485APOS 1 d443510d485apos.htm 485APOS 485APOS
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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 26, 2012

Registration Nos. 333-89822; 811-21114

 

 

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form N-1A

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

   THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933    x
   Pre-Effective Amendment No.   
      Post-Effective Amendment No. 75    x

and/or

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

   THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940    x
   Amendment No. 84    x

 

 

ProShares Trust

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Trust Instrument)

 

 

7501 Wisconsin Avenue,

Suite 1000 Bethesda, MD 20814

(Address of Principal Executive Office) (Zip Code)

(240) 497-6400

(Area Code and Telephone Number)

Michael L. Sapir, CEO

ProShare Advisors LLC

7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1000

Bethesda, MD 20814

(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

 

 

with copies to:

John Loder, Esq.

c/o Ropes & Gray LLP

Prudential Tower

800 Boylston Street

Boston, MA 02199-3600

 

Amy R. Doberman

ProShare Advisors LLC

7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1000

Bethesda, MD 20814

 

 

Approximate date of Proposed Public Offering:

It is proposed that this filing will become effective:

 

  ¨ immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
  ¨ on              pursuant to paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of Rule 485
  ¨ 60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
  ¨ on pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
  x 75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
  ¨ on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485.

If appropriate, check the following:

 

  ¨ This post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.

 

 

 


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EXPLANATORY NOTE

This post-effective amendment relates only to ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged, a new series of ProShares Trust. No information relating to any other series or class of series of ProShares Trust is amended or superseded hereby.


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Preliminary                             

Prospectus

  

Subject to Completion

November 26, 2012

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Funds may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

LOGO

Prospectus

[                    ], 2013

Specialty ProShares

[            ] ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged

 

PROSHARES TRUST    Distributor: SEI Investments Distribution Co.

 

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.


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Table of Contents

 

3    Summary Section
4    ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged
26    Investment Objective, Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks
36    Management of ProShares Trust
36    Determination of NAV
36    Distributions
36    Dividend Reinvestment Services
36    Taxes


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proshares.com :: 3

Summary Section


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4 :: proshares.com :: ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged    Specialty ProShares IRCP

 

Investment Objective

ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged (the “Fund”) seeks investment results, before fees and expenses, that track the performance of the [            ] (the “Index”).

The Index (Bloomberg Ticker:         ) is designed to provide exposure to the USD-denominated high yield corporate debt market while at the same time seeking to minimize the influence on returns (both negative and positive) attributable to changing interest rates on U.S. Treasury securities (“Treasury interest rates”). The Index attempts to meet this goal by taking (a) long positions in high yield corporate bonds and (b) an offsetting short position in fixed income US Treasury securities, as adjusted to be of equivalent duration. By taking such short positions, the Index is designed to mitigate any losses the high yield bonds would otherwise experience in a generally rising Treasury interest rate environment (and conversely, will limit any gains the high yield bonds would experience in a falling Treasury interest rate environment).

The Index does not attempt to mitigate other factors that impact the price and yield of corporate bonds such as changes to the markets perceived underlying credit risk of the corporate entity.

The long high yield corporate bond positions included in the Index are designed to provide a balanced representation of the universe of U.S. dollar-denominated high yield corporate bonds for sale within the United States, by means of including liquid high yield corporate bonds as determined by the index provider. Currently, the bonds eligible for inclusion in the Index include U.S. dollar-denominated, corporate bonds for sale in the United States that are issued by companies domiciled in developed market countries and; are rated sub-investment grade by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc., Fitch, Inc. or Standard and Poor’s Financial Services, LLC; and are subject to both minimum issue outstanding, minimum aggregate issuer notional outstanding criteria. The Index is modified market value weighted.

The equivalent short Treasury positions included in the Index are determined based on which U.S. Treasury bills, notes or bonds (together, “Treasury Securities”), in combination, will most closely reflect an equivalent sensitivity to changes in Treasury interest rates as the long high yield corporate position.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund

The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy or hold shares of the Fund.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses

(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

 

Investment Advisory Fees

     [    ]

Other Expenses*

     [    ]
  

 

 

 

Total Annual Operating Expenses Before Fee Waivers and Expense Reimbursements

     [    ]

Fee Waiver/Reimbursement**

     [    ]
  

 

 

 

Total Annual Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Expense Reimbursements

     [    ]
  

 

 

 

 

* “Other Expenses” are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
** ProShare Advisors LLC (“ProShare Advisors”) has contractually agreed to waive Investment Advisory and Management Services Fees and to reimburse Other Expenses to the extent Total Annual Operating Expenses Before Fee Waivers and Expense Reimbursements, as a percentage of average daily net assets, exceed [            ]% through [            ], 2014. After such date, the expense limitation may be terminated or revised. Amounts waived or reimbursed in a particular contractual period may be recouped by ProShare Advisors within five years of the end of that contractual period to the extent that recoupment will not cause the Fund’s expenses to exceed any expense limitation in place at that time.

Example: This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of each period. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, except that the fee waiver/expense reimbursement is assumed only to pertain to the first year. Although your actual cost may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your approximate costs would be:

 

1 Year

   3 Years  

$[        ]

   $ [        

The Fund pays transaction and financing costs associated with transacting in securities and derivatives. In addition, investors may pay brokerage commissions on their purchases and sales of the Fund’s shares. These costs are not reflected in the example or the table above.

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when the Fund’s shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate is calculated without regard to cash instruments or derivatives transactions. If such transactions were included, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate would be significantly higher.

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund invests in a combination of debt securities and derivatives that ProShare Advisors believes should track the performance of the Index. The Index allocates to long positions in high yield corporate bonds and a duration adjusted equivalent short position in Treasury Securities.

 


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The types of debt securities and derivatives that the Fund will principally invest in are set forth below. Cash balances arising from the use of derivatives will typically be held in money market instruments.

 

   

Debt Securities—The Fund will invest in debt securities, primarily high yield corporate bonds, that are issued by corporate issuers that are rated below “investment-grade” by an average of the leading credit rating agencies—Moody’s Investors Service, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services and Fitch Ratings. Credit rating agencies evaluate issuers and assign ratings based on their opinions of the issuer’s ability to pay interest and principal as scheduled. Those issuers with a greater risk of default—not paying interest or principal in a timely manner—are rated below investment grade.

 

   

Derivatives — The Fund invests in derivatives, which are financial instruments whose value is derived from the value of an underlying asset (including ETFs), interest rate or index. The Fund primarily invests in derivatives as a substitute for obtaining short exposure in U.S. Treasury securities . These derivatives principally include:

 

   

Futures Contracts—A standardized contract traded on, or subject to the rules of, an exchange that calls for the future delivery of a specified quantity and type of asset at a specified time and place or, alternatively, may call for cash settlement.

 

   

Swap Agreements — Contracts entered into primarily with major global financial institutions for a specified period ranging from a day to more than one year. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the return (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. The gross return to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” e.g., the return on or change in value of a particular dollar amount invested in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index.

 

   

Money Market Instruments — The Fund invests in short-term cash instruments that have a remaining maturity of 397 days or less and exhibit high quality credit profiles, including:

 

   

U.S. Treasury Bills — U.S. government securities that have initial maturities of one year or less, and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States.

 

   

Repurchase Agreements — Contracts in which a seller of securities, usually U.S. government securities or other money market instruments, agrees to buy them back at a specified time and price. Repurchase agreements are primarily used by the Fund as a short-term investment vehicle for cash positions.

ProShare Advisors uses a mathematical approach to investing. Using this approach, ProShare Advisors determines the type, quantity and mix of investment positions that the Fund should hold to approximate the performance of the Index. The Fund may gain exposure to only a representative sample of the securities in the Index, which is intended to have aggregate characteristics similar to those of the Index. ProShare Advisors does not invest the assets of the Fund in securities or derivatives based on Pro-Share Advisors’ view of the investment merit of a particular security or instrument, other than for cash management purposes, nor does it

conduct conventional research or analysis (other than in determining counterparty creditworthiness), or forecast market movement or trends, in managing the assets of the Fund. The Fund seeks to remain fully invested at all times in securities and/or derivatives that, in combination, provide exposure to the Index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. Please see “Investment Objective, Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks” in the Fund’s full prospectus for additional details.

The Fund will invest at least 80% of its assets (i.e., net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes), under normal circumstances, in securities contained in the Index and/or investments that, in combination, should have similar economic characteristics.

Principal Risks

You could lose money by investing in the Fund.

 

   

Risks Associated with the Use of Derivatives — The Fund uses investment techniques, such as investing in derivatives, that may be considered aggressive. Investing in derivatives may expose the Fund to greater risks than investing directly in the reference asset(s) underlying those derivatives, such as counterparty risk, liquidity risk and increased correlation risk (each as discussed below). When the Fund uses derivatives, there may be imperfect correlation between the value of the reference asset(s) and the derivative, which may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective. Moreover, with respect to the use of swap agreements, if the Index has a dramatic intraday move that causes a material decline in the Fund’s net assets, the terms of a swap agreement between the Fund and its counterparty may permit the counterparty to immediately close out the transaction with the Fund. In that event, the Fund may be unable to enter into another swap agreement or invest in other derivatives to achieve the desired exposure consistent with the Fund’s investment objective. This, in turn, may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective, even if the Index reverses all or a portion of its intraday move by the end of the day. Any financing, borrowing and other costs associated with using derivatives may also have the effect of lowering the Fund’s return.

 

   

Correlation Risk — A number of factors may affect the Fund’s ability to achieve a high degree of correlation with the Index, and there can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation. Failure to achieve a high degree of correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective. The factors that may adversely affect the Fund’s correlation with the Index include fees, expenses, transaction costs, financing costs associated with the use of derivatives, income items, valuation methodology, accounting standards and disruptions or illiquidity in the markets for the securities or financial instruments in which the Fund invests. The Fund may not have investment exposure to all securities in the Index, or its weighting of investment exposure to such securities may be different from that of the Index. In addition, the Fund may invest in securities or financial instruments not included in the Index. The Fund may also be subject to large movements of assets into and out of the Fund, potentially resulting in the Fund being over- or under-exposed to the Index. Activities surrounding Index reconstitutions or other Index rebalancing events may hinder the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective.

 


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Debt Instrument Risk—The Fund will invest in, or seek exposure to, debt instruments. Debt instruments may have varying levels of sensitivity to changes in interest rates, issuer credit risk and other factors. In addition, changes in the credit quality of the issuer of a debt instrument can also affect the price of a debt instrument, as can an issuer’s default on its payment obligations. Such factors may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to change.

 

   

High Yield Risk—Exposure to high yield (lower rated) debt instruments (also known as “junk bonds”) may involve greater levels of interest rate, credit, liquidity and valuation risk than for higher rated instruments. High yield debt instruments may be sensitive to economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to a company. These securities are subject to greater risk of loss, greater sensitivity to interest rate and economic changes, valuation difficulties, and a potential lack of a secondary or public market for securities. High yield debt instruments are considered predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to make principal and interest payments and, therefore, such instruments generally involve greater risk of default or price changes than higher rated debt instruments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce market liquidity (liquidity risk). Less active markets may diminish the Fund’s ability to obtain accurate market quotations when valuing the portfolio securities and thereby give rise to valuation risk. High yield debt instruments may also present risks based on payment expectations. For example, these instruments may contain redemption or call provisions. If an issuer exercises these provisions in a declining interest rate market, the Fund would have to replace the security with a lower yielding security, resulting in a decreased return for investors. If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the issuer’s security could lose its entire value. Furthermore, the transaction costs associated with the purchase and sale of high yield debt instruments may vary greatly depending upon a number of factors and may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.

 

   

Credit Risk—Due to its investments in high yield corporate bonds, the Fund will be subject to the risk that an issuer is unwilling or unable to make timely payments to meet its contractual obligations. At times when credit risk increases, the value of the high yield corporate bonds that comprise the Index (and therefore the value of the Fund) will typically decrease. Conversely, when credit risk of the bonds decreases, the value of the Index (and the Fund) will typically increase.

 

   

Interest Rate Risk— Interest rate risk is the risk that debt securities may fluctuate in value due to changes in interest rates. Commonly, investments subject to interest rate risk will decrease in value when interest rates rise and increase in value when interest rates decline. The value of securities with longer maturities may fluctuate more in response to interest rate changes than securities with shorter maturities. The Index (and therefore the Fund) seeks to mitigate this risk by taking short positions in Treasury Bonds; such short positions should increase in value in rising rate environments and should decrease in value in falling rate environments, thereby mitigating the corresponding gains and losses in the high yield corporate positions of the Fund arising from changing Treasury interest rates.

 

   

Long/Short Risk — The Fund seeks long exposure to high yield corporate bonds and duration-adjusted equivalent short exposure to U.S. Treasury securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce

   

high, or even positive, returns and the Fund could lose money if either or both the Fund’s long and short positions produce negative returns. For example, if the Index’s high yield corporate bonds enter into a period of declining credit quality at the same time that Treasury interest rates fall, the Fund may experience greater losses than if the Fund pursued a long-only high yield corporate bond strategy. A goal of the long/short strategy is to mitigate the price sensitivity of high yield corporate bonds to fluctuations in Treasury interest rates. A risk of that strategy is the imperfect correlation between price movement of securities sold and the price movement of the Fund’s investments.

 

   

Counterparty Risk — The Fund will also be subject to credit risk with respect to the amount it expects to receive from counterparties to derivatives and repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or fails to perform its obligations, the value of your investment in the Fund may decline.

 

   

Early Close/Late Close/Trading Halt Risk — An exchange or market may close early, close late or issue trading halts on specific securities, or the ability to buy or sell certain securities or derivatives may be restricted, which may result in the Fund being unable to buy or sell certain securities or derivatives. In such circumstances, the Fund may be unable to rebalance its portfolio, may be unable to accurately price its investments and/or may incur substantial trading losses.

 

   

Liquidity Risk — In certain circumstances, such as the disruption of the orderly markets for the securities or derivatives in which the Fund invests, the Fund might not be able to dispose of certain holdings quickly or at prices that represent true market value in the judgment of ProShare Advisors. Such a situation may prevent the Fund from limiting losses, realizing gains or achieving a high correlation with the Index.

 

   

Market Price Variance Risk — The Fund’s shares are listed for trading on the [NYSE Arca] and can be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of shares will fluctuate in response to changes in NAV and supply and demand for shares. ProShare Advisors cannot predict whether shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Given the fact that shares can be created and redeemed in Creation Units, as defined below, ProShare Advisors believes that large discounts or premiums to the NAV of shares should not be sustained. The Fund’s investment results are measured based upon the daily NAV of the Fund. Investors purchasing and selling shares in the secondary market may not experience investment results consistent with those experienced by those creating and redeeming directly with the Fund.

 

   

Non-Diversification Risk — The Fund is classified as “non-diversified” under the Investment Company Act of 1940, and has the ability to invest a relatively high percentage of its assets in the securities of a small number of issuers susceptible to a single economic, political or regulatory event, or in derivative instruments with a single counterparty if ProShare Advisors determines that doing so is the most efficient means of meeting the Fund’s investment objective. This makes the performance of the Fund more susceptible to adverse impact from credit risk relating to that counterparty than a diversified fund might be.

 

   

Portfolio Turnover Risk — Active market trading of the Fund’s shares may cause more frequent creation or redemption activities that could, in certain circumstances, increase the number of portfolio transactions. High levels of transactions increase brokerage costs and may result in increased taxable capital gains.

 


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Short Sale Exposure Risk — The Fund may seek short exposure through financial instruments such as swap agreements, which may cause the Fund to be exposed to certain risks associated with selling securities short. These risks include, under certain market conditions, an increase in the volatility and decrease in the liquidity of securities underlying the short position, which may lower the Fund’s return, result in a loss, have the effect of limiting the Fund’s ability to obtain short exposure through financial instruments such as swap agreements, or require the Fund to seek short exposure through alternative investment strategies that may be less desirable or may be costly to implement. To the extent that, at any particular point in time, the securities underlying the short position may be thinly traded or have a limited market, including due to regulatory action, the Fund may be unable to meet its investment objective due to a lack of a counterparty or counter-parties. Obtaining short exposure through these instruments may be considered an aggressive investment technique.

 

   

Geographic Concentration Risk — Because the Fund focuses its investments in particular foreign countries or geographic regions, it may be more volatile than a more geographically diversified fund. The performance of the Fund will be affected by the political, social and economic conditions in those foreign countries and geographic regions and subject to the related risks.

Please see “Investment Objective, Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks” in the Fund’s full prospectus for additional details.

 

 


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Investment Results

Performance history will be available for the Fund after it has been in operation for a full calendar year. After a full year, performance information will be shown on an annual basis. Annual returns are required to be shown and should not be interpreted as suggesting that the Fund should or should not be held for longer periods of time. The Fund may not be suitable for all investors.

Management

The Fund is advised by ProShare Advisors. Alexander Ilyasov Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since [            ].

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

The Fund will issue and redeem shares only to Authorized Participants (typically broker-dealers) in exchange for the deposit or delivery of a basket of assets (securities and/or cash) in large blocks, known as Creation Units, each of which comprises 50,000 shares. Retail investors may only purchase and sell shares on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. Because the shares trade at market prices rather than at NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (premium) or less than NAV (discount).

Tax Information

Income and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income taxes and may also be subject to state and local taxes. Distributions for this Fund may be significantly higher than those of most exchange-traded funds.

 


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proshares.com :: 25

Investment Objective, Principal

Investment Strategies and Related Risks


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26 :: proshares.com :: Investment Objective, Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks

 

Investment Objective, Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks

This section contains additional details about the Fund’s investment objective, principal investment strategies and related risks.

Investment Objective

ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged (the “Fund”) is designed to correspond to the performance of an index. The Fund seeks to achieve its stated investment objective both on a single day and over time. The Fund’s investment objective is non-fundamental, meaning it may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) of ProShares Trust (the “Trust”), without the approval of Fund shareholders. The Fund reserves the right to substitute a different index or security for the index.

Principal Investment Strategies

In seeking to achieve the Fund’s investment objective, ProShare Advisors uses a mathematical approach to investing. Using this approach, ProShare Advisors LLC (“ProShare Advisors”) determines the type, quantity and mix of investment positions that the Fund should hold to approximate the performance of the Fund’s index. The Fund employ various investment techniques that ProShare Advisors believes should, in the aggregate, simulate the movement, inverse, or multiple thereof, as applicable, of the Fund’s index.

