4, 1986, and July 3, 1996.
     Although RJR and RJR Tobacco recognize that, under certain circumstances, they may have other unresolved indemnification obligations to JTI under the 1999 Purchase Agreement, RJR and RJR Tobacco disagree with JTI as to (1) what circumstances relating to any such matters may give rise to indemnification obligations by RJR and RJR Tobacco, and (2) the nature and extent of any such obligation. RJR and RJR Tobacco have conveyed their position to JTI, and the parties have agreed to resolve their differences at a later time. In the interim, RJR and RJR Tobacco have been paying defense costs and expenses incurred by JTI in connection with some, but not all, of the Canadian litigation matters described above. RJR Tobacco expensed $4 million during the first nine months of 2010 for funds reimbursed to JTI for costs and expenses arising out of the Canadian Litigation.
     See note 5 for additional information related to the Comprehensive Agreement entered into by RJR Tobacco with the Canadian federal, provincial and territorial governments, and the plea agreement of Northern Brands in connection with certain Canadian matters.
     European Community. On October 30, 2002, the European Community and ten of its member states filed a complaint in the EDNY against RJR, RJR Tobacco and several currently and formerly related companies. The complaint contains many of the same or similar allegations found in an earlier complaint, now dismissed, filed in August 2001 and also alleges that the defendants, together with certain identified and unidentified persons, engaged in money laundering and other conduct violating civil RICO and a variety of common laws. The complaint also alleges that the defendants manufactured cigarettes that were eventually sold in Iraq in violation of U.S. sanctions. The plaintiffs seek compensatory, punitive and treble damages among other types of relief. This matter has been stayed and largely inactive since November 24, 2009 when, with the court’s permission, the European Community and member states filed and served a second amended complaint. The second amended complaint added 16 member states as plaintiffs and RAI, RJR Tobacco and R. J. Reynolds Global Products Inc., referred to as GPI, as defendants. The allegations contained in the second amended complaint are in most respects either identical or similar to those found in the prior complaint, but now add new allegations primarily regarding the activities of RAI, RJR Tobacco and GPI following the B&W business combination. Pursuant to a stipulation and order, the defendants filed a motion to dismiss the plaintiffs’ second amended complaint on February 15, 2010. Oral argument of the motion occurred on October 26, 2010. Supplemental briefs were then filed. Ruling on part of the defendants’ motion to dismiss, on March 8, 2011, the court dismissed the plaintiffs’ RICO claims, and reserved decision as to dismissal of the plaintiffs’ state-law claims. Thereafter, on May 13, 2011, the court granted the remaining portion of the defendants’ motion and dismissed the plaintiffs’ state-law claims based on the court’s lack of subject matter jurisdiction. On May 16, 2011, the clerk of court entered a judgment dismissing the action in its entirety. On June 10, 2011, the plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, appealing from the May 16, 2011 judgment, as well as the March 8, 2011 and May 13, 2011 orders that respectively resulted in the dismissal of their RICO and state-law claims. Briefing is underway. A date for oral argument has not yet been scheduled.
     Star Patent Infringement. On May 23, 2001, and July 30, 2002, Star Scientific, Inc. filed two patent infringement actions, later consolidated, against RJR Tobacco in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland. The consolidated action, known as Star I, involved two patents (U.S. Patent Nos. 6,202,649 and 6,425,401), both entitled “Method of Treating Tobacco to Reduce Nitrosamine Content, and Products Produced Thereby.” Star accused RJR Tobacco of infringing certain claims of these patents during the 2001 and 2002 growing seasons and asked the court to: enter an injunction restraining RJR Tobacco from further acts of infringement; award Star damages, including a reasonable royalty, to compensate for the infringement; increase the damages due to willfulness; award pre-judgment and post-judgment interest and reasonable attorney fees; and order RJR Tobacco to deliver up to the court

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for destruction all products manufactured from any process that infringes any claim of either patent. RJR Tobacco filed counterclaims seeking a declaration that the asserted claims of Star’s patents are invalid, unenforceable and not infringed by RJR Tobacco. Between January 31 and February 8, 2005, the court held a first bench trial on RJR Tobacco’s affirmative defense and counterclaim based upon inequitable conduct. Additionally, in response to the court’s invitation, RJR Tobacco filed two summary judgment motions in January 2005.
     In January 2007, the court granted RJR Tobacco’s motion for summary judgment of invalidity based on indefiniteness. The court granted in part and denied in part, RJR Tobacco’s other summary judgment motion concerning the effective filing date of Star’s patents. In June 2007, the court ruled that Star’s patents are unenforceable due to inequitable conduct by Star and its representatives in the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, referred to as the PTO, and entered final judgment in favor of RJR Tobacco and against Star. Star filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.
     In August 2008, the Federal Circuit issued a decision reversing the district court’s rulings against Star and remanded the case to the district court for further proceedings on the issues of validity and infringement. Star updated its reasonable royalty damages calculation to a range of $294.9 million to $362.1 million.
     In late 2008, RJR Tobacco petitioned the PTO to reexamine the claims of Star’s patents at issue in Star I based on substantial new questions of patentability. The PTO agreed to reexamine the claims ex parte. The district court decided to move forward with the trial in Star I rather than await the outcome of the reexamination proceedings.
     Trial began on May 18, 2009, and on June 16, 2009, the jury returned a verdict in favor of RJR Tobacco on every question put to it. The jury decided that RJR Tobacco had not infringed either of Star’s patents and that the patents were invalid on four independent bases.
     Shortly after the start of the Star I jury trial, in May 2009, Star filed a follow-on lawsuit — Star II — in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland seeking damages for alleged infringement during the 2003 growing season and beyond of the two Star patents found invalid and not infringed in Star I. The district court stayed Star II pending the outcome of proceedings in Star I, and Star II was administratively closed pending further order of the district court upon the application, by December 31, 2012, of any party.
     In November 2009, RJR Tobacco filed a bill of costs (later renewed) seeking reimbursement of its recoverable costs as the prevailing party in Star I, and also filed a motion seeking reimbursement of its attorney fees and excess costs incurred in defending Star I. In December 2009, the district court upheld the jury verdict by denying Star’s combined motion for judgment as a matter of law or new trial. The court entered judgment in RJR Tobacco’s favor and awarded RJR Tobacco all assessable costs. The court deferred proceedings with respect to RJR Tobacco’s motion for attorneys’ fees and excess costs pending final resolution of the reexamination and any appellate proceedings.
     On Star’s request and without objection from RJR Tobacco, the district court deferred briefing on RJR Tobacco’s renewed bill of costs until after the resolution of appellate proceedings.
     In December 2009, Star filed a notice of appeal in the Federal Circuit from the district court’s final judgment order. On August 26, 2011, the Federal Circuit issued a decision affirming the jury’s finding of non-infringement but reversing, in a split decision, on invalidity. Writing in dissent, Judge Dyk stated that he would affirm the jury’s finding of invalidity based upon indefiniteness.
     On September 26, 2011, RJR Tobacco filed a combined petition for panel rehearing and rehearing en banc with the Federal Circuit seeking rehearing on whether Star’s patents at issue are invalid based upon indefiniteness. The Federal Circuit requested that Star respond to RJR Tobacco’s petition. RJR Tobacco anticipates that Star’s response will be filed on or before October 25, 2011.
     In the PTO reexamination proceeding, the PTO in March and April 2011 issued ex parte reexamination certificates confirming the patentability of the claims of the Star patents at issue in Star I. The PTO reexamination proceeding did not address the question of whether Star’s patents are invalid based upon indefiniteness.

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Other Matters. In November, 2009, RAI and B&W were served with subpoenas issued by the Office of the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Defense, seeking two broad categories of documents in connection with a civil investigation:
    documents regarding the sale of U.S. manufactured cigarettes to the Army Air Force Exchange Service and the Navy Exchange Command either directly by the manufacturers or through distributors during the period January 1, 1998 through December 31, 2001; and
 
