10-K 1 d644551d10k.htm 10-K 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period                    to                     

Commission File No. 000-50028

WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

NEVADA   46-0484987

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

3131 Las Vegas Boulevard South—Las Vegas, Nevada 89109

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

(702) 770-7555

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, $.01 par value   Nasdaq Global Select Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   x    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   ¨    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates based on the closing price as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2013 was approximately $10.3 billion.

As of February 14, 2014, 101,212,217 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, $.01 par value, were outstanding.

Portions of the registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be filed not later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

  

Item 1.

   Business      3   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      18   

Item 1B

   Unresolved Staff Comments      34   

Item 2.

   Properties      34   

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings      35   

Item 4.

   Mine Safety Disclosures      41   

PART II

  

Item 5.

   Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities      42   

Item 6.

   Selected Financial Data      42   

Item 7.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      44   

Item 7A.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      70   

Item 8.

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      73   

Item 9.

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      127   

Item 9A.

   Controls and Procedures      127   

Item 9B.

   Other Information      127   

PART III

  

Item 10.

   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      128   

Item 11.

   Executive Compensation      128   

Item 12.

   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters      128   

Item 13.

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence      129   

Item 14.

   Principal Accountant Fees and Services      129   

PART IV

  

Item 15.

   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      130   

Signatures

     145   

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

Wynn Resorts, Limited, a Nevada corporation, was formed in June 2002, is led by Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Stephen A. Wynn, and is a leading developer, owner and operator of destination casino resorts. Wynn Resorts, Limited currently owns 72.3% of Wynn Macau, Limited which operates a casino hotel resort property in the Macau Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (“Macau”). In Las Vegas, Nevada, we own and operate Wynn Las Vegas, which includes Encore at Wynn Las Vegas. We present our results based on the following two segments: Macau Operations and Las Vegas Operations. For more information on the financial results for our segments, see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 17 “Segment Information.”

Unless the context otherwise requires, all references herein to “Wynn Resorts,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our,” or similar terms, refer to Wynn Resorts, Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries.

Wynn Resorts files annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments of such reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Any document Wynn Resorts files may be inspected, without charge, at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, N.E. Washington, D.C. 20549 or at the SEC’s internet site address at http://www.sec.gov. Information related to the operation of the SEC’s public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, through our own internet address at www.wynnresorts.com, Wynn Resorts provides a hyperlink to a third-party SEC filing website which posts these filings as soon as reasonably practicable, where they can be reviewed without charge. The information found on our website is not a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or any other report we file or furnish to the SEC.

Our Resorts

Macau Operations

Wynn Macau opened on September 6, 2006. On April 21, 2010, we opened Encore at Wynn Macau, an expansion of Wynn Macau. We refer to the fully integrated Wynn Macau and Encore at Wynn Macau resort as “Wynn Macau | Encore” or as our “Macau Operations.” We believe that this resort offers exceptional accommodations, amenities and service.

Our Macau Operations feature 1,008 spacious guest rooms and suites, 493 table games, 866 slot machines and a poker pit in approximately 280,000 square feet of casino gaming space (including sky casinos and private gaming salons), casual and fine dining in eight restaurants, two spas and a salon, lounges, meeting facilities and approximately 57,000 square feet of retail space featuring boutiques from Bvlgari, Cartier, Chanel, Dior, Dunhill, Ermenegildo Zegna, Ferrari, Giorgio Armani, Graff, Gucci, Hermes, Hugo Boss, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Loro Piana, Louis Vuitton, Miu Miu, Piaget, Prada, Roger Dubuis, Rolex, Tiffany, Tudor, Vacheron Constantin, Van Cleef & Arpels, Versace, Vertu, and others. Our Macau Operations include a show in the rotunda featuring a Chinese zodiac-inspired ceiling along with gold “prosperity tree” and “dragon of fortune” attractions.

Las Vegas Operations

Wynn Las Vegas opened on April 28, 2005. On December 22, 2008, we opened Encore at Wynn Las Vegas, an expansion of Wynn Las Vegas. We refer to the fully integrated Wynn Las Vegas and Encore at Wynn Las Vegas resort as “Wynn Las Vegas | Encore” or as our “Las Vegas Operations.” We believe that this resort offers exceptional accommodations, amenities and service.

 

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Our Las Vegas Operations feature 4,748 hotel rooms and suites, 230 table games, 1,854 slot machines, a race and sports book and a poker room in approximately 186,000 square feet of casino gaming space (including a sky casino and private gaming salons), casual and fine dining in 34 food and beverage outlets, two spas and salons, lounges, and approximately 96,000 square feet of retail space featuring boutiques from Alexander McQueen, Brioni, Cartier, Chanel, Chloé, Chopard, Dior, Graff, Hermes, IWC Schaffhausen, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Loro Piana, Louis Vuitton, Manolo Blahnik, Nicholas Kirkwood, Oscar de la Renta, Piaget, Rolex, Vertu and others. Our Las Vegas Operations also offer three nightclubs, a beach club, a Ferrari and Maserati automobile dealership, wedding chapels, an 18-hole golf course, approximately 284,000 square feet of meeting space, a specially designed theater presenting “Le Rêve-The Dream,” a water-based theatrical production, and the Encore Theater presenting various headliner entertainment acts throughout the year.

See Item 7—“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Results of Operations” for more information.

Construction and Development Opportunities

In the ordinary course of our business, and as a market leader and innovator, we have made and continue to make certain enhancements and refinements to our resort complexes.

In September 2011, Palo Real Estate Company Limited (“Palo”) and Wynn Resorts (Macau), S.A. (“Wynn Macau”), each an indirect subsidiary of Wynn Macau, Limited, formally accepted the terms and conditions of a draft land concession contract from the Macau government for approximately 51 acres of land in the Cotai area of Macau. On May 2, 2012, the land concession contract was gazetted by the government of Macau evidencing the final step in the granting of the land concession.

The initial term of the land concession contract is 25 years from May 2, 2012, and it may be renewed with government approval for successive periods. The total land premium payable, including interest as required by the land concession contract, is $193.4 million. An initial payment of $62.5 million was paid in December 2011, with eight additional semi-annual payments of approximately $16.4 million each (including interest at 5%) which began in November 2012. As of December 31, 2013, the Company has recorded this obligation and related asset with $29.3 million included as a current liability and $46.8 million included as a long-term liability. The Company will also be required to make annual lease payments of $0.8 million during the resort construction period and annual lease payments of approximately $1.1 million once the development is completed.

On the land subject to the land concession discussed above, we are currently constructing Wynn Palace, a full-scale integrated resort containing a 1,700-room hotel, performance lake, meeting space, casino, spa, retail offerings and food and beverage outlets. The total project budget, including construction costs, capitalized interest, pre-opening expenses, land costs and financing fees, is $4 billion. As of December 31, 2013, we have invested $703.7 million in the project. We continue to remain on schedule for an opening in the first half of 2016.

On July 29, 2013, Wynn Macau and Palo executed a guaranteed maximum price construction (“GMP”) contract with Leighton Contractors (Asia) Limited, acting as the general contractor. Under the GMP contract, the general contractor is responsible for both the construction and design of the project. The general contractor is obligated to substantially complete the project in the first half of 2016 for a guaranteed maximum price of HK$20 billion (approximately $2.57 billion). An early completion bonus for achievement of substantial completion on or before January 25, 2016, will be paid to the general contractor if certain conditions are satisfied under the GMP contract. Both the contract time and guaranteed maximum price are subject to further adjustment under certain specified conditions. The performance of the general contractor is backed by a full completion guarantee given by Leighton Holdings Limited, the parent company of the general contractor, as well as a performance bond for 5% of the guaranteed maximum price.

 

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Our Strategy

We believe that Steve Wynn is the preeminent designer, developer and operator of destination casino resorts and has developed brand name status. Mr. Wynn’s involvement with our casino resorts provides a distinct advantage over other gaming enterprises. We integrate luxurious surroundings, distinctive entertainment and superior amenities, including convention facilities, entertainment, fine dining and premium retail offerings, to create resorts that appeal to our international customer base.

Our resorts are designed, built and operated to provide a premium experience for our guests. Our business is dependent upon repeat visitation from our guests and we believe superior customer experience and service is the best marketing strategy to attract and retain our customers. Our company heavily emphasizes human resources and staff training to ensure our employees are prepared to provide the luxury service that our guests expect. We market our resorts directly to gaming customers using database marketing techniques, as well as traditional incentives, including reduced room rates and complimentary meals and suites. Our rewards system offers discounted and complimentary meals, lodging and entertainment for our guests. We also create general market awareness for our resorts through various media channels, including social media, television, radio, newspapers, magazines, the internet, direct mail and billboards.

Mr. Wynn and his team bring significant experience in designing, developing and operating casino resorts. The senior executive team has an average of over 25 years of experience in the hotel and gaming industries. We also have an approximately 125-person design, development and construction subsidiary, the senior management of which has significant experience in all major construction disciplines.

For the sixth consecutive year, Wynn Macau and The Spa at Wynn Macau received the Forbes five-star distinction, while Encore at Wynn Macau and the Spa at Encore at Wynn Macau received the Forbes five-star distinction for the second consecutive year. For the eighth consecutive year, The Tower Suites at Wynn Las Vegas has received the Forbes five-star distinction. The Spa at Wynn Las Vegas earned five-star recognition from Forbes for the sixth year in a row. The Tower Suites at Encore and the Spa at Encore are also recipients of the Forbes five-star distinction. In addition, a number of restaurants in our resorts have earned star-distinction from Forbes, with 38 stars in total for the current year.

We continually seek out new opportunities for additional gaming or related businesses, in the United States, and worldwide. On November 11, 2013, we announced that our Board had elected to withdraw the previously filed application for a gaming license in Pennsylvania. We have made an application for a gaming license in Massachusetts. The process is competitive and we do not expect to know the outcome until the end of the first half of 2014. Proceeding with this project will require significant expenditure of Company funds. In addition, we are exploring expansion opportunities in other international jurisdictions.

Market and Competition

The casino resort industry is highly competitive. Both our Macau Operations and our Las Vegas Operations compete with other high-quality casino resorts. Resorts located on or near our properties compete on the basis of overall atmosphere, range of amenities, level of service, price, location, entertainment, themes and size, among other factors. We seek to differentiate our Macau and Las Vegas resorts from other major resorts by concentrating on our fundamental elements of superior design, atmosphere, personal service and luxury.

Macau

Macau is governed as a special administrative region of China and is located approximately 37 miles southwest of, and approximately one hour away via ferry from, Hong Kong. Macau, which has been a casino destination for more than 50 years, consists principally of a peninsula on mainland China, with two neighboring islands, Taipa and Coloane, between which the Cotai area is located. In 2002, the government of Macau ended a

 

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40 year monopoly of the conduct of gaming operations by conducting a competitive process resulting in the issuance of concessions to conduct gaming operations to three concessionaires (including Wynn Macau), who in turn were permitted, subject to the approval of the government of Macau, to each grant one subconcession, resulting in a total of six gaming concessionaires. In addition to Wynn Macau, each of Sociedade de Jogos de Macau (“SJM”) and Galaxy Entertainment Group Limited are primary concessionaires and Sands China Ltd., Melco Crown and MGM China Holdings Limited operate under subconcessions. There is no limit to the number of casinos each concessionaire is permitted to operate, but each facility is subject to government approval. Currently, there are 35 operating casinos in Macau.

We believe that Macau is located in one of the world’s largest concentrations of potential gaming customers. According to Macau Statistical Information, casinos in Macau, the largest gaming market in the world, generated approximately $45.2 billion in gaming revenue in 2013, an 18.6% increase over the approximately $38.1 billion generated in 2012, and a significant increase over the approximately $2.9 billion generated in 2002.

Macau’s gaming market is primarily dependent on tourists. Tourist arrivals in 2013 were 29.3 million, compared to 28.1 million in 2012. The Macau market has also experienced tremendous growth in capacity in the last several years. As of December 31, 2013, there were 27,764 hotel rooms, 5,750 table games and 13,106 slot machines in Macau, compared to 12,978 hotel rooms, 2,762 table games and 6,546 slot machines as of December 31, 2006.

Gaming customers traveling to Macau have typically come from nearby destinations in Asia including Hong Kong, mainland China, Taiwan, South Korea and Malaysia. According to the Macau Statistics and Census Service Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, approximately 90% of the tourists who visited Macau in 2013 came from Hong Kong, mainland China and Taiwan. Travel to Macau by citizens of mainland China requires a visa. Chinese government officials have, on occasion, exercised their authority to adjust the visa policy and may do so in the future.

Wynn Macau faces competition from casinos located throughout Asia, as well as other major gaming centers located around the world, including Singapore, Australia, Las Vegas and cruise ships in Asia that offer gaming.

Las Vegas

Las Vegas is the largest gaming market in the United States. During 2013, the economic environment in the gaming and hotel markets in Las Vegas continued to improve with increased levels of gaming revenue and hotel room demand. While these gaming and hotel statistics have increased from prior year levels, uncertainty still exists in the Las Vegas market. During 2013, the average daily room rate increased 2.4%, visitation remained relatively flat at 39.7 million visitors, and Las Vegas Strip gaming revenues increased 4.8%, all as compared to the year ended December 31, 2012. During 2012, the average daily room rate increased 2.8%, visitation increased 2.1% to 39.7 million visitors, and Las Vegas Strip gaming revenues increased 2.3%, all as compared to the year ended December 31, 2011.

Our Las Vegas Operations are located on the Las Vegas Strip and compete with other high-quality resorts and hotel casinos in Las Vegas. Our Las Vegas Operations also compete, to some extent, with other casino resorts in Nevada and throughout the United States, and elsewhere in the world. The legalization of casino gaming in or near metropolitan areas from which we attract customers could have a negative effect on our business. New or renovated casinos in Asia, including Singapore, the Philippines, South Korea and Macau, could draw gaming customers away from Las Vegas.

 

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Geographic Data

Geographic data are reported in Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 17 “Segment Information.” Additional financial data about our geographic operations is provided in Item 7—“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”.

Regulation and Licensing

Macau

General. As a casino concessionaire, Wynn Macau, an indirect 72.3% owned subsidiary of the Company, is subject to the regulatory control of the Government of Macau. The government has adopted Laws and Administrative Regulations governing the operation of casinos in Macau. Only concessionaires or subconcessionaires are permitted to operate casinos. Subconcessions may be awarded subject to the approval of the Macau government and each concessionaire has issued one subconcession. Each concessionaire was required to enter into a concession agreement with the Macau government which, together with the Law and Administrative Regulations, form the framework for the regulation of the activities of the concessionaire.

Under the Law and Administrative Regulations, concessionaires are subject to suitability requirements relating to background, associations and reputation, as are stockholders of 5% or more of a concessionaire’s equity securities, officers, directors and key employees. The same requirements apply to any entity engaged by a concessionaire to manage casino operations. Concessionaires are required to satisfy minimum capitalization requirements, demonstrate and maintain adequate financial capacity to operate the concession and submit to continuous monitoring of their casino operations by the Macau government. Concessionaires also are subject to periodic financial reporting requirements and reporting obligations with respect to, among other things, certain contracts, financing activities and transactions with directors, financiers and key employees. Transfers or the encumbering of interests in concessionaires must be reported to the Macau government and are ineffective without government approval.

Each concessionaire is required to engage an executive director who must be a permanent resident of Macau and the holder of at least 10% of the capital stock of the concessionaire. The appointment of the executive director and of any successor is ineffective without the approval of the Macau government. All contracts placing the management of a concessionaire’s casino operations with a third party also are ineffective without the approval of the Macau government.

Concessionaires are subject to a special gaming tax of 35% of gross gaming revenue, and must also make an annual contribution of up to 4% of gross gaming revenue for the promotion of public interests, social security, infrastructure and tourism. Concessionaires are obligated to withhold applicable taxes, according to the rate in effect as set by the government, from any commissions paid to games promoters. The withholding rate may be adjusted from time to time.

A games promoter, also known as a junket representative, is a person who, for the purpose of promoting casino gaming activity, arranges customer transportation and accommodations, and provides credit in their sole discretion, food and beverage services and entertainment in exchange for commissions or other compensation from a concessionaire. Macau law provides that games promoters must be licensed by the Macau government in order to do business with and receive compensation from concessionaires. For a license to be obtained, direct and indirect owners of 5% or more of a games promoter (regardless of its corporate form or sole proprietor status), its directors and its key employees must be found suitable. Applicants are required to pay the cost of license investigations, and are required to maintain suitability standards during the period of licensure. The term of a games promoters’ license is one calendar year, and licenses can be renewed for additional periods upon the submission of renewal applications. Natural person junket representative licensees are subject to a suitability verification process every three years and business entity licensees are subject to the same requirement every six years. The Gaming Inspection and Coordination Bureau (“DICJ”) implemented certain instructions in 2009,

 

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which have the force of law, relating to commissions paid to, and by, games promoters. Such instructions also impose certain financial reporting and audit requirements on games promoters.

Under Macau law, licensed games promoters must identify outside contractors who assist them in their promotion activities. These contractors are subject to approval of the Macau government. Changes in the management structure of business entity games promoters licensees must be reported to the Macau government and any transfer or the encumbering of interests in such licensees is ineffective without prior government approval. To conduct gaming promotion activities licensees must be registered with one or more concessionaires and must have written contracts with such concessionaires, copies of which must be submitted to the Macau government.

Macau law further provides that concessionaires are jointly responsible with their games promoters for the activities of such representatives and their directors and contractors in the concessionaires’ casinos, and for their compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Concessionaires must submit annual lists of their games promoters, and must update such lists on a quarterly basis. The Macau government may designate a maximum number of games promoters and specify the number of games promoters a concessionaire is permitted to engage. Concessionaires are subject to periodic reporting requirements with respect to commissions paid to their games promoters representatives and are required to oversee their activities and report instances of unlawful activity.

The government of Macau may assume temporary custody and control over the operation of a concession in certain circumstances. During any such period, the costs of operations must be borne by the concessionaire. The government of Macau also may redeem a concession starting at an established date after the entering into effect of a concession. The government of Macau may also terminate a concession for cause, including, without limitation, failure of the concessionaire to fulfill its obligations under law or the concession contract.

Concession Agreement. The concession agreement between Wynn Macau and the Macau government required Wynn Macau to construct and operate one or more casino gaming properties in Macau, including, at a minimum, one full-service casino resort by the end of December 2006, and to invest not less than a total of 4 billion Macau patacas (approximately $500 million) in Macau-related projects by June 2009. These obligations were satisfied upon the opening of Wynn Macau in 2006.

Wynn Macau was also obligated to obtain, and did obtain, a 700 million Macau pataca (approximately $87 million) bank guarantee from Banco National Ultramarino, S.A. (“BNU”) that was effective until March 31, 2007. The amount of this guarantee was reduced to 300 million Macau patacas (approximately $37 million) for the period from April 1, 2007 until 180 days after the end of the term of the concession agreement. This guarantee, which is for the benefit of the Macau government, assures Wynn Macau’s performance under the casino concession agreement, including the payment of premiums, fines and indemnity for any material failure to perform the concession agreement. Wynn Macau is obligated, upon demand by BNU, to promptly repay any claim made on the guarantee by the Macau government. BNU is currently paid an annual fee by Wynn Macau for the guarantee of approximately 5.2 million patacas (approximately $0.7 million).

The government of Macau may redeem the concession beginning on June 24, 2017, and in such event Wynn Macau will be entitled to fair compensation or indemnity. The amount of such compensation or indemnity will be determined based on the amount of revenue generated during the tax year prior to the redemption multiplied for the remaining years under the concession.

The government of Macau may unilaterally rescind the concession if Wynn Macau fails to fulfill its fundamental obligations under the concession agreement. The concession agreement expressly provides that the government of Macau may unilaterally rescind the concession agreement if Wynn Macau:

 

   

conducts unauthorized games or activities that are excluded from its corporate purpose;

 

   

abandons or suspends gaming operations in Macau for more than seven consecutive days (or more than 14 days in a civil year) without justification;

 

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defaults in payment of taxes, premiums, contributions or other required amounts;

 

   

does not comply with government inspections or supervision;

 

   

systematically fails to observe its obligations under the concession system;

 

   

fails to maintain bank guarantees or bonds satisfactory to the government;

 

   

is the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or becomes insolvent;

 

   

engages in serious fraudulent activity, damaging to the public interest; or,

 

   

repeatedly and seriously violates applicable gaming laws.

If the government of Macau unilaterally rescinds the concession agreement for one of the reasons stated above, Wynn Macau will be required to compensate the government in accordance with applicable law, and the areas defined as casino under Macau law and all of the gaming equipment pertaining to the gaming operations of Wynn Macau will be transferred to the government without compensation. In addition, the government of Macau may, in the public interest, unilaterally terminate the concession at any time, in which case Wynn Macau would be entitled to reasonable compensation.

Nevada

Introduction. The ownership and operation of casino gaming facilities in the State of Nevada are subject to the Nevada Gaming Control Act and the regulations made under the Act, as well as to various local ordinances. Our Las Vegas Operations are subject to the licensing and regulatory control of the Nevada Gaming Commission, the Nevada State Gaming Control Board and the Clark County Liquor and Gaming Licensing Board, which we refer to herein collectively as the “Nevada Gaming Authorities.”

Policy Concerns of Gaming Laws. The laws, regulations and supervisory procedures of the Nevada Gaming Authorities are based upon declarations of public policy. Such public policy concerns include, among other things:

 

   

preventing unsavory or unsuitable persons from being directly or indirectly involved with gaming at any time or in any capacity;

 

   

establishing and maintaining responsible accounting practices and procedures;

 

   

maintaining effective controls over the financial practices of licensees, including establishing minimum procedures for internal fiscal affairs and safeguarding assets and revenue, providing reliable recordkeeping and requiring the filing of periodic reports with the Nevada Gaming Authorities;

 

   

preventing cheating and fraudulent practices; and

 

   

providing a source of state and local revenue through taxation and licensing fees.

Changes in applicable laws, regulations and procedures could have significant negative effects on our Las Vegas gaming operations and our financial condition and results of operations.

Owner and Operator Licensing Requirements. Our subsidiary, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC, the owner and operator of our Las Vegas Operations, has been approved by the Nevada Gaming Authorities as a limited liability company licensee, referred to as a company licensee, which includes approval to conduct casino gaming operations, including a race book and sports pool and pari-mutuel wagering. These gaming licenses are not transferable.

Company Registration Requirements. Wynn Resorts was found suitable by the Nevada Gaming Commission to own the equity interests of Wynn Resorts Holdings, LLC (“Wynn Resorts Holdings”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts, and to be registered by the Nevada Gaming Commission as a publicly traded corporation, referred to as a registered company, for the purposes of the Nevada Gaming Control Act. Wynn Resorts Holdings was found suitable by the Nevada Gaming Commission to own the equity interests of Wynn

 

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Las Vegas, LLC and to be registered by the Nevada Gaming Commission as an intermediary company. In addition to being licensed, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC, as an issuer of debt securities registered with the SEC, also qualified as a registered company. Wynn Las Vegas Capital Corp., a co-issuer of the debt securities, was not required to be registered or licensed, but may be required to be found suitable as a lender or financing source.

Periodically, we are required to submit detailed financial and operating reports to the Nevada Gaming Commission and provide any other information that the Nevada Gaming Commission may require. Substantially all of our material loans, leases, sales of securities and similar financing transactions must be reported to, and/or approved by, the Nevada Gaming Commission.

Individual Licensing Requirements. No person may become a more than 5% stockholder or member of, or receive any percentage of the profits of, an intermediary company or company licensee without first obtaining licenses and approvals from the Nevada Gaming Authorities. The Nevada Gaming Authorities may investigate any individual who has a material relationship to or material involvement with us to determine whether the individual is suitable or should be licensed as a business associate of a gaming licensee. Certain of our officers, directors and key employees have been or may be required to file applications with the Nevada Gaming Authorities and are or may be required to be licensed or found suitable by the Nevada Gaming Authorities. All applications required as of the date of this report have been filed. However, the Nevada Gaming Authorities may require additional applications and may also deny an application for licensing for any reason which they deem appropriate. A finding of suitability is comparable to licensing, and both require submission of detailed personal and financial information followed by a thorough investigation. An applicant for licensing or an applicant for a finding of suitability must pay or must cause to be paid all the costs of the investigation. Changes in licensed positions must be reported to the Nevada Gaming Authorities and, in addition to their authority to deny an application for a finding of suitability or licensing, the Nevada Gaming Authorities have the jurisdiction to disapprove a change in a corporate position.

If the Nevada Gaming Authorities were to find an officer, director or key employee unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would have to sever all relationships with that person. In addition, the Nevada Gaming Commission may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Determinations of suitability or questions pertaining to licensing are not subject to judicial review in Nevada.

Redemption of Securities Owned By an Unsuitable Person. The Company’s articles of incorporation provide that, to the extent required by the gaming authority making the determination of unsuitability or to the extent the Board of Directors determines, in its sole discretion, that a person is likely to jeopardize the Company’s or any affiliate’s application for, receipt of, approval for, right to the use of, or entitlement to, any gaming license, shares of Wynn Resorts’ capital stock that are owned or controlled by an unsuitable person or its affiliates are subject to redemption by Wynn Resorts. The redemption price will be the amount, if any, required by the gaming authority or, if the gaming authority does not determine the price, the sum deemed by the Board of Directors to be the fair value of the securities to be redeemed. If Wynn Resorts determines the redemption price, the redemption price will be capped at the closing price of the shares on the principal national securities exchange on which the shares are listed on the trading day before the redemption notice is given. If the shares are not listed on a national securities exchange, the redemption price will be capped at the closing sale price of the shares as quoted on The NASDAQ Global Select Market or if the closing price is not reported, the mean between the bid and ask prices, as quoted by any other generally recognized reporting system. Wynn Resorts’ right of redemption is not exclusive of any other rights that it may have or later acquire under any agreement, its bylaws or otherwise. The redemption price may be paid in cash, by promissory note, or both, as required, and pursuant to the terms established by, the applicable Gaming Authority and, if not, as the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts elects, and as set forth in the Company’s articles of incorporation.

On February 18, 2012, Wynn Resorts’ Gaming Compliance Committee concluded an investigation after receiving an independent report by Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan, LLP (the “Freeh Report”) detailing a pattern of

 

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misconduct by Aruze USA, Inc. (at the time a stockholder of Wynn Resorts), Universal Entertainment Corporation, Aruze USA, Inc.’s parent company, and Kazuo Okada, (the majority shareholder of Universal Entertainment Corporation and a former member of the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts and Wynn Macau, Limited) (collectively, the “Okada Parties”).

Based on the Freeh Report, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts determined that the Okada Parties are “unsuitable persons” under Article VII of the Company’s articles of incorporation. The Board of Directors was unanimous (other than Mr. Okada) in its determination. After authorizing the redemption of the Aruze shares, the Board of Directors took certain actions to protect the Company and its operations from any influence of an unsuitable person, including placing limitations on the provision of certain operating information to unsuitable persons and formation of an Executive Committee of the Board to manage the business and affairs of the Company during the period between each annual meeting. The Charter of the Executive Committee provides that “Unsuitable Persons” are not permitted to serve on the Committee. All members of the Board, other than Mr. Okada, were appointed to the Executive Committee on February 18, 2012. The Board of Directors also requested that Mr. Okada resign as a director of Wynn Resorts (under Nevada corporation law, a board of directors does not have the power to remove a director) and recommended that Mr. Okada be removed as a member of the Board of Directors of Wynn Macau, Limited. In addition, on February 18, 2012, Mr. Okada was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Las Vegas Capital Corp., an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts. On February 24, 2012, Mr. Okada was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Macau, Limited and on February 22, 2013, he was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts by a stockholder vote in which 99.6% of the over 86 million shares voted were cast in favor of removal. Additionally, Mr. Okada resigned from the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts on February 21, 2013. Although the Company has retained the structure of the Executive Committee, the Board has resumed its past role in managing the business and affairs of the Company.

Based on the Board of Directors’ finding of “unsuitability,” on February 18, 2012, Wynn Resorts redeemed and cancelled Aruze USA, Inc.’s 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. The Company engaged an independent financial advisor to assist in the fair value calculation and concluded that a discount to the then current trading price was appropriate because of, among other things, restrictions on most of the shares held by Aruze USA, Inc. under the terms of the Stockholders Agreement (as defined below). Pursuant to its articles of incorporation, Wynn Resorts issued the Redemption Price Promissory Note (the “Redemption Note”) to Aruze USA, Inc. in redemption of the shares. The Redemption Note has a principal amount of $1.94 billion, matures on February 18, 2022 and bears interest at the rate of 2% per annum, payable annually in arrears on each anniversary of the date of the Redemption Note. The Company may, in its sole and absolute discretion, at any time and from time to time, and without penalty or premium, prepay the whole or any portion of the principal or interest due under the Redemption Note. In no instance shall any payment obligation under the Redemption Note be accelerated except in the sole and absolute discretion of Wynn Resorts or as specifically mandated by law. The indebtedness evidenced by the Redemption Note is and shall be subordinated in right of payment, to the extent and in the manner provided in the Redemption Note, to the prior payment in full of all existing and future obligations of Wynn Resorts or any of its affiliates in respect of indebtedness for borrowed money of any kind or nature.

