10-K 1 elnk-20131231x10k.htm 10-K ELNK-2013.12.31-10K
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013
OR 
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                to               .
Commission File Number: 001-15605
EARTHLINK HOLDINGS CORP.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
46-4228084
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
1375 Peachtree St., Atlanta, Georgia  30309
(Address of principal executive offices)  (Zip Code)
(404) 815-0770
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 _______________________________________________________
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Common Stock, $.01 par value
_______________________________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o  No x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes x  No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation of S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer x
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o  No x
 
The aggregate market value of the registrant's outstanding common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant on June 30, 2013 was $630.5 million. As of January 31, 2014, 101,956,949 shares of common stock, $0.01 par value per share, were outstanding.
Portions of the Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and to be used in connection with the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on April 29, 2014 are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.
 



EARTHLINK HOLDINGS CORP.
Annual Report on Form 10-K
For the Year Ended December 31, 2013
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Certain statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The words "estimate," "plan," "intend," "expect," "anticipate," "believe" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are found at various places throughout this report. EarthLink Holdings Corp. disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Although EarthLink Holdings Corp. believes that its expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, it can give no assurance that its targets and goals will be achieved. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ from estimates or projections contained in the forward-looking statements are described under "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Part I and under "Safe Harbor Statement" in Item 7 of Part II.
PART I


Item 1.    Business.

Change in Organization Structure

On December 31, 2013, through the creation of a new holding company structure (the “Holding Company Reorganization”), EarthLink, Inc. merged with EarthLink, LLC, which became a wholly-owned subsidiary of a new publicly traded parent company, EarthLink Holdings Corp. We expect the new holding company design will enhance our corporate structure and provide greater flexibility and efficiency from a management, operations, customer, regulatory, accounting, financial and tax perspective. As the Holding Company Reorganization occurred at the parent company level, the remainder of our subsidiaries, operations and customers were not affected. Additionally, following the Holding Company Reorganization, EarthLink Holdings Corp. became the primary obligor on our outstanding debt obligations and EarthLink, LLC became a guarantor and a restricted subsidiary. The Holding Company Reorganization was effected under Section 251(g) of the Delaware General Corporation Law which provides for the formation of a holding company structure without a stockholder vote. Existing shares of EarthLink, Inc. common stock were converted into the same number of shares of common stock of EarthLink Holdings Corp.

Overview

EarthLink Holdings Corp. (“EarthLink” or the “Company”), together with its consolidated subsidiaries, is a leading communications and IT services provider, empowering businesses with a fully-managed, end-to-end communications, IT and virtualization portfolio including cloud computing, IT security, colocation, enterprise-class hosted applications, secure network connectivity and IT support services. We operate two reportable segments, Business Services and Consumer Services. Our Business Services segment provides a broad range of data, voice and IT services to retail and wholesale business customers. Our Consumer Services segment provides nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to residential customers. We operate an extensive network including more than 28,000 route miles of fiber, 90 metro fiber rings and eight secure enterprise-class data centers that provide data and voice IP service coverage across more than 90 percent of the United States.

We were incorporated in 2013 as a Delaware corporation in connection with the Holding Company Reorganization described above. Through our subsidiaries and predecessor entities, we have historically been a provider of nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to residential customers. In 1996, we first expanded our small to mid-sized business market presence by introducing business-class Internet access and web hosting services to businesses throughout the United States. In 2006, we expanded into the enterprise business market by acquiring New Edge Networks, a provider of managed IP-based network solutions to businesses nationwide. During late 2010 and early 2011, we acquired two integrated communications providers, ITC^DeltaCom, Inc. and One Communications Corp, which transformed our business from being primarily an Internet services provider (''ISP'') to residential customers into a network and communications provider for business customers. In addition, through these acquisitions we acquired a substantial network infrastructure that gave us a core foundation on which to build our IT services platform. During 2011, we also entered into other strategic transactions in order to complement our business services and expand our IT services portfolio. These five IT services transactions enabled us to more quickly introduce IT services into the market place. During 2013, we completed the next step in the evolution of our network and IT services platform, which was the investment of capital to extend our core fiber IP network, expand our IT solutions footprint with additional data centers and launch a next generation cloud hosting platform. We also acquired CenterBeam, Inc. in 2013 to further grow our IT services portfolio by adding IT services customer scale, expanded IT support center resources and complementary products and capabilities.

Our corporate offices are located at 1375 Peachtree St., Atlanta, Georgia 30309, and our telephone number at that location is (404) 815-0770. Our website address is www.earthlink.net.

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Business Strategy

Our business strategy is to be the premier communications and IT services provider for mid-market and enterprise customers. We believe IT services is an emerging market with significant opportunity for growth. Our goal is to use our nationwide network and newly developed and acquired IT services to be a one-stop ubiquitous provider of these services to larger and multi-location enterprise customers. We are also focused on maximizing the cash flow generated by our traditional voice and data products. The key elements of our business strategy are as follows:

Offer a complete package of communications and IT services products. We provide a nationwide suite of business voice, data and IT services. We are focused on maintaining a broad suite of products and services and offering solutions to address the evolving business and infrastructure needs of our customers. In 2012 and 2013, we expanded our IT solutions footprint with four additional data centers and invested capital to extend our core fiber IP network. We also acquired CenterBeam in July 2013 to further grow our IT services portfolio, specifically around customer end-point management. We believe our broad suite of products allows us to compete for larger and more complex customers.

Increase revenues from growth products and services. Revenues from some of our products and services have been declining due to economic, competitive, technological and regulatory developments and we expect some of these revenues to continue to decline. We are attempting to manage this decline by working with our customers to replace or augment declining products with our growth products, where financially and technically feasible to do so. Our growth products are MultiProtocol Label Switching ("MPLS"), hosted voice and IT services such as virtualization and virtual tech care. We are also focused on growing revenues for these products by enhancing our sales force efforts and increasing brand awareness for our IT services. We also aim to grow our wholesale services as we capitalize on unique and new fiber routes within our footprint.

Provide a superior customer experience. We are committed to providing high-quality customer service and continuing to monitor customer satisfaction in all facets of our business. We believe exceeding customers’ expectations for service increases loyalty and reduces churn. We also believe that our broad communications and IT services portfolio and blend of access technologies for connectivity enable us to provide high-quality customer service by solving a wide range of issues faced by our customers and prospects. We are focused on creating a customer-focused organization that will provide a quality approach to offering and supporting EarthLink products and services.

Optimize our cost structure. We are currently focused on optimizing the cost structure of our business by reducing network costs, streamlining our internal processes and operations and maximizing the cash flows generated from traditional voice and data products. The success of our operating efficiency and cost reduction initiatives is necessary to align costs with declining revenues for some of our products as non-variable costs place further pressure on margins.

Opportunistically consider potential strategic acquisitions. We continue to evaluate acquisition opportunities as we become aware of them. We believe that targeted corporate acquisitions, when available at the right economics, can be an effective means to improve our product, network, and data center capabilities or to accelerate revenue growth. Our acquisition strategy may include investments or acquisitions of new product and services capabilities, network assets or business customers to achieve greater national scale.

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Business Services Segment

Our Business Services segment provides a broad range of data, voice and IT services to retail and wholesale customers. We derived approximately 71%, 76% and 78% of our revenues during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively, from our Business Services segment.

Products and Services

Data Services. We offer a broad range of data and Internet services to business customers, including high-speed Internet access, dedicated Internet access and MPLS services. We offer a full range of access types, including DSL, T-1 and DS3 lines, Ethernet and wireless broadband, at speeds ranging from 1.5Mbps to over 100Mbps. Connectivity is primarily provided over our facilities-based nationwide network and is monitored 24/7 to keep customer information secure. Our high-speed services also includes enhanced features such as online faxing, email, POP services, web hosting, firewall and Virtual Private Networks (“VPN”), among others.

Voice Services. We offer a broad range of voice services to business customers, including local, domestic and international switched access, dedicated long distance services, hosted voice solutions and access trunks for customers that own and operate switching equipment on their own premises. We offer a full range of access types, including traditional voice lines, T1 and Ethernet. We also provide enhanced services to our customers by offering a number of calling features.

IT Services. We offer cloud, data center, managed security, application and IT support services. Our enterprise-class data centers are all on-net and linked for redundancy. We also provide consulting services for security of network and hosting environments, virtualization and disaster recovery, among others. We offer the following IT services:

Cloud services. We provide cloud hosting and dedicated server services to customers using servers located in our data center facilities. One key offering from our virtualization services portfolio is our VMware vCloud Powered Cloud services for disaster recovery and hosted server environments.

Data center services. We allow customers the ability to colocate their data and equipment within our secure and power redundant data centers.

Managed security services. We provide 24/7 monitoring and management of security appliances, software and network-based controls and incident response. Our managed security services include network and cloud security, endpoint and device security, compliance and enhanced monitoring and business continuity and disaster recovery.

Application Services. We offer a suite of enterprise applications that can be hosted in our data centers. Applications include: Secure email hosting, email encryption, email archiving and secure file sharing.

IT support services. We provide 24/7 IT support services. Our IT solution center has a help desk and remote care platform, support specialists and engineers.

Wholesale Services. We provide voice and data services to other communications carriers, to larger-scale providers of network capacity and to other businesses. Revenues from these services are generated from sales to other communications companies, including incumbent local exchange carriers (“ILECs”), competitive local exchange carriers (“CLECs”), wireless service providers, cable companies, ISPs and others. We offer broadband transport services, including private line services, Ethernet private line services and wavelength services, that allow other communications providers to transport the traffic of their end-user or wholesale customers across our local and intercity network; local communications services to ISPs and local dial tone communications services to service providers; nationwide live and automated operator and directory assistance services; and dedicated Internet access services through our IP network and our direct connectivity to the IP networks of ISPs.

Other Services. We lease server space and provide web hosting services that enable customers to build and maintain an effective online presence. Features include domain names, storage, mailboxes, software tools to build websites, e-commerce applications and 24/7 customer support.

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Sales and Distribution

We market our retail Business Services through direct, inside and independent sales channels. Our direct sales force is composed of sales personnel and technical consultants. We also maintain an inside sales force and we use lead generation tools like Search Engine Marketing to drive demand. We supplement our direct and inside sales force with our independent channel partners, who leverage their business relationships with the customer and act as sales agents for us. The channel partners include value-added resellers, local area network consultants and other telecommunications and IT consultants to businesses. Our authorized dealers and agents receive commissions based on services sold and installed, usage volume and customer retention.

In order to accelerate our transition into an IT services company, we have reduced our direct sales presence in smaller markets and focus on larger geographic markets where there are more customers with a propensity to buy IT services. In addition, we are increasing our efforts in Search Engine Marketing to drive leads for our inside sales force, increasing brand awareness for our IT services and adding additional technical talent in the field to support our IT services sales efforts.

We market our wholesale Business Services through a dedicated direct sales force. We generally enter into master service agreements with our wholesale services customers that have terms ranging from one to five years.

Customer Service and Retention

We believe that our broad communications and IT services portfolio and blend of access technologies for connectivity are key differentiators that can help us build long-term customer relationships. We believe that offering a bundled package of communications and IT services to our business customers increases retention rates and limits customer churn. With our nationwide service, we offer myLink, a secure customer portal, which provides customers with a centralized tool for self-service applications, reporting and management features 24/7. We are also seeking to improve customer response times through internal training programs and integrated billing, support and sales systems. We reinforce our strategy through compensation programs that reward our sales and account management staff based on customer retention.

Network Infrastructure

We provide secure, efficient and reliable communications services primarily through an expansive fiber optic network, an advanced nationwide MPLS network and switch and colocation facilities. We have eight enterprise-class data centers on our fiber network which are fully integrated with our nationwide IP network with five of those data centers employing next generation cloud architecture to support our IT services. Throughout the network, advanced monitoring and management tools are in place to ensure performance and quality, bringing value and an enhanced experience to our customers.

Fiber Optic Network - As of December 31, 2013, our advanced fiber optic network consisted of more than 28,000 route miles covering 30 states plus the District of Columbia and provides for high-quality wavelength, Ethernet, SONET, Internet access and virtual private networking services. The network infrastructure is built on our Dense Wave Division Multiplexing, or DWDM, platform and core routers. We are currently extending our core fiber IP network by adding approximately 900 route miles of fiber to our optical transport capabilities. The additional capacity will increase our ability to offer native 100 Gig transport services across parts of our fiber footprint, offering customers the advantage of unique network routes for enhanced redundancy and network diversity.

Nationwide MPLS Network - Our nationwide network is based on MPLS, a highly-scalable and high-performance packet transport system, with a broad array of IP infrastructure positioned in strategic locations across the U.S. We have interconnection agreements with major local exchange carriers to lease unbundled network elements, as well as commercial services agreements with national communications companies, CLECs, and cable and wireless service providers to provide last mile access to our customers and connectivity onto our network.

Colocation Facilities - With co-located communications equipment within the central offices of ILECs and alternative access providers in various markets in the United States, we offer remote facilities-based local and long distance services in markets by using our switches in other locations as hosts. Using our fiber optic network and leased facilities to connect our remote equipment to our switches, colocation provides cost-efficient access to last mile facilities to connect to customers.

Switch Facilities - Our array of switch facilities send voice and data traffic domestically and internationally through balanced and cost-effective routing. Services are also offered on Metaswitch's MetaSphere MTAS (Multimedia Telephony Application Server) providing an innovative portfolio of hosted and managed business-class communications solutions such as nationwide hosted PBX and SIP trunking services. Metaswitch's voice portal capabilities are also integrated into customer portals,

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offering our clients easy access to a ubiquitous, cross-platform, unified messaging, call control and self-service interface enabling them to access directly and upgrade their entire communications experience.

Data Centers - We operate eight data centers across the United States that are connected to our nationwide IP network. Five of these data centers are equipped with our next-generation cloud hosting platform. Our data centers allow us to offer state-of-the-art integrated computing and storage platforms designed to support our current and future IT services products, including managed hosting services, cloud computing, managed security and colocation services.

Network Management/Monitoring - Our network infrastructure is supported by two geographically diverse Network Operations Centers ("NOCs") in Atlanta, Georgia and Anniston, Alabama. These two centers operate 24 by 7, providing proactive network surveillance, incident management, and planned maintenance activities for all Transport, Data, and Switching infrastructure. The two centers use a consolidated suite of network surveillance tools that allows shared distribution of alarms and alerts. The geographic diversity of the NOCs enables a robust disaster recovery/business continuity plan. In the event one NOC is unable to operate; functions are designed to transfer over to the other fully redundant center.

Competition

The communications industry is highly competitive, and we expect this competition to intensify. These markets are rapidly changing due to industry consolidation, an evolving regulatory environment and the emergence of new technologies. We compete directly or indirectly with ILECs, such as AT&T, Inc., CenturyLink, Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc.; CLECs, such as Level 3 Communications Inc., MegaPath, Inc., Windstream Corporation and XO Communications; interexchange carriers, such as Sprint Corp; wireless and satellite service providers; cable service providers, such as Charter Communications, Inc., Comcast Corporation, Cox Communications, Inc. and Time Warner Cable; and stand-alone VoIP providers. We experience significant pricing and product competition from AT&T and other incumbents that are the dominant providers of telecommunications services in our markets. We also face intense competition from cable providers for small business customers, which typically consist of single location customers. We have reduced, and may be required to further reduce, some or all of the prices we charge for our retail local, long distance and data services.

The IT services industry is also highly competitive. It is highly fragmented and evolving, with competitors ranging in size from small, local independent firms to very large telecommunications companies, hardware manufacturers and system integrators. We compete directly or indirectly with telecommunications companies such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Level 3 and Verizon; system integrators such as Accenture, CSC, Hewlett-Packard and IBM; managed hosting and cloud providers such as Amazon Web Services, Equinix, Inc., Internap Network Services Corporation, Rackspace Hosting, Inc. and Web.com Group, Inc.; and managed security companies such as Perimeter eSecurity and Dell SecureWorks.

We believe the primary competitive factors in the communications and IT services industries include price, availability, reliability of service, network security, variety of service offerings, quality of service and reputation of the service provider. While we believe our business services compete favorably based on some of these factors, we are at a competitive disadvantage with respect to certain of our competitors. Many of our current and potential competitors have greater market presence, engineering, technical and marketing capabilities and financial, personnel and other resources substantially greater than ours; own larger and more diverse networks; are subject to less regulation; or have substantially stronger brand names. In addition, industry consolidation has resulted in larger competitors that have greater economies of scale. Consequently, these competitors may be better equipped to charge lower prices for their products and services, to provide more attractive offerings, to develop and expand their communications and network infrastructures more quickly, to adapt more swiftly to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements, to increase prices that we pay for wholesale inputs to our services and to devote greater resources to the marketing and sale of their products and services.

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Consumer Services Segment

Our Consumer Services segment provides nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to individual customers. We derived approximately 29%, 24% and 22% of our revenues during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively, from our Consumer Services segment. The decreases were primarily due to continued maturation in the market for consumer Internet access.

Products and Services

Internet Access Services. We offer narrowband and broadband Internet access with a wide variety of content and features, including email, a customizable start page, antivirus and firewall protection, acceleration tools and technical and customer support. We provide high-speed access services via cable and DSL and wireless access via 4G. Availability for these services depends on the service provider.

Value-Added Services. We offer ancillary services sold as add-on features to our Internet access services, such as security products, premium email only, home networking and email storage, among others. We offer free and fee-based value-added services to both subscribers and non-subscribers. We also generate advertising revenues by leveraging the value of our customer base and user traffic; through paid placements for searches, powered by the GoogleTM search engine; from fees generated through revenue sharing arrangements with online partners whose products and services can be accessed through our web properties; from commissions received from partners for the sale of partners' services to our subscribers; and from sales of advertising on our various web properties.

Sales and Distribution

We engage in limited sales and marketing for our Consumer Segment services. Our marketing efforts are focused on retaining customers and adding customers through alliances and partnerships. We offer our products and services primarily through direct customer contact through our call centers, search engine marketing, affinity marketing partners, resellers and marketing alliances such as our relationships with Time Warner Cable and Dish Network.

Customer Service and Retention

Our customer support is available by chat and phone as well as through help sites and Internet guide files on our web sites. We have been recognized historically by customer service and marketing organizations for ranking high in customer satisfaction for our dial-up and high-speed Internet services. We believe that quality customer service and technical support increase customer satisfaction, which reduces churn. We also believe that satisfied and more tenured customers provide cost benefits, including reduced contact center support costs and reduced bad debt expense. We provide award-winning customer service, invest in loyalty and retention efforts and continually monitor customer satisfaction for our services.

Network Infrastructure

We provide subscribers with narrowband Internet access primarily through third-party network service providers. Our principal providers for narrowband services are AT&T, GlobalPOPs and Windstream. We also have agreements with certain regional and local narrowband providers. We provide residential broadband services via DSL and cable service agreements. We provide cable broadband services through agreements with Time Warner Cable that allow us to provide broadband services over Time Warner Cable's and Bright House Networks' cable network in substantially all their markets and with Comcast that allow us to provide broadband services over Comcast's cable network in certain Comcast markets. We provide DSL broadband services through agreements with AT&T, CenturyLink, Fairpoint, Frontier, Megapath and Verizon. These agreements generally have volume based tiered pricing which is leading to higher unit costs as we see a decline in subscribers over time. Many of our agreements have a short term or operate on a month-to-month basis. We cannot be certain of renewal or non-termination of our contracts or that legislative or regulatory factors will not affect our contracts.

We maintain a leased backbone consisting of a networked loop of connections between multiple cities and our technology centers. We maintain data centers to provide service availability and connectivity.

Competition

The Internet access industry is extremely competitive, and we expect competition to continue to intensify. We compete directly or indirectly with national communications companies and local exchange carriers, such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Verizon and Windstream; cable companies providing broadband access, including Charter Communications, Inc., Comcast, Cox

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Communications, Inc. and Time Warner Cable; local and regional ISPs; established online services companies, such as AOL and the Microsoft Network; free or value-priced ISPs, such as United Online, Inc. which provides service under the brands Juno and NetZero; wireless Internet service providers; content companies and email providers, such as Google and Yahoo!; and satellite and fixed wireless service providers. In addition, technologies such as 4G, Ethernet or other alternatives to network access, have products or services that compete with ours. Competitors for our advertising services also include content providers, large web publishers, web search engine and portal companies, Internet advertising providers, content aggregation companies, social-networking web sites, and various other companies that facilitate Internet advertising.