    documents regarding the sale of U.S. manufactured cigarettes by the manufacturers to civilian market customers for resale in non-federal excise tax markets during the periods January 1, 1998 through December 31, 2001 and September 1, 2008 through September 1, 2009.
RAI and RJRT has responded to the subpoenas, including the extent to which the subpoenas seek documents regarding the domestic tobacco operations acquired from B&W in 2004, and plan to otherwise cooperate appropriately with the investigation.
     In May 2011, RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe received separate letters from counsel to Walgreen Co. regarding a 60-day notice served on Walgreen by a consumer group alleging violations of California’s Proposition 65. The group claims that Walgreen provided or sold products with containers or wrappers containing insufficient warning in violation of California law. Walgreen believes that RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe provided the noticed products, and is requesting that RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe pay for Walgreen’s defense, indemnify Walgreen and hold Walgreen harmless from all liability, loss or expense (including legal expense) related to sales of any products covered by the 60-day notice, manufactured or distributed to Walgreen by RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe. In June 2011, RJR Tobacco submitted a reply to Walgreen’s counsel, and Santa Fe submitted a reply in July 2011. Neither company has received a response from Walgreen’s counsel. RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe each believes that it has valid defenses to Walgreen’s claims.
     Finally, in the first quarter of 2005, Commonwealth Brands, Inc., referred to as Commonwealth, was served with an individual smoking and health case, Croft v. Akron Gasket in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Commonwealth requested indemnity from RJR Tobacco pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement dated July 24, 1996, between Commonwealth and B&W, referred to as the 1996 Purchase Agreement. As a result of the B&W business combination, RJR Tobacco agreed to indemnify Commonwealth for this claim to the extent, if any, required by the 1996 Purchase Agreement. The scope of the indemnity will be at issue and has not been determined.
Smokeless Tobacco Litigation
     As of September 30, 2011, American Snuff Co. was a defendant in six actions brought by individual plaintiffs in West Virginia state court seeking damages in connection with personal injuries allegedly sustained as a result of the usage of American Snuff Co.’s smokeless tobacco products. These actions are pending before the same West Virginia court as the 588 consolidated individual smoker cases against RJR Tobacco, B&W, as RJR Tobacco’s indemnitee, or both. Pursuant to the court’s December 3, 2001, order, the smokeless tobacco claims and defendants remain severed.
     Pursuant to a second amended complaint filed in September 2006, American Snuff Co. is a defendant in Vassallo v. United States Tobacco Company, pending in the Eleventh Circuit Court in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The individual plaintiff alleges that he sustained personal injuries, including addiction and cancer, as a result of his use of smokeless tobacco products, allegedly including products manufactured by American Snuff Co. The plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory and consequential damages in an amount greater than $15,000. There is not a punitive damages demand in this case, though the plaintiff retains the right to seek leave of court to add such a demand later. Discovery is underway.
Tobacco Buyout Legislation and Related Litigation
     In 2004, legislation was passed eliminating the U.S. government’s tobacco production controls and price support program. The buyout of tobacco quota holders provided for in the Fair and Equitable Tobacco Reform Act, referred to as FETRA, is funded by a direct quarterly assessment on every tobacco product manufacturer and importer, on a market-share basis measured on volume to which federal excise tax is applied. The aggregate cost of the buyout to the industry is approximately $9.9 billion, including approximately $9.6 billion payable to quota tobacco holders

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and growers through industry assessments over ten years and approximately $290 million for the liquidation of quota tobacco stock. As a result of the tobacco buyout legislation, the MSA Phase II obligations established in 1999 continued as scheduled through the end of 2010, but were offset against the tobacco quota buyout obligations. RAI’s operating subsidiaries’ annual expense under FETRA for 2011 and thereafter, excluding the tobacco stock liquidation assessment, is estimated to be approximately $230 million to $260 million.
     RAI’s operating subsidiaries recorded the FETRA assessment on a quarterly basis as cost of goods sold. RAI’s operating subsidiaries estimate that their overall share of the buyout will approximate $2.4 billion to $2.8 billion prior to the deduction of permitted offsets under the MSA. In addition, future market pricing could impact the carrying value of inventory, and adversely affect RJR Tobacco’s financial position and results of operations.
     As noted above, the MSA Phase II obligations are offset against the tobacco quota buyout obligations. Because growers in two states, Maryland and Pennsylvania, did not participate in the quota system, they are not eligible for payments under FETRA. Given that the assessments paid by tobacco product manufacturers and importers under FETRA fully offset their MSA Phase II payment obligations, the growers in Maryland and Pennsylvania would no longer receive payments under the MSA Phase II program. Thus, the growers in these two states do not receive payments under either FETRA or the MSA Phase II program.
ERISA Litigation
     In May 2002, in Tatum v. The R.J.R. Pension Investment Committee of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Capital Investment Plan, an employee of RJR Tobacco filed a class-action suit in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina, alleging that the defendants, RJR, RJR Tobacco, the RJR Employee Benefits Committee and the RJR Pension Investment Committee, violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, referred to as ERISA. The actions about which the plaintiff complains stem from a decision made in 1999 by RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp., subsequently renamed Nabisco Group Holdings Corp., referred to as NGH, to spin off RJR, thereby separating NGH’s tobacco business and food business. As part of the spin-off, the 401(k) plan for the previously related entities had to be divided into two separate plans for the now separate tobacco and food businesses. The plaintiff contends that the defendants breached their fiduciary duties to participants of the RJR 401(k) plan when the defendants removed the stock funds of the companies involved in the food business, NGH and Nabisco Holdings Corp., referred to as Nabisco, as investment options from the RJR 401(k) plan approximately six months after the spin-off. The plaintiff asserts that a November 1999 amendment (the “1999 Amendment”) that eliminated the NGH and Nabisco funds from the RJR 401(k) plan on January 31, 2000, contained sufficient discretion for the defendants to have retained the NGH and Nabisco funds after January 31, 2000, and that the failure to exercise such discretion was a breach of fiduciary duty. In his complaint, the plaintiff requests, among other things, that the court require the defendants to pay as damages to the RJR 401(k) plan an amount equal to the subsequent appreciation that was purportedly lost as a result of the liquidation of the NGH and Nabisco funds.
     In July 2002, the defendants filed a motion to dismiss, which the court granted in December 2003. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed the dismissal of the complaint, holding that the 1999 Amendment did contain sufficient discretion for the defendants to have retained the NGH and Nabisco funds as of February 1, 2000, and remanded the case for further proceedings. The court granted the plaintiff leave to file an amended complaint and denied all pending motions as moot. In April 2007, the defendants moved to dismiss the amended complaint. The court granted the motion in part and denied it in part, dismissing all claims against the RJR Employee Benefits Committee and the RJR Pension Investment Committee. The remaining defendants, RJR and RJR Tobacco, filed their answer and affirmative defenses in June 2007. The plaintiff filed a motion for class certification, which the court granted in September 2008. The district court ordered mediation, but no resolution of the case was reached. In September 2008, each of the plaintiffs and the defendants filed motions for summary judgment, and in January 2009, the defendants filed a motion to decertify the class. A second mediation occurred in June 2009, but again no resolution of the case was reached. The district court overruled the motions for summary judgment and the motion to decertify the class.
     A non-jury trial was held in January and February 2010. During closing arguments, the plaintiff argued for the first time that certain facts arising at trial showed that the 1999 Amendment was not validly adopted, and then moved to amend his complaint to conform to this evidence at trial. On June 1, 2011, the court granted the plaintiff’s motion to amend his complaint and found that the 1999 Amendment was invalid.

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     The parties filed their findings of fact and conclusions of law on February 4, 2011. A decision is pending.
Environmental Matters
     RAI and its subsidiaries are subject to federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations concerning the discharge, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous or toxic substances. Such laws and regulations provide for significant fines, penalties and liabilities, sometimes without regard to whether the owner or operator of the property knew of, or was responsible for, the release or presence of hazardous or toxic substances. In addition, third parties may make claims against owners or operators of properties for personal injuries and property damage associated with releases of hazardous or toxic substances. In the past, RJR Tobacco has been named a potentially responsible party with third parties under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act with respect to several superfund sites. RAI and its subsidiaries are not aware of any current environmental matters that are expected to have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations or financial position of RAI or its subsidiaries.
     In September 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, referred to as EPA, passed a rule which requires companies to monitor greenhouse gas, referred to as GHG, emissions beginning in January, 2010 and, depending upon the industry in which the particular company operates or the amount of the company’s GHG emissions, report these emissions to EPA on an annual basis, beginning in 2011. Based upon its GHG emission levels, RJR Tobacco submitted the required GHG emissions reports to the EPA pertaining to one of its facilities. RJR Tobacco is fully prepared to make annual submissions in accordance with the EPA’s regulations.
     RAI and its operating subsidiaries believe that climate change is an environmental issue primarily driven by carbon dioxide emissions from the use of energy. RAI’s operating subsidiaries are working to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by minimizing the use of energy where cost effective, minimizing waste to landfills and increasing recycling. Climate change is not viewed by RAI’s operating subsidiaries as a significant direct economic risk to their businesses, but rather an indirect risk involving the potential for a longer term general increase in the cost of doing business. Regulatory changes are difficult to predict but the current regulatory risks to the business of RAI’s operating subsidiaries with respect to climate change are relatively low and financial impacts will be driven more by the cost of natural gas and electricity. Efforts are made to mitigate the effect of increases in fuel costs directly impacting RAI’s operating subsidiaries by evaluating natural gas usage and market conditions, and occasionally purchasing forward contracts, limited to a three-year period, for natural gas. In addition, RAI’s operating subsidiaries are constantly evaluating electrical energy conservation measures and energy efficient equipment to mitigate impacts of increases in electrical energy costs.
     Regulations promulgated by the EPA and other governmental agencies under various statutes have resulted in, and likely will continue to result in, substantial expenditures for pollution control, waste treatment, facility modification and similar activities. RAI and its subsidiaries are engaged in a continuing program to comply with federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations, and dependent upon the probability of occurrence and reasonable estimation of cost, accrue or disclose any material liability. Although it is difficult to reasonably estimate the portion of capital expenditures or other costs attributable to compliance with environmental laws and regulations, RAI does not expect such expenditures or other costs to have a material adverse effect on the business, results of operations or financial position of RAI or its subsidiaries.
Other Contingencies
     In connection with the sale of the international tobacco business to JTI, pursuant to the 1999 Purchase Agreement, RJR and RJR Tobacco agreed to indemnify JTI against:
    any liabilities, costs and expenses arising out of the imposition or assessment of any tax with respect to the international tobacco business arising prior to the sale, other than as reflected on the closing balance sheet;
 
    any liabilities, costs and expenses that JTI or any of its affiliates, including the acquired entities, may incur after the sale with respect to any of RJR’s or RJR Tobacco’s employee benefit and welfare plans; and