The investment techniques utilized to simulate the movement of each applicable index are intended to enhance liquidity, maintain a tax-efficient portfolio and reduce transaction costs while, at the same time, seeking to maintain high correlation with, and similar aggregate characteristics to, the applicable index or inverse of the applicable index, as applicable. For example, the Fund may gain exposure directly or indirectly to only a representative sample of the securities in the index, which are intended to have aggregate characteristics similar to those of the index. Similarly, the Fund may overweight or underweight certain components contained in the index, invest in securities and/or financial instruments that are not included in the index, or invest in investments not included in the index but that are designed to provide the requisite exposure to the index. ProShare Advisors does not invest the assets of the Fund in securities or financial instruments based on ProShare Advisors’ view of the investment merit of a particular security, instrument, or company, other than for cash management purposes, nor does it conduct conventional research or analysis, or forecast market movement or trends, in managing the assets of the Fund. The Fund generally seeks to remain fully invested at all times in securities and/or financial instruments that, in combination, provide exposure to its index without regard to market conditions, trends or direction. The Fund does not take temporary defensive positions.

Principal Investment Strategies Specific to ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged

ProShares High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged seeks to remain fully exposed to the constituents of the Index by investing at least 80% of its assets (i.e., net assets plus borrowings for investment purposes), under normal circumstances, in securities contained in the Index and/or investments that, in combination, should have similar economic characteristics.

In addition, the Fund will invest in a combination of debt securities and derivatives that ProShare Advisors believes should track the performance of the Index. Cash balances arising from the use of derivatives will typically be held in money market instruments.

 

   

Debt Securities—The Fund will invest in debt securities, primarily high yield corporate bonds, that are issued by corporate issuers that are rated below “investment-grade” by an average of the leading credit rating agencies—Moody’s Investors Service, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services and Fitch Ratings. Credit rating agencies evaluate issuers and assign ratings based on their opinions of the issuer’s ability to pay interest and principal as scheduled. Those issuers with a greater risk of default—not paying interest or principal in a timely manner—are rated below investment grade.

 

   

Derivatives — The Fund invests in derivatives, which are financial instruments whose value is derived from the value of an underlying asset (including ETFs), interest rate or index. The Fund primarily invests in derivatives as a substitute for obtaining short exposure in U.S. Treasury securities . These derivatives principally include:

 

   

Futures Contracts—A standardized contract traded on, or subject to the rules of, an exchange that calls for the future delivery of a specified quantity and type of asset at a specified time and place or, alternatively, may call for cash settlement.

 

   

Swap Agreements — Contracts entered into primarily with major global financial institutions for a specified period ranging from a day to more than one year. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the return (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. The gross return to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” e.g., the return on or change in value of a particular dollar amount invested in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index.

 

   

Money Market Instruments — The Fund invests in short-term cash instruments that have a remaining maturity of 397 days or less and exhibit high quality credit profiles, including:

 

   

U.S. Treasury Bills — U.S. government securities that have initial maturities of one year or less, and are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States.

 

   

Repurchase Agreements — Contracts in which a seller of securities, usually U.S. government securities or other money market instruments, agrees to buy them back at a specified time and price. Repurchase agreements are primarily used by the Fund as a short-term investment vehicle for cash positions.

 


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Principal Risks

Like all investments, investing in the Fund entails risks. The factors most likely to have a significant impact on the Fund’s portfolio are called “principal risks.” The principal risks for the Fund are described in the Fund’s Summary Prospectus and additional information regarding certain of these risks, as well as information related to other potential risks to which the Fund may be subject, is provided below. The SAI contains additional information about the Fund, its investment strategies and related risks. The Fund may be subject to other risks in addition to those identified as principal risks.

    Risks Associated with the Use of Derivatives — The Fund uses investment techniques, such as investing in derivatives (including investing in swap agreements, futures contracts, options on futures contracts, securities and indexes, forward contracts and similar instruments), that may be considered aggressive. When the Fund uses derivatives, there may be imperfect correlation between the value of the derivative, which may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective. The use of derivatives and aggressive investment techniques also exposes the Fund to risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in the reference asset(s) underlying the derivative (e.g., the securities contained in the Fund’s index), including: 1) the risk that there may be imperfect correlation between the price of the financial instruments and movements in the prices of the reference asset(s); 2) the risk that an instrument is mispriced; 3) credit or counterparty risk on the amount each Fund expects to receive from a counterparty; 4) the risk that securities prices, interest rates and currency markets will move adversely and a Fund will incur significant losses; 5) the risks that the cost of holding a financial instrument might exceed its total return; and 6) the possible absence of a liquid secondary market for a particular instrument and possible exchange imposed price fluctuation limits, either of which may make it difficult or impossible to adjust a Fund’s position in a particular instrument when desired.

Moreover, with respect to the use of swap agreements, if an index has a dramatic intraday move that causes a material decline in a Fund’s net assets, the terms of a swap agreement between the Fund and its counterparty may permit the counterparty to immediately close out the transaction with the Fund. In that event, the Fund may be unable to enter into another swap agreement or invest in other derivatives to achieve the desired exposure consistent with the Fund’s investment objective. This, in turn, may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective, even if the index reverses all or a portion of its intraday move by the end of the day. Any financing, borrowing and other costs associated with using derivatives may also have the effect of lowering the Fund’s return.

 

   

Correlation Risk —There can be no guarantee that the Fund will achieve a high degree of correlation with its index. Failure to achieve a high degree of correlation may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective. A number of factors may adversely affect the Fund’s correlation with its index, including material over- or under-exposure, fees, expenses, transaction costs, financing costs associated with the use of derivatives,

   

income items, valuation methodology, infrequent trading in the securities underlying its index, accounting standards and disruptions or illiquidity in the markets for the securities or financial instruments in which the Fund invests. The Fund may not have investment exposure to all securities in its index. In addition, the Fund may invest in securities or financial instruments not included in the Fund’s index. The Fund may be subject to large movements of assets into and out of the Fund, potentially resulting in the Fund being over- or under-exposed to its index.

 

   

Debt Instrument Risk—The Fund will invest in, or seek exposure to, debt instruments. Debt instruments may have varying levels of sensitivity to changes in interest rates, issuer credit risk and other factors. Typically, the value of outstanding debt instruments falls when interest rates rise. The values of debt instruments with longer maturities may fluctuate more in response to interest rate changes than those of debt instruments with shorter maturities.

Many types of debt instruments are subject to prepayment risk, which is the risk that the issuer of the security will repay principal prior to the maturity date. Debt instruments allowing prepayment may offer less potential for gains during a period of declining interest rates, as the Fund may be required to reinvest the proceeds received at lower interest rates. In addition, changes in the credit quality of the issuer of a debt instrument can also affect the price of a debt instrument, as can an issuer’s default on its payment obligations. Such factors may cause the value of an investment in the Fund to change. High yield corporate debt is considered to be speculative and may have a greater risk of default than other types of debt instruments.

 

   

High Yield Risk—Exposure to high yield (lower rated) debt instruments (also known as “junk bonds”) may involve greater levels of interest rate, credit, liquidity and valuation risk than for higher rated instruments. High yield debt instruments may be sensitive to economic changes, political changes, or adverse developments specific to a company. These securities are subject to greater risk of loss, greater sensitivity to interest rate and economic changes, valuation difficulties, and a potential lack of a secondary or public market for securities. High yield debt instruments are considered predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to make principal and interest payments and, therefore, such instruments generally involve greater risk of default or price changes than higher rated debt instruments. An economic downturn or period of rising interest rates could adversely affect the market for these securities and reduce market liquidity (liquidity risk). Less active markets may diminish the Fund’s ability to obtain accurate market quotations when valuing the portfolio securities and thereby give rise to valuation risk. High yield debt instruments may also present risks based on payment expectations. For example, these instruments may contain redemption or call provisions. If an issuer exercises these provisions in a declining interest rate market, the Fund would have to replace the security with a lower yielding security, resulting in a decreased return for investors. If the issuer of a security is in default with respect to interest or principal payments, the issuer’s security could lose its entire value. Furthermore, the transaction costs associated with the purchase and sale of high yield debt instruments may vary greatly depending upon a number of factors and may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.

 


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Credit Risk—Due to its investments in high yield corporate bonds, the Fund will be subject to the risk that an issuer is unwilling or unable to make timely payments to meet its contractual obligations. At times when credit risk increases, the value of the high yield corporate bonds that comprise the Index (and therefore the value of the Fund) will typically decrease. Conversely, when credit risk of the bonds decreases, the value of the Index (and the Fund) will typically increase.

 

   

Interest Rate Risk— Interest rate risk is the risk that debt securities may fluctuate in value due to changes in interest rates. Commonly, investments subject to interest rate risk will decrease in value when interest rates rise and increase in value when interest rates decline. The value of securities with longer maturities may fluctuate more in response to interest rate changes than securities with shorter maturities. The Index (and therefore the Fund) seeks to mitigate this risk by taking short positions in Treasury Bonds; such short positions should increase in value in rising rate environments and should decrease in value in falling rate environments, thereby mitigating the corresponding gains and losses in the high yield corporate positions of the Fund arising from changing Treasury interest rates.

 

   

Long/Short Risk — The Fund seeks long exposure to certain securities and short exposure to certain other securities. There is no guarantee that the returns on the Fund’s long or short positions will produce high, or even positive, returns and the Fund could lose money if either or both the Fund’s long and short positions produce negative returns. For example, if the Index’s high yield corporate bonds enter into a period of declining credit quality at the same time that Treasury interest rates fall, the Fund may experience greater losses than if the Fund pursued a long only or short only strategy. A goal of the long/short strategy is to mitigate the price sensitivity of high yield corporate bonds to fluctuations in interest rates. A risk of that strategy is the imperfect correlation between price movement of securities sold and the price movement of the Fund’s investments.

 

   

Counterparty Risk — The Fund will be subject to credit risk (i.e., the risk that a counterparty is unwilling or unable to make timely payments to meet its contractual obligations) with respect to the amount the Fund expects to receive from counterparties to financial instruments and repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund. The Fund structures the agreements such that either party can terminate the contract without penalty prior to the termination date. The Fund may be negatively impacted if a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under such an agreement. The Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery in a bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding and the Fund may obtain only limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances. The Fund typically enters into transactions with counterparties whose credit rating, at the time of the transaction, is investment grade, as determined by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization, or, if unrated, judged by ProShare Advisors to be of comparable quality. These are usually only major, global financial institutions. The Fund seeks to mitigate risks by generally requiring that the counterparties for the Fund agree to post collateral for the benefit of the Fund, marked to market daily, in an amount approximately equal to what the counterparty owes the Fund, subject to certain minimum thresholds. To the extent any such collateral is insufficient or there are delays in accessing the collateral, the Fund will be exposed to the risks described above, including possible delays in recovering amounts as a result of bankruptcy proceedings.

   

Market Price Variance Risk — Individual shares of the Fund will be listed for trading on the [NYSE Arca] and can be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The market prices of shares will fluctuate in response to changes in NAV and supply and demand for shares. ProShare Advisors cannot predict whether shares will trade above, below or at their NAV. Differences between secondary market prices and NAV for shares may be due largely to supply and demand forces in the secondary market, which may not be the same forces as those influencing prices for securities or instruments held by the Fund at a particular time. Given the fact that shares can be created and redeemed in Creation Units, ProShare Advisors believes that large discounts or premiums to the NAV of shares should not be sustained. There may, however, be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly and you may pay more than NAV when buying shares on the secondary market, and you may receive less than NAV when you sell those shares. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that shares normally will trade close to their NAV, disruptions to creations and redemptions may result in trading prices that differ significantly from the NAV. The market price of shares, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid-ask spread” charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the particular security. In times of severe market disruption, the bid-ask spread often increases significantly. This means that shares may trade at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that you most want to sell your shares. The Fund’s investment results are measured based upon the daily NAV of the Fund. Investors purchasing and selling shares in the secondary market may not experience investment results consistent with those experienced by those creating and redeeming directly with the Fund.

 

   

Short Sale Exposure Risk —The Fund may seek inverse exposure, which may cause the Fund to be exposed to certain risks associated with selling securities short. These risks include, under certain market conditions, an increase in the volatility and decrease in the liquidity of securities underlying the short position, which may lower the Fund’s return, result in a loss, have the effect of limiting the Fund’s ability to obtain inverse or inverse leveraged exposure through financial instruments such as swap agreements or requiring the Fund to seek inverse or inverse leveraged exposure through alternative investment strategies that may be less desirable or may be costly to implement. To the extent that, at any particular point in time, the securities underlying the short position may be thinly-traded or have a limited market, including due to regulatory action, the Fund may be unable to meet its investment objective due to a lack of available securities or counterparties. During such periods, the Fund’s ability to issue additional Creation Units may be adversely affected. Obtaining inverse and/or inverse leveraged exposure may be considered an aggressive investment technique.

 

   

Trading Risk — Although the shares are listed for trading on the [NYSE Arca] and may be listed or traded on U.S. and non-U.S. stock exchanges other than such exchange, there can be no

 


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assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. Trading in shares on an exchange may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of an exchange, make trading in shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in shares on an exchange is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to exchange “circuit breaker” rules. Short selling of shares is also limited pursuant to SEC rules if the trading price of shares varies by more than 10% from the previous day’s closing price on the exchange. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the exchange necessary to maintain the listing of the Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged or that the shares will trade with any volume, or at all, on any stock exchange.

 

   

Geographic Concentration Risk — Because the Fund focuses its investments in companies economically tied to particular foreign countries or geographic regions it may be particularly susceptible to economic, political or regulatory events affecting those countries or regions. In addition, currency devaluations could occur in foreign countries that have not yet experienced currency devaluation to date, or could continue to occur in foreign countries that have already experienced such devaluations. As a result, the Fund may be more volatile than a more geographically diversified fund.

Additional Securities, Instruments and Strategies

A description of the additional securities, instruments and strategies that may be utilized by the Fund that are not principal investment strategies of the Fund is set forth in the SAI. The Trust and the Fund have obtained an exemptive order from the SEC allowing a registered investment company to invest in the Fund beyond the limits of Section 12(d)(1) subject to certain conditions, including that a registered investment company enters into a Participation Agreement with ProShares Trust regarding the terms of the investment. Any investment company considering purchasing shares of the Fund in amounts that would cause it to exceed the restrictions of Section 12(d)(1) should contact the Trust.

A Precautionary Note Regarding Unusual Circumstances — ProShares Trust can postpone payment of redemption proceeds for any period during which: (1) the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) or The NASDAQ Stock Market is closed other than customary weekend and holiday closings; (2) trading on the NYSE or The NASDAQ Stock Market is restricted; (3) any emergency circumstances exist, as determined by the SEC; and/or (4) the SEC by order permits for the protection of shareholders of a Fund.

A Precautionary Note Regarding Regulatory Initiatives — There is a possibility of future regulatory changes altering, perhaps to a material extent, the nature of an investment in the Fund or the ability of the Fund to continue to implement its investment strategies.

The futures markets are subject to comprehensive statutes, regulations, and margin requirements. In addition, the SEC, CFTC and the exchanges are authorized to take extraordinary actions in the event of a market emergency, including, for example, the retro-active implementation of speculative position limits or higher margin requirements, the establishment of daily price limits and the suspension of trading. The regulation of swaps and futures transactions in the United States is a rapidly changing area of law and is subject to modification by government and judicial action. The effect of any future regulatory change on the Funds is impossible to predict, but could be substantial and adverse.

In particular, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) was signed into law by President Obama on July 21, 2010. The Dodd-Frank Act will change the way in which the U.S. financial system is supervised and regulated. Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act sets forth a new legislative framework for OTC derivatives, including financial instruments, such as swaps, in which the Funds may invest. Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act makes broad changes to the OTC derivatives market, grants significant new authority to the SEC and the CFTC to regulate OTC derivatives and market participants, and will require clearing and exchange trading of many OTC derivatives transactions.

Precautionary Notes

A Precautionary Note to Retail Investors — The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), a limited trust company and securities depositary that serves as a national clearinghouse for the settlement of trades for its participating banks and broker-dealers,

 


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or its nominee will be the registered owner of all outstanding shares of the Fund. Your ownership of shares will be shown on the records of DTC and the DTC Participant broker through whom you hold the shares. PROSHARES TRUST WILL NOT HAVE ANY RECORD OF YOUR OWNERSHIP. Your account information will be maintained by your broker, who will provide you with account statements, confirmations of your purchases and sales of shares, and tax information. Your broker also will be responsible for ensuring that you receive shareholder reports and other communications from the Fund whose shares you own. Typically, you will receive other services (e.g., average cost information) only if your broker offers these services.

A Precautionary Note to Purchasers of Creation Units — You should be aware of certain legal risks unique to investors purchasing Creation Units directly from the issuing Fund. Because new shares may be issued on an ongoing basis, a “distribution” of shares could be occurring at any time. As a dealer, certain activities on your part could, depending on the circumstances, result in your being deemed a participant in the distribution, in a manner that could render you a statutory underwriter and subject you to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). For example, you could be deemed a statutory underwriter if you purchase Creation Units from an issuing Fund, break them down into the constituent shares, and sell those shares directly to customers, or if you choose to couple the creation of a supply of new shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for shares. Whether a person is an underwriter depends upon all of the facts and circumstances pertaining to that person’s activities, and the examples mentioned here should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that could cause you to be deemed an under-writer. Dealers who are not “underwriters,” but are participating in a distribution (as opposed to engaging in ordinary secondary market transactions), and thus dealing with shares as part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(3)(C) of the Securities Act, will be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act.

A Precautionary Note to Investment Companies — For purposes of the 1940 Act, the Fund is a registered investment company, and the acquisition of Fund shares by other investment companies is subject to the restrictions of Section 12(d)(1) thereof.

Provisions in the Dodd-Frank Act include new registration, record-keeping, capital and margin requirements for “swap dealers” and “major swap participants” as determined by the Dodd-Frank Act and applicable regulations; and the forced use of clearinghouse mechanisms for many OTC derivative transactions. The CFTC, SEC and other federal regulators have been tasked with developing the rules and regulations enacting the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. Although the original one-year period prescribed for rulemaking and regulations has been extended by both the SEC and the CFTC, it is not possible at this time to gauge the exact nature and scope of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act on the Fund. However, it is expected that swap dealers, major market participants and swap counterparties, including the Fund, will experience new and/or additional regulations, requirements,

compliance burdens and associated costs. The new law and the rules to be promulgated may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to meet its investment objective either through limits or requirements imposed on it or upon its counterparties. In particular, new position limits imposed on the Fund or its counterparties may impact the Fund’s ability to invest in a manner that efficiently meets its investment objective, and new requirements, including capital and mandatory clearing, may increase the cost of the Fund’s investments and cost of doing business, which could adversely affect investors.

The Index

The Fund has entered into a licensing agreement for the use of the index. A brief description of the Fund’s index is included in the Summary Prospectus.

[Index License information to be provided]

Portfolio Holdings Information

A description of the Trust’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ SAI. The top ten holdings of the Fund are posted on a daily basis to the Trust’s website at proshares.com.

 


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Management of ProShares Trust


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36 :: proshares.com :: Management of ProShares Trust

Board of Trustees and Officers

The Board is responsible for the general supervision of the Fund. The officers of the Trust are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Fund.