We believe the primary competitive factors in the Internet access industry are price, speed, features, coverage area and quality of service. While we believe our Internet access services compete favorably based on some of these factors when compared to some Internet access providers, we are at a competitive disadvantage relative to some or all of these factors with respect to other of our competitors. Current and potential competitors include many large companies that have substantially greater market presence and greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we have. Our dial-up Internet access services do not compete favorably with broadband services with respect to speed, and dial-up Internet access services no longer have a significant, if any, price advantage over certain broadband services. Most of the largest providers of broadband services, such as cable and telecommunications companies, control their own networks and offer a wider variety of services than we offer, including voice, data and video services. Their ability to bundle services and to offer broadband services at prices below the price that we can profitably offer comparable services puts us at a competitive disadvantage. In addition, our only significant access to offer broadband services over cable is through our agreement with Time Warner Cable.
Regulatory Environment

Our services are subject to varying degrees of federal, state and local regulation. Communications services are subject to particularly extensive regulation at both the federal and state levels. Internet access services, which are not communications services, are subject to a lesser degree of regulation. Federal, state and local regulations governing our services are the subject of ongoing judicial proceedings, rulemakings and legislative initiatives that could change the manner in which our industry operates and affect our business.

Overview

Through our wholly-owned subsidiaries, we hold numerous federal and state regulatory licenses to provide communications services. The Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) exercises jurisdiction over communications common carriers to the extent that they provide, originate or terminate interstate or international communications services or as otherwise required by federal law. The FCC also has authority over some issues related to local telephone competition. State regulatory commissions, commonly referred to as public utility commissions (“PUCs”), generally retain jurisdiction over telecommunications carriers to the extent that they provide, originate or terminate intrastate communications services. PUCs also have authority to review and approve interconnection agreements between incumbent telephone carriers and competitive carriers such as us, and to conduct arbitration of disputes arising in the negotiation of such agreements. Local governments may require us to obtain licenses, permits or franchises to use the public rights-of-way necessary to install and operate our network. Our operations are also subject to various consumer, environmental, building, safety, health and other governmental laws and regulations.

The regulatory environment relating to our business continues to evolve. Bills intended to amend the Communications Act of 1934, as amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (“Communications Act”), are introduced in Congress from time to time and their effect on us and the communications industry cannot always be predicted. In late 2013, the House Commerce Committee announced what is expected to be a multi-year process to revise the Communications Act. Proposed legislation, if enacted, could have a significant effect on our business, particularly if the legislation impairs our ability to interconnect with incumbent carrier networks, lease portions of other carriers' networks or resell their services at reasonable prices, or lease elements of incumbent carrier networks under acceptable rates, terms and conditions. We cannot predict the outcome of any ongoing legislative initiatives or administrative or judicial proceedings or their potential impact upon the communications and information technology industries generally or upon us specifically.

Federal Regulation

Our operating subsidiaries that provide telecommunications services subject to FCC authorizations are classified as non-dominant telecommunications carriers by the FCC and, as a result, the prices, terms and conditions of our interstate and international communications services are subject to relatively limited FCC regulation. Like all common carriers, we are subject to the general requirement that our charges, practices and classifications for communications services must be “just and reasonable,” and that we refrain from engaging in any “unjust or unreasonable discrimination” with respect to our charges, practices or classifications.

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The FCC must grant its approval before any change in control of any carrier providing interstate or international communications services, or of any entity controlling such a carrier, and before the assignment of any authorizations held by such a carrier. We have the operating authority required by the FCC to conduct our interstate and international communications business as it is currently conducted. As a non-dominant carrier, we may install and operate additional facilities for the transmission of domestic interstate communications without prior FCC authorization, except to the extent that radio licenses are required. The following discussion summarizes some specific areas of federal regulation that directly or indirectly affect our business.

Local Competition. The Communications Act preempts state and local laws to the extent that they prevent competition in the provisioning of any telecommunications service. It also imposes a variety of duties on carriers providing local telephone services, including competitive carriers such as us, to promote competition in the provisioning of these services. These duties include requirements for all local carriers to:

interconnect with other telecommunications carriers;
establish reciprocal compensation arrangements for the completion of telecommunications service calls originated by customers of other carriers, which the FCC has interpreted to include bill and keep (a pricing arrangement under which each carrier terminates calls from the other at no charge);
permit the resale of their services;
permit users to retain their telephone numbers when changing carriers; and
provide competing carriers access to poles, ducts, conduits and rights-of-way at regulated prices.

Incumbent carriers, which are telephone companies that held monopoly local telephone service franchises before the Telecommunications Act of 1996, or their successors in interest, are subject to additional duties. These include obligations of incumbent carriers to:

offer interconnection at any technically feasible point in their networks on a non-discriminatory basis;
offer colocation of competitors' equipment at their premises on a non-discriminatory basis;
make available some of their network facilities, features and capabilities, referred to as Unbundled Network Elements, or UNEs, on non-discriminatory, cost-based terms; and
offer wholesale versions of their retail services for resale at discounted rates.

Collectively, these requirements recognize that local telephone service competition depends on cost-based and non-discriminatory interconnection with, and use of, some elements of incumbent carrier networks and facilities under specified circumstances. Failure to achieve and maintain such arrangements could have a material adverse effect on our ability to provide competitive local telephone services.

FCC rules define the scope of the facilities that incumbent carriers must make available as UNEs to competitive carriers such as us at rates based on the Total Element Long Run Incremental Cost, or TELRIC, standard. Incumbent carriers must offer access to their copper loops and subloops in all areas, until they choose to retire them, but must offer access to certain higher-capacity DS1 and DS3 transmission facilities only in wire center serving areas with relatively few business lines and collocated competitive carriers, as defined by detailed FCC regulations. In general, incumbent carriers are not required to offer UNEs at TELRIC-based rates for fiber loops, DS1 and DS3 transmission facilities and interoffice fiber optic facilities in relatively large wire centers or wire centers deemed to already be “competitive” based on FCC standards, or optical speed transmission facilities. Further, incumbent companies are not required to provide local switching as a UNE, which means that we cannot rely on the Unbundled Network Element-Platform, or UNE-P, to provide local services to customers at TELRIC-based rates. In some circumstances, AT&T, Verizon and other incumbent carriers are making available some of these facilities and services, either as lightly regulated special access services or under unregulated “commercial agreements,” at prices significantly higher than TELRIC.

Interconnection Agreements. Under the Communications Act, incumbent carriers are required to negotiate in good faith with competitive carriers such as us regarding terms for interconnection, colocation, reciprocal compensation for local traffic and access to UNEs. If the negotiating carriers cannot reach agreement within a prescribed time, either carrier may request binding arbitration of the disputed issues by a state regulatory commission. In addition, competitive carriers are permitted to “adopt” in their entirety agreements reached between the incumbent carrier and another carrier during the initial term of that agreement.
 
An interconnection agreement typically has a term of three years, although the parties may mutually agree to extend or amend such agreements. We operate under interconnection agreements with AT&T, CenturyLink, Fairpoint Communications, Frontier Communications, Verizon and Windstream. Our retail operating companies each maintain interconnection agreements with the incumbent in each state and service territory within which we purchase UNEs. We expect, but cannot assure, that each new interconnection agreement to which we are or will be a party will provide us with the ability to provide service in a state on a reasonable commercial basis. Many of our interconnection agreements provide either that a party is entitled to demand

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renegotiation of the entire agreement or particular provisions thereof based on intervening changes in law resulting from ongoing legal and regulatory activity, or as a result of an immediately effective change in law, in which case the agreement will be resolved pursuant to a dispute resolution process if the parties do not agree upon the impact of a change in law. The initial terms of many of our interconnection agreements with AT&T, Fairpoint and Verizon have expired; however, each of our expired agreements contains an “evergreen” provision that allows the agreement to continue in effect until terminated. New agreements could result in less favorable rates, terms and conditions than our prior agreements.

If we cannot negotiate new interconnection agreements or renew our existing interconnection agreements in each state on acceptable terms, we may invoke our ability to seek binding arbitration before state regulatory agencies. The arbitration process, which is conducted on a state-by-state basis, can be costly and time-consuming, and the results of arbitration may be unfavorable to us. If we are not able to renegotiate or enter into interconnection agreements on acceptable terms, or if we are subject to unfavorable arbitration decisions, our cost of doing business could increase and our ability to compete could be impeded. Moreover, our interconnection agreements and traffic exchange with companies other than ILECs (such as wireless and VoIP providers and other competitive carriers) are not subject to the statutory arbitration mechanism, making it potentially more difficult to reach any agreement on terms that we view as acceptable.

Consolidation in the telecommunications industry has significantly affected the availability of acceptable interconnection agreements that competitive carriers such as us can adopt without incurring the expense of lengthy negotiation and arbitration with an incumbent carrier in each state. Before their respective mergers with ILECs, AT&T and MCI dedicated significant internal and external resources to negotiate and arbitrate interconnection agreements that many competitive carriers adopted or used as model agreements. These resources and the resulting model agreements are no longer available as a result of consolidation among carriers, and it is likely that competitive carriers like us will be required to invest more resources than in the past to secure acceptable interconnection agreements.  The largest incumbent carriers are also attempting to eliminate mandatory interconnection through FCC rulemaking, and replace regulated interconnection arrangements with commercial negotiations.

Internet Protocol-Enabled Services. The FCC has classified cable modem services offered by cable companies and broadband Internet services offered by wireline LECs as “information services” and not telecommunications services subject to regulation under Title II of the Communications Act. The FCC's policy has also been to classify narrowband Internet access services as “information services,” which are not subject to traditional telecommunications services regulation, such as licensing or pricing regulation. Nonetheless, the FCC has asserted “ancillary jurisdiction” to impose certain types of regulation on information services, as discussed further under “Network Management and Internet Neutrality,” below.

The current regulatory environment for VoIP services remains unclear, as the FCC has not decided whether VoIP is an “information service” or “telecommunications service.” The FCC has, however, issued a series of rulings addressing aspects of the regulatory treatment of interconnected VoIP service, so that VoIP services that interconnect with the public switched telephone network (“PSTN”) are now subject to a number of regulatory requirements, including rules relating to Universal Service Fund (“USF”) contributions, Customer Proprietary Network Information rules, the provisioning of network access to authorized law enforcement personnel, local number portability, E-911 and others. The FCC also ruled that state utility regulatory commissions may not impose pricing and entry regulations on “nomadic” interconnected VoIP services such as that offered by Vonage, concluding that Vonage's VoIP application and others like it, are interstate services subject only to federal regulation. Reviewing courts have affirmed these FCC decisions. Broader questions on the regulatory status of VoIP remain to be resolved. We cannot predict how these matters will be resolved or the impact of these matters on companies with which we compete or interconnect.

In November 2011, the FCC adopted intercarrier compensation rules under which all traffic, including VoIP traffic that interconnects with the PSTN, ultimately will be subject to a bill-and-keep framework. We expect these new rules to result in a loss of revenues and could potentially increase our volume of carrier disputes. In addition, because the new rules regarding payment obligations for VoIP traffic are prospective only and do not address any intercarrier compensation payment obligations for VoIP traffic for any prior periods, we cannot predict how disputes regarding treatment of this traffic for prior periods will be resolved. The FCC also issued a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking which asks for further input on many of the issues involved, including IP to IP interconnection.  While the FCC rulemaking notes an “expectation that parties will negotiate in good faith” toward IP to IP interconnection agreements, the FCC notice asks questions about the legal framework that these interconnection arrangements should apply, which creates some potential uncertainty regarding whether these arrangements will be economic. 


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Intercarrier Compensation. The FCC regulates the access rates charged by local carriers to interexchange carriers for the origination and termination of long distance traffic. These access rates historically have made up a significant portion of the cost of providing long distance service. Under the FCC's November 2011 order, however, these rates are being reduced, and a uniform bill-and-keep framework for both intrastate and interstate terminating access traffic will be the ultimate end state for all telecommunications traffic exchanged with a local exchange carrier. The reforms required by the FCC's new rules are being phased in over a multi-year transition. Since July 2013, all local carriers' intrastate tariffed terminating access charges must be no higher than their interstate access charges. Under existing FCC rules, competitive carriers' interstate access charges may not be greater than those of the incumbent carriers with which they compete, so the net effect of these rules is to limit competitive carriers' intrastate access charges to the incumbent carrier's level. From now through 2018, further reductions in both intrastate and interstate terminating access charges and reciprocal compensation rates are required, with an ultimate end state of bill-and-keep (that is, a rate level of zero) for all transport and termination charges. These new rules significantly alter the manner in which all carriers, including us, are compensated and pay for the origination and termination of telecommunications traffic. We expect these new rules to result in a loss of revenues and potentially to increase our volume of carrier disputes. Several states, industry groups, and other telecommunications carriers filed petitions for review of the FCC order, which have been consolidated in the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. The outcome of these petitions is unpredictable.

Special Access. Special access is a service offered by incumbent carriers that provides for use of dedicated transmission facilities or private lines by wireline and wireless telecommunications carriers, Internet-based service providers and large enterprise end-users. We rely on the purchase of special access services for “last mile” access to many of our customers' locations. As a result, the price of special access services has a major effect on our ability to price our retail offerings to meet our gross margin expectations while remaining competitively priced in the retail market. Incremental increases in the prices of special access services will exert pressure on our gross margins. Since special access services are not subject to the unbundling requirements of the Communications Act, the prices for special access services have not been directly affected by the FCC's modification of network unbundling rules. To the extent, however, that the availability of UNE digital T1 lines may have served as a restraint on the prices charged for special access services, we could face increased prices for special access services given the limited alternative means of last mile access in some larger central offices resulting from application of the current unbundling rules.

In 1999, the FCC adopted rules that enable incumbent carriers to obtain pricing flexibility for their interstate special access services in particular metropolitan areas depending on the level of competition present in that area. We purchase interstate special access services from incumbent carriers in many metropolitan areas where pricing flexibility has been granted. Depending on the degree of pricing flexibility for which the incumbent carrier qualifies in particular areas, the incumbent carrier may be entitled to impose contracts with minimum revenue commitments and bundles of purportedly discounted and non-discounted services that, in effect, enable the carrier to charge substantially greater prices for special access services in those areas, while making it more difficult for competitive carriers to offer substitute services. In addition, the FCC has granted petitions by the incumbent carriers for forbearance from any regulation of some special access services, including packet-switched services such as Ethernet, and optical carrier services such as OC-3 and higher-capacity services. These services are not subject to any price regulations and are provided by incumbent carriers solely under contracts, which as noted above may contain minimum revenue commitments and other restrictive terms.

In October 2013, AT&T notified special access customers that it will no longer offer new term plans longer than 36 months for tariffed special access TDM (i.e. DS1 and DS3) services. AT&T filed its proposed tariff changes with the FCC in November 2013. The FCC suspended the proposed AT&T tariff change for five months and initiated an investigation, after which AT&T withdrew its filing, but it indicated that it intends to submit revised tariff changes in the near future. If AT&T were to ultimately prevail on the tariff change, this would effectively raise prices for EarthLink and eliminate the certainty of longer term agreements.

As a result of the mergers of BellSouth, SBC and AT&T and of MCI and Verizon, the number of providers of competitive access services has diminished. The FCC and the Department of Justice placed conditions on the AT&T and Verizon mergers to constrain the ability of AT&T and Verizon to raise prices on their wholesale special access and equivalent retail services, but these regulatory pricing constraints have now expired. AT&T and Verizon are therefore free to realign charges for special access services with current commercial rates. Because a substantial portion of our services are delivered over special access lines purchased from AT&T and Verizon, a significant increase in the price for special access could substantially increase our cost of services.

The FCC currently is considering whether and how to reform its special access rules. In 2012, the FCC suspended consideration of new petitions for metropolitan area pricing flexibility by incumbent carriers, but this decision does not affect previously approved pricing flexibility. The FCC also announced a project to gather extensive data concerning the special access market to allow it to formulate new pricing rules, but this project is likely to take considerable time to complete. We rely to a considerable extent on interstate special access services purchased from the incumbent carriers in order to connect to our customers. We cannot predict when the FCC will issue a decision regarding special access prices or how any such decision will affect our

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business. A significant increase in the price for special access could materially increase our cost of services. Additional pricing flexibility for special access services offered by the incumbent carriers could place us at a competitive disadvantage, both as a purchaser of access and as a vendor of access to other carriers or end-user customers.

Universal Service. The Communications Act and the FCC's rules provide for a federal USF, which is intended to subsidize communications services in rural and high-cost areas, services for low-income consumers, and services for schools, libraries and rural health care providers. Currently, the FCC assesses all telecommunications providers, including us, a percentage of interstate and international revenues received from U.S. retail customers. Providers are permitted to pass through their USF contribution assessment to their customers in a manner consistent with FCC billing regulations. The FCC is considering a number of proposed changes to the method of assessing these USF contributions, but we cannot predict when it may reach a decision or what types of changes may be adopted.

In December 2012, the FCC adopted an order clarifying its USF contribution rules that adversely affects companies like us that use special access services purchased from incumbent carriers to provide only broadband Internet access to our customers. The FCC stated that in these cases, the incumbent carrier must pay a USF contribution on its special access revenues, which these carriers as a matter of course pass through to the special access customer. This in turn increases our cost of purchasing special access service and using it as an input in providing broadband Internet services. However, we must compete against broadband Internet access services provided by incumbent carriers and cable television companies, among others, which are not subject to USF contribution requirements and therefore do not incur this added cost. Several companies have petitioned for FCC reconsideration of this decision, but we cannot predict whether these petitions will be successful or when they may be decided.

In November 2011, the FCC adopted extensive revisions to its high-cost support USF program, which largely subsidizes the provision of local telephone service by incumbent carriers in rural areas. Under the new program, it should be difficult for incumbent carriers to receive subsidies for services provided in competition with unsubsidized providers like us, although we cannot be certain that this will occur. It is also possible, under certain conditions, for competitive providers like us to seek subsidies for constructing and operating broadband Internet access facilities in rural areas. However, we cannot predict whether provision of broadband services in such rural areas will be economically practicable, even with potential subsidies.

Customer Proprietary Network Information and Privacy. The Communications Act and the FCC's rules require carriers to implement measures to prevent the unauthorized disclosure of Customer Proprietary Network Information (“CPNI”). CPNI includes information related to the quantity, technological configuration, type, destination and the amount of use of a communications service. CPNI rules include restrictions on telecommunications carriers and providers of interconnected VoIP service. We must file a verified certification of compliance by March 1 of each year that affirms the existence of training and other sales and marketing processes designed to prevent improper use and unauthorized release of CPNI. An inadvertent violation of these and related CPNI requirements by us could subject our company to significant fines or other regulatory penalties.

Additional measures to protect CPNI and consumer privacy are proposed from time to time, and both Congress and the FCC currently are considering such additional measures. These developments appear to be part of a broader trend to protect consumer information as it continues increasingly to be transmitted in electronic formats. We cannot predict whether additional requirements governing CPNI or other consumer data will be enacted, or whether such additional requirements will affect our ability to market or provide our services to current and future customers.

Network Management and Internet Neutrality. In August 2005, the FCC adopted a policy statement that outlined four principles intended to preserve and promote the open and interconnected nature of the public Internet, stating that consumers are entitled to access lawful Internet content and to run applications and use services of their choice, subject to the needs of law enforcement and reasonable network management. In an August 2008 decision, the FCC characterized these net neutrality principles as binding and enforceable and stated that network operators have the burden to prove that their network management techniques are reasonable. In that order, which was overturned by a court decision in April 2010, the FCC imposed sanctions on a broadband Internet access provider for managing its network by blocking or degrading some Internet transmissions and applications in a way that the FCC found to be unreasonably discriminatory. In December 2010, the FCC issued new rules to govern network management practices that, among other things, require public disclosure of network management practices and prohibit unreasonable discrimination in the transmission of Internet traffic. These rules have taken effect but on January 14, 2014, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit vacated certain aspects of these rules, including rules that barred fixed telecommunications providers and cable television operators from engaging in unreasonable discrimination and prevented all broadband providers, fixed and wireless, from blocking traffic. It is not possible to determine what course the FCC will take in the wake of the Court’s decision or what specific broadband network management techniques or related business arrangements may be deemed reasonable or unreasonable in the future. We cannot predict how any future legislative, regulatory or judicial decisions relating to net neutrality might affect our ability to manage our broadband network or develop new products or services.