The Okada Parties have challenged the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares and the Company is currently involved in litigation with those parties as well as related shareholder derivative litigation. See Item 1A—“Risk Factors”, Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”. The outcome of these various proceedings cannot be predicted. The Company’s claims and the Okada Parties’ counterclaims are in a preliminary stage and management has determined that based on proceedings to date, it is currently unable to determine the probability of the outcome of this matter or the range of reasonably possible loss, if any. An adverse judgment or settlement involving payment of a material amount could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition.

 

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Consequences of Violating Gaming Laws. If the Nevada Gaming Commission determines that we have violated the Nevada Gaming Control Act or any of its regulations, it could limit, condition, suspend or revoke our registrations and gaming license. In addition, we and the persons involved could be subject to substantial fines for each separate violation of the Nevada Gaming Control Act, or of the regulations of the Nevada Gaming Commission, at the discretion of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Further, the Nevada Gaming Commission could appoint a supervisor to operate our Las Vegas Operations and, under specified circumstances, earnings generated during the supervisor’s appointment (except for the reasonable rental value of the premises) could be forfeited to the State of Nevada. Limitation, conditioning or suspension of any of our gaming licenses and the appointment of a supervisor could, and revocation of any gaming license would, have a significant negative effect on our gaming operations.

Requirements for Voting or Nonvoting Securities Holders. Regardless of the number of shares held, any beneficial owner of Wynn Resorts’ voting or nonvoting securities may be required to file an application, be investigated and have that person’s suitability as a beneficial owner of voting securities determined if the Nevada Gaming Commission has reason to believe that the ownership would be inconsistent with the declared policies of the State of Nevada. If the beneficial owner of the voting or nonvoting securities of Wynn Resorts who must be found suitable is a corporation, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability company or trust, it must submit detailed business and financial information including a list of its beneficial owners. The applicant must pay all costs of the investigation incurred by the Nevada Gaming Authorities in conducting any investigation.

The Nevada Gaming Control Act requires any person who acquires more than 5% of the voting securities of a registered company to report the acquisition to the Nevada Gaming Commission. The Nevada Gaming Control Act requires beneficial owners of more than 10% of a registered company’s voting securities to apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability within 30 days after the Chairman of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board mails the written notice requiring such filing. However, an “institutional investor,” as defined in the Nevada Gaming Control Act, which beneficially owns more than 10% but not more than 11% of a registered company’s voting securities as a result of a stock repurchase by the registered company may not be required to file such an application. Further, an institutional investor which acquires more than 10%, but not more than 25%, of a registered company’s voting securities may apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a waiver of a finding of suitability if the institutional investor holds the voting securities for investment purposes only. An institutional investor that has obtained a waiver may hold more than 25% but not more than 29% of a registered company’s voting securities and maintain its waiver where the additional ownership results from a stock repurchase by the registered company. An institutional investor will not be deemed to hold voting securities for investment purposes unless the voting securities were acquired and are held in the ordinary course of business as an institutional investor and not for the purpose of causing, directly or indirectly, the election of a majority of the members of the Board of Directors of the registered company, a change in the corporate charter, bylaws, management, policies or operations of the registered company, or any of its gaming affiliates, or any other action which the Nevada Gaming Commission finds to be inconsistent with holding the registered company’s voting securities for investment purposes only. Activities which are not deemed to be inconsistent with holding voting securities for investment purposes only include:

 

   

voting on all matters voted on by stockholders or interest holders;

 

   

making financial and other inquiries of management of the type normally made by securities analysts for informational purposes and not to cause a change in management, policies or operations; and,

 

   

other activities that the Nevada Gaming Commission may determine to be consistent with such investment intent.

The articles of incorporation of Wynn Resorts include provisions intended to assist its implementation of the above restrictions.

Wynn Resorts is required to maintain a current stock ledger in Nevada which may be examined by the Nevada Gaming Authorities at any time. If any securities are held in trust by an agent or by a nominee, the record

 

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holder may be required to disclose the identity of the beneficial owner to the Nevada Gaming Authorities. A failure to make the disclosure may be grounds for finding the record holder unsuitable. We are required to provide maximum assistance in determining the identity of the beneficial owner of any of Wynn Resorts’ voting securities. The Nevada Gaming Commission has the power to require the stock certificates of any registered company to bear a legend indicating that the securities are subject to the Nevada Gaming Control Act. The certificates representing shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock note that the shares are subject to a right of redemption and other restrictions set forth in Wynn Resorts’ articles of incorporation and bylaws and that the shares are, or may become, subject to restrictions imposed by applicable gaming laws.

Consequences of Being Found Unsuitable. Any person who fails or refuses to apply for a finding of suitability or a license within 30 days after being ordered to do so by the Nevada Gaming Commission or by the Chairman of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, or who refuses or fails to pay the investigative costs incurred by the Nevada Gaming Authorities in connection with the investigation of its application, may be found unsuitable. The same restrictions apply to a record owner if the record owner, after request, fails to identify the beneficial owner. Any person found unsuitable and who holds, directly or indirectly, any beneficial ownership of any voting security or debt security of a registered company beyond the period of time as may be prescribed by the Nevada Gaming Commission may be guilty of a criminal offense. We will be subject to disciplinary action if, after we receive notice that a person is unsuitable to hold an equity interest or to have any other relationship with us, we:

 

   

pay that person any dividend or interest upon any voting securities;

 

   

allow that person to exercise, directly or indirectly, any voting right held by that person relating to Wynn Resorts;

 

   

pay remuneration in any form to that person for services rendered or otherwise; or,

 

   

fail to pursue all lawful efforts to require the unsuitable person to relinquish such person’s voting securities including, if necessary, the immediate purchase of the voting securities for cash at fair market value.

Gaming Laws Relating to Debt Securities Ownership. The Nevada Gaming Commission may, in its discretion, require the owner of any debt or similar securities of a registered company, to file applications, be investigated and be found suitable to own the debt or other security of the registered company if the Nevada Gaming Commission has reason to believe that such ownership would otherwise be inconsistent with the declared policies of the State of Nevada. If the Nevada Gaming Commission decides that a person is unsuitable to own the security, then under the Nevada Gaming Control Act, the registered company can be sanctioned, including the loss of its approvals if, without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission, it:

 

   

pays to the unsuitable person any dividend, interest or any distribution whatsoever;

 

   

recognizes any voting right by the unsuitable person in connection with the securities;

 

   

pays the unsuitable person remuneration in any form; or,

 

   

makes any payment to the unsuitable person by way of principal, redemption, conversion, exchange, liquidation or similar transaction.

Approval of Public Offerings. We may not make a public offering without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission if the proceeds from the offering are intended to be used to construct, acquire or finance gaming facilities in Nevada, or to retire or extend obligations incurred for those purposes or for similar transactions. On March 21, 2013, the Nevada Gaming Commission granted us and Wynn Las Vegas, LLC prior approval, subject to certain conditions, to make public offerings for a period of three years (the “Shelf Approval”). The Shelf Approval also applies to any affiliated company wholly owned by us which is a publicly traded corporation or would thereby become a publicly traded corporation pursuant to a public offering. The Shelf Approval may be rescinded for good cause without prior notice upon the issuance of an interlocutory stop

 

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order by the Chairman of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board. The Shelf Approval does not constitute a finding, recommendation or approval by any of the Nevada Gaming Authorities as to the accuracy or adequacy of the offering memorandum or the investment merits of the securities. Any representation to the contrary is unlawful.

Approval of Changes in Control. A registered company must obtain the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission with respect to a change in control through merger; consolidation; stock or asset acquisitions; management or consulting agreements; or any act or conduct by a person by which the person obtains control of the registered company.

Entities seeking to acquire control of a registered company must satisfy the Nevada State Gaming Control Board and Nevada Gaming Commission with respect to a variety of stringent standards before assuming control of the registered company. The Nevada Gaming Commission may also require controlling stockholders, officers, directors and other persons having a material relationship or involvement with the entity proposing to acquire control to be investigated and licensed as part of the approval process relating to the transaction.

Approval of Defensive Tactics. The Nevada legislature has declared that some corporate acquisitions opposed by management, repurchases of voting securities and corporate defense tactics affecting Nevada corporate gaming licensees or affecting registered companies that are affiliated with the operations of Nevada gaming licensees may be harmful to stable and productive corporate gaming. The Nevada Gaming Commission has established a regulatory scheme to reduce the potential adverse effects of these business practices upon Nevada’s gaming industry and to further Nevada’s policy in order to:

 

   

assure the financial stability of corporate gaming licensees and their affiliated companies;

 

   

preserve the beneficial aspects of conducting business in the corporate form; and,

 

   

promote a neutral environment for the orderly governance of corporate affairs.

Approvals may be required from the Nevada Gaming Commission before a registered company can make exceptional repurchases of voting securities above its current market price and before a corporate acquisition opposed by management can be consummated. The Nevada Gaming Control Act also requires prior approval of a plan of recapitalization proposed by a registered company’s Board of Directors in response to a tender offer made directly to its stockholders for the purpose of acquiring control.

Fees and Taxes. License fees and taxes, computed in various ways depending on the type of gaming or activity involved, are payable to the State of Nevada and to the counties and cities in which the licensed subsidiaries’ respective operations are conducted. Depending upon the particular fee or tax involved, these fees and taxes are payable monthly, quarterly or annually and are based upon:

 

   

a percentage of the gross revenue received;

 

   

the number of gaming devices operated; or,

 

   

the number of table games operated.

A live entertainment tax also is imposed on admission charges and sales of food, beverages and merchandise where live entertainment is furnished.

Foreign Gaming Investigations. Any person who is licensed, required to be licensed, registered, required to be registered in Nevada, or is under common control with such persons (collectively, “licensees”), and who proposes to become involved in a gaming venture outside of Nevada, is required to deposit with the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, and thereafter maintain, a revolving fund in the amount of $10,000 to pay the expenses of investigation of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board of the licensee’s or registrant’s participation in such foreign gaming. The revolving fund is subject to increase or decrease at the discretion of the Nevada Gaming

 

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Commission. Licensees and registrants are required to comply with the foreign gaming reporting requirements imposed by the Nevada Gaming Control Act. A licensee or registrant is also subject to disciplinary action by the Nevada Gaming Commission if it:

 

   

knowingly violates any laws of the foreign jurisdiction pertaining to the foreign gaming operation;

 

   

fails to conduct the foreign gaming operation in accordance with the standards of honesty and integrity required of Nevada gaming operations;

 

   

engages in any activity or enters into any association that is unsuitable because it poses an unreasonable threat to the control of gaming in Nevada, reflects or tends to reflect, discredit or disrepute upon the State of Nevada or gaming in Nevada, or is contrary to the gaming policies of Nevada;

 

   

engages in activities or enters into associations that are harmful to the State of Nevada or its ability to collect gaming taxes and fees; or,

 

   

employs, contracts with or associates with a person in the foreign operation who has been denied a license or finding of suitability in Nevada on the ground of unsuitability.

Licenses for Conduct of Gaming and Sale of Alcoholic Beverages. The conduct of gaming activities and the service and sale of alcoholic beverages at Wynn Las Vegas are subject to licensing, control and regulation by the Clark County Liquor and Gaming Licensing Board, which has granted Wynn Las Vegas, LLC licenses for such purposes. In addition to approving Wynn Las Vegas, LLC, the Clark County Liquor and Gaming Licensing Board has the authority to approve all persons owning or controlling the stock of any corporation controlling a gaming license. Clark County gaming and liquor licenses are not transferable. The County has full power to limit, condition, suspend or revoke any license. Any disciplinary action could, and revocation would, have a substantial negative impact upon our operations.

Other Regulations

In addition to gaming regulations, we are subject to extensive local, state, federal and foreign laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. These include, but are not limited to, laws and regulations relating to alcoholic beverages, environmental matters, employment and immigration, currency and other transactions, taxation, zoning and building codes, marketing and advertising, lending, debt collection, privacy, telemarketing, money laundering, laws and regulations administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, and anti-bribery laws, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Such laws and regulations could change or could be interpreted differently in the future, or new laws and regulations could be enacted. Any material changes, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could adversely affect our business and operating results.

Seasonality

We may experience fluctuations in revenues and cash flows from month to month, however, we do not believe that our business is materially impacted by seasonality.

Employees

As of December 31, 2013, we had a total of approximately 16,500 full-time equivalent employees (including approximately 7,000 in Macau and 9,500 in Las Vegas).

We entered into a ten year collective bargaining agreement with the Culinary and Bartenders Union local covering approximately 5,575 employees at our Las Vegas Operations that will expire in 2015. We also entered into a ten year collective bargaining agreement with the Transportation Workers Union in November 2010, which covers the table games dealers at Wynn Las Vegas. Certain other unions may seek to organize the workers of our Las Vegas Operations.

 

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Intellectual Property

Among our most important marks are our trademarks and service marks that use the name “WYNN.” Wynn Resorts has registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO”) a variety of the WYNN-related trademarks and service marks in connection with a variety of goods and services. These marks include “WYNN RESORTS,” “WYNN DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT,” “WYNN LAS VEGAS,” “ENCORE” and “WYNN MACAU.” Some of the applications are based upon ongoing use and others are based upon a bona fide intent to use the marks.

A common element of most of these marks is the use of the surname “WYNN.” As a general rule, a surname (or the portion of a mark primarily constituting a surname) is not eligible for registration unless the surname has acquired “secondary meaning.” Wynn Resorts has been successful in demonstrating to the PTO such secondary meaning for the Wynn name based upon factors including Mr. Wynn’s prominence as a resort developer.

Federal registrations are not completely dispositive of the right to such marks. Third parties who claim prior rights with respect to similar marks may nonetheless challenge our right to obtain registrations or our use of the marks and seek to overcome the presumptions afforded by such registrations.

We have also filed applications with various foreign patent and trademark registries, including in Macau, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, certain European countries and various other jurisdictions throughout the world, to register a variety of WYNN-related trademarks and service marks in connection with a variety of goods and services. These marks include many of the same marks filed with the United States PTO and include “WYNN MACAU,” “WYNN LAS VEGAS,” “WYNN PALACE” and “ENCORE.” Some of the applications are based upon ongoing use and others are based upon a bona fide intent to use the marks.

We recognize that our intellectual property assets, including the word and logo version of “WYNN,” are among our most valuable assets. As a result, and in connection with expansion of our resorts and gaming activities outside the United States, we have undertaken a program to register our trademarks and other intellectual property rights in relevant jurisdictions. We have retained counsel and intend to take all steps necessary to protect our intellectual property rights against unauthorized use throughout the world.

On August 6, 2004, we entered into agreements with Mr. Wynn that confirm and clarify our rights to use the “Wynn” name and Mr. Wynn’s persona in connection with our casino resorts. Under a Surname Rights Agreement, Mr. Wynn has acknowledged our exclusive, fully paid-up, perpetual, worldwide right to use, and to own and register trademarks and service marks incorporating, the “Wynn” name for casino resorts and related businesses, together with the right to sublicense the name and marks to our affiliates. Under a Rights of Publicity License, Mr. Wynn has granted us the exclusive, royalty-free, worldwide right to use his full name, persona and related rights of publicity for casino resorts and related businesses, together with the ability to sublicense the persona and publicity rights to our affiliates, until October 24, 2017.

We have also registered various domain names including, but not limited to, www.wynnlasvegas.com, www.wynnmacau.com, www.wynnmacaulimited.com, www.encorelasvegas.com and www.wynnresorts.com, with various domain registrars around the world. Our domain registrations extend to various foreign countries such as “.com.cn” and “.com.hk.” We pursue domain related infringement on a case by case basis depending on the infringing domain in question. The information found on these websites is not a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or any other report we file or furnish to the SEC.

Forward-Looking Statements

We make forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K based upon the beliefs and assumptions of our management and on information currently available to us. Forward-looking statements

 

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include, but are not limited to, information about our business strategy, development activities, competition and possible or assumed future results of operations, throughout this report and are often preceded by, followed by or include the words “may,” “will,” “should,” “would,” “could,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or similar expressions.

Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those we express in these forward-looking statements, including the risks and uncertainties in Item 1A—“Risk Factors” and other factors we describe from time to time in our periodic filings with the SEC, such as:

 

   

our dependence on Stephen A. Wynn and existing management;

 

   

regulatory or enforcement actions and probity investigations;

 

   

potential violations of law by Mr. Kazuo Okada, a former shareholder of ours;

 

   

changes in the valuation of the promissory note we issued in connection with the redemption of Mr. Okada’s shares;

 

   

any violations by us of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or federal anti-money laundering laws;

 

   

pending or future legal proceedings;

 

   

decreases in levels of travel, leisure and consumer spending;

 

   

fluctuations in occupancy rates and average daily room rates;

 

   

competition in the casino/hotel and resort industries and actions taken by our competitors;

 

   

uncertainties over the development and success of new gaming and resort properties;

 

   

new development and construction activities of competitors;

 

   

our dependence on a limited number of resorts and locations for all of our cash flow;

 

   

adverse tourism and trends reflecting current domestic and international economic conditions;

 

   

general global macroeconomic conditions;

 

   

doing business in foreign locations such as Macau;

 

   

changes in gaming laws or regulations (including the legalization of gaming in certain jurisdictions);

 

   

the effect of environmental regulation on management and construction of projects;

 

   

our current and future insurance coverage levels;

 

   

our subsidiaries’ ability to pay us dividends and distributions;

 

   

our ability to protect our intellectual property rights;

 

   

our relationships with Macau games promoters;

 

   

our ability to maintain our customer relationships and collect and enforce gaming debts;

 

   

the maintenance of our concession from the Macau government;

 

   

changes in exchange rates;

 

   

cybersecurity risk including misappropriation of customer information or other breaches of information security;

 

   

changes in U.S. laws regarding healthcare;

 

   

changes in federal, foreign, or state tax laws or the administration of such laws;

 

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approvals under applicable jurisdictional laws and regulations (including gaming laws and regulations);

 

   

volatility and weakness in world-wide credit and financial markets and from governmental intervention in the financial markets;

 

   

conditions precedent to funding under our credit facilities;

 

   

continued compliance with all provisions in our credit agreements;

 

   

leverage and debt service (including sensitivity to fluctuations in interest rates);

 

   

restrictions or conditions on visitation by citizens of mainland China to Macau;

 

   

the impact that an outbreak of an infectious disease or the impact of extreme weather patterns or a natural disaster may have on the travel and leisure industry; and

 

   

the consequences of military conflicts and any future security alerts and/or terrorist attacks.

Further information on potential factors that could affect our financial condition, results of operations and business are included in this report and our other filings with the SEC. You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which are based only on information available to us at the time this statement is made. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the risk factors set forth below, as well as the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, regarding matters which could have an adverse effect, including a material one, on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Risks Related to our Business

The loss of Stephen A. Wynn could significantly harm our business.

Our ability to maintain our competitive position is dependent to a large degree on the efforts, skills and reputation of Stephen A. Wynn, the Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and one of the principal stockholders of Wynn Resorts. Mr. Wynn’s employment agreement expires in October 2020. However, we cannot assure you that Mr. Wynn will remain with Wynn Resorts, Limited. If we lose the services of Mr. Wynn, or if he is unable to devote sufficient attention to our operations for any other reason, our business may be significantly impaired.

Visitation to Macau may decline due to economic disruptions in mainland China as well as increased restrictions on visitations to Macau from citizens of mainland China.

A significant number of our gaming customers at Wynn Macau come from mainland China. Any economic disruption or contraction in China could disrupt the number of patrons visiting our property or the amount they may be willing to spend. In addition, any travel restrictions imposed by China on its citizens could disrupt the number of visitors from mainland China to our property. It is not known when, or if, policies similar to those implemented in 2009 restricting visitation by mainland Chinese citizens to Macau and Hong Kong, will be put in place and travel policies may be adjusted, without notice, in the future. The resulting decreased visitation would negatively affect our revenues and results of operations.

 

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Potential violations of law by Mr. Okada (former director and formerly the largest beneficial owner of our shares) and his affiliates could have adverse consequences to the Company.

On February 18, 2012, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts received a report from Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan, LLP detailing numerous instances of conduct constituting prima facie violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) by Kazuo Okada (formerly the largest beneficial owner of our shares) and certain of his affiliates. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies.” The Company has provided the Freeh Report to applicable regulators and has been cooperating with related investigations of such regulators. The conduct of Mr. Okada and his affiliates and the outcome of any resulting regulatory findings could have adverse consequences to the Company. A finding by regulatory authorities that Mr. Okada violated the FCPA on Company property and/or otherwise involved the Company in criminal or civil violations could result in actions by regulatory authorities against the Company. Relatedly, regulators have and may pursue separate investigations into the Company’s compliance with applicable laws in connection with the Okada matter, as discussed in Item 3—“Legal Proceedings”. While the Company believes that it is in full compliance with all applicable laws, any such investigations could result in actions by regulators against the Company, which could negatively affect the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

Mr. Okada and his affiliates have challenged the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s Shares. An adverse judgment or settlement resulting from the related litigation could reduce our profits or limit our ability to operate our business.

On February 18, 2012, after receiving the Freeh Report, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts determined that Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Mr. Kazuo Okada (collectively, the “Okada Parties”) were “unsuitable” within the meaning of Article VII of Wynn Resorts’ articles of incorporation and redeemed all of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”. On February 19, 2012, Wynn Resorts filed a complaint in the Eighth Judicial District Court, Clark County, Nevada against the Okada Parties (as amended, the “Complaint”), alleging breaches of fiduciary duty and related claims (the “Redemption Action”) arising from the activities addressed in the Freeh Report. The Company is seeking compensatory and special damages as well as a declaration that it acted lawfully and in full compliance with its articles of incorporation, bylaws and other governing documents in redeeming and cancelling the shares of Aruze, USA, Inc. On March 12, 2012, the Okada Parties filed an answer denying the claims and a counterclaim (as amended, the “Counterclaim”) against the Company, each of the members of the Company’s Board of Directors (other than Mr. Okada) and Wynn Resorts’ General Counsel (collectively, the “Wynn Parties”), seeking, among other things a declaration that the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares was void, an injunction restoring Aruze USA, Inc.’s share ownership, damages in an unspecified amount and rescission of the Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement, dated as of January 6, 2010, by and among Aruze USA, Inc., Stephen A. Wynn, and Elaine Wynn (the “Stockholders Agreement”). In connection with the Redemption Action and Counterclaim (1) various Okada Parties filed a complaint in the Tokyo District Court against the Company, all members of the Board (other than Mr. Okada) and the Company’s General Counsel alleging that the press release issued by the Company in connection with the Redemption Action has damaged their social evaluation and credibility and seeking damages and legal fees, (2) four federal derivative actions were commenced against the Company and all members of its Board of Directors, (3) two state derivative actions were commenced against the Company and all members of its Board of Directors and (4) regulatory inquiries and investigations were initiated against the Company. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings”, for a full description of these matters and status as of the date of this report. The Company is vigorously pursuing its claims against the Okada Parties, and together with the other counter-defendants, vigorously defending against the Counterclaims and other actions asserted against them. However, as with all litigation, the outcome of these proceedings cannot be predicted. Any adverse judgments or settlements involving payment of a material sum of money could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and could expose us to additional claims by third parties, including current or former investors or regulators. Any adverse judgments or settlements would reduce our profits and could limit our ability to operate our business.

 

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Change in valuation of our Redemption Price Promissory Note could have a negative impact on our results of operations.

In connection with the redemption of the shares previously held by Aruze USA, Inc., we recorded the fair value of the Redemption Note of approximately $1.94 billion in accordance with applicable accounting guidance. We utilized an independent third party valuation to assist in the determination of this fair value. In determining this fair value, we estimated the Redemption Note’s present value using discounted cash flows with a probability weighted expected return for redemption assumptions and a discount rate which included time value and non-performance risk adjustments commensurate with risk of the Redemption Note.

Considerations for the redemption assumptions included the stated maturity of the Redemption Note, uncertainty of the related cash flows as well as potential effects of the following: uncertainties surrounding the potential outcome and timing of pending litigation with the Okada Parties (see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies”); the outcome of on-going investigations of Aruze USA, Inc. by the United States Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Department of Justice and by the Nevada Gaming Control Board; and other potential legal and regulatory actions. In addition, in the furtherance of various future business objectives, we considered our ability, at our sole option, to prepay the Redemption Note at any time in accordance with its terms without penalty. Accordingly, we reasonably determined that the estimated life of the Redemption Note could be less than the contractual life of the Redemption Note.

In determination of the appropriate discount rate to be used in the estimated present value, the Redemption Note’s subordinated position relative to all other debt in our capital structure and credit ratings associated our traded debt were considered. Observable inputs for the risk free rate based on Federal Reserve rates for U.S. Treasury securities and credit risk spread based on a yield curve index of similarly rated debt was used. As a result of this analysis, we concluded the Redemption Notes’ stated rate of 2% approximated a market rate.

A change in any of the assumptions discussed above could result in a change in the fair value of this Redemption Note and significantly impact our results of operations.

Ongoing litigation and other disputes with Mr. Okada and certain of his affiliates could distract management and result in negative publicity and additional scrutiny of regulators.

There has been widespread publicity of the findings in the Freeh Report of prima facie violations of law by Mr. Okada and his affiliates, the Board’s unsuitability finding, the redemption of shares and related litigation. The actions, litigation, and publicity could reduce demand for shares of Wynn Resorts and Wynn Macau, Limited and thereby have a negative impact on the trading prices of their respective shares. The disputes may also lead to additional scrutiny from regulators, which could lead to investigations relating to, and possibly a negative impact on, the Company’s gaming licenses, and possibly have a negative impact on the Company’s ability to bid successfully for new gaming market opportunities.

Any violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or applicable Anti-Money Laundering laws or regulations could have a negative impact on us.

A significant portion of our revenue is derived from operations outside the United States, which exposes the Company to complex foreign and U.S. regulations inherent in doing business cross-border and in each of the countries in which it transacts business. We also deal with significant amounts of cash in our operations and are subject to various reporting and anti-money laundering regulations. Any violation of anti-money laundering laws or regulations by any of our resorts could have a negative effect on our results of operations. Compliance with international and U.S. laws and regulations that apply to our international operations also increases our cost of doing business in foreign jurisdictions.

 

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We are subject to regulations imposed by the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws that generally prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from offering, promising, authorizing or making improper payments to foreign government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Violations of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws may result in severe criminal and civil sanctions as well as other penalties and the SEC and U.S. Department of Justice have increased their enforcement activities with respect to the FCPA.

Internal control policies and procedures and employee training and compliance programs that we have implemented to deter prohibited practices may not be effective in prohibiting our directors, employees, contractors or agents from violating or circumventing our policies and the law. If our directors, employees or agents fail to comply with applicable laws or Company policies governing our international operations, the Company may face investigations, prosecutions and other legal proceedings and actions which could result in civil penalties, administrative remedies and criminal sanctions. Any future government investigations, prosecutions or other legal proceedings or actions, however, could have a negative impact on us.

Kazuo Okada, one of our former directors, failed to comply with internal training in these matters and failed to return to the Company an executed Acknowledgment agreeing to comply with the Company’s Code of Business Conduct and Ethics. For additional information on the Freeh Report, which detailed numerous instances of conduct constituting prima facie violations of the FCPA by Mr. Okada and certain of his affiliates, and the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares, see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies.” On February 19, 2012, the Company filed a complaint in Nevada state court against Mr. Okada and other entities alleging, among other things, breach of fiduciary duty in connection with alleged violations of the FCPA. For a detailed description of the legal proceedings between the Company and Mr. Okada and his affiliates, see Item 3—“Legal Proceedings.”

Our business is particularly sensitive to reductions in discretionary consumer and corporate spending as a result of downturns in the economy.

Consumer demand for hotel/casino resorts, trade shows and conventions and for the type of luxury amenities that we offer is particularly sensitive to downturns in the economy which adversely impact discretionary spending on leisure activities. Changes in discretionary consumer spending or consumer preferences brought about by factors such as perceived or actual general economic conditions, high unemployment, the housing foreclosure crisis, perceived or actual changes in disposable consumer income and wealth, an economic recession and changes in consumer confidence in the economy, or fears of war and future acts of terrorism could reduce customer demand for the luxury amenities and leisure activities we offer, and may have a significant negative impact on our operating results.

Our casino, hotel, convention and other facilities face intense competition, which may increase in the future.

The casino/hotel industry is highly competitive. Resorts located on or near the Las Vegas Strip compete with other Las Vegas Strip hotels and with other hotel casinos in Las Vegas on the basis of overall atmosphere, range of amenities, level of service, price, location, entertainment, theme and size, among other factors.

Wynn Las Vegas also competes with other hotel/casino facilities in other cities. The proliferation of gaming activities in other areas could significantly harm our business as well. In particular, the legalization or expansion of casino gaming in or near metropolitan areas from which we attract customers could have a negative effect on our business. In addition, new or renovated casinos in Macau or elsewhere in Asia could draw Asian gaming customers away from our Las Vegas Operations.

