10-K 1 a2206945z10-k.htm 10-K

Use these links to rapidly review the document
Table of Contents
PART IV

Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549

FORM 10-K

ý   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011

or

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number 1-15319

SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

Maryland   04-3445278
(State of Organization)   (IRS Employer Identification No.)

Two Newton Place, 255 Washington Street, Suite 300, Newton, Massachusetts

 

02458-1634
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code 617-796-8350

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title Of Each Class   Name Of Each Exchange On Which Registered
Common Shares of Beneficial Interest   New York Stock Exchange

         Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check One):

Large accelerated filer ý   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No ý

         The aggregate market value of the voting shares of the registrant held by non-affiliates was $3.3 billion based on the $23.41 closing price per common share on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2011. For purposes of this calculation, an aggregate of 413,028 common shares held directly or by affiliates of the trustees and officers of the registrant have been included in the number of shares held by affiliates.

         Number of the registrant's common shares outstanding as of February 17, 2012: 162,646,046.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

         Certain information required in Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated by reference to our to be filed definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held on May 17, 2012, or our definitive Proxy Statement.

   


Table of Contents

In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the terms the "Company", "SNH", "we", "us" and "our" include Senior Housing Properties Trust and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.


WARNING CONCERNING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

        THIS ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K CONTAINS STATEMENTS WHICH CONSTITUTE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS WITHIN THE MEANING OF THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995 AND OTHER SECURITIES LAWS. ALSO, WHENEVER WE USE WORDS SUCH AS "BELIEVE", "EXPECT", "ANTICIPATE", "INTEND", "PLAN", "ESTIMATE", OR SIMILAR EXPRESSIONS, WE ARE MAKING FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. THESE FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE BASED UPON OUR PRESENT INTENT, BELIEFS OR EXPECTATIONS, BUT FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE NOT GUARANTEED TO OCCUR AND MAY NOT OCCUR. FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS IN THIS REPORT RELATE TO VARIOUS ASPECTS OF OUR BUSINESS, INCLUDING:

    OUR ACQUISITIONS AND SALES OF PROPERTIES,

    OUR ABILITY TO RAISE EQUITY OR DEBT CAPITAL,

    OUR ABILITY TO PAY INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL OF OUR DEBT,

    OUR ABILITY TO PAY DISTRIBUTIONS AND THE AMOUNT OF SUCH DISTRIBUTIONS,

    OUR ABILITY TO RETAIN OUR EXISTING TENANTS AND MAINTAIN CURRENT RENTAL RATES,

    OUR POLICIES AND PLANS REGARDING INVESTMENTS AND FINANCINGS,

    THE FUTURE AVAILABILITY OF BORROWINGS UNDER OUR REVOLVING CREDIT FACILITY,

    OUR TAX STATUS AS A REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUST, OR REIT,

    OUR BELIEF THAT FIVE STAR QUALITY CARE, INC., OR FIVE STAR, OUR FORMER SUBSIDIARY, WHICH, AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2011, IS RESPONSIBLE FOR 44.6% OF OUR CURRENT ANNUALIZED RENTS, HAS ADEQUATE FINANCIAL RESOURCES AND LIQUIDITY TO MEET ITS OBLIGATIONS TO US,

    OUR EXPECTATION THAT WE WILL BENEFIT FINANCIALLY BY PARTICIPATING IN AFFILIATES INSURANCE COMPANY, OR AIC, WITH REIT MANAGEMENT & RESEARCH LLC, OR RMR, AND COMPANIES TO WHICH RMR PROVIDES MANAGEMENT SERVICES, AND

    OTHER MATTERS.