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Forbearance. The Communications Act provides the FCC with the authority to not enforce, or “forbear” from enforcing, statutory requirements and regulations if certain public interest factors are satisfied. If the FCC were to forbear from enforcing regulations that have been established to enable competing broadband Internet access and VoIP, our business could be adversely affected. In December 2005, the FCC granted, in part, a petition for forbearance filed by CenturyLink (formerly Qwest) seeking relief from specified dominant carrier regulations, including some unbundling obligations related to high capacity loops and transport, in those portions of the Omaha metropolitan statistical area where facilities-based competition had allegedly increased significantly. The FCC's dominant carrier regulations require CenturyLink, in part, to offer UNEs and also serve as a check on dominant carrier pricing for other wholesale services, such as special access lines, that we seek to purchase at commercially acceptable prices. Since being granted relief by the FCC, CenturyLink has substantially increased the prices for the network elements that we use to provide services in eight central offices in the Omaha metropolitan statistical area.

Since 2007, the FCC has denied a series of petitions by CenturyLink and Verizon seeking similar forbearance from dominant carrier regulation in particular metropolitan areas. Most recently, in a June 2010 order denying a CenturyLink petition for relief in Phoenix, the FCC set forth specific thresholds and analytical frameworks that must be met for grant of such petitions. That FCC decision was affirmed by a court of appeals. If the FCC grants any forbearance or similar petitions filed by incumbent carriers in the future affecting markets in which we operate, our ability to purchase wholesale network services from these carriers at cost-based prices that would allow us to achieve our target profit margins in those markets could be materially adversely affected. The grant of these petitions also would enable incumbent carriers to compete with their competitors, including us, more aggressively on price in the affected markets.

Other Federal Regulation. In addition to the specific matters listed above, we are subject to a variety of other FCC filing, reporting, record-keeping and fee payment requirements. The FCC has the authority generally to condition, modify, cancel, terminate, revoke or decline to renew licenses and operating authority for failure to comply with federal laws and the FCC's rules, regulations and policies. Fines or other penalties also may be imposed for such violations. The FCC or third parties may raise issues with regard to our compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Moreover, we are subject to additional federal regulation and compliance requirements from other government agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission, the Internal Revenue Service and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

State Regulation

We are subject to various state laws and regulations. Most state PUCs require providers such as us to obtain certificates of authority from the commission before offering communications services between points within the state. We may also be required to file tariffs or price lists setting forth the terms, conditions and prices for specified services that are classified as intrastate and to update or amend our tariffs when we adjust our rates or add new products. We also are subject to various reporting and record-keeping requirements and contribute to state USF, E911 and other funds, and collect and/or pay other taxes, fees and surcharges where applicable. Certificates of authority can be conditioned, modified, canceled, terminated or revoked by state regulatory authorities for a carrier's failure to comply with state laws or rules, regulations and policies of state regulatory authorities. State utility commissions generally have authority to supervise telecommunications service providers in their states and to enforce state utility laws and regulations. Fines or other penalties also may be imposed for violations. PUCs or third parties may raise issues with regard to our compliance with applicable laws or regulations.

Through certain of our operating subsidiaries, we have authority to offer intrastate long distance services in all 50 U.S. states, and have authority to offer local telephone services in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. We provide local services, where authorized, by reselling the retail local services of the incumbent carrier in a given territory and, in some established markets, by using incumbent carriers' network elements and our own local switching facilities.

State PUCs have responsibility under the Communications Act to oversee relationships between incumbent carriers and their competitors with respect to such competitors' use of the incumbent carriers' network elements and wholesale local services. PUCs arbitrate interconnection agreements between the incumbent carriers and competitive carriers such as us when requested by one of the parties. Under the Telecommunications Act, the decisions of state PUCs with regard to interconnection disputes may be appealed to federal courts. There remain important unresolved issues regarding the scope of the authority of PUCs and the extent to which the commissions will adopt policies that promote local telephone service competition.

States also regulate in part the intrastate carrier access services of carriers like us. As an interexchange carrier (“IXC”), we are required to pay intrastate access charges to local exchange carriers when they originate or terminate our intrastate long distance traffic. As a CLEC, we charge IXCs intrastate access charges for the origination and termination services we provide to them. Under the FCC's November 2011 order, state commissions will have oversight of the intrastate access charge transition process to ensure that carriers comply with the FCC's timing and required reductions. States will continue to review intrastate switched access tariffs, as well as interconnection agreements and associated reciprocal compensation rates, to ensure compliance

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with the FCC's intercarrier compensation framework and transition. States may also have responsibility for determining the network “edge” for purposes of bill-and-keep agreements. What these proceedings may entail or to what extent requirements arising from such proceedings will affect our operations is unclear.

In addition, state legislatures are considering, and in some cases enacting, new laws that limit the authority of the state PUCs to regulate and oversee the business dealings of carriers. We could be harmed by these actions.

We will be affected by how states regulate the retail prices of the incumbent carriers with which we compete. As the degree of intrastate competition is perceived to increase, states are offering incumbent carriers increased pricing flexibility and deregulation of services deemed to be competitive. This flexibility and deregulation may present the incumbent carriers with an opportunity to subsidize services that compete with our services with revenues generated from their non-competitive services, thereby allowing them to offer competitive services at prices lower than most or all of their competitors. For example, some ILECs have obtained authority to create affiliates that operate on a much less regulated basis and, therefore, could provide significant competition in addition to the local services historically offered by more regulated entities. We cannot predict the extent to which these developments may affect our business.

Many states require prior approval for transfers of control of certified carriers, corporate reorganizations, acquisitions of telecommunications operations, assignment of carrier assets, carrier stock offerings and incurrence by carriers of significant debt obligations. These requirements can delay and increase the cost we incur to complete various financing transactions, including future stock or debt offerings, the sale of part or all of our regulated business or the acquisition of assets and other entities to be used in our regulated business.

Local Government Authorizations and Related Rights-of-Way

We are subject to numerous local regulations such as building codes, municipal franchise requirements and licensing. Such regulations vary on a city-by-city and county-by-county basis and can affect our provision of both network services and carrier services. We are required to obtain street use and construction permits and licenses or franchises to install and expand our fiber optic network using municipal rights-of-way. In some municipalities where we have installed network equipment, we are required to pay license or franchise fees based on a percentage of gross revenues or a per linear foot basis. Following the expiration of existing franchises, these fees are at risk of increasing. In many markets, incumbent carriers do not pay these franchise fees or pay fees that are substantially lower than those required to be paid by us, although the Telecommunications Act requires that, in the future, such fees be applied in a competitively neutral manner. To the extent that our competitors do not pay the same level of fees that we do, we could be at a competitive disadvantage. Termination of the existing franchise or license agreements before their expiration dates, or a failure to renew the franchise or license agreements, and a requirement that we remove the corresponding portion of our facilities or abandon the corresponding portion of our network, could harm our business. In addition, we would be adversely affected if we are unable to obtain additional authorizations for any new network construction on reasonable terms.

A number of states are considering reforming their laws and regulations governing the issuance of franchises and permits by local governmental authorities, and some states already have enacted laws authorizing some types of entities to secure a state-wide franchise. Congress also has considered from time to time, and may consider in the future, various proposals intended to reform the relationship between federal, state and local governments in connection with the franchising process. We cannot predict how these issues will be resolved, or the extent to which these developments will affect our ability to compete. Unresolved issues also exist regarding the ability of new local service providers to gain access to commercial office buildings to serve tenants. The outcome of these challenges cannot be predicted.

Other Regulation

Internet Taxation. The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act, which is in effect through November 2014, places a moratorium on taxes on Internet access and multiple, discriminatory taxes on electronic commerce. Certain states have enacted various taxes on Internet access and electronic commerce, and selected states' taxes are being contested on a variety of bases. If these state tax laws are not successfully contested, or if future state and federal laws imposing taxes or other regulations on Internet access and electronic commerce are adopted, our cost of providing Internet access services could be increased and our business could be adversely affected.

Consumer Protection. Federal and state governments have adopted consumer protection laws and undertaken enforcement actions to address advertising and user privacy. As part of these efforts, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and some state Attorney General offices have conducted investigations into the privacy practices of companies that collect information about individuals on the Internet. The FTC and various state agencies as well as individuals have investigated and asserted claims against, or instituted inquiries into, ISPs in connection with marketing, billing, customer retention, cancellation and disclosure practices.

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Proprietary Rights

Our EarthLink, EarthLink Business, EarthLink Carrier and PeoplePC trademarks are valuable assets to our business, and are registered trademarks in the United States. In particular, we believe the strength of these brands among existing and potential customers is important to the success of our business. Additionally, our EarthLink, EarthLink Business, EarthLink Carrier and PeoplePC service marks, proprietary technologies, domain names and similar intellectual property are also important to the success of our business. We principally rely upon trademark law as well as contractual restrictions to establish and protect our technology and proprietary rights and information. We require employees and consultants and, when possible, suppliers and distributors to sign confidentiality agreements, and we generally control access to, and distribution of, our technologies, documentation and other proprietary information. We will continue to assess appropriate occasions for seeking trademark and other intellectual property protections for those aspects of our business and technology that we believe constitute innovations providing us with a competitive advantage. From time to time, third parties have alleged that certain of our technologies infringe on their intellectual property rights. To date, none of these claims has had an adverse effect on our ability to market and sell our services.

Employees

As of December 31, 2013, we had 3,035 employees. None of our employees are represented by a labor union, and we have no collective bargaining agreements. We consider our relationship with our employees to be good and have not experienced interruptions of operations due to labor disagreements.

Available Information

We file annual reports, quarterly reports, current reports, proxy statements and other documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The public may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at (202) 942-8090. Also, the SEC maintains an Internet web site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers, including EarthLink, that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any documents that we file with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.

We also make available free of charge on or through our Internet web site (http://www.earthlink.net) our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and, if applicable, amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as well as Section 16 reports filed on Forms 3, 4 and 5, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Our Internet web site is not meant to be incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

We also provide a copy of our Annual Report on Form 10-K via mail, at no cost, upon receipt of a written request to the following address:

Investor Relations
EarthLink Holdings Corp.
1375 Peachtree Street
Atlanta, GA 30309

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Item 1A.    Risk Factors.
The following risk factors and other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K should be carefully considered. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may adversely impact our business operations. If any of the following risks occur, our business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows could be materially adversely affected.
Risks Related to Our Strategy

We may not be able to execute our strategy to be a leading communications and IT services provider, which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Our strategy for growth is to be the premier communications and IT services provider for mid-market and enterprise customers. This strategy has historically been focused on small and medium-sized businesses. During 2012 and 2013, we invested capital to extend our core fiber IP network, expand our IT services footprint with additional data centers and launch a next generation cloud hosting platform. Our objective is that our nationwide network and suite of IT services will allow us to compete for larger enterprise customers and more complex deals. We are focused on growing our IT services revenues through new and existing channels, leveraging distribution channels, increasing brand awareness and positioning our business to take advantage of important trends in these markets. As a result of focusing on investments in IT services, we are decreasing investments in traditional voice and data products, which makes us more reliant on the IT services market.

There can be no assurance that our strategy will be successful. The market for IT services is still relatively new and continues to evolve. While we believe our expertise, investments in infrastructure and portfolio of services provides us with a strong foundation to compete, if we do not have sufficient customer demand to support our new services, our financial results may be harmed. Our success depends on the timing and market acceptance of our new products and services, our ability to market our services in a cost-effective manner to new customers, our ability to differentiate our services from those of our competitors, our ability to maintain and expand our sales to existing customers, our ability to strengthen awareness of our brand, our ability to hire and train effective sales and IT personnel, our ability to provide quality implementation and customer support for these products and the reliability and quality of our services. If the market for these services fails to grow or continues to grow more slowly than we currently anticipate, or if our services fail to achieve widespread customer acceptance, our business would suffer. Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

We may not be able to grow revenues from our growth products and services to offset declining revenues from our traditional products and services, which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

Revenues from our traditional voice and data products have been declining and we expect these revenues to continue to decline. Specifically, Business Services revenues for traditional voice, lower-end broadband and web hosting have been declining due to economic, competitive, technological and regulatory developments. Additionally, our Consumer Services revenues have been declining and are expected to continue to decline due to the continued maturation of the market for Internet access and competitive pressures in the industry. We believe our growth products are MultiProtocol Label Switching ("MPLS"), hosted voice and IT services, and we are focused on growing revenues by selling these services to new and existing customers. However, we may not be successful in our efforts to increase revenues generated from our growth products and services to offset the revenue declines in our traditional products. In addition, the sales cycle for our growth products is longer than the sales cycle for our traditional voice and data products, especially as we compete for larger and more complex customers. If we are unable to successfully implement our strategy to counteract these declining revenues or if revenue growth takes longer than expected, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Our failure to achieve operating efficiencies will adversely affect our results of operations.

We have an operating framework that includes a disciplined focus on operational efficiency. We are currently focused on optimizing the cost structure of our business by optimizing our core access network, reducing network costs, streamlining our internal processes and operations and maximizing the cash flows generated from our business. The success of our operating efficiency and cost reduction initiatives is necessary to align costs with trends in our traditional voice and data products, as revenue from these products has been declining and as non-variable costs place further pressure on margins. We are currently incurring upfront costs to achieve these efficiencies and cost reduction initiatives. If we do not recognize the anticipated benefits of our cost reduction opportunities in a timely manner or they present greater than anticipated costs, our results of operations and cash flows will decline. Additionally, we are incurring increased costs related to our Business Services growth strategy. If the increased operating costs required to support our revenue growth turn out to be greater than anticipated, or our resulting revenues are lower

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than expected, we may be unable to improve our results of operations and/or cash flows.

As a result of our continuing review of our business, we may have to undertake further restructuring plans that would require additional charges, including incurring facility exit and restructuring charges.

We continue to evaluate our business, which may result in restructuring activities. We may choose to divest certain business operations based on management's assessment of their strategic value to our business, consolidate or close certain facilities or outsource certain functions. Decisions to eliminate or limit certain business operations in the future could involve the expenditure of capital, consumption of management resources, realization of losses, transition and wind-up expenses, further reduction in workforce, impairment of assets, facility consolidation and the elimination of revenues along with associated costs, any of which could cause our operating results to decline and may fail to yield the expected benefits.

We may be unsuccessful integrating acquisitions into our business, which could result in operating difficulties, losses and other adverse consequences.

Over the past several years, we have completed two major acquisitions, ITC^DeltaCom and One Communications, and several smaller acquisitions, including our acquisitions of STS Telecom and CenterBeam. Our management has been and continues to be involved in integrating these acquisitions into our business. Our ability to achieve the benefits of acquisitions depends in part on the successful integration and leveraging of technology, operations, sales and marketing channels and personnel. Integration and other risks associated with acquisitions can be more pronounced for larger and more complicated transactions or if multiple transactions are integrated simultaneously. The challenges and risks involved in the integration of our acquired businesses, as well as any future businesses that we may acquire, include:

diversion of management's attention and resources that would otherwise be available for the current operation of our business;
failure to fully achieve expected synergies and costs savings;
higher integration costs than anticipated;
the impact on employee morale and the retention of employees, many of whom may have specialized knowledge about the business;
lost revenues or opportunities as a result of our current or potential customers or strategic partners deciding to delay or forego business;
difficulties combining product offerings and entering into new markets in which we are not experienced;
difficulties integrating the sales organizations of acquired companies;
the integration of departments, operating support systems, such as provisioning and billing systems, and technologies, such as network equipment;
the need to implement and maintain uniform controls, procedures and policies throughout all of our acquired companies or the need to remediate significant control deficiencies that may exist at acquired companies; and
potential unknown liabilities.

The integration of our operating support system for our acquisitions has taken longer than anticipated to complete, which has impacted sales productivity and effectiveness, sales cycle time, quality and customer satisfaction. This is a complicated undertaking requiring significant resources and expertise and support from third-party vendors. There are numerous critical deliverables included in this integration, including: completion of systems development and testing, training for employees and careful process documentation. However, during the second half of 2013 we made progress on the integration of our operating support system and expect to make additional progress during 2014.

We may not realize anticipated synergies, cost savings, growth opportunities and operational efficiencies from our acquisitions, or the anticipated benefits may take longer or present greater costs to realize than expected. In addition, the failure to integrate our operating support and billing systems successfully or delay of integration could adversely affect our ability to implement our business plans. The occurrence or continuation of any of these risks could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.  

If we are unable to adapt to changes in technology and customer demands, we may not remain competitive, and our revenues and operating results could suffer.

We operate in an industry characterized by changing technology, changes in customer needs and frequent new service and product introductions. Our success will depend, in part, on our ability to use leading technologies effectively, to continue to develop our technical expertise, to enhance our existing services and to develop new services that meet changing customer needs on a timely and cost-effective basis. We may not be able to adapt quickly enough to changing technology, customer requirements

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and industry standards. If the technology choices we make prove to be incorrect, ineffective or unacceptably costly, we may not be able to compete effectively. In addition, new technologies may be protected by patents or other intellectual property laws, and, therefore, may be available only to our competitors.

Unfavorable general economic conditions could harm our business.

Unfavorable general economic conditions, including recession and disruptions to the credit and financial markets, could negatively affect our business. These conditions could adversely affect the affordability of, and customer demand for, some of our products and services and could cause customers to delay or forego purchases of our products and services, especially our IT services. Many of our existing and target customers are small and medium-sized businesses. We believe these businesses are more likely to be affected by economic downturns than larger, more established businesses. Unfavorable general economic conditions could cause business customers to reduce technology spending, which could negatively impact sales of our growth services. In addition, our business customers may not be able to obtain adequate access to credit, which could affect their ability to make timely payments to us. One or more of these circumstances could cause our revenues to decline, churn to increase, allowance for doubtful accounts and write-offs of accounts receivable to increase or otherwise adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Unfavorable general economic conditions could also negatively impact third-party vendors we rely on for services and network equipment integral to our business. If these vendors encounter financial difficulties, their ability to supply services and network equipment to us may be curtailed. If such vendors were to fail, we may not be able to replace them without disruption to, or deterioration of, our service and we may incur higher costs associated with new vendors. If we were required to purchase another manufacturer's equipment, we could incur significant initial costs to integrate the equipment into our network and to train personnel to use the new equipment. Any interruption in the services provided by our third-party vendors could adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We may be unable to successfully identify, manage and assimilate future acquisitions, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

We expect to continue to evaluate and consider potential strategic transactions in order to grow our business. At any given time, we may be engaged in discussions or negotiations with respect to one or more of such transactions that may be material to our financial condition and results of operations. There can be no assurance that any such discussions or negotiations will result in the consummation of any transaction, or that we will identify appropriate transactions on terms acceptable to us. Future acquisitions may result in significant costs and expenses and charges to earnings, including those related to severance, employee benefit costs, retention costs for executive officers and key employees, asset impairment charges, integration costs, charges from the elimination of duplicative facilities and contracts, unexpected liabilities, legal, accounting and financial advisory fees. Adverse capital markets conditions could also negatively impact our ability to make acquisitions. Additionally, future acquisitions may result in the dilutive issuances of equity securities, use of our cash resources, incurrence of debt or contingent liabilities, amortization expense related to acquired definite-lived intangible assets or the potential impairment of amounts capitalized as intangible assets, including goodwill. Any of these items could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We also may experience risks relating to the challenges and costs of closing a transaction and the risk that an announced transaction may not close. Completion of certain acquisition transactions are conditioned upon, among other things, the receipt of government approvals, including from the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) and certain state public utility commissions. Failure to complete a pending transaction would prevent us from realizing the anticipated benefits. We would also remain liable for significant transaction costs, including legal and accounting fees, whether or not the transaction is completed. We may also face increased market risks due to delays in completing transactions due to the need to receive these approvals. In addition, the market price of our common stock may reflect a market assumption as to whether the transaction will occur. Consequently, the completion of, or a failure to complete, a transaction could result in a significant change in the market price of our common stock.


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Risks Related to Our Business Services Segment

We face significant competition in the communications and IT services industry that could reduce our profitability.