Investment Adviser

ProShare Advisors, located at 7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1000, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, serves as the investment adviser to the Fund and provides investment advice and management services to the Fund. ProShare Advisors oversees the investment and reinvestment of the assets in the Fund. For its investment advisory services, the Fund pays ProShare Advisors a fee at an annualized rate based on its average daily net assets, of [            ]% of average daily net assets. A discussion regarding the basis for the Board approving the investment advisory agreement for the Fund will be included in the Trust’s semi-annual or annual report to shareholders that covers the period during which the approval occurred. To the extent the Fund invests in exchange-traded funds (ETFs) sponsored by ProShare Advisors and /or common units of beneficial interest of one or more separate series of a trust sponsored by an affiliate of ProShare Advisors, ProShare Advisors has agreed to waive its investment advisory fees in an amount equal to the investment advisory fees and management services fees applicable to Fund assets invested in such ETFs and/or trust securities.

Portfolio Management

The following individual has responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Fund, as set forth in the summary section.

Alexander Ilyasov, ProShare Advisors—Portfolio Manager since November 2009. ProFund Advisors—Portfolio Manager since November 2009. World Asset Management—Portfolio Manager from January 2006 through November 2009; Portfolio Analyst from July 2005 through January 2006.

Determination of NAV

The NAV per share of the Fund is computed by dividing the value of the net assets of the Fund (i.e., the value of its total assets less total liabilities) by its total number of shares outstanding. Expenses and fees are accrued daily and taken into account for purposes of determining NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated by J.P. Morgan Investor Services Co. and determined ordinarily at 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) each business day when the bond markets are open for trading.

Securities and other assets are generally valued at their market value using information provided by a pricing service or market quotations. Certain short-term securities are valued on the basis of amortized cost. In addition, certain derivatives linked to an index may be valued based on the performance of one or more U.S. ETFs or instruments that reflect the values of the securities in such index, when the level of the index is not computed as of the close of the U.S. securities markets.

When a market price is not readily available, securities and other assets are valued at fair value in good faith under procedures established by, and under the general supervision and responsibility of, the Board. The use of a fair valuation method may

be appropriate if, for example: (i) market quotations do not accurately reflect fair value of an investment; (ii) an investment’s value has been materially affected by events occurring after the close of the exchange or market on which the investment is principally traded (for example, a foreign exchange or market); (iii) a trading halt closes an exchange or market early; or (iv) other events result in an exchange or market delaying its normal close. This procedure incurs the unavoidable risk that the valuation may be higher or lower than the securities might actually command if the Fund sold them. See the SAI for more details.

The NYSE is open every week, Monday through Friday, except when the following holidays are celebrated: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (the third Monday in January), Presidents’ Day (the third Monday in February), Good Friday, Memorial Day (the last Monday in May), July 4th, Labor Day (the first Monday in September), Thanksgiving Day (the fourth Thursday in November) and Christmas Day. The NYSE may close early on the business day before each of these holidays and on the day after Thanksgiving Day. Exchange holiday schedules are subject to change without notice. If the exchange or market on which the Fund’s investments are primarily traded closes early, the NAV may be calculated prior to its normal calculation time. Creation/redemption transaction order time cutoffs would also be accelerated.

Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association’s

(“SIFMA”) Proposed Early Close Schedule: On the following days in 2013, SIFMA has recommended that the bond markets close on January 1, 2013, January 21, 2013, and February 18, 2013. SIFMA may announce changes to this schedule or other early close dates from time to time. A Fund may cease taking transaction requests, including requests to exchange to or from other funds managed by ProShare Advisors or its affiliates on such days, at the cut-off time.

 


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Distributions

As a shareholder, you will earn a share of the investment income and net realized capital gains, if any, derived from the Fund’s direct security holdings and derivatives. You will receive such earnings as either an income dividend or a capital gains distribution. The Fund intends to declare and distribute to its shareholders at least annually virtually all of its net income, if any, as well as net realized capital gains. Subject to Board approval, some or all of any net capital gains distribution may be declared payable in either additional shares of the Fund or in cash. If such a distribution is declared payable in that fashion, holders of shares will receive additional shares of the Fund unless they elect to receive cash. Distributions may be declared and paid more frequently to comply with the distribution requirements of the Internal Revenue Code or for other reasons.

Dividend Reinvestment Services

As noted above under “Distributions”, the Fund may declare a distribution from net realized capital gains distribution to be payable in additional shares or cash. Even if the Fund does not declare a distribution to be payable in shares, brokers may make available to their customers who own shares the DTC book-entry dividend reinvestment service. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and capital gains will automatically be reinvested in additional whole shares of the same Fund. Without this service, investors would have to take their distributions in cash. To determine whether the dividend reinvestment service is available and whether there is a commission or other charge for using this service, please consult your broker.

Frequent Purchases and Redemption of Shares

The Board has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of shares that appear to attempt to take advantage of potential arbitrage opportunities. The Board believes this is appropriate because ETFs, such as the Fund, are intended to be attractive to arbitrageurs, as trading activity is critical to ensuring that the market price of Fund shares remains at or close to NAV.

Taxes

The following is certain general information about taxation of the Funds:

 

   

Each Fund intends to qualify for treatment as a “regulated investment company” for U.S. federal income tax purposes. In order to so qualify, each Fund must meet certain tests with respect to the sources and types of its income, the nature and diversification of its assets, and the timing and amount of its distributions.

 

   

If a Fund qualifies for treatment as a regulated investment company, it is not subject to federal income tax on net investment income and net realized capital gains that the Fund timely distributes to its shareholders.

 

   

Investments by a Fund in options, futures, forward contracts, swap agreements and other derivative derivatives are subject to numerous special and complex tax rules. These rules could

   

affect the amount, timing or character of the distributions to shareholders by a Fund. In addition, because the application of these rules may be uncertain under current law, an adverse determination or future Internal Revenue Service guidance with respect to these rules may affect whether a Fund has made sufficient distributions, and otherwise satisfied the relevant requirements, to maintain its qualification as a regulated investment company and avoid a Fund-level tax.

 

   

Investments by a Fund in debt obligations issued or purchased at a discount and certain derivative investments could cause a Fund to recognize taxable income in excess of the cash generated by such investments, potentially requiring the Fund to dispose of investments (including when otherwise disadvantageous to do so) in order to meet its distribution requirements, and could affect the amount, timing or character of the income distributed to shareholders by a Fund.

Taxable investors should be aware of the following basic tax points:

 

   

Distributions are taxable to you for federal income tax purposes whether you receive them in cash or reinvest them in additional shares.

 

   

Distributions declared in October, November or December of one year—if paid to you by the end of January of the following year—are taxable for federal income tax purposes as if received the calendar year in which the distributions were declared.

 


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Management of ProShares Trust :: proshares.com :: 37

 

   

Any distributions from income or short-term capital gains that you receive generally are taxable to you as ordinary income for federal income tax purposes. Currently, ordinary income dividends you receive that are reported as “qualified dividend income” may be taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains. However, income received in the form of ordinary income dividends will not be considered long-term capital gains for other federal income tax purposes, including the calculation of net capital losses. The special tax treatment of qualified dividend income will apply only to taxable years beginning before January 1, 2013, unless Congress enacts tax legislation providing otherwise.

 

   

Any distributions of net long-term capital gains are taxable to you as long-term capital gains for federal income tax purposes, no matter how long you have owned your shares.

 

   

Distributions from net realized capital gains may vary considerably from year to year as a result of the Fund’s normal investment activities and cash flows.

 

   

A sale or exchange of Fund shares is a taxable event. This means that you may have a capital gain to report as income, or a capital loss to report as a deduction, when you complete your federal income tax return.

 

   

Dividend and capital gain distributions that you receive, as well as your gains or losses from any sale or exchange of Fund shares, may be subject to state and local income taxes.

 

   

If you are not a citizen or a permanent resident of the United States, or if you are a foreign entity, dividends and short-term capital gain distributions that you receive will generally be subject to a 30% U.S. withholding tax, unless a lower treaty rate or a statutory exemption applies.

 

   

Dividends and interest received by a Fund from sources outside the U.S. may be subject to withholding and other taxes imposed by foreign countries, which would reduce returns from an investment in a Fund’s shares. Tax conventions between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate such taxes. If more than 50% of the value of a Fund’s total assets at the close of a taxable year consists of securities of foreign corporations, the Fund will be eligible to elect to “pass through” to you foreign income taxes that it pays. If this election is made, you will be required to include your share of those taxes in gross income as a distribution from the Fund and you generally will be allowed to claim a credit (or a deduction, if you itemize deductions) for such amounts on your federal U.S. income tax return, subject to certain limitations.

 

   

By law, a percentage of your distributions and proceeds will generally be withheld if you have not provided a taxpayer identification number or social security number, have under-reported dividend or interest income or have failed to certify to a Fund that you are not subject to such withholding. The backup withholding rate is currently 28% for amounts paid through December 31, 2012. Under current law, the backup withholding rate will increase to 31% for amounts paid after December 31, 2012.

In addition, taxable investors who purchase or redeem Creation Units should be aware of the following:

 

   

A person who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and any cash amount paid.

 

   

A person who exchanges Creation Units for securities generally will recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the aggregate market value of the securities received and any cash received. However, all or a portion of any loss a person realizes upon an exchange of Creation Units for securities will be disallowed by the Internal Revenue Service if such person purchases other substantially identical shares of a Fund within 30 days before or after the exchange. In such case, the basis of the newly purchased shares will be adjusted to reflect the dis-allowed loss.

Note: This Prospectus provides general U.S. federal income tax information only. Your investment in a Fund may have other tax implications. If you are investing through a tax-deferred retirement account, such as an IRA, special tax rules apply. Please consult your tax advisor for detailed information about a Fund’s tax consequences for you. See “Taxation” in the SAI for more information.

Premium/Discount Information

The Trust’s website has information about the premiums and discounts for each of the Funds. Premiums or discounts are the differences between the NAV and market price of a Fund on a given day, generally at the time NAV is calculated. A premium is the amount that a Fund is trading above the NAV. A discount is the amount that a Fund is trading below the NAV.

Distribution (12b-1) Plan

Under a Rule 12b-1 Distribution Plan (the “Plan”) adopted by the Board, each Fund may pay the Funds’ distributor and financial intermediaries, such as broker-dealers and investment advisors, up to 0.25% on an annualized basis of the average daily net assets of a Fund as reimbursement or compensation for distribution related activities with respect to the Fund. Because these fees are paid out of each Fund’s assets on an on-going basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges. For the prior fiscal year, no payments were made by any Fund under the Plan.

 


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LOGO   Investment Company Act file number 811-21114

ProShares Trust

7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1000 Bethesda, MD 20814

866.PRO.5125 866.776.5125

proshares.com

You can find additional information about the Funds in their current SAI, dated             , which has been filed electronically with the SEC and which is incorporated by reference into, and is legally a part of, this Prospectus. Copies of the SAI are available, free of charge, online at proshares.com. You may also request a free copy of the SAI or make inquiries to ProShares by writing us at the address set forth above or calling us toll-free at the telephone number set forth above.

You can find other information about ProShares on the SEC’s website (www.sec.gov) or you can get copies of this information after payment of a duplicating fee by electronic request at publicinfo@sec.gov or by writing to the Public Reference Section of the SEC, Washington, D.C. 20549-0102. Information about ProShares, including their SAI, can be reviewed and copied at the SEC’s Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. For information on the Public Reference Room, call the SEC at (202) 551-8090.

 

© 2013 ProShare Advisors LLC. All rights reserved.    JAN13


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Preliminary Statement

of Additional Information

  

Subject to Completion

November 26, 2012

The information in this Statement of Additional Information is not complete and may be changed. Shares of the Funds may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Statement of Additional Information is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

October 1, 2012, as supplemented [            ], 2013

ProShares Trust

7501 WISCONSIN AVENUE, SUITE 1000—EAST TOWER

BETHESDA, MD 20814

866.PRO.5125 866.776.5125

 

Global Fixed Income    SKF    UltraShort Financials    Ultra Style
COBO    USD Covered Bond    RXD    UltraShort Health Care    UVG    Ultra Russell1000 Value
GGOV    German Sovereign /    SIJ    UltraShort Industrials    UKF    Ultra Russell1000 Growth
   Sub-Sovereign ETF    DUG    UltraShort Oil & Gas    UVU    Ultra Russell MidCap Value
   SRS    UltraShort Real Estate    UKW    Ultra Russell MidCap Growth
Hedge Strategies    SSG    UltraShort Semiconductors    UVT    Ultra Russell2000 Value
CSM    Credit Suisse 130/30    REW    UltraShort Technology    UKK    Ultra Russell2000 Growth
HDG    Hedge Replication ETF    TLL    UltraShort Telecommunications      
RALS    RAFI® Long/Short    SDP    UltraShort Utilities    Ultra Sector
   FINZ    UltraPro Short Financials    UYM    Ultra Basic Materials
Geared             BIB    Ultra Nasdaq Biotechnology
Short MarketCap    Short International    UGE    Ultra Consumer Goods
SH    Short S&P 500®    EFZ    Short MSCI EAFE    UCC    Ultra Consumer Services
PSQ    Short QQQ®    EUM    Short MSCI Emerging Markets    UYG    Ultra Financials
DOG    Short Dow 30SM    YXI    Short FTSE China 25    RXL    Ultra Health Care
MYY    Short MidCap400    EFU    UltraShort MSCI EAFE    UXI    Ultra Industrials
RWM    Short Russell2000    EEV    UltraShort MSCI Emerging Markets    DIG    Ultra Oil & Gas
SBB    Short SmallCap600    EPV    UltraShort MSCI Europe    URE    Ultra Real Estate
TWQ    UltraShort Russell3000    JPX    UltraShort MSCI Pacific ex-Japan    KRU    Ultra KBW Regional Banking
SDS    UltraShort S&P500®    BZQ    UltraShort MSCI Brazil    USD    Ultra Semiconductors
QID    UltraShort QQQ®    FXP    UltraShort FTSE China 25    ROM    Ultra Technology
DXD    UltraShort Dow30SM    EWV    UltraShort MSCI Japan    LTL    Ultra Telecommunications
MZZ    UltraShort MidCap400    SMK    UltraShort MSCI Mexico    UPW    Ultra Utilities
TWM    UltraShort Russell2000       Investable Market    FINU    UltraPro Financials
SDD    UltraShort SmallCap600            
SPXU    UltraPro Short S&P500®    Short Fixed Income    Ultra International
SQQQ    UltraPro Short QQQ®    TBX    Short 7-10 Year Treasury    EFO    Ultra MSCI EAFE
SDOW    UltraPro Short Dow30SM    TBF    Short 20+ Year Treasury    EET    Ultra MSCI Emerging Markets
SMDD    UltraPro Short MidCap400    SJB    Short High Yield    UPV    Ultra MSCI Europe
SRTY    UltraPro Short Russell2000    IGS    Short Investment Grade Corporate    UXJ    Ultra MSCI Pacific ex-Japan
      TBZ    UltraShort 3-7 Year Treasury    UBR    Ultra MSCI Brazil
Short Style    PST    UltraShort 7-10 Year Treasury    XPP    Ultra FTSE China 25
SJF    UltraShort Russell1000 Value    TBT    UltraShort 20+ Year Treasury    EZJ    Ultra MSCI Japan
SFK    UltraShort Russell1000 Growth    TPS    UltraShort TIPS    UMX    Ultra MSCI Mexico
SJL    UltraShort Russell MidCap Value    TTT    UltraPro Short 20+ Year Treasury       Investable Market
SDK    UltraShort Russell MidCap Growth            
SJH    UltraShort Russell2000 Value    Ultra MarketCap    Ultra Fixed Income
SKK    UltraShort Russell2000 Growth    UWC    Ultra Russell3000    UST    Ultra 7-10 Year Treasury
      SSO    Ultra S&P500®    UBT    Ultra 20+ Year Treasury
Short Sector    QDL    Ultra QQQ®    UJB    Ultra High Yield
SBM    Short Basic Materials    DDM    Ultra Dow30SM    IGU    Ultra Investment Grade Corporate
SEF    Short Financials    MVV    Ultra MidCap400    Inflation and Volatility [**New Fund here]
DDG    Short Oil & Gas    UWM    Ultra Russell2000      
REK    Short Real Estate    SAA    Ultra SmallCap600    Inflation   
KRS    Short KBW Regional Banking    UPRO    UltraPro S&P500®    RINF    30 Year TIPS/TSY Spread
SMN    UltraShort Basic Materials    TQQQ    UltraPro QQQ®    FINF    Short 30 Year TIPS/TSY Spread
BIS    UltraShort Nasdaq Biotechnology    UDOW    UltraPro Dow30SM    UINF    UltraPro 10 Year TIPS/TSY Spread
SZK    UltraShort Consumer Goods    UMDD    UltraPro MidCap400    SINF    UltraPro Short 10 Year
SCC    UltraShort Consumer Services    URTY    UltraPro Russell2000       TIPS/TSY Spread

This Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) is not a prospectus. It should be read in conjunction with the Prospectus of ProShares Trust dated October 1, 2012 and the Prospectus dated [    ] for the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged (the “Prospectuses”), which incorporate this SAI by reference. A copy of each Prospectus and a copy of the Annual Report to shareholders for the Funds that have completed a fiscal year are available, without charge, upon request to the address above, by telephone at the number above, or on the Trust’s website at www.ProShares.com. The Financial Statements and Notes contained in the Annual Report to Shareholders for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2012 are incorporated by reference into and are deemed part of this SAI. The principal U.S. national stock exchange on which all Funds (except those noted below) identified in this SAI are listed is the NYSE Arca. The Ultra Nasdaq Biotechnology, UltraShort Nasdaq Biotechnology, UltraPro QQQ and UltraPro Short QQQ are listed on The NASDAQ Stock Market.


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

PROSHARES TRUST

     1   

INVESTMENT POLICIES, TECHNIQUES AND RELATED RISKS

     2   

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

     16   

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

     23   

PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS AND BROKERAGE

     24   

MANAGEMENT OF PROSHARES TRUST

     29   

INVESTMENT ADVISOR

     33   

PROXY VOTING POLICY AND PROCEDURES

     49   

DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS POLICY

     50   

OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS

     51   

COSTS AND EXPENSES

     59   

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CONCERNING SHARES

     60   

PURCHASE AND REDEMPTION OF SHARES

     62   

TAXATION

     69   

OTHER INFORMATION

     82   

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

     90   

APPENDIX A

     A-1   

APPENDIX B

     B-1   


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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

For ease of use, certain terms or names that are used in this SAI have been shortened or abbreviated. A list of many of these terms and their corresponding full names or definitions can be found below. An investor may find it helpful to review the terms and names before reading the SAI.