OUR ACTUAL RESULTS MAY DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE CONTAINED IN OR IMPLIED BY OUR FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS AS A RESULT OF VARIOUS FACTORS. FACTORS THAT COULD HAVE A MATERIAL ADVERSE EFFECT ON OUR FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS AND UPON OUR BUSINESS, RESULTS OF OPERATIONS, FINANCIAL CONDITION, FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS, NORMALIZED FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS, CASH AVAILABLE FOR DISTRIBUTION, CASH FLOWS, LIQUIDITY AND PROSPECTS INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

    THE IMPACT OF CHANGES IN THE ECONOMY AND THE CAPITAL MARKETS ON US AND OUR TENANTS,

i


Table of Contents

    THE IMPACT OF THE PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, OR PPACA, AND OTHER RECENTLY ENACTED, ADOPTED OR PROPOSED LEGISLATION OR REGULATIONS ON OUR TENANTS AND THEIR ABILITY TO PAY OUR RENTS,

    ACTUAL AND POTENTIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST WITH OUR MANAGING TRUSTEES, FIVE STAR, COMMONWEALTH REIT, OR CWH, AND RMR AND THEIR RELATED PERSONS AND ENTITIES,

    COMPLIANCE WITH, AND CHANGES TO, FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS, ACCOUNTING RULES, TAX RATES AND SIMILAR MATTERS,

    LIMITATIONS IMPOSED ON OUR BUSINESS AND OUR ABILITY TO SATISFY COMPLEX RULES IN ORDER FOR US TO QUALIFY AS A REIT FOR U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX PURPOSES, AND

    COMPETITION WITHIN THE HEALTHCARE AND REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES.

FOR EXAMPLE:

    FIVE STAR IS OUR LARGEST TENANT AND FIVE STAR MAY EXPERIENCE FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES AS A RESULT OF A NUMBER OF FACTORS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO:

    CHANGES IN MEDICARE AND MEDICAID PAYMENTS, INCLUDING THOSE RESULTING FROM PPACA AND OTHER RECENTLY ENACTED, ADOPTED OR PROPOSED LEGISLATION OR REGULATIONS, WHICH COULD RESULT IN REDUCED RATES OR A FAILURE OF SUCH RATES TO MATCH FIVE STAR'S COST INCREASES,

    CHANGES IN REGULATIONS AFFECTING ITS OPERATIONS,

    CHANGES IN THE ECONOMY GENERALLY OR GOVERNMENTAL POLICIES WHICH REDUCE THE DEMAND FOR THE SERVICES FIVE STAR OFFERS,

    INCREASES IN INSURANCE AND TORT LIABILITY COSTS, AND

    INEFFECTIVE INTEGRATION OF NEW ACQUISITIONS,

    IF FIVE STAR'S OPERATIONS BECOME UNPROFITABLE, FIVE STAR MAY BECOME UNABLE TO PAY OUR RENTS,

    OUR OTHER TENANTS MAY EXPERIENCE LOSSES AND BECOME UNABLE TO PAY OUR RENTS,

    CONTINUED AVAILABILITY OF BORROWINGS UNDER OUR REVOLVING CREDIT FACILITY IS SUBJECT TO OUR SATISFYING CERTAIN FINANCIAL COVENANTS AND MEETING OTHER CUSTOMARY CONDITIONS,

    INCREASING THE MAXIMUM BORROWINGS UNDER OUR REVOLVING CREDIT FACILITY IS SUBJECT TO OBTAINING ADDITIONAL COMMITMENTS FROM LENDERS, WHICH MAY NOT OCCUR,

    OUR PENDING ACQUISITIONS OF SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITIES AND PROPERTIES LEASED TO MEDICAL PROVIDERS OR MEDICAL RELATED BUSINESSES, CLINICS AND BIOTECH LABORATORY TENANTS, AND CERTAIN RELATED MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS ARE CONTINGENT UPON VARIOUS CLOSING CONDITIONS, INCLUDING IN SOME CASES, OUR COMPLETION OF DILIGENCE AND / OR REGULATORY, LENDER OR OTHER THIRD PARTY

ii


Table of Contents

      APPROVALS. ACCORDINGLY, SOME OR ALL OF THESE PURCHASES AND ANY RELATED MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS MAY BE DELAYED OR MAY NOT OCCUR,