The communications industry is highly competitive, and we expect this competition to intensify. These markets are rapidly changing due to industry consolidation, an evolving regulatory environment and the emergence of new technologies. We compete directly or indirectly with incumbent local exchange carriers (“ILECs”), such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc.; competitive telecommunications companies (“CLECs”), such as Level 3 Communications Inc., MegaPath, Inc., Windstream Holdings, Inc. and XO Communications; interexchange carriers, such as Sprint Nextel Corporation; wireless and satellite service providers; cable service providers, such as Charter Communications, Inc., Comcast Corporation, Cox Communications, Inc. and Time Warner Cable; and stand-alone VoIP providers. We experience significant pricing and product competition from AT&T and other incumbents that are the dominant providers of telecommunications services in our markets, and we experience intense competition from cable companies for small business customers. We have reduced, and may be required to further reduce, some or all of the prices we charge for our retail local, long distance and data services.

The IT services industry is also highly competitive. These markets are highly fragmented and evolving. Competitors range in size from small, local independent firms to very large telecommunications companies, hardware manufacturers and system integrators. We compete directly or indirectly with telecommunications companies such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Level 3 and Verizon; system integrators such as Accenture, CSC, Hewlett-Packard and IBM; managed hosting and cloud providers such as Amazon Web Services, Equinix, Inc., Internap Network Services Corporation, Rackspace Hosting, Inc. and Web.com Group, Inc.; and managed security companies such as Perimeter eSecurity and Dell Secure Works.

We believe the primary competitive factors in the communications and IT services industries include price, availability, reliability of service, network security, variety of service offerings, quality of service and reputation of the service provider. While we believe our business services compete favorably based on some of these factors, we are at a competitive disadvantage with respect to certain of our competitors. Many of our current and potential competitors have greater market presence, engineering, technical and marketing capabilities and financial, personnel and other resources substantially greater than ours; own larger and more diverse networks; are subject to less regulation; or have substantially stronger brand names. In addition, industry consolidation has resulted in larger competitors that have greater economies of scale. Consequently, these competitors may be better equipped to charge lower prices for their products and services, to provide more attractive offerings, to develop and expand their communications and network infrastructures more quickly, to adapt more swiftly to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements, to increase prices that we pay for wholesale inputs to our services and to devote greater resources to the marketing and sale of their products and services.

Competition could adversely impact us in several ways, including: (i) the loss of customers and resulting revenue; (ii) the possibility of customers reducing their usage of our services or shifting to less profitable services; (iii) reduced traffic on our networks; (iv) the need to expend substantial time or money on new capital improvement projects; and (v) the need to lower prices or increase marketing expenses to remain competitive.

Failure to retain existing customers could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.
During 2013, we experienced an increase in churn for our retail business customers, primarily single location customers using traditional voice and data products, including traditional voice, lower-end broadband and web hosting. Many of these customers were coming out of contract term. Our customers have no obligation to renew their agreements for our services after the expiration of their initial commitment, and these service agreements may not be renewed at the same price or level of service, if at all. If our customers do not renew their agreements with us or if they renew on less favorable terms, our revenue could decline and our business may suffer. Changes in the economy, increased competition from other providers, or issues with the quality of service we deliver can also impact our customer churn. In addition, we have implemented, and expect to continue to implement, targeted price increases, which could negatively impact customer churn. To combat churn, we are offering our customers a bundle of services, including our growth products, are increasing retention efforts, and are focusing on mid-market and larger enterprise customers with multiple locations, who have a lower churn profile. However, failure to retain existing customers could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

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Decisions by legislative or regulatory authorities, including the Federal Communications Commission, relieving incumbent carriers of certain regulatory requirements, and possible further deregulation in the future, may restrict our ability to provide services and may increase the costs we incur to provide these services.

We rely in significant part on purchasing wholesale services, including special access services, interconnection to exchange traffic with incumbent and other carriers, and leasing network facilities from AT&T, CenturyLink, Verizon and other incumbent carriers. Over the past several years, the FCC has reduced or eliminated a number of regulations governing the incumbent carriers' offerings, which has had the effect of reducing these carriers' competition-related obligations. These FCC actions include removal of local switching and other network elements from the list of elements that the incumbent carriers must provide on an unbundled basis at TELRIC cost-based rates, the grant of broad pricing flexibility to incumbents for their special access services in many areas, and the nationwide deregulation of certain services including optical carrier transmission and packet-switched services. If the FCC continues to reduce or eliminate regulations governing incumbent carriers, and if the incumbent carriers do not continue to permit us to purchase these services from them under commercial arrangements at reasonable rates, our business could be adversely affected and our cost of providing local service could increase. This can have a significant adverse impact on our operating results and cash flows.

The incumbent carriers regularly attempt to further reduce their competition-related obligations to non-incumbent carriers like us. In November 2012, AT&T filed a petition with the FCC requesting that the FCC open a proceeding “to facilitate… the transition” from technology platforms such as copper loops to IP-based platforms, which proceeding could have the effect of further reducing the local competition-related obligations of the incumbent carriers. The FCC has also established a task force to coordinate its efforts on IP interconnection. Likewise, certain states have taken steps to address IP interconnection. In late 2013, AT&T proposed to eliminate certain multi-year discount plans for purchases of special access services, which we have benefitted from. Although AT&T withdrew its proposal after the FCC initiated an investigation, AT&T indicated that it intends to submit a revised proposal and there is no assurance that AT&T will not be permitted to eliminate these discounts in the future. If the FCC, Congress, state legislatures or state regulatory agencies were to adopt measures further reducing the local competition-related obligations of the incumbents or allowing those carriers to increase further the rates we must pay, we could experience additional increases in operating costs that would negatively affect our operating results and cash flows. In addition, the FCC currently is considering whether and how to reform its special access rules. We rely to a considerable extent on interstate special access services purchased from the incumbent carriers in order to connect to our customers. If the FCC adopts rules that do not protect our ability to purchase these services at reasonable prices on non-discriminatory terms as compared to our competitors, our business could be adversely affected.

If we are unable to interconnect with AT&T, Verizon and other incumbent carriers on acceptable terms, our ability to offer competitively priced local telephone services will be adversely affected.

To provide local telephone services, we must interconnect with and resell the services of the incumbent carriers to supplement our own network facilities, pursuant to interconnection agreements between us and the incumbent carriers. We operate under interconnection agreements with AT&T, CenturyLink, Fairpoint Communications, Frontier Communications, Verizon and Windstream. An interconnection agreement typically has a term of three years, although the parties may mutually agree to extend or amend such agreements. Federal law requires these carriers to negotiate the terms of interconnection agreements with us in good faith, but if such negotiations are unsuccessful we may be forced into an expensive arbitration proceeding before state PUCs, with an uncertain outcome. If we are not able to renegotiate or enter into interconnection agreements on acceptable terms, or if we are subject to unfavorable arbitration decisions, our cost of doing business could increase and our ability to compete could be impeded. Moreover, our interconnection agreements and traffic exchange agreements with companies other than ILECs (such as wireless and VoIP providers and other competitive carriers) are not subject to the statutory arbitration mechanism, making it potentially more difficult to reach any agreement on terms that we view as acceptable. If we are unable to enter into, maintain, or update favorable interconnection agreements in our markets, our ability to provide local services on a competitive and profitable basis may be adversely affected. Any successful effort by the incumbent carriers to deny or substantially limit our access to their network elements or wholesale services (in commercial agreements or by regulatory petition or otherwise) also would harm our ability to provide local telephone services.

Our operating performance will suffer if we are not offered competitive rates for the access services we need to provide our long distance services.

We depend on other communications companies to originate and terminate a significant portion of the long distance traffic initiated by our customers. The FCC regulates the access rates charged by local carriers to interexchange carriers for the origination and termination of long distance traffic. These access rates make up a significant portion of the cost of providing long distance service. In late 2011, the FCC adopted policy changes that over time are reducing carriers' terminating access rates. These

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rules significantly alter the manner in which all carriers, including carriers that use different service platforms such as wireless and VoIP, are compensated for the termination of telecommunications traffic. These rules have generally reduced the rates that we pay for our access services. Our operating performance will suffer if we are not offered these access services at rates that are substantially equivalent to the costs of, and rates charged to, our competitors and that permit profitable pricing of our long distance services.

We may experience reductions in switched access and reciprocal compensation revenue.

We may experience declines in revenues for switched access and reciprocal compensation as a result of lower volume of traditional long distance voice minutes and FCC and state regulations compelling a reduction of switched access and reciprocal compensation rates. In late 2011, the FCC adopted policy changes that over time are reducing carriers' terminating access rates. We have modified our applicable state access tariffs and billing to implement the FCC's required reduction in intrastate access charges. These rules have resulted in a loss of revenues and an increase in our volume of carrier disputes, and we expect this to continue and we are required to reduce our interstate access charges and reciprocal compensation charges in coming years. Moreover, the FCC has pending an open proceeding that asks whether originating switched access charges should also be reduced. Switched access and reciprocal compensation together have been declining over time. There can be no assurance that we will be able to compensate for the reduction in intercarrier compensation revenue with other revenue sources or increased volume.

Failure to obtain and maintain necessary permits and rights-of-way could interfere with our network infrastructure and operations.

We must negotiate and manage agreements with state highway authorities, local governments, transit authorities, local telephone companies and other utilities, railroads, long distance carriers and other parties to obtain and maintain rights-of-way and similar franchises and licenses needed to install, operate and maintain fiber optic cable and our other network elements. If any of these authorizations terminate or lapse, our operations could be adversely affected.

We have substantial business relationships with several large telecommunications carriers, and some of our customer agreements may not continue due to financial difficulty, acquisitions, non-renewal or other factors, which could adversely affect our wholesale revenue and results of operations.

We generate wholesale revenue from the sale of transmission capacity to other telecommunications carriers and have substantial business relationships with several large telecommunications carriers for whom we provide services. Replacing this wholesale revenue may be difficult because individual enterprise and small to medium business customers tend to place smaller service orders than our larger carrier customers. In addition, pricing pressure on services that we sell to our carrier customers may challenge our ability to grow revenue from carrier customers. As a result, if our larger carrier customers terminate the services they receive from us, our wholesale revenues and results of operations could be adversely affected.

We obtain a majority of our network equipment and software from a limited number of third-party suppliers.

We obtain the majority of our network equipment and software from a limited number of third-party suppliers. We also rely on these suppliers for technical support and assistance. If any of these relationships is terminated or if the third-party suppliers were to otherwise fail to provide necessary equipment and software, our ability to efficiently maintain, upgrade or expand our network could be impaired. Although we believe that we would be able to address our future equipment needs with equipment obtained from other suppliers, we cannot assure that such equipment would be compatible with our network without significant modifications or cost, if at all. If we were unable to obtain the equipment necessary to maintain our network, our ability to attract and retain customers and provide our services would be impaired.

Work stoppages experienced by other communications companies on whom we rely for service could adversely impact our ability to provision and service our customers.

To offer voice and data services, we must interconnect our network with the networks of the incumbent carriers and resell the services of the incumbent carriers to supplement our own network facilities. We place a significant amount of reliance on these carriers to provide these connections promptly after we place the order, so that we can complete the provisioning of services for our customers. Work stoppages experienced by AT&T, Verizon or any other carrier on which we rely, whether due to labor disputes or other matters, could adversely affect our business through unanticipated delays in the delivery of services purchased to our customers and increased prices to source purchases through alternative vendors, and ultimately could result in cancellation of pending orders. Additionally, work stoppages could result in delays in scheduled or necessary maintenance events in response to trouble tickets or outages on our vendor's networks for existing customer services or for services that we purchase from them for our own needs. Any such disruption could have an adverse effect on our business, our results of operations and cash flows.

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Risks Related to Our Consumer Services Segment

Our commercial and alliance arrangements may not be renewed or may not generate expected benefits, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

A significant number of our new consumer subscribers are generated through our agreements with Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks, Dish Network and other strategic alliances. Generally, our strategic alliances and marketing relationships are not exclusive and may have a short term. Our agreement with Time Warner Cable expires in October 2015. Our agreement with Bright House Networks expires at the end of March 2014; however, we are currently in negotiations for renewal. Our agreement with Dish Network operates on an annual renewal basis and expires in September 2014. There are no assurances we will be able to renew these agreements or other strategic alliances as they expire or otherwise terminate, or that we will receive the same benefits as we do today if the agreements are extended. Our inability to maintain our marketing relationships or establish new marketing relationships could result in delays and increased costs in adding paying subscribers and adversely affect our ability to add new customers, which could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, there is no commitment for Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks and other partners to provide us with new customers and these partners may market their own services rather than ours. We have experienced a decrease in new consumer subscribers as a result of decreased marketing efforts of some of our partners. Further decreases in the number of new consumer subscribers generated through these relationships could adversely affect our results of operations.

Our consumer business is dependent on the availability of third-party network service providers.

Our consumer business depends on the capacity, affordability, reliability and security of third-party network service providers. Only a small number of providers offer the network services we require, and the majority of our network services are currently purchased from a limited number of network service providers. Our largest providers of broadband connectivity are AT&T, Bright House Networks, CenturyLink, Comcast Corporation, Fairpoint, Frontier, MegaPath, Time Warner Cable and Verizon. Many network service providers have merged and may continue to merge, which would reduce the number of suppliers from which we could purchase network services. Our principal providers for narrowband services are AT&T, GlobalPOPs and Windstream. We also purchase narrowband services from certain regional and local providers.

We cannot be certain of renewal or non-termination of our contracts or that legislative or regulatory factors will not affect our contracts. Our results of operations could be materially adversely affected if we are unable to renew or extend contracts with our current network service providers on acceptable terms, renew or extend current contracts with our network service providers at all, acquire similar network capacity from other network providers, or otherwise maintain or extend our footprint. Additionally, each of our network service providers sells network access to some of our competitors and could choose to grant those competitors preferential network access or pricing. Many of our network service providers compete with us in the market to provide consumer Internet access. As our consumer business continues to decline, our vendors may not want to continue their relationship with us or do so at current prices. Our agreements generally have volume based tiered pricing which is leading to higher unit costs as we see a decline in subscribers over time. In addition, as our consumer subscribers continue to decline, our value-added partners may raise their wholesale prices or discontinue their partnering relationship with us. Such events may cause us to incur additional costs, pay increased rates for wholesale access services, increase the retail prices of our service offerings and/or discontinue providing retail access services, any of which could adversely affect our ability to compete in the market for consumer access services.

We face significant competition in the Internet access industry that could reduce our profitability.

The Internet access industry is extremely competitive, and we expect competition to continue to intensify. We compete directly or indirectly with national communications companies and local exchange carriers, such as AT&T, CenturyLink, Verizon and Windstream; cable companies providing broadband access, including Charter Communications, Inc., Comcast, Cox Communications, Inc. and Time Warner Cable; local and regional ISPs; established online services companies, such as AOL and the Microsoft Network; free or value-priced ISPs, such as United Online, Inc. which provides service under the brands Juno and NetZero; wireless Internet service providers; content companies and email providers, such as Google and Yahoo!; and satellite and fixed wireless service providers. In addition, technologies such as 4G, Ethernet or other alternatives to network access, have products or services that compete with ours. Competitors for our advertising services also include content providers, large web publishers, web search engine and portal companies, Internet advertising providers, content aggregation companies, social-networking web sites, and various other companies that facilitate Internet advertising.

We believe the primary competitive factors in the Internet access industry are price, speed, features, coverage area and quality of service. While we believe our Internet access services compete favorably based on some of these factors when compared to some Internet access providers, we are at a competitive disadvantage relative to some or all of these factors with respect to other

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of our competitors. Current and potential competitors include many large companies that have substantially greater market presence and greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we have. Our dial-up Internet access services do not compete favorably with broadband services with respect to speed, and dial-up Internet access services no longer have a significant, if any, price advantage over certain broadband services. Most of the largest providers of broadband services, such as cable and telecommunications companies, control their own networks and offer a wider variety of services than we offer, including voice, data and video services. Their ability to bundle services and to offer broadband services at prices below the price that we can profitably offer comparable services puts us at a competitive disadvantage. In addition, our only significant access to offer broadband services over cable is through our agreement with Time Warner Cable.

Competition could adversely impact us in several ways, including: (i) the loss of customers and resulting revenue; (ii) the possibility of customers shifting to less profitable services; (iii) the need to lower prices of our services; and (iv) the need to increase marketing expenses or other operating costs to remain competitive. We experience pricing pressures for our consumer access services, particularly our consumer broadband services, due to competition, volume-based pricing and other factors. Many providers have reduced and may continue to reduce the retail price of their Internet access services to maintain or increase their market share, which could cause us to reduce, or prevent us from raising, our prices. We may encounter further market pressures to: migrate existing customers to lower-priced service offerings; restructure service offerings to offer more value; reduce prices; and respond to particular short-term, market-specific situations, such as special introductory pricing or new product or service offerings. Any of the above could adversely affect our revenues and profitability.

The continued decline of our consumer access subscribers will adversely affect our results of operations.

During the year ended December 31, 2013, our average consumer access subscribers decreased from 1.2 million to 1.1 million. Our consumer access subscriber base and revenues have been declining due to continued maturation of the market for Internet access and competitive pressures in the industry. We expect our consumer access subscriber base and revenues to continue to decline, which will adversely affect our profitability and results of operations. In addition, we have implemented, and expect to continue to implement, targeted price increases, which could negatively impact our churn rates. Our strategy for consumer access subscribers is to engage in limited sales and marketing efforts and focus instead on retaining customers and adding customers that are more likely to produce an acceptable rate of return. If we do not maintain our relationships with current customers or acquire new customers, our revenues will decline and our profitability will be adversely affected. In addition, we will not be able to reduce costs proportional to our revenue declines over time.

Potential regulation of Internet service providers could adversely affect our operations.

Our Internet access services are not currently subject to substantial regulation by the FCC or state public utilities commissions. Narrowband and broadband Internet access are currently classified as “information services” and are not subject to traditional telecommunications services regulation, such as licensing, pricing regulation or Universal Service Fund ("USF") contribution obligations. Additionally, the current regulatory environment for VoIP services remains unclear, as the FCC has not decided whether VoIP is an “information service” or “telecommunications service”. Classifying VoIP as a telecommunications service could require us to obtain a telecommunications license for VoIP services. However, under FCC rules, our VoIP services are required to comply with many of the same regulatory obligations, including payment of fees, as legacy telephone services. Any change to the regulation of Internet service providers could significantly impact our costs for these services and adversely affect our results of operations.

General Risks

Cyber security breaches could harm our business.
We maintain large repositories of personal and proprietary customer data and are a third-party provider of network and IT services. Cyber security breaches expose us to a risk of unauthorized access to this information. The risk that a security breach could seriously harm our business is likely to increase as we expand our cloud and IT services. We are regularly subject to cyber security attacks and are also subject to employee error or malfeasance or other disruptions, although no attack or other disruption has had material consequences to date. Techniques used to obtain unauthorized access to, or to sabotage, systems change frequently and generally are not recognized until launched against a target. We may be required to use significant capital and other resources to remedy, protect against or alleviate these and related problems, and we may not be able to remedy these problems in a timely manner, or at all. A material security breach could damage our reputation, increase our security costs, expose us to litigation and lead to the loss of existing or potential customers. If our services are perceived as not being secure, our business, including our strategy to serve as a leading communications and IT services provider, may be adversely affected.


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Privacy concerns relating to our business could damage our reputation and deter current and potential users from using our services.

Concerns about our practices with regard to the collection, use, disclosure or security of personal information or other privacy-related matters, even if unfounded, could damage our reputation and operating results. We strive to comply with all applicable data protection laws and regulations, as well as our own posted privacy policies. However, any failure or perceived failure to comply with these laws, regulations or policies may result in proceedings or actions against us by government entities or others, which could have an adverse effect on our business.

Federal and state governments have adopted consumer protection laws and undertaken enforcement actions to address advertising and user privacy. Our services and business practices, or changes to our services and business practices could subject us to investigation or enforcement actions if we fail to adequately comply with applicable consumer protection laws. Existing and future federal and state laws and regulations also may affect the manner in which we are required to protect confidential customer data and other information, which could increase the cost of our operations and our potential liability if the security of our confidential customer data is breached.

Interruption or failure of our network, information systems or other technologies could impair our ability to provide our services, which could damage our reputation and harm our operating results.