Our Macau operations also face intense competition. Currently there are 35 operating casinos in Macau. We hold a concession under one of only three gaming concessions and three subconcessions authorized by the Macau government to operate casinos in Macau. The Macau government has had the ability to grant additional gaming

 

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concessions since April 2009. If the Macau government were to allow additional competitors to operate in Macau through the grant of additional concessions or subconcessions, we would face additional competition, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Current concessionaries and subconcessionaires can open additional facilities.

Our Macau resort complex also faces competition from casinos located in other areas of Asia, including the Marina Bay Sands and Resorts World Sentosa resorts operating in Singapore, Genting Highlands Resort, a major gaming and resort destination located outside of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and casinos in the Philippines. We also encounter competition from other major gaming centers located around the world, including Australia and Las Vegas, cruise ships in Asia that offer gaming, and other casinos throughout Asia. Further, if current efforts to legalize gaming in other Asian countries are successful, our Wynn Macau resort will face additional regional competition.

We are entirely dependent on a limited number of resorts for all of our cash flow, which subjects us to greater risks than a gaming company with more operating properties.

We are entirely dependent upon our Macau Operations and Las Vegas Operations for all of our operating cash flow. As a result, we are subject to a greater degree of risk than a gaming company with more operating properties or greater geographic diversification. The risks to which we have a greater degree of exposure include the following:

 

   

local economic and competitive conditions;

 

   

changes in local and state governmental laws and regulations, including gaming laws and regulations;

 

   

natural and other disasters;

 

   

a decline in the number of visitors to Las Vegas or Macau;

 

   

a decrease in gaming and non-casino activities at our resorts; and

 

   

the outbreak of infectious diseases.

Any of the factors outlined above could negatively affect our ability to generate sufficient cash flow to make payments or maintain our covenants with respect to our debt.

Development costs of Wynn Palace may be higher than expected.

The total project budget, including construction costs, capitalized interest, pre-opening expenses, land costs and financing fees, is $4 billion.

These projected development costs reflect our best estimates and the actual development costs may be higher than expected. Owners’ contingencies that have been set aside to cover cost overruns may be insufficient to cover the full amount of such overruns. If these contingencies are not sufficient to cover these costs, we may not have the funds required to pay the excess costs and Wynn Palace may not be completed. Failure to complete Wynn Palace would negatively affect our financial condition, our results of operations and our ability to pay our debt.

There are significant risks associated with the construction of Wynn Palace, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows from this planned facility.

Major construction projects of the scope and scale of Wynn Palace entail significant risks, including:

 

   

shortages of materials or skilled labor;

 

   

unforeseen engineering, environmental and/or geological problems;

 

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work stoppages;

 

   

delays or interference from severe weather or natural disasters;

 

   

unanticipated cost increases; and

 

   

unavailability of construction equipment.

Construction, equipment or staffing problems or difficulties in obtaining any of the requisite licenses, permits and authorizations from regulatory authorities could increase the total cost, delay or prevent the construction or opening or otherwise affect the design and features of Wynn Palace.

We anticipate that only some of the subcontractors engaged for these projects will post bonds guaranteeing timely completion of the subcontractor’s work and payment for all of that subcontractor’s labor and materials. These bonds may not be adequate to ensure completion of the work.

Our Wynn Palace facility may not commence operations on schedule and construction costs for this project may exceed budgeted amounts. Failure to complete this project on schedule or within budget may have a significant negative effect on us and on our ability to make payments on our debt.

Our business relies on high-end, international customers. We often extend credit, and we may not be able to collect gaming receivables from our credit players or credit play may decrease.

General. A significant portion of our table games revenue at our resorts is attributable to the play of a limited number of international customers. The loss or a reduction in the play of the most significant of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cashflows. A downturn in economic conditions in the countries in which these customers reside could cause a further reduction in the frequency of visits by and revenue generated from these customers.

We conduct our gaming activities on a credit as well as a cash basis. This credit is unsecured. We will extend credit to those customers whose level of play and financial resources, in the opinion of management, warrant such an extension. The collectability of receivables from international customers could be negatively affected by future business or economic trends or by significant events in the countries in which these customers reside.

In addition, premium gaming is more volatile than other forms of gaming, and variances in win-loss results attributable to high-end gaming may have a positive or negative impact on cash flow and earnings in a particular quarter.

Wynn Las Vegas. While gaming debts evidenced by a credit instrument, including what is commonly referred to as a “marker,” are enforceable under the current laws of Nevada, and judgments on gaming debts are enforceable in all states of the United States under the Full Faith and Credit Clause of the United States Constitution, other jurisdictions may determine that direct or indirect enforcement of gaming debts is against public policy. Although courts of some foreign nations will enforce gaming debts directly and the assets in the United States of foreign debtors may be used to satisfy a judgment, judgments on gaming debts from U.S. courts are not binding on the courts of many foreign nations. We cannot assure you that we will be able to collect the full amount of gaming debts owed to us, even in jurisdictions that enforce them. Recent changes in economic conditions may make it more difficult to assess creditworthiness and more difficult to collect the full amount of any gaming debt owed to us. Our inability to collect gaming debts could have a significant negative impact on our operating results.

Wynn Macau. Although the law in Macau permits casino operators to extend credit to gaming customers, Wynn Macau may not be able to collect all of its gaming receivables from its credit players. We expect that Wynn Macau will be able to enforce these obligations only in a limited number of jurisdictions, including

 

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Macau. To the extent our gaming customers are visitors from other jurisdictions, we may not have access to a forum in which we will be able to collect all of our gaming receivables because, among other reasons, courts of many jurisdictions do not enforce gaming debts and we may encounter forums that will refuse to enforce such debts. Our inability to collect gaming debts could have a significant negative impact on our operating results.

Currently, the gaming tax in Macau is calculated as a percentage of gross gaming revenue. However, unlike Nevada, the gross gaming revenue calculation in Macau does not include deductions for uncollectible gaming debts. As a result, if we extend credit to our customers in Macau and are unable to collect on the related receivables from them, we remain obligated to pay taxes on our winnings from these customers.

We are subject to extensive state and local regulation and licensing and gaming authorities have significant control over our operations. The cost of compliance or failure to comply with such regulations and authorities could have a negative effect on our business.

The operations of our resorts are contingent upon our obtaining and maintaining all necessary licenses, permits, approvals, registrations, findings of suitability, orders and authorizations in the jurisdictions in which our resorts are located. The laws, regulations and ordinances requiring these licenses, permits and other approvals generally relate to the responsibility, financial stability and character of the owners and managers of gaming operations, as well as persons financially interested or involved in gaming operations. The Nevada Gaming Commission may require the holder of any debt or securities we or Wynn Las Vegas issue to file applications, be investigated and be found suitable to own Wynn Resorts’ securities if it has reason to believe that the security ownership would be inconsistent with the declared policies of the State of Nevada.

The Company’s articles of incorporation also provide that, to the extent required by the gaming authority making the determination of unsuitability or to the extent the Board of Directors determines, in its sole discretion, that a person is likely to jeopardize the Company’s or any affiliate’s application for, receipt of, approval for, right to the use of, or entitlement to, any gaming license, shares of Wynn Resorts’ capital stock that are owned or controlled by an unsuitable person or its affiliates are subject to redemption by Wynn Resorts. The redemption price may be paid in cash, by promissory note, or both, as required, and pursuant to the terms established by, the applicable gaming authority and, if not, as Wynn Resorts elects.

On February 18, 2012, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts received the Freeh Report. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings”, and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies.” After receiving the Freeh Report, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts determined that Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Mr. Okada were “unsuitable” within the meaning of Article VII of Wynn Resorts’ articles of incorporation and redeemed all of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”.

Nevada regulatory authorities also have broad powers to request detailed financial and other information, to limit, condition, suspend or revoke a registration, gaming license or related approvals, approve changes in our operations and levy fines or require forfeiture of assets for violations of gaming laws or regulations. Complying with gaming laws, regulations and license requirements is costly. Any change in the Nevada laws, regulations or licenses applicable to our business or a violation of any current or future laws or regulations applicable to our business or gaming licenses could require us to make substantial expenditures and forfeit assets, and would negatively affect our gaming operations.

Wynn Macau’s operations are subject to unique risks. Failure to adhere to the regulatory and gaming environment in Macau could result in the revocation of Wynn Macau’s concession or otherwise negatively affect its operations in Macau. Moreover, we are subject to the risk that U.S. regulators could determine that Macau’s gaming regulatory framework has not developed in a way that would permit us to conduct operations in Macau in a manner consistent with the way in which we intend, or the Nevada gaming authorities require us, to conduct our operations in the United States.

 

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Our information technology and other systems are subject to cyber security risk including misappropriation of customer information or other breaches of information security.

We rely on information technology and other systems to maintain and transmit customer financial information, credit card settlements, credit card funds transmissions, mailing lists and reservations information. The systems and processes we have implemented to protect customers, employees and company information are subject to the ever-changing risk of compromised security. These risks include cyber and physical security breaches, system failure, computer viruses, and negligent or intentional misuse by customers, company employees, or employees of third party vendors. The steps we take to deter and mitigate these risks may not be successful and our insurance coverage for protecting against cybersecurity risks may not be sufficient. Any disruption, compromise or loss of data or systems that results from a cybersecurity attack or breach could materially adversely impact, operations or regulatory compliance and could result in remedial expenses, fines, litigation, and loss of reputation, potentially impacting our financial results.

Our insurance coverage may not be adequate to cover all possible losses that we could suffer, including losses resulting from terrorism, and our insurance costs may increase.

We have comprehensive property and liability insurance policies for our properties with coverage features and insured limits that we believe are customary in their breadth and scope. However, in the event of a substantial loss, the insurance coverage we carry may not be sufficient to pay the full market value or replacement cost of our lost investment or could result in certain losses being totally uninsured. As a result, we could lose some or all of the capital we have invested in a property, as well as the anticipated future revenue from the property, and we could remain obligated for debt or other financial obligations related to the property.

Market forces beyond our control may limit the scope of the insurance coverage we can obtain in the future or our ability to obtain coverage at reasonable rates. Certain catastrophic losses may be uninsurable or too expensive to justify obtaining insurance. As a result, if we suffer such a catastrophic loss, we may not be successful in obtaining future insurance without increases in cost or decreases in coverage levels. Furthermore, our debt instruments and other material agreements require us to maintain a certain minimum level of insurance. Failure to satisfy these requirements could result in an event of default under these debt instruments or material agreements, which would negatively affect our business and financial condition.

Our business is particularly sensitive to the willingness of our customers to travel. Acts of terrorism, regional political events and developments in the conflicts in certain countries could cause severe disruptions in air travel that reduce the number of visitors to our facilities, resulting in a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

We are dependent on the willingness of our customers to travel. Only a small amount of our business is and will be generated by local residents. Most of our customers travel to reach our Las Vegas and Macau properties. Acts of terrorism may severely disrupt domestic and international travel, which would result in a decrease in customer visits to Las Vegas and Macau, including our properties. Regional conflicts could have a similar effect on domestic and international travel. Disruptions in air or other forms of travel as a result of any further terrorist act, outbreak of hostilities or escalation of war would have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

We are a parent company and our primary source of cash is and will be distributions from our subsidiaries.

We are a parent company with limited business operations of our own. Our main asset is the capital stock of our subsidiaries. We conduct most of our business operations through our direct and indirect subsidiaries. Accordingly, our primary sources of cash are dividends and distributions with respect to our ownership interests in our subsidiaries that are derived from the earnings and cash flow generated by our operating properties. Our subsidiaries might not generate sufficient earnings and cash flow to pay dividends or distributions in the future.

 

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Our subsidiaries’ payments to us will be contingent upon their earnings and upon other business considerations. In addition, our subsidiaries’ debt instruments and other agreements limit or prohibit certain payments of dividends or other distributions to us. We expect that future debt instruments for the financing of our other developments will contain similar restrictions. An inability of our subsidiaries to pay us dividends and distributions would have a significant negative effect on our liquidity.

If a third party successfully challenges our ownership of, or right to use, the Wynn-related trademarks and/or service marks, our business or results of operations could be harmed.

Our intellectual property assets, especially the logo version of “Wynn,” are among our most valuable assets. We have filed applications with the PTO and with various foreign patent and trademark registries including registries in Macau, China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, certain European countries and various other jurisdictions throughout the world, to register a variety of WYNN-related trademarks and service marks in connection with a variety of goods and services. These marks include “WYNN RESORTS,” “WYNN DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT,” “WYNN LAS VEGAS,” “WYNN MACAU,” “WYNN PALACE” and “ENCORE.” Some of the applications are based upon ongoing use and others are based upon a bona fide intent to use the marks in the future.

A common element of most of these marks is the use of the surname “WYNN.” As a general rule, a surname (or the portion of a mark primarily constituting a surname) is not eligible for registration unless the surname has acquired “secondary meaning.” To date, we have been successful in demonstrating to the PTO such secondary meaning for the Wynn name, in certain of the applications, based upon factors including Mr. Wynn’s prominence as a resort developer, but we cannot assure you that we will be successful with the other pending applications.

Federal registrations are not completely dispositive of the right to such marks. Third parties who claim prior rights with respect to similar marks may nonetheless challenge our right to obtain registrations or our use of the marks and seek to overcome the presumptions afforded by such registrations.

Furthermore, due to the increased use of technology in computerized gaming machines and in business operations generally, other forms of intellectual property rights (such as patents and copyrights) are becoming of increased relevance. It is possible that, in the future, third parties might assert superior intellectual property rights or allege that their intellectual property rights cover some aspect of our operations. The defense of such allegations may result in substantial expenses, and, if such claims are successfully prosecuted, may have a material impact on our business. Efforts we take to acquire and protect our intellectual property rights against unauthorized use throughout the world, which may include retaining counsel and commencing litigation in various jurisdictions, may be costly and may not be successful in protecting and preserving the status and value of our intellectual property assets.

We are subject to taxation by various governments and agencies. The rate of taxation could change.

We are subject to tax by various governments and agencies, both in the U.S. and in Macau. Changes in the rates of taxation, the amount of taxes we owe and the time when income is subject to taxation, our ability to claim U.S. foreign tax credits, failure to renew our Macau dividend agreement and Macau income tax exemption after 2015 and the imposition of foreign withholding taxes could increase our overall rate of taxation.

Because we own real property, we are subject to extensive environmental regulation, which creates uncertainty regarding future environmental expenditures and liabilities.

We have incurred costs to comply with environmental requirements, such as those relating to discharges into the air, water and land, the handling and disposal of solid and hazardous waste and the cleanup of properties affected by hazardous substances. Under these and other environmental requirements we may be required to

 

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investigate and clean up hazardous or toxic substances or chemical releases at our property. As an owner or operator, we could also be held responsible to a governmental entity or third parties for property damage, personal injury and investigation and cleanup costs incurred by them in connection with any contamination.

These laws typically impose cleanup responsibility and liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of or caused the presence of the contaminants. The liability under those laws has been interpreted to be joint and several unless the harm is divisible and there is a reasonable basis for allocation of the responsibility. The costs of investigation, remediation or removal of those substances may be substantial, and the presence of those substances, or the failure to remediate a property properly, may impair our ability to use our property.

Risks Associated with our Macau Operations

We depend upon games promoters for a significant portion of our gaming revenue. If we are unable to maintain, or develop additional, successful relationships with reputable games promoters, our ability to maintain or grow our gaming revenues could be adversely affected.

We may lose the clientele of our games promoters, who generate a significant portion of our gaming revenue. There is intense competition among casino operators in Macau for services provided by games promoters, which we expect to intensify as additional casinos open in Macau. If we are unable to maintain, or develop additional, successful relationships with reputable games promoters, or lose a significant number of our games promoters to our competitors, our ability to maintain or grow our gaming revenues will be adversely affected and we will have to seek alternative ways of developing relationships with VIP customers. In addition, if our games promoters are unable to develop or maintain relationships with our VIP customers, our ability to maintain or grow our gaming revenues will be hampered.

Increased competition for the services of games promoters may require us to pay increased commission rates to games promoters.

Certain games promoters have significant leverage and bargaining strength in negotiating operational agreements with casino operators. This leverage could result in games promoters negotiating changes to our operational agreements, including higher commissions, or the loss of business to a competitor or the loss of certain relationships with games promoters. If we need to increase our commission rates or otherwise change our practices with respect to games promoters due to competitive forces, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

Failure by the games promoters with whom we work to comply with Macau gaming laws and high standards of probity and integrity might affect our reputation and ability to comply with the requirements of our concession, Macau gaming laws and other gaming licenses.

The reputations and probity of the games promoters with whom we work are important to our own reputation and to our ability to operate in compliance with our concession, Macau gaming laws and other gaming licenses. We are not able to control our games promoters’ compliance with these high standards of probity and integrity, and our games promoters may violate provisions in their contracts with us designed to ensure such compliance. In addition, if we enter into a new business relationship with a games promoter whose probity is in doubt, this may be considered by regulators or investors to reflect negatively on our own probity. If our games promoters are unable to maintain required standards of probity and integrity, we may face consequences from gaming regulators with authority over our operations. Furthermore, if any of our games promoters violate the Macau gaming laws while on our premises, the Macau government may, in its discretion, take enforcement action against us, the games promoter, or each concurrently, and we may be sanctioned and our reputation could be harmed.

 

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The financial resources of our games promoters may be insufficient to allow them to continue doing business at our resort.

Our games promoters may encounter decreased liquidity, limiting their ability to grant credit to their patrons, resulting in decreased gaming volume at Wynn Macau. Furthermore, credit already extended by our games promoters to their patrons may become increasingly difficult for them to collect. This inability to grant credit and collect amounts due can negatively affect our games promoters’ operations, and as a result, our results of operations could be adversely impacted.

Revenues from our Macau gaming operations will end if we cannot secure an extension of our concession in 2022 or if the Macau government exercises its redemption right in 2017.

Our concession agreement with the Macau government expires in June 2022. Unless our concession is extended, in June 2022, all of our gaming operations and related equipment in Macau will be automatically transferred to the Macau government without compensation to us and we will cease to generate any revenues from these operations. Beginning in June 2017, the Macau government may redeem the concession agreement by providing us at least one year’s prior notice. In the event the Macau government exercises this redemption right, we are entitled to fair compensation or indemnity. The amount of such compensation or indemnity will be determined based on the amount of revenue generated during the tax year prior to the redemption multiplied for the remaining years under the concession. We may not be able to renew or extend our concession agreement on terms favorable to us or at all and, if our concession is redeemed, the compensation paid to us may not be adequate to compensate us for the loss of future revenues. The redemption of or failure to extend our concession would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

If Wynn Macau fails to comply with the concession agreement, the Macau government can terminate our concession without compensation to us, which would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

The Macau government has the right to unilaterally terminate our concession in the event of our material non-compliance with the basic obligations under the concession and applicable Macau laws. The concession agreement expressly provides that the government of Macau may unilaterally rescind the concession agreement if Wynn Macau:

 

   

conducts unauthorized games or activities that are excluded from its corporate purpose;

 

   

suspends gaming operations in Macau for more than seven consecutive days (or more than 14 days in a civil year) without justification;

 

   

defaults in payment of taxes, premiums, contributions or other required amounts;

 

   

does not comply with government inspections or supervision;

 

   

systematically fails to observe its obligations under the concession system;

 

   

fails to maintain bank guarantees or bonds satisfactory to the government;

 

   

is the subject of bankruptcy proceedings or becomes insolvent;

 

   

engages in serious fraudulent activity, damaging to the public interest; or

 

   

repeatedly violates applicable gaming laws.

If the government of Macau unilaterally rescinds the concession agreement, Wynn Macau will be required to compensate the government in accordance with applicable law, and the areas defined as casino space under Macau law and all of the gaming equipment pertaining to our gaming operations will be transferred to the government without compensation. The loss of our concession would prohibit us from conducting gaming operations in Macau, which would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

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Our Macau subsidiaries’ indebtedness is secured by a substantial portion of their assets.

Subject to applicable laws, including gaming laws, and certain agreed upon exceptions, our Macau subsidiaries’ debt is secured by liens on substantially all of their assets. In the event of a default by such subsidiaries under their financing documents, or if such subsidiaries experience insolvency, liquidation, dissolution or reorganization, the holders of such secured debt would first be entitled to payment from their collateral security, and only then would holders of our Macau subsidiaries’ unsecured debt be entitled to payment from their remaining assets.

We compete for limited labor resources in Macau and Macau government policies may also affect our ability to employ imported labor.

The success of our operations in Macau will be affected by our success in hiring and retaining employees. We compete with a large number of casino resorts in Macau for a limited number of qualified employees. We have to seek employees from other countries to adequately staff our resort and certain Macau government policies affect our ability to import labor in certain job classifications. Despite our coordination with the Macau labor and immigration authorities to assure that our labor needs are satisfied, we may not be able to recruit and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees for our operations or obtain required work permits for those employees.

Wynn Macau may be affected by adverse political and economic conditions.

A significant portion of our revenue is derived from our Macau operations. Our Macau operations are subject to significant political, economic and social risks inherent in doing business in an emerging market. Macau’s legislative, regulatory, legal, economic and cultural institutions are in a period of transition. The continued success of Wynn Macau will depend on political and economic conditions in Macau and mainland China. For example, fiscal decline and civil, domestic or international unrest in Macau, China or the surrounding region could significantly harm our business, not only by reducing customer demand for casino resorts, but also by increasing the risk of imposition of taxes and exchange controls or other governmental restrictions, laws or regulations that might impede Wynn Macau’s operations or ability to repatriate funds.

Macau may not have an adequate transportation infrastructure to accommodate the demand from future development.

Because of additional casino projects which are under construction and to be developed in the future, the ferry and helicopter services which provide transportation between Macau and Hong Kong may need to be expanded to accommodate the increased visitation of Macau. If transportation facilities to and from Macau are inadequate to meet the demands of an increased volume of gaming customers visiting Macau, the desirability of Macau as a gaming destination, as well as the results of operations of Wynn Macau, could be negatively impacted.

Extreme weather conditions may have an adverse impact on Wynn Macau.

Macau’s subtropical climate and location on the South China Sea are subject to extreme weather conditions including typhoons and heavy rainstorms. Unfavorable weather conditions could negatively affect the profitability of our resort complex and prevent or discourage guests from traveling to Macau.

Conflicts of interest may arise because certain of our directors and officers are also directors of Wynn Macau, Limited.

In October 2009, Wynn Macau, Limited, an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts and the developer, owner and operator of Wynn Macau, listed its ordinary shares of common stock on The Stock

 

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Exchange of Hong Kong Limited. Wynn Macau, Limited sold through an initial public offering, 1,437,500,000 shares (27.7%) of this subsidiary’s common stock. As a result of Wynn Macau, Limited having stockholders who are not affiliated with us, we and certain of our officers and directors who also serve as officers and/or directors of Wynn Macau, Limited may have conflicting fiduciary obligations to our stockholders and to the minority stockholders of Wynn Macau, Limited. Decisions that could have different implications for Wynn Resorts and Wynn Macau, Limited, including contractual arrangements that we have entered into or may in the future enter into with Wynn Macau, Limited, may give rise to the appearance of a potential conflict of interest.

Certain Nevada gaming laws apply to Wynn Macau’s gaming activities and associations.

Certain Nevada gaming laws also apply to gaming activities and associations in jurisdictions outside the State of Nevada. With respect to our Wynn Macau operations, we and our subsidiaries that must be licensed to conduct gaming operations in Nevada are required to comply with certain reporting requirements concerning gaming activities and associations in Macau conducted by our Macau-related subsidiaries. We and our licensed Nevada subsidiaries also will be subject to disciplinary action by the Nevada Gaming Commission if our Macau-related subsidiaries:

 

   

knowingly violate any Macau laws relating to their Macau gaming operations;

 

   

fail to conduct Wynn Macau’s operations in accordance with the standards of honesty and integrity required of Nevada gaming operations;

 

   

engage in any activity or enter into any association that is unsuitable for us because it poses an unreasonable threat to the control of gaming in Nevada, reflects or tends to reflect discredit or disrepute upon the State of Nevada or gaming in Nevada, or is contrary to Nevada gaming policies;

 

   

engage in any activity or enter into any association that interferes with the ability of the State of Nevada to collect gaming taxes and fees; or

 

   

employ, contract with or associate with any person in the foreign gaming operation who has been denied a license or a finding of suitability in Nevada on the ground of unsuitability, or who has been found guilty of cheating at gambling.

Such disciplinary action could include suspension, conditioning, limitation or revocation of the registration, licenses or approvals held by us and our licensed Nevada subsidiaries, including Wynn Las Vegas, LLC, and the imposition of substantial fines.

In addition, if the Nevada State Gaming Control Board determines that any actual or intended activities or associations of our Macau-related subsidiaries may be prohibited pursuant to one or more of the standards described above, the Nevada State Gaming Control Board can require us and our licensed Nevada subsidiaries to file an application with the Nevada Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability of the activity or association. If the Nevada Gaming Commission finds that the activity or association in Macau is unsuitable or prohibited, our Macau-related subsidiaries will either be required to terminate the activity or association, or will be prohibited from undertaking the activity or association. Consequently, should the Nevada Gaming Commission find that our Macau-related subsidiary’s gaming activities or associations in Macau are unsuitable, those subsidiaries may be prohibited from undertaking their planned gaming activities or associations in Macau, or be required to divest their investment in Macau, possibly on unfavorable terms.

Unfavorable changes in currency exchange rates may increase Wynn Macau’s obligations under the concession agreement and cause fluctuations in the value of our investment in Macau.

The currency delineated in Wynn Macau’s concession agreement with the government of Macau is the Macau pataca. The Macau pataca, which is not a freely convertible currency, is linked to the Hong Kong dollar, and the two are often used interchangeably in Macau. The Hong Kong dollar is linked to the U.S. dollar and the

 

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exchange rate between these two currencies has remained relatively stable over the past several years. However, the exchange linkages of the Hong Kong dollar and the Macau pataca, and the Hong Kong dollar and the U.S. dollar, are subject to potential changes due to changes in Chinese governmental policies and international economic and political developments.

If the Hong Kong dollar and the Macau pataca are no longer linked to the U.S. dollar, the exchange rate for these currencies may severely fluctuate. The current rate of exchange fixed by the applicable monetary authorities for these currencies may also change.

Because many of Wynn Macau’s payment and expenditure obligations are in Macau patacas, in the event of unfavorable Macau pataca or Hong Kong dollar rate changes, Wynn Macau’s obligations, as denominated in U.S. dollars, would increase. In addition, because we expect that most of the revenues for any casino that we operate in Macau will be in Hong Kong dollars, we are subject to foreign exchange risk with respect to the exchange rate between the Hong Kong dollar and the U.S. dollar. Also, if any of our Macau-related entities incur U.S. dollar-denominated debt, fluctuations in the exchange rates of the Macau pataca or the Hong Kong dollar, in relation to the U.S. dollar, could have adverse effects on our results of operations, financial condition and ability to service its debt.

Currency exchange controls and currency export restrictions could negatively impact Wynn Macau.

Currency exchange controls and restrictions on the export of currency by certain countries may negatively impact the success of Wynn Macau. For example, there are currently existing currency exchange controls and restrictions on the export of the renminbi, the currency of China. Restrictions on the export of the renminbi may impede the flow of gaming customers from China to Macau, inhibit the growth of gaming in Macau and negatively impact Wynn Macau’s gaming operations.

Risks Related to Share Ownership and Stockholder Matters

Our largest stockholders are able to exert significant influence over our operations and future direction.

As of December 31, 2013, Mr. Wynn and Elaine P. Wynn own 10,026,708 shares and 9,659,355 shares, respectively, or in the aggregate approximately 19.5%, of our outstanding common stock. As a result, Mr. Wynn and Elaine P. Wynn, to the extent they vote their shares in a similar manner, may be able to exert significant influence over all matters requiring our stockholders’ approval, including the approval of significant corporate transactions. In addition, until February 2012, Aruze USA, Inc. owned 24,549,222 shares of our outstanding common stock. On February 18, 2012, the Company redeemed all of the shares of the Company’s common stock held by Aruze USA, Inc. For additional information on the redemption, see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”.

Under the Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement, dated as of January 6, 2010, by and among Stephen A. Wynn, Elaine P. Wynn and Aruze USA, Inc. (the “Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement”), Mr. Wynn and Elaine P. Wynn have agreed to vote the shares of the Company’s common stock held by them subject to the terms of the Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement in a manner so as to elect to our Board of Directors each of the nominees contained on each and every slate of directors endorsed by Mr. Wynn, which slate will include, subject to certain exceptions, Elaine P. Wynn. As a result of this voting arrangement, Mr. Wynn, as a practical matter, exercises significant influence over the slate of directors to be elected to our Board of Directors. In addition, with stated exceptions, the Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement requires the written consent of the other party prior to any party selling any shares of the Company’s common stock that it owns.