    THIS ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K STATES THAT WE HAVE TWO PROPERTIES CLASSIFIED AS HELD FOR SALE. WE MAY NOT BE ABLE TO SELL THESE PROPERTIES ON TERMS ACCEPTABLE TO US OR OTHERWISE,

    THIS ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K STATES THAT THE TERMS OF VARIOUS TRANSACTIONS BETWEEN US AND EACH OF CWH AND FIVE STAR WERE REVIEWED AND APPROVED BY SPECIAL COMMITTEES OF EACH OF OUR BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND CWH'S BOARD OF TRUSTEES OR FIVE STAR'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS, RESPECTIVELY, COMPOSED SOLELY OF INDEPENDENT TRUSTEES OR DIRECTORS WHO ARE NOT ALSO TRUSTEES OR DIRECTORS OF THE OTHER PARTY TO THE TRANSACTION, AND THAT THEY WERE REPRESENTED BY SEPARATE COUNSEL. AN IMPLICATION OF THESE STATEMENTS MAY BE THAT THE PURCHASE PRICES AND OTHER TERMS OF THESE TRANSACTIONS ARE AS FAVORABLE TO US AS THOSE WE COULD OBTAIN IN SIMILAR TRANSACTIONS WITH UNRELATED THIRD PARTIES. HOWEVER, DESPITE THESE PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS, WE COULD STILL BE SUBJECTED TO CLAIMS CHALLENGING THESE TRANSACTIONS OR OUR ENTRY INTO THESE TRANSACTIONS BECAUSE OF THE MULTIPLE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG US, CWH AND FIVE STAR AND THEIR RELATED PERSONS AND ENTITIES, AND DEFENDING EVEN MERITLESS CLAIMS COULD BE EXPENSIVE AND DISTRACTING TO MANAGEMENT,

    WE MAY BE UNABLE TO REPAY OUR DEBT OBLIGATIONS WHEN THEY BECOME DUE,

    OUR ABILITY TO MAKE FUTURE DISTRIBUTIONS DEPENDS UPON A NUMBER OF FACTORS, INCLUDING OUR FUTURE EARNINGS. WE MAY BE UNABLE TO MAINTAIN OUR CURRENT RATE OF DISTRIBUTIONS AND FUTURE DISTRIBUTIONS MAY BE SUSPENDED OR PAID AT A LESSER RATE THAN THE DISTRIBUTIONS WE NOW PAY,

    OUR ABILITY TO GROW OUR BUSINESS AND INCREASE OUR DISTRIBUTIONS DEPENDS IN LARGE PART UPON OUR ABILITY TO BUY PROPERTIES AND ARRANGE FOR THEIR PROFITABLE OPERATION OR LEASE THEM FOR RENTS WHICH EXCEED OUR CAPITAL COSTS. WE MAY BE UNABLE TO IDENTIFY PROPERTIES THAT WE WANT TO ACQUIRE OR TO NEGOTIATE ACCEPTABLE PURCHASE PRICES, ACQUISITION FINANCING, MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS OR LEASE TERMS FOR NEW PROPERTIES,

    SOME OF OUR TENANTS MAY NOT RENEW EXPIRING LEASES, AND WE MAY BE UNABLE TO LOCATE NEW TENANTS TO MAINTAIN THE HISTORICAL OCCUPANCY RATES OF, OR RENTS FROM, OUR PROPERTIES,

    RENTS THAT WE CAN CHARGE AT OUR PROPERTIES MAY DECLINE, AND

    THIS ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K STATES THAT WE BELIEVE THAT OUR CONTINUING RELATIONSHIPS WITH FIVE STAR, CWH, RMR, AIC AND THEIR AFFILIATED AND RELATED PERSONS AND ENTITIES MAY BENEFIT US AND PROVIDE US WITH ADVANTAGES IN OPERATING AND GROWING OUR BUSINESS. IN FACT, THE ADVANTAGES WE BELIEVE WE MAY REALIZE FROM THESE RELATIONSHIPS MAY NOT MATERIALIZE.

iii


Table of Contents

        THESE RESULTS COULD OCCUR DUE TO MANY DIFFERENT CIRCUMSTANCES, SOME OF WHICH ARE BEYOND OUR CONTROL, SUCH AS NEW LEGISLATION AFFECTING OUR BUSINESS OR THE BUSINESSES OF OUR TENANTS, NATURAL DISASTERS OR CHANGES IN OUR TENANTS' REVENUES OR COSTS, OR CHANGES IN CAPITAL MARKETS OR THE ECONOMY GENERALLY.