Our success depends on our ability to provide reliable service. Many of our products are supported by our eight data centers. Our network, data centers, central offices, corporate headquarters and those of our third-party service providers are vulnerable to damage or interruption from fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, floods and other natural disasters, terrorist attacks, power loss, capacity limitations, telecommunications failures, software and hardware defects or malfunctions, break ins, sabotage and vandalism, human error and other disruptions that are beyond our control. Some of our systems are not fully redundant, and our disaster recovery or business continuity planning may not be adequate. We have experienced interruptions in service in the past due to factors such as vulnerabilities in equipment, configuration, design and operating procedures. We also experience interruptions due to cable damage, theft of our equipment, power outages, inclement weather and service failures of our third-party service providers.  We may experience service interruptions or system failures in the future. We continue to invest capital to enhance, expand and increase the reliability of our network, but these capital expenditures may not achieve the results we expect. The occurrence of any disruption or system failure or other significant disruption to business continuity may result in a loss of business, increase expenses, damage our reputation for providing reliable service, subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny or expose us to litigation and possible financial losses, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Our business depends on effective business support systems and processes.

Our business depends on our ability to maintain and develop effective business support systems. Business support systems are needed for quoting, accepting and inputting customer orders for services; provisioning, installing and delivering services; providing customers with direct access to our information systems so that they can manage the services that they purchase from us, generally through on-line customer portals; and billing for services. To effectively manage our information technology infrastructure, we will need to continue to maintain our data, billing and other operational and financial systems, procedures and controls, which can be costly. We have experienced system failures from time to time, and any interruption in the availability of our business support systems, in particular our billing systems, could result in an immediate, and possibly substantial, loss of revenues. Our ability to maintain, expand and update our information technology infrastructure in response to acquisitions, growth and changing needs is important to the continued implementation of our business strategy.  In addition, as our consumer business continues to decline, we are more dependent on fewer individuals to maintain our internal consumer business support systems. Our inability to maintain, expand or upgrade our technology infrastructure could have adverse consequences, which could include the delayed implementation of new service offerings, increased acquisition integration costs, service or billing interruptions and the diversion of development resources.

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If we, or other industry participants, are unable to successfully defend against disputes or legal actions, we could face substantial liabilities or suffer harm to our financial and operational prospects.

We are currently a party to various disputes, litigation or other legal proceedings arising from normal business activities, including regulatory audits, trademark and patent infringement, billing disputes, rights of access, tax, consumer protection, employment and tort. The result of any current or future disputes, litigation or other legal proceedings is inherently unpredictable. Defending against disputes, litigation or other legal proceedings may involve significant expense and diversion of management's attention and resources from other matters. Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we may not prevail in these actions. In addition, our ongoing operations may subject us to litigation risks and costs in the future. Both the costs of defending lawsuits and any settlements or judgments against us could adversely affect our results of operations.

We are also subject to the risks associated with the resolution of various third-party disputes, lawsuits, arbitrations and proceedings affecting our Business Services segment. The deregulation of the telecommunications industry, the implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the evolution of telecommunications infrastructure from time-division multiplexing to Internet Protocol, and the distress of many carriers in the telecommunications industry as a result of continued competitive factors and financial pressures have resulted in the involvement of numerous industry participants in disputes, lawsuits, proceedings and arbitrations before state and federal regulatory commissions, private arbitration organizations such as the American Arbitration Association, and courts over many issues that will be important to our financial and operational success. These issues include the interpretation and enforcement of existing interconnection agreements and tariffs, the terms of new interconnection agreements, operating performance obligations, intercarrier compensation, treatment of different categories of traffic (for example, traffic originated or terminated on wireless or VoIP), the jurisdiction of traffic for intercarrier compensation purposes, the wholesale services and facilities available to us, the prices we will pay for those services and facilities and the regulatory treatment of new technologies and services.

We may be accused of infringing upon the intellectual property rights of third parties, which is costly to defend and could limit our ability to use certain technologies in the future.

From time to time third parties have alleged that we infringe on their intellectual property rights, including patent rights, and we expect to continue to be subject to such claims. We may be unaware of filed patent applications and of issued patents that could be related to our products and services. Increasingly, these claims are made by patent holding companies that are not operating companies. The alleging parties generally seek royalty payments for prior use as well as future royalty streams. Defending against disputes, litigation or other legal proceedings, whether or not meritorious, may involve significant expense and diversion of management's attention and resources from other matters. Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we may not prevail in these actions. Both the costs of defending lawsuits and any settlements or judgments against us could adversely affect our results of operations.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property.

We regard our trademarks, including EarthLink, EarthLink Business, EarthLink Carrier and PeoplePC, as valuable assets to our business. In particular, we believe the strength of these brands among existing and potential customers is important to the success of our business. Additionally, our EarthLink, EarthLink Business, EarthLink Carrier and PeoplePC service marks, proprietary technologies, domain names and similar intellectual property are also important to the success of our business. We principally rely upon trademark law as well as contractual restrictions to establish and protect our technology and proprietary rights and information. We require employees and consultants and, when possible, suppliers and distributors to sign confidentiality agreements, and we generally control access to, and distribution of, our technologies, documentation and other proprietary information. The efforts we have taken to protect our proprietary rights may not be sufficient or effective. Third parties may infringe or misappropriate our trademarks and similar proprietary rights. If we are unable to protect our proprietary rights from unauthorized use, our brand image may be harmed and our business may suffer. In addition, protecting our intellectual property and other proprietary rights is expensive and time consuming. Any increase in the unauthorized use of our intellectual property could make it more expensive to do business and consequently harm our results of operations.

We may be unable to hire and retain sufficient qualified personnel, and the loss of any of our key executive officers could adversely affect us.

Our business depends on our ability to hire and retain key executive officers, senior management, sales, IT and other key personnel, many of whom have significant experience in our industry and whose expertise is required to successfully transition our business into a leading communications and IT services provider. There is substantial and continuous competition for highly skilled sales and IT personnel. Acquisitions and workforce reductions may affect our ability to retain or replace key personnel,

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harm employee morale and productivity or disrupt our business. Key employees may depart because of issues relating to the uncertainty and difficulty resulting from integration changes or a desire not to remain with us following a merger transaction or a restructuring.  Effective succession planning is important to our long-term success. Failure to ensure effective transfer of knowledge and transitions involving key employees could hinder execution of our business strategies. Finally, the loss of any of our key executives could impair our ability to execute our business strategy or otherwise have a material adverse effect on us.

Government regulations could adversely affect our business or force us to change our business practices.

Our services are subject to varying degrees of federal, state and local regulation. Federal, state and local regulations governing our services are the subject of ongoing judicial proceedings, rulemakings and legislative initiatives that could change the manner in which our industry operates and affect our business. Changes in regulations or in governing legislation, such as the Telecommunications Act of 1996, could have a significant effect on our business, particularly if the change impairs our ability to interconnect with incumbent carrier networks, lease portions of other carriers' networks or resell their services at reasonable prices, or lease elements of networks of the ILECs under acceptable rates, terms and conditions. We cannot predict the outcome of any ongoing legislative initiatives or administrative or judicial proceedings or their potential impact upon the communications and information technology industries generally or upon us specifically.

Failure to make proper payments for federal USF assessments, FCC regulatory fees or other amounts mandated by federal and state regulations; failure to maintain proper state tariffs and certifications; failure to comply with federal, state or local laws and regulations; failure to obtain and maintain required licenses, franchises and permits; imposition of burdensome license, franchise or permit requirements for us to operate in public rights-of-way; and imposition of new burdensome or adverse regulatory requirements could limit the types of services we provide or the terms on which we provide these services.

We are subject to regulatory audits in the ordinary course of business with respect to various matters, including audits by the Universal Service Administrative Company on USF assessments and payments. These audits can cover periods for several years prior to the date the audit is undertaken and could result in the imposition of liabilities, interest and penalties if our positions are not accepted by the auditing entity. Our financial statements contain reserves for certain of such potential liabilities which we consider reasonable. Calculation of payments due with respect to these matters can be complex and subject to differences in interpretation. As a result, these audits could result in liabilities in excess of such reserves which could adversely affect our results of operations.
Our business also is subject to a variety of other U.S. laws and regulations from various entities, including the Federal Trade Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, as well as by state and local regulatory agencies, that could subject us to liabilities, claims or other remedies. Compliance with these laws and regulations is complex and may require significant costs. In addition, the regulatory framework relating to Internet and communications services is evolving and both the federal government and states from time to time pass legislation that impacts our business. It is likely that additional laws and regulations will be adopted that would affect our business. We cannot predict the impact future laws, regulatory changes or developments may have on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. The enactment of any additional laws or regulations, increased enforcement activity of existing laws and regulations, or claims by individuals could significantly impact our costs or the manner in which we conduct business, all of which could adversely affect our results of operations and cause our business to suffer.

Our business may suffer if third parties are unable to provide services or terminate their relationships with us.

Our business and financial results depend, in part, on the availability and quality of certain third-party service providers. Specifically, we rely on third parties for customer service and technical support, web hosting services, certain billing and collection services and E911 service for our VoIP services. Our Consumer Services segment relies primarily on one customer service and technical support vendor. We may have to increase the price we pay or find a new supplier, which could impact our customers' experience and increase churn. We are not currently equipped to provide the necessary range of service and support functions in the event that any of our service providers become unable or unwilling to offer these services to us. Our outsourced customer support providers utilize international locations to provide us with customer service and technical support services, and as a result, our customer support providers may become subject to financial, economic, environmental and political risks beyond our or the providers' control, which could jeopardize their ability to deliver customer service and technical support services. In addition, our VoIP services, including our E911 service, depend on the proper functioning of facilities and equipment owned and operated by third parties and is, therefore, beyond our control. If one or more of our service providers does not provide us with quality services, or if our relationship with any of our third party vendors terminates and we are unable to provide those services internally or identify a replacement vendor in an orderly, cost-effective and timely manner, our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows could suffer.


25


We may be required to recognize impairment charges on our goodwill and intangible assets, which would adversely affect our results of operations and financial position.

As of December 31, 2013, we had approximately $139.2 million of goodwill and $155.4 million of other intangible assets. Of the goodwill, $50.3 million was allocated to our Business Services reporting unit and $88.9 million was allocated to our Consumer Services reporting unit. We perform an impairment test of our goodwill annually during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year or when events occur or circumstances change that would more-likely-than-not indicate that goodwill or any such assets might be impaired. We evaluate the recoverability of our definite-lived intangible assets for impairment when events occur or circumstances change that would indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances, indicating that the carrying value of our goodwill or intangible assets may not be recoverable, include a decline in stock price and market capitalization, reduced future cash flow estimates, higher customer churn and slower growth rates in our industry.

During the first quarter of 2013, we performed an interim goodwill impairment test following a sustained decrease in our stock price and market capitalization which resulted in a $256.7 million non-cash impairment charge to goodwill relating to our Business Services reporting unit. We did not record any goodwill impairment as a result of our fiscal 2013 annual goodwill impairment test. However, deterioration in estimated future cash flows in our reporting units could result in future goodwill impairment. As we continue to assess the ongoing expected cash flows and carrying amounts of our goodwill and other intangible assets, changes in economic conditions, changes to our business strategy, changes in operating performance or other indicators of impairment could cause us to record a significant impairment charge during the period in which the impairment is determined, negatively impacting our results of operations and financial position.

We may have exposure to greater than anticipated tax liabilities and we may be limited in the use of our net operating losses and certain other tax attributes in the future.

As of December 31, 2013, we had approximately $620.8 million of gross tax net operating losses for federal income tax purposes and approximately $32.6 million of net tax net operating losses for state income tax purposes, which includes federal and state net operating losses acquired in connection with our acquisitions. The tax net operating losses for federal income tax purposes begin to expire in 2020 and the tax net operating losses for state income tax purposes began to expire in 2013. 

Our future income taxes could be adversely affected by changes in tax laws, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations thereof. Our determination of our tax liability is always subject to review by applicable tax authorities. Any adverse outcome of such a review could have a negative effect on our operating results and financial condition. In addition, the determination of our provision for income taxes and other tax liabilities requires significant judgment, and there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. Although we believe our estimates are reasonable, the ultimate tax outcome may differ from the amounts recorded in our financial statements and may materially affect our financial results in the period or periods for which such determination is made.

An “ownership change” that occurs during a “testing period” (as such terms are defined in Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended) could place significant limitations, on an annual basis, on the use of such net operating losses to offset future taxable income we may generate. In general, future stock transactions and the timing of such transactions could cause an “ownership change” for income tax purposes. Such transactions may include our purchases under our share repurchase program, additional issuances of common stock by us and acquisitions or sales of shares by certain holders of our shares, including persons who have held, currently hold, or may accumulate in the future five percent or more of our outstanding stock. Many of these transactions are beyond our control. Calculations of an “ownership change” under Section 382 are complex and to some extent are dependent on information that is not publicly available. The risk of an “ownership change” occurring could increase if additional shares are repurchased, if additional persons acquire five percent or more of our outstanding common stock in the near future and/or current five percent stockholders increase their interest. Due to this risk, we monitor our purchases of additional shares of our common stock. Since an “ownership change” also could result from a change in control of our company, with subsequent annual limitations on the use of our net operating losses, this could discourage a change in control.

Risks Related to Our Liquidity and Financial Resources

Our indebtedness could adversely affect our financial health and limit our ability to react to changes in our industry.

As of December 31, 2013, we had $600.0 million outstanding principal amount of debt, which consisted of $300.0 million outstanding principal amount of 7.375% senior secured notes due 2020 (the “Senior Secured Notes”) and $300.0 million outstanding principal amount of 8.875% senior notes due 2019 (the “Senior Notes”). We also have $135.0 million of unutilized capacity under our senior secured revolving credit facility and we may incur significant additional indebtedness in the future. Our substantial

26


indebtedness may:

make it difficult for us to satisfy our financial obligations, including making scheduled principal and interest payments on our indebtedness;
limit our ability to borrow additional funds for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other general business purposes;
limit our ability to use our cash flow or obtain additional financing for future working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other general business purposes;
require us to use a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to make debt service payments;
limit our flexibility to plan for, or react to, changes in our business and industry;
place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our less leveraged competitors; and
increase our vulnerability to the impact of adverse economic and industry conditions.

Our ability to make payments on our indebtedness will depend on our ability in the future to generate cash flows from operations, which is subject to all the risks of our business. We may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows from operations for us to repay our indebtedness when such indebtedness becomes due and to meet our other cash needs.

We may require substantial capital to support business growth, and this capital may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

We incurred capital expenditures of $143.6 million in 2013, and we expect to incur capital expenditures of approximately $125.0 million to $135.0 million in 2014. We recently invested capital to roll out additional data centers and to extend our fiber network. We may require additional capital to support our business growth, including the need to develop new services and products, enhance our operating infrastructure or acquire complementary businesses and technologies. We may also require substantial capital to maintain, upgrade and enhance our network facilities and operations. Accordingly, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings to secure additional funds.

We may not be able to secure additional debt or equity financing on favorable terms, or at all, at the time we desire to obtain such funding. If we are unable to obtain additional capital when needed, we may not be able to pursue our growth strategy, and our business could suffer. If we raise additional funds through further issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, our existing stockholders could suffer significant dilution in their percentage ownership of our company, and any new equity securities we issue could have rights, preferences and privileges senior to those of holders of our common stock. In addition, any debt financing that we may obtain in the future could have restrictive covenants relating to our capital raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities, including potential acquisitions.

Our debt agreements include restrictive covenants, and failure to comply with these covenants could trigger acceleration of payment of outstanding indebtedness.

The agreements that govern our Senior Secured Notes, Senior Notes and senior secured revolving credit facility impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us. These restrictions limit or restrict, among other things, our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries to:

incur or guarantee additional indebtedness or issue preferred stock;
pay dividends or make other distributions to stockholders;
purchase or redeem capital stock or subordinated indebtedness;
make investments;
create liens or use assets as security;
enter into agreements restricting such restricted subsidiaries' ability to pay dividends, make loans or transfer assets to us or other restricted subsidiaries;
engage in transactions with affiliates; and
consolidate or merge with or into other companies or transfer all or substantially all of our or their assets.

If we breach any of these covenants, a default could result under one or more of these agreements, which may require us to repay some or all of our indebtedness.


27


Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock

We may reduce, or cease payment of, quarterly cash dividends.

The payment of future quarterly dividends is discretionary and is subject to determination by our Board of Directors each quarter following its review of our financial condition, results of operations, cash requirements, investment opportunities and such other factors as are deemed relevant by our Board of Directors. Changes in our business needs, including funding for acquisitions, capital expenditures and working capital, or a change in tax laws relating to dividends, among other factors, could cause our Board of Directors to decide to reduce, or cease the payment of, dividends in the future. In addition, the agreements governing our Senior Secured Notes, Senior Notes and senior secured revolving credit facility contain restrictions on the amount of dividends we can pay. There can be no assurance that we will not decrease or discontinue quarterly cash dividends, and if we do, our stock price could be negatively impacted.

Our stock price may be volatile.

The trading price of our common stock may be subject to fluctuations in response to certain events and factors, such as quarterly variations in results of operations; entry into business combinations or other major transactions; changes in financial estimates; changes in recommendations or reduced coverage by securities analysts; the operating and stock price performance of other companies that investors may deem comparable to us; news reports relating to trends in the markets in which we operate; market trends unrelated to our performance; and general economic conditions. A significant drop in our stock price could also expose us to the risk of securities class action lawsuits, which could result in substantial costs and divert management's attention and resources, which could adversely affect our business. Finally, volatility or a lack of positive performance in our stock price may adversely affect our ability to retain key employees, many of whom have been granted stock incentive awards.

Provisions of our certificate of incorporation, bylaws and other elements of our capital structure could limit our share price and delay a change of control of the company.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that could make it more difficult or even prevent a third party from acquiring us without the approval of our incumbent Board of Directors. These provisions, among other things, limit the right of stockholders to call special meetings of stockholders and authorize the Board of Directors to issue preferred stock in one or more series without any action on the part of stockholders. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock and significantly impede the ability of the holders of our common stock to change control of the company. These provisions that inhibit or discourage takeover attempts could reduce the market value of our common stock.

Our bylaws designate the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware as the sole and exclusive forum for certain types of actions and proceedings that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ flexibility in obtaining a judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or employees.

Our bylaws provide that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf, (ii) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our current or former directors, officers or other employees or agents to us or our stockholders, (iii) any action asserting a claim against us or any of our directors or officers or other employees arising pursuant to any provision of the Delaware General Corporation Law or the Certificate of Incorporation or Bylaws (as either may be amended from time to time), or (iv) any action asserting a claim against us or any of our current or former directors or officers or other employee or agent of ours governed by the internal affairs doctrine. In the event that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware lacks jurisdiction over any action or proceeding described above, the sole and exclusive forum for such action or proceeding will be another state or federal court located within the State of Delaware. These exclusive forum provisions may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees or agents, which may discourage such lawsuits against us and our directors, officers, employees or agents. Alternatively, if a court were to find these provisions of our bylaws inapplicable to, or unenforceable in respect of, one or more of the specified types of actions or proceedings, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such matters in other jurisdictions, which could adversely affect our business and financial condition.





28


Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments.
None.

Item 2.    Properties.
We lease or own several facilities for corporate offices, sales offices, data centers, switch sites and other facilities across our nationwide service area. These leases have various expiration dates through 2024. We believe our facilities are suitable and adequate for our business operations.
Office space. Our corporate headquarters is in Atlanta, Georgia, where we occupy approximately 76,000 square feet under a lease that will expire in 2014. Our other main facilities for corporate offices include 34,000 square feet in Anniston, Alabama under a lease that will expire in 2018, 54,000 square feet in Huntsville, Alabama under a lease that will expire in 2016 and 71,000 square feet in Rochester, New York under a lease that will expire in 2022. We also lease multiple sales offices in locations throughout the United States. We own an administrative office in Arab, Alabama.
Data centers. We operate eight data centers. We own a data center facility in Atlanta, Georgia and we lease data center facilities in Marlboro, Massachusetts; Rochester, New York; Columbia, South Carolina; San Jose, California; Chicago, Illinois; Dallas, Texas; and Miami, Florida.
Network. We own switch sites in Anniston, Birmingham and Montgomery, Alabama and in Nashville, Tennessee. We lease space for switch sites in various cities throughout the southeastern and northeastern United States. As part of our fiber optic network, we own or lease rights-of-way, land, and point-of-presence space throughout the southeastern and northeastern United States.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings.
The Company is party to various legal and regulatory proceedings and other disputes arising from normal business activities. The Company’s management believes that there are no disputes, litigation or other legal or regulatory proceedings asserted or pending against the Company that could have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows, and believes that adequate provision for any probable and estimable losses has been made in the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements. However, the result of any current or future disputes, litigation or other legal or regulatory proceedings is inherently unpredictable and could result in liabilities that are higher than currently predicted.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures.
Not applicable.