In June 2012, in connection with the pending litigation between the Company and Aruze USA, Inc., Elaine P. Wynn submitted a cross claim against Mr. Wynn and Kazuo Okada seeking to void the Amended and

 

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Restated Stockholders Agreement. Certain Wynn Las Vegas indentures provide that if Mr. Wynn, together with certain related parties, in the aggregate beneficially owns a lesser percentage of the outstanding common stock of the Company than is beneficially owned by any other person, a change of control will have occurred. If Elaine Wynn prevails in her cross claim, Stephen A. Wynn would not beneficially own or control Elaine Wynn’s shares and a change in control may result under the Wynn Las Vegas debt documents. For additional information on the cross claim, see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 8 “Long-Term Debt” and Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”.

In November 2006, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts approved an amendment of its bylaws that exempts future acquisitions of shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock by either Mr. Wynn or Aruze USA, Inc. from Nevada’s acquisition of controlling interest statutes. In light of the determination by the Board of Directors on February 18, 2012 that each of Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Mr. Kazuo Okada is an “Unsuitable Person” under the Company’s articles of incorporation and the redemption and cancellation of Aruze USA Inc.’s shares of Company common stock, our Fifth Amended and Restated Bylaws amended these provisions to delete the reference to Aruze USA, Inc. and its affiliates. The Nevada acquisition of controlling interest statutes require stockholder approval in order to exercise voting rights in connection with any acquisition of a controlling interest in certain Nevada corporations unless the articles of incorporation or bylaws of the corporation in effect on the 10th day following the acquisition of a controlling interest by certain acquiring persons provide that these statutes do not apply to the corporation or to the acquisition specifically by types of existing or future stockholders. These statutes define a “controlling interest” as (i) one-fifth or more but less than one third, (ii) one-third or more but less than a majority, or (iii) a majority or more, of the voting power in the election of directors. As a result of these bylaws provisions, Mr. Wynn or his affiliates may acquire ownership of outstanding voting shares of Wynn Resorts permitting him or them to exercise more than one-third but less than a majority, or a majority or more, of all of the voting power of the Company in the election of directors, without requiring a resolution of the Company’s stockholders granting voting rights in the control shares acquired.

Our stock price may be volatile.

The trading price of our common stock may be subject to wide fluctuations. Our stock price may fluctuate in response to a number of events and factors, such as general United States, China, and world economic and financial conditions, our own quarterly variations in operating results, increased competition, changes in financial estimates and recommendations by securities analysts, changes in applicable laws or regulations, changes affecting the travel industry. The stock market in general, and prices for companies in our industry in particular, has experienced extreme volatility that may be unrelated to the operating performance of a particular company. These broad market and industry fluctuations may adversely affect the price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance.

Risks Related to our Substantial Indebtedness

We are highly leveraged and future cash flow may not be sufficient for us to meet our obligations, and we might have difficulty obtaining more financing.

We have a substantial amount of consolidated debt in relation to our equity. As of December 31, 2013, we had total outstanding debt of approximately $6.6 billion, which includes a portion of the funds we expect to need to construct Wynn Palace. We may, however, incur additional indebtedness in connection with the construction of Wynn Palace. See Item—1 “Business”, “Construction and Development Opportunities”. In addition, we are permitted to incur additional indebtedness if certain conditions are met, including conditions under our Wynn Macau credit facilities and our Wynn Las Vegas indentures in connection with other future potential development plans. On February 18, 2012, we issued a subordinated promissory note with a principal amount of approximately $1.94 billion in redemption of all of the shares of Wynn Resorts common stock held by Aruze USA, Inc. (the “Redemption Note”). For additional information on the redemption and the Redemption Note, see Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies”.

 

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Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences. For example:

 

   

failure to meet our payment obligations could result in acceleration of our indebtedness, foreclosure upon our assets that serve as collateral or bankruptcy;

 

   

servicing our indebtedness requires a substantial portion of our cash flow from the operations of Wynn Las Vegas and Wynn Macau and reduces the amount of available cash, if any, to fund working capital and other cash requirements;

 

   

Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Kazuo Okada have challenged the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares and we are currently involved in litigation with those parties as well as related shareholder derivative litigation. The outcome of these various proceedings cannot be predicted. Any adverse judgments or settlements involving payment of a material sum of money could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and could expose us to additional claims by third parties including current or former investors or regulators. Any adverse judgments or settlements would reduce our profits and could limit our ability to operate our business. See Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”;

 

   

we may experience decreased revenues from our operations due to decreased consumer spending levels and high unemployment, and could fail to generate sufficient cash to fund our liquidity needs and/or fail to satisfy the financial and other restrictive covenants to which we are subject under our existing indebtedness. Our business may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs;

 

   

we may not be able to obtain additional financing, if needed, to satisfy working capital requirements or pay for other capital expenditures, debt service or other obligations; and

 

   

rates with respect to a portion of the interest we pay will fluctuate with market rates and, accordingly, our interest expense will increase if market interest rates increase.

Under the terms of the documents governing our debt facilities, subject to certain limitations, we are permitted to incur indebtedness. If we incur additional indebtedness, the risks described above will be exacerbated.

The agreements governing our debt facilities contain certain covenants that restrict our ability to engage in certain transactions and may impair our ability to respond to changing business and economic conditions.

Some of our debt facilities require us to satisfy various financial covenants, which include requirements for minimum interest coverage ratios and leverage ratios pertaining to total debt to earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (both currently required for our Wynn Macau credit facilities). Future indebtedness or other contracts could contain covenants more restrictive than those contained in our existing debt facilities.

The agreements governing our debt facilities also contain restrictions on our ability to engage in certain transactions and may limit our ability to respond to changing business and economic conditions. These restrictions include, among other things, limitations on our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries to:

 

   

pay dividends or distributions or repurchase equity;

 

   

incur additional debt;

 

   

make investments;

 

   

create liens on assets to secure debt;

 

   

enter into transactions with affiliates;

 

   

issue stock of, or member’s interests in, subsidiaries;

 

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enter into sale-leaseback transactions;

 

   

engage in other businesses;

 

   

merge or consolidate with another company;

 

   

transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets;

 

   

issue disqualified stock;

 

   

create dividend and other payment restrictions affecting subsidiaries; and

 

   

designate restricted and unrestricted subsidiaries.

Our ability to comply with the terms of our outstanding facilities may be affected by general economic conditions, industry conditions and other events outside of our control. As a result, we may not be able to maintain compliance with these covenants. If our or Wynn Macau’s operations fail to generate adequate cash flow, we may violate those covenants, causing a default under our agreements, which would materially and adversely affect our operating results and our financial condition or result in our lenders or holders of our debt taking action to enforce their security interests in our various assets or cause all outstanding amounts to be due and payable immediately.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Macau Land Concessions

The government of Macau owns most of the land in Macau. In most cases, private interests in real property located in Macau are obtained through long-term leases known as concessions and other grants of rights to use land from the government. In July 2004, our subsidiary, Wynn Macau, entered into a land concession contract under which Wynn Macau leases from the Macau government an approximately 16-acre parcel of land in downtown Macau’s inner harbor area where Wynn Macau is located. The term of the land concession contract is 25 years from August 2004, and it may be renewed with government approval for successive periods. Wynn Macau paid a land concession premium of approximately 319.4 million Macau patacas (approximately US $40 million) for this land concession. In 2009, the Company and the Macau government agreed to modify this land concession as a result of the expansion of Wynn Macau with Encore at Wynn Macau and the additional square footage that was added as a result of such expansion. In November 2009, the Company made an additional one-time land premium payment of approximately 113.4 million Macau patacas (approximately US $14.2 million). Annual rent of approximately 4.2 million Macau patacas (approximately US $525,000) is being paid in accordance with the land concession contract.

In September 2011, Palo Real Estate Company Limited and Wynn Macau, each an indirect subsidiary of Wynn Macau Limited, formally accepted the terms and conditions of a draft land concession contract from the Macau government for approximately 51 acres of land in the Cotai area of Macau. On May 2, 2012, the land concession contract was gazetted by the government of Macau evidencing the final step in the granting of the land concession. We are currently constructing Wynn Palace in the Cotai area of Macau, a full-scale integrated resort containing a 1,700-room hotel, performance lake, meeting space, casino, spa, retail offerings and food and beverage outlets. The total project budget, including construction costs, capitalized interest, pre-opening expenses, land costs and financing fees, is $4 billion. As of December 31, 2013, we have invested $703.7 million in the project. We continue to remain on schedule for an opening in the first half of 2016.

 

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Las Vegas Land

We currently own approximately 238 acres of land on or near the Las Vegas Strip consisting of approximately 75 acres at the northeast corner of the intersection of Las Vegas Boulevard and Sands Avenue, on which Wynn Las Vegas is located, the approximately 140-acre golf course behind Wynn Las Vegas, approximately 5 acres adjacent to the golf course on which an office building is located, and approximately 18 acres located across from the Wynn Las Vegas site at Koval Lane and Sands Avenue, a portion of which is improved with an employee parking garage and an office building.

Las Vegas Water Rights

We own approximately 834 acre-feet of permitted and certificated water rights, which we currently use to irrigate the golf course. We also own approximately 151.5 acre-feet of permitted and certificated water rights for commercial use. There are significant cost savings and conservation benefits associated with using water supplied pursuant to our water rights. We anticipate using our water rights to support future development of the golf course land.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are occasionally party to lawsuits. As with all litigation, no assurance can be provided as to the outcome of such matters and we note that litigation inherently involves significant costs. For more information regarding the Company’s legal matters see Item 1A—“Risk Factors” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies,” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Atlantic-Pacific Capital

On May 3, 2010, Atlantic-Pacific Capital, Inc. (“APC”) filed an arbitration demand with JAMS, a private alternative dispute resolution provider, regarding an agreement with the Company. The action concerns a claim for compensation of approximately $32 million pursuant to an agreement entered into between APC and the Company on or about March 30, 2008, whereby APC was engaged to raise private equity capital for a specific investment vehicle sponsored by the Company. APC is seeking compensation unrelated to the investment vehicle. The Company has denied APC’s claims for compensation. The Company filed a Complaint for Damages and Declaratory Relief against APC in the Eighth Judicial District Court, Clark County, Nevada, on May 10, 2010, which APC removed to the United States District Court, District of Nevada. In March 2011, the District Court denied APC’s motion to compel arbitration, and dismissed the action. APC appealed, and on November 13, 2012, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit reversed the District Court and compelled arbitration. The arbitration is set for April 2014. An arbitrator has been selected, and the parties have been engaging in discovery. Management believes that APC’s claims against the Company are without merit, and the Company intends to continue to defend this matter vigorously.

Determination of Unsuitability and Redemption of Aruze USA, Inc. and Affiliates

On February 18, 2012, Wynn Resorts’ Gaming Compliance Committee concluded an investigation after receiving an independent report by Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan, LLP (the “Freeh Report”) detailing a pattern of misconduct by Aruze USA, Inc. (at the time a stockholder of Wynn Resorts), Universal Entertainment Corporation, Aruze USA, Inc.’s parent company, and Kazuo Okada, (the majority shareholder of Universal Entertainment Corporation and a former member of the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts and Wynn Macau, Limited) (collectively, the “Okada Parties”). The factual record presented in the Freeh Report included evidence that the Okada Parties had provided valuable items to certain foreign gaming officials who were responsible for regulating gaming in a jurisdiction in which entities controlled by Mr. Okada were developing a gaming resort. Mr. Okada denied the impropriety of such conduct to members of the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts and while serving as one of the Company’s directors Mr. Okada refused to acknowledge or abide by Wynn Resorts’ anti-bribery policies and refused to participate in the training all other directors have received concerning these policies.

 

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Based on the Freeh Report, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts determined that the Okada Parties are “unsuitable persons” under Article VII of the Company’s articles of incorporation. The Board of Directors was unanimous (other than Mr. Okada) in its determination. After authorizing the redemption of the Aruze shares, as discussed below, the Board of Directors took certain actions to protect the Company and its operations from any influence of an unsuitable person, including placing limitations on the provision of certain operating information to unsuitable persons and formation of an Executive Committee of the Board to manage the business and affairs of the Company during the period between each annual meeting. The Charter of the Executive Committee provides that “Unsuitable Persons” are not permitted to serve on the Committee. All members of the Board, other than Mr. Okada, were appointed to the Executive Committee on February 18, 2012. The Board of Directors also requested that Mr. Okada resign as a director of Wynn Resorts (under Nevada corporation law, a board of directors does not have the power to remove a director) and recommended that Mr. Okada be removed as a member of the Board of Directors of Wynn Macau, Limited. In addition, on February 18, 2012, Mr. Okada was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Las Vegas Capital Corp., an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts. On February 24, 2012, Mr. Okada was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Macau, Limited and on February 22, 2013, he was removed from the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts by a stockholder vote in which 99.6% of the over 86 million shares voted were cast in favor of removal. Additionally, Mr. Okada resigned from the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts on February 21, 2013. Although the Company has retained the structure of the Executive Committee, the Board has resumed its past role in managing the business and affairs of the Company.

Based on the Board of Directors’ finding of “unsuitability,” on February 18, 2012, Wynn Resorts redeemed and cancelled Aruze USA, Inc.’s 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. Following a finding of “unsuitability,” Article VII of Wynn Resorts’ articles of incorporation authorizes redemption at “fair value” of the shares held by unsuitable persons. The Company engaged an independent financial advisor to assist in the fair value calculation and concluded that a discount to the then current trading price was appropriate because of, among other things, restrictions on most of the shares held by Aruze USA, Inc. under the terms of the Stockholders Agreement (as defined below). Pursuant to its articles of incorporation, Wynn Resorts issued the Redemption Note to Aruze USA, Inc. in redemption of the shares. The Redemption Note has a principal amount of $1.94 billion, matures on February 18, 2022 and bears interest at the rate of 2% per annum, payable annually in arrears on each anniversary of the date of the Redemption Note. The Company may, in its sole and absolute discretion, at any time and from time to time, and without penalty or premium, prepay the whole or any portion of the principal or interest due under the Redemption Note. In no instance shall any payment obligation under the Redemption Note be accelerated except in the sole and absolute discretion of Wynn Resorts or as specifically mandated by law. The indebtedness evidenced by the Redemption Note is and shall be subordinated in right of payment, to the extent and in the manner provided in the Redemption Note, to the prior payment in full of all existing and future obligations of Wynn Resorts or any of its affiliates in respect of indebtedness for borrowed money of any kind or nature.

The Company provided the Freeh Report to appropriate regulators and law enforcement agencies and has been cooperating with related investigations that such regulators and agencies have undertaken. The conduct of the Okada Parties and any resulting regulatory investigations could have adverse consequences to the Company and its subsidiaries. A finding by regulatory authorities that Mr. Okada violated anti-corruption statutes and/or other laws or regulations applicable to persons affiliated with a gaming licensee on Company property and/or otherwise involved the Company in criminal or civil violations could result in actions by regulatory authorities against the Company and its subsidiaries.

Redemption Action and Counterclaim

On February 19, 2012, Wynn Resorts filed a complaint in the Eighth Judicial District Court, Clark County, Nevada against the Okada Parties (as amended, the “Complaint”), alleging breaches of fiduciary duty and related claims (the “Redemption Action”) arising from the activities addressed in the Freeh Report. The Company is seeking compensatory and special damages as well as a declaration that it acted lawfully and in full compliance with its articles of incorporation, bylaws and other governing documents in redeeming and cancelling the shares of Aruze, USA, Inc.

 

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On March 12, 2012, the Okada Parties removed the action to the United States District Court for the District of Nevada (the action was subsequently remanded to Nevada state court). On that same date, the Okada Parties filed an answer denying the claims and a counterclaim (as amended, the “Counterclaim”) that purports to assert claims against the Company, each of the members of the Company’s Board of Directors (other than Mr. Okada) and Wynn Resorts’ General Counsel (the “Wynn Parties”). The Counterclaim alleges, among other things: (1) that the shares of Wynn Resorts common stock owned by Aruze USA, Inc. were exempt from the redemption-for-unsuitability provisions in the Wynn Resorts articles of incorporation (the “Articles”) pursuant to certain agreements executed in 2002; (2) that the Wynn Resorts directors who authorized the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares acted at the direction of Stephen A. Wynn and did not independently and objectively evaluate the Okada Parties’ suitability, and by so doing, breached their fiduciary duties; (3) that the Wynn Resorts directors violated the terms of the Wynn Resorts Articles by failing to pay Aruze USA, Inc. fair value for the redeemed shares; and (4) that the terms of the Redemption Note that Aruze USA, Inc. received in exchange for the redeemed shares, including the Redemption Note’s principal amount, duration, interest rate, and subordinated status, were unconscionable. Among other relief, the Counterclaim seeks a declaration that the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares was void, an injunction restoring Aruze USA, Inc.’s share ownership, damages in an unspecified amount and rescission of the Amended and Restated Stockholders Agreement, dated as of January 6, 2010, by and among Aruze USA, Inc., Stephen A. Wynn, and Elaine Wynn (the “Stockholders Agreement”).

On June 19, 2012, Elaine Wynn responded to the Counterclaim and asserted a cross claim against Steve Wynn and Kazuo Okada seeking a declaration that (1) any and all of Elaine Wynn’s duties under the Stockholders Agreement be discharged; (2) the Stockholders Agreement is subject to rescission and is rescinded; (3) the Stockholders Agreement is an unreasonable restraint on alienation in violation of public policy; and/or (4) the restrictions on sale of shares shall be construed as inapplicable to Elaine Wynn. Mr. Wynn filed his answer to Elaine Wynn’s cross claim on September 24, 2012. The indentures for Wynn Las Vegas, LLC’s 7 7/8% first mortgage notes due 2020, 7 3/4% first mortgage notes due 2020 (the “2020 Indentures”) and the indenture for Wynn Las Vegas, LLC’s 4 1/4% Senior Notes due 2023 (the “2023 Indenture,” and, together with the 2020 Indentures, the “Indentures”) provide that if Stephen A. Wynn, together with certain related parties, in the aggregate beneficially owns a lesser percentage of the outstanding common stock of the Company than are beneficially owned by any other person, a change of control will have occurred. If Elaine Wynn prevails in her cross claim, Stephen A. Wynn would not beneficially own or control Elaine Wynn’s shares and a change in control may result under the Wynn Las Vegas debt documents. Under the 2020 Indentures, the occurrence of a change of control requires that the Company make an offer to each holder to repurchase all or any part of such holder’s notes at a purchase price equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount thereof plus accrued and unpaid interest on the notes purchased, if any, to the date of repurchase (unless the notes have been previously called for redemption). Under the 2023 Indenture, if a change of control occurs and within 60 days after that occurrence the 4 1/4% Senior Notes due 2023 are rated below investment grade by both rating agencies that rate such notes, the Company is required to make an offer to each holder to repurchase all or any part of such holder’s notes at a purchase price equal to 101% of the aggregate principal amount thereof plus accrued and unpaid interest on the notes purchased, if any, to the date of repurchase (unless the notes have been previously called for redemption). Mr. Wynn is opposing Ms. Wynn’s cross claim.

The Company’s Complaint and the Okada Parties’ Counterclaim have been, and continue to be, challenged through motion practice. At a hearing held on November 13, 2012, the Nevada state court granted the Wynn Parties’ motion to dismiss the Counterclaim with respect to the Okada Parties’ claim under the Nevada Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act with respect to certain Company executives but otherwise denied the motion. At a hearing held on January 15, 2013, the court denied the Okada Parties’ motion to dismiss the Company’s Complaint. On April 22, 2013, the Company filed a second amended complaint. On August 30, 2013, the Okada Parties filed their third amended Counterclaim. On September 18, 2013, the Company filed a Partial Motion to Dismiss related to a claim in the third amended Counterclaim alleging civil extortion by Mr. Wynn and the Company’s General Counsel. On October 29, 2013, the court granted the motion and dismissed the claim. On November 26, 2013, the Okada Parties filed their fourth amended Counterclaim, and the Company

 

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filed an answer to that pleading on December 16, 2013. The parties had been engaged in discovery at the time the court entered the Stay (defined and discussed below). Therefore, although the court previously set a timetable for all discovery, pre-trial and trial deadlines, with a five-week jury trial scheduled to commence in April 2014, this schedule will necessarily change due to the Stay.

On February 13, 2013, the Okada Parties filed a motion in the Nevada state court asking the court to establish an escrow account (specifically, they asked the court to establish a “disputed ownership fund,” as defined in a federal tax regulation (“DOF”)) to hold the Redemption Note as well as the redeemed shares themselves (although those shares were previously cancelled in February 2012), until the resolution of the Redemption Action and Counterclaim. The Okada Parties subsequently filed reply papers in further support of their motion, in which they narrowed the relief they were seeking, specifically by withdrawing their request that the redeemed shares be placed into the escrow account. On April 17, 2013, the court entered an order granting the Okada Parties’ motion in part as to the narrowed relief outlined in their reply papers. Among other things, the court’s order directed the Okada Parties to establish an escrow account with a third party (without making any ruling as to whether such an account would satisfy the requirements of a DOF) to hold interest payments tendered by the Company on the Redemption Note. Per the court’s order, the Company is to have no responsibility for fees or costs of the account, and will receive a full release and indemnity related to the account. On each of February 14, 2013 and February 13, 2014, the Company issued checks to Aruze USA, Inc. in the amount of $38.7 million, representing the interest payments due on the Redemption Note at those times. However, as of the date of this report, the checks remain uncashed. The parties engaged in discussions regarding the terms of the escrow agreement contemplated by the court’s order. However, the Okada Parties recently advised of their intent to deposit any checks for interest and principal, past and future, due under the terms of the Redemption Note to the Clerk of the Court for deposit into the Clerk’s Trust Account.

On April 8, 2013, the United States Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice filed a Motion to Intervene and for Temporary and Partial Stay of Discovery in the Redemption Action. The motion stated that the federal government has been conducting a criminal investigation of the Okada Parties involving the “same underlying allegations of misconduct—that is, potential violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act and related fraudulent conduct—that form the basis of” the Company’s complaint, as amended, in the Redemption Action. The motion sought to stay all discovery in the Redemption Action related to the Okada Parties’ allegedly unlawful activities in connection with their casino project in the Philippines until the conclusion of the criminal investigation and any resulting criminal prosecution, with an interim status update to the court in six months. At a hearing on May 2, 2013, the court granted the motion and ordered that all discovery in the Redemption Action be stayed for a period of six months (the “Stay”). On May 30, 2013, Elaine Wynn filed a motion for partial relief from the Stay, to allow her to conduct limited discovery related to her cross and counterclaims. The Wynn Parties opposed the motion so as to not interfere with the United States government’s investigation. At a hearing on August 1, 2013, the court denied the motion. On October 29, 2013, the United States Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice filed a Motion to Extend the Stay for a period of six months, expiring May 2, 2014. At a hearing on October 31, 2013, the court granted the requested extension based upon an affidavit provided under seal that outlined, among other things, concerns for witness safety. The court did, however, order the parties to exchange written discovery propounded prior to May 2, 2013, including discovery related to the Elaine Wynn cross and counterclaims referred to above.

Subject to the Stay, the Company will continue to vigorously pursue its claims against the Okada Parties, and the Company and the Wynn Parties will continue to vigorously defend against the counterclaims asserted against them. The Company’s claims and the Okada Parties’ counterclaims remain in an early stage and management has determined that based on proceedings to date, it is currently unable to determine the probability of the outcome of this matter or the range of reasonably possible loss, if any. An adverse judgment or settlement involving payment of a material amount could cause a material adverse effect on our financial condition. See Item 1A—“Risk Factors” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”.

 

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Litigation Commenced by Kazuo Okada

Japan Action:

On August 28, 2012, Mr. Okada, Universal Entertainment Corporation and Okada Holdings (“Okada Japan Parties”) filed a complaint in Tokyo District Court against the Company, all members of the Board of Directors (other than Mr. Okada) and the Company’s General Counsel (the “Wynn Parties”), alleging that the press release issued by the Company with respect to the redemption has damaged plaintiffs’ social evaluation and credibility. The Okada Japan Parties seek damages and legal fees from the Wynn Parties. After asking the Okada Japan Parties to clarify the allegations in their complaint, the Wynn Parties objected to the jurisdiction of the Japanese court. On April 30, 2013, the Wynn Parties filed a memorandum in support of their jurisdictional position. On October 21, 2013, the court dismissed the action on jurisdictional grounds. On November 1, 2013, the Okada Japan Parties filed an appeal moving the matter to the Tokyo High Court. An informal hearing on the matter has been scheduled for February 27, 2014.

Indemnification Action:

On March 20, 2013, Mr. Okada filed a complaint against the Company in Nevada state court for indemnification under the Company’s Articles, bylaws and agreements with its directors. The complaint seeks advancement of Mr. Okada’s costs and expenses (including attorney’s fees) incurred pursuant to the various legal proceedings and related regulatory investigations described above. The Company believes there is no basis for the relief requested in the complaint and intends to vigorously defend against this matter. The Company’s answer and counterclaim was filed on April 15, 2013. The counterclaim names each of the Okada Parties as defendants and seeks indemnification under the Company’s Articles for costs and expenses (including attorney’s fees) incurred pursuant to the various legal proceedings and related regulatory investigations described above. On April 30, 2013, Mr. Okada filed his reply to the counterclaim.

On June 14, 2013, Mr. Okada filed a motion for partial summary judgment that he was entitled to advancement of his expenses incurred in the various proceedings and investigations. Mr. Okada also filed a special motion to dismiss, arguing that the Company’s counterclaims seek to infringe upon Mr. Okada’s right to petition the court, and constitute a strategic lawsuit against public policy. The Company’s counterclaims seek only to enforce Wynn Resorts’ contractual right to indemnity under Article VII, Section 4 of the Company’s Articles. At a hearing on August 1, 2013, the court denied both motions and provided for limited discovery (i.e., discovery that does not implicate any of the issues subject to the Stay entered in the Redemption Action). On August 2, 2013, the court stayed discovery in the indemnification action related to the government investigations (consistent with the Stay in the Redemption Action), and ordered that all other discovery be conducted within ninety (90) days.

On August 22, 2013, the Company noticed Mr. Okada’s deposition for September 16, 2013. Mr. Okada filed a motion for protective order seeking to vacate his deposition, arguing that he did not have any information relevant to his claims for advancement of fees and/or indemnity that he asserted against the Company. On October 18, 2013, after a full briefing by the parties, the court denied Mr. Okada’s motion and entered an order stating that Mr. Okada’s deposition testimony is relevant to the claims he asserted against the Company, that Mr. Okada may not designate someone else to testify on his behalf, and that the Company may sequence discovery in the action as it chooses. On February 4, 2014, the court entered an order on the parties’ stipulation that: (1) dismissed Okada’s claims asserted against the Company in that action (i.e., all Okada’s claims that relate to advancement); (2) reserved Okada’s right to assert, in the future, any claims for indemnity following the resolution of the Redemption Action; and (3) stayed the claims asserted by the Company against Okada in that action pending the resolution of the Redemption Action.

 

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Related Investigations and Derivative Litigation

Investigations:

In the U.S. Department of Justice’s Motion to Intervene and for Temporary and Partial Stay of Discovery in the Redemption Action, the Department of Justice states in a footnote that the government also has been conducting a criminal investigation into the Company’s donation to the University of Macau discussed above. The Company has not received any target letter or subpoena in connection with such an investigation. The Company intends to cooperate fully with the government in response to any inquiry related to the donation to the University of Macau.

Other regulators may pursue separate investigations into the Company’s compliance with applicable laws arising from the allegations in the matters described above and in response to the Counterclaim and other litigation filed by Mr. Okada suggesting improprieties in connection with the Company’s donation to the University of Macau. While the Company believes that it is in full compliance with all applicable laws, any such investigations could result in actions by regulators against the Company.

Derivative Claims:

Six derivative actions were commenced against the Company and all members of its Board of Directors: four in the United States District Court, District of Nevada, and two in the Eighth Judicial District Court of Clark County, Nevada.

The four federal actions brought by the following plaintiffs have been consolidated: (1) The Louisiana Municipal Police Employees’ Retirement System, (2) Maryanne Solak, (3) Excavators Union Local 731 Welfare Fund, and (4) Boilermakers Lodge No. 154 Retirement Fund (collectively, the “Federal Plaintiffs”).

The Federal Plaintiffs filed a consolidated complaint on August 6, 2012, asserting claims for: (1) breach of fiduciary duty; (2) waste of corporate assets; (3) injunctive relief; and (4) unjust enrichment. The claims are against the Company and all Company directors, including Mr. Okada, however, the plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed Mr. Okada as a defendant in this consolidated action on September 27, 2012. The Federal Plaintiffs claim that the individual defendants breached their fiduciary duties and wasted assets by: (a) failing to ensure the Company’s officers and directors complied with federal and state laws and the Company’s Code of Conduct; (b) voting to allow the Company’s subsidiary to make the donation to the University of Macau; and (c) redeeming Aruze USA, Inc.’s stock such that the Company incurs the debt associated with the redemption. The Federal Plaintiffs seek unspecified compensatory damages, restitution in the form of disgorgement, reformation of corporate governance procedures, an injunction against all future payments related to the donation/pledge, and all fees (attorneys, accountants, and experts) and costs. The directors responded to the consolidated complaint by filing a motion to dismiss on September 14, 2012. On February 1, 2013, the federal court dismissed the complaint for failure to plead adequately the futility of a pre-suit demand on the Board. The dismissal was without prejudice to the Federal Plaintiffs’ ability to file a motion within 30 days seeking leave to file an amended complaint. On April 9, 2013, the Federal Plaintiffs filed their amended complaint. The Company and the directors filed their motion to dismiss the amended complaint on May 23, 2013. The Federal Plaintiffs filed their opposition on July 8, 2013, and the Company and directors filed their reply on August 8, 2013. The court has not yet ruled on this motion.