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    any liabilities, costs and expenses incurred by JTI or any of its affiliates arising out of certain activities of Northern Brands.
     As described above in “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — Other Litigation and Developments—Claims for Indemnification,” RJR Tobacco has received claims for indemnification from JTI, and several of these have been resolved pursuant to the SA-MR. Although RJR and RJR Tobacco recognize that, under certain circumstances, they may have other unresolved indemnification obligations to JTI under the 1999 Purchase Agreement, RJR and RJR Tobacco disagree what circumstances described in such claims give rise to any indemnification obligations by RJR and RJR Tobacco and the nature and extent of any such obligation. RJR and RJR Tobacco have conveyed their position to JTI, and the parties have agreed to resolve their differences at a later date.
     RJR Tobacco, Santa Fe and American Snuff Co. have entered into agreements to indemnify certain distributors and retailers from liability and related defense costs arising out of the sale or distribution of their products. Additionally, Santa Fe has entered into an agreement to indemnify a supplier from liability and related defense costs arising out of the sale or use of Santa Fe’s products. The cost has been, and is expected to be, insignificant. RJR Tobacco, Santa Fe and American Snuff Co. believe that the indemnified claims are substantially similar in nature and extent to the claims that they are already exposed to by virtue of their having manufactured those products.
     Except as otherwise noted above, RAI is not able to estimate the maximum potential amount of future payments, if any, related to these indemnification obligations.
Note 11 — Shareholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income
                                                 
                            Accumulated              
                            Other     Total        
    Common     Paid-In     Accumulated     Comprehensive     Shareholders’     Comprehensive  
    Stock     Capital     Deficit     Loss     Equity     Income  
Balance as of December 31, 2009
  $     $ 8,498     $ (579 )   $ (1,421 )   $ 6,498          
Net income
                804             804     $ 804  
Retirement benefits, net of $8 million tax expense
                      94       94       94  
Unrealized gain on long-term investments, net of $2 million tax expense
                      4       4       4  
Cumulative translation adjustment, net of $8 million tax benefit
                      (5 )     (5 )     (5 )
 
                                             
Total comprehensive income
                                          $ 897  
 
                                             
Dividends — $1.35 per share
                (793 )           (793 )        
Common stock repurchased
          (5 )                 (5 )        
Equity incentive award plan and stock-based compensation
          29                   29          
Excess tax benefit on stock-based compensation plans
          2                   2          
 
                                     
Balance as of September 30, 2010
  $     $ 8,524     $ (568 )   $ (1,328 )   $ 6,628          
 
                                     
                                                 
                            Accumulated              
                            Other     Total        
    Common     Paid-In     Accumulated     Comprehensive     Shareholders’     Comprehensive  
    Stock     Capital     Deficit     Loss     Equity     Income  
Balance as of December 31, 2010
  $     $ 8,535     $ (547 )   $ (1,478 )   $ 6,510          
Net income
                1,024             1,024     $ 1,024  
Retirement benefits, net of $65 million tax expense
                      100       100       100  
Unrealized loss on long-term investments, net of $4 million tax benefit
                      (7 )     (7 )     (7 )
 
                                             
Cumulative translation adjustment
                      (2 )     (2 )     (2 )
 
                                             
Total comprehensive income
                                          $ 1,115  
 
                                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
                                                 
                            Accumulated              
                          Other     Total        
    Common     Paid-In     Accumulated     Comprehensive     Shareholders’     Comprehensive  
    Stock     Capital     Deficit     Loss     Equity     Income  
Dividends — $1.59 per share
                (935 )           (935 )        
Common stock repurchased
          (6 )                 (6 )        
Equity incentive award plan and stock-based compensation
          29                   29          
Excess tax benefit on stock-based compensation plans
          1                   1          
 
                                     
Balance as of September 30, 2011
  $     $ 8,559     $ (458 )   $ (1,387 )   $ 6,714          
 
                                     
     Due to RAI’s incorporation in North Carolina, which does not recognize treasury shares, the shares repurchased are cancelled at the time of repurchase. During the first nine months of 2011, RAI purchased 162,257 shares of RAI common stock that were forfeited with respect to tax liabilities associated with restricted stock vesting under the LTIP, a plan which expired in 2009 and was replaced by the Reynolds American Inc. 2009 Omnibus Incentive Compensation Plan, referred to as the Omnibus Plan.
     On February 16, 2011, May 6, 2011 and July 15, 2011, RAI’s board of directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.53 per common share, or $2.12 on an annualized basis, to shareholders of record as of March 10, 2011, June 10, 2011 and September 12, 2011, respectively.
Note 12 — Stock Plans
     In February 2011, the board of directors of RAI approved a grant to key employees of RAI and its subsidiaries of 1,561,331 nonvested restricted stock units under the Omnibus Plan, effective March 1, 2011. The restricted stock units generally will vest on March 1, 2014. Upon settlement, each grantee will receive a number of shares of RAI’s common stock equal to the product of the number of vested units and a percentage up to 150% based on the average RAI annual incentive award plan score over the three-year period ending December 31, 2013.
     As an equity-based grant, compensation expense relating to the 2011 Omnibus Plan grant will take into account the vesting period lapsed and will be calculated based on the per share closing price of RAI common stock on the date of grant, or $33.99. Dividends paid on shares of RAI common stock will accumulate on the restricted stock units and will be paid to the grantee on the vesting date. If RAI fails to pay its shareholders cumulative dividends of at least $6.36 per share for the three-year performance period ending December 31, 2013, then each award will be reduced by an amount equal to three times the percentage of the dividend underpayment, up to a maximum reduction of 50%.
Note 13 — Segment Information
     RAI’s reportable operating segments are RJR Tobacco and American Snuff. The RJR Tobacco segment consists of the primary operations of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. The American Snuff segment consists of the primary operations of American Snuff Co. and, prior to its sale on February 28, 2011, Lane. RAI’s subsidiaries, Santa Fe and Niconovum AB, among others, are included in All Other. The segments were identified based on how RAI’s chief operating decision maker allocates resources and assesses performance. Certain of RAI’s operating subsidiaries have entered into intercompany agreements for products or services with other subsidiaries. As a result, certain activities of an operating subsidiary may be included in a different segment of RAI.
     RAI’s largest reportable operating segment, RJR Tobacco, is the second largest cigarette manufacturer in the United States. RJR Tobacco’s brands include many of the best-selling cigarettes in the United States: CAMEL, PALL MALL, WINSTON, KOOL, DORAL and SALEM. Those brands, and its other brands, including MISTY and CAPRI, are manufactured in a variety of styles and marketed in the United States. As part of its total tobacco strategy, RJR Tobacco also offers two types of smoke-free tobacco products, CAMEL Snus, and in certain lead markets, CAMEL Dissolvables. RJR Tobacco also manages contract manufacturing of cigarette and tobacco products through arrangements with BAT affiliates, and manages the export of tobacco products to certain U.S. territories, U.S. duty-free shops and U.S. overseas military bases.
     RAI’s other reportable operating segment, American Snuff, is the second largest smokeless tobacco products manufacturer in the United States. American Snuff’s leading brands are GRIZZLY, KODIAK and LEVI GARRETT.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
     Santa Fe manufactures and markets cigarettes and other tobacco products under the NATURAL AMERICAN SPIRIT brand, as well as manages RJR Tobacco’s super premium cigarette brands, DUNHILL and STATE EXPRESS 555, which are licensed from BAT. The financial position and results of operations of this operating segment, as well as Niconovum AB, do not meet the materiality criteria to be reportable.
     Intersegment revenues and items below the operating income line of the condensed consolidated statements of income (unaudited) are not presented by segment, since they are excluded from the measure of segment profitability reviewed by RAI’s chief operating decision maker. Additionally, information about total assets by segment is not reviewed by RAI’s chief operating decision maker and therefore is not disclosed.
     Segment Data:
                                 