        THE INFORMATION CONTAINED ELSEWHERE IN THIS ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K, INCLUDING UNDER THE CAPTION "RISK FACTORS", OR INCORPORATED HEREIN IDENTIFIES OTHER IMPORTANT FACTORS THAT COULD CAUSE DIFFERENCES FROM OUR FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS. OUR FILINGS WITH THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ARE AVAILABLE ON ITS WEBSITE AT WWW.SEC.GOV.

        YOU SHOULD NOT PLACE UNDUE RELIANCE UPON OUR FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS.

        EXCEPT AS REQUIRED BY LAW, WE DO NOT INTEND TO UPDATE OR CHANGE ANY FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS AS A RESULT OF NEW INFORMATION, FUTURE EVENTS OR OTHERWISE.


STATEMENT CONCERNING LIMITED LIABILITY

THE AMENDED AND RESTATED DECLARATION OF TRUST ESTABLISHING SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST, DATED SEPTEMBER 20, 1999, AS AMENDED AND SUPPLEMENTED, AS FILED WITH THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF ASSESSMENTS AND TAXATION OF MARYLAND, PROVIDES THAT NO TRUSTEE, OFFICER, SHAREHOLDER, EMPLOYEE OR AGENT OF SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST SHALL BE HELD TO ANY PERSONAL LIABILITY, JOINTLY OR SEVERALLY, FOR ANY OBLIGATION OF, OR CLAIM AGAINST, SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST. ALL PERSONS DEALING WITH SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST IN ANY WAY SHALL LOOK ONLY TO THE ASSETS OF SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST FOR THE PAYMENT OF ANY SUM OR THE PERFORMANCE OF ANY OBLIGATION.

iv


Table of Contents

SENIOR HOUSING PROPERTIES TRUST
2011 FORM 10-K ANNUAL REPORT

Table of Contents

 
   
  Page  

 

Part I

       

Item 1.

 

Business

    1  

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

    36  

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

    51  

Item 2.

 

Properties

    52  

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

    52  

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

    52  

 

Part II

       

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Shares, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

   
53
 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

    53  

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    55  

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

    86  

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    89  

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

    89  

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

    89  

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

    90  

 

Part III

       

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

   
91
 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

    91  

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    91  

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

    91  

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

    91  

 

Part IV

       

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

   
92
 

 

Signatures

       

v


Table of Contents


PART I

Item 1.    Business.

The Company.

        We are a real estate investment trust, or REIT, that was organized under the laws of the state of Maryland in 1998. As of December 31, 2011, we owned 369 properties located in 38 states and Washington, D.C. On that date, the undepreciated carrying value of our properties, net of impairment losses, was $4.7 billion. Our portfolio includes: 249 senior living communities with 29,678 living units / beds and two rehabilitation hospitals with 364 licensed beds, with an undepreciated carrying value of $3.1 billion; 108 properties leased to medical providers or medical related businesses, clinics and biotech laboratory tenants, or MOBs, with 7.6 million square feet of space and an undepreciated carrying value of $1.4 billion; and, 10 wellness centers with approximately 812,000 square feet of interior space plus outdoor developed facilities with an undepreciated carrying value of $0.2 billion.

        Our principal executive offices are located at Two Newton Place, 255 Washington Street, Suite 300, Newton, Massachusetts 02458-1634, and our telephone number is (617) 796-8350.