 

Term

  

Definition

1933 Act    Securities Act of 1933
1934 Act    Securities Exchange Act of 1934
1940 Act    Investment Company Act of 1940
The Advisor or ProShare Advisors    ProShare Advisors LLC
Board of Trustees or Board    Board of Trustees of ProShares Trust
CFTC    U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Code or Internal Revenue Code    Internal Revenue Code of 1986
Distributor or SEI    SEI Investments Distribution Co.
Exchange    NYSE Arca or The NASDAQ Stock Market
Fund(s)    One or more of the series of the Trust identified on the front cover of this SAI
Independent Trustee(s)    Trustees who are not “Interested Persons” of the Advisor or Trust as defined under Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act
New Funds    The UltraPro Financials, the UltraPro Short Financials, and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged
SAI    The Trust’s Statement of Additional Information dated October 1, 2012
SEC    U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Shares    The shares of the Funds
Trust    ProShares Trust
Trustee(s)    One or more of the trustees of the Trust

PROSHARES TRUST

ProShares Trust (the “Trust”) is a Delaware statutory trust and is registered with the SEC as an open-end management investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). The Trust was organized on May 29, 2002 and consists of multiple series, including the 118 Funds listed on the front cover of this SAI.

Each Fund, except for the Global Fixed Income ProShares Funds, the Hedge Strategies ProShares Funds, the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged, and the 30 Year TIPS/TSY Spread (each, a “Matching ProShares Fund” and collectively, the “Matching ProShares Funds”), is “geared” in the sense that each is designed to seek daily investment results that, before fees and expenses, correspond to the performance of a daily benchmark such as the inverse (-1x), multiple (i.e., 2x or 3x), or inverse multiple (i.e., -2x or -3x) of the daily performance of an index for a single day, not for any other period. The Short ProShares Funds (i.e., the Geared ProShares Funds and the Inflation and Volatility ProShares Funds that have the prefix “Short”, “UltraShort” or “UltraPro Short” in their names) are designed to correspond to the inverse of the daily performance or an inverse multiple of the daily performance of an index. The Ultra ProShares Funds (i.e., the Geared ProShares Funds and the Inflation and Volatility ProShares Funds that have the prefix “Ultra” or UltraPro” in their names) are designed to correspond to a multiple of the daily performance of an index. The Funds, except the Matching ProShares Funds, do not seek to achieve their stated investment objective over a period of time greater than a single day. A “single day” is measured from the time the Fund calculates its net asset value (“NAV”) to the time of the Fund’s next NAV calculation. Each of the Matching ProShares Funds seeks to achieve its stated investment objective both on a single day and over time.

Each Fund’s investment objective is non-fundamental, meaning it may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) of the Trust, without the approval of Fund shareholders. Each Fund reserves the right to substitute a different index or security for its index, without the approval of that Fund’s shareholders.

Other funds may be added in the future. Each of the Funds is a non-diversified management investment company.

The Funds are exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and the shares of each Fund (“Shares”) are listed on the NYSE Arca or The NASDAQ Stock Market (each, an “Exchange”). The Shares trade on the relevant Exchange at market prices that may differ to some degree from the Shares’ net asset values (“NAV”). Each Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis at NAV in large, specified numbers of Shares called “Creation Units.” Creation Units of the Matching ProShares and Ultra ProShares Funds are issued and redeemed in-kind for securities included in the relevant index (for purposes of this SAI, the term “index” includes the Merrill Lynch Factor Model – Exchange Series benchmark) and an amount of cash or entirely in cash, in each case at the discretion of ProShare Advisors LLC (the “Advisor” or “ProShare

 

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Advisors”). Creation Units of the Short ProShares Funds are purchased and redeemed in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, Shares are not redeemable securities of the Funds. Retail investors, therefore, generally will not be able to purchase the Shares directly. Rather, most retail investors will purchase Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a broker.

Reference is made to the Prospectus for a discussion of the investment objectives and policies of each of the Funds. The discussion below supplements, and should be read in conjunction with, the Prospectus. Portfolio management is provided to the Funds by ProShare Advisors, a Maryland limited liability company with offices at 7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1000, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

The investment restrictions of the Funds specifically identified as fundamental policies may not be changed without the affirmative vote of at least a majority of the outstanding voting securities of that Fund, as defined in the 1940 Act. The investment objectives and all other investment policies of the Funds not specified as fundamental (including the index of a Fund) may be changed by the Board without the approval of shareholders.

It is the policy of the Funds to pursue their investment objectives of correlating with their indices regardless of market conditions, to attempt to remain nearly fully invested and not to take defensive positions.

The investment techniques and strategies discussed below may be used by a Fund if, in the opinion of the Advisor, the techniques or strategies may be advantageous to the Fund. A Fund may reduce or eliminate its use of any of these techniques or strategies without changing the Fund’s fundamental policies. There is no assurance that any of the techniques or strategies listed below, or any of the other methods of investment available to a Fund, will result in the achievement of the Fund’s objectives. Also, there can be no assurance that any Fund will grow to, or maintain, an economically viable size, and management may determine to liquidate a Fund at a time that may not be opportune for shareholders.

As a general matter, the Short ProShares Funds respond differently in response to market conditions than the Matching ProShares or the Ultra ProShares Funds. The terms “favorable market conditions” and “adverse market conditions,” as used in this SAI, are Fund-specific. Market conditions should be considered favorable to a Fund when such conditions make it more likely that the value of an investment in that Fund will increase. Market conditions should be considered adverse to a Fund when such conditions make it more likely that the value of an investment in that Fund will decrease. For example, market conditions that cause the level of the S&P 500 to rise are considered “favorable” to the Ultra S&P500 and are considered “adverse” to the Short S&P500.

Exchange Listing and Trading

There can be no assurance that the requirements of an Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of Shares of any Fund will continue to be met. An Exchange may remove a Fund from listing under certain circumstances.

As in the case of all equities traded on an Exchange, the brokers’ commission on transactions in the Funds will be based on negotiated commission rates at customary levels for retail customers.

In order to provide current Share pricing information, an Exchange disseminates an updated Indicative Optimized Portfolio Value (“IOPV”) for each Fund. The Trust is not involved in or responsible for any aspect of the calculation or dissemination of the IOPVs and makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the IOPVs. IOPVs are expected to be disseminated on a per Fund basis every 15 seconds during regular trading hours of an Exchange.

INVESTMENT POLICIES, TECHNIQUES AND RELATED

RISKS General

A Fund may consider changing its index at any time, including if, for example: the current index becomes unavailable; the Board believes that the current index no longer serves the investment needs of a majority of shareholders or that another index may better serve their needs; or the financial or economic environment makes it difficult for the Fund’s investment results to correspond sufficiently to its current index. If believed appropriate, a Fund may specify an index for itself that is “leveraged” or proprietary. There can be no assurance that a Fund will achieve its objective.

Fundamental securities analysis is not used by ProShare Advisors in seeking to correlate a Fund’s investment returns with its index. Rather, ProShare Advisors primarily uses a mathematical approach to determine the investments a Fund makes and techniques it employs. While ProShare Advisors attempts to minimize any “tracking error,” certain factors tend to cause a Fund’s investment results to vary from a perfect correlation to its index. See “Special Considerations” below for additional details.

 

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For purposes of this SAI, the word “invest” refers to a Fund directly and indirectly investing in securities or other instruments. Similarly, when used in this SAI, the word “investment” refers to a Fund’s direct and indirect investments in securities and other instruments. For example, the Funds typically invest indirectly in securities or instruments by using financial instruments with economic exposure similar to those securities or instruments.

Additional information concerning the Funds, their investment policies and techniques, and the securities and financial instruments in which they may invest is set forth below.

Name Policies

The Matching and Ultra ProShares Funds subject to the SEC “names rule” (Rule 35d-1 under the 1940 Act) have adopted non-fundamental investment policies obligating them to commit, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of their assets to securities contained in their index and/or investments with similar economic characteristics. The Short ProShares Funds subject to the “names rule” have adopted non-fundamental investment policies obligating them to commit, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of their assets to investments that, in combination, have economic characteristics that correlate to the inverse of its index. For purposes of each such investment policy, “assets” includes a Fund’s net assets, as well as amounts borrowed for investment purposes, if any. In addition, for purposes of such an investment policy, “assets” includes not only the amount of a Fund’s net assets attributable to investments directly providing investment exposure to the type of investments suggested by its name (e.g., the value of stocks, or the value of derivative instruments such as futures, options or options on futures), but also the amount of the Fund’s net assets that are segregated on the Fund’s books and records or being used as collateral, as required by applicable regulatory guidance, or otherwise used to cover such investment exposure. The Board has adopted a policy to provide investors with at least 60 days’ notice prior to changes in a Fund’s name policy.

Equity Securities (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income, Short Fixed Income, Ultra Fixed Income and Inflation and Volatility ProShares Funds)

The Funds may invest in equity securities. The market price of securities owned by a Fund may go up or down, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Securities may decline in value due to factors affecting securities markets generally or particular industries represented in the securities markets. The value of a security may decline due to general market conditions not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates, or adverse investor sentiment generally. A security’s value may also decline due to factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. The value of a security may also decline for a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods or services. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities, and the Funds are particularly sensitive to these market risks.

Foreign Securities (not applicable to the Inflation and Volatility ProShares Funds)

The Funds may invest in foreign issuers, securities traded principally in securities markets outside the United States, U.S.-traded securities of foreign issuers and/or securities denominated in foreign currencies (together “foreign securities”). Also, each Fund may seek exposure to foreign securities by investing in Depositary Receipts (discussed below). Foreign securities may involve special risks due to foreign economic, political and legal developments, including unfavorable changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulation (including currency blockage), expropriation or nationalization of assets, confiscatory taxation, taxation of income earned in foreign nations, withholding of portions of interest and dividends in certain countries and the possible difficulty of obtaining and enforcing judgments against foreign entities. Default in foreign government securities, political or social instability or diplomatic developments could affect investments in securities of issuers in foreign nations. In addition, in many countries there is less publicly available information about issuers than is available in reports about issuers in the United States. Foreign companies are not generally subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, and auditing practices and requirements may differ from those applicable to U.S. companies. The growing interconnectivity of global economies and financial markets has increased the possibilities that conditions in any one country or region could have an adverse impact on issuers of securities in a different country or region.

In addition, the securities of some foreign governments, companies and markets are less liquid, and may be more volatile, than comparable securities of domestic governments, companies and markets. Some foreign investments may be subject to brokerage commissions and fees that are higher than those applicable to U.S. investments. A Fund also may be affected by different settlement practices or delayed settlements in some foreign markets. Furthermore, some foreign jurisdictions regulate and limit U.S. investments in the securities of certain issuers.

 

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A Fund’s foreign investments that are related to developing (or “emerging market”) countries may be particularly volatile due to the aforementioned factors.

A Fund may value its financial instruments based upon foreign securities by using market prices of domestically-traded financial instruments with comparable foreign securities market exposure.

Exposure to Securities or Issuers in Specific Foreign Countries or Regions

Some Funds focus their investments in particular foreign geographical regions or countries. In addition to the risks of investing in foreign securities discussed above, the investments of such Funds may be exposed to special risks that are specific to the country or region in which the investments are focused. Furthermore, Funds with such a focus may be subject to additional risks associated with events in nearby countries or regions or those of a country’s principal trading partners. Additionally, some Funds have an investment focus in a foreign country or region that is an emerging market and, therefore, are subject to heightened risks relative to Funds that focus their investments in more developed countries or regions.

Exposure to Foreign Currencies

Each Fund may invest directly in foreign currencies or hold financial instruments that provide exposure to foreign currencies, in particular “hard currencies,” or may invest in securities that trade in, or receive revenues in, foreign currencies. “Hard currencies” are currencies in which investors have confidence and are typically currencies of economically and politically stable industrialized nations. To the extent that a Fund invests in such currencies, that Fund will be subject to the risk that those currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Fund assets that are denominated in foreign currencies may be devalued against the U.S. dollar, resulting in a loss. Additionally, recent issues associated with the euro may have adverse effects on non-U.S. investments generally and on currency markets. A U.S. dollar investment in Depositary Receipts or ordinary shares of foreign issuers traded on U.S. exchanges may be affected differently by currency fluctuations than would an investment made in a foreign currency on a foreign exchange in shares of the same issuer. Foreign currencies are also subject to risks caused by inflation, interest rates, budget deficits, low savings rates, political factors and government control.

Depositary Receipts

The Funds may invest in depositary receipts. Depositary receipts are receipts, typically issued by a financial institution, which evidence ownership of underlying securities issued by a non-U.S. issuer. Types of depositary receipts include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) and New York Shares (“NYSs”).

ADRs represent the right to receive securities of foreign issuers deposited in a domestic bank or a correspondent bank. ADRs are an alternative to purchasing the underlying securities in their national markets and currencies. For many foreign securities, U.S. dollar-denominated ADRs, which are traded in the United States on exchanges or over-the-counter (“OTC”), are issued by domestic banks. In general, there is a large, liquid market in the United States for many ADRs. Investments in ADRs have certain advantages over direct investment in the underlying foreign securities because: (i) ADRs are U.S. dollar-denominated investments that are easily transferable and for which market quotations are readily available, and (ii) issuers whose securities are represented by ADRs are generally subject to auditing, accounting and financial reporting standards similar to those applied to domestic issuers. ADRs do not eliminate all risk inherent in investing in the securities of foreign issuers. By investing in ADRs rather than directly in the stock of foreign issuers outside the U.S., however, the Funds can avoid certain risks related to investing in foreign securities on non-U.S. markets.

GDRs are receipts for shares in a foreign-based corporation traded in capital markets around the world. While ADRs permit foreign corporations to offer shares to American citizens, GDRs allow companies in Europe, Asia, the United States and Latin America to offer shares in many markets around the world. NYSs (or “direct shares”) are foreign stocks denominated in U.S. dollars and traded on American exchanges without being converted into ADRs. These stocks come from countries that do not restrict the trading of their stocks on other nations’ exchanges. Each Fund may also invest in ordinary shares of foreign issuers traded directly on U.S. exchanges

The Funds may invest in both sponsored and unsponsored depositary receipts. Certain depositary receipts, typically those designated as “unsponsored,” require the holders thereof to bear most of the costs of such facilities, while issuers of “sponsored” facilities normally pay more of the costs thereof. The depository of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the issuer of the deposited securities or to pass through the voting rights to facility holders with respect to the deposited securities, whereas the depository of a sponsored facility typically distributes shareholder communications and passes through the voting rights.

 

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Unsponsored ADR programs are organized independently and without the cooperation of the issuer of the underlying securities. As a result, available information concerning the issuers may not be as current for unsponsored ADRs, and the price of unsponsored depositary receipts may be more volatile than if such instruments were sponsored by the issuer and/or there may be no correlation between available information and the market value.

Futures Contracts and Related Options (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares Funds)

Each Fund may purchase or sell futures contracts and options thereon as a substitute for a comparable market position in the underlying securities or to satisfy regulatory requirements. A physical-settlement futures contract generally obligates the seller to deliver (and the purchaser to take delivery of) the specified asset on the expiration date of the contract. A cash-settled futures contract obligates the seller to deliver (and the purchaser to accept) an amount of cash equal to a specific dollar amount (the contract multiplier) multiplied by the difference between the final settlement price of a specific futures contract and the price at which the agreement is made. No physical delivery of the underlying asset is made.

Each Fund generally engages in closing or offsetting transactions before final settlement of a futures contract wherein a second identical futures contract is sold to offset a long position (or bought to offset a short position). In such cases, the obligation is to deliver (or take delivery of) cash equal to a specific dollar amount (the contract multiplier) multiplied by the difference between the price of the offsetting transaction and the price at which the original contract was entered into. If the original position entered into is a long position (futures contract purchased), there will be a gain (loss) if the offsetting sell transaction is carried out at a higher (lower) price, inclusive of commissions. If the original position entered into is a short position (futures contract sold) there will be a gain (loss) if the offsetting buy transaction is carried out at a lower (higher) price, inclusive of commissions.

When a Fund purchases a put or call option on a futures contract, the Fund pays a premium for the right to sell or purchase the underlying futures contract for a specified price upon exercise at any time during the option period. By writing (selling) a put or call option on a futures contract, a Fund receives a premium in return for granting to the purchaser of the option the right to sell to or buy from the Fund the underlying futures contract for a specified price upon exercise at any time during the option period.

Whether a Fund realizes a gain or loss from futures activities depends generally upon movements in the underlying currency, commodity, security or index. The extent of a Fund’s loss from an unhedged short position in futures contracts or from writing options on futures contracts is potentially unlimited. The Funds may engage in related closing transactions with respect to options on futures contracts. The Funds will engage in transactions in futures contracts and related options that are traded on a U.S. exchange or board of trade or that have been approved for sale in the U.S. by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”).

Upon entering into a futures contract, each Fund will be required to deposit with the broker an amount of cash or cash equivalents in the range of approximately 5% to 10% of the contract amount for equity index futures and in the range of approximately 1% to 3% of the contract amount for treasury futures (this amount is subject to change by the exchange on which the contract is traded). This amount, known as “initial margin,” is in the nature of a performance bond or good faith deposit on the contract and is returned to the Fund upon termination of the futures contract, assuming all contractual obligations have been satisfied. Subsequent payments, known as “variation margin,” to and from the broker will be made daily as the price of the index underlying the futures contract fluctuates, making the long and short positions in the futures contract more or less valuable, a process known as “marking-to-market.” At any time prior to expiration of a futures contract, a Fund may elect to close its position by taking an opposite position, which will operate to terminate the Fund’s existing position in the contract.

When a Fund purchases or sells a futures contract, or buys or sells an option thereon, the Fund “covers” its position. To cover its position, a Fund may enter into an offsetting position, earmark or segregate with its custodian bank or on the official books and records of the Fund cash or liquid instruments (marked-to-market on a daily basis) that, when added to any amounts deposited with a futures commission merchant as margin, are equal to the market value of the futures contract or otherwise “cover” its position. When required by law, a Fund will segregate liquid assets in an amount equal to the value of the Fund’s total assets committed to the consummation of such futures contracts. Obligations under futures contracts so covered will not be considered senior securities for purposes of a Fund’s investment restriction concerning senior securities.

 

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For example, a Fund may cover its long position in a futures contract by purchasing a put option on the same futures contract with a strike price (i.e., an exercise price) as high or higher than the price of the futures contract, or, if the strike price of the put is less than the price of the futures contract, the Fund will earmark/segregate cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the difference between the strike price of the put and the price of the future. A Fund may also “cover” its long position in a futures contract by taking a short position in the instruments underlying the futures contract, or by taking positions in instruments whose prices are expected to move relatively consistently, inversely to the futures contract. A Fund may “cover” its short position in a futures contract by purchasing a call option on the same futures contract with a strike price (i.e., an exercise price) as low or lower than the price of the futures contract, or, if the strike price of the call is greater than the price of the futures contract, the Fund will earmark or segregate cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the difference between the strike price of the call and the price of the future. A Fund may also “cover” its short position in a futures contract by taking a long position in the instruments underlying the futures contract, or by taking positions in instruments whose prices are expected to move relatively consistently to the futures contract. A Fund may cover its long or short positions in futures by earmarking or segregating with its custodian bank or on the official books and records of the Funds cash or liquid instruments (marked-to-market on a daily basis) that, when added to any amounts deposited with a futures commission merchant as margin, are equal to the market value of the futures contract or otherwise “cover” its position.