    For the Three Months     For the Nine Months Ended  
    Ended September 30,     September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
Net sales:
                               
RJR Tobacco
  $ 1,882     $ 1,917     $ 5,533     $ 5,579  
American Snuff
    163       185       483       528  
All Other
    155       137       442       363  
 
                       
Consolidated net sales
  $ 2,200     $ 2,239     $ 6,458     $ 6,470  
 
                       
Operating income:
                               
RJR Tobacco
  $ 519     $ 561     $ 1,402     $ 1,572  
American Snuff
    89       95       255       253  
All Other
    51       33       164       91  
Corporate expense
    (24 )     (27 )     (68 )     (64 )
 
                       
Consolidated operating income
  $ 635     $ 662     $ 1,753     $ 1,852  
 
                       
Reconciliation to income from continuing operations before income taxes:
                               
Operating income
  $ 635     $ 662     $ 1,753     $ 1,852  
Interest and debt expense
    55       55       165       176  
Interest income
    (3 )     (3 )     (9 )     (9 )
Other expense (income), net
    2       (8 )     2       4  
 
                       
Income from continuing operations before income taxes
  $ 581     $ 618     $ 1,595     $ 1,681  
 
                       
Note 14 — Related Party Transactions
     RAI’s operating subsidiaries engage in transactions with affiliates of BAT, which owns approximately 42% of RAI’s outstanding common stock. A summary of balances and transactions with such BAT affiliates was as follows:
     Balances:
                 
    September 30,     December 31,  
    2011     2010  
Accounts receivable
  $ 74     $ 48  
Accounts payable
    4       4  
Deferred revenue
    10       53  
     Transactions for the nine months ended September 30:

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
                 
    2011     2010  
Net sales
  $ 380     $ 329  
Purchases
    11       10  
     RAI’s operating subsidiaries sell contract-manufactured cigarettes and processed strip leaf to BAT affiliates. Pricing for contract manufactured cigarettes is based on negotiated cost, plus 10%, adjusted for contract years 2011 through 2014 with prices increasing or decreasing by a multiple equal to changes in the Producer Price Index, reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Net sales to BAT affiliates, primarily cigarettes, represented approximately 5.9% of RAI’s total net sales during the nine months ended September 30, 2011.
     RJR Tobacco recorded deferred sales revenue relating to leaf sold to BAT affiliates that had not been delivered as of the end of the respective quarter, given that RJR Tobacco has a legal right to bill the BAT affiliates. Leaf sales revenue to BAT affiliates is recognized when the product is shipped to the customer.
     RAI’s operating subsidiaries also purchase unprocessed leaf at market prices, and import cigarettes at prices not to exceed manufacturing costs plus 10%, from BAT affiliates.
     A member of the board of directors of RAI is also the president and chief executive officer of a company from which RJR Tobacco and American Snuff purchase certain raw materials. Such purchases during the nine months ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, and related amounts due at September 30, 2011 and 2010, were less than $1 million. In addition to the purchases of raw materials, in July 2011, RJR Tobacco sold an airplane to this company for approximately $8 million.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Note 15 — RAI Guaranteed, Unsecured Notes — Condensed Consolidating Financial Statements
     The following condensed consolidating financial statements have been prepared pursuant to Rule 3-10 of Regulation S-X, relating to the guaranties of RAI’s $3.6 billion unsecured notes. RAI’s direct, wholly owned subsidiaries and certain of its indirectly owned subsidiaries have fully and unconditionally and jointly and severally, guaranteed these notes. The following condensed consolidating financial statements include: the accounts and activities of RAI, the parent issuer; RJR, RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co., Santa Fe, and certain of RAI’s other subsidiaries, the Guarantors; other indirect subsidiaries of RAI that are not Guarantors; and elimination adjustments.

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Income
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent             Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                       
Net sales
  $     $ 2,040     $ 30     $ (7 )   $ 2,063  
Net sales, related party
          137                   137  
 
                             
Net sales
          2,177       30       (7 )     2,200  
Cost of products sold
          1,144       11       (7 )     1,148  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    8       379       24             411  
Amortization expense
          6                   6  
 
                             
Operating income (loss)
    (8 )     648       (5 )           635  
Interest and debt expense
    53       32             (30 )     55  
Interest income
    (30 )     (2 )     (1 )     30       (3 )
Other expense (income), net
    5       (13 )     (1 )     11       2  
 
                             
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (36 )     631       (3 )     (11 )     581  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (17 )     230       1             214  
Equity income (loss) from subsidiaries
    386       (1 )           (385 )      
 
                             
Net income (loss)
  $ 367     $ 400     $ (4 )   $ (396 )   $ 367  
 
                             
For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                       
Net sales
  $     $ 2,123     $ 41     $ (18 )   $ 2,146  
Net sales, related party
          93                   93  
 
                             
Net sales
          2,216       41       (18 )     2,239  
Cost of products sold
          1,179       23       (18 )     1,184  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    3       364       21       (1 )     387  
Amortization expense
          6                   6  
 
                             
Operating income (loss)
    (3 )     667       (3 )     1       662  
Interest and debt expense
    53       31             (29 )     55  
Interest income
    (29 )     (1 )     (2 )     29       (3 )
Other income, net
    (7 )     (11 )     (1 )     11       (8 )
 
                             
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (20 )     648             (10 )     618  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (7 )     244       (1 )     1       237  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    394       3             (397 )      
 
                             
Net income
  $ 381     $ 407     $ 1     $ (408 )   $ 381  
 
                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Income
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent             Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                       
Net sales
  $     $ 6,013     $ 84     $ (19 )   $ 6,078  
Net sales, related party
          380                   380  
 
                             
Net sales
          6,393       84       (19 )     6,458  
Cost of products sold
          3,421       22       (19 )     3,424  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    124       1,072       67             1,263  
Amortization expense
          18                   18  
 
                             
Operating income (loss)
    (124 )     1,882       (5 )           1,753  
Interest and debt expense
    159       95             (89 )     165  
Interest income
    (89 )     (4 )     (5 )     89       (9 )
Other expense (income), net
    7       (37 )           32       2  
 
                             
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (201 )     1,828             (32 )     1,595  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (81 )     651       1             571  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    1,144       7             (1,151 )      
 
                             
Net income (loss)
  $ 1,024     $ 1,184     $ (1 )   $ (1,183 )   $ 1,024  
 
                             
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                       
Net sales
  $     $ 6,102     $ 120     $ (81 )   $ 6,141  
Net sales, related party
          329                   329  
 
                             
Net sales
          6,431       120       (81 )     6,470  
Cost of products sold
          3,456       62       (81 )     3,437  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    12       1,055       58       (1 )     1,124  
Amortization expense
          19                   19  
Asset impairment and exit charges
          24       14             38  
 
                             
Operating income (loss)
    (12 )     1,877       (14 )     1       1,852  
Interest and debt expense
    170       96             (90 )     176  
Interest income
    (90 )     (3 )     (6 )     90       (9 )
Other expense (income), net
          (28 )           32       4  
 
                             
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes
    (92 )     1,812       (8 )     (31 )     1,681  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (30 )     697       (7 )     1       661  
Equity income (loss) from subsidiaries
    866       (69 )           (797 )      
 
                             
Income (loss) from continuing operations
    804       1,046       (1 )     (829 )     1,020  
Losses from discontinued operations, net of tax
          (142 )     (74 )           (216 )
 
                             
Net income (loss)
  $ 804     $ 904     $ (75 )   $ (829 )   $ 804  
 
                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent             Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                       
Cash flows from operating activities
  $ 577     $ 1,034     $ 2     $ (772 )   $ 841  
 
                             
Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:
                                       
Capital expenditures
          (142 )                 (142 )
Net proceeds from sale of business
    79       123                   202  
Proceeds from termination of joint venture
                32             32  
Return of intercompany investments
    690                   (690 )      
Other, net
    40       37             (64 )     13  
 
                             
Net cash flows from investing activities
    809       18       32       (754 )     105  
 
                             
Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:
                                       
Dividends paid on common stock
    (903 )     (740 )           740       (903 )
Repayment of long-term debt
    (400 )                       (400 )
Proceeds from termination of interest rate swaps
    185       1                   186  
Dividends paid on preferred stock
    (32 )                 32        
Distribution of equity
          (690 )           690        
Other, net
    (33 )     (40 )     (3 )     64       (12 )
 
                             
Net cash flows used in financing activities
    (1,183 )     (1,469 )     (3 )     1,526       (1,129 )
 
                             
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                (2 )           (2 )
 
                             
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    203       (417 )     29             (185 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    327       1,616       252             2,195  
 
                             
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 530     $ 1,199     $ 281     $     $ 2,010  
 
                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent             Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                       
Cash flows from operating activities
  $ 120     $ 1,220     $ 10     $ (332 )   $ 1,018  
 