        We believe that the aging of the U.S. population will increase demand for existing independent living communities, assisted living communities, nursing homes, MOBs, wellness centers and other medical and healthcare related properties. We plan to profit from this demand by purchasing additional properties and entering into leases and management agreements with qualified operators which generate returns to us that exceed our operating and capital costs and by structuring leases that provide or permit for periodic rental increases.

        Our business plan contemplates investments in independent living communities, assisted living communities, nursing homes, rehabilitation hospitals, MOBs and wellness centers. Some properties combine more than one type of service in a single building or campus. Our Board of Trustees establishes our investment, financing and disposition policies and may change them at any time without shareholder approval.

Short and Long Term Residential Care Facilities.

        Independent Living Communities.    Independent living communities, or congregate care communities, also provide high levels of privacy to residents and require residents to be capable of relatively high degrees of independence. Unlike a senior apartment property, an independent living community usually bundles several services as part of a regular monthly charge. For example, an independent living community may include one or two meals per day in a central dining room, daily or weekly maid service or a social director in the base charge. Additional services are generally available from staff employees on a fee for service basis. In some independent living communities, separate parts of the property are dedicated to assisted living or nursing services.

        Assisted Living Communities.    Assisted living communities typically have one bedroom units which include private bathrooms and efficiency kitchens. Services bundled within one charge usually include three meals per day in a central dining room, daily housekeeping, laundry, medical reminders and 24 hour availability of assistance with the activities of daily living, such as dressing and bathing. Professional nursing and healthcare services are usually available at the property on call or at regularly scheduled times.

        Nursing Homes.    Nursing homes generally provide extensive nursing and healthcare services similar to those available in hospitals, without the high costs associated with operating theaters, emergency rooms or intensive care units. A typical purpose built nursing home includes mostly rooms with one or two beds, a separate bathroom and shared dining facilities. Licensed nursing professionals staff nursing homes 24 hours per day.

1


Table of Contents

        Rehabilitation Hospitals.    Rehabilitation hospitals, also known as inpatient rehabilitation facilities, or IRFs, provide intensive physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech language pathology services beyond the capabilities customarily available in nursing homes. Patients in IRFs generally receive a minimum of three hours of rehabilitation services daily. IRFs often also provide outpatient services to patients who do not remain overnight. Our two rehabilitation hospitals have beds available for inpatient services and provide extensive outpatient services from the hospitals' premises, such as rehabilitation services for amputees, brain injury, cardio-pulmonary conditions, orthopedic conditions, spinal cord injury, stroke and neurorehabilitation.

Properties Leased to Medical Providers or Medical Related Businesses, Clinics and Biotech Laboratory Tenants (MOBs).

        The MOBs are office or commercial buildings constructed for use or operated as medical office space for physicians and other health personnel, and other businesses in medical related fields, including clinics and laboratory uses.

Wellness Centers.

        Wellness centers typically have gymnasiums, strength and cardiovascular equipment areas, tennis and racquet sports facilities, pools, spas and children's centers. Professional sport training and therapist services are often available. Wellness centers often market themselves as clubs for which members may pay monthly fees plus additional fees for specific services.

Other Types of Real Estate.

        In the past, we have considered investing in real estate different from our existing property types, including age restricted apartment buildings and some properties located outside the United States. We may explore such alternative investments in the future.

Lease Terms.

        Our leases of senior living communities and wellness centers are so-called "triple-net" leases which generally require the tenants to pay rent, to pay all operating expenses of the properties, to indemnify us from liability which may arise by reason of our ownership of the properties, to maintain the leased properties at their expense, to remove and dispose of hazardous substances in compliance with applicable law and to maintain insurance for their own and our benefit. In the event of partial damage, condemnation or taking, these tenants are required to rebuild with insurance or other proceeds, if any; in the case of total destruction, condemnation or taking, we receive all insurance or other proceeds and these tenants are required to pay any positive difference in the amount of proceeds and our historical investments in the affected properties; in the event of material destruction or condemnation, some of these tenants have a right to purchase the affected property for amounts at least equal to our historical investment in the affected property.