The two state court actions brought by the following plaintiffs have also been consolidated: (1) IBEW Local 98 Pension Fund and (2) Danny Hinson (collectively, the “State Plaintiffs”). Through a coordination of efforts by all parties, the directors and the Company (a nominal defendant) have been served in all of the actions. The State Plaintiffs filed a consolidated complaint on July 20, 2012 asserting claims for (1) breach of fiduciary duty; (2) abuse of control; (3) gross mismanagement; and (4) unjust enrichment. The claims are against the Company and all Company directors, including Mr. Okada, as well as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, who signs financial disclosures filed with the SEC. The State Plaintiffs claim that the individual defendants failed to

 

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disclose to the Company’s stockholders the investigation into, and the dispute with director Okada as well as the alleged potential violations of the FCPA related to, the University of Macau Development Foundation donation. The State Plaintiffs seek unspecified monetary damages (compensatory and punitive), disgorgement, reformation of corporate governance procedures, an order directing the Company to internally investigate the donation, as well as attorneys’ fees and costs. On October 13, 2012, the court entered the parties’ stipulation providing for a stay of the state derivative action for 90 days, subject to the parties’ obligation to monitor the progress of the pending litigation, discussed above, between Wynn Resorts (among others) and Mr. Okada (among others). Per the stipulation, Wynn Resorts and the individual defendants were not required to respond to the consolidated complaint while the stay remained in effect. Following the expiration of the stay, the State Plaintiffs advised the Company and the individual defendants that they intended to resume the action by filing an amended complaint, which they did, on April 26, 2013. The Company and directors filed their motion to dismiss on June 10, 2013. However, on July 31, 2013, the parties agreed to a stipulation that was submitted to, and approved by the court. The stipulation contemplates a stay of the consolidated state court derivative action of equal duration as the Stay entered by the court in the Redemption Action. On February 5, 2014, the court entered a new stipulation between the parties that provides for a further stay of the state derivative action and directs the parties, within 30 days of the conclusion of the stay in the Redemption Action, to discuss how the state derivative action should proceed and to file a joint report with the court.

The individual defendants are vigorously defending against the claims pleaded against them in these derivative actions. We are unable to predict the outcome of these litigations at this time.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not Applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

Our common stock trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “WYNN.” The following table sets forth the high and low sale prices for the indicated periods, as reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market.

 

     High      Low  

Year Ended December 31, 2013

     

First Quarter

   $ 126.98       $ 113.39   

Second Quarter

   $ 144.99       $ 114.41   

Third Quarter

   $ 159.85       $ 124.57   

Fourth Quarter

   $ 194.53       $ 155.77   

Year Ended December 31, 2012

     

First Quarter

   $ 132.59       $ 104.62   

Second Quarter

   $ 138.28       $ 95.82   

Third Quarter

   $ 116.47       $ 90.11   

Fourth Quarter

   $ 123.64       $ 103.34   

Holders

There were approximately 195 holders of record of our common stock as of February 14, 2014.

Dividends

Wynn Resorts is a holding company and, as a result, our ability to pay dividends is dependent on our ability to obtain funds and our subsidiaries’ ability to provide funds to us. Restrictions imposed by our subsidiaries’ debt instruments significantly restrict certain key subsidiaries holding a majority of our assets, including Wynn Las Vegas, LLC and Wynn Macau, from making dividends or distributions to Wynn Resorts. Specifically, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC and certain of its subsidiaries are restricted under the indentures governing the first mortgage notes from making certain “restricted payments,” as defined in the indentures. These restricted payments include the payment of dividends or distributions to any direct or indirect holders of equity interests of Wynn Las Vegas, LLC. Restricted payments cannot be made unless certain financial and non-financial criteria have been satisfied. In addition, the terms of the other loan agreements of Wynn Las Vegas, LLC and Wynn Macau contain similar restrictions. Our Company has paid the following dividends:

 

   

In December 2013, we paid a cash dividend of $3.00 per share. In each of March 2013, June 2013, August 2013 and November 2013, we paid a cash dividend of $1.00 per share.

 

   

In November 2012, we paid a cash dividend of $8.00 per share. In each of March 2012, June 2012 and August 2012, we paid a cash dividend of $0.50 per share.

The Company has increased its quarterly dividend to $1.25 per share in 2014. On January 30, 2014, we announced a cash dividend of $1.25 per share, payable on February 27, 2014 to Stockholders of record as of February 13, 2014. Our Board of Directors will continue to periodically assess the level and appropriateness of any cash dividends.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following tables reflect selected consolidated financial data of Wynn Resorts and its subsidiaries. This data should be read together with our Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto, Item 7—“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the other

 

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information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Operating results for the periods presented are not indicative of the results that may be expected for future years. Significant events impacting our selected financial data include:

 

   

On April 28, 2005, we opened our Wynn Las Vegas resort.

 

   

On September 6, 2006, we opened our Wynn Macau resort.

 

   

On December 24, 2007, we opened an expansion of our Wynn Macau resort.

 

   

On December 22, 2008, we opened Encore at Wynn Las Vegas, an expansion of Wynn Las Vegas.

 

   

On October 9, 2009, Wynn Macau, Limited listed its shares of common stock on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited. Wynn Macau, Limited sold 27.7% of its common stock through an initial public offering.

 

   

On April 21, 2010, we opened Encore at Wynn Macau, a further expansion of Wynn Macau.

 

   

On February 18, 2012, we redeemed and cancelled Aruze USA, Inc.’s 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts common stock.

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011     2010     2009  
     (in thousands, except per share amounts)  

Consolidated Statements of Income Data:

          

Net revenues

   $ 5,620,936      $ 5,154,284      $ 5,269,792      $ 4,184,698      $ 3,045,611   

Pre-opening costs

     3,169        466        —          9,496        1,817   

Operating income

     1,290,091        1,029,276        1,008,240        625,252        234,963   

Net income

     1,004,157        728,699        825,113        316,596        39,107   

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest[1]

     (275,505     (226,663     (211,742     (156,469     (18,453

Net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited

     728,652        502,036        613,371        160,127        20,654   

Basic income per share

   $ 7.25      $ 4.87      $ 4.94      $ 1.30      $ 0.17   

Diluted income per share

   $ 7.17      $ 4.82      $ 4.88      $ 1.29      $ 0.17   

 

     As of December 31,  
     2013      2012      2011      2010      2009  
     (in thousands, except per share amounts)  

Consolidated Balance Sheets Data:

              

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 2,435,041       $ 1,725,219       $ 1,262,587       $ 1,258,499       $ 1,991,830   

Construction in progress

     558,624         110,490         28,477         22,901         457,594   

Total assets

     8,377,030         7,276,594         6,899,496         6,674,497         7,581,769   

Total long-term obligations[2]

     6,789,145         6,041,285         3,096,149         3,405,983         3,695,821   

Stockholders’ equity[3]

     132,351         103,932         2,223,454         2,380,585         3,160,363   

Cash distributions declared per common share

   $ 7.00       $ 9.50       $ 6.50       $ 8.50       $ 4.00   

 

[1] In October 2009, Wynn Macau, Limited, our indirect wholly owned subsidiary and the developer, owner and operator of Wynn Macau, listed its ordinary shares of common stock on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited. Wynn Macau, Limited sold 1,437,500,000 shares (27.7%) of its common stock through an initial public offering. Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest represents the noncontrolling interests’ share of our net income of Wynn Macau, Limited.
[2] Includes long-term debt, the required contract premium payments under our land concession contract at Wynn Macau, future charitable contributions and deferred income taxes.

 

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[3] In February 2012, in connection with the redemption and cancellation of Aruze USA, Inc.’s 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts common stock, stockholders’ equity was reduced by $1.94 billion, the face amount of the Redemption Note. Aruze USA has challenged the redemption and cancellation of the 24,549,222 shares and legal proceedings are ongoing. Please see Item 3—“Legal Proceedings”.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Overview

We are a developer, owner and operator of destination casino resorts. In the Macau Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (“Macau”), we operate and own 72.3% of Wynn Macau, which opened on September 6, 2006. On April 21, 2010, we opened Encore at Wynn Macau, a further expansion of Wynn Macau. We refer to the fully integrated Wynn Macau and Encore at Wynn Macau resort as Wynn Macau | Encore or as our Macau Operations. In Las Vegas, Nevada, we own and operate Wynn Las Vegas | Encore, which we refer to as our Las Vegas Operations. We are developing Wynn Palace, a full-scale casino resort in the Cotai area of Macau.

Our Resorts

The following table sets forth information about our resorts as of February 14, 2014:

 

     Hotel Rooms  &
Suites
     Approximate Casino
Square Footage
     Approximate Number
of Table Games
     Approximate Number
of Slots
 

Macau Operations

     1,008         280,000         493         866   

Las Vegas Operations

     4,748         186,000         230         1,854   

Macau Operations

We operate Wynn Macau | Encore under a 20-year casino concession agreement granted by the Macau government in June 2002.

Our Macau resort complex features:

 

   

Approximately 280,000 square feet of casino space, offering 24-hour gaming and a full range of games, including private gaming salons, sky casinos and a poker pit;

 

   

Two luxury hotel towers with a total of 1,008 spacious guest rooms and suites;

 

   

Casual and fine dining in eight restaurants;

 

   

Approximately 57,000 square feet of high-end, brand-name retail shopping, including stores and boutiques by Bvlgari, Cartier, Chanel, Dior, Dunhill, Ferrari, Giorgio Armani, Graff, Gucci, Hermes, Hugo Boss, Jaegar-LeCoultre, Loro Piana, Louis Vuitton, Miu Miu, Piaget, Prada, Roger Dubuis, Rolex, Tiffany, Tudor, Vacheron Constantin, Van Cleef & Arpels, Versace, Vertu, Ermenegildo Zegna and others;

 

   

Recreation and leisure facilities, including two health clubs and spas, a salon, a pool; and

 

   

Lounges and meeting facilities.

 

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During 2013, we made renovations to our spa, VIP gaming area and various other areas on our property. In response to our evaluation of our Macau Operations and the reactions of our guests, we have made and expect to continue to make enhancements and refinements to this resort complex.

Las Vegas Operations

Wynn Las Vegas | Encore is located at the intersection of the Las Vegas Strip and Sands Avenue, and occupies approximately 215 acres of land fronting the Las Vegas Strip. In addition, we own approximately 18 acres across Sands Avenue, a portion of which is utilized for employee parking and an office building, and approximately 5 acres adjacent to the golf course on which an office building is located.

Our Las Vegas resort complex features:

 

   

Approximately 186,000 square feet of casino space, offering 24-hour gaming and a full range of games, including private gaming salons, a sky casino, a poker room, and a race and sports book;

 

   

Two luxury hotel towers with a total of 4,748 spacious guest rooms, suites and villas;

 

   

34 food and beverage outlets featuring signature chefs;

 

   

A Ferrari and Maserati automobile dealership;

 

   

Approximately 96,000 square feet of high-end, brand-name retail shopping, including stores and boutiques by Alexander McQueen, Brioni, Cartier, Chanel, Chloé, Chopard, Dior, Graff, Hermes, IWC Schaffhausen, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Loro Piana, Louis Vuitton, Manolo Blahnik, Nicholas Kirkwood, Oscar de la Renta, Piaget, Rolex, Vertu and others;

 

   

Recreation and leisure facilities, including an 18-hole golf course, swimming pools, private cabanas and two full service spas and salons;

 

   

Two showrooms; and

 

   

Three nightclubs and a beach club.

During 2013, we remodeled our villas and two of our restaurants. In response to our evaluation of our Las Vegas Operations and the reactions of our guests, we have and expect to continue to make enhancements and refinements to this resort complex.

Future Development

We are currently constructing Wynn Palace in the Cotai area of Macau, a full-scale integrated resort containing a 1,700-room hotel, performance lake, meeting space, casino, spa, retail offerings and food and beverage outlets. The total project budget, including construction costs, capitalized interest, pre-opening expenses, land costs and financing fees, is $4 billion. As of December 31, 2013, we have invested $703.7 million in the project. We continue to remain on schedule for an opening in the first half of 2016.

On July 29, 2013, Wynn Macau and Palo finalized and executed a GMP contract with Leighton Contractors (Asia) Limited, acting as the general contractor. Under the GMP contract, the general contractor is responsible for both the construction and design of the Wynn Palace project. The general contractor is obligated to substantially complete the project in the first half of 2016 for a guaranteed maximum price of HK$20 billion (approximately $2.57 billion). An early completion bonus for achievement of substantial completion on or before January 25, 2016 will be paid to the general contractor if certain conditions are satisfied under the GMP contract. Both the contract time and guaranteed maximum price are subject to further adjustment under certain specified conditions. The performance of the general contractor is backed by a full completion guarantee given by Leighton Holdings Limited, the parent company of the general contractor, as well as a performance bond for 5% of the guaranteed maximum price.

 

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We continually seek out new opportunities for additional gaming or related businesses, in the United States, and worldwide. On November 11, 2013, we announced that our Board had elected to withdraw the previously filed application for a gaming license in Pennsylvania. We have made an application for a gaming license in Massachusetts. The process is competitive and we expect to know the outcome by the end of the first half of 2014. Proceeding with this project will require significant expenditure of Company funds. In addition, we are exploring various international jurisdictions for expansion opportunities.

Results of Operations

The table below presents our net revenues (amounts in thousands).

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013      2012      2011  

Net Revenues:

        

Macau Operations

   $ 4,040,526       $ 3,667,454       $ 3,789,073   

Las Vegas Operations

     1,580,410         1,486,830         1,480,719   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 5,620,936       $ 5,154,284       $ 5,269,792   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Reliance on only two resort complexes (in two geographic regions) for our operating cash flow exposes us to certain risks that competitors, whose operations are more geographically diversified, may be better able to control. In addition to the concentration of operations in two resort complexes, many of our customers are premium gaming customers who wager on credit, thus exposing us to increased credit risk. High-end gaming also increases the potential for variability in our results.

Operating Measures

Certain key operating statistics specific to the gaming industry are included in our discussion of our operational performance for the periods for which a Consolidated Statement of Income is presented. Below are definitions of these key operating statistics discussed:

 

   

Table games win is the amount of drop or turnover that is retained and recorded as casino revenue.

 

   

Drop is the amount of cash and net markers issued that are deposited in a gaming table’s drop box.

 

   

Turnover is the sum of all losing rolling chip wagers within our Wynn Macau Operations’ VIP program.

 

   

Rolling chips are identifiable chips that are used to track turnover for purposes of calculating incentives.

 

   

Slot win is the amount of handle (representing the total amount wagered) that is retained by us and is recorded as casino revenue.

 

   

Average Daily Rate (“ADR”) is calculated by dividing total room revenue including the retail value of promotional allowances (less service charges, if any) by total rooms occupied including complimentary rooms.

 

   

Revenue per Available Room (“REVPAR”) is calculated by dividing total room revenue including the retail value of promotional allowances (less service charges, if any) by total rooms available.

 

   

Occupancy is calculated by dividing total occupied rooms, including complimentary rooms, by the total rooms available.

Below is a discussion of the methodologies used to calculate win percentage at our resorts.

In our VIP casino in Macau, customers primarily purchase non-negotiable chips, commonly referred to as rolling chips, from the casino cage and there is no deposit into a gaming table drop box from chips purchased

 

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from the cage. Non-negotiable chips can only be used to make wagers. Winning wagers are paid in cash chips. The loss of the non-negotiable chips in the VIP casino is recorded as turnover and provides a base for calculating VIP casino win percentage. It is customary in Macau to measure VIP casino play using this rolling chip method. We expect our win as a percentage of turnover to be within the range of 2.7% to 3.0%.

The measurement base used in the general casino is not the same as what is used in the VIP casino. In our general casino in Macau, customers may purchase cash chips at either the gaming tables or at the casino cage. The cash used to purchase the cash chips at the gaming tables is deposited in the gaming table’s drop box. This is the base of measurement that we use for calculating win percentage in our general casino. We do not report an expected range for the win percentage in our general casino as chips purchased at the casino cage are excluded from table games drop and distort our expected win percentage. With increased purchases at the casino cage, we believe the relevant indicator of volumes in the mass market segment should be table games win.

The measurements in our VIP casino and the general casino are not comparable as the general casino tracks the initial purchase of chips at the table while the measurement method in our VIP casino tracks the sum of all losing wagers. Accordingly, the base measurement in the VIP casino is much larger than the base measurement in the general casino. As a result, the expected win percentage with the same amount of gaming win is smaller in the VIP casino when compared to the general casino.

In Las Vegas, customers purchase chips at the gaming tables. The cash and net markers used to purchase chips are deposited in the gaming table’s drop box. This is the base of measurement that we use for calculating win percentage in Las Vegas. Each type of table game has its own theoretical win percentage. Our expected table games win percentage in Las Vegas is 21% to 24%.

Financial results for the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the year ended December 31, 2012.

Revenues

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013 are comprised of $4,490.6 million in casino revenues (79.9% of total net revenues) and $1,130.3 million of net non-casino revenues (20.1% of total net revenues). Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2012 are comprised of $4,034.8 million in casino revenues (78.3% of total net revenues) and $1,119.5 million of net non-casino revenues (21.7% of total net revenues).

Casino revenues are primarily comprised of the net win from our table games and slot machine operations. Casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013 of $4,490.6 million represents a $455.9 million (11.3%) increase from casino revenues of $4,034.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Our Macau Operations experienced a $365.4 million (10.6%) increase in casino revenues to $3,807.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to the prior year casino revenues of $3,442.5 million due primarily to stronger table game volumes in our general casino and VIP casino. Our Las Vegas Operations experienced a $90.5 million (15.3%) increase in casino revenues to $682.8 million, compared to the prior year casino revenues of $592.3 million due to a significant increase in our table games win percentage (before discounts).

 

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The table below sets forth key gaming statistics related to our Macau and Las Vegas operations.

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013      2012      Increase/
(Decrease)
    Percent
Change
 
     (amounts in thousands, except for win per day amounts)  

Macau Operations:

          

VIP Casino

          

VIP turnover

   $ 122,991,763       $ 119,251,854       $ 3,739,909        3.14

VIP win as a % of turnover

     3.01%         2.84%         0.17 pts        —     

General Casino

          

Drop(1)

   $ 2,633,870       $ 2,764,664       $ (130,794     (4.73 )% 

Table games win

   $ 992,872       $ 843,001       $ 149,871        17.8

Table games win %(1)

     37.7%         30.5%         7.2 pts        —     

Table games win per unit per day

   $ 13,098       $ 11,549       $ 1,549        13.4

Slot machine handle

   $ 4,846,938       $ 4,697,463       $ 149,475        3.2

Slot machine win

   $ 245,578       $ 247,020       $ (1,442     (0.6 )% 

Slot machine win per unit per day

   $ 777       $ 718       $ 59        8.2

Las Vegas Operations:

          

Drop

   $ 2,617,634       $ 2,591,833       $ 25,801        1.0

Table games win

   $ 657,927       $ 567,014       $ 90,913        16.0

Table games win %

     25.1%         21.9%         3.2 pts        —     

Table games win per unit per day

   $ 7,729       $ 7,031       $ 698        9.9

Slot machine handle

   $ 2,874,646       $ 2,908,678       $ (34,032     (1.2 )% 

Slot machine win

   $ 177,452       $ 177,420       $ 32        0.0

Slot machine win per unit per day

   $ 239       $ 206       $ 33        16.0

 

(1) Customers purchase general casino gaming chips at either the gaming tables or the casino cage. Chips purchased at the casino cage are excluded from table games drop and will increase the expected win percentage. With the increased purchases at the casino cage in our Macau general casino, we believe the relevant indicator of volumes in the general casino should be table games win.

For the year ended December 31, 2013, room revenues were $492.2 million, an increase of $12.2 million (2.6%) compared to prior year room revenue of $480 million. Room revenue at our Macau Operations decreased $3 million (2.6%) to $114.6 million compared to the prior year period of $117.7 million. During 2013, we renovated approximately 600 guestrooms in the original Wynn Macau tower, contributing to an approximate 4.8% reduction in the number of available room-nights during the year. Room revenue at our Las Vegas Operations increased $15.3 million (4.2%) to $377.6 million compared to the prior year room revenue of $362.3 million. In Las Vegas, during 2013, we experienced an increase in occupancy and an increase in room rates compared to 2012.

 

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The table below sets forth key operating measures related to room revenue.

 

     Years Ended
December 31,
 
     2013     2012  

Average Daily Rate

    

Macau

   $ 313      $ 315   

Las Vegas

     258        252   

Occupancy

    

Macau

     95.5     93.0

Las Vegas

     84.6     82.9

REVPAR

    

Macau

   $ 299      $ 293   

Las Vegas

     218        209   

Other non-casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2013, included food and beverage revenues of $586.7 million, retail revenues of $278.9 million, entertainment revenues of $65.4 million, and other revenues from outlets such as the spa and salon, of $74.4 million. Other non-casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2012, included food and beverage revenues of $588.4 million, retail revenues of $261.6 million, entertainment revenues of $81.8 million, and other revenues from outlets, including the spa and salon, of $73.8 million. Food and beverage revenues were relatively flat year-over-year at our Macau Operations and Las Vegas Operations. Retail revenues at our Macau Operations increased $10.5 million (5.9%) due to stronger business in our leased stores. Retail revenues at our Las Vegas Operations increased $6.7 million (8.0%) as we completed the reconfiguration to certain stores in our retail area during the first half of 2013. Entertainment revenues decreased $16.4 million (20%) due to a Las Vegas show that ended its run in November 2012.

Departmental, Administrative and Other Expenses

For the year ended December 31, 2013, departmental expenses included casino expenses of $2.8 billion, room expenses of $133.5 million, food and beverage expenses of $323.6 million, and entertainment, retail and other expenses of $175.3 million. Also included are general and administrative expenses of approximately $448.8 million and $11.9 million charged as a provision for doubtful accounts receivable. For the year ended December 31, 2012, departmental expenses included casino expenses of $2.6 billion, room expenses of $126.5 million, food and beverage expenses of $308.4 million, and entertainment, retail and other expenses of $189.8 million. Also included are general and administrative expenses of approximately $441.7 million and approximately $18.1 million charged as a provision for doubtful accounts receivable. Casino expenses have increased during the year ended December 31, 2013 due primarily to higher gaming taxes commensurate with the increase in casino revenue at our Las Vegas Operations and Macau Operations (where we incur a gaming tax and other levies at a rate totaling 39% in accordance with the concession agreement). Food and beverage expenses increased over the prior year period primarily due to additional nightclub promotional costs at our Las Vegas Operations. The decrease in entertainment, retail and other expenses was due primarily to a Las Vegas show that ended its run in November 2012. General and administrative expense increased primarily due to higher stock-based compensation expense related to the accelerated vesting of a restricted stock award that was previously granted to our former chief operating officer and increased development costs partially offset by higher expenses related to the share redemption and litigation with a former shareholder that were incurred during the prior year period. During the years ended 2013 and 2012, we recorded adjustments of $14.9 million and $30.9 million, respectively, to our reserve estimates for casino accounts receivable based on the results of historical collection patterns and current collection trends.

Pre-opening costs

During the year ended December 31, 2013, we incurred $3.2 million of pre-opening costs as compared to $0.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. We began to incur pre-opening costs during October 2012

 

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related to the design and planning for Wynn Palace. We expect our pre-opening costs to increase in the future as construction and development of Wynn Palace continues toward the expected completion in the first half of 2016.

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation and amortization for the year ended December 31, 2013, was $371.1 million compared to $373.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012.

During the construction of our resorts, costs incurred in the construction of the buildings, improvements to land and the purchases of assets for use in operations were capitalized. Once these resorts opened, their assets were placed into service and we began recognizing the associated depreciation expense. Depreciation expenses will continue throughout the estimated useful lives of these assets. In addition, we continually evaluate the useful life of our property and equipment, intangibles and other assets and adjust them when warranted.

The maximum useful life of assets at our Macau Operations is the remaining life of the gaming concession or land concession, which currently expire in June 2022 and August 2029, respectively. Consequently, depreciation related to our Macau Operations is charged on an accelerated basis when compared to our Las Vegas Operations.

Property charges and other

Property charges and other for the year ended December 31, 2013, was $17.1 million compared to $40 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, property charges and other related primarily to miscellaneous renovations and abandonments at our resorts, a contract termination fee and entertainment development costs. For the year ended December 31, 2012, property charges and other related primarily to a remodel of a Las Vegas restaurant, charges related to the cancellation of a Las Vegas show which ended its run in November 2012, and miscellaneous renovations and abandonments.

In response to our evaluation of our resorts and the reactions of our guests, we continue to remodel and make enhancements at our resorts.

Other non-operating costs and expenses

Interest income was $15.7 million and $12.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. This increase is mainly due to higher cash balances during 2013. During 2013 and 2012, our short-term investment strategy was to preserve capital while retaining sufficient liquidity. The majority of our short-term investments were primarily in money market accounts, time deposits and fixed deposits with a maturity of three months or less.

Interest expense was $299 million, net of capitalized interest of $10.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $288.8 million, net of capitalized interest of $2 million, for the year ended December 31, 2012. Our interest expense increased compared to the prior year period primarily due to the issuance of the Wynn Las Vegas $500 million 4 1/4% Senior Notes in May 2013 and a full period of expense for the $1.94 billion Redemption Note and the Wynn Las Vegas $900 million 5 3/8% first mortgage notes, which were issued in 2012. Capitalized interest increased due to the construction costs of Wynn Palace. Capitalized interest will continue to increase with the ongoing borrowings and construction costs of Wynn Palace.

We recorded a gain of $14.2 million and $1 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, respectively, resulting from the changes in the fair value of our interest rate swaps during those years. For further information on our interest rate swaps, see Item 7A—“Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.”

 

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During the year ended December 31, 2013, we recognized $40.4 million in loss from extinguishment of debt. On May 22, 2013, Wynn Las Vegas completed the purchase of $274.7 million of the 7 7/8% First Mortgage Notes due 2017 (the “2017 Notes”) pursuant to a tender offer for any and all of the 2017 Notes. In connection with this tender offer, Wynn Las Vegas paid $19.6 million in consideration to holders who tendered their notes. Additionally, Wynn Las Vegas expensed $6.7 million of unamortized financing costs and original issue discount related to the 2017 Notes and incurred other fees of approximately $0.3 million related to the tender offer. On November 1, 2013, Wynn Las Vegas redeemed the untendered 2017 Notes plus accrued and unpaid interest. As a result of the redemption, we incurred redemption fees of $8.9 million and expensed $4.9 million of unamortized financing costs and original issue discount.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, we recognized $25.2 million in loss from extinguishment of debt primarily attributable to the amendment of our credit agreements. In March 2012, Wynn Las Vegas entered into an eighth amendment to its Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement”). In connection with this amendment, Wynn Las Vegas prepaid all term loans under the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement, terminated all of its revolving credit commitments that were due to expire in 2013, and terminated all but $100 million of its revolving credit commitments expiring in 2015. In connection with this transaction, we expensed deferred financing fees of $4.8 million. Additionally, as described in Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 8 “Long-Term Debt” to our Consolidated Financial Statements, we amended our Wynn Macau credit facilities in July 2012. In connection with amending the Wynn Macau credit facilities, we expensed $17.7 million of deferred financing costs and third party fees.

Income Taxes

For the year ended December 31, 2013, we recorded a tax benefit of $17.6 million. Our income tax benefit is primarily related to a decrease in our deferred tax liabilities reduced by foreign taxes assessable on the dividends of Wynn Macau. Since June 30, 2010, we have no longer considered our portion of the tax earnings and profits of Wynn Macau, Limited to be permanently reinvested. No additional U.S. tax provision has been made with respect to amounts not considered permanently reinvested as we anticipate that U.S. foreign tax credits should be sufficient to eliminate any U.S. tax provision relating to such repatriation. We have not provided deferred U.S. income taxes or foreign withholding taxes on temporary differences which are considered indefinitely reinvested. On November 30, 2010, Wynn Macau received a second 5-year exemption from Macau’s 12% Complementary Tax on casino gaming profits, thereby exempting the casino gaming profits of Wynn Macau through December 31, 2015. Accordingly, we were exempted from the payment of approximately $107.3 million and $87.1 million in such taxes for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Our non-gaming profits remain subject to the Macau Complementary Tax and casino winnings remain subject to the Macau Special Gaming tax and other levies at a rate totaling 39% in accordance with our concession agreement.