29


PART II

Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Market Information
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol "ELNK." The following table sets forth the high and low sale prices for our common stock for the periods indicated, as reported by the NASDAQ Global Market.
 
 
Stock Price
 
 
High
 
Low
Year Ended December 31, 2012
 
 
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
8.22

 
$
6.42

Second Quarter
 
8.59

 
7.16

Third Quarter
 
7.62

 
5.94

Fourth Quarter
 
7.36

 
6.11

Year Ended December 31, 2013
 
 
 
 
First Quarter
 
7.07

 
5.38

Second Quarter
 
6.30

 
5.23

Third Quarter
 
6.80

 
4.86

Fourth Quarter
 
5.46

 
4.70

The last reported sale price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Market on January 31, 2014 was $4.34 per share.
Holders
There were 1,390 holders of record of our common stock on January 31, 2014.
Dividends
During 2009, we began paying quarterly cash dividends. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, cash dividends declared were $0.20, $0.20 and $0.20 per common share, respectively, and total dividend payments were $22.9 million, $21.1 million and $20.8 million, respectively. The decision to declare future dividends is made at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, investment opportunities and other factors the Board of Directors may deem relevant. In addition, the agreements governing our Senior Secured Notes, Senior Notes and our senior secured revolving credit facility contain restrictions on the amount of dividends we can pay.

30


Performance Graph
The following indexed line graph indicates our total return to stockholders from December 31, 2008 to December 31, 2013, as compared to the total return for the Russell 2000 and NASDAQ Telecomm indices for the same period. The calculations in the graph assume that $100 was invested on December 31, 2008 in our common stock and each index and also assumes dividend reinvestment.
 
 
December 31, 2008
 
December 31, 2009
 
December 31, 2010
 
December 31, 2011
 
December 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2013
EarthLink 
 
$
100

 
$
127.1

 
$
141.3

 
$
108.8

 
$
112.3

 
$
91.4

Russell 2000 Index
 
100

 
125.2

 
156.9

 
148.4

 
170.1

 
233.0

NASDAQ Telecomm Index
 
100

 
148.2

 
154.1

 
134.6

 
137.3

 
170.3


Share Repurchases
The number of shares repurchased and the average price paid per share for each month in the three months ended December 31, 2013 are as follows:
2013
 
Total Number
of Shares
Repurchased (1)
 
Average
Price Paid
per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Repurchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Program (2)
 
Maximum Dollar
Value that May
Yet be Purchased
Under the Program
 
 
(in thousands, except average price paid per share)
October 1 through October 31
 

 
$

 

 
$
67,907

November 1 through November 30
 
88

 
5.23

 

 
67,907

December 1 through December 31
 

 

 

 
67,907

Total
 
88

 
 

 

 
 

_______________________________________________________________________________

(1)
In November 2013, we repurchased 88,280 shares from a former member of our Board of Directors in a private transaction pursuant to a stock purchase agreement following his resignation from the Board of Directors.

(2)
Since the inception of the share repurchase program ("Repurchase Program"), the Board of Directors has authorized a total of $750.0 million for the repurchase of our common stock. The Board of Directors has also approved repurchasing common stock pursuant to plans under Rule 10b5-1 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We may repurchase our common stock from time to time in compliance with the Securities and Exchange Commission's regulations and other legal requirements, and subject to market conditions and other factors. The Repurchase Program does not require EarthLink to acquire any specific number of shares and may be terminated at any time.

31


Item 6.    Selected Financial Data.
The following selected consolidated financial data was derived from our consolidated financial statements. The data should be read in conjunction with "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
2009
 
2010 (1)
 
2011 (1)
 
2012
 
2013
 
 
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
Statement of operations data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
$
723,729

 
$
621,204

 
$
1,300,543

 
$
1,335,135

 
$
1,240,606

Operating costs and expenses (2)(3)
 
541,571

 
459,355

 
1,170,899

 
1,263,112

 
1,505,555

Income (loss) from operations
 
182,158

 
161,849

 
129,644

 
72,023

 
(264,949
)
Income (loss) from continuing operations (4)
 
287,118

 
81,573

 
37,273

 
9,938

 
(536,866
)
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax (5)
 

 
(93
)
 
(2,706
)
 
(2,418
)
 
(1,961
)
Net income (loss)
 
287,118

 
81,480

 
34,567

 
7,520

 
(538,827
)
Basic net income (loss) per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
$
2.69

 
$
0.75

 
$
0.34

 
$
0.09

 
$
(5.23
)
Discontinued operations
 

 

 
(0.03
)
 
(0.02
)
 
(0.02
)
Basic net income (loss) per share
 
$
2.69

 
$
0.75

 
$
0.32

 
$
0.07

 
$
(5.25
)
Diluted net income (loss) per share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
$
2.66

 
$
0.75

 
$
0.34

 
$
0.09

 
$
(5.23
)
Discontinued operations
 

 

 
(0.02
)
 
(0.02
)
 
(0.02
)
Diluted net income (loss) per share
 
$
2.66

 
$
0.74

 
$
0.32

 
$
0.07

 
$
(5.25
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic weighted average common shares outstanding
 
106,909

 
108,057

 
108,098

 
105,221

 
102,599

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding
 
108,084

 
109,468

 
108,949

 
105,983

 
102,599

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividends declared per common share
 
$
0.28

 
$
0.62

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.20

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash flow data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash provided by operating activities
 
208,622

 
154,449

 
146,234

 
191,055

 
124,156

Cash (used in) provided by investing activities
 
(37,121
)
 
(454,193
)
 
141,594

 
(163,836
)
 
(112,500
)
Cash used in financing activities
 
(47,070
)
 
(68,299
)
 
(318,997
)
 
(81,381
)
 
(52,641
)

 
 
As of December 31,
 
 
2009
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
 
(in thousands)
Balance sheet data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
610,995

 
$
242,952

 
$
211,783

 
$
157,621

 
$
116,636

Investments in marketable securities
 
84,966

 
320,118

 
29,607

 
46,851

 

Cash and marketable securities
 
695,961

 
563,070

 
241,390

 
204,472

 
116,636

Total assets
 
1,074,618

 
1,523,918

 
1,680,451

 
1,599,410

 
1,007,318

Long-term debt, including long-term portion of capital leases (6)
 
232,248

 
594,320

 
653,765

 
614,890

 
606,442

Total liabilities
 
340,594

 
766,050

 
927,307

 
880,606

 
845,100

Accumulated deficit
 
(729,715
)
 
(648,235
)
 
(613,668
)
 
(606,148
)
 
(1,144,975
)
Stockholders' equity
 
734,024

 
757,868

 
753,144

 
718,804

 
162,218


32


_______________________________________________________________________________

(1)
On December 8, 2010, we acquired ITC^DeltaCom, a provider of integrated communications services to customers in the southeastern U.S. On April 1, 2011, we acquired One Communications, a privately-held integrated telecommunications solutions provider serving customers in the northeast, mid-Atlantic and upper midwest sections of the United States. The results of operations of ITC^DeltaCom and One Communications have been included in our consolidated financial statements since the acquisition date. The comparison of selected financial data is affected by these acquisitions and, to a lesser extent, by other smaller acquisitions completed during the year ended December 31, 2011, including STS Telecom, Logical Solutions and Business Vitals, LLC, among others, and our CenterBeam transaction completed during the year ended December 31, 2013.
(2)
Operating costs and expenses for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2010 and 2013 include non-cash impairment charges of $24.1 million, $1.7 million and $255.6 million, respectively, related to goodwill and certain intangible assets. During 2009, we concluded the carrying value of goodwill and certain intangible assets of New Edge Holding Company in our Business Services segment were impaired in conjunction with our annual tests of goodwill and intangible assets. During 2010, we decided to re-brand the New Edge name as EarthLink Business and wrote off our New Edge trade name. During 2013, we performed an interim goodwill impairment test following a sustained decrease in our stock price and market capitalization which resulted in an impairment charge in our Business Services reporting unit.
(3)
Operating costs and expenses for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 include restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs of $5.6 million, $22.4 million, $32.1 million, $18.2 million and $40.0 million, respectively.
(4)
During the year ended December 31, 2009, we recorded an income tax benefit in the Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) of approximately $198.8 million from the release of our valuation allowance related to deferred tax assets. These deferred tax assets related primarily to net operating loss carryforwards which we determined we would more-likely-than-not be able to utilize due to the generation of sufficient taxable income in the future. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we recorded an income tax provision of approximately $266.3 million during the fourth quarter to record a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets. These deferred tax assets related primarily to net operating loss carryforwards which we determined we would not "more-likely-than-not" be able to utilize.
(5)
The operating results of our telecom systems business acquired as part of ITC^DeltaCom have been separately presented as discontinued operations for all periods presented. On August 2, 2013, we sold our telecom systems business. The telecom systems results of operations were previously included in our Business Services segment.
(6)
Includes the carrying amount of ITC^DeltaCom's 10.5% senior secured notes due on April 1, 2016, EarthLink's 8.875% Senior Notes due 2019, EarthLink's 8.375% Senior Secured Notes due June 1, 2020 and EarthLink's convertible senior notes due November 15, 2026. In December 2010, we assumed the ITC^DeltaCom Notes in our acquisition of ITC^DeltaCom. In May 2011, we issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 8.875% Senior Notes due May 15, 2019. In November 2011, we redeemed our convertible senior notes. In December 2012, we redeemed $32.5 million aggregate principal amount of the ITC^DeltaCom Notes and in May 2013, we redeemed the remaining $292.3 million aggregate principal amount of the ITC^DeltaCom Notes. Also in May 2013, we issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 8.375% Senior Secured Notes due June 1, 2020.


33


Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to provide a reader of our financial statements with a narrative from the perspective of management. The following MD&A should be read in conjunction with audited Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Certain statements in this MD&A are forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ from estimates or projections contained in the forward-looking statements are described under “Cautionary Note Concerning Factors That May Affect Future Results” in this Item 7.

Change in Organization Structure

On December 31, 2013, through the creation of a new holding company structure (the “Holding Company Reorganization”), EarthLink, Inc. merged into EarthLink, LLC, which became a wholly-owned subsidiary of a new publicly traded parent company, EarthLink Holdings Corp. We expect the new holding company design will enhance our corporate structure and provide greater flexibility and efficiency from a management, operations, customer, regulatory, accounting, financial and tax perspective. As the Holding Company Reorganization occurred at the parent company level, the remainder of our subsidiaries, operations and customers were not affected. Accordingly, the historical financial statements reflect the effect of the reorganization for all periods presented. Following the Holding Company Reorganization, EarthLink Holdings Corp. became the primary obligor on our outstanding debt obligations and EarthLink, LLC became a guarantor and a restricted subsidiary. The Holding Company Reorganization was effected under Section 251(g) of the Delaware General Corporation Law which provides for the formation of a holding company structure without a stockholder vote. Existing shares of EarthLink, Inc. common stock were converted into the same number of shares of common stock of EarthLink Holdings Corp.

Overview
 
EarthLink Holdings Corp. (“EarthLink” or the “Company”), together with its consolidated subsidiaries, is a leading communications and IT services provider, empowering businesses with a fully-managed, end-to-end communications, IT and virtualization portfolio including cloud computing, IT security, colocation, enterprise-class hosted applications, secure network connectivity and IT support services. We operate two reportable segments, Business Services and Consumer Services. Our Business Services segment provides a broad range of data, voice and IT services to retail and wholesale business customers. Our Consumer Services segment provides nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to residential customers. We operate an extensive network including more than 28,000 route miles of fiber, 90 metro fiber rings and eight secure enterprise-class data centers that provide data and voice IP service coverage across more than 90 percent of the United States.

Business Strategy
Our business strategy is to be the premier communications and IT services provider for mid-market and enterprise customers. We believe IT services is an emerging market with significant opportunity for growth. Our goal is to use our nationwide network and newly developed and acquired IT services to be a one-stop ubiquitous provider of these services to larger and multi-location enterprise customers. We are also focused on maximizing the cash flow generated by our traditional voice and data products. The key elements of our business strategy are as follows:
Offer a complete package of communications and IT services products. We provide a nationwide suite of business voice, data and IT services. We are focused on maintaining a broad suite of products and services and offering solutions to address the evolving business and infrastructure needs of our customers. In 2012 and 2013, we expanded our IT solutions footprint with four additional data centers and invested capital to extend our core fiber IP network. We also acquired CenterBeam in July 2013 to further grow our IT services portfolio, specifically around customer end-point management. We believe our broad suite of products allows us to compete for larger and more complex customers.

Increase revenues from growth products and services. Revenues from some of our products and services have been declining due to economic, competitive, technological and regulatory developments and we expect some of these revenues to continue to decline. We are attempting to manage this decline by working with our customers to replace or augment declining products with our growth products, where financially and technically feasible to do so. Our growth products are MultiProtocol Label Switching ("MPLS"), hosted voice and IT services such as virtualization and virtual tech care. We are also focused on growing revenues for these products by enhancing our sales force efforts and increasing brand awareness for our IT services. We also aim to grow our wholesale services as we capitalize on unique and new fiber routes within our footprint.


34


Provide a superior customer experience. We are committed to providing high-quality customer service and continuing to monitor customer satisfaction in all facets of our business. We believe exceeding customers’ expectations for service increases loyalty and reduces churn. We also believe that our broad communications and IT services portfolio and blend of access technologies for connectivity enable us to provide high-quality customer service by solving a wide range of issues faced by our customers and prospects. We are focused on creating a customer-focused organization that will provide a quality approach to offering and supporting EarthLink products and services.

Optimize our cost structure. We are currently focused on optimizing the cost structure of our business by reducing network costs, streamlining our internal processes and operations and maximizing the cash flows generated from traditional voice and data products. The success of our operating efficiency and cost reduction initiatives is necessary to align costs with declining revenues for some of our products as non-variable costs place further pressure on margins.

Opportunistically consider potential strategic acquisitions. We continue to evaluate acquisition opportunities as we become aware of them. We believe that targeted corporate acquisitions, when available at the right economics, can be an effective means to improve our product, network, and data center capabilities or to accelerate revenue growth. Our acquisition strategy may include investments or acquisitions of new product and services capabilities, network assets or business customers to achieve greater national scale.

Challenges and Risks
 
The primary challenge we face is executing on our business strategy to be the premier communications and IT services provider, and more specifically to continue to grow revenues from our growth products and services. Contributing to this challenge are the following: responding to competitive and economic pressures, reducing churn in our existing customer base, providing products and services that meet changing customer needs on a timely and cost-effective basis, and adapting to regulatory changes and initiatives. Another primary challenge is managing the rate of decline in revenues for our traditional products.  To address these challenges, we are targeting larger customers who have lower churn profiles, focusing efforts on customer retention, upselling additional growth products and services to existing customers, implementing cost efficiencies in order to maximize cash flows and seeking to make costs more variable. Our future success for growth depends on the timing and market acceptance of our new products and services, our ability to market our services to new customers, our ability to differentiate our services from those of our competitors, our ability to maintain and expand our sales to existing customers, our ability to strengthen awareness of our brand, our ability to provide quality implementation and customer support for these products and the reliability and quality of our services.

Revenue Sources
 
Business Services. Our Business Services segment earns revenue by providing a broad range of data, voice and IT services to retail and wholesale business customers. We present our Business Services revenue in the following three categories: (1) retail services, which includes data, voice and IT services provided to business customers; (2) wholesale services, which includes the sale of transmission capacity to other telecommunications carriers and businesses; and (3) other services, which primarily consists of web hosting. Our IT services, which are included within our retail services, include data centers, virtualization, security, applications, premises-based solutions, managed solutions and support services. Revenues generally consist of recurring monthly charges for such services; usage fees; installation fees; termination fees; and administrative fees.
 
Consumer Services. Our Consumer Services segment earns revenue by providing nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to residential customers. We present our Consumer Services in two categories: (1) access services, which includes narrowband access services and broadband access services; and (2) value-added services, which includes revenues from ancillary services sold as add-on features to EarthLink’s Internet access services, such as security products, premium email only, home networking and email storage; search revenues; and advertising revenues. Revenues generally consist of recurring monthly charges for such services.


35


General Developments in our Business

Key developments in our business during 2013 are described below:

Issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 7.375% Senior Secured Notes due 2020 (the “Senior Secured Notes”) in May 2013 and used the net proceeds, together with available cash, to fund a tender offer and redemption of our ITC^DeltaCom 10.5% Senior Secured Notes due April 2016 (the "ITC^DeltaCom Notes"), which had been assumed in connection with our acquisition of ITC^DeltaCom, Inc. ("ITC^DeltaCom"). The debt issuance and redemption will reduce the amount of interest we will pay going forward.

Acquired substantially all of the assets of CenterBeam, Inc. ("CenterBeam"), a privately-held information technology managed service provider delivering cloud computing and hosted IT services to mid-sized businesses, in July 2013 for a total consideration of approximately $23.5 million to further grow our IT services portfolio by adding IT services customer scale, expanded IT support center resources and complementary products and capabilities.

Sold our ITC^DeltaCom telecom systems business in August 2013, which was a low margin business that generated mostly non-recurring revenue streams.

Completed the roll out of four additional data centers, launched our next generation cloud hosting platform in five of our eight data centers and expanded our fiber network with additional unique routes.

Made progress in the integration of our operating support systems and began to leverage some of these new capabilities in pursuing our business strategy.

Generated revenues of $1.2 billion in 2013, a 7% decrease during the year consisting of a $53.2 million decrease in Business Services revenue and a $41.3 million decrease in Consumer Services revenue. The decreases were primarily driven by declines in traditional voice and data products. However, partially offsetting these declines was an increase in sales of growth products for our Business Services and a decrease in churn for our Consumer Services.

Generated a net loss of $538.8 million in 2013, which reflects a $255.6 million goodwill impairment and related tax impact, a $265.3 million increase to our income tax provision due to the recording of a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets, an increase in restructuring, acquisition and integration costs and a decrease in Adjusted EBITDA, as described below.

Generated Adjusted EBITDA (a non-GAAP measure, see “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” in this Item 7) of $227.1 million in 2013, a decrease from $283.9 million in the prior year primarily due to the decrease in revenues from traditional voice and data products, as well as increased costs to grow our business.

Made $20.8 million of dividend payments to shareholders and repurchased 1.2 million shares of common stock for $6.1 million during the year.

Trends in our Business
 
Our financial results are impacted by several significant trends, which are described below.
 
Industry factors. We operate in the communications and IT services industry, which is characterized by intense competition, industry consolidation resulting in larger competitors, an evolving regulatory environment, changing technology and changes in customer needs.  We expect these trends to continue. In addition, merger and acquisition transactions and other factors have reduced the number of vendors from which we may purchase network elements that we leverage to operate our business.
Traditional business services revenues. Our traditional voice and data business service revenues, specifically traditional voice and lower-end, single site broadband services, have been declining due to competitive pressures and changes in the industry, and we expect this trend to continue. We have also experienced an increase in churn for these retail products, especially as customers come out of contract term. To counteract trends in our Business Services revenues, we are focused on building long-term customer relationships, offering customers a bundle that includes our growth services and focusing on larger, more complex customers who have a lower churn profile. As a result, sales in our growth products have increased and the mix of new sales is shifting towards our growth products. We are also taking steps to lower the cost structure of our Business Services operations.