A Fund may cover its sale of a call option on a futures contract by taking a long position in the underlying futures contract at a price less than or equal to the strike price of the call option, or, if the long position in the underlying futures contract is established at a price greater than the strike price of the written (sold) call, the Fund will segregate liquid instruments equal in value to the difference between the strike price of the call and the price of the future. A Fund may also cover its sale of a call option by taking positions in instruments whose prices are expected to move relatively consistently to the call option. A Fund may cover its sale of a put option on a futures contract by taking a short position in the underlying futures contract at a price greater than or equal to the strike price of the put option, or, if the short position in the underlying futures contract is established at a price less than the strike price of the written put, the Fund will segregate cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the difference between the strike price of the put and the price of the future. A Fund may also cover its sale of a put option by taking positions in instruments the prices of which are expected to move relatively consistently to the put option. Obligations under futures contracts so covered will not be considered senior securities for purposes of a Fund’s investment restriction concerning senior securities.

The primary risks associated with the use of futures contracts are imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the futures and the market value of the underlying securities, and the possibility of an illiquid market for a futures contract. Although each Fund intends to sell futures contracts only if there is an active market for such contracts, no assurance can be given that a liquid market will exist for any particular contract at any particular time. Many futures exchanges and boards of trade limit the amount of fluctuation permitted in futures contract prices during a single trading day. Once the daily limit has been reached in a particular contract, no trades may be made that day at a price beyond that limit or trading may be suspended for specified periods during the day. Futures contract prices could move to the limit for several consecutive trading days with little or no trading, thereby preventing prompt liquidation of futures positions and potentially subjecting a Fund to substantial losses. If trading is not possible, or if a Fund determines not to close a futures position in anticipation of adverse price movements, the Fund will be required to make daily cash payments of variation margin. The risk that the Fund will be unable to close out a futures position will be minimized by entering into such transactions on a national securities exchange with an active and liquid secondary market. Although the counterparty to a futures contract is often a clearing organization, backed by a group of financial institutions, there may be instances in which the counterparty could fail to perform its obligations, causing significant losses to a Fund.

Currently, registered investment companies may engage in unlimited futures transactions and options thereon provided that the investment advisor to the company claims an exclusion from regulation as a commodity pool operator. In connection with its management of the Trust, the Advisor has claimed such an exclusion from registration as a commodity pool operator and commodity trading adviser under the Commodity Exchange Act (the “CEA”). Therefore, neither the Trust nor the Advisor is subject to the registration and regulatory requirements of the CEA. Thus, currently, there are no limitations on the extent to which each Fund may engage in transactions involving futures and options thereon, except as set forth in the Prospectus and this SAI. On February 9, 2012, the CFTC adopted amendments to its rules that will likely affect the Advisor and certain Funds’ abilities to continue to claim this exclusion after December 31, 2012. If a Fund were no longer able to claim the exclusion, the Advisor would be required to register as a “commodity pool operator” and “commodity trading advisor”, and certain Funds and the Advisor would be subject to regulation under the CEA. These amendments may affect the ability of the Funds to use futures contracts, options on futures contracts or commodities (as well as swap agreements) and may substantially increase regulatory compliance costs for the Advisor and the Funds. As of the date of this SAI, the ultimate impact of the CFTC amendments on the Funds is uncertain. It is possible, however, that the amendments may adversely affect the Advisor’s ability to manage the Funds, may impair the Funds’ ability to achieve their investment objective and/or may result in reduced returns to Fund investors.

 

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Forward Contracts (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares Funds and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged)

The Funds may enter into forward contracts to attempt to gain exposure to an index or asset without actually purchasing such asset, or to hedge a position. Forward contracts are two-party contracts pursuant to which one party agrees to pay the counterparty a fixed price for an agreed-upon amount of an underlying asset or the cash value of the underlying asset at an agreed-upon date. When required by law, a Fund will segregate liquid assets in an amount equal to the value of the Fund’s total assets committed to the consummation of such forward contracts. Obligations under forward contracts so covered will not be considered senior securities for purposes of a Fund’s investment restriction concerning senior securities. Forward contracts with terms greater than seven days may be considered to be illiquid for purposes of the Fund’s illiquid investment limitations. A Fund will not enter into a forward contract unless the Advisor believes that the other party to the transaction is creditworthy. A Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a forward contract in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a counterparty. If such a default occurs, a Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the forward contract, but such remedies may be subject to bankruptcy and insolvency laws, which could affect the Fund’s rights as a creditor.

Forward Currency Contracts (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares Funds and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged)

The Funds may invest in forward currency contracts for investment or risk management purposes. A forward currency contract is an obligation to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date, which may be any fixed number of days from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time of the contract. These contracts are entered into on the interbank market conducted directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers.

The Funds may invest in a combination of forward currency contracts and U.S. dollar-denominated market instruments in an attempt to obtain an investment result that is substantially the same as a direct investment in a foreign currency-denominated instrument. This investment technique creates a “synthetic” position in the particular foreign currency instrument whose performance the manager is trying to duplicate. For example, investing in a combination of U.S. dollar-denominated instruments with “long” forward currency exchange contracts creates a position economically equivalent to investing in a money market instrument denominated in the foreign currency itself. Such combined positions are sometimes necessary when the money market in a particular foreign currency is small or relatively illiquid.

For hedging purposes, the Funds may invest in forward currency contracts to hedge either specific transactions (transaction hedging) or portfolio positions (position hedging). Transaction hedging is the purchase or sale of forward currency contracts with respect to specific receivables or payables of the Funds in connection with the purchase and sale of portfolio securities. Position hedging is the sale of a forward currency contract on a particular currency with respect to portfolio positions denominated or quoted in that currency.

The Funds are not required to enter into forward currency contracts for hedging purposes. It is possible, under certain circumstances, that the Fund may have to limit its currency transactions to qualify as a “regulated investment company” under the Internal Revenue Code. The Funds do not intend to enter into a forward currency contract with a term of more than one year, or to engage in position hedging with respect to the currency of a particular country to more than the aggregate market value (at the time the hedging transaction is entered into) of their portfolio securities denominated in (or quoted in or currently convertible into or directly related through the use of forward currency contracts in conjunction with money market instruments to) that particular currency.

At or before the maturity of a forward currency contract, the Funds may either sell a portfolio security and make delivery of the currency, or retain the security and terminate its contractual obligation to deliver the currency by buying an “offsetting” contract obligating them to buy, on the same maturity date, the same amount of the currency. If the Fund engages in an offsetting transaction, it may later enter into a new forward currency contract to sell the currency.

If the Funds engage in offsetting transactions, the Funds will incur a gain or loss, to the extent that there has been movement in forward currency contract prices. If forward prices go down during the period between the date a Fund enters into a forward currency contract for the sale of a currency and the date it enters into an offsetting contract for the purchase of the currency, the Fund will realize a gain to the extent that the price of the currency it has agreed to sell exceeds the price of the currency it has agreed to buy. If forward prices go up, the Fund will suffer a loss to the extent the price of the currency it has agreed to buy exceeds the price of the currency it has agreed to sell.

Because the Fund invests in cash instruments denominated in foreign currencies, it may hold foreign currencies pending investment or conversion into U.S. dollars. Although the Fund values its assets daily in U.S. dollars, it does not convert its holdings of foreign currencies into U.S. dollars on a daily basis. The Fund will convert its holdings from time to time, however, and incur the costs of currency conversion. Foreign exchange dealers do not charge a fee for conversion,

 

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but they do realize a profit based on the difference between the prices at which they buy and sell various currencies. Thus, a dealer may offer to sell a foreign currency to the Fund at one rate, and offer to buy the currency at a lower rate if the Fund tries to resell the currency to the dealer.

Although forward currency contracts may be used by the Funds to try to manage currency exchange risks, unanticipated changes in currency exchange rates could result in poorer performance than if a Fund had not entered into these transactions. Even if the Advisor correctly predicts currency exchange rate movements, a hedge could be unsuccessful if changes in the value of a Fund’s futures position do not correspond to changes in the value of the currency in which its investments are denominated. This lack of correlation between a Fund’s forwards and currency positions may be caused by differences between the futures and currency markets.

These transactions also involve the risk that a Fund may lose its margin deposits or collateral and may be unable to realize the positive value, if any, of its position if a bank or broker with whom the Fund has an open forward position defaults or becomes bankrupt.

Options (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged)

Each Fund may buy and write (sell) options for the purpose of realizing its investment objective. By buying a call option, a Fund has the right, in return for a premium paid during the term of the option, to buy the asset underlying the option at the exercise price. By writing a call option a Fund becomes obligated during the term of the option to sell the asset underlying the option at the exercise price if the option is exercised. By buying a put option, a Fund has the right, in return for a premium paid during the term of the option, to sell the asset underlying the option at the exercise price. By writing a put option, a Fund becomes obligated during the term of the option to purchase the asset underlying the option at the exercise price if the option is exercised. During the term of the option, the writer may be assigned an exercise notice by the broker-dealer through whom the option was sold. The exercise notice would require the writer to deliver, in the case of a call, or take delivery of, in the case of a put, the underlying asset against payment of the exercise price. This obligation terminates upon expiration of the option, or at such earlier time that the writer effects a closing purchase transaction by purchasing an option covering the same underlying asset and having the same exercise price and expiration date as the one previously sold. Once an option has been exercised, the writer may not execute a closing purchase transaction. To secure the obligation to deliver the underlying asset in the case of a call option, the writer of a call option is required to deposit in escrow the underlying asset or other assets in accordance with the rules of the Options Clearing Corporation (the “OCC”), an institution created to interpose itself between buyers and sellers of options. The OCC assumes the other side of every purchase and sale transaction on an exchange and, by doing so, gives its guarantee to the transaction. When writing call options on an asset, a Fund may cover its position by owning the underlying asset on which the option is written. Alternatively, the Fund may cover its position by owning a call option on the underlying asset, on a share-for-share basis, which is deliverable under the option contract at a price no higher than the exercise price of the call option written by the Fund or, if higher, by owning such call option and depositing and segregating cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the difference between the two exercise prices. In addition, a Fund may cover its position by segregating cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the exercise price of the call option written by the Fund. When a Fund writes a put option, the Fund will segregate with its custodian bank cash or liquid instruments having a value equal to the exercise value of the option. The principal reason for a Fund to write call options on assets held by the Fund is to attempt to realize, through the receipt of premiums, a greater return than would be realized on the underlying assets alone.

If a Fund that writes an option wishes to terminate the Fund’s obligation, the Fund may effect a “closing purchase transaction.” The Fund accomplishes this by buying an option of the same series as the option previously written by the Fund. The effect of the purchase is that the writer’s position will be canceled by the OCC. However, a writer may not effect a closing purchase transaction after the writer has been notified of the exercise of an option. Likewise, a Fund which is the holder of an option may liquidate its position by effecting a “closing sale transaction.” The Fund accomplishes this by selling an option of the same series as the option previously purchased by the Fund. There is no guarantee that either a closing purchase or a closing sale transaction can be effected. If any call or put option is not exercised or sold, the option will become worthless on its expiration date. A Fund will realize a gain (or a loss) on a closing purchase transaction with respect to a call or a put option previously written by the Fund if the premium, plus commission costs, paid by the Fund to purchase the call or put option to close the transaction is less (or greater) than the premium, less commission costs, received by the Fund on the sale of the call or the put option. The Fund also will realize a gain if a call or put option which the Fund has written lapses unexercised, because the Fund would retain the premium.

Although certain securities exchanges attempt to provide continuously liquid markets in which holders and writers of options can close out their positions at any time prior to the expiration of the option, no assurance can be given that a market will exist at all times for all outstanding options purchased or sold by a Fund. If an options market were to become unavailable, the Fund would be unable to realize its profits or limit its losses until the Fund could exercise options it holds, and the Fund would remain obligated until options it wrote were exercised or expired. Reasons for the absence of liquid secondary market on an exchange include the following: (i) there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options;

 

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(ii) restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening or closing transactions or both; (iii) trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options; (iv) unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; (v) the facilities of an exchange or the OCC may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading volume; or (vi) one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options) and those options would cease to exist, although outstanding options on that exchange that had been issued by the OCC as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms.

Index Options (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged)

The Funds may purchase and write options on indexes to create investment exposure consistent with their investment objectives, to hedge or limit the exposure of their positions, or to create synthetic money market positions.

An index fluctuates with changes in the values of the assets included in the index. Options on indexes give the holder the right to receive an amount of cash upon exercise of the option. Receipt of this cash amount will depend upon the closing level of the index upon which the option is based being greater than (in the case of a call) or less than (in the case of a put) the level at which the exercise price of the option is set. The amount of cash received, if any, will be the difference between the closing level of the index and the exercise price of the option, multiplied by a specified dollar multiple. The writer (seller) of the option is obligated, in return for the premiums received from the purchaser of the option, to make delivery of this amount to the purchaser. All settlements of index options transactions are in cash.

Index options are subject to substantial risks, including the risk of imperfect correlation between the option price and the value of the underlying assets composing the index selected and the risk that there might not be a liquid secondary market for the option. Because the value of an index option depends upon movements in the level of the index rather than the price of a particular asset, whether a Fund will realize a gain or loss from the purchase or writing (sale) of options on an index depends upon movements in the level of prices for specific underlying assets generally or, in the case of certain indexes, in an industry or market segment. A Fund will not enter into an option position that exposes the Fund to an obligation to another party, unless the Fund either (i) owns an offsetting position in the underlying securities or other options and/or (ii) earmarks or segregates with the Fund’s custodian bank cash or liquid instruments that, when added to the premiums deposited with respect to the option, are equal to the market value of the underlying assets not otherwise covered.

Each Fund may engage in transactions in index options listed on national securities exchanges or traded in the OTC market as an investment vehicle for the purpose of realizing the Fund’s investment objective. The exercising holder of an index option receives, instead of the asset, cash equal to the difference between the closing level of the index and the exercise price of the option. Some index options are based on a broad market index such as the S&P 500®, the New York Stock Exchange, Inc. (“NYSE”) Composite Index or on a narrower index such as the Philadelphia Stock Exchange Over-the-Counter Index. Options currently are traded on the Chicago Board Options Exchange and other exchanges (“Options Exchanges”). Purchased OTC options and the cover for written OTC options will be subject to the relevant Fund’s 15% limitation on investment in illiquid securities. See “Illiquid Securities” below. When required by law, a Fund will segregate liquid assets in an amount equal to the value of the Fund’s total assets committed to the consummation of such options. Obligations under options so covered will not be considered senior securities for purposes of a Fund’s investment restriction concerning senior securities.

Each of the Options Exchanges has established limitations governing the maximum number of call or put options on the same index which may be bought or written (sold) by a single investor, whether acting alone or in concert with others (regardless of whether such options are written on the same or different Options Exchanges or are held or written on one or more accounts or through one or more brokers). Under these limitations, option positions of all investment companies advised by the same investment advisor are combined for purposes of these limits. Pursuant to these limitations, an Options Exchange may order the liquidation of positions and may impose other sanctions or restrictions. These position limits may restrict the number of listed options which a Fund may buy or sell. The Advisor intends to comply with all limitations.

Swap Agreements (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares)

The Funds may enter into swap agreements for purposes of attempting to gain exposure to an underlying asset without actually purchasing such asset, or to hedge a position. Swap agreements are two-party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a day to more than one year. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. The gross return to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” for example, the return on or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested in a “basket” of securities or an ETF representing a particular index or group of securities. Other forms of swap agreements

 

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include: interest rate caps, under which, in return for a premium, one party agrees to make payments to the other to the extent that interest rates exceed a specified rate, or “cap”; interest rate floors, under which, in return for a premium, one party agrees to make payments to the other to the extent that interest rates fall below a specified level, or “floor”; and interest rate collars, under which a party sells a cap and purchases a floor or vice versa in an attempt to protect itself against interest rate movements exceeding given minimum or maximum levels.

Most swap agreements entered into by a Fund calculate and settle the obligations of the parties to the agreement on a “net basis” with a single payment. Consequently, a Fund’s current obligations (or rights) under a swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement (the “net amount”).

A Fund’s current obligations under a swap agreement will be accrued daily (offset against any amounts owed to the Fund) and any accrued but unpaid net amounts owed to a swap counterparty will be covered by segregating or earmarking cash or other assets determined to be liquid, but typically no payments will be made until the settlement date. Swap agreements with terms greater than seven days may be considered to be illiquid for purposes of the Fund’s illiquid investment limitations. A Fund will not enter into any swap agreement unless the Advisor believes that the other party to the transaction is creditworthy. The counterparty to any swap agreement will typically be a major global financial institution. A Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty. If such a default occurs, a Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the swap agreements, but such remedies may be subject to bankruptcy and insolvency laws that could affect the Fund’s right as a creditor.

Each Fund may enter into swap agreements to invest in a market without owning or taking physical custody of securities in circumstances in which direct investment is restricted for legal reasons or is otherwise impracticable. On a long swap, the counterparty will generally agree to pay the Fund the amount, if any, by which the notional amount of the swap agreement would have increased in value had it been invested in the particular underlying assets (e.g., securities comprising the relevant index), plus an amount equal to any dividends or interest that would have been received on those assets. The Fund will agree to pay to the counterparty an amount equal to a floating rate of interest on the notional amount of the swap agreement plus the amount, if any, by which the notional amount would have decreased in value had it been invested in such assets plus, in certain instances, commissions or trading spreads on the notional amount. Therefore, the return to the Fund on such swap agreements should be the gain or loss on the notional amount plus dividends or interest on the assets less the interest paid by the Fund on the notional amount. As a trading technique, the Advisor may substitute physical securities with a swap agreement having risk characteristics substantially similar to the underlying securities.

As noted above, swap agreements typically are settled on a net basis, which means that the two payment streams are netted out, with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments. Payments may be made at the conclusion of a swap agreement or periodically during its term. The timing and character of any income, gain or loss recognized by a Fund on the payment or payments made or received on a swap will vary depending upon the terms of the particular swap. Swap agreements do not involve the delivery of securities or other underlying assets. Accordingly, the risk of loss with respect to swap agreements is limited to the net amount of payments that a Fund is contractually obligated to make. If the other party to a swap agreement defaults, a Fund’s risk of loss consists of the net amount of payments that such Fund is contractually entitled to receive, if any. The net amount of the excess, if any, of a Fund’s obligations over its entitlements with respect to each equity swap will be accrued on a daily basis and an amount of cash or liquid assets, having an aggregate NAV at least equal to such accrued excess will be earmarked or segregated by a Fund’s custodian. Inasmuch as these transactions are entered into for hedging purposes or are offset by earmarked or segregated cash or liquid assets, as permitted by applicable law, the Funds and their Advisor believe that these transactions do not constitute senior securities within the meaning of the 1940 Act, and, accordingly, will not treat them as being subject to a Fund’s borrowing restrictions.