In April 2012, the Company reached an agreement with the Appellate division of the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) regarding issues raised during the examination of the 2006 through 2009 U.S. income tax returns. The settlement with the Appellate division did not impact the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits. The settlement of the 2006 through 2009 examination issues resulted in a cash tax payment of $1.3 million and the utilization of $3.1 million and $0.9 million in foreign tax credit and general business credit carryforwards, respectively.

During December 2012, the IRS completed an examination of the Company’s 2010 U.S. income tax return and had no changes. In May 2013, the Company received notification that the IRS completed its examination of the Company’s 2011 U.S. income tax return and had no changes.

For tax year 2012, the Company is participating in the IRS Compliance Assurance Program (“CAP”), which accelerates IRS examination of key transactions with the goal of resolving any issues before the taxpayer files its return. The Company believes the IRS will complete their examination of the 2012 tax year in the next 12 months. In March 2013, the Company received notification that it had been selected for the Compliance

 

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Maintenance phase of CAP for the 2013 tax year. In the Compliance Maintenance phase, the IRS, at its discretion, may reduce the level of review of the taxpayer’s tax positions based on the complexity and number of issues, and the taxpayer’s history of compliance, cooperation and transparency in the CAP. The Company does not expect a change in its unrecognized tax benefits as a result of the completion of these examinations.

In July 2012, the Macau Financial Services Bureau commenced an examination of the 2008 Macau income tax return of Wynn Macau. In November 2012, the Company received the results of the examination. While no additional tax was due, adjustments were made to the Company’s foreign net operating loss carryforwards.

In January 2013, the Macau Financial Services Bureau examined the 2009 and 2010 Macau income tax returns of Palo, which is a co-holder of the land concession for Wynn Palace. The exam resulted in no change to the tax returns.

In March 2013, the Macau Financial Services Bureau commenced an examination of the 2009, 2010, and 2011 Macau income tax returns of Wynn Macau. Since the examination is in its initial stages, the Company is unable to determine if it will conclude within the next 12 months. The Company believes that its liability for uncertain tax positions is adequate with respect to these years.

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

In October 2009, Wynn Macau, Limited, an indirect wholly owned subsidiary, listed its ordinary shares of common stock on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited. Wynn Macau, Limited sold 1,437,500,000 shares (27.7%) of its common stock through an initial public offering. We recorded net income attributable to noncontrolling interests of $275.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $226.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This represents the noncontrolling interests’ share of net income from Wynn Macau, Limited for each year.

Financial results for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the year ended December 31, 2011.

Revenues

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2012 are comprised of $4,034.8 million in casino revenues (78.3% of total net revenues) and $1,119.5 million of net non-casino revenues (21.7% of total net revenues). Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2011 are comprised of $4,190.5 million in casino revenues (79.5% of total net revenues) and $1,079.3 million of net non-casino revenues (20.5% of total net revenues).

Casino revenues are primarily comprised of the net win from our table games and slot machine operations. Casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2012 of $4,034.8 million represents a $155.7 million (3.7%) decrease from casino revenues of $4,190.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. Our Las Vegas Operations experienced a $32.9 million (5.3%) decrease in casino revenues to $592.3 million, compared to the prior year casino revenues of $625.2 million due to a decrease in our table games win percentage (before discounts). Our Macau Operations experienced a $122.8 million (3.4%) decrease in casino revenues to $3,442.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the prior year due to lower turnover and hold percentage in our VIP casino.

 

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The table below sets forth key gaming statistics related to our Macau and Las Vegas operations.

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2012      2011      Increase/
(Decrease)
    Percent
Change
 
     (amounts in thousands, except for win per day amounts)  

Macau Operations:

          

VIP Casino

          

VIP turnover

   $ 119,251,854       $ 123,099,838       $ (3,847,984     (3.1 )% 

VIP win as a % of turnover

     2.84%         2.93%         (0.09) pts        —     

General Casino

          

Drop(1)

   $ 2,764,664       $ 2,769,284       $ (4,620     (0.2 )% 

Table games win

   $ 843,001       $ 787,678       $ 55,323        7.0

Table games win %(1)

     30.5%         28.4%         2.1 pts        —     

Table games win per unit per day

   $ 11,549       $ 10,045       $ 1,504        15.0

Slot machine handle

   $ 4,697,463       $ 5,400,697       $ (703,234     (13.0 )% 

Slot machine win

   $ 247,020       $ 277,124       $ (30,104     (10.9 )% 

Slot machine win per unit per day

   $ 718       $ 760       $ (42     (5.5 )% 

Las Vegas Operations:

          

Drop

   $ 2,591,833       $ 2,366,711       $ 225,122        9.5

Table games win

   $ 567,014       $ 589,093       $ (22,079     (3.7 )% 

Table games win %

     21.9%         24.9%         (3.0) pts        —     

Table games win per unit per day

   $ 7,031       $ 7,188       $ (157     (2.2 )% 

Slot machine handle

   $ 2,908,678       $ 2,738,261       $ 170,417        6.2

Slot machine win

   $ 177,420       $ 170,027       $ 7,393        4.3

Slot machine win per unit per day

   $ 206       $ 184       $ 22        12.0

 

(1) Customers purchase general casino gaming chips at either the gaming tables or the casino cage. Chips purchased at the casino cage are excluded from table games drop and will increase the expected win percentage. With the increased purchases at the casino cage in our Macau general casino, we believe the relevant indicator of volumes in the general casino should be table games win.

For the year ended December 31, 2012, room revenues were $480 million, an increase of $7.9 million (1.7%) compared to prior year room revenue of $472.1 million. Room revenue at our Las Vegas Operations increased $8.3 million (2.3%) to $362.3 million compared to the prior year room revenue of $354 million. In Las Vegas, we experienced an increase in room rates during the year ended December 31, 2012, however our occupancy rate decreased 3.2 percentage points, both compared to the prior year. We were able to achieve an increase in ADR as we adjusted rates to attract a higher quality customer who would take advantage of all aspects of our resort. Room revenue at our Macau Operations did not change significantly during the year ended December 31, 2012.

 

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The table below sets forth key operating measures related to room revenue.

 

     Years Ended
December 31,
 
     2012     2011  

Average Daily Rate

    

Macau

   $ 315      $ 315   

Las Vegas

     252        242   

Occupancy

    

Macau

     93.0     91.8

Las Vegas

     82.9     86.1

REVPAR

    

Macau

   $ 293      $ 289   

Las Vegas

     209        208   

Other non-casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2012, included food and beverage revenues of $588.4 million, retail revenues of $261.6 million, entertainment revenues of $81.8 million, and other revenues from outlets such as the spa and salon, of $73.8 million. Other non-casino revenues for the year ended December 31, 2011, included food and beverage revenues of $547.7 million, retail revenues of $260.8 million, entertainment revenues of $82.2 million, and other revenues from outlets, including the spa and salon, of $71.8 million. Food and beverage revenues at our Las Vegas Operations increased $36.3 million (8%), while our Macau Operations increased $4.4 million (4.8%), as compared to the prior year. The increase in Las Vegas is due primarily to strong business in our beach club and nightclubs. Retail revenues at our Macau Operations increased $2.6 million (1.5%), while retail at our Las Vegas Operations decreased by $1.8 million (2.1%). The increase at Wynn Macau is due primarily to strong same-store sales growth combined with new stores from the first half of 2012. Retail revenues at our Las Vegas Operations decreased as we reconfigured the Encore retail area and rebranded several retail outlets. Entertainment revenues decreased $0.4 million (0.5%) from the prior year primarily due to a Las Vegas show that ended its run in November 2012 and another Las Vegas show that ended in April 2011.

Departmental, Administrative and Other Expenses

For the year ended December 31, 2012, departmental expenses included casino expenses of $2,626.8 million, room expenses of $126.5 million, food and beverage expenses of $308.4 million, and entertainment, retail and other expenses of $189.8 million. Also included are general and administrative expenses of approximately $441.7 million and $18.1 million charged as a provision for doubtful accounts receivable. For the year ended December 31, 2011, departmental expenses included casino expenses of $2,686.4 million, room expenses of $125.3 million, food and beverage expenses of $283.9 million, and entertainment, retail and other expenses of $214.4 million. Also included are general and administrative expenses of approximately $389.1 million and approximately $33.8 million charged as a provision for doubtful accounts receivable. Casino expenses have decreased during the year ended December 31, 2012 due to lower volume which caused lower junket commission expense and lower gaming taxes at our Macau Operations (where we incur a gaming tax and other levies at a rate totaling 39% in accordance with the concession agreement). Although our room revenues increased $7.9 million (1.7%), room expenses increased only $1.2 million (1%) as the revenue increase was driven primarily by increased ADR. Food and beverage expenses increased over the prior year primarily due to additional nightclub promotional costs in Las Vegas. The decrease in entertainment, retail and other expenses was driven by the conversion of certain owned retail stores to leased outlets in Macau resulting in lower cost of sales. General and administrative expense increased primarily due to legal and other costs incurred related to the share redemption and litigation with a former stockholder, higher advertising costs, development and other activities. The provision for doubtful accounts decreased during the year ended December 31, 2012 as we recorded an adjustment of $30.9 million that benefitted our reserve estimates for casino accounts receivable based on the results of historical collection patterns and current collection trends.

 

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Pre-opening costs

We began to incur pre-opening costs during October 2012 related to the design and planning for our Wynn Palace Resort. We expect our pre-opening costs to increase in the future as construction and development of Wynn Palace continues toward the expected completion in the first half of 2016. There were no pre-opening expenses incurred during the year ended December 31, 2011.

Depreciation and amortization

Depreciation and amortization for the year ended December 31, 2012, was $373.2 million compared to $398 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. Depreciation expense decreased due to assets with a 5-year life being fully depreciated as of September 2011 at our Macau Operations and assets with a three and six year life becoming fully depreciated throughout 2011 at our Las Vegas Operations.

During the construction of our resorts, costs incurred in the construction of the buildings, improvements to land and the purchases of assets for use in operations were capitalized. Once these resorts opened, their assets were placed into service and we began recognizing the associated depreciation expense. Depreciation expenses will continue throughout the estimated useful lives of these assets. In addition, we continually evaluate the useful life of our property and equipment, intangibles and other assets and adjust them when warranted.

The maximum useful life of assets at our Macau Operations is the remaining life of the gaming concession or land concession, which currently expire in June 2022 and August 2029, respectively. Consequently, depreciation related to our Macau Operations is charged on an accelerated basis when compared to our Las Vegas Operations.

Property charges and other

Property charges and other for the year ended December 31, 2012, were $40 million compared to $130.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. Property charges and other for the year ended December 31, 2012 include the remodel of a Las Vegas restaurant, charges associated with the termination of a Las Vegas show that ended its run in November 2012, charges associated with the reconfiguration of Las Vegas retail areas and miscellaneous renovations and abandonments at our resorts.

Property charges and other for the year ended December 31, 2011 include a charge of $109.6 million reflecting the present value of a charitable contribution made by Wynn Macau to the University of Macau Development Foundation. This contribution consists of a $25 million payment made in May 2011, and a commitment for additional donations of $10 million each year for the calendar years 2012 through 2022 inclusive, for a total of $135 million. The amount reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income has been discounted using our then estimated borrowing rate over the time period of the remaining committed payments. Also included are the write off of certain off-site golf memberships by Wynn Las Vegas, miscellaneous renovations and abandonments at our resorts, including modifications of the Encore at Wynn Las Vegas and Wynn Macau retail esplanades, closure of the Blush nightclub and the write off of certain costs related to a show that ended its run in Las Vegas in April 2011.

Other non-operating costs and expenses

Interest income was $12.5 million and $7.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. This increase in mainly due to higher cash balances during 2012. During 2012 and 2011, our short-term investment strategy was to preserve capital while retaining sufficient liquidity. Beginning in April 2011, we have invested in certain corporate bond securities and commercial paper, in addition to holding money-market accounts, U.S. Treasury Bills and bank time deposits with a maturity of three months or less, which has contributed to the increase in interest income.

 

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Interest expense was $288.8 million, net of capitalized interest of $2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to $229.9 million, net of capitalized interest of $0, for the year ended December 31, 2011. Our interest expense increased compared to the prior year primarily due to the issuance of the $1.94 billion Redemption Note by Wynn Resorts, the issuance of the Wynn Las Vegas $900 million 5 3/8% first mortgage notes in March 2012, and the increase in the Wynn Macau term loan offset by the reduction of $370.9 million in Wynn Las Vegas term loan borrowings, all as described in Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 8—“Long-Term Debt”.

Changes in the fair value of our interest rate swaps are recorded as an increase (decrease) in swap fair value in each period. We recorded a gain of $1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, resulting from the changes in the fair value of our interest rate swaps during the year. For the year ended December 31, 2011, we recorded a gain of $14.2 million resulting from the increase in the fair value of interest rate swaps between December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2011. For further information on our interest rate swaps, see Item 7A—“Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.”

Income Taxes

For the year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded a tax expense of $4.3 million. Our income tax expense is primarily related to the timing of the payment of dividends from Macau, stock option exercises and capital expenditures. Since June 30, 2010, we have no longer considered our portion of the tax earnings and profits of Wynn Macau, Limited to be permanently reinvested. No additional U.S. tax provision has been made with respect to amounts not considered permanently reinvested as we anticipate that U.S. foreign tax credits should be sufficient to eliminate any U.S. tax provision relating to such repatriation. We have not provided deferred U.S. income taxes or foreign withholding taxes on temporary differences which are considered indefinitely reinvested. On November 30, 2010, Wynn Macau received a second 5-year exemption from Macau’s 12% Complementary Tax on casino gaming profits, thereby exempting the casino gaming profits of Wynn Macau through December 31, 2015. Accordingly, we were exempted from the payment of approximately $87.1 million and $82.7 million in such taxes for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Our non-casino profits remain subject to the Macau Complementary Tax and casino winnings remain subject to the Macau Special Gaming tax and other levies at a rate totaling 39% in accordance with our concession agreement.

In April 2012, the Company reached an agreement with the Appellate division of the IRS regarding issues raised during the examination of the 2006 through 2009 U.S. income tax returns. The settlement with the Appellate division did not impact the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits. The settlement of the 2006 through 2009 examination issues resulted in a cash tax payment of $1.3 million and the utilization of $3.1 million and $0.9 million in foreign tax credit and general business credit carryforwards, respectively.

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

We recorded net income attributable to noncontrolling interests of $226.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to $211.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The increase is attributable to the noncontrolling interests’ share of net income from Wynn Macau, Limited for each year.

Adjusted Property EBITDA

We use adjusted property EBITDA to manage the operating results of our segments. Adjusted property EBITDA is earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, pre-opening costs, property charges and other, corporate expenses, intercompany golf course and water rights leases, stock-based compensation, and other non-operating income and expenses, and includes equity in income from unconsolidated affiliates. Adjusted property EBITDA is presented exclusively as a supplemental disclosure because we believe that it is widely used to measure the performance, and as a basis for valuation, of gaming companies. We use adjusted property EBITDA as a measure of the operating performance of our segments and to compare the operating performance

 

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of our properties with those of our competitors. We also present adjusted property EBITDA because it is used by some investors as a way to measure a company’s ability to incur and service debt, make capital expenditures and meet working capital requirements. Gaming companies have historically reported EBITDA as a supplement to financial measures in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). In order to view the operations of their casinos on a more stand-alone basis, gaming companies, including us, have historically excluded from their EBITDA calculations pre-opening expenses, property charges, corporate expenses and stock-based compensation that do not relate to the management of specific casino properties. However, adjusted property EBITDA should not be considered as an alternative to operating income as an indicator of our performance, as an alternative to cash flows from operating activities as a measure of liquidity, or as an alternative to any other measure determined in accordance with GAAP. Unlike net income, adjusted property EBITDA does not include depreciation or interest expense and therefore does not reflect current or future capital expenditures or the cost of capital. We have significant uses of cash flows, including capital expenditures, interest payments, debt principal repayments, taxes and other non-recurring charges, which are not reflected in adjusted property EBITDA. Also, our calculation of adjusted property EBITDA may be different from the calculation methods used by other companies and, therefore, comparability may be limited.

The following table (amounts in thousands) summarizes adjusted property EBITDA for our Macau and Las Vegas Operations as reviewed by management and summarized in Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 17 “Segment Information.” That footnote also presents a reconciliation of adjusted property EBITDA to net income.

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013      2012      2011  

Macau Operations

   $ 1,324,119       $ 1,167,340       $ 1,196,232   

Las Vegas Operations

     486,682         408,472         439,036   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Adjusted Property EBITDA

   $ 1,810,801       $ 1,575,812       $ 1,635,268   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2013, the adjusted property EBITDA at both our Macau and Las Vegas Operations benefitted from stronger operating results primarily in the casino department due to an increase in table games volume and win percentage. Refer to the discussions above regarding the specific details of our results of operations.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Operating Activities

Our operating cash flows primarily consist of our operating income generated by our Macau and Las Vegas operations (excluding depreciation and other non-cash charges), interest paid, and changes in working capital accounts such as receivables, inventories, prepaid expenses, and payables. Our table games play both in Macau and Las Vegas is a mix of cash play and credit play, while our slot machine play is conducted primarily on a cash basis. A significant portion of our table games revenue is attributable to the play of a limited number of premium international customers that gamble on credit. The ability to collect these gaming receivables may impact our operating cash flow for the period. Our rooms, food and beverage, and entertainment, retail, and other revenue is conducted primarily on a cash basis or as a trade receivable. Accordingly, operating cash flows will be impacted by changes in operating income and accounts receivables.

Net cash provided from operations for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $1.7 billion compared to $1.2 billion provided by operations for the year ended December 31, 2012. Cash flow from operations improved due to significant changes in ordinary working capital accounts such as accounts payables and accrued expenses. Also benefitting operating cash flow was increased operating income that was driven primarily by stronger operating results in the casino department.

 

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During the year ended December 31, 2012, our operating activities provided $1.2 billion compared to $1.5 billion during the year ended December 31, 2011. This decrease is primarily due to lower casino department profitability and changes in ordinary working capital accounts.

Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $677.6 million compared to $344.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. Net cash used in investing activities was primarily driven by capital expenditures, net of construction payables and retention of $506.8 million and $241 million for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. During the year ended December 31, 2013, capital expenditures included $381.1 million in site preparation costs and piling work for Wynn Palace, along with capital expenditures for various other renovations at our resorts. Capital expenditures during the year ended December 31, 2012 primarily related to various renovations at our resorts, a one-time payment of $50 million in consideration of an unrelated third party’s relinquishment of certain rights in and to any future development on the Cotai land that we are using for constructing Wynn Palace, as well as site preparation costs for Wynn Palace.

During the year ended December 31, 2011, our net cash used in investing activities was $459.1 million. Our primary use of cash was for the investment of $215.5 million in corporate debt securities and commercial paper, net of maturities, and $184.1 million in capital expenditures primarily for room and suite remodel at Wynn Las Vegas and various other renovations at our resorts.

Financing Activities

Net cash flows used in financing activities were $291.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, which was primarily attributable to payment of dividends of $1,035 million and the redemption of first mortgage notes of $500 million, offset by proceeds from the issuance of senior notes of $1,100 million and the increase in our senior term loan facility of $200 million.

Net cash flows used in financing activities were $382.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, which was primarily attributable to principal payments of $1,022.8 million on term loan facilities and payment of dividends of $955.5 million, partially offset by proceeds of $1,648.6 million from the issuance of first mortgage notes of $900 million and proceeds of $748.6 million from the fully funded senior term loan facility.

During the year ended December 31, 2011, we used cash flows in financing activities of $1,057.6 million primarily attributable to payment of dividends.

Macau Operations

On October 16, 2013, Wynn Macau, Limited (“WML”), an indirect subsidiary of Wynn Resorts, Limited, entered into an Indenture, dated as of October 16, 2013 (the “WML Indenture”), between WML and Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as trustee, pursuant to which WML issued $600 million aggregate principal amount of 5 1/4% Senior Notes due 2021 (the “2021 Notes”). WML received net proceeds of approximately $591.5 million from the offering of the 2021 Notes after deducting commissions and estimated expenses of the offering and will use the net proceeds for working capital requirements and general corporate purposes.

The WML Indenture contains covenants limiting WML’s (and certain of its subsidiaries’) ability to, among other things: merge or consolidate with another company; transfer or sell all or substantially all of its properties or assets; and lease all or substantially all of its properties or assets. The terms of the WML Indenture contain customary events of default, including, but not limited to: default for 30 days in the payment when due of interest on the 2021 Notes; default in the payment when due of the principal of, or premium, if any, on the 2021 Notes; failure to comply with any payment obligations relating to the repurchase by WML of the 2021 Notes upon a change of control; failure to comply with certain covenants in the WML Indenture; certain defaults on certain

 

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other indebtedness; failure to pay judgments against WML or certain subsidiaries that, in the aggregate, exceed $50 million; and certain events of bankruptcy or insolvency. In the case of an event of default arising from certain events of bankruptcy or insolvency, all 2021 Notes then outstanding will become due and payable immediately without further action or notice.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, Wynn Macau repaid $150.4 million of borrowings under the Wynn Macau Senior Revolving Credit Facility. On June 27, 2012, the Wynn Macau Senior Revolving Credit Facility matured with an outstanding balance of $0.

On July 31, 2012, Wynn Macau amended and restated its credit facilities, dated September 14, 2004 (as so amended and restated, the “Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities”), and appointed Bank of China Limited, Macau Branch as intercreditor agent, facilities agent and security agent. The Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities took effect on July 31, 2012 and expand availability under Wynn Macau’s senior secured bank facility to $2.3 billion equivalent, consisting of a $750 million equivalent fully funded senior secured term loan facility and a $1.55 billion equivalent senior secured revolving credit facility. Borrowings under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities, which consist of both Hong Kong Dollar and United States Dollar tranches, were used to refinance Wynn Macau’s existing indebtedness, and will be used to fund the design, development, construction and pre-opening expenses of Wynn Palace, and for general corporate purposes.

On July 30, 2013, Wynn Macau exercised its option to increase the senior term loan facility by $200 million equivalent pursuant to the terms and provisions of the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. The $200 million equivalent was fully funded as of July 31, 2013 and is required to be used for the payment of certain Wynn Palace related construction and development costs.

The term loan facility matures in July 2018, and the revolving credit facility matures in July 2017. The principal amount of the term loan is required to be repaid in two equal installments in July 2017 and July 2018. The senior secured facilities will bear interest for the first six months after closing at LIBOR or HIBOR plus a margin of 2.50% and thereafter will be subject to LIBOR or HIBOR plus a margin of between 1.75% to 2.50% based on Wynn Macau’s leverage ratio.

Borrowings under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities are guaranteed by Palo Real Estate Company Limited (“Palo”), a subsidiary of Wynn Macau, and by certain subsidiaries of the Company that own equity interests in Wynn Macau, and are secured by substantially all of the assets of Wynn Macau, the equity interests in Wynn Macau and substantially all of the assets of Palo.

In connection with amending the Wynn Macau credit facilities, we expensed $17.7 million and capitalized $33.2 million of financing costs in the year ended December 31, 2012.

The Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities contain a requirement that the Company must make mandatory repayments of indebtedness from specified percentages of excess cash flow. If the Wynn Macau subsidiary has a Consolidated Leverage Ratio, as defined in the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities, of greater than 4.0 to 1, such repayment is defined as 50% of Excess Cash Flow, as defined in the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. If the Consolidated Leverage Ratio is equal or less than 4.0 to 1, then no excess cash flow prepayment is required. Based on current estimates the Company does not believe that the Wynn Macau Consolidated Leverage Ratio during the year ending December 31, 2014 will exceed 4.0 to 1. Accordingly, the Company does not expect to make any mandatory repayments pursuant to this requirement during 2014.

The Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities contain customary covenants restricting certain activities including, but not limited to: the incurrence of additional indebtedness, the incurrence or creation of liens on any of its property, sales and leaseback transactions, the ability to dispose of assets, and make loans or other investments. In addition, Wynn Macau was required by the financial covenants to maintain a Leverage Ratio, as defined in the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities, of not greater than 4.0 to 1 as of December 31, 2013, and

 

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an Interest Coverage Ratio, as defined, of not less than 2.00 to 1. Management believes that Wynn Macau was in compliance with all covenants at December 31, 2013.

Las Vegas Operations

On May 15, 2013, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC commenced the tender offer for any and all of the outstanding $500 million aggregate principal amount of the 2017 Notes of Wynn Las Vegas and Wynn Las Vegas Capital Corp., an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts, Limited (together with Wynn Las Vegas, the “Issuers”), and a solicitation of consents to certain proposed amendments to the indenture (the “2017 Indenture”) governing the 2017 Notes.

The tender offer expired on May 21, 2013 and at the time of expiration, Wynn Las Vegas had received valid tenders with respect to approximately $274.7 million of the $500 million aggregate principal amount of the 2017 Notes outstanding. On May 22, 2013, note holders who validly tendered their 2017 Notes received the total consideration of $1,071.5 for each $1,000 principal amount of 2017 Notes, the premium portion of which totaled approximately $19.6 million. In accordance with accounting standards, the tender offer premium was expensed and is included in loss on extinguishment of debt in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income. In addition, upon the tender offer completion, the Issuers entered into a supplemental indenture, which eliminated substantially all of the restrictive covenants and certain events of default from the 2017 Indenture.

Also in connection with this transaction, unamortized financing costs and original issue discount related to the 2017 Notes totaling $6.7 million were expensed and are included in loss on extinguishment of debt in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income.

On November 1, 2013, the Company redeemed the untendered 2017 Notes principal amount of $225.3 million. The redemption price was equal to 103.938% of the aggregate principal amount of the 2017 Notes plus accrued and unpaid interest on November 1, 2013. The total redemption fees paid were $8.9 million and we expensed $4.9 million of unamortized financing costs and original issue discount.

Separately, on May 22, 2013, the Issuers completed the issuance of $500 million aggregate principal amount of 4 1/4% Senior Notes due 2023 (the “2023 Notes”) pursuant to an indenture, dated as of May 22, 2013 (the “2023 Indenture”), among the Issuers, all of the Issuers’ subsidiaries, other than Wynn Las Vegas Capital Corp. which was a co-issuer, and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee. The 2023 Notes were issued at par. The Issuers used the net proceeds from the 2023 Notes to cover the cost of purchasing the 2017 Notes tendered in the tender offer. In addition, the Issuers satisfied and discharged the 2017 Indenture and, in November 2013, used the remaining net proceeds to redeem any and all of the 2017 Notes not previously tendered. In connection with the issuance of the 2023 Notes, the Company capitalized approximately $4.1 million of financing costs.

The 2023 Notes will mature on May 30, 2023 and bear interest at the rate of 5 1/4% per annum. The Issuers may redeem all or a portion of the 2023 Notes at any time, which redemption price includes a make-whole premium if redeemed before February 28, 2023. The 2023 Notes are also subject to mandatory redemption requirements imposed by gaming laws and regulations of gaming authorities in Nevada.

The 2023 Indenture contains covenants limiting the Issuers’ and the Issuers’ restricted subsidiaries’ ability to: create liens on assets to secure debt; enter into sale-leaseback transactions; and merge or consolidate with another company. These covenants are subject to a number of important and significant limitations, qualifications and exceptions.

The 2023 Notes are the Issuers’ senior unsecured obligations and rank pari passu in right of payment with the Issuers’ outstanding 7 7/8% First Mortgage Notes due 2020 (“7 7/8% 2020 Notes”), 7 3/4% First Mortgage Notes due 2020 (the “7 3/4% 2020 Notes”) and 5 3/8% First Mortgage Notes Due 2022 (the “2022 Notes” and, together with the 7 7/8% 2020 Notes and 7 3/4% Notes, the “Existing Notes”). The 2023 Notes are secured by a first priority pledge of the Company’s equity interests, the effectiveness of which is subject to the prior approval of the Nevada gaming authorities. The equity interests of the Company also secure the Existing Notes. If Wynn Resorts, Limited receives an investment grade rating from one or more ratings agencies, the first priority pledge securing the 2023 Notes will be released.

 

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On March 12, 2012, the Issuers issued, in a private offering, $900 million aggregate principal amount of 2022 Notes pursuant to an Indenture, dated as of March 12, 2012 (the “2022 Indenture”). A portion of the proceeds were used to repay all amounts outstanding under the Wynn Las Vegas term loan facilities. In October 2012, the Issuers commenced an offer to exchange all of the 2022 Notes for notes registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. The exchange offer closed on November 6, 2012.

The 2022 Notes will mature on March 15, 2022 and bear interest at the rate of 5 3/8% per annum. The Issuers may redeem all or a portion of the 2022 Notes at any time on or after March 15, 2017, at a premium decreasing ratably to zero, plus accrued and unpaid interest. In addition, prior to March 15, 2015, the Issuers may redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the 2022 Notes with the net proceeds of one or more qualified equity contributions made to the Issuers by their parent, Wynn Resorts, Limited. The 2022 Notes are also subject to mandatory redemption requirements imposed by gaming laws and regulations of gaming authorities in Nevada.