                             
Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:
                                       
Capital expenditures
          (113 )     (2 )           (115 )
Proceeds from termination of joint venture
                28             28  
Contributions to intercompany investments
          (75 )           75        
Return of intercompany investments
    897                   (897 )      
Other, net
    40       39             (62 )     17  
 
                             
Net cash flows from (used in) investing activities
    937       (149 )     26       (884 )     (70 )
 
                             
Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:
                                       
Dividends paid on common stock
    (787 )     (300 )           300       (787 )
Repayment of long-term debt
    (300 )                       (300 )
Dividends paid on preferred stock
    (32 )                 32        
Receipt of equity
                75       (75 )      
Distribution of equity
          (897 )           897        
Intercompany notes payable
    (21 )     (40 )     (1 )     62        
 
                             
Net cash flows from (used in) financing activities
    (1,140 )     (1,237 )     74       1,216       (1,087 )
 
                             
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                (6 )           (6 )
 
                             
Net cash flows related to discontinued operations, net of tax benefit
    72       (324 )     (74 )           (326 )
 
                             
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    (11 )     (490 )     30             (471 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    361       2,136       226             2,723  
 
                             
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 350     $ 1,646     $ 256     $     $ 2,252  
 
                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent             Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
September 30, 2011
                                       
Assets
                                       
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 530     $ 1,199     $ 281     $     $ 2,010  
Accounts receivable
          68       20             88  
Accounts receivable, related party
          74                   74  
Notes receivable
          1       32             33  
Other receivables
    147       55       2       (186 )     18  
Inventories
          875       40       (1 )     914  
Deferred income taxes, net
    12       950       1             963  
Prepaid expenses and other
    52       249       7       (3 )     305  
 
                             
Total current assets
    741       3,471       383       (190 )     4,405  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    6       1,042       3       1       1,052  
Trademarks and other intangible assets, net
          2,607       49             2,656  
Goodwill
          7,999       11             8,010  
Long-term intercompany notes
    1,960       1,345             (3,305 )      
Investment in subsidiaries
    9,370       463             (9,833 )      
Other assets and deferred charges
    48       185       70       (23 )     280  
 
                             
Total assets
  $ 12,125     $ 17,112     $ 516     $ (13,350 )   $ 16,403  
 
                             
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
                                       
Accounts payable
  $ 1     $ 109     $ 4     $     $ 114  
Tobacco settlement accruals
          2,341                   2,341  
Due to related party
          4                   4  
Deferred revenue, related party
          10                   10  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    402       58                   460  
Other current liabilities
    449       814       43       (189 )     1,117  
 
                             
Total current liabilities
    852       3,336       47       (189 )     4,046  
Intercompany notes and interest payable
    1,345       1,960             (3,305 )      
Long-term debt (less current maturities)
    3,152       60                   3,212  
Deferred income taxes, net
          721       4       (23 )     702  
Long-term retirement benefits (less current portion)
    44       1,428       13             1,485  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    18       224       2             244  
Shareholders’ equity
    6,714       9,383       450       (9,833 )     6,714  
 
                             
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
  $ 12,125     $ 17,112     $ 516     $ (13,350 )   $ 16,403  
 
                             

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Notes To Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets
(Dollars in Millions)
                                         
    Parent           Non-              
    Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated    
December 31, 2010
                                       
Assets
                                       
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 327     $ 1,616     $ 252     $     $ 2,195  
Accounts receivable
          103       15             118  
Accounts receivable, related party
          48                   48  
Notes receivable
          1       33             34  
Other receivables
    80       160       2       (232 )     10  
Inventories
          1,022       34       (1 )     1,055  
Deferred income taxes, net
    10       934       2             946  
Prepaid expenses and other
    38       155       4       (2 )     195  
Assets held for sale
          201                   201  
 
                             
Total current assets
    455       4,240       342       (235 )     4,802  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    6       991       4       1       1,002  
Trademarks and other intangible assets, net
          2,625       50             2,675  
Goodwill
          7,991       19             8,010  
Long-term intercompany notes
    2,000       1,366             (3,366 )      
Investment in subsidiaries
    9,696       462             (10,158 )      
Other assets and deferred charges
    267       242       100       (20 )     589  
 
                             
Total assets
  $ 12,424     $ 17,917     $ 515     $ (13,778 )   $ 17,078  
 
                             
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
                                       
Accounts payable
  $     $ 175     $ 4     $     $ 179  
Tobacco settlement accruals
          2,589                   2,589  
Due to related party
          4                   4  
Deferred revenue, related party
          53                   53  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    400                         400  
Other current liabilities
    489       855       37       (234 )     1,147  
 
                             
Total current liabilities
    889       3,676       41       (234 )     4,372  
Intercompany notes and interest payable
    1,366       2,000             (3,366 )      
Long-term debt (less current maturities)
    3,580       121                   3,701  
Deferred income taxes, net
          535       3       (20 )     518  
Long-term retirement benefits (less current portion)
    34       1,622       12             1,668  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    45       262       2             309  
Shareholders’ equity
    6,510       9,701       457       (10,158 )     6,510  
 
                             
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
  $ 12,424     $ 17,917     $ 515     $ (13,778 )   $ 17,078  
 
                             

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Note 16 — RJR Guaranteed, Unsecured Notes — Condensed Consolidating Financial Statements
     The following condensed consolidating financial statements have been prepared pursuant to Rule 3-10 of Regulation S-X, relating to the guaranties of RJR’s $59 million unsecured notes. RAI and certain of its direct or indirect, wholly owned subsidiaries, have fully and unconditionally, and jointly and severally, guaranteed these notes. The following condensed consolidating financial statements include: the accounts and activities of RAI, the parent Guarantor; RJR, the issuer of the debt securities; RJR Tobacco, and certain of RJR’s other subsidiaries, the other Guarantors; other subsidiaries of RAI and RJR, including Santa Fe and American Snuff Co. that are not Guarantors; and elimination adjustments.

72


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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Income
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                               
Net sales
  $     $     $ 1,763     $ 308     $ (8 )   $ 2,063  
Net sales, related party
                137                   137  
 
                                   
Net sales
                1,900       308       (8 )     2,200  
Cost of products sold
                1,052       104       (8 )     1,148  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    8       1       329       73             411  
Amortization expense
                5       1             6  
 
                                   
Operating income (loss)
    (8 )     (1 )     514       130             635  
Interest and debt expense
    53       2             41       (41 )     55  
Interest income
    (30 )     (2 )     (10 )     (2 )     41       (3 )
Other expense (income), net
    5       (11 )     (1 )     (2 )     11       2  
 
                                   
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (36 )     10       525       93       (11 )     581  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (17 )           194       37             214  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    386       333       2             (721 )      
 
                                   
Net income
  $ 367     $ 343     $ 333     $ 56     $ (732 )   $ 367  
 
                                   
For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                               
Net sales
  $     $     $ 1,851     $ 328     $ (33 )   $ 2,146  
Net sales, related party
                90       3             93  
 
                                   
Net sales
                1,941       331       (33 )     2,239  
Cost of products sold
                1,098       120       (34 )     1,184  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    3       1       292       92       (1 )     387  
Amortization expense
                6                   6  
 
                                   
Operating income (loss)
    (3 )     (1 )     545       119       2       662  
Interest and debt expense
    53       1       1       42       (42 )     55  
Interest income
    (29 )     (2 )     (12 )     (2 )     42       (3 )
Other expense (income), net
    (7 )     (11 )     1       (2 )     11       (8 )
 
                                   
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (20 )     11       555       81       (9 )     618  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (7 )           214       29       1       237  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    394       346       3             (743 )      
 
                                   
Net income
  $ 381     $ 357     $ 344     $ 52     $ (753 )   $ 381  
 
                                   

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Income
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                               
Net sales
  $     $     $ 5,225     $ 895     $ (42 )   $ 6,078  
Net sales, related party
                378       2             380  
 
                                   
Net sales
                5,603       897       (42 )     6,458  
Cost of products sold
                3,183       283       (42 )     3,424  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    124       (6 )     915       230             1,263  
Amortization expense
                16       2             18  
 
                                   
Operating income (loss)
    (124 )     6       1,489       382             1,753  
Interest and debt expense
    159       6             122       (122 )     165  
Interest income
    (89 )     (4 )     (33 )     (5 )     122       (9 )
Other expense (income), net
    7       (34 )           (3 )     32       2  
 
                                   
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (201 )     38       1,522       268       (32 )     1,595  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (81 )     2       549       101             571  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    1,144       984       11             (2,139 )      
 
                                   
Net income
  $ 1,024     $ 1,020     $ 984     $ 167     $ (2,171 )   $ 1,024  
 
                                   
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                               
Net sales
  $     $     $ 5,346     $ 919     $ (124 )   $ 6,141  
Net sales, related party
                321       8             329  
 