In the normal course of business, a Fund enters into standardized contracts created by the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, Inc. (“ISDA agreements”) with certain counterparties for derivative transactions. These agreements contain, among other conditions, events of default and termination events, and various covenants and representations. Certain of the Fund’s ISDA agreements contain provisions that require the Fund to maintain a predetermined level of net assets, and/or provide limits regarding the decline of the Fund’s NAV over specific periods of time, which may or may not be exclusive of redemptions. If the Fund were to trigger such provisions and have open derivative positions, at that time counterparties to the ISDA agreements could elect to terminate such ISDA agreements and request immediate payment in an amount equal to the net liability positions, if any, under the relevant ISDA agreement. Pursuant to the terms of its ISDA agreements, the Fund will have already collateralized its liability under such agreements, in some cases only in excess of certain threshold amounts. The Funds seek to mitigate risks by generally requiring that the counterparties for each Fund agree to post collateral for the benefit of the Fund, marked to market daily, in an amount approximately equal to what the counterparty owes the Fund subject to certain minimum thresholds, although

 

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the Funds may not always be successful. To the extent any such collateral is insufficient or there are delays in accessing the collateral, the Funds will be exposed to the risks described above, including possible delays in recovering amounts as a result of bankruptcy proceedings.

The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity which involves investment techniques and risks in addition to, and in some cases different from, those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The primary risks associated with the use of swap agreements are mispricing or improper valuation, imperfect correlation between movements in the notional amount and the price of the underlying investments, and the inability of counterparties to perform. The Advisor, under the supervision of the Board of Trustees, is responsible for determining and monitoring the liquidity of the Funds’ transactions in swap agreements.

Currently, the Advisor has claimed an exclusion from registration as a commodity pool operator and commodity trading adviser under the CEA. On February 9, 2012, the CFTC adopted amendments to its rules that will likely affect the Advisor and certain Funds’ abilities to continue to claim this exclusion after December 31, 2012. If a Fund were no longer able to claim the exclusion, the Advisor would be required to register as a “commodity pool operator” and “commodity trading advisor”, and certain Funds and the Advisor would be subject to regulation under the CEA. In addition, the CFTC, in conjuction with other federal regulators, also recently proposed stricter margin requirements for certain swap transactions. If adopted, the proposed requirements could increase the amount of margin necessary to conduct many swap transactions, limit the types of assets that can be used as collateral for such transactions, and impose other restrictions. The CFTC amendments and/or the rule proposals may affect the ability of the Funds to use swap agreements (as well as futures contracts and options on futures contracts or commodities) and may substantially increase regulatory compliance costs for the Advisor and the Funds. As of the date of this SAI, the ultimate impact of the CFTC amendments and/or the rule proposals on the Funds is uncertain. It is possible, however, that the amendments and/or the rule proposals may adversely affect the Advisor’s ability to manage the Funds, may impair the Funds’ ability to achieve their investment objective and/or may result in reduced returns to Fund investors.

When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Securities

Each Fund, from time to time, in the ordinary course of business, may purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis (i.e., delivery and payment can take place between a month and 120 days after the date of the transaction). These securities are subject to market fluctuations and no interest accrues to the purchaser during this period. At the time a Fund makes the commitment to purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis, the Fund will record the transaction and thereafter reflect the value of the securities, each day, in determining the Fund’s NAV. Each Fund will not purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis if, as a result, it determines that more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets would be invested in illiquid securities. At the time of delivery of the securities, the value of the securities may be more or less than the purchase price.

The Trust will earmark or segregate with the Trust’s custodian bank cash or liquid instruments equal to or greater in value than the Fund’s purchase commitments for such when-issued or delayed-delivery securities, or when the Trust does not believe that a Fund’s NAV or income will be adversely affected by the Fund’s purchase of securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis. Because a Fund will identify cash or liquid securities to satisfy its purchase commitments in the manner described, a Fund’s liquidity and the ability of the Advisor to manage a Fund might be affected in the event its commitments to purchase when-issued or delayed-delivery securities exceeds 40% of the value of its assets.

Investments in Other Investment Companies (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income and the Inflation and Volatility ProShares)

The Funds may invest in the securities of other investment companies, including ETFs, to the extent that such an investment would be consistent with the requirements of the 1940 Act or any exemptive order issued by the SEC. If a Fund invests in, and, thus, is a shareholder of, another investment company, the Fund’s shareholders will indirectly bear the Fund’s proportionate share of the fees and expenses paid by such other investment company, including advisory fees, in addition to both the management fees payable directly by the Fund to the Fund’s own investment advisor and the other expenses that the Fund bears directly in connection with the Fund’s own operations.

Because most ETFs are investment companies, absent exemptive relief, investments in such funds generally would be limited under applicable federal statutory provisions. Those provisions restrict a fund’s investment in the shares of another investment company to up to 5% of its assets (which may represent no more than 3% of the securities of such other investment company) and limit aggregate investments in all investment companies to 10% of assets. A Fund may invest in certain ETFs in excess of the statutory limit in reliance on an exemptive order issued by the SEC to those entities and pursuant to procedures approved by the Board provided that the Fund complies with the conditions of the exemptive relief, as they may be amended from time to time, and any other applicable investment limitations.

 

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Real Estate Investment Trusts (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income and the Inflation and Volatility ProShares)

Each Fund may invest in real estate investment trusts (“REITs”). Equity REITs invest primarily in real property while mortgage REITs invest in construction, development and long-term mortgage loans. Their value may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property of the REIT, the creditworthiness of the issuer, property taxes, interest rates, and tax and regulatory requirements, such as those relating to the environment. REITs are dependent upon management skill, are not diversified and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, default by borrowers, self-liquidation and the possibility of failing to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income under the Code and failing to maintain exempt status under the 1940 Act.

Illiquid Securities

Each Fund may purchase illiquid securities, including securities that are not readily marketable and securities that are not registered (“restricted securities”) under the 1933 Act, but which can be sold to qualified institutional buyers under Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “1933 Act”). A Fund will not invest more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets in illiquid securities. The term “illiquid securities” for this purpose means securities that cannot be disposed of within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the amount at which the Fund has valued the securities. Under the current guidelines of the staff of the SEC, illiquid securities also are considered to include, among other securities, purchased OTC options, certain cover for OTC options, repurchase agreements with maturities in excess of seven days, and certain securities whose disposition is restricted under the federal securities laws. The Fund may not be able to sell illiquid securities when the Advisor considers it desirable to do so or may have to sell such securities at a price that is lower than the price that could be obtained if the securities were more liquid. In addition, the sale of illiquid securities also may require more time and may result in higher dealer discounts and other selling expenses than the sale of securities that are not illiquid. Illiquid securities may be more difficult to value due to the unavailability of reliable market quotations for such securities, and investments in illiquid securities may have an adverse impact on NAV.

Institutional markets for restricted securities have developed as a result of the promulgation of Rule 144A under the 1933 Act, which provides a safe harbor from 1933 Act registration requirements for qualifying sales to institutional investors. When Rule 144A securities present an attractive investment opportunity and otherwise meet selection criteria, a Fund may make such investments. Whether or not such securities are illiquid depends on the market that exists for the particular security. The staff of the SEC has taken the position that the liquidity of Rule 144A restricted securities is a question of fact for a board of trustees to determine, such determination to be based on a consideration of the readily-available trading markets and the review of any contractual restrictions. The SEC staff also has acknowledged that, while a board of trustees retains ultimate responsibility, trustees may delegate this function to an investment adviser. The Board of Trustees has delegated this responsibility for determining the liquidity of Rule 144A restricted securities which may be invested in by a Fund to the Advisor. It is not possible to predict with assurance exactly how the market for Rule 144A restricted securities or any other security will develop. A security that when purchased had a fair degree of marketability may subsequently become illiquid and, accordingly, a security that was deemed to be liquid at the time of acquisition may subsequently become illiquid. In such event, appropriate remedies will be considered to minimize the effect on the Fund’s liquidity.

Debt Instruments

Below is a description of various types of money market instruments and other debt instruments that a Fund may utilize for investment purposes, as “cover” for other investment techniques such Fund employs, or for liquidity purposes. Other types of money market instruments and debt instruments may become available that are similar to those described below and in which the Funds also may invest consistent with their investment goals and policies.

Money Market Instruments

To seek its investment objective, as a cash reserve, for liquidity purposes, or as “cover” for positions it has taken, each Fund may invest all or part of its assets in cash or cash equivalents, which include, but are not limited to, short-term money market instruments, U.S. government securities, certificates of deposit, bankers acceptances or repurchase agreements secured by U.S. government securities. Each Fund may invest in money market instruments issued by foreign and domestic governments, financial institutions, corporations and other entities in the U.S. or in any foreign country.

U.S. Government Securities

The Funds may invest in U.S. government securities in pursuit of their investment objectives, as “cover” for the investment techniques these Funds employ, or for liquidity purposes.

 

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U.S. government securities include U.S. Treasury securities, which are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury and which differ only in their interest rates, maturities, and times of issuance. U.S. Treasury bills have initial maturities of one year or less; U.S. Treasury notes have initial maturities of one to ten years; and U.S. Treasury bonds generally have initial maturities of greater than ten years. In addition, U.S. government securities include Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (“TIPS”). TIPS are inflation protected public obligations of the U.S. Treasury. These securities are designed to provide inflation protection to investors. TIPS are income generating instruments whose interest and principal payments are adjusted for inflation – a sustained increase in prices that erodes the purchasing power of money. The inflation adjustment, which is typically applied monthly to the principal of the bond, follows a designated inflation index such as the Consumer Price Index. A fixed-coupon rate is applied to the inflation-adjusted principal so that as inflation rises, both the principal value and the interest payments increase. This can provide investors with a hedge against inflation, as it helps preserve the purchasing power of an investment. Because of the inflation-adjustment feature, inflation-protected bonds typically have lower yields than conventional fixed-rate bonds. In addition, TIPS decline in value when real interest rates rise. However, in certain interest rate environments, such as when real interest rates are rising faster than nominal interest rates, TIPS may experience greater losses than other fixed income securities with similar duration.

Certain U.S. government securities are issued or guaranteed by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government including, but not limited to, obligations of U.S. government agencies or instrumentalities, such as the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae” or “FNMA”), the Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae” or “GNMA”), the Small Business Administration, the Federal Farm Credit Administration, the Federal Home Loan Banks, Banks for Cooperatives (including the Central Bank for Cooperatives), the Federal Land Banks, the Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Commodity Credit Corporation, the Federal Financing Bank, the Student Loan Marketing Association, the National Credit Union Administration and the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation. Some obligations issued or guaranteed by U.S. government agencies and instrumentalities, including, for example, GNMA pass-through certificates, are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. On September 7, 2008, FNMA and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac” or “FHLMC”), a similar U.S. government instrumentality, were placed into conservatorship by their new regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency. Simultaneously, the U.S. Treasury made a commitment of indefinite duration to maintain the positive net worth of both entities. No assurance can be given that the initiatives discussed above with respect to the debt and mortgage-backed securities issued by FNMA and FHLMC will be successful. Other obligations issued by or guaranteed by federal agencies, such as those securities issued by FNMA, are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. government to purchase certain obligations of the federal agency but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, while other obligations issued by or guaranteed by federal agencies, such as those of the Federal Home Loan Banks, are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury. While the U.S. government provides financial support to such U.S. government-sponsored federal agencies, no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will always do so, since the U.S. government is not so obligated by law. U.S. Treasury notes and bonds typically pay coupon interest semi-annually and repay the principal at maturity. All U.S. government securities are subject to credit risk.

Yields on U.S. government securities depend on a variety of factors, including the general conditions of the money and bond markets, the size of a particular offering, and the maturity of the obligation. Debt securities with longer maturities tend to produce higher yields and are generally subject to potentially greater capital appreciation and depreciation than obligations with shorter maturities and lower yields. The market value of U.S. government securities generally varies inversely with changes in market interest rates. An increase in interest rates, therefore, would generally reduce the market value of a Fund’s portfolio investments in U.S. government securities, while a decline in interest rates would generally increase the market value of a Fund’s portfolio investments in these securities.

Repurchase Agreements

Each of the Funds may enter into repurchase agreements with financial institutions in pursuit of its investment objectives, as “cover” for the investment techniques it employs, or for liquidity purposes. Under a repurchase agreement, a Fund purchases a debt security and simultaneously agrees to sell the security back to the seller at a mutually agreed-upon future price and date, normally one day or a few days later. The resale price is greater than the purchase price, reflecting an agreed-upon market interest rate during the purchaser’s holding period. While the maturities of the underlying securities in repurchase transactions may be more than one year, the term of each repurchase agreement will always be less than one year. The Funds follow certain procedures designed to minimize the risks inherent in such agreements. These procedures include effecting repurchase transactions only with major global financial institutions. The creditworthiness of each of the firms that is a party to a repurchase agreement with the Funds will be monitored by the Advisor. In addition, the value of the collateral underlying the repurchase agreement will always be at least equal to the repurchase price, including any accrued interest earned on the repurchase agreement. In the event of a default or bankruptcy by a selling financial institution, a Fund will seek to liquidate such collateral which could involve certain costs or delays and, to the extent that proceeds from any sale upon a default of the obligation to repurchase were less than the repurchase price, the Fund could

 

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suffer a loss. A Fund also may experience difficulties and incur certain costs in exercising its rights to the collateral and may lose the interest the Fund expected to receive under the repurchase agreement. Repurchase agreements usually are for short periods, such as one week or less, but may be longer. It is the current policy of the Funds not to invest in repurchase agreements that do not mature within seven days if any such investment, together with any other illiquid assets held by the Fund, amounts to more than 15% of the Fund’s total net assets. The investments of each of the Funds in repurchase agreements at times may be substantial when, in the view of ProShare Advisors, liquidity, investment, regulatory, or other considerations so warrant.

Other Fixed Income Securities

Each Fund may invest in a wide range of fixed income securities, which may include foreign sovereign, sub-sovereign and supranational bonds, as well as any other obligations of any rating or maturity such as foreign and domestic investment grade corporate debt securities and lower-rated corporate debt securities (commonly known as “junk bonds”). Lower-rated or high yield debt securities include corporate high yield debt securities, zero-coupon securities, payment-in-kind securities, and STRIPS. Investment grade corporate bonds are those rated BBB or better by Stand & Poor’s Rating Group (“S&P”) or Baa or better by Moody’s Investor Services (“Moody’s”). Securities rated BBB by S&P are considered investment grade, but Moody’s considers securities rated Baa to have speculative characteristics. The Funds may also invest in unrated securities.

FOREIGN SOVEREIGN, SUB-SOVEREIGN AND SUPRANATIONAL SECURITIES (not applicable to the USD Covered Bond and the High Yield-Interest Rate Hedged). The Funds may invest in fixed-rate debt securities issued by non-U.S. governments (foreign sovereign bonds), local governments, entities or agencies of non-U.S. country (foreign sub-sovereign bonds) as well as by two or more central governments or institutions (supranational bonds). These types of debt securities are typically general obligations of the issuer and are typically guaranteed by such issuer. Despite this guarantee, such debt securities are subject to default, restructuring or changes to the terms of the debt to the detriment of security holders. Such an event impacting a security held by a Fund would likely have an adverse impact on the Fund’s returns. Also, due to demand from other investors, certain types of these debt securities may be less accessible to the capital markets and may be difficult for a Fund to source. This may cause a Fund, at times, to pay a premium to obtain such securities for its own portfolio. For more information related to foreign sovereign, sub-sovereign and supranational securities, see “Foreign Securities” and “Exposure to Securities or Issuers in Specific Foreign Countries or Regions” above.

CORPORATE DEBT SECURITIES (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares). Corporate debt securities are fixed income securities issued by businesses to finance their operations, although corporate debt instruments may also include bank loans to companies. Notes, bonds, debentures and commercial paper are the most common types of corporate debt securities, with the primary difference being their maturities and secured or unsecured status. Commercial paper has the shortest term and is usually unsecured. The broad category of corporate debt securities includes debt issued by domestic or foreign companies of all kinds, including those with small-, mid- and large-capitalizations. Corporate debt may be rated investment-grade or below investment-grade and may carry variable or floating rates of interest.

Because of the wide range of types and maturities of corporate debt securities, as well as the range of creditworthiness of its issuers, corporate debt securities have widely varying potentials for return and risk profiles. For example, commercial paper issued by a large established domestic corporation that is rated investment-grade may have a modest return on principal, but carries relatively limited risk. On the other hand, a long-term corporate note issued by a small foreign corporation from an emerging market country that has not been rated may have the potential for relatively large returns on principal, but carries a relatively high degree of risk.

Corporate debt securities carry both credit risk and interest rate risk. Credit risk is the risk that a Fund could lose money if the issuer of a corporate debt security is unable to pay interest or repay principal when it is due. Some corporate debt securities that are rated below investment-grade are generally considered speculative because they present a greater risk of loss, including default, than higher quality debt securities. The credit risk of a particular issuer’s debt security may vary based on its priority for repayment. For example, higher ranking (senior) debt securities have a higher priority than lower ranking (subordinated) securities. This means that the issuer might not make payments on subordinated securities while continuing to make payments on senior securities. In addition, in the event of bankruptcy, holders of higher- ranking senior securities may receive amounts otherwise payable to the holders of more junior securities. Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of certain corporate debt securities will tend to fall when interest rates rise. In general, corporate debt securities with longer terms tend to fall more in value when interest rates rise than corporate debt securities with shorter terms.

JUNK BONDS. “Junk Bonds” generally offer a higher current yield than that available for higher-grade issues. However, lower-rated securities involve higher risks, in that they are especially subject to adverse changes in general economic conditions and in the industries in which the issuers are engaged, to changes in the financial condition of the issuers and to price fluctuations in response to changes in interest rates. During periods of economic downturn or rising interest rates, highly leveraged issuers may experience financial stress that could adversely affect their ability to make payments of interest and principal and increase the possibility of default. In addition, the market for lower-rated debt securities has

 

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expanded rapidly in recent years, and its growth paralleled a long economic expansion. At times in recent years, the prices of many lower-rated debt securities declined substantially, reflecting an expectation that many issuers of such securities might experience financial difficulties. As a result, the yields on lower-rated debt securities rose dramatically, but such higher yields did not reflect the value of the income stream that holders of such securities expected, but rather, the risk that holders of such securities could lose a substantial portion of their value as a result of the issuers’ financial restructuring or default. There can be no assurance that such declines will not recur. The market for lower-rated debt issues generally is thinner and less active than that for higher quality securities, which may limit each Fund’s ability to sell such securities at fair value in response to changes in the economy or financial markets. Adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may also decrease the values and liquidity of lower-rated securities, especially in a thinly traded market. Changes by recognized rating services in their rating of a fixed income security may affect the value of these investments. Each Fund will not necessarily dispose of a security when its rating is reduced below its rating at the time of purchase. However, the Advisor will monitor the investment to determine whether continued investment in the security will assist in meeting each Fund’s investment objective.