The 2022 Indenture contains covenants limiting the Issuers’ and the Issuers’ restricted subsidiaries’ ability to: pay dividends or distributions or repurchase equity; incur additional debt; make investments; create liens on assets to secure debt; enter into transactions with affiliates; issue stock of, or member’s interests in, subsidiaries; enter into sale-leaseback transactions; engage in other businesses; merge or consolidate with another company; transfer and sell assets; issue disqualified stock; create dividend and other payment restrictions affecting subsidiaries; and designate restricted and unrestricted subsidiaries. These covenants are subject to a number of important and significant limitations, qualifications and exceptions.

Concurrently with the issuance of the 2022 Notes, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC entered into an eighth amendment (“Amendment No. 8”) to its Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement”). Amendment No. 8 amended the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement to, among other things, permit the issuance of the 2022 Notes. With the issuance of the 2022 Notes, Wynn Las Vegas prepaid all term loans under the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement, terminated all of its revolving credit commitments that were due to expire in 2013, and terminated all but $100 million of its revolving credit commitments expiring in 2015. In connection with this transaction, Wynn Las Vegas expensed deferred financing costs of $4.8 million.

On September 17, 2012, Wynn Las Vegas terminated the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement. No loans were outstanding under the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement at the time of termination. Prior to such termination, certain letters of credit in which lenders had participated pursuant to the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement were reallocated to a separate, unsecured letter of credit facility provided by Deutsche Bank, A.G. Wynn Las Vegas, LLC did not incur any early termination penalties in connection with the termination.

In connection with the termination, the Company expensed $2.6 million of previously deferred financing costs and third party fees related to the Wynn Las Vegas Credit Agreement.

For more information on our outstanding first mortgage notes, see Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 8 “Long-Term Debt.”

Capital Resources

At December 31, 2013, we had approximately $2,435 million of cash and cash equivalents and $254.4 million of available-for-sale investments in foreign and domestic debt securities with maturities of up to 2 years. Our cash is available for operations, debt service and retirement, development activities, general corporate purposes and enhancements to our resorts. In addition, we had $199.9 million of restricted cash for Wynn Palace related construction and development costs. Of these amounts, Wynn Macau, Limited and its subsidiaries held $1,822.3 million and $4.9 million in cash and available-for-sale investments, respectively, of which we own 72.3%. If our portion of this cash was repatriated to the U.S. on December 31, 2013, approximately two-thirds of this amount would be subject to U.S. tax in the year of repatriation. Wynn Resorts, Limited, which is not a

 

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guarantor of the debt of its subsidiaries, held $381.6 million (including cash of its subsidiaries other than those of Wynn Las Vegas and Wynn Macau) and $249.5 million of cash and available-for-sale investments, respectively. Wynn Las Vegas LLC held cash balances of $231.2 million.

On July 30, 2013, Wynn Macau exercised its option to increase the senior term loan facility by $200 million equivalent pursuant to the terms and provisions of the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. The $200 million equivalent was fully funded as of July 31, 2013 and is required to be used for the payment of certain Wynn Palace related construction and development costs.

We believe that cash flow from operations, availability under our Wynn Macau credit facility and our existing cash balances will be adequate to satisfy our anticipated uses of capital during 2014. If any additional financing becomes necessary, we cannot provide assurance that future borrowings will be available.

Cash and cash equivalents include cash in bank and fixed deposits, investments in money market funds, domestic and foreign bank time deposits and commercial paper, all with maturities of less than 90 days.

Redemption Price Promissory Note

Based on the Board of Directors’ finding of “unsuitability,” on February 18, 2012, we redeemed and cancelled Aruze USA, Inc.’s 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. Following a finding of “unsuitability,” our articles of incorporation authorize redemption at “fair value” of the shares held by unsuitable persons. We engaged an independent financial advisor to assist in the fair value calculation and concluded that a discount to the then current trading price was appropriate because of, among other things, restrictions on most of the shares which are subject to the terms of an existing stockholder agreement. Pursuant to our articles of incorporation, we issued the Redemption Price Promissory Note (the “Redemption Note”) to Aruze USA, Inc., a former stockholder and related party, in redemption of the shares. The Redemption Note has a principal amount of approximately $1.94 billion, matures on February 18, 2022 and bears interest at the rate of 2% per annum, payable annually in arrears on each anniversary of the date of the Redemption Note. We may, in our sole and absolute discretion, at any time and from time to time, and without penalty or premium, prepay the whole or any portion of the principal or interest due under the Redemption Note. In no instance shall any payment obligation under the Redemption Note be accelerated except in the sole and absolute discretion of Wynn Resorts or as specifically mandated by law. The indebtedness evidenced by the Redemption Note is and shall be subordinated in right of payment, to the extent and in the manner provided in the Redemption Note, to the prior payment in full of all existing and future obligations of Wynn Resorts and of its affiliates in respect of indebtedness for borrowed money of any kind or nature. Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Kazuo Okada have challenged the redemption of Aruze USA, Inc.’s shares and we are currently involved in litigation with those parties as well as related shareholder derivative litigation. The outcome of these various proceedings cannot be predicted. If any of these proceedings were to be determined adversely to us or a settlement involving a payment of a material sum of money were to occur, there could be a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. See Item 1A—“Risk Factors”, Item 3—“Legal Proceedings” and Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 16 “Commitments and Contingencies”.

Wynn Resorts, Limited

During the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, we paid cash dividends totaling $7.00 per share, $9.50 per share and $6.50 per share, respectively.

Our Board of Directors has authorized an equity repurchase program of up to $1.7 billion. The repurchase program may include repurchases from time to time through open market purchases, in privately negotiated transactions, and under plans complying with Rules 10b5-1 and 10b-18 under the Exchange Act. As of December 31, 2013, we had purchased a cumulative total of 12,978,085 shares of our common stock for a net cost of $1.1 billion under the program, with no purchases made under this program during the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011.

 

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During 2013 and 2012, the Company repurchased a total of 114,355 (8,796 shares were purchased during the fourth quarter 2013) and 7,640 shares, respectively, in satisfaction of tax withholding obligations on vested restricted stock.

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have not entered into any transactions with special purpose entities nor do we engage in any derivatives except for previously discussed interest rate swaps. We do not have any retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity. At December 31, 2013, we had unsecured outstanding letters of credit totaling $16.7 million.

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

The following table summarizes our scheduled contractual commitments at December 31, 2013 (amounts in millions):

 

     Payments Due By Period  
     Less
Than
1 Year
     1 to 3
Years
     4 to 5
Years
     After
5 Years
     Total  

Long-term debt obligations

   $ 1.1       $ 2.8       $ 981.5       $ 5,608.5       $ 6,593.9   

Fixed interest payments

     269.9         539.7         539.7         661.5         2,010.8   

Estimated variable interest payments[1]

     22.9         45.8         26.5         —           95.2   

Operating leases

     8.8         14.7         3.4         4.8         31.7   

Construction contracts and commitments

     970.0         1,327.8         —           —           2,297.8   

Leasehold interest in land

     29.3         46.8         —           —           76.1   

Employment agreements

     53.5         60.8         19.1         9.1         142.5   

Other[2]

     80.6         67.8         42.1         99.3         289.8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total commitments

   $ 1,436.1       $ 2,106.2       $ 1,612.3       $ 6,383.2       $ 11,537.8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

[1] Amounts for all periods represent our estimated future interest payments on our debt facilities based upon amounts outstanding and LIBOR or HIBOR rates at December 31, 2013. Such rates continue at historical lows as of December 31, 2013. Actual rates will vary.
[2] Other includes open purchase orders, future charitable contributions, fixed gaming tax payments in Macau and other contracts. As further discussed in Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 15 “Income Taxes”, of this report, we had $89.5 million of unrecognized tax benefits as of December 31, 2013. Due to the inherent uncertainty of the underlying tax positions, it is not practicable to assign this liability to any particular year and therefore it is not included in the table above as of December 31, 2013.

Other Liquidity Matters

Wynn Resorts is a holding company and, as a result, our ability to pay dividends is highly dependent on our ability to obtain funds and our subsidiaries’ ability to provide funds to us. Restrictions imposed by our Wynn Macau and Wynn Las Vegas debt instruments significantly restrict our ability to pay dividends. Specifically, Wynn Las Vegas, LLC and certain of its subsidiaries are restricted under the indentures governing its notes from making certain “restricted payments” as defined in the indentures. These restricted payments include the payment of dividends or distributions to any direct or indirect holders of equity interests of Wynn Las Vegas, LLC. These restricted payments may not be made unless certain financial and non-financial criteria have been satisfied. While the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities contain similar restrictions, Wynn Macau is currently in compliance with all requirements, namely satisfaction of its leverage ratio, which must be met in order to pay dividends and is presently able to pay dividends in accordance with the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities.

 

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Wynn Las Vegas, LLC intends to fund its operations and capital requirements from cash on hand and operating cash flow. We cannot assure you however, that our Las Vegas Operations will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or the availability of additional indebtedness will be sufficient to enable us to service and repay Wynn Las Vegas, LLC’s indebtedness and to fund its other liquidity needs. Similarly, we expect that our Macau Operations will fund Wynn Macau’s debt service obligations with existing cash, operating cash flow and availability under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. However, we cannot assure you that operating cash flows will be sufficient to do so. We may refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of the indebtedness on acceptable terms or at all. Certain legal matters may also impact our liquidity. As described in our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies”, Elaine Wynn has submitted a cross claim against Steve Wynn and Kazuo Okada. The Indentures for Wynn Las Vegas provide that if Stephen A. Wynn, together with certain related parties, in the aggregate beneficially owns a lesser percentage of the outstanding common stock of the Company than are beneficially owned by any other person, a change of control will have occurred. If Elaine Wynn prevails in her cross claim, Stephen A. Wynn would not beneficially own or control Elaine Wynn’s shares and a change in control may result under the Wynn Las Vegas debt documents.

In the future, we may periodically consider repurchasing our outstanding notes for cash. The amount of any notes to be repurchased, as well as the timing of any repurchases, will be based on business, market and other conditions and factors, including price, contractual requirements or consents, and capital availability. Any repurchases might be made using a variety of methods, which may include open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions, or by any combination of those methods, in compliance with applicable securities laws and regulations.

New business developments or other unforeseen events may occur, resulting in the need to raise additional funds. We continue to explore opportunities to develop additional gaming or related businesses in domestic and international markets. There can be no assurances regarding the business prospects with respect to any other opportunity. Any new development would require us to obtain additional financing. We may decide to conduct any such development through Wynn Resorts or through subsidiaries separate from the Las Vegas or Macau-related entities.

The Company’s articles of incorporation provide that, to the extent required by the gaming authority making the determination of unsuitability or to the extent the Board of Directors determines, in its sole discretion, that a person is likely to jeopardize the Company’s or any affiliate’s application for, receipt of, approval for, right to the use of, or entitlement to, any gaming license, shares of Wynn Resorts’ capital stock that are owned or controlled by an unsuitable person or its affiliates are subject to redemption by the Company. The redemption price may be paid in cash, by promissory note or both, as required by the applicable gaming authority and, if not, as we elect. Any promissory note that we issue to an unsuitable person or its affiliate in exchange for its shares could increase our debt to equity ratio and would increase our leverage ratio.

On February 18, 2012, the Board of Directors of Wynn Resorts determined that Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Mr. Kazuo Okada are “unsuitable” under our articles of incorporation and redeemed and cancelled all of Aruze USA, Inc.’s, 24,549,222 shares of Wynn Resorts’ common stock. Pursuant to our articles of incorporation, we issued the Redemption Note to Aruze USA, Inc. in redemption of the shares. For additional information on the redemption and the Redemption Note, see Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies.”

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Management’s discussion and analysis of our results of operations and liquidity and capital resources are based on our consolidated financial statements. Our consolidated financial statements were prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. A summary of our significant accounting policies are presented in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Certain of our

 

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accounting policies require management to apply significant judgment in defining the appropriate assumptions integral to financial estimates. On an ongoing basis, management evaluates those estimates, including those relating to the estimated lives of depreciable assets, asset impairment, allowances for doubtful accounts, accruals for customer loyalty rewards, contingencies, litigation and other items. Judgments are based on historical experience, terms of existing contracts, industry trends and information available from outside sources, as appropriate. However, by their nature, judgments are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty, and therefore actual results could differ from our estimates.

Development, Construction and Property and Equipment Estimates

During the construction and development of a resort, pre-opening or start-up costs are expensed when incurred. In connection with the construction and development of our resorts, significant start-up costs are incurred and charged to pre-opening costs through their respective openings. Once our resorts open, expenses associated with the opening of the resorts are no longer charged as pre-opening costs.

During the construction and development stage, direct costs such as those incurred for the design and construction of our resorts, including applicable portions of interest, are capitalized. Accordingly, the recorded amounts of property and equipment increase significantly during construction periods. Depreciation expense related to capitalized construction costs is recognized when the related assets are placed in service. Upon the opening of our resorts, we began recognizing depreciation expense on the resort’s fixed assets. The remaining estimated useful lives of assets are periodically reviewed.

Our leasehold interest in land in Macau under the land concession contracts entered into in August 2004 and May 2012 are being amortized over 25 years, to the initial term of the concession contract, which currently terminate in August 2029 and May 2037. Depreciation on a majority of the assets comprising Wynn Macau commenced in September of 2006, when Wynn Macau opened. The maximum useful life of assets at Wynn Macau is deemed to be the remaining life of the land concession which currently expires in August 2029, or the gaming concession which currently expires in June 2022. Consequently, depreciation related to Wynn Macau will generally be charged over shorter periods when compared to Wynn Las Vegas.

Costs of repairs and maintenance are charged to expense when incurred. The cost and accumulated depreciation of property and equipment retired or otherwise disposed of are eliminated from the respective accounts and any resulting gain or loss is included in operating income.

We also evaluate our property and equipment and other long-lived assets for impairment in accordance with applicable accounting standards. For assets to be disposed of, we recognize the asset at the lower of carrying value or fair market value less costs of disposal, as estimated based on comparable asset sales, solicited offers, or a discounted cash flow model. For assets to be held and used, we review for impairment whenever indicators of impairment exist. In reviewing for impairment, we compare the estimated future cash flows of the asset, on an undiscounted basis, to the carrying value of the asset. If the undiscounted cash flows exceed the carrying value, no impairment is indicated. If the undiscounted cash flows do not exceed the carrying value, an impairment is recorded based on the fair value of the asset, typically measured using a discounted cash flow model. If an asset is still under development, future cash flows include remaining construction costs. All recognized impairment losses, whether for assets to be disposed of or assets to be held and used, are recorded as operating expenses.

Redemption Price Promissory Note

In connection with the redemption of the shares previously held by Aruze USA, Inc., we recorded the fair value of the Redemption Note of approximately $1.94 billion in accordance with applicable accounting guidance. We utilized an independent third party valuation to assist in the determination of this fair value. In determining this fair value, we estimated the Redemption Note’s present value using discounted cash flows with a probability weighted expected return for redemption assumptions and a discount rate which included time value and non-performance risk adjustments commensurate with risk of the Redemption Note.

 

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Considerations for the redemption assumptions included the stated maturity of the Redemption Note, uncertainty of the related cash flows as well as potential effects of the following: uncertainties surrounding the potential outcome and timing of pending litigation with the Aruze USA, Inc. (at the time a stockholder of Wynn Resorts), Universal Entertainment Corporation (Aruze USA, Inc.’s parent company), and Kazuo Okada (the majority shareholder of Universal Entertainment Corporation and former director of the Company and certain of its subsidiaries and affiliates) (collectively, the “Okada Parties”) (see Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies”); the outcome of on-going investigations of Aruze USA, Inc. by the United States Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Nevada Gaming Control Board; and other potential legal and regulatory actions. In addition, in the furtherance of various future business objectives, we considered our ability, at our sole option, to prepay the Redemption Note at any time in accordance with its terms without penalty. Accordingly, we reasonably determined that the estimated life of the Redemption Note could be less than the contractual life of the Redemption Note.

In determination of the appropriate discount rate to be used in the estimated present value, the Redemption Note’s subordinated position relative to all other debt in our capital structure and credit ratings associated our traded debt were considered. Observable inputs for the risk free rate based on Federal Reserve rates for U.S. Treasury securities and credit risk spread based on a yield curve index of similarly rated debt were used. As a result of this analysis, we concluded the Redemption Notes’ stated rate of 2% approximated a market rate.

Investments and Fair Value

We have made investments in domestic and foreign corporate debt securities and commercial paper. Our investment policy requires investments to be investment grade and limits the amount of exposure to any one issuer with the objective of minimizing the potential risk of principal loss. We determine the appropriate classification (held-to-maturity/available-for-sale) of our investments at the time of purchase and reevaluate such designation as of each balance sheet date. Our investments are reported at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, reported in other comprehensive income (loss). Adjustments are made for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts to maturity computed under the effective interest method. Such amortization is included in interest income together with realized gains and losses and the stated interest on such securities.

We measure certain of our financial assets and liabilities, such as cash equivalents, available-for-sale securities and interest rate swaps, at fair value on a recurring basis pursuant to accounting standards for fair value measurements. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. These accounting standards establish a three-tier fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. These tiers include: Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions.

We obtain pricing information in determining the fair value of our available-for-sale securities from independent pricing vendors. Based on our inquiries, the pricing vendors use various pricing models consistent with what other market participants would use. The assumptions and inputs used by the pricing vendors are derived from market observable sources including: reported trades, broker/dealer quotes, issuer spreads, benchmark curves, bids, offers and other market-related data. We have not made adjustments to such prices. Each quarter, we validate the fair value pricing methodology to determine the fair value consistent with applicable accounting guidance and to confirm that the securities are classified properly in the fair value hierarchy. We also compare the pricing received from our vendors to independent sources for the same or similar securities.

Allowance for Estimated Doubtful Accounts Receivable

A substantial portion of our outstanding receivables relates to casino credit play. Credit play, through the issuance of markers, represents a significant portion of the table games volume at our Las Vegas Operations. While offered, the issuance of credit at our Macau Operations is less significant when compared to Las Vegas.

 

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Our goal is to maintain strict controls over the issuance of credit and aggressively pursue collection from those customers who fail to pay their balances in a timely fashion. These collection efforts may include the mailing of statements and delinquency notices, personal contacts, the use of outside collection agencies, and litigation. Markers issued at our Las Vegas Operations are generally legally enforceable instruments in the United States, and United States assets of foreign customers may be used to satisfy judgments entered in the United States.

The enforceability of markers and other forms of credit related to gaming debt outside of the United States varies from country to country. Some foreign countries do not recognize the enforceability of gaming related debt, or make enforcement burdensome. We closely consider the likelihood and difficulty of enforceability, among other factors, when issuing credit to customers who are not residents of the United States. In addition to our internal credit and collection departments, located in both Las Vegas and Macau, we have a network of legal, accounting and collection professionals to assist us in our determinations regarding enforceability and our overall collection efforts.

As of December 31, 2013 and 2012, approximately 86% and 84% of our casino accounts receivable were owed by customers from foreign countries, primarily in Asia. In addition to enforceability issues, the collectability of markers given by foreign customers is affected by a number of factors including changes in currency exchange rates and economic conditions in the customers’ home countries.

We regularly evaluate our reserve for bad debts based on a specific review of customer accounts as well as management’s prior experience with collection trends in the casino industry and current economic and business conditions. In determining our allowance for estimated doubtful accounts receivable, we apply loss factors based on historical marker collection history to aged account balances and we specifically analyze the collectability of each account with a balance over a specified dollar amount, based upon the age, the customer’s financial condition, collection history and any other known information.

The following table presents key statistics related to our casino accounts receivable (amounts in thousands):

 

     December 31,
2013
    December 31,
2012
 

Casino accounts receivable

   $ 252,998      $ 275,302   

Allowance for doubtful casino accounts receivable

   $ 73,561      $ 101,548   

Allowance as a percentage of casino accounts receivable

     29.1     36.9

Percentage of casino accounts receivable outstanding over 180 days

     30.3     34.3

Our reserve for doubtful casino accounts receivable is based on our estimates of amounts collectible and depends on the risk assessments and judgments by management regarding realizability, the state of the economy and our credit policy. In June 2013, the Company recorded an adjustment to its reserve estimates for casino accounts receivable based on the results of historical collection patterns and current collection trends. For the year ended December 31, 2013, this adjustment benefitted operating income by $14.9 million and net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited by $12 million (or $0.12 per share on a fully diluted basis). For the year ended December 31, 2012, this adjustment benefitted operating income by $30.9 million and net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited by $23.3 million (or $0.22 per share on a fully diluted basis). Our reserve methodology is applied similarly to credit extended at each of our resorts. As of December 31, 2013 and 2012, approximately 24.8% and 30.8%, respectively, of our outstanding casino account receivable balance originated at our Macau Operations.

At December 31, 2013, a 100 basis-point change in the allowance for doubtful accounts as a percentage of casino accounts receivable would change the provision for doubtful accounts by approximately $2.5 million.

 

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As our customer payment experience evolves, we will continue to refine our estimated reserve for bad debts. Accordingly, the associated provision for doubtful accounts expense may fluctuate. Because individual customer account balances can be significant, the reserve and the provision can change significantly between periods, as we become aware of additional information about a customer or changes occur in a region’s economy or legal system.

Derivative Financial Instruments

We seek to manage our market risk, including interest rate risk associated with variable rate borrowings, through balancing fixed-rate and variable-rate borrowings and the use of derivative financial instruments. We account for derivative financial instruments in accordance with applicable accounting standards. Derivative financial instruments are recognized as assets or liabilities, with changes in fair value affecting net income. As of December 31, 2013, changes in our interest rate swap fair values are being recorded in our Consolidated Statements of Income, as the swaps do not qualify for hedge accounting.

We measure the fair value of our interest rate swaps on a recurring basis. We categorize our interest rate swap contracts as Level 2 in the hierarchy as described above. The fair value approximates the amount we would receive (pay) if these contracts were settled at the respective valuation dates. Fair value is estimated based upon current, and predictions of future, interest rate levels along a yield curve, the remaining duration of the instruments and other market conditions, and therefore is subject to significant estimation and a high degree of variability of fluctuation between periods. We adjust this amount by applying a non-performance valuation, considering our creditworthiness or the creditworthiness of our counterparties at each settlement date, as applicable.

Stock-Based Compensation

Accounting standards for stock-based payments establish standards for the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges its equity instruments for goods and services or incurs a liability in exchange for goods and services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments. It requires an entity to measure the costs of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award and recognize that cost over the service period. We use the Black-Scholes valuation model to value the equity instruments we issue. The Black-Scholes valuation model uses assumptions of expected volatility, risk-free interest rates, the expected term of options granted, and expected rates of dividends. Management determines these assumptions by reviewing current market rates, making industry comparisons and reviewing conditions relevant to our Company.

The expected volatility and expected term assumptions can significantly impact the fair value of stock options. We believe that the valuation techniques and the approach utilized to develop our assumptions are reasonable in calculating the fair value of the options we grant. We estimate the expected stock price volatility using a combination of implied and historical factors related to our stock price in accordance with applicable accounting standards. As our stock price fluctuates, this estimate will change. For example, a 10% change in the volatility assumption for the 77,800 options granted in 2013 would have resulted in an approximate $0.01 million change in fair value. Expected term represents the estimated average time between the option’s grant date and its exercise date. A 10% change in the expected term assumption for the 77,800 options granted in 2013 would have resulted in an approximate $0.3 million change in fair value. These assumed changes in fair value would have been recognized over the vesting schedule of such awards.

Accounting standards also require the classification of stock compensation expense in the same financial statement line items as cash compensation, and therefore impacts our departmental expenses (and related operating margins), pre-opening costs and construction in progress for our development projects, and our general and administrative expenses (including corporate expenses).

 

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Income Taxes

We are subject to income taxes in the United States and other foreign jurisdictions where we operate. Accounting standards require the recognition of deferred tax assets, net of applicable reserves, and liabilities for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on the income tax provision and deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. Accounting standards require recognition of a future tax benefit to the extent that realization of such benefit is more likely than not. Otherwise, a valuation allowance is applied.

As of December 31, 2013, we have a foreign tax credit carryover of $2,615 million and we have recorded a valuation allowance of $2,543 million against this asset based on our estimate of future realization. The foreign tax credits are attributable to the Macau special gaming tax which is 35% of gross gaming revenue in Macau. The U.S. taxing regime only allows a credit for 35% of “net” foreign source income. Due to our current operating history of U.S. losses, we currently do not rely on forecasted taxable income in order to support the utilization of the foreign tax credits. As we become more profitable, each year we reevaluate our methodology in determining the need for valuation allowances. The estimated future foreign tax credit realization was based upon the estimated future taxable income from the reversal of “net” U.S. taxable temporary differences that we expect will reverse during the 10-year foreign tax credit carryover period. The amount of the valuation allowance is subject to change based upon the actual reversal of temporary differences and future taxable income exclusive of reversing temporary differences.

Our income tax returns are subject to examination by the IRS and other tax authorities in the locations where we operate. We assess potentially unfavorable outcomes of such examinations based on accounting standards for uncertain income taxes. The accounting standards prescribe a minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements.

Uncertain tax position accounting standards apply to all tax positions related to income taxes. These accounting standards utilize a two-step approach for evaluating tax positions. Recognition (Step I) occurs when the Company concludes that a tax position, based on its technical merits, is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination. Measurement (Step II) is only addressed if the position is deemed to be more likely than not to be sustained. Under Step II, the tax benefit is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is more likely than not to be realized upon settlement. Use of the term “more likely than not” is consistent with how that term is used in accounting for income taxes (i.e., likelihood of occurrence is greater than 50%).

Tax positions failing to qualify for initial recognition are recognized in the first subsequent interim period that they meet the “more likely than not” standard. If it is subsequently determined that a previously recognized tax position no longer meets the “more likely than not” standard, it is required that the tax position is derecognized. Accounting standards for uncertain tax positions specifically prohibit the use of a valuation allowance as a substitute for derecognition of tax positions. As applicable, we recognize accrued penalties and interest related to unrecognized tax benefits in the provision for income taxes.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In July 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standards update that amends the presentation requirements of an unrecognized tax benefit when a loss or other carryforward exists. The update would require the netting of unrecognized tax benefits against a deferred tax asset for a loss or other carryforward that would apply in settlement of the uncertain tax positions. The effective date for this update is for the annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2013. The Company is currently evaluating the impact, if any, of adopting this statement on its consolidated financial statements.

 

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In February 2013, the FASB issued an accounting standards update that amends the presentation requirements for reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income. The amendment would require an entity to present amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component either on the face of the statement where net income is presented or in the notes. This update is effective prospectively for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012. The Company has adopted this update; Item 8—“Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, Note 3—“Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.”

In July 2012, the FASB issued an accounting standards update that is intended to simplify the guidance for testing the decline in the realizable value (impairment) of indefinite-lived intangible assets other than goodwill. The update allows for the consideration of qualitative factors in determining whether it is necessary to perform quantitative impairment tests. The effective date for this update is for the years and interim impairment tests performed for years beginning after September 15, 2012. The adoption of this guidance did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Market risk is the risk of loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and prices, such as interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and commodity prices.

Interest Rate Risks

One of our primary exposures to market risk is interest rate risk associated with our debt facilities that bear interest based on floating rates. See Item 7—“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Activities.” We attempt to manage interest rate risk by managing the mix of long-term fixed rate borrowings and variable rate borrowings supplemented by hedging activities as believed by us to be appropriate. We cannot assure you that these risk management strategies have had the desired effect, and interest rate fluctuations could have a negative impact on our results of operations.

The following table provides estimated future cash flow information derived from our best estimates of repayments at December 31, 2013 of our expected long-term indebtedness and related weighted average interest rates by expected maturity dates. However, we cannot predict the LIBOR or HIBOR rates that will be in effect in the future. As of December 31, 2013, such rates remain at historic lows. Actual rates will vary. The one-month LIBOR and HIBOR rates at December 31, 2013 of 0.1677% and 0.2100%, respectively were used for all variable rate calculations in the table below.

The information is presented in U.S. dollar equivalents as applicable

 

Years Ending December 31,

 

Expected Maturity Date

 
     2014     2015     2016     2017     2018     Thereafter     Total  
(in millions)  

Long-term debt:

              

Fixed rate

   $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 5,608      $ 5,608   

Average interest rate

     —       —       —       —       —       4.8     4.8

Variable rate

   $ 1.1      $ 1.4      $ 1.4      $ 405      $ 576      $ —        $ 985   

Average interest rate

     1.4     1.4     1.4     1.9     2.0     —       1.9

 

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Interest Rate Swap Information

We have entered into floating-for-fixed interest rate swap arrangements relating to certain of our floating-rate debt facilities. We measure the fair value of our interest rate swaps on a recurring basis. Changes in the fair values of our interest rate swaps for each reporting period recorded are, and will continue to be, recognized as an increase (decrease) in swap fair value in our Consolidated Statements of Income, as the swaps do not qualify for hedge accounting.