                                   
Net sales
                5,667       927       (124 )     6,470  
Cost of products sold
                3,235       327       (125 )     3,437  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    12       2       854       257       (1 )     1,124  
Amortization expense
                18       1             19  
Asset impairment and exit charges
                24       14             38  
 
                                   
Operating income (loss)
    (12 )     (2 )     1,536       328       2       1,852  
Interest and debt expense
    170       5       1       125       (125 )     176  
Interest income
    (90 )     (4 )     (34 )     (6 )     125       (9 )
Other expense (income), net
          (31 )     6       (3 )     32       4  
 
                                   
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes
    (92 )     28       1,563       212       (30 )     1,681  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (30 )           618       72       1       661  
Equity income from subsidiaries
    866       649       8             (1,523 )      
 
                                   
Income from continuing operations
    804       677       953       140       (1,554 )     1,020  
Gains (losses) from discontinued operations, net of tax
          88       (230 )     (74 )           (216 )
 
                                   
Net income
  $ 804     $ 765     $ 723     $ 66     $ (1,554 )   $ 804  
 
                                   

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2011
                                               
Cash flows from operating activities
  $ 577     $ 1,310     $ 683     $ 308     $ (2,037 )   $ 841  
 
                                   
Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:
                                               
Capital expenditures
                (36 )     (106 )           (142 )
Net proceeds from sale of business
    79             123                   202  
Proceeds from termination of joint venture
                      32             32  
Return of intercompany investments
    690                         (690 )      
Other, net
    40       19       71             (117 )     13  
 
                                   
Net cash flows from (used in) investing activities
    809       19       158       (74 )     (807 )     105  
 
                                   
Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:
                                               
Dividends paid on common stock
    (903 )     (740 )     (1,265 )           2,005       (903 )
Repayment of long-term debt
    (400 )                             (400 )
Proceeds from termination of interest rate swaps
    185       1                         186  
Dividends paid on preferred stock
    (32 )                       32        
Distribution of equity
          (560 )           (130 )     690        
Other, net
    (33 )     (37 )           (59 )     117       (12 )
 
                                   
Net cash flows used in financing activities
    (1,183 )     (1,336 )     (1,265 )     (189 )     2,844       (1,129 )
 
                                   
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                      (2 )           (2 )
 
                                   
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    203       (7 )     (424 )     43             (185 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    327       14       1,506       348             2,195  
 
                                   
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 530     $ 7     $ 1,082     $ 391     $     $ 2,010  
 
                                   

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Table of Contents

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2010
                                               
Cash flows from operating activities
  $ 120     $ 433     $ 1,033     $ 169     $ (737 )   $ 1,018  
 
                                   
Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:
                                               
Capital expenditures
                (38 )     (77 )           (115 )
Proceeds from termination of joint venture
                      28             28  
Return of intercompany investments
    897       795                   (1,692 )      
Contribution to intercompany investments
          (75 )                 75        
Other, net
    40       24       36       1       (84 )     17  
 
                                   
Net cash flows from (used in) investing activities
    937       744       (2 )     (48 )     (1,701 )     (70 )
 
                                   
Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:
                                               
Dividends paid on common stock
    (787 )     (300 )     (405 )           705       (787 )
Repayment of long-term debt
    (300 )                             (300 )
Dividends paid on preferred stock
    (32 )                       32        
Receipt of equity
                      75       (75 )      
Distribution of equity
          (897 )     (795 )           1,692        
Intercompany notes payable
    (21 )     1             (64 )     84        
 
                                   
Net cash flows from (used in) financing activities
    (1,140 )     (1,196 )     (1,200 )     11       2,438       (1,087 )
 
                                   
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                      (6 )           (6 )
 
                                   
Net cash flows related to discontinued operations, net of tax benefit
    72             (324 )     (74 )           (326 )
 
                                   
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    (11 )     (19 )     (493 )     52             (471 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    361       24       2,001       337             2,723  
 
                                   
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 350     $ 5     $ 1,508     $ 389     $     $ 2,252  
 
                                   

76


Table of Contents

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
September 30, 2011
                                               
Assets
                                               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 530     $ 7     $ 1,082     $ 391     $     $ 2,010  
Accounts receivable
                55       33             88  
Accounts receivable, related party
                74                   74  
Notes receivable
          1             32             33  
Other receivables
    147       24       149       3       (305 )     18  
Inventories
                494       420             914  
Deferred income taxes, net
    12       1       908       42             963  
Prepaid expenses and other
    52             226       27             305  
 
                                   
Total current assets
    741       33       2,988       948       (305 )     4,405  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    6             654       391       1       1,052  
Trademarks and other intangible assets, net
                1,300       1,356             2,656  
Goodwill
                5,303       2,707             8,010  
Long-term intercompany notes
    1,960       157       1,345             (3,462 )      
Investment in subsidiaries
    9,370       7,432       445             (17,247 )      
Other assets and deferred charges
    48       33       160       73       (34 )     280  
 
                                   
Total assets
  $ 12,125     $ 7,655     $ 12,195     $ 5,475     $ (21,047 )   $ 16,403  
 
                                   
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
                                               
Accounts payable
  $ 1     $     $ 94     $ 19     $     $ 114  
Tobacco settlement accruals
                2,288       53             2,341  
Due to related party
                4                   4  
Deferred revenue, related party
                10                   10  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    402       58                         460  
Other current liabilities
    449       101       611       261       (305 )     1,117  
 
                                   
Total current liabilities
    852       159       3,007       333       (305 )     4,046  
Intercompany notes and interest payable
    1,345                   2,117       (3,462 )      
Long-term debt (less current maturities)
    3,152       60                         3,212  
Deferred income taxes, net
                227       508       (33 )     702  
Long-term retirement benefits (less current portion)
    44       24       1,311       106             1,485  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    18       3       219       4             244  
Shareholders’ equity
    6,714       7,409       7,431       2,407       (17,247 )     6,714  
 
                                   
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
  $ 12,125     $ 7,655     $ 12,195     $ 5,475     $ (21,047 )   $ 16,403  
 
                                   

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) (Continued)
Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets
(Dollars in Millions)
                                                 
    Parent             Other     Non-              
    Guarantor     Issuer     Guarantors     Guarantors     Eliminations     Consolidated  
December 31, 2010
                                               
Assets
                                               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 327     $ 14     $ 1,506     $ 348     $     $ 2,195  
Accounts receivable
                50       68             118  
Accounts receivable, related party
                48                   48  
Notes receivable
          1             33             34  
Other receivables
    80       32       225       57       (384 )     10  
Inventories
                600       456       (1 )     1,055  
Deferred income taxes, net
    10       1       892       43             946  
Prepaid expenses and other
    38             130       30       (3 )     195  
Assets held for sale
                20       181             201  
 
                                   
Total current assets
    455       48       3,471       1,216       (388 )     4,802  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    6             689       306       1       1,002  
Trademarks and other intangible assets, net
                1,316       1,359             2,675  
Goodwill
                5,303       2,707             8,010  
Long-term intercompany notes
    2,000       174       1,366             (3,540 )      
Investment in subsidiaries
    9,696       7,611       435             (17,742 )      
Other assets and deferred charges
    267       56       194       101       (29 )     589  
 
                                   
Total assets
  $ 12,424     $ 7,889     $ 12,774     $ 5,689     $ (21,698 )   $ 17,078  
 
                                   
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
                                               
Accounts payable
  $     $     $ 103     $ 76     $     $ 179  
Tobacco settlement accruals
                2,532       57             2,589  
Due to related party
                4                   4  
Deferred revenue, related party
                53                   53  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    400                               400  
Other current liabilities
    489       138       652       255       (387 )     1,147  
 
                                   
Total current liabilities
    889       138       3,344       388       (387 )     4,372  
Intercompany notes and interest payable
    1,366                   2,174       (3,540 )      
Long-term debt (less current maturities)
    3,580       121                         3,701  
Deferred income taxes, net
                76       471       (29 )     518  
Long-term retirement benefits (less current portion)
    34       25       1,496       113             1,668  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    45       12       247       5             309  
Shareholders’ equity
    6,510       7,593       7,611       2,538       (17,742 )     6,510  
 
                                   
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
  $ 12,424     $ 7,889     $ 12,774     $ 5,689     $ (21,698 )   $ 17,078  
 
                                   