UNRATED DEBT SECURITIES (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares). The Funds may also invest in unrated debt securities. Unrated debt, while not necessarily lower in quality than rated securities, may not have as broad a market. Because of the size and perceived demand for the issue, among other factors, certain issuers may decide not to pay the cost of getting a rating for their bonds. The creditworthiness of the issuer, as well as any financial institution or other party responsible for payments on the security, will be analyzed to determine whether to purchase unrated bonds.

COVERED BONDS (not applicable to the German Sovereign / Sub-Sovereign ETF). The Funds may invest in covered bonds, which are debt securities issued by banks or other credit institutions that are backed by both the issuing institution and underlying pool of assets that compose the bond (a “cover pool”). The cover pool for a covered bond is typically composed of residential or commercial mortgage loans or loans to public sector institutions. A covered bond may lose value if the credit rating of the issuing bank or credit institution is downgraded or the quality of the assets in the cover pool deteriorates.

Reverse Repurchase Agreements

Each Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements as part of its investment strategy. Reverse repurchase agreements involve sales by a Fund of portfolio assets concurrently with an agreement by the Fund to repurchase the same assets at a later date at a fixed price. Generally, the effect of such a transaction is that a Fund can recover all or most of the cash invested in the portfolio securities involved during the term of the reverse repurchase agreement, while a Fund will be able to keep the interest income associated with those portfolio securities. Such transactions are advantageous only if the interest cost to a Fund of the reverse repurchase transaction is less than the cost of obtaining the cash otherwise. Opportunities to achieve this advantage may not always be available, and a Fund intends to use the reverse repurchase technique only when it will be to the Fund’s advantage to do so. A Fund will segregate with its custodian bank cash or liquid instruments equal in value to the Fund’s obligations in respect of reverse repurchase agreements.

Short Sales (not applicable to the Global Fixed Income ProShares)

The Funds may engage in short sales transactions. A short sale is a transaction in which a Fund sells a security it does not own in anticipation that the market price of that security will decline. To complete such a transaction, a Fund must borrow the security to make delivery to the buyer. The Fund is then obligated to replace the security borrowed by borrowing the same security from another lender, purchasing it at the market price at the time of replacement or paying the lender an amount equal to the cost of purchasing the security. The price at such time may be more or less than the price at which the security was sold by the Fund. Until the security is replaced, the Fund is required to repay the lender any dividends it receives, or interest which accrues, during the period of the loan. To borrow the security, the Fund also may be required to pay a premium, which would increase the cost of the security sold. The net proceeds of the short sale will be retained by the broker, to the extent necessary to meet the margin requirements, until the short position is closed out. A Fund also will incur transaction costs in effecting short sales.

The Funds may make short sales “against the box,” i.e., when a security identical to or convertible or exchangeable into one owned by a Fund is borrowed and sold short. Whenever a Fund engages in short sales, it earmarks or segregates liquid securities or cash in an amount that, when combined with the amount of collateral deposited with the broker in connection with the short sale, equals the current market value of the security sold short. The earmarked or segregated assets are marked-to-market daily.

A Fund will incur a loss as a result of a short sale if the price of the security increases between the date of the short sale and the date on which the Fund replaces the borrowed security. A Fund will realize a gain if the price of the security declines in price between those dates. The amount of any gain will be decreased, and the amount of any loss increased, by the amount of the premium, dividends or interest a Fund may be required to pay, if any, in connection with a short sale.

 

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The Short QQQ, UltraShort QQQ, UltraPro Short QQQ, Ultra QQQ and UltraPro QQQ Funds will not sell short the equity securities of issuers contained in the NASDAQ-100 Index. The Ultra and UltraShort Nasdaq Biotechnology Funds will not sell short the securities of issues contained in the Nasdaq Biotechnology Index.

Borrowing

Each Fund may borrow money for cash management purposes or investment purposes. Borrowing for investment is known as leveraging. Leveraging investments, by purchasing securities with borrowed money, is a speculative technique which increases investment risk, but also increases investment opportunity. Because substantially all of a Fund’s assets will fluctuate in value, whereas the interest obligations on borrowings may be fixed, the NAV per Share of the Fund will fluctuate more when the Fund is leveraging its investments than would otherwise be the case. Moreover, interest costs on borrowings may fluctuate with changing market rates of interest and may partially offset or exceed the returns on the borrowed funds. Under adverse conditions, a Fund might have to sell portfolio securities to meet interest or principal payments at a time when investment considerations would not favor such sales.

As required by the 1940 Act, each Fund must maintain continuous asset coverage (total assets, including assets acquired with borrowed funds, less liabilities exclusive of borrowings) of 300% of all amounts borrowed. If at any time the value of a Fund’s assets should fail to meet this 300% coverage test, the Fund, within three days (not including weekends and holidays), will reduce the amount of the Fund’s borrowings to the extent necessary to meet this 300% coverage requirement. Maintenance of this percentage limitation may result in the sale of portfolio securities at a time when investment considerations would not favor such sale. In addition to the foregoing, the Funds are authorized to borrow money as a temporary measure for extraordinary or emergency purposes in amounts not in excess of 5% of the value of each Fund’s total assets. This borrowing is not subject to the foregoing 300% asset coverage requirement. The Funds are authorized to pledge portfolio securities as ProShare Advisors deems appropriate in connection with any borrowings.

Each Fund may also enter into reverse repurchase agreements, which may be viewed as a form of borrowing, with financial institutions. However, under the current pronouncements, to the extent a Fund “covers” its repurchase obligations, such agreement will not be considered to be a “senior security” and, therefore, will not be subject to the 300% asset coverage requirement otherwise applicable to borrowings by that Fund.

Portfolio Turnover

A Fund’s portfolio turnover may vary from year to year, as well as within a year. The nature of the Funds may cause the Funds to experience substantial differences in brokerage commissions from year to year. High portfolio turnover and correspondingly greater brokerage commissions, to a great extent, depend on the purchase, redemption, and exchange activity of a Fund’s investors, as well as each Fund’s investment objective and strategies. The overall reasonableness of brokerage commissions is evaluated by ProShare Advisors based upon its knowledge of available information as to the general level of commissions paid by other institutional investors for comparable services. In addition, a Fund’s portfolio turnover level may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective. “Portfolio Turnover Rate” is defined under the rules of the SEC as the lesser of the value of the securities purchased or securities sold, excluding all securities whose maturities at time of acquisition were one year or less, divided by the average monthly value of such securities owned during the year. Based on this definition, instruments with remaining maturities of less than one year are excluded from the calculation of the Portfolio Turnover Rate. Instruments excluded from the calculation of portfolio turnover generally would include futures contracts, swap agreements and option contracts in which the Funds invest since such contracts generally have a remaining maturity of less than one year. ETFs, such as the Funds, may incur very low levels of portfolio turnover (or none at all in accordance with the SEC methodology described above) because of the way in which they operate and the way shares are created in Creation Units. However, a low or zero Portfolio Turnover Rate should not be assumed to be indicative of the amount of gains that a Fund may or may not distribute to shareholders, as the instruments excluded from the calculation described above may have generated taxable gains upon their sale or maturity. For those Funds that commenced operations prior to May 31, 2012, each such Fund’s turnover rate for the period from that Fund’s commencement of operations to May 31, 2012 is set forth in the Annual Report to shareholders. Annual Portfolio turnover rates are also shown in each Fund’s Prospectus.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

As discussed above and in the Prospectus, the Funds present certain risks, some of which are further described below.

Tracking and Correlation

Several factors may affect a Fund’s ability to achieve a high degree of correlation within its Index. Among these factors are: (1) a Fund’s fees and expenses, including brokerage (which may be increased by high portfolio turnover) and

 

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the costs associated with the use of derivatives; (2) less than all of the securities in the index being held by a Fund and securities not included in the index being held by a Fund; (3) an imperfect correlation between the performance of instruments held by a Fund, such as futures contracts, and the performance of the underlying securities in the cash market; (4) bid-ask spreads (the effect of which may be increased by portfolio turnover); (5) holding instruments traded in a market that has become illiquid or disrupted; (6) a Fund’s Share prices being rounded to the nearest cent; (7) changes to the index that are not disseminated in advance; (8) the need to conform a Fund’s portfolio holdings to comply with investment restrictions or policies or regulatory or tax law requirements; (9) limit up or limit down trading halts on options or futures contracts which may prevent a Fund from purchasing or selling options or futures contracts; (10) early and unanticipated closings of the markets on which the holdings of a Fund trade, resulting in the inability of the Fund to execute intended portfolio transactions; and (11) fluctuations in currency exchange rates.

Furthermore, each Fund, except the Matching ProShares Funds, has an investment objective to match a multiple (2x or 3x), the inverse (-1x) or a multiple of the inverse (-2x or -3x) of the performance of an index on a single day. A “single day” is measured from the time the Fund calculates its NAV to the time of the Fund’s next NAV calculation. These Funds are subject to the correlation risks described above. In addition, while a close correlation of any Fund to its index may be achieved on any single trading day for certain Funds, over time, the cumulative percentage increase or decrease in the NAV of the Shares may diverge, in some cases significantly, from the cumulative percentage decrease or increase in the index due to a compounding effect as further described in the Prospectus and below.

Leverage

Each Fund (except the Matching ProShares and the Short (-1x) ProShares Funds) intends to use, on a regular basis, leverage in pursuing its investment objectives. Leverage exists when a Fund achieves the right to a return on a capital base that exceeds the Fund’s assets. Utilization of leverage involves special risks and should be considered to be speculative. Specifically, leverage creates the potential for greater gains to Fund shareholders during favorable market conditions and the risk of magnified losses during adverse market conditions. Leverage is likely to cause higher volatility of the NAVs of these Funds’ Shares. Leverage may also involve the creation of a liability that does not entail any interest costs or the creation of a liability that requires the Fund to pay interest which would decrease the Fund’s total return to shareholders. If these Funds achieve their investment objectives, during adverse market conditions, shareholders should experience a loss greater than they would have incurred had these Funds not been leveraged.

•Special Note Regarding the Correlation Risks of Geared Funds (all Funds except the Matching ProShares Funds). As a result of compounding, for periods greater than one day, the use of leverage tends to cause the performance of a Fund to vary from its index’s performance times the stated multiple or inverse multiple in the Fund’s investment objective, before accounting for fees and fund expenses. Compounding affects all investments, but has a more significant impact on geared funds. Four factors significantly affect how close daily compounded returns are to longer-term index returns times the fund’s multiple: the length of the holding period, index volatility, whether the multiple is positive or inverse, and its leverage level. Longer holding periods, higher index volatility, inverse multiples and greater leverage each can lead to returns farther from the multiple times the index return. As the tables below show, particularly during periods of higher index volatility, compounding will cause longer term results to vary from the index performance times the stated multiple in the Fund’s investment objective. This effect becomes more pronounced as volatility increases.

A geared ProShares Fund’s return for periods longer than one day is primarily a function of the following:

 

  a) index performance;

 

  b) index volatility;

 

  c) period of time;

 

  d) financing rates associated with leverage or inverse exposure;

 

  e) other Fund expenses; and

 

  f) dividends or interest paid with respect to securities included in the index.

The fund performance for a geared ProShares Fund can be estimated given any set of assumptions for the factors described above. The tables on the next five pages illustrate the impact of two factors, index volatility and index performance, on a geared fund. Index volatility is a statistical measure of the magnitude of fluctuations in the returns of an index and is calculated as the standard deviation of the natural logarithms of one plus the index return (calculated daily), multiplied by the square root of the number of trading days per year (assumed to be 252). The tables show estimated Fund returns for a number of combinations of index performance and index volatility over a one-year period. Assumptions used in the tables include: (a) no dividends paid with respect to securities included in the index; (b) no Fund expenses; and (c) borrowing/lending rates (to obtain leverage or inverse exposure) of zero percent. If Fund expenses and/or actual borrowing lending rates were reflected, the Fund’s performance would be different than shown.

 

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The first table below shows a performance example of an Ultra ProShares Fund (which have an investment objective to correspond to two times (2x) the daily performance of an index). The Ultra ProShares Fund could be expected to achieve a 20% return on a yearly basis if the index performance was 10%, absent any costs, the correlation risk or other factors described above and in the Prospectus under “Correlation Risk” and “Compounding Risk.” However, as the table shows, with an index volatility of 20%, such a Fund would return 16.3%. In the charts below, areas shaded lighter represent those scenarios where a leveraged Fund with the investment objective described will return the same as or outperform (i.e., return more than) the index performance times the stated multiple in the Fund’s investment objective; conversely, areas shaded darker represent those scenarios where the Fund will underperform (i.e., return less than) the index performance times the stated multiple in the Fund’s investment objective.

Estimated Fund Return Over One Year When the Fund Objective is to Seek Daily Investment Results, Before Fund Fees and Expenses and Leverage Costs, that Correspond to Two Times (2x) the Daily Performance of an Index.

 

One Year
Index

Performance

  Two Times     Index Volatility   
  (2x)
One  Year
Index
Performance
  0%     5%     10%     15%     20%     25%     30%     35%     40%     45%     50%     55%     60%  
-60%   -120%     -84.0%        -84.0%        -84.2%        -84.4%        -84.6%        -85.0%        -85.4%        -85.8%        -86.4%        -86.9%        -87.5%        -88.2%        -88.8%   
-55%   -110%     -79.8%        -79.8%        -80.0%        -80.2%        -80.5%        -81.0%        -81.5%        -82.1%        -82.7%        -83.5%        -84.2%        -85.0%        -85.9%   
-50%   -100%     -75.0%        -75.1%        -75.2%        -75.6%        -76.0%        -76.5%        -77.2%        -77.9%        -78.7%        -79.6%        -80.5%        -81.5%        -82.6%   
-45%   -90%     -69.8%        -69.8%        -70.1%        -70.4%        -70.9%        -71.6%        -72.4%        -73.2%        -74.2%        -75.3%        -76.4%        -77.6%        -78.9%   
-40%   -80%     -64.0%        -64.1%        -64.4%        -64.8%        -65.4%        -66.2%        -67.1%        -68.2%        -69.3%        -70.6%        -72.0%        -73.4%        -74.9%   
-35%   -70%     -57.8%        -57.9%        -58.2%        -58.7%        -59.4%        -60.3%        -61.4%        -62.6%        -64.0%        -65.5%        -67.1%        -68.8%        -70.5%   
-30%   -60%     -51.0%        -51.1%        -51.5%        -52.1%        -52.9%        -54.0%        -55.2%        -56.6%        -58.2%        -60.0%        -61.8%        -63.8%        -65.8%   
-25%   -50%     -43.8%        -43.9%        -44.3%        -45.0%        -46.0%        -47.2%        -48.6%        -50.2%        -52.1%        -54.1%        -56.2%        -58.4%        -60.8%   
-20%   -40%     -36.0%        -36.2%        -36.6%        -37.4%        -38.5%        -39.9%        -41.5%        -43.4%        -45.5%        -47.7%        -50.2%        -52.7%        -55.3%   
-15%   -30%     -27.8%        -27.9%        -28.5%        -29.4%        -30.6%        -32.1%        -34.0%        -36.1%        -38.4%        -41.0%        -43.7%        -46.6%        -49.6%   
-10%   -20%     -19.0%        -19.2%        -19.8%        -20.8%        -22.2%        -23.9%        -26.0%        -28.3%        -31.0%        -33.8%        -36.9%        -40.1%        -43.5%   
-5%   -10%     -9.8%        -10.0%        -10.6%        -11.8%        -13.3%        -15.2%        -17.5%        -20.2%        -23.1%        -26.3%        -29.7%        -33.3%        -37.0%   
0%   0%     0.0%        -0.2%        -1.0%        -2.2%        -3.9%        -6.1%        -8.6%        -11.5%        -14.8%        -18.3%        -22.1%        -26.1%        -30.2%   
5%   10%     10.3%        10.0%        9.2%        7.8%        5.9%        3.6%        0.8%        -2.5%        -6.1%        -10.0%        -14.1%        -18.5%        -23.1%   
10%   20%     21.0%        20.7%        19.8%        18.3%        16.3%        13.7%        10.6%        7.0%        3.1%        -1.2%        -5.8%        -10.6%        -15.6%   
15%   30%     32.3%        31.9%        30.9%        29.3%        27.1%        24.2%        20.9%        17.0%        12.7%        8.0%        3.0%        -2.3%        -7.7%   
20%   40%     44.0%        43.6%        42.6%        40.8%        38.4%        35.3%        31.6%        27.4%        22.7%        17.6%        12.1%        6.4%        0.5%   
25%   50%     56.3%        55.9%        54.7%        52.8%        50.1%        46.8%        42.8%        38.2%        33.1%        27.6%        21.7%        15.5%        9.0%   
30%   60%     69.0%        68.6%        67.3%        65.2%        62.4%        58.8%        54.5%        49.5%        44.0%        38.0%        31.6%        24.9%        17.9%   
35%   70%     82.3%        81.8%        80.4%        78.2%        75.1%        71.2%        66.6%        61.2%        55.3%        48.8%        41.9%        34.7%        27.2%   
40%   80%     96.0%        95.5%        94.0%        91.6%        88.3%        84.1%        79.1%        73.4%        67.0%        60.1%        52.6%        44.8%        36.7%   
45%   90%     110.3%        109.7%        108.2%        105.6%        102.0%        97.5%        92.2%        86.0%        79.2%        71.7%        63.7%        55.4%        46.7%   
50%   100%     125.0%        124.4%        122.8%        120.0%        116.2%        111.4%        105.6%        99.1%        91.7%        83.8%        75.2%        66.3%        57.0%   
55%   110%     140.3%        139.7%        137.9%        134.9%        130.8%        125.7%        119.6%        112.6%        104.7%        96.2%        87.1%        77.5%        67.6%   
60%   120%     156.0%        155.4%        153.5%        150.3%        146.0%        140.5%        134.0%        126.5%        118.1%        109.1%        99.4%        89.2%        78.6%   

 

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The table below shows a performance example of a Short ProShares Fund (which has an investment objective to correspond to the inverse (-1x) of the daily performance of an index). In the chart below, areas shaded lighter represent those scenarios where a Short ProShares Fund will return the same or outperform (i.e., return more than) the index performance; conversely areas shaded darker represent those scenarios where a Short ProShares Fund will underperform (i.e., return less than) the index performance.

Estimated Fund Return Over One Year When the Fund Objective is to Seek Daily Investment Results, Before Fees and Expenses, that Correspond to the Inverse (-1x) of the Daily Performance of an Index.