Macau Operations

Effective, September 28, 2012, we entered into two interest rate swap agreements intended to hedge a portion of the underlying interest rate risk on borrowings under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. Under the two swap agreements, the Company pays a fixed interest rate (excluding the applicable interest margin) of 0.73% on notional amounts corresponding to borrowings of HK$3.95 billion (approximately $509.4 million) incurred under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities in exchange for receipts on the same amount at a variable interest rate based on the applicable HIBOR at the time of payment. These interest rate swaps fix the all-in interest rate on such amounts at 2.48% to 3.23%. These interest rate swap agreements mature in July 2017.

Effective October 31, 2012, we entered into a third interest rate swap agreement intended to hedge a portion of the underlying interest rate risk on borrowings under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities. Under this swap agreement, the Company pays a fixed interest rate (excluding the applicable interest margin) of 0.6763% on notional amounts corresponding to borrowings of $243.8 million incurred under the Amended Wynn Macau Credit Facilities in exchange for receipts on the same amount at a variable rate based on the applicable LIBOR at the time of payment. This interest rate swap fixes the all-in interest rate on such amounts at 2.4263% to 3.1763%. This interest rate swap agreement matures in July 2017.

As of December 31, 2013, the interest rate swaps were recorded as an asset of $10.3 million and included in deposits and other assets. As of December 31, 2012, the interest rate swaps were recorded as a liability of $3.9 million and included in other long-term liabilities.

The fair value approximates the amount we would pay if these contracts were settled at the respective valuation dates. Fair value is estimated based upon current, and predictions of future, interest rate levels along a yield curve, the remaining duration of the instruments and other market conditions, and therefore, is subject to significant estimation and a high degree of variability of fluctuation between periods. We adjust this amount by applying a non-performance valuation, considering our creditworthiness or the creditworthiness of our counterparties at each settlement date, as applicable.

Las Vegas Operations

In June 2012, we terminated our only Wynn Las Vegas swap for a payment of $2.4 million.

Other Interest Rate Swap Information

The following table provides information about our interest rate swaps, by contractual maturity dates, as of December 31, 2013 and using estimated future LIBOR and HIBOR rates based upon implied forward rates in the yield curve. The information is presented in U.S. dollar equivalents, which is our reporting currency:

 

     Years Ending December 31,  
     Expected Maturity Date  
     2014     2015     2016     2017     2018     Thereafter     Total  
     (in millions)  

Average notional amount

   $      $      $      $ 753.0      $      $      $ 753.0   

Average pay rate

                 0.71             0.71

Average receive rate

                 0.60             0.60

 

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We do not use derivative financial instruments, other financial instruments or derivative commodity instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

Interest Rate Sensitivity

As of December 31, 2013, approximately 96% all of our debt was based on fixed rates, including the notional amounts related to interest rate swaps. Based on our borrowings as of December 31, 2013, an assumed 1% change in the variable rates would cause our annual interest cost to change by $2.3 million.

Foreign Currency Risks

The currency delineated in Wynn Macau’s concession agreement with the government of Macau is the Macau pataca. The Macau pataca, which is not a freely convertible currency, is linked to the Hong Kong dollar, and in many cases the two are used interchangeably in Macau. The Hong Kong dollar is linked to the U.S. dollar and the exchange rate between these two currencies has remained relatively stable over the past several years. However, the exchange linkages of the Hong Kong dollar and the Macau pataca, and the Hong Kong dollar and the U.S. dollar, are subject to potential changes due to, among other things, changes in Chinese governmental policies and international economic and political developments.

If the Hong Kong dollar and the Macau pataca are not linked to the U.S. dollar in the future, severe fluctuations in the exchange rate for these currencies may result. We also cannot assure you that the current rate of exchange fixed by the applicable monetary authorities for these currencies will remain at the same level.

Because many of Wynn Macau’s payment and expenditure obligations are in Macau patacas, in the event of unfavorable Macau pataca or Hong Kong dollar rate changes, Wynn Macau’s obligations, as denominated in U.S. dollars, would increase. In addition, because we expect that most of the revenues for any casino that Wynn Macau operates in Macau will be in Hong Kong dollars, we are subject to foreign exchange risk with respect to the exchange rate between the Hong Kong dollar and the U.S. dollar. Also, if any of our Macau-related entities incur U.S. dollar-denominated debt, fluctuations in the exchange rates of the Macau pataca or the Hong Kong dollar, in relation to the U.S. dollar, could have adverse effects on Wynn Macau’s results of operations, financial condition, and ability to service its debt. To date, we have not engaged in hedging activities intended to protect against foreign currency risk. Approximately 53% of our cash balances are denominated in foreign currencies, primarily the Hong Kong Dollar. Based on our balances at December 31, 2013, an assumed 1% change in the US dollar/Hong Kong dollar exchange rate would cause a foreign currency transaction gain/loss of approximately $12.3 million.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting

Firm on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

     74   

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting

Firm on the Consolidated Financial Statements

     75   

Consolidated Balance Sheets

     76   

Consolidated Statements of Income

     77   

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

     78   

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

     79   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     80   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     81   

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries:

We have audited Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries’ (the “Company”) internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (1992 framework) (the “COSO criteria”). The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, included in Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the 2013 consolidated financial statements of Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries and our report dated February 28, 2014 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Las Vegas, Nevada

February 28, 2014

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2013. Our audits also included the financial statement schedules listed in the Index at item 15(a)2. These financial statements and schedules are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedules based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Wynn Resorts, Limited and subsidiaries at December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2013, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedules referred to above, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, present fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (1992 framework) and our report dated February 28, 2014 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Las Vegas, Nevada

February 28, 2014

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(amounts in thousands, except share data)

 

     December 31,  
     2013     2012  

ASSETS

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 2,435,041      $ 1,725,219   

Investment securities

     174,399        138,887   

Receivables, net

     241,932        238,573   

Inventories

     74,739        63,799   

Prepaid expenses and other

     42,703        35,900   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     2,968,814        2,202,378   

Property and equipment, net

     4,934,449        4,727,899   

Restricted cash and investment securities

     279,925        140,334   

Intangibles, net

     30,767        31,297   

Deferred financing costs, net

     67,926        71,189   

Deposits and other assets

     91,001        99,227   

Investment in unconsolidated affiliates

     4,148        4,270   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 8,377,030      $ 7,276,594   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts and construction payables

   $ 272,861      $ 164,858   

Current portion of long-term debt

     1,050        1,050   

Current portion of land concession obligation

     29,341        27,937   

Customer deposits

     704,401        544,649   

Gaming taxes payable

     205,260        163,092   

Accrued compensation and benefits

     83,769        75,962   

Accrued interest

     101,442        100,562   

Other accrued liabilities

     47,739        44,244   

Construction retention

     3,578        3,826   

Deferred income taxes, net

     4,035        3,178   

Income taxes payable

     2,058        2,019   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     1,455,534        1,131,377   

Long-term debt

     6,586,518        5,781,770   

Land concession obligation

     46,819        76,186   

Other long-term liabilities

     141,465        137,830   

Deferred income taxes, net

     14,343        45,499   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     8,244,679        7,172,662   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 16)

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, par value $0.01; 40,000,000 shares authorized; zero shares issued and outstanding

     —          —     

Common stock, par value $0.01; 400,000,000 shares authorized; 114,170,493 and 113,730,442 shares issued; 101,192,408 and 100,866,712 shares outstanding

     1,142        1,137   

Treasury stock, at cost; 12,978,085 and 12,863,730 shares

     (1,143,419     (1,127,947

Additional paid-in capital

     888,727        818,821   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     2,913        4,177   

Retained earnings

     66,130        44,775   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Wynn Resorts, Limited stockholders’ deficit

     (184,507     (259,037

Noncontrolling interest

     316,858        362,969   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total equity

     132,351        103,932   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 8,377,030      $ 7,276,594   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(amounts in thousands, except share data)

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011  

Operating revenues:

      

Casino

   $ 4,490,637      $ 4,034,759      $ 4,190,507   

Rooms

     492,230        479,983        472,074   

Food and beverage

     586,672        588,437        547,735   

Entertainment, retail and other

     418,705        417,209        414,786   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross revenues

     5,988,244        5,520,388        5,625,102   

Less: promotional allowances

     (367,308     (366,104     (355,310
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net revenues

     5,620,936        5,154,284        5,269,792   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating costs and expenses:

      

Casino

     2,846,489        2,626,822        2,686,372   

Rooms

     133,503        126,527        125,286   

Food and beverage

     323,573        308,394        283,940   

Entertainment, retail and other

     175,257        189,832        214,435   

General and administrative

     448,788        441,699        389,053   

Provision for doubtful accounts

     11,877        18,091        33,778   

Pre-opening costs

     3,169        466        —     

Depreciation and amortization

     371,051        373,199        398,039   

Property charges and other

     17,138        39,978        130,649   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating costs and expenses

     4,330,845        4,125,008        4,261,552   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     1,290,091        1,029,276        1,008,240   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

      

Interest income

     15,713        12,543        7,654   

Interest expense, net of amounts capitalized

     (299,022     (288,759     (229,918

Increase in swap fair value

     14,235        991        14,151   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     (40,435     (25,151     —     

Equity in income from unconsolidated affiliates

     1,085        1,086        1,472   

Other

     4,856        3,012        3,968   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense), net

     (303,568     (296,278     (202,673
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     986,523        732,998        805,567   

Benefit (provision) for income taxes

     17,634        (4,299     19,546   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     1,004,157        728,699        825,113   

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest

     (275,505     (226,663     (211,742
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited

   $ 728,652      $ 502,036      $ 613,371   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted income per common share:

      

Net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited:

      

Basic

   $ 7.25      $ 4.87      $ 4.94   

Diluted

   $ 7.17      $ 4.82      $ 4.88   

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

      

Basic

     100,540        103,092        124,039   

Diluted

     101,641        104,249        125,667   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(amounts in thousands)

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011  

Net income

   $ 1,004,157      $ 728,699      $ 825,113   

Other comprehensive income:

      

Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax

     (2,106     2,749        2,102   

Unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities, net of tax

     319        1,780        (2,070
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     1,002,370        733,228        825,145   

Less: Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interest

     (274,982     (227,855     (211,823
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited

   $ 727,388      $ 505,373      $ 613,322   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(amounts in thousands, except share data)

 

    Common stock                                            
    Shares
outstanding
    Par
value
    Treasury
stock
    Additional
paid-in
capital
    Accumulated
other
comprehensive
income
    Retained
earnings
    Total
Wynn Resorts,  Ltd
stockholders’
equity (deficit)
    Noncontrolling
interest
    Total
stockholders’
equity
 

Balances, January 1, 2011

    124,599,508      $ 1,374      $ (1,119,407   $ 3,346,050      $ 889      $ 9,042      $ 2,237,948      $ 142,637      $ 2,380,585   

Net income

    —          —          —          —          —          613,371        613,371        211,742        825,113   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          1,520        —          1,520        582        2,102   

Net unrealized loss on investments

    —          —          —          —          (1,569     —          (1,569     (501     (2,070

Exercise of stock options

    431,126        4        —          23,836        —          —          23,840        19        23,859   

Shares repurchased by the company and held as treasury shares

    (51,136     —          (7,629     —          —          —          (7,629     —          (7,629

Issuance of restricted stock

    101,500        1        —          (1     —          —          —          —          —     

Cash dividends declared

    —          —          —          (226,755     —          (586,045     (812,800     (221,649     (1,034,449

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          11,176        —          —          11,176        —          11,176   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          23,165        —          —          23,165        1,602        24,767   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balances, December 31, 2011

    125,080,998        1,379        (1,127,036     3,177,471        840        36,368        2,089,022        134,432        2,223,454   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stock redemption

    (24,549,222     (245     —          (1,936,198     —          —          (1,936,443     —          (1,936,443

Net income

    —          —          —          —          —          502,036        502,036        226,663        728,699   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          1,987        —          1,987        762        2,749   

Net unrealized gain on investments

    —          —          —          —          1,350        —          1,350        430        1,780   

Exercise of stock options

    332,576        3        —          15,580        —          —          15,583        —          15,583   

Cancellation of restricted stock

    (31,500     —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Shares repurchased by the company and held as treasury shares

    (7,640     —          (911     —          —          —          (911     —          (911

Issuance of restricted stock

    41,500        —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —     

Cash dividends declared

    —          —          —          (462,730     —          (493,629     (956,359     —          (956,359

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          5,537        —          —          5,537        —          5,537   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          19,161        —          —          19,161        682        19,843   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balances, December 31, 2012

    100,866,712        1,137        (1,127,947     818,821        4,177        44,775        (259,037     362,969        103,932   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

    —          —          —          —          —          728,652        728,652        275,505        1,004,157   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          (1,522     —          (1,522     (584     (2,106

Net unrealized gain on investments

    —          —          —          —          258        —          258        61        319   

Exercise of stock options

    383,151        5        —          20,431        —          —          20,436        —          20,436   

Cancellation of restricted stock

    (78,500     (1     —          1        —          —          —          —          —     

Shares repurchased by the company and held as treasury shares

    (114,355     —          (15,472     —          —          —          (15,472     —          (15,472

Issuance of restricted stock

    135,400        1        —          (1     —          —          —          —          —     

Cash dividends declared

    —          —          —          480        —          (707,297     (706,817     (322,305     (1,029,122

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          10,474        —          —          10,474        —          10,474   

Stock-based compensation

    —          —          —          38,521        —          —          38,521        1,212        39,733   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balances, December 31, 2013

    101,192,408      $ 1,142      $ (1,143,419   $ 888,727      $ 2,913      $ 66,130      $ (184,507   $ 316,858      $ 132,351   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(amounts in thousands)

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013     2012     2011  

Cash flows from operating activities:

      

Net income

   $ 1,004,157      $ 728,699      $ 825,113   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

      

Depreciation and amortization

     371,051        373,199        398,039   

Deferred income taxes

     (19,826     (3,655     (10,822

Stock-based compensation

     39,537        19,648        23,881   

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

     (12,332     (5,253     (11,052

Amortization and write-offs of deferred financing costs and other

     21,453        23,965        19,683   

Loss on extinguishment of debt

     40,435        25,151        —     

Provision for doubtful accounts

     11,877        18,091        33,778   

Property charges and other

     6,950        36,714        104,223   

Equity in income (loss) of unconsolidated affiliates, net of distributions

     122        106        (144

Increase in swap fair value

     (14,235     (991     (14,151

Increase (decrease) in cash from changes in:

      

Receivables, net

     (14,875     (21,019     (84,653

Inventories and prepaid expenses and other

     (17,749     3,644        11,168   

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

     260,077        (12,581     220,772   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     1,676,642        1,185,718        1,515,835   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows used in investing activities:

      

Capital expenditures, net of construction payables and retention

     (506,786     (240,985     (184,146

Purchase of corporate debt securities

     (222,856     (183,445     (316,533

Proceeds from sale or maturity of corporate debt securities

     146,112        216,051        101,017   

Restricted cash

     (100,709     (99,163     —     

Deposits and purchase of other assets

     (13,961     (38,042     (60,135

Proceeds from sale of assets

     20,620        730        697   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (677,580     (344,854     (459,100
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

      

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

     20,436        15,583        23,859   

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

     12,332        5,253        11,052   

Dividends paid

     (1,034,986     (955,493     (1,033,447

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt

     1,297,870        1,648,643        150,483   

Principal payments on long-term debt

     (501,400     (1,022,847     (201,901

Repurchase of common stock

     (15,472     (911     (7,629

Interest rate swap settlement

     —          (2,368     —     

Payments on long-term land concession obligation

     (27,917     (13,449     —     

Payment of financing costs

     (42,006     (56,890     (58
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (291,143     (382,479     (1,057,641
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate on cash

     1,903        4,247        4,994   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents:

      

Increase in cash and cash equivalents

     709,822        462,632        4,088   

Balance, beginning of year

     1,725,219        1,262,587        1,258,499   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, end of year

   $ 2,435,041      $ 1,725,219      $ 1,262,587   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow disclosures:

      

Increase in debt related to the redemption of stock

   $ —        $ 1,936,443      $ —     

Cash paid for interest, net of amounts capitalized

     284,849        225,499        221,123   

Change in property and equipment included in accounts and construction payables

     67,650        6,557        13,794   

Cash paid for income taxes

     2,518        4,547        2,088   

Increase in liability for dividends declared on nonvested stock

     2,708        866        1,003   

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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WYNN RESORTS, LIMITED AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. Organization

Wynn Resorts, Limited, a Nevada corporation (together with its subsidiaries, “Wynn Resorts” or the “Company”) owns 72.3% of Wynn Macau, Limited which operates a casino hotel resort property in the Macau Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. The Company also owns and operates a casino hotel resort property in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Our Macau resort is a resort destination casino with two luxury hotel towers (Wynn Macau and Encore) with a total of 1,008 spacious rooms and suites, approximately 280,000 square feet of casino space, casual and fine dining in eight restaurants, approximately 57,000 square feet of retail space, recreation and leisure facilities, including two health clubs and spas and a pool.

Our Las Vegas operations (Wynn Las Vegas and Encore) feature two luxury hotel towers with a total of 4,748 spacious hotel rooms, suites and villas, approximately 186,000 square feet of casino space, 34 food and beverage outlets featuring signature chefs, an on-site 18-hole golf course, meeting space, a Ferrari and Maserati dealership, approximately 96,000 square feet of retail space as well as two showrooms, three nightclubs and a beach club.

In October 2009, Wynn Macau, Limited, an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, listed its ordinary shares of common stock on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited. Through an initial public offering, including the over allotment, Wynn Macau, Limited sold 1,437,500,000 shares (27.7%) of this subsidiary’s common stock.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of Consolidation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its majority-owned subsidiaries. Investments in the 50%-owned joint ventures operating the Ferrari and Maserati automobile dealership and the Brioni mens’ retail clothing store inside Wynn Las Vegas are accounted for under the equity method. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Certain amounts in the consolidated financial statements for the previous years have been reclassified to be consistent with the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on the previously reported net income.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Redemption Price Promissory Note

The Company recorded the fair value of the Redemption Price Promissory Note (the “Redemption Note”) of approximately $1.94 billion in accordance with applicable accounting guidance. The Company utilized an independent third party valuation to assist in the determination of this fair value. In determining this fair value, the Company estimated the Redemption Note’s present value using discounted cash flows with a probability weighted expected return for redemption assumptions and a discount rate which included time value and non-performance risk adjustments commensurate with risk of the Redemption Note.

Considerations for the redemption assumptions included the stated maturity of the Redemption Note, uncertainty of the related cash flows as well as potential effects of the following: uncertainties surrounding the

 

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potential outcome and timing of pending litigation with Aruze USA, Inc., Universal Entertainment Corporation and Mr. Kazuo Okada (collectively, the “Okada Parties”) (see Note 16—“Commitments and Contingencies”); the outcome of on-going investigations of Aruze USA, Inc. by the United States Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Nevada Gaming Control Board; and other potential legal and regulatory actions. In addition, in the furtherance of various future business objectives, the Company considered its ability, at its sole option, to prepay the Redemption Note at any time in accordance with its terms without penalty. Accordingly, the Company reasonably determined that the estimated life of the Redemption Note could be less than the contractual life of the Redemption Note.

In determination of the appropriate discount rate to be used in the estimated present value, the Redemption Note’s subordinated position relative to all other debt in the Company’s capital structure and credit ratings associated with the Company’s traded debt were considered. Observable inputs for the risk free rate based on Federal Reserve rates for U.S. Treasury securities and credit risk spread based on a yield curve index of similarly rated debt were used. As a result of this analysis, the Company concluded the Redemption Notes’ stated rate of 2% approximated a market rate.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less and include both U.S. dollar-denominated and foreign currency-denominated securities. Cash equivalents are carried at cost, which approximates fair value. Cash equivalents of $1,349.6 million and $969.2 million at December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, were invested in bank time deposits, money market accounts, U.S. treasuries and commercial paper. In addition, the Company held bank deposits and cash on hand of approximately $1,085.4 million and $756 million as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Restricted Cash and Investment Securities

Restricted cash consists primarily of certain proceeds of the Company’s financing activities that are restricted by the agreements governing the Company’s debt instruments for the payment of certain Wynn Palace related construction and development costs. The Company’s long-term restricted cash balances consisted of approximately $199.9 million and $99.2 million at December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, substantially all of which were invested in time deposits. In November 2013, the Company used $243 million of current restricted cash for the purpose of redeeming the portion of the 7 7/8% First Mortgage Notes due 2017 of Wynn Las Vegas, LLC (“Wynn Las Vegas”) an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Wynn Resorts, Limited, that were not tendered in May 2013 in the cash tender offer (the “tender offer”). For more information on the Wynn Las Vegas tender offer, see Note 8—“Long-Term Debt.”

Investment securities consist of short-term and long-term investments in domestic and foreign corporate debt securities and commercial paper. The Company’s investment policy limits the amount of exposure to any one issuer with the objective of minimizing the potential risk of principal loss. Management determines the appropriate classification (held-to-maturity/available-for-sale) of its securities at the time of purchase and reevaluates such designation as of each balance sheet date. The Company’s current investments are reported at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, reported in other comprehensive income. Adjustments are made for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts to maturity computed under the effective interest method. Such amortization is included in interest income together with realized gains and losses and the stated interest on such securities.

 

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Accounts Receivable and Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of casino accounts receivable. The Company issues credit in the form of “markers” to approved casino customers following investigations of creditworthiness. At December 31, 2013 and 2012, approximately 86% and 84% of the Company’s markers were due from customers residing outside the United States, primarily in Asia. Business or economic conditions or other significant events in these countries could affect the collectability of such receivables.

Accounts receivable, including casino and hotel receivables, are typically non-interest bearing and are initially recorded at cost. Accounts are written off when management deems them to be uncollectible. Recoveries of accounts previously written off are recorded when received. An estimated allowance for doubtful accounts is maintained to reduce the Company’s receivables to their carrying amount, which approximates fair value. The allowance is estimated based on specific review of customer accounts as well as management’s experience with collection trends in the casino industry and current economic and business conditions. In June 2013, the Company recorded an adjustment to its reserve estimates for casino accounts receivable based on the results of historical collection patterns and current collection trends. This adjustment benefitted operating income by $14.9 million and net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited by $12 million (or $0.12 per share on a fully diluted basis for the year ended December 31, 2013). In June 2012, the Company recorded a similar adjustment to its reserve estimates for casino accounts receivable based on the results of historical collection patterns and current collection trends. For the year ended December 31, 2012, this adjustment benefitted operating income by $30.9 million and net income attributable to Wynn Resorts, Limited by $23.3 million (or $0.22 per share on a fully diluted basis).

Inventories

Inventories consist of retail merchandise, food and beverage items which are stated at the lower of cost or market value and certain operating supplies. Cost is determined by the first-in, first-out, average and specific identification methods.

Property and Equipment

Purchases of property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is provided over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the straight-line method as follows:

 

Buildings and improvements

  10 to 45 years

Land improvements

  10 to 45 years

Leasehold interest in land

  25 years

Airplanes

  18 to 20 years

Furniture, fixtures and equipment

  3 to 20 years

Costs related to improvements are capitalized, while costs of repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred. The cost and accumulated depreciation of property and equipment retired or otherwise disposed of are eliminated from the respective accounts and any resulting gain or loss is included in operations.

Capitalized Interest

The interest cost associated with major development and construction projects is capitalized and included in the cost of the project. Interest capitalization ceases once a project is substantially complete or no longer

 

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undergoing construction activities to prepare it for its intended use. When no debt is specifically identified as being incurred in connection with a construction project, the Company capitalizes interest on amounts expended on the project at the Company’s weighted average cost of borrowed money. Interest of $10.5 million and $2 million was capitalized for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. No interest was capitalized for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Intangibles

The Company’s indefinite-lived intangible assets consist primarily of water rights acquired as part of the original purchase price of the property on which Wynn Las Vegas is located, and trademarks. Indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized, but are reviewed for impairment annually. The Company’s finite-lived intangible assets consist primarily of a Macau gaming concession. Finite-lived intangible assets are amortized over the shorter of their contractual terms or estimated useful lives.

Long-Lived Assets

Long-lived assets, which are to be held and used, including intangibles and property and equipment, are periodically reviewed by management for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable. If an indicator of impairment exists, the Company compares the estimated future cash flows of the asset, on an undiscounted basis, to the carrying value of the asset. If the undiscounted cash flows exceed the carrying value, no impairment is indicated. If the undiscounted cash flows do not exceed the carrying value, then impairment is measured as the difference between fair value and carrying value, with fair value typically based on a discounted cash flow model. If an asset is still under development, future cash flows include remaining construction costs.

Deferred Financing Costs

Direct and incremental costs incurred in obtaining loans or in connection with the issuance of long-term debt are capitalized and amortized to interest expense over the terms of the related debt agreements. Approximately $11.2 million, $11 million and $11.6 million were amortized to interest expense during the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Debt discounts incurred in connection with the issuance of debt have been capitalized and are being amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method.

Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company seeks to manage its market risk, including interest rate risk associated with variable rate borrowings, through balancing fixed-rate and variable-rate borrowings with the use of derivative financial instruments. The fair value of derivative financial instruments are recognized as assets or liabilities at each balance sheet date, with changes in fair value affecting net income as the Company’s current interest rate swaps do not qualify for hedge accounting. Accordingly, changes in the fair value of the interest rate swaps are presented as an increase (decrease) in swap fair value in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income. The differentials paid or received on interest rate swap agreements are recognized as adjustments to interest expense.

Revenue Recognition and Promotional Allowances

The Company recognizes revenues at the time persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the service is provided or the retail goods are sold, prices are fixed or determinable and collection is reasonably assured.

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued)

 

Casino revenues are measured by the aggregate net difference between gaming wins and losses, with liabilities recognized for funds deposited by customers before gaming play occurs and for chips in the customers’ possession. Cash discounts, other cash incentives related to casino play and commissions rebated through junkets to customers are recorded as a reduction to casino revenue. Hotel, food and beverage, entertainment and other operating revenues are recognized when services are performed. Entertainment, retail and other revenue includes rental income which is recognized on a time proportion basis over the lease term. Contingent rental income is recognized when the right to receive such rental income is established according to the lease agreements. Advance deposits on rooms and advance ticket sales are recorded as customer deposits until services are provided to the customer.

Revenues are recognized net of certain sales incentives which are required to be recorded as a reduction of revenue; consequently, the Company’s casino revenues are reduced by discounts, commissions and points earned in the player’s club loyalty program.

The retail value of accommodations, food and beverage, and other services furnished to guests without charge is included in gross revenues. Such amounts are then deducted as promotional allowances. The estimated cost of providing such promotional allowances is primarily included in casino expenses as follows (amounts in thousands):

 

     Years Ended December 31,  
     2013      2012      2011  

Rooms

   $ 52,585       $ 53,487       $ 52,019   

Food and beverage

     112,897         107,882         104,413   

Entertainment, retail and other

     14,659         17,522         17,017   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 180,141       $ 178,891       $ 173,449   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Customer Loyalty Program

The Company offers a slot club program whereby customers may earn points based on their level of play that may be redeemed for free credit that must be replayed in the slot machine. The Company accrues a liability based on the points earned times the redemption value, less an estimate for breakage, and records a related reduction in casino revenue.

Slot Machine Jackpots

The Company does not accrue a liability for base jackpots because it has the ability to avoid such payment as slot machines can legally be removed from the gaming floor without payment of the base amount. When the Company is unable to avoid payment of the jackpot (i.e., the incremental amount on a progressive slot machine) due to legal requirements, the jackpot is accrued as the obligation becomes unavoidable. This liability is accrued over the time period in which the incremental progressive jackpot amount is generated with a related reduction in casino revenue.

Gaming Taxes

The Company is subject to taxes based on gross gaming revenue in the jurisdictions in which it operates, subject to applicable jurisdictional adjustments. These gaming taxes are an assessment on the Company’s gaming revenue and are recorded as an expense within the “Casino” line item in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income. These taxes totaled $2 billion, $1.8 billion and $1.9 billion for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

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Advertising Costs

The Company expenses advertising costs the first time the advertising takes place. Advertising costs incurred in development periods are included in pre-opening costs. Once a project is completed, advertising costs are primarily included in general and administrative expenses. Total advertising costs were $21.5 million, $23 million and $19.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Pre-Opening Costs

Pre-opening costs consist primarily of direct salaries and wages, legal and consulting fees, insurance, utilities and advertising, and are expensed as incurred. During the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, the Company incurred pre-opening costs in connection with the design and construction of Wynn Palace in the Cotai area of Macau. There were no pre-opening costs during the year ended December 31, 2011.

Income Taxes

The Company is subject to income taxes in the United States and other foreign jurisdictions where it operates. Accounting standards require the recognition of deferred tax assets, net of applicable reserves, and liabilities for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on the income tax provision and deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in the results of operations in the period that includes the enactment date. Accounting standards also require recognition of a future tax benefit to the extent that realization of such benefit is more likely than not. Otherwise, a valuation allowance is applied.

The Company’s income tax returns are subject to examination by the IRS and other tax authorities in the locations where it operates. The Company assesses potentially unfavorable outcomes of such examinations based on accounting standards for uncertain income taxes. The accounting standards prescribe a minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements.

Uncertain tax position accounting standards apply to all tax positions re