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
     The following is a discussion and analysis of RAI’s business, initiatives, critical accounting policies and its consolidated results of operations and financial position. Following the overview and discussion of business initiatives, the critical accounting policies disclose certain accounting policies that are material to RAI’s results of operations and financial position for the periods presented in this report. The discussion and analysis of RAI’s results of operations compares the third quarter of 2011 with the third quarter of 2010 and the first nine months of 2011 with the first nine months of 2010. Disclosures related to liquidity and financial position complete management’s discussion and analysis. You should read this discussion and analysis of RAI’s consolidated financial position and results of operations in conjunction with the financial information included in the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
Overview and Business Initiatives
     RAI’s reportable operating segments are RJR Tobacco and American Snuff. The RJR Tobacco segment consists of the primary operations of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. The American Snuff segment consists of the primary operations of American Snuff Co. and, prior to its sale on February 28, 2011, Lane. On February 28, 2011, RAI completed the sale of all of the capital stock of Lane and certain other assets related to the Lane operations, to an affiliate of STG for net proceeds of $202 million in cash. RAI’s subsidiaries, Santa Fe and Niconovum AB, among others, are included in All Other. Certain of RAI’s operating subsidiaries have entered into intercompany agreements for products or services with other subsidiaries. As a result, certain activities of an operating subsidiary may be included in a different segment of RAI.
     RAI’s largest reportable operating segment, RJR Tobacco, is the second largest cigarette manufacturer in the United States. RJR Tobacco’s brands include many of the best-selling cigarettes in the United States: CAMEL, PALL MALL, WINSTON, KOOL, DORAL and SALEM. Those brands, and its other brands, including MISTY and CAPRI, are manufactured in a variety of styles and marketed in the United States. RJR Tobacco also manages contract manufacturing of cigarettes and tobacco products through arrangements with BAT affiliates, and manages the export of tobacco products to certain U.S. territories, U.S. duty-free shops and U.S. overseas military bases.
     RAI’s other reportable operating segment, American Snuff, is the second largest smokeless tobacco products manufacturer in the United States. American Snuff’s leading brands are GRIZZLY, KODIAK and LEVI GARRETT.
     Santa Fe manufactures and markets cigarettes and other tobacco products under the NATURAL AMERICAN SPIRIT brand and manages RJR Tobacco’s super premium cigarette brands, DUNHILL and STATE EXPRESS 555, which are licensed from BAT.
RJR Tobacco
     RJR Tobacco primarily conducts business in the highly competitive U.S. cigarette market, which has a few large manufacturers and many smaller participants. The U.S. cigarette market is a mature market in which overall consumer demand has declined since 1981 and is expected to continue to decline. Profitability of the U.S. cigarette industry and RJR Tobacco continues to be adversely impacted by decreases in consumption, increases in state excise taxes and governmental regulations and restrictions, such as marketing limitations, product standards and ingredients legislation.
     The international rights to substantially all of RJR Tobacco’s brands were sold in 1999 to JTI, and no international rights were acquired in connection with the B&W business combination.
     RJR Tobacco offers two types of modern smoke-free tobacco, CAMEL Snus and CAMEL Dissolvables. CAMEL Snus is pasteurized tobacco in a small pouch that provides convenient tobacco consumption. CAMEL Dissolvables consist of CAMEL Orbs, Sticks and Strips, all of which are made of finely milled tobacco and dissolve completely in the mouth.

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     RJR Tobacco’s cigarette brand portfolio strategy is based upon three brand categories: growth, support and non-support. The growth brands consist of a premium brand, CAMEL, and a value brand, PALL MALL. Although both of these brands are managed for long-term market share and profit growth, CAMEL will continue to receive the most significant equity support. The support brands include four premium brands, WINSTON, KOOL, SALEM and CAPRI, and two value brands, DORAL and MISTY, all of which receive limited marketing support. The non-support brands, consisting of all other brands, are managed to maximize near-term profitability. The key objectives of the portfolio strategy are to ensure the long-term market share growth of the growth brands while managing the support brands for long-term sustainability and profitability. Consistent with that strategy, RJR Tobacco has discontinued many of its non-core cigarette styles as well as private-label cigarette brands. RJR Tobacco’s modern smoke-free products, snus and dissolvable tobacco products, are marketed under the CAMEL brand and focus on long-term growth.
     Competition is based primarily on brand positioning, including price, product attributes and packaging, consumer loyalty, promotions, advertising and retail presence. Cigarette brands produced by the major manufacturers generally require competitive pricing, substantial marketing support, retail programs and other incentives to maintain or improve market position or to introduce a new brand or brand style.
     RJR Tobacco is committed to building and maintaining a portfolio of profitable brands. RJR Tobacco’s marketing programs are designed to strengthen brand image, build brand awareness and loyalty, and switch adult smokers of competing brands to RJR Tobacco brands. In addition to building strong brand equity, RJR Tobacco’s marketing approach utilizes a retail pricing strategy, including discounting at retail, to defend certain brands’ shares of market against competitive pricing pressure. RJR Tobacco’s competitive pricing methods may include list price changes, discounting programs, such as retail and wholesale buydowns, periodic price reductions, off-invoice price reductions, dollar-off promotions and consumer coupons. Retail buydowns refer to payments made to the retailer to reduce the price that consumers pay at retail. Consumer coupons generally are distributed by a variety of methods, including in, or on, the cigarette pack and by direct mail.
American Snuff
     American Snuff offers a range of differentiated smokeless and other tobacco products to adult consumers. The moist snuff category is divided into premium and price-value brands. The moist snuff category has developed many of the characteristics of the larger cigarette market, including multiple pricing tiers with intense competition, focused marketing programs and significant product innovation.
     In contrast to the declining U.S. cigarette market, U.S. moist snuff volumes grew approximately 5% in the first nine months of 2011. Profit margins on moist snuff products are generally higher than on cigarette products. Moist snuff’s growth is partially attributable to cigarette smokers switching from cigarettes to smokeless tobacco products or using both.
     American Snuff faces significant competition in the smokeless tobacco categories. Similar to the cigarette market, competition is based primarily on brand positioning and price, as well as product attributes and packaging, consumer loyalty, promotions, advertising and retail presence.
     American Snuff Co. is replacing its manufacturing operations in Memphis, Tennessee, expecting the new facility to be fully operational by early 2012, and increasing its tobacco-processing capacity in Clarksville, Tennessee, expecting the new facility to be fully operational by the end of 2011.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
     GAAP requires estimates and assumptions to be made that affect the reported amounts in RAI’s condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited) and accompanying notes. Some of these estimates require difficult, subjective and/or complex judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain, and as a result, actual results could differ from those estimates. Due to the estimation processes involved, the following summarized accounting policies and their application are considered to be critical to understanding the business operations, financial position and results of operations of RAI and its subsidiaries.

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Litigation
     RAI discloses information concerning litigation for which an unfavorable outcome is more than remote. RAI and its subsidiaries record their legal expenses and other litigation costs and related administrative costs as selling, general and administrative expenses as those costs are incurred. RAI and its subsidiaries will record any loss related to litigation at such time as an unfavorable outcome becomes probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated on an individual case-by-case basis. When the reasonable estimate is a range, the recorded loss will be the best estimate within the range. If no amount in the range is a better estimate than any other amount, the minimum amount of the range will be recorded.
     As discussed in note 10 to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited), RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co. and their affiliates, including RAI, and indemnitees, have been named in a number of tobacco-related legal actions, proceedings or claims seeking damages in amounts ranging into the hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars. Unfavorable judgments have been returned in a number of tobacco-related cases and state enforcement actions.
     RAI and its subsidiaries believe that they have valid bases for appeal of adverse verdicts against them and believe they have valid defenses to all actions and intend to defend all actions vigorously. RAI’s management continues to conclude that the loss of any particular smoking and health tobacco litigation claim against RJR Tobacco or its affiliates or indemnitees, including B&W, or the loss of any particular claim concerning the use of smokeless tobacco against American Snuff Co., when viewed on an individual basis, is not probable or estimable, except for four Engle Progeny cases described in “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry — Engle and Engle Progeny Cases” in note 10 to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
     Litigation is subject to many uncertainties, and it is possible that some of the tobacco-related legal actions, proceedings or claims could ultimately be decided against RJR Tobacco, American Snuff Co. or their affiliates, including RAI, and indemnitees. Any unfavorable outcome of such actions could have a material adverse effect on the consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position of RAI or its subsidiaries. For further discussion of the litigation and legal proceedings pending against RAI or its affiliates or indemnitees, see note 10 to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
State Settlement Agreements
     RJR Tobacco and Santa Fe are participants in the MSA, and RJR Tobacco is a participant in the other State Settlement Agreements. Their obligations and the related expense charges under the State Settlement Agreements are subject to adjustments based upon, among other things, the volume of cigarettes sold by the operating subsidiaries, their relative market share and inflation. Since relative market share is based on cigarette shipments, the best estimate of the allocation of charges to RJR Tobacco under these agreements is recorded in cost of products sold as the products are shipped. Adjustments to these estimates are recorded in the period that the change becomes probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. American Snuff Co. is not a participant in the State Settlement Agreements. For more information related to historical and expected settlement expenses and payments under the State Settlement Agreements, see “— Litigation Affecting the Cigarette Industry— Health-Care Cost Recovery Cases — State Settlement Agreements” and “— State Settlement Agreements — Enforcement and Validity” in note 10 to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
Intangible Assets
     Intangible assets include goodwill, trademarks and other intangible assets. The determination of fair value involves considerable estimates and judgment. For goodwill, the determination of the fair value of a reporting unit involves, among other things, RAI’s market capitalization, and application of the income approach, which includes developing forecasts of future cash flows and determining an appropriate discount rate. If goodwill impairment is implied, the fair values of individual assets and liabilities, including unrecorded intangibles, must be determined. Although RAI believes it has based its impairment testing and impairment charges on reasonable estimates and assumptions, the use of different estimates and assumptions could result in materially different results. Generally, if the current competitive or regulatory environment worsens or RAI’s operating companies’ strategic initiatives