 

One Year  Index
Performance
  Inverse (-1x)

of One Year

Index
Performance

    Index Volatility   
    0%     5%     10%     15%     20%     25%     30%     35%     40%     45%     50%     55%     60%  
-60%   60%     150.0%        149.4%        147.5%        144.4%        140.2%        134.9%        128.5%        121.2%        113.0%        104.2%        94.7%        84.7%        74.4%   
-55%   55%     122.2%        121.7%        120.0%        117.3%        113.5%        108.8%        103.1%        96.6%        89.4%        81.5%        73.1%        64.2%        55.0%   
-50%   50%     100.0%        99.5%        98.0%        95.6%        92.2%        87.9%        82.8%        76.9%        70.4%        63.3%        55.8%        47.8%        39.5%   
-45%   45%     81.8%        81.4%        80.0%        77.8%        74.7%        70.8%        66.2%        60.9%        54.9%        48.5%        41.6%        34.4%        26.9%   
-40%   40%     66.7%        66.3%        65.0%        63.0%        60.1%        56.6%        52.3%        47.5%        42.0%        36.1%        29.8%        23.2%        16.3%   
-35%   35%     53.8%        53.5%        52.3%        50.4%        47.8%        44.5%        40.6%        36.1%        31.1%        25.6%        19.8%        13.7%        7.3%   
-30%   30%     42.9%        42.5%        41.4%        39.7%        37.3%        34.2%        30.6%        26.4%        21.7%        16.7%        11.3%        5.6%        -0.3%   
-25%   25%     33.3%        33.0%        32.0%        30.4%        28.1%        25.3%        21.9%        18.0%        13.6%        8.9%        3.8%        -1.5%        -7.0%   
-20%   20%     25.0%        24.7%        23.8%        22.2%        20.1%        17.4%        14.2%        10.6%        6.5%        2.1%        -2.6%        -7.6%        -12.8%   
-15%   15%     17.6%        17.4%        16.5%        15.0%        13.0%        10.5%        7.5%        4.1%        0.3%        -3.9%        -8.4%        -13.1%        -17.9%   
-10%   10%     11.1%        10.8%        10.0%        8.6%        6.8%        4.4%        1.5%        -1.7%        -5.3%        -9.3%        -13.5%        -17.9%        -22.5%   
-5%   5%     5.3%        5.0%        4.2%        2.9%        1.1%        -1.1%        -3.8%        -6.9%        -10.3%        -14.0%        -18.0%        -22.2%        -26.6%   
0%   0%     0.0%        -0.2%        -1.0%        -2.2%        -3.9%        -6.1%        -8.6%        -11.5%        -14.8%        -18.3%        -22.1%        -26.1%        -30.2%   
5%   -5%     -4.8%        -5.0%        -5.7%        -6.9%        -8.5%        -10.5%        -13.0%        -15.7%        -18.8%        -22.2%        -25.8%        -29.6%        -33.6%   
10%   -10%     -9.1%        -9.3%        -10.0%        -11.1%        -12.7%        -14.6%        -16.9%        -19.6%        -22.5%        -25.8%        -29.2%        -32.8%        -36.6%   
15%   -15%     -13.0%        -13.3%        -13.9%        -15.0%        -16.5%        -18.3%        -20.5%        -23.1%        -25.9%        -29.0%        -32.3%        -35.7%        -39.3%   
20%   -20%     -16.7%        -16.9%        -17.5%        -18.5%        -19.9%        -21.7%        -23.8%        -26.3%        -29.0%        -31.9%        -35.1%        -38.4%        -41.9%   
25%   -25%     -20.0%        -20.2%        -20.8%        -21.8%        -23.1%        -24.8%        -26.9%        -29.2%        -31.8%        -34.7%        -37.7%        -40.9%        -44.2%   
30%   -30%     -23.1%        -23.3%        -23.8%        -24.8%        -26.1%        -27.7%        -29.7%        -31.9%        -34.5%        -37.2%        -40.1%        -43.2%        -46.3%   
35%   -35%     -25.9%        -26.1%        -26.7%        -27.6%        -28.8%        -30.4%        -32.3%        -34.5%        -36.9%        -39.5%        -42.3%        -45.3%        -48.3%   
40%   -40%     -28.6%        -28.7%        -29.3%        -30.2%        -31.4%        -32.9%        -34.7%        -36.8%        -39.1%        -41.7%        -44.4%        -47.2%        -50.2%   
45%   -45%     -31.0%        -31.2%        -31.7%        -32.6%        -33.7%        -35.2%        -37.0%        -39.0%        -41.2%        -43.7%        -46.3%        -49.0%        -51.9%   
50%   -50%     -33.3%        -33.5%        -34.0%        -34.8%        -35.9%        -37.4%        -39.1%        -41.0%        -43.2%        -45.6%        -48.1%        -50.7%        -53.5%   
55%   -55%     -35.5%        -35.6%        -36.1%        -36.9%        -38.0%        -39.4%        -41.0%        -42.9%        -45.0%        -47.3%        -49.8%        -52.3%        -55.0%   
60%   -60%     -37.5%        -37.7%        -38.1%        -38.9%        -40.0%        -41.3%        -42.9%        -44.7%        -46.7%        -49.0%        -51.3%        -53.8%        -56.4%   

 

19


Table of Contents

The table below shows a performance example of an UltraShort ProShares Fund (which has an investment objective to correspond to two times the inverse (-2x) of the daily performance of an index). In the chart below, areas shaded lighter represent those scenarios where an UltraShort ProShares Fund will return the same or outperform (i.e., return more than) the index performance; conversely areas shaded darker represent those scenarios where an UltraShort ProShares Fund will underperform (i.e., return less than) the index performance.

Estimated Fund Return Over One Year When the Fund Objective is to Seek Daily Investment Results, Before Fees and Expenses, that Correspond to Two Times the Inverse (-2x) of the Daily Performance of an Index.

 

One Year
Index
Performance
  Two Times     Index Volatility   
  the Inverse
(-2x) of
One Year
Index
Performance
  0%     5%     10%     15%     20%     25%     30%     35%     40%     45%     50%     55%     60%  
-60%   120%     525.0%        520.3%        506.5%        484.2%        454.3%        418.1%        377.1%        332.8%        286.7%        240.4%        195.2%        152.2%        112.2%   
-55%   110%     393.8%        390.1%        379.2%        361.6%        338.0%        309.4%        277.0%        242.0%        205.6%        169.0%        133.3%        99.3%        67.7%   
-50%   100%     300.0%        297.0%        288.2%        273.9%        254.8%        231.6%        205.4%        177.0%        147.5%        117.9%        88.9%        61.4%        35.8%   
-45%   90%     230.6%        228.1%        220.8%        209.0%        193.2%        174.1%        152.4%        128.9%        104.6%        80.1%        56.2%        33.4%        12.3%   
-40%   80%     177.8%        175.7%        169.6%        159.6%        146.4%        130.3%        112.0%        92.4%        71.9%        51.3%        31.2%        12.1%        -5.7%   
-35%   70%     136.7%        134.9%        129.7%        121.2%        109.9%        96.2%        80.7%        63.9%        46.5%        28.9%        11.8%        -4.5%        -19.6%   
-30%   60%     104.1%        102.6%        98.1%        90.8%        81.0%        69.2%        55.8%        41.3%        26.3%        11.2%        -3.6%        -17.6%        -30.7%   
-25%   50%     77.8%        76.4%        72.5%        66.2%        57.7%        47.4%        35.7%        23.1%        10.0%        -3.2%        -16.0%        -28.3%        -39.6%   
-20%   40%     56.3%        55.1%        51.6%        46.1%        38.6%        29.5%        19.3%        8.2%        -3.3%        -14.9%        -26.2%        -36.9%        -46.9%   
-15%   30%     38.4%        37.4%        34.3%        29.4%        22.8%        14.7%        5.7%        -4.2%        -14.4%        -24.6%        -34.6%        -44.1%        -53.0%   
-10%   20%     23.5%        22.5%        19.8%        15.4%        9.5%        2.3%        -5.8%        -14.5%        -23.6%        -32.8%        -41.7%        -50.2%        -58.1%   
-5%   10%     10.8%        10.0%        7.5%        3.6%        -1.7%        -8.1%        -15.4%        -23.3%        -31.4%        -39.6%        -47.7%        -55.3%        -62.4%   
0%   0%     0.0%        -0.7%        -3.0%        -6.5%        -11.3%        -17.1%        -23.7%        -30.8%        -38.1%        -45.5%        -52.8%        -59.6%        -66.0%   
5%   -10%     -9.3%        -10.0%        -12.0%        -15.2%        -19.6%        -24.8%        -30.8%        -37.2%        -43.9%        -50.6%        -57.2%        -63.4%        -69.2%   
10%   -20%     -17.4%        -18.0%        -19.8%        -22.7%        -26.7%        -31.5%        -36.9%        -42.8%        -48.9%        -55.0%        -61.0%        -66.7%        -71.9%   
15%   -30%     -24.4%        -25.0%        -26.6%        -29.3%        -32.9%        -37.3%        -42.3%        -47.6%        -53.2%        -58.8%        -64.3%        -69.5%        -74.3%   
20%   -40%     -30.6%        -31.1%        -32.6%        -35.1%        -38.4%        -42.4%        -47.0%        -51.9%        -57.0%        -62.2%        -67.2%        -72.0%        -76.4%   
25%   -50%     -36.0%        -36.5%        -37.9%        -40.2%        -43.2%        -46.9%        -51.1%        -55.7%        -60.4%        -65.1%        -69.8%        -74.2%        -78.3%   
30%   -60%     -40.8%        -41.3%        -42.6%        -44.7%        -47.5%        -50.9%        -54.8%        -59.0%        -63.4%        -67.8%        -72.0%        -76.1%        -79.9%   
35%   -70%     -45.1%        -45.5%        -46.8%        -48.7%        -51.3%        -54.5%        -58.1%        -62.0%        -66.0%        -70.1%        -74.1%        -77.9%        -81.4%   
40%   -80%     -49.0%        -49.4%        -50.5%        -52.3%        -54.7%        -57.7%        -61.1%        -64.7%        -68.4%        -72.2%        -75.9%        -79.4%        -82.7%   
45%   -90%     -52.4%        -52.8%        -53.8%        -55.5%        -57.8%        -60.6%        -63.7%        -67.1%        -70.6%        -74.1%        -77.5%        -80.8%        -83.8%   
50%   -100%     -55.6%        -55.9%        -56.9%        -58.5%        -60.6%        -63.2%        -66.1%        -69.2%        -72.5%        -75.8%        -79.0%        -82.1%        -84.9%   
55%   -110%     -58.4%        -58.7%        -59.6%        -61.1%        -63.1%        -65.5%        -68.2%        -71.2%        -74.2%        -77.3%        -80.3%        -83.2%        -85.9%   
60%   -120%     -60.9%        -61.2%        -62.1%        -63.5%        -65.4%        -67.6%        -70.2%        -73.0%        -75.8%        -78.7%        -81.5%        -84.2%        -86.7%   

 

20


Table of Contents

The tables below show performance examples of an UltraPro and UltraPro Short ProShares Fund (which have investment objectives to correspond to three times (3x) and three times the inverse of (-3x), respectively, the daily performance of an index). In the charts below, areas shaded lighter represent those scenarios where a Fund will return the same as or outperform (i.e., return more than) the index performance times the stated multiple in the Fund’s investment objective; conversely, areas shaded darker represent those scenarios where the Fund will underperform (i.e., return less than) the index performance times the stated multiple in the Fund’s investment objective.

Estimated Fund Return Over One Year When the Fund Objective is to Seek Daily Investment Results, Before Fund Fees and Expenses and Leverage Costs, that Correspond to Three Times (3x) the Daily Performance of an Index.

 

One Year  Index

Performance

  Three Times

(3x)

Index
Performance

    Index Volatility   
    0%     5%     10%     15%     20%     25%     30%     35%     40%     45%     50%     55%     60%  
-60%   -180%     -93.6%        -93.6%        -93.8%        -94.0%        -94.3%        -94.7%        -95.1%        -95.6%        -96.0%        -96.5%        -97.0%        -97.4%        -97.8%   
-55%   -165%     -90.9%        -91.0%        -91.2%        -91.5%        -91.9%        -92.4%        -93.0%        -93.7%        -94.4%        -95.0%        -95.7%        -96.3%        -96.9%   
-50%   -150%     -87.5%        -87.6%        -87.9%        -88.3%        -88.9%        -89.6%        -90.5%        -91.3%        -92.3%        -93.2%        -94.1%        -95.0%        -95.8%   
-45%   -135%     -83.4%        -83.5%        -83.9%        -84.4%        -85.2%        -86.2%        -87.3%        -88.5%        -89.7%        -90.9%        -92.1%        -93.3%        -94.3%   
-40%   -120%     -78.4%        -78.6%        -79.0%        -79.8%        -80.8%        -82.1%        -83.5%        -85.0%        -86.6%        -88.2%        -89.8%        -91.3%        -92.7%   
-35%   -105%     -72.5%        -72.7%        -73.3%        -74.3%        -75.6%        -77.2%        -79.0%        -81.0%        -83.0%        -85.0%        -87.0%        -88.9%        -90.7%   
-30%   -90%     -65.7%        -66.0%        -66.7%        -67.9%        -69.6%        -71.6%        -73.8%        -76.2%        -78.8%        -81.3%        -83.8%        -86.2%        -88.4%   
-25%   -75%     -57.8%        -58.1%        -59.1%        -60.6%        -62.6%        -65.0%        -67.8%        -70.8%        -73.9%        -77.0%        -80.1%        -83.0%        -85.7%   
-20%   -60%     -48.8%        -49.2%        -50.3%        -52.1%        -54.6%        -57.6%        -60.9%        -64.5%        -68.3%        -72.1%        -75.8%        -79.3%        -82.6%   
-15%   -45%     -38.6%        -39.0%        -40.4%        -42.6%        -45.5%        -49.1%        -53.1%        -57.5%        -62.0%        -66.5%        -71.0%        -75.2%        -79.1%   
-10%   -30%     -27.1%        -27.6%        -29.3%        -31.9%        -35.3%        -39.6%        -44.3%        -49.5%        -54.9%        -60.3%        -65.6%        -70.6%        -75.2%   
-5%   -15%     -14.3%        -14.9%        -16.8%        -19.9%        -24.0%        -28.9%        -34.5%        -40.6%        -46.9%        -53.3%        -59.5%        -65.4%        -70.9%   
0%   0%     0.0%        -0.7%        -3.0%        -6.5%        -11.3%        -17.1%        -23.7%        -30.8%        -38.1%        -45.5%        -52.8%        -59.6%        -66.0%   
5%   15%     15.8%        14.9%        12.3%        8.2%        2.7%        -4.0%        -11.6%        -19.8%        -28.4%        -36.9%        -45.3%        -53.3%        -60.7%   
10%   30%     33.1%        32.1%        29.2%        24.4%        18.0%        10.3%        1.6%        -7.8%        -17.6%        -27.5%        -37.1%        -46.3%        -54.8%   
15%   45%     52.1%        51.0%        47.6%        42.2%        34.9%        26.1%        16.1%        5.3%        -5.9%        -17.2%        -28.2%        -38.6%        -48.4%   
20%   60%     72.8%        71.5%        67.7%        61.5%        53.3%        43.3%        31.9%        19.7%        6.9%        -5.9%        -18.4%        -30.3%        -41.3%   
25%   75%     95.3%        93.9%        89.5%        82.6%        73.2%        61.9%        49.1%        35.2%        20.9%        6.4%        -7.7%        -21.2%        -33.7%   
30%   90%     119.7%        118.1%        113.2%        105.4%        94.9%        82.1%        67.7%        52.1%        35.9%        19.7%        3.8%        -11.3%        -25.4%   
35%   105%     146.0%        144.2%        138.8%        130.0%        118.2%        104.0%        87.8%        70.4%        52.2%        34.0%        16.2%        -0.7%        -16.4%   
40%   120%     174.4%        172.3%        166.3%        156.5%        143.4%        127.5%        109.5%        90.0%        69.8%        49.5%        29.6%        10.7%        -6.8%   
45%   135%     204.9%        202.6%        195.9%        185.0%        170.4%        152.7%        132.7%        111.1%        88.6%        66.1%        44.0%        23.0%        3.5%   
50%   150%     237.5%        235.0%        227.5%        215.5%        199.3%        179.8%        157.6%        133.7%        108.8%        83.8%        59.4%        36.2%        14.6%   
55%   165%     272.4%        269.6%        261.4%        248.1%        230.3%        208.7%        184.3%        157.9%        130.4%        102.8%        75.9%        50.3%        26.5%   
60%   180%     309.6%        306.5%        297.5%        282.9%        263.3%        239.6%        212.7%        183.6%        153.5%        123.1%        93.5%        65.3%        39.1%   

 

21


Table of Contents

Estimated Fund Return Over One Year When the Fund Objective is to Seek Daily Investment Results, Before Fees and Expenses, that Correspond to Three Times the Inverse (-3x) of the Daily Performance of an Index.

 

 

One Year  Index
Performance
  Three

Times the
Inverse (-3x)
of
One Year
Index
Performance

    Index Volatility   
    0%     5%     10%     15%     20%     25%     30%     35%     40%     45%     50%     55%     60%  
-60%   180%     462.5%        439.2%        371.5%        265.2%        129.1%        973.9%        810.5%        649.2%        498.3%        363.6%        248.6%        154.4%        80.2%   
-55%   165%     997.4%        981.1%        933.5%        858.8%        763.2%        654.2%        539.5%        426.2%        320.2%        225.6%        144.9%        78.7%        26.6%   
-50%   150%     700.0%        688.1%        653.4%        599.0%        529.3%        449.8%        366.2%        283.6%        206.3%        137.4%        78.5%        30.3%        -7.7%   
-45%   135%     501.1%        492.1%        466.0%        425.1%        372.8%        313.1%        250.3%        188.2%        130.1%        78.3%        34.1%        -2.1%        -30.7%   
-40%   120%     363.0%        356.1%        336.0%        304.5%        264.2%        218.2%        169.8%        122.0%        77.3%        37.4%        3.3%        -24.6%        -46.6%   
-35%   105%     264.1%        258.7%        242.9%        218.1%        186.4%        150.3%        112.2%        74.6%        39.4%        8.0%        -18.8%        -40.7%        -58.0%   
-30%   90%     191.5%        187.2%        174.6%        154.7%        129.3%        100.4%        69.9%        39.8%        11.6%        -13.5%        -34.9%        -52.5%        -66.4%   
-25%   75%     137.0%        133.5%        123.2%        107.1%        86.5%        62.9%        38.1%        13.7%        -9.2%        -29.7%        -47.1%        -61.4%        -72.7%   
-20%   60%     95.3%        92.4%        83.9%        70.6%        53.6%        34.2%        13.8%        -6.3%        -25.2%        -42.0%        -56.4%        -68.2%        -77.5%   
-15%   45%     62.8%