36


IT services. The industry for cloud, managed security and IT services is relatively new and continues to evolve. The IT services market is growing as security needs, compliance requirements and IT costs increase. IT services currently represents the smallest proportion of our Business Services revenues. However, we believe this represents a significant growth area for our business and there is opportunity for EarthLink to address this market nationally. As a result, we have been taking steps to accelerate our transition into an IT services company. Specifically, we are focusing on larger geographic markets where there are more customers with a propensity to buy IT services, increasing our efforts in Search Engine Marketing to drive leads for our inside sales force, increasing brand awareness for our IT services and adding additional technical talent in the field to support our IT services sales efforts.
Economic conditions. Many of our customers are small and medium-sized businesses. We believe these businesses are more likely to be affected by economic downturns than larger, more established businesses. We believe that the financial and economic pressures faced by our customers in this environment of diminished consumer spending, corporate downsizing and tightened credit have had, and may continue to have, an adverse effect on our results of operations, including longer sales cycles and increased customer demands for price reductions in connection with contract renewals. Additionally, our consumer access services are discretionary and dependent upon levels of consumer spending. Unfavorable economic conditions could cause customers to slow spending in the future, which could adversely affect our revenues and churn.
Consumer access declines. Our consumer access subscriber base and revenues have been declining and are expected to continue to decline due to the continued maturation of the market for Internet access and competitive pressures in the industry. In addition, we have implemented, and expect to continue to implement, targeted price increases, which could negatively impact our churn rates. To counteract trends in our consumer revenues, we are focused on customer retention, operational efficiency and adding customers through marketing channels that we believe will produce an acceptable rate of return.
Business Outlook

We expect continued declines in Business Services revenues from traditional voice and data products. Revenues may also be adversely impacted by churn, competition, regulatory changes, timing and market acceptance of our newer products and services, shifting patterns of use, convergence of technology and general economic conditions. However, to counteract these pressures, we continue to emphasize our diverse portfolio of communications and IT services and are focused on growing our suite of growth and IT services. We are also focused on growing our wholesale services as we capitalize on new and unique fiber routes within our footprint. As a result, we expect the mix of our retail Business Service revenues to change over time, from traditional products to growth products and services. As our product mix shifts towards growth products, revenues may be impacted in the near term by longer sales cycles and installations and higher costs to deliver these services. We expect our consumer access subscriber base and revenues to continue to decrease due to limited sales and marketing activities, competition from cable, DSL and wireless providers, declines in gross broadband subscriber additions and the continued maturation of the market for narrowband Internet access. However, we expect the rate of churn and revenue decline to continue to decline as our customer base becomes longer tenured.


37


Consolidated Results of Operations
 
The following comparison of statement of operations data is affected by our acquisition of One Communications on April 1, 2011. The results of operations of One Communications are included in our operating results beginning on the acquisition date. The following comparison of statement of operations data is also affected, to a lesser extent, by our other acquisitions and transactions completed during 2011 including STS Telecom, Logical Solutions and Business Vitals, LLC, among others, and our CenterBeam transaction completed during 2013.
 
The following table sets forth statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Revenues
$
1,300,543

 
$
1,335,135

 
$
1,240,606

Operating costs and expenses:
 

 
 
 
 

Cost of revenues (exclusive of depreciation and amortization shown separately below)
581,264

 
632,616

 
600,742

Selling, general and administrative (exclusive of of depreciation and amortization shown separately below)
397,574

 
429,087

 
426,070

Depreciation and amortization
159,993

 
183,165

 
183,114

Impairment of goodwill

 

 
255,599

Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs
32,068

 
18,244

 
40,030

Total operating costs and expenses
1,170,899

 
1,263,112

 
1,505,555

Income (loss) from operations
129,644

 
72,023

 
(264,949
)
Interest expense and other, net
(70,640
)
 
(63,416
)
 
(60,686
)
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes
59,004

 
8,607

 
(325,635
)
Income tax (provision) benefit
(21,731
)
 
1,331

 
(211,231
)
Net income (loss)
37,273

 
9,938

 
(536,866
)
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
(2,706
)
 
(2,418
)
 
(1,961
)
Net income (loss)
$
34,567

 
$
7,520

 
$
(538,827
)

Revenues
 
The following table presents our revenues for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Business Services
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail services
$
766,098

 
$
845,664

 
$
793,940

 
$
79,566

 
10
 %
 
$
(51,724
)
 
(6
)%
Wholesale services
136,224

 
151,910

 
151,071

 
15,686

 
12
 %
 
(839
)
 
(1
)%
Other
22,376

 
19,851

 
19,216

 
(2,525
)
 
(11
)%
 
(635
)
 
(3
)%
Total revenues
924,698

 
1,017,425

 
964,227

 
92,727

 
10
 %
 
(53,198
)
 
(5
)%
Consumer Services
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Access services
323,998

 
269,533

 
231,448

 
(54,465
)
 
(17
)%
 
(38,085
)
 
(14
)%
Value-added services
51,847

 
48,177

 
44,931

 
(3,670
)
 
(7
)%
 
(3,246
)
 
(7
)%
Total revenues
375,845

 
317,710

 
276,379

 
(58,135
)
 
(15
)%
 
(41,331
)
 
(13
)%
Total revenues
$
1,300,543

 
$
1,335,135

 
$
1,240,606

 
$
34,592

 
3
 %
 
$
(94,529
)
 
(7
)%


38


Business Services

Retail Services. Retail services include data, voice and IT services (including data centers, virtualization, security, applications, premises-based solutions, managed solutions and support services) provided to business customers. The following table presents the primary reasons for the changes in Business Services retail revenues for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years:
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
(in millions)
Due to acquisitions (a)
$
104.3

 
$
8.6

Due to growth products (b)

 
18.7

Due to IT services (c)
12.2

 
13.5

Due net favorable settlements and reserve adjustments (d)
9.4

 
(9.4
)
Due to decline in traditional voice and data products (e)
(46.3
)
 
(83.1
)
   Total change in Business Services retail revenues
$
79.6

 
$
(51.7
)
______________

(a)
Increase in 2012 due to the inclusion of revenues from One Communications for a full year in 2012 compared to a partial period in 2011, as the acquisition occurred on April 1, 2011. Increase in 2013 due to the inclusion of revenues from CenterBeam beginning in July 2013.
(b)
Increase in 2013 due to sales of growth products, including MPLS and hosted voice. During 2012, this amount was included in the decline in traditional voice and data products as we were still integrating our reporting systems and were not able to capture this detail separately.
(c)
Increase due to IT Services transactions entered into during 2011 and new product launches to expand our IT services portfolio.
(d)
Change due to net favorable settlements and reserve adjustments of $9.4 million during 2012.
(e)
Decrease due to decline in certain traditional voice and data products, including traditional voice, lower-end, single site broadband services and web hosting. Revenues for these traditional voice and data products have been decreasing due to competition in the industry, the migration of customers to more advanced services and a decreased emphasis on selling these services. The decrease in 2012 was partially offset by sales of growth products, including MPLS and hosted voice.
    
Wholesale Services. Wholesale services includes the sale of transmission capacity to other telecommunications carriers and businesses. The increase in wholesale services revenues during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the inclusion of revenues from One Communications for a full year in 2012 compared to a partial period in 2011. The decrease in wholesale services revenues during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to an increase in customer churn in the current year and a favorable settlement with a telecommunications carrier recorded during the prior year. This was partially offset by a $1.2 million favorable adjustment associated with the One Communications acquisition recognized during the year ended December 31, 2013 and an increase in transport and usage revenues as we capitalize on unique fiber routes.

Other Services. Other services consists primarily of web hosting and certain equipment-related revenue. The decreases in other services revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years were primarily due to a decrease in average web hosting accounts.
    
Consumer Services
 
Access services. Access services include narrowband access services (including traditional, fully-featured narrowband access and value-priced narrowband access) and broadband access services (including high-speed access via DSL and cable and VoIP). Access service revenues consist of recurring monthly charges for narrowband and broadband access services; usage fees; installation fees; termination fees; and fees for equipment.

The decreases in consumer access revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years were due to decreases in narrowband access and broadband access revenues. This was primarily due to a decrease in average consumer access subscribers, which were 1.5 million, 1.2 million and 1.1 million during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.  The decrease in average consumer access subscribers resulted from limited sales and marketing activities, the continued maturation of and competition in the market for Internet access and competitive pressures in the industry. However, we continue to focus on the retention of customers and on marketing channels that we believe will produce an acceptable rate of

39


return. Our monthly consumer subscriber churn rates were 2.6%, 2.4% and 2.1% during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively, which moderated the decline in average consumer subscribers. Churn rates decreased due to the increased tenure of our consumer subscriber base. Slightly offsetting the decreases in revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years was an increase in average revenue per subscriber due to targeted price increases implemented over the past year and a change in mix of subscribers.

Value-added services revenues. Value-added services revenues consist of revenues from ancillary services sold as add-on features to our Internet access services, such as security products, premium email only, home networking and email storage; search revenues; and advertising revenues.  We derive these revenues from fees charged for ancillary services; fees generated through revenue sharing arrangements with online partners whose products and services can be accessed through our web properties, such as the Google search engine; and fees charged for advertising on our various web properties.
 
The decreases in value-added services revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years were due primarily to a decrease in revenues from our security and home networking services and a decrease in search and advertising revenues. These decreases were attributable to the overall decline in the average number of consumer subscribers.

Cost of revenues
 
The following table presents our cost of revenues for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Business Services
$
463,782

 
$
527,514

 
$
506,245

 
$
63,732

 
14
 %
 
$
(21,269
)
 
(4
)%
Consumer Services
117,482

 
105,102

 
94,497

 
(12,380
)
 
(11
)%
 
(10,605
)
 
(10
)%
Total cost of revenues
$
581,264

 
$
632,616

 
$
600,742

 
$
51,352

 
9
 %
 
$
(31,874
)
 
(5
)%
 
Business Services

Cost of revenues for our Business Services segment primarily consists of the cost of connecting customers to our networks via leased facilities; the costs of leasing components of our network facilities; costs paid to third-party providers for interconnect access and transport services; the costs of providing IT services; and the cost of equipment sold to customers.

The following table presents the primary reasons for the changes in Business Services cost of revenues for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years:
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
(in millions)
Due to acquisitions (a)
$
58.0

 
$
3.0

Due to IT services (b)
8.3

 
4.6

Due to change in reserves for regulatory audits (c)
8.3

 
(15.5
)
Due to favorable settlements (d)

 
(3.8
)
Due to decline in traditional voice and data products, offset by growth (e)
(10.9
)
 
(9.6
)
   Total change in Business Services cost of revenues
$
63.7

 
$
(21.3
)
______________

(a)
Increase in 2012 due to the inclusion of cost of revenues from One Communications for a full year in 2012 compared to a partial period in 2011. Increase in 2013 due to inclusion of CenterBeam cost of revenues beginning in July 2013.
(b)
Increase due to IT services transactions entered into during 2011 and new product launches to expand our IT services portfolio.
(c)
Increase in 2012 due to an $8.3 million charge recorded in the second quarter of 2012 to increase our reserves for regulatory audits, primarily an audit conducted by the Universal Service Administrative Company on previous ITC^DeltaCom Universal Service Fund assessments and payments. Decrease in 2013 due to the $8.3 million charge recorded in the prior year and a $7.2 million favorable adjustment recorded in the third quarter of 2013 to decrease our reserves for regulatory audits resulting from final interpretation and resolution of certain regulatory audits, primarily the audit by the Universal Service Administrative Company

40


(d)
Decrease due to certain favorable settlements recognized during 2013, including: a $1.8 million favorable adjustment due to the renegotiation of an IRU agreement recorded as a liability in purchase accounting for ITC^DeltaCom; a $0.9 million favorable adjustment for an arbitrator's final decision with respect to post-closing working capital adjustments relating to the One Communications acquisition; and a $1.1 million favorable settlement with a telecommunication vendor.
(e)
Decrease due to decline in certain traditional voice and data products, including traditional voice, lower-end, single site broadband services and web hosting, partially offset by sales of growth products which include MPLS and hosted VoIP.

Consumer Services

Cost of revenues for our Consumer Services segment primarily consists of telecommunications fees and network operations costs incurred to provide our Internet access services; fees paid to suppliers of our value-added services; fees paid to content providers for information provided on our online properties; and the cost of equipment sold to customers for use with our services. Our principal providers for narrowband services are AT&T, GlobalPOPs and Windstream. We also purchase lesser amounts of narrowband services from certain regional and local providers. Our principal providers of broadband connectivity are AT&T Inc., Bright House Networks, CenturyLink, Inc., Comcast Corporation, Megapath, Time Warner Cable and Verizon Communications, Inc. Many of our agreements have a short term or operate on a month-to-month basis. We cannot be certain of renewal or non-termination of our contracts or that legislative or regulatory factors will not affect our contracts.

The decreases in Consumer Services cost of revenues during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years were primarily due to the declines in the average number of consumer services subscribers. Partially offsetting this decrease was an increase in our average cost per subscriber. Our agreements with certain service providers generally have volume based tiered pricing which is leading to higher unit costs as we see a decline in subscribers over time. Also contributing to the increase was a shift in the mix to customers with higher costs associated with delivering services.
 
Selling, general and administrative
 
The following table presents our selling, general and administrative expenses for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Selling, general and administrative expenses
$
397,574

 
$
429,087

 
$
426,070

 
$
31,513

 
8
%
 
$
(3,017
)
 
(1
)%
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses consist of expenses related to sales and marketing, customer service, network operations, information technology, regulatory, billing and collections, corporate administration, and legal and accounting. Such costs include salaries and related employee costs (including stock-based compensation), outsourced labor, professional fees, property taxes, travel, insurance, occupancy costs, advertising and other administrative expenses.

The following table presents the primary reasons for the changes in selling, general and administrative expenses for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years:
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
(in millions)
Due to acquisitions (a)
$
43.3

 
$
3.6

Due to decrease in people-related costs (b)

(8.3
)
 
(9.9
)
Due to change in stock-based compensation expense (c)
(3.3
)
 
2.8

Due to change in other selling, general and administrative (d)
(0.2
)
 
0.5

   Total change in selling, general and administrative expenses
$
31.5

 
$
(3.0
)
______________

41


    
(a)
Increase in 2012 due to the inclusion of selling, general and administrative expenses from One Communications and STS Telecom for a full year in 2012 compared to partial periods in 2011. Increase in 2013 due to the inclusion of CenterBeam selling, general and administrative expenses beginning in July 2013.
(b)
Decrease primarily due to cost savings realized from workforce reductions and other synergies from integrating our businesses. Also contributing was an increase in personnel costs being classified in capitalized labor and integration-related costs.
(c)
Decrease in 2012 due to lower headcount, which resulted in fewer grants. Increase in 2013 due to higher grants and stock-based compensation expense recognized for the acceleration of vesting in connection with certain employee terminations.
(d)
Change in other selling, general and administrative costs such as professional fees, property taxes, commissions, outsourced labor, travel, insurance, occupancy costs and advertising.

Depreciation and amortization
 
The following table presents our depreciation and amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Depreciation expense
$
100,774

 
$
112,489

 
$
116,744

 
$
11,715

 
12
%
 
$
4,255

 
4
 %
Amortization expense
59,219

 
70,676

 
66,370

 
11,457

 
19
%
 
(4,306
)
 
(6
)%
Total depreciation and amortization
$
159,993

 
$
183,165

 
$
183,114

 
$
23,172

 
14
%
 
$
(51
)
 
 %
 
Depreciation and amortization includes depreciation of property and equipment and amortization of definite-lived intangible assets acquired in purchases of businesses and purchases of customer bases from other companies. Property and equipment is depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the various asset classes. Customer installation and acquisition costs are amortized over the actual weighted average initial contract terms of contracts initiated each month, assuming a customer churn factor. Leasehold improvements are depreciated using the straight-line method over the shorter of the estimated useful life or the remaining term of the lease. Definite-lived intangible assets, which primarily consist of subscriber bases and customer relationships, acquired software and technology, trade names and other assets, are amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives, which range from three to six years.

The following table presents the primary reasons for the changes in depreciation and amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years:
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
(in millions)
Due to depreciation expense from acquisitions (a)
$
12.8

 
$
0.2

Due to amortization expense from acquisitions (b)
10.9

 
0.8

Due to other changes in depreciation expense (c)
(1.1
)
 
4.0

Due to other changes in amortization expense (d)
0.6

 
(5.1
)
   Total change in depreciation and amortization
$
23.2

 
$
(0.1
)
______________

(a)
Increase in 2012 due to depreciation expense resulting from property and equipment obtained in the acquisitions of One Communications on April 1, 2011 and STS Telecom on March 2, 2011. Increase in 2013 due to inclusion of CenterBeam depreciation expense beginning July 1, 2013.
(b)
Increase in 2012 due to amortization expense resulting from the definite-lived intangible assets obtained in the acquisitions of One Communications on April 1, 2011 and STS Telecom on March 2, 2011. Increase in 2013 due to amortization expense resulting from the definite-lived intangible assets obtained in the acquisition of CenterBeam on July 1, 2013.
(c)
Decrease in depreciation expense in 2012 primarily due to assets becoming fully depreciated during the year. Increase in depreciation expense in 2013 primarily due to an increase in capital expenditures, including customer acquisition costs, costs to maintain and enhance our network and costs for data center and fiber expansion. Also contributing to the increase in 2013 was accelerated depreciation expense on property and equipment that was disposed of during the year.
(d)
Increase in amortization expense in 2012 primarily due to a change in useful life for certain One Communications intangible assets, offset by definite-lived intangible assets becoming fully amortized during the year. Decrease in

42


amortization expense in 2013 primarily due to definite-lived intangible assets becoming fully amortized during the year.

Impairment of goodwill
 
Interim goodwill test. During the first quarter of 2013, we recognized a $256.7 million non-cash impairment charge to goodwill related to our Business Services reporting unit, of which $255.6 million is included in continuing operations and $1.1 million is reflected in discontinued operations. We test our goodwill annually during the fourth quarter of each fiscal year or when events or changes in circumstances indicate that goodwill might be impaired. Our stock price and market capitalization declined during the three months ended March 31, 2013 following the announcement in mid-February 2013 of our fourth quarter 2012 earnings and 2013 financial guidance. As a result of the sustained decrease in stock price and market capitalization, we performed an interim goodwill test in conjunction with the preparation of our financial statements for the three months ended March 31, 2013. The primary factor contributing to the impairment was a change in the discount rate and market multiples as a result of the change in these market conditions, both key assumptions used in the determination of fair value.
Impairment testing of goodwill is required at the reporting unit level and involves a two-step process. We identified two reporting units, Business Services and Consumer Services, for evaluating goodwill. Each of these reporting units constitutes a business for which discrete financial information is available and segment management regularly reviews the operating results. The first step of the impairment test involves comparing the estimated fair values of our reporting units with the reporting units' carrying amounts, including goodwill. We estimated the fair values of our reporting units based on weighting of the income and market approaches. These models use significant unobservable inputs, or Level 3 inputs, as defined by the fair value hierarchy. Under the income approach, the fair value of the reporting unit was estimated based on the present value of estimated cash flows using a discounted cash flow method. The significant assumptions used in the discounted cash flow method included internal forecasts and projections developed by management for planning purposes, available industry/market data, strategic plans, discount rates and the growth rate to calculate the terminal value. Under the market approach, the fair value was estimated using the guideline company method. We selected guideline companies in the industry in which each reporting unit operates.

Upon completion of the first step, we determined that the carrying value of our Business Services reporting unit exceeded its estimated fair value, so a second step was performed to compare the carrying amount of goodwill to the implied fair value of that goodwill. The implied fair value of goodwill for the Business Services reporting unit was determined in the same manner as utilized to recognize goodwill in a business combination. To determine the implied value of goodwill, fair values were allocated to the assets and liabilities of the Business Services reporting unit as of March 31, 2013. The implied fair value of goodwill was measured as the excess of the fair value of the Business Services reporting unit over the fair value of its assets and liabilities. The impairment loss of $256.7 million during the first quarter of 2013 was measured as the amount the carrying value of goodwill exceeded the implied fair value of the goodwill.
Annual goodwill test. We did not record any impairment of goodwill during the years ended 2011 or 2012. In addition, our annual test of impairment for fiscal 2013 did not result in an impairment. However, approximately $50.3 million of goodwill attributable to our Business Services reporting unit and $88.9 million of goodwill attributable to our Consumer Services reporting unit remains as of December 31, 2013. Deterioration in market conditions or estimated future cash flows in our reporting units could result in future goodwill impairment. We continue to monitor events and circumstances which may affect the fair value of this reporting unit.

Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs
 
Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs consisted of the following during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Integration-related costs
$
4,044

 
$
10,452

 
$
21,622

 
$
6,408

 
158
 %
 
$
11,170

 
107
 %
Severance, retention and other employee costs
16,460

 
6,067

 
14,844

 
(10,393
)
 
(63
)%
 
8,777

 
145
 %
Transaction-related costs
5,756

 
1,399

 
1,021

 
(4,357
)
 
(76
)%
 
(378
)
 
(27
)%
Facility-related costs
5,530

 
479

 
2,328

 
(5,051
)
 
(91
)%
 
1,849

 
386
 %
Legacy plan restructuring costs
278

 
(153
)
 
215

 
(431
)
 
(155
)%
 
368

 
241
 %
Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs
$
32,068

 
$
18,244

 
$
40,030

 
$
(13,824
)
 
(43
)%
 
$
21,786

 
119
 %

43


 
Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs consist of costs related to EarthLink’s restructuring, acquisition and integration-related activities. Such costs include: 1) integration-related costs, such as system conversion, rebranding costs and integration-related consulting and employee costs; 2) severance, retention and other employee termination costs associated with acquisition and integration activities and with certain voluntary employee separations; 3) transaction-related costs, which are direct costs incurred to effect a business combination, such as advisory, legal, accounting, valuation and other professional fees; and 4) facility-related costs, such as lease termination and asset impairments. Restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs are expensed in the period in which the costs are incurred and the services are received and are included in restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs in the Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)
The decrease in restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to a decline in certain up-front costs related to our 2010 and 2011 acquisitions, such as severance costs incurred to eliminate duplicate positions, transaction costs incurred to effect the transactions and facility-related costs to exit duplicate facilities. Partially offsetting this decline was an increase in integration-related costs, as we incurred costs to integrate operating support systems and networks.
The increase in restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to an increase in costs to integrate operating support systems, networks and certain billing systems as we worked to complete several significant integration milestones during the year; costs related to our acquisition of CenterBeam; employee termination costs associated with certain voluntary employee separations; and costs to exit duplicate facilities. In addition, during the first quarter of 2013, we restructured our sales organization in order to better meet the needs of the IT services market, which resulted in a reduction in our sales workforce and some offices closing. We also decided to exit telecom systems sales early in 2013 to enable focus on our hosted VoIP platform for new voice customers, which resulted in a small number of position eliminations.
Interest expense and other, net
 
The following table presents our interest expense and other, net, for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Interest expense
$
74,949

 
$
64,331

 
$
60,495

 
$
(10,618
)
 
(14
)%
 
$
(3,836
)
 
(6
)%
Interest income
(4,678
)
 
(2,076
)
 
(84
)
 
2,602

 
(56
)%
 
1,992

 
(96
)%
Other, net
369

 
1,161

 
275

 
792

 
215
 %
 
(886
)
 
(76
)%
Total interest expense and other, net
$
70,640

 
$
63,416

 
$
60,686

 
$
(7,224
)
 
(10
)%
 
$
(2,730
)
 
(4
)%
 
Interest expense and other, net, is primarily comprised of interest expense incurred on our debt and capital leases, amortization of debt issuance costs, debt premiums, and debt discounts; interest earned on our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities; and other miscellaneous income and expense items.
 
The decrease in interest expense and other, net, during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the redemption and repayment of our outstanding $255.8 million principal amount of convertible senior notes due 2026 on November 15, 2011, as well as the redemption of $32.5 million aggregate principal amount of our 10.5% ITC^DeltaCom Notes on December 6, 2012. Partially offsetting this was a decrease in interest income due to lower investment yields and a decrease in our average cash and marketable securities.

The decrease in interest expense and other, net, during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to lower interest expense resulting from the issuance of 7.375% Senior Secured Notes and repayment of our remaining ITC^DeltaCom Notes in May 2013.  In May 2013, we issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 7.375% Senior Secured Notes. Also in May 2013, we completed a tender offer and redemption of all outstanding principal of our 10.5% ITC^DeltaCom Notes. Partially offsetting the decrease in interest expense was a $2.0 million loss on repayment of debt recorded in connection with the redemption of our ITC^DeltaCom Notes and a $2.0 million decrease in interest income due to lower cash and marketable securities. We recognized a net loss of $2.0 million as a result of $16.2 million of premiums paid for the acquisition of ITC^DeltaCom Notes, net of a $14.2 million write-off of the unamortized premium on debt.


44


Income tax (provision) benefit
 
The following table presents the components of the income tax (provision) benefit for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Current (provision) benefit
$
(3,777
)
 
$
1,224

 
$
1,639

Deferred (provision ) benefit
(17,954
)
 
107

 
(212,870
)
Total income tax (provision) benefit
$
(21,731
)
 
$
1,331

 
$
(211,231
)
 
During the year ended December 31, 2011, the current tax provision was due to state income and federal and state alternative minimum tax ("AMT") amounts payable due to the net operating loss carryforward limitations associated with the AMT calculation and the non-cash deferred tax provision was due primarily to the utilization of net operating loss carryforwards. During the year ended December 31, 2012, the current and non-cash deferred benefits were primarily due to the tax impact of changes to our state deferred income tax rates and the resulting impact on the re-measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities recorded on the balance sheet as of January 1, 2012; the release of valuation allowance related to specific state net operating losses; and the reversal of state related uncertain tax positions in the current year due to statute expirations. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the current tax benefit was primarily related to expense for Canadian tax amounts payable, prior year state tax items and penalties and interest related to uncertain tax positions, which is offset with benefit from the current release of uncertain tax positions related to prior years. During the year ended December 31, 2013, the non-cash deferred tax provision was due primarily to the recording of a valuation allowance against deferred tax assets (as further described below).

The tax provision for the year ended December 31, 2013 includes a $266.3 million non-cash charge to record a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. During the three months ended December 31, 2013, we entered into a three-year cumulative loss position. For purposes of assessing the realization of the deferred tax assets, this cumulative loss position is considered significant negative evidence. Also during the three months ended December 31, 2013, management reassessed its projections of future taxable income. This change in projections, coupled with its cumulative loss position caused management to modify its assessment of the realizability of its deferred tax asset and conclude that a full valuation allowance, exclusive of our deferred tax liabilities with indefinite useful lives and our capital loss carryforward, was necessary.

We will reassess the realization of the deferred tax assets each reporting period. To the extent that our financial results improve and the deferred tax assets becomes realizable, we will reduce the valuation allowance through earnings.
 
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

The operating results of the our telecom systems business acquired as part of ITC^DeltaCom have been separately presented as discontinued operations for all periods presented. On August 2, 2013, we sold our telecom systems business. We received $0.6 million of cash and recorded an $0.8 million receivable for contingent consideration expected to be received over the next four years. No gain or loss was recognized on the sale. We have no significant continuing involvement in the operations or significant continuing direct cash flows. The telecom systems results of operations were previously included in our Business Services segment.

The following table presents summarized results of operations related to discontinued operations for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Revenues
$
13,561

 
$
13,842

 
$
6,141

Operating costs and expenses
(18,096
)
 
(17,860
)
 
(8,102
)
Income tax benefit
1,829

 
1,600

 

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
$
(2,706
)
 
$
(2,418
)
 
$
(1,961
)

45


Segment Results of Operations
 
We operate two reportable segments, Business Services and Consumer Services. We present our segment information along the same lines that our chief executive reviews our operating results in assessing performance and allocating resources. Our Business Services segment earns revenue by providing a broad range of data, voice and IT services to businesses and communications carriers. Our Consumer Services segment provides nationwide Internet access and related value-added services to residential customers.
 
We evaluate the performance of our operating segments based on segment operating income. Segment operating income includes revenues from external customers, related cost of revenues and operating expenses directly attributable to the segment, which include expenses over which segment managers have direct discretionary control, such as advertising and marketing programs, customer support expenses, operations expenses, product development expenses, certain technology and facilities expenses, billing operations and provisions for doubtful accounts. Segment operating income excludes other income and expense items and certain expenses over which segment managers do not have discretionary control. Costs excluded from segment operating income include various corporate expenses (consisting of certain costs such as corporate management, human resources, finance and legal), depreciation and amortization, impairment of goodwill and intangible assets, restructuring, acquisition and integration-related costs and stock-based compensation expense, as they are not considered in the measurement of segment performance.
 
Business Services Segment
 
The following table sets forth operating results for our Business Services segment for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
$
924,698

 
$
1,017,425

 
$
964,227

 
$
92,727

 
10
 %
 
$
(53,198
)
 
(5
)%
Cost of revenues
463,782

 
527,514

 
506,245

 
63,732

 
14
 %
 
(21,269
)
 
(4
)%
Segment operating expenses
293,211

 
332,542

 
342,630

 
39,331

 
13
 %
 
10,088

 
3
 %
Segment operating income
$
167,705

 
$
157,369

 
$
115,352

 
$
(10,336
)
 
(6
)%
 
$
(42,017
)
 
(27
)%
 
The increase in Business Services revenues during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to a full year of One Communications revenues in 2012 compared to a partial period 2011; revenues from our IT services transactions entered into during 2011 and new product launches over the year; partially offset by continued declines in revenues for certain traditional voice and data products, including traditional voice, web hosting and lower-end, single site broadband services. The decrease in Business Services revenues during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to continued declines in revenues for traditional voice and data products, partially offset by revenues from our growth products, including MPLS, hosted voice and IT services, and revenues from CenterBeam beginning in July 2013. For more detail, please see discussion under "Revenues" in "Consolidated Results of Operations" elsewhere in this section.

The decrease in Business Services operating income during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the decline in traditional voice and data products. The decrease in Business Services operating income during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the continued decline in revenues for traditional voice and data products. In addition, costs increased due to investments in our growth products and due to the change in mix of products to growth products, which are more costly to deliver.


46


Consumer Services Segment

Consumer Services Operating Metrics
 
The following table sets forth subscriber and operating data for our Consumer Services segment for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
Consumer Subscriber Activity
 

 
 
 
 
Subscribers at beginning of year
1,636,000

 
1,350,000

 
1,139,000

Gross organic subscriber additions
184,000

 
146,000

 
105,000

Churn
(470,000)

 
(357,000)

 
(268,000)

Subscribers at end of year (a)
1,350,000

 
1,139,000

 
976,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
Consumer Metrics
 

 
 
 
 
Average narrowband subscribers (b)
830,000

 
678,000

 
582,000

Average broadband subscribers (b)
654,000

 
562,000

 
473,000

Average consumer subscribers (b)
1,484,000

 
1,240,000

 
1,055,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
ARPU (c)
$
21.10

 
$
21.34

 
$
21.83

Churn rate (d)
2.6
%
 
2.4
%
 
2.1
%

(a) Subscriber counts do not include new nonpaying customers. Customers receiving service under promotional programs that include periods of free service at inception are not included in subscriber counts until they become paying customers.
 
(b) Average subscribers is calculated by averaging the ending monthly subscribers or accounts for the thirteen months preceding and including the end of the year.

(c) ARPU represents the average monthly revenue per user (subscriber). ARPU is computed by dividing average monthly revenue for the period by the average number of subscribers for the period. Average monthly revenue used to calculate ARPU includes recurring service revenue as well as nonrecurring revenues associated with equipment and other one-time charges associated with initiating or discontinuing services.
 
(d) Churn rate is used to measure the rate at which subscribers discontinue service on a voluntary or involuntary basis.  Churn rate is computed by dividing the average monthly number of subscribers that discontinued service during the period by the average subscribers for the period.
 

47


Consumer Services Operating Results
 
The following table sets forth operating results for our Consumer Services segment for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Revenues
$
375,845

 
$
317,710

 
$
276,379

 
$
(58,135
)
 
(15
)%
 
$
(41,331
)
 
(13
)%
Cost of revenues
117,482

 
105,102

 
94,497

 
(12,380
)
 
(11
)%
 
(10,605
)
 
(10
)%
Segment operating expenses
73,293

 
67,526

 
50,623

 
(5,767
)
 
(8
)%
 
(16,903
)
 
(25
)%
Segment operating income
$
185,070

 
$
145,082

 
$
131,259

 
$
(39,988
)
 
(22
)%
 
$
(13,823
)
 
(10
)%

The decreases in Consumer Services revenues and operating income during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 compared to the prior years were primarily due to the continued maturation of and competition in the market for consumer Internet access and competitive pressures in the industry. The decreases in revenue were partially offset by decreases in operating expenses as our consumer subscriber base has decreased and become longer-tenured. Our longer tenured customers require less customer service and technical support and have a lower frequency of non-payment.

Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
The following table sets forth summarized cash flow data for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2012 vs 2011
 
2013 vs 2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
$ Change
 
% Change
 
(dollars in thousands)
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
146,234

 
$
191,055

 
$
124,156

 
$
44,821

 
31
 %
 
$
(66,899
)
 
(35
)%
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
141,594

 
(163,836
)
 
(112,500
)
 
(305,430
)
 
(216
)%
 
51,336

 
31
 %
Net cash used in financing activities
(318,997
)
 
(81,381
)
 
(52,641
)
 
237,616

 
74
 %
 
28,740

 
35
 %
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents
$
(31,169
)
 
$
(54,162
)
 
$
(40,985
)
 
$
(22,993
)
 
(74
)%
 
$
13,177

 
24
 %
 
Operating activities 

The increase in cash provided by operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to the inclusion of a full period of cash generated by One Communications in 2012 compared to a partial period in 2011. Also contributing to the increase was an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, primarily related to timing of certain payments to network providers. This was partially offset by severance, transaction and other integration-related costs and an increase in interest payments.

The decrease in cash provided by operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year period was primarily due to the overall decrease in revenues as well as an increase in payments for acquisition, restructuring and integration-related activities.
 
Investing activities

The change in cash flows from investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to $307.4 million change in cash associated with investments in marketable securities. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we received cash of $290.1 million for sales and maturities of investments in marketable securities, net of purchases. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we used cash of $17.2 million for purchases of marketable securities, net of sales and maturities.  Also contributing to the decrease was a $45.4 million increase in capital expenditures, primarily due to a full year of One Communications of capital expenditures, network and technology center related projects and customer acquisition costs. The overall decrease in cash flows from investing activities was offset by a $43.1 million decrease in cash used for acquisitions, net of cash acquired.

48


 
The decrease in net cash used in investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year period was primarily due to a $64.1 million change in net cash from purchases and sales of marketable securities. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we used $17.2 million of cash for purchases of marketable securities, net of sales and maturities. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we generated $46.9 million of cash from sales and maturities of marketable securities, net of purchases. Also contributing was a $3.7 million decrease in capital expenditures. Partially offsetting these decreases was $16.8 million of cash used for our acquisition of CenterBeam in July 2013.

Financing activities

The decrease in net cash used in financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the prior year was primarily due to a $215.0 million net change in cash flows from debt activities, a $21.6 million decrease in repurchases of common stock and a $1.8 million decrease in dividend payments. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we used $250.3 million for repayment of debt and capital lease obligations and during the year ended December 31, 2012, we used $35.3 million for repayment of debt and capital lease obligations. During the year ended December 31, 2011, we repurchased 6.3 million shares of our common stock for $47.0 million and during the year ended December 31, 2012, we repurchased 3.7 million shares of our common stock for $25.4 million. Dividend payments were $22.9 million and $21.1 million during the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2012, respectively, reflecting quarterly dividends of $0.05 per share.

The decrease in net cash used in financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was primarily due to a $19.3 million decrease in repurchases of common stock, a $9.4 million decrease in net cash used for debt and capital lease transactions and a $0.3 million decrease in dividends paid. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we repurchased 3.7 million shares of our common stock for $25.4 million compared to 1.1 million shares of our common stock for $6.1 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we used $35.3 million for repayments of debt and capital lease obligations, compared to $25.8 million net cash used for debt transactions during the year ended December 31, 2013, which are more fully described below. Dividend payments were $21.1 million and $20.8 million during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively, reflecting quarterly dividends of $0.05 per share.

In May 2013, we completed a private placement of $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of Senior Secured Notes, resulting in net proceeds of $292.6 million after deducting transaction fees of $7.4 million. We used proceeds from the private placement, together with available cash, to fund a tender offer and redemption of our ITC^DeltaCom Notes. We used approximately $314.8 million to repay the ITC^DeltaCom Notes, which consisted of $292.3 million of outstanding principal amount, $16.2 million of premiums and $6.3 million of accrued and unpaid interest. In May 2013, we also amended and restated our revolving credit facility and paid $1.9 million of transaction fees and expenses. Finally, in connection with our acquisition of CenterBeam in July 2013, we assumed and repaid $6.5 million of debt.

Future uses of cash
 
Our primary future cash requirements relate to outstanding indebtedness, capital expenditures and investments in our Business Services segment. In addition, we have historically used cash for dividends and we may use cash in the future to make strategic acquisitions or repurchase common stock or debt.
 
Debt and interest. We expect to use cash to service our outstanding indebtedness, including our $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of Senior Notes due in May 2019, our $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of Senior Secured Notes due in June 2020 and any future borrowings under our $135.0 million revolving credit facility.
 
Capital expenditures. We expect to incur capital expenditures of approximately $125.0 million to $135.0 million during 2014. The capital expenditures primarily relate to the acquisition of new customers and to maintain and upgrade our network and technology infrastructure. The actual amount of capital expenditures may fluctuate due to a number of factors which are difficult to predict and could change significantly over time. Additionally, technological advances may require us to make capital expenditures to develop or acquire new equipment or technology in order to replace aging or obsolete equipment.
 
Investments in our Business Services segment. One of our key strategies is to grow our Business Services revenue. We are deploying a wide array of cloud, managed security and IT support services. We expect to invest cash in sales and marketing efforts and resources required to support our business services, including investments in search engine marketing campaigns and advertising to increase brand awareness.
 
Dividends. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, cash dividends declared were $0.20 per common share. The decision to declare future dividends is made at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on, among other

49


things, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, investment opportunities, restrictions on dividends under the agreements governing our indebtedness and other factors the Board of Directors may deem relevant.
 
Other. We may also use cash to invest in or acquire other companies, to repurchase common stock or to repurchase or redeem debt. We expect to continue to evaluate and consider potential strategic transactions that we believe may complement or grow our business. Although we continue to consider and evaluate potential strategic transactions, there can be no assurance that we will be able to consummate any such transaction. In addition, we continue to evaluate our business, including evaluating ways to reduce the cost structure of our business, and may incur costs for additional restructuring activities.
 
Our cash requirements depend on numerous factors, including costs required to integrate our acquisitions, costs incurred to redeem or repurchase debt, the size and types of future acquisitions in which we may engage, the costs required to maintain our network infrastructure, the outcome of various telecommunications-related disputes and proceedings, the pricing of our services and the level of resources used for our sales and marketing activities, among others. In addition, our use of cash in connection with acquisitions may limit other potential uses of our cash, including stock repurchases, debt repayments or repurchases and dividend payments.
 
Future sources of cash
 
Our principal sources of liquidity are our cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities, as well as the cash flow we generate from our operations. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2012 and 2013, we generated $146.2 million, $191.1 million and $124.2 million in cash from operations, respectively. As of December 31, 2013, we had $116.6 million in cash and cash equivalents. Our cash and cash equivalents are subject to general credit, liquidity, market, and interest rate risks, which may be exacerbated by unfavorable economic conditions.

Another source of liquidity is our revolving credit facility. We have a credit agreement providing for a senior secured revolving credit facility with aggregate revolving commitments of $135.0 million. The senior secured revolving credit facility terminates in May 2017, and at that time any amounts outstanding thereunder shall be due and payable in full.  As of December 31, 2013, no amounts had been drawn or were outstanding under the senior secured revolving credit facility.
 
Our available cash and cash equivalents, together with our results of operations, are expected to be sufficient to meet our operating expenses, service outstanding indebtedness, capital requirements and investment and other obligations for at least the next 12 months. However, to increase available liquidity or to fund acquisitions or other strategic activities, we may seek additional financing. We have no commitments for any additional financing and have no lines of credit or similar sources of financing, other than the $135.0 million credit facility. We cannot be sure that we can obtain additional financing on favorable terms, if at all, through the issuance of equity securities or the incurrence of additional debt. Additional equity financing may dilute our stockholders, and debt financing, if available, may restrict our ability to repurchase common stock or debt, declare and pay dividends and raise future capital. If we are unable to obtain additional needed financing, it may prohibit us from refinancing existing indebtedness and making acquisitions, capital expenditures and/or investments, which could materially and adversely affect our business.


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Contractual Obligations and Commitments
The following table sets forth our contractual obligations and commercial commitments as of December 31, 2013:
 
 
 
 
Payment Due by Period
 
 
Total
 
2014
 
2015-
2016
 
2017-
2018
 
After 5 Years
 
 
(in thousands)
Long-term debt (1)
 
$
600,000

 
$

 
$