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adversely affect their financial performance, the fair value of goodwill, trademarks and other intangible assets could be impaired in future periods. Trademarks and other intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested for impairment annually, in the fourth quarter. Goodwill, trademarks and other intangible assets are tested more frequently if events and circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired.
Fair Value Measurement
     RAI determines fair value of assets and liabilities using a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between market participant assumptions based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity, and the reporting entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions based on the best information available in the circumstances.
     Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, essentially an exit price. The levels of the fair value hierarchy are:
     Level 1: inputs are quoted prices, unadjusted, in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.
     Level 2: inputs are other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. A Level 2 input must be observable for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
     Level 3: inputs are unobservable and reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
Pension and Postretirement Benefits
     RAI and certain of its subsidiaries sponsor a number of non-contributory defined benefit pension plans covering most of their employees, and also provide certain health and life insurance benefits for most of their retired employees and their dependents. These benefits are generally no longer provided to employees hired on or after January 1, 2004.
     Because pension and other postretirement obligations ultimately will be settled in future periods, the determination of annual expense and liabilities is subject to estimates and assumptions. RAI reviews these assumptions annually based on historic experience and expected future trends or coincidental with a major event and modifies them as needed. Demographic assumptions such as termination of employment, mortality or retirement are reviewed periodically as expectations change.
     Gains or losses are annual changes in the amount of either the benefit obligation or the market-related value of plan assets resulting from experience different from that assumed or from changes in assumptions. The minimum amortization of unrecognized gains or losses is included in pension expense. Prior service costs, which are changes in benefit obligations due to plan amendments, are amortized on a straight-line basis over the average remaining service period for active employees, or average remaining life expectancies for inactive employees if most of the plan obligations are due to inactive employees.
     The minimum amortization of unrecognized gains or losses is also included in the postretirement benefit expense. Prior service costs, which are changes in benefit obligations due to plan amendments, are amortized on a straight-line basis over the service period to expected full eligibility age for active employees, or average remaining life expectancies for inactive employees if most of the plan obligations are due to inactive employees.
     Differences between actual results and actuarial assumptions are accumulated and amortized over future periods. In recent years, actual results have varied significantly from actuarial assumptions. In particular, pension and postretirement obligations have increased due to significant decreases in discount rates. These changes have resulted in an increase in charges to other comprehensive loss and increased pension and postretirement expense. The Pension Protection Act may require additional cash funding of the increased pension obligations in the future.

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Income Taxes
     Tax law requires certain items to be excluded or included in taxable income at different times than is required for book reporting purposes. These differences may be permanent or temporary in nature.
     RAI determines its annual effective income tax rate based on forecasted pre-tax book income and forecasted permanent book and tax differences. The rate is established at the beginning of the year and is evaluated on a quarterly basis. Any changes to the forecasted information may cause the effective rate to be adjusted. Additional tax, interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions are recognized in tax expense on a quarterly basis.
     To the extent that any book and tax differences are temporary in nature, that is, the book realization will occur in a different period than the tax realization, a deferred tax asset or liability is established. To the extent that a deferred tax asset is created, management evaluates RAI’s ability to realize this asset. RAI maintains a valuation allowance to reduce certain deferred tax assets to amounts that are more likely than not to be realized. This allowance is attributable to deferred tax assets established for capital loss carryforwards.
     The financial statements reflect management’s best estimate of RAI’s current and deferred tax liabilities and assets. Future events, including but not limited to, additional resolutions with taxing authorities could have an impact on RAI’s current estimate of tax liabilities, realization of tax assets and effective income tax rate.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
     For additional information relating to recently issued accounting pronouncements, see note 1 to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
Results of Operations
                                                 
    For the Three Months Ended September 30,     For the Nine Months Ended September 30,  
    2011     2010     % Change     2011     2010     % Change  
Net sales(1):
                                               
RJR Tobacco
  $ 1,882     $ 1,917       (1.8 )%   $ 5,533     $ 5,579       (0.8 )%
American Snuff
    163       185       (11.9 )%     483       528       (8.5 )%
All Other
    155       137       13.1 %     442       363       21.8 %
 
                                       
Net sales
    2,200       2,239       (1.7 )%     6,458       6,470       (0.2 )%
Cost of products sold(1)(2)
    1,148       1,184       (3.0 )%     3,424       3,437       (0.4 )%
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    411       387       5.7 %     1,263       1,124       12.2 %
Amortization expense
    6       6             18       19       (5.3 )%
Asset impairment and exit charges
              NM(3)           38     NM(3)
 
Operating income:
                                               
RJR Tobacco
    519       561       (7.5 )%     1,402       1,572       (10.8 )%
American Snuff
    89       95       (6.3 )%     255       253       0.8 %
All Other
    51       33       54.5 %     164       91       80.2 %
Corporate expense
    (24 )     (27 )     (11.1 )%     (68 )     (64 )     6.3 %
 
                                       
Operating income
  $ 635     $ 662       (4.1 )%   $ 1,753     $ 1,852       (5.3 )%
 
                                       
 
(1)   Excludes excise taxes of:

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    For the Three Months Ended     For the Nine Months Ended  
    September 30,     September 30,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010  
RJR Tobacco
  $ 940     $ 1,009     $ 2,784     $ 2,945  
American Snuff
    12       27       45       81  
All Other
    98       94       287       253  
 
                       
 
  $ 1,050     $ 1,130     $ 3,116     $ 3,279  
 
                       
 
(2)   See below for further information related to the State Settlement Agreements, federal tobacco buyout expense and FDA expense included in cost of products sold.
 
(3)   Percentage of change not meaningful.
RJR Tobacco
Net Sales
     Domestic cigarette shipment volume, in billions of units for RJR Tobacco and the industry, were as follows(1):
                                                 
    For the Three Months Ended     For the Nine Months Ended  
    September 30,     September 30,  
    2011     2010     % Change     2011     2010     % Change  
Growth brands:
                                               
CAMEL excluding non-filter
    5.6       5.6       0.5 %     16.0       16.1       (0.9 )%
PALL MALL
    5.6       5.5       2.2 %     16.4       14.9       10.6 %
 
                                       
 
    11.2       11.0       1.3 %     32.4       31.0       4.6 %
Support brands
    6.7       8.0       (15.7 )%     20.5       23.9       (14.3 )%
Non-support brands
    0.8       1.0       (25.1 )%     2.4       3.6       (33.3 )%
 
                                       
Total domestic
    18.7       20.1       (6.8 )%     55.3       58.5       (5.5 )%
 
                                       
Total premium
    10.7       11.5       (6.6 )%     31.4       33.7       (6.7 )%
Total value
    8.0       8.6       (7.1 )%     23.9       24.9       (3.9 )%
Premium/total mix
    57.3 %     57.2 %             56.8 %     57.5 %        
Industry(2):
                                               
Premium
    51.5       55.5       (7.2 )%     155.8       161.7       (3.6 )%
Value
    22.8       24.0       (4.8 )%     65.6       68.2       (3.9 )%
 
                                       
Total domestic
    74.4       79.5       (6.4 )%     221.4       229.9       (3.7 )%
 
                                       
Premium/total mix
    69.3 %     69.8 %             70.4 %     70.3 %        
 
(1)   Amounts presented in this table are rounded on an individual basis and, accordingly, may not sum on an aggregate basis. Percentages are calculated on unrounded numbers.
 
(2)   Based on information from Management Science Associates, Inc., referred to as MSAi.
     RJR Tobacco’s net sales are dependent upon its cigarette shipment volume in a declining market, premium versus value-brand mix and list pricing, offset by promotional spending, trade incentives and excise taxes.
     RJR Tobacco’s net sales for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, decreased compared to the prior-year quarter, due to $150 million attributable to lower cigarette volume, as well as an unfavorable premium-to-value mix, partially offset by higher pricing of $74 million and higher related party sales of $46 million. RJR Tobacco’s net sales for the nine months ended September 30, 2011, decreased from the prior-year period, due to $379 million attributable to lower cigarette volume and an unfavorable premium-to-value mix, partially offset by higher pricing of $293 million and higher related party sales of $56 million.

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     The shares of RJR Tobacco’s cigarette brands as a percentage of total share of U.S. retail cigarette sales according to Information Resources Inc., referred to as IRI/Capstone(1), were as follows(2):