        Our leases of MOBs include both triple-net leases, as described above, and some net and modified gross leases where we are responsible to operate and maintain the properties and we charge tenants for some or all of the property operating costs. A small percentage of our MOB leases are so-called "full-service" leases where we receive fixed rent from our tenants and no reimbursement for our property operating costs.

        Events of Default.    Under our leases events of default generally include:

    failure of the tenant to pay rent or any other money when due;

    failure of the tenant to provide periodic financial reports when due;

    failure of the tenant to perform other terms, covenants or conditions of its lease and the continuance thereof for a specified period after written notice;

2


Table of Contents

    failure of the tenant to maintain required insurance coverages; or

    revocation of any material license necessary for the tenant's operation of our property.

        Default Remedies.    Upon the occurrence of any event of default under our leases, we generally may (subject to applicable law):

    terminate the affected lease and accelerate the rent;

    terminate the tenant's rights to occupy and use the affected property, rent the property to another tenant and recover from the tenant the difference between the amount of rent which would have been due under the lease and the rent received under the reletting;

    make any payment or perform any act required to be performed by the tenant under its lease;

    exercise our rights with respect to any collateral securing the lease; and

    require the defaulting tenant to reimburse us for all payments made and all costs and expenses incurred in connection with any exercise of the foregoing remedies.

Management Contracts.

        Because we are a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we generally may not operate our communities. For certain of our communities, which we refer to as the Managed Communities, we use the taxable REIT subsidiary, or TRS, structure authorized by the REIT Investment Diversification and Empowerment Act, or RIDEA. Under this structure, we lease certain of our communities to our TRSs and the TRSs enter into long term management contracts, or the Management Contracts, for the operation of such communities. The Management Contracts for the communities managed for our account provide the manager with a management fee, which is a percentage of the gross revenues realized at the communities, plus reimbursement for the manager's direct costs and expenses related to the communities and an incentive fee equal to a percentage of the annual net operating income of the communities after we realize an annual return equal to a percentage of our invested capital.

        Although we have various rights as owner under the Management Contracts, we rely on the manager's personnel, good faith, expertise, historical performance, technical resources and information systems, proprietary information and judgment to manage our Managed Communities efficiently and effectively. We also rely on the manager to set resident fees and otherwise operate those properties in compliance with our Management Contracts.

Investment Policies.

        Acquisitions.    Our present investment goals are to acquire additional properties primarily for income and secondarily for appreciation potential. In implementing this acquisition strategy, we consider a range of factors relating to each proposed acquisition, including:

    use and size of the property;

    proposed acquisition price;

    existing or proposed lease or management terms;

    availability and reputation of a financially qualified lessee(s), operator(s) or guarantor(s);

    historical and projected cash flows from the operations of the property;

    estimated replacement cost of the property;

    design, physical condition and age of the property;

    competitive market environment of the property;

    price segment and payment sources in which the property is operated; and

    level of permitted services and regulatory history of the property and its historical operators.

3


Table of Contents

        We have no policies which specifically limit the percentage of our assets which may be invested in any individual property, in any one type of property, in properties leased to any one tenant or in properties leased to an affiliated group of tenants.

        Form of Investments.    We prefer wholly owned investments in fee interests. However, circumstances may arise in which we may invest in leaseholds, joint ventures, mortgages and other real estate interests. We may invest in real estate joint ventures if we conclude that by doing so we may benefit from the participation of co-venturers or that our opportunity to participate in the investment is contingent on the use of a joint venture structure. We may invest in participating, convertible or other types of mortgages if we conclude that by doing so, we may benefit from the cash flow or appreciation in the value of a property which is not available for purchase.

Mergers and Strategic Combinations.

        In the past, we have considered the possibility of entering mergers or strategic combinations with other companies and we may again explore such possibilities in the future.

Disposition Policies.

        From time to time we consider the sale of one or more properties or investments. Disposition decisions are made based on a number of factors including, but not limited to, the following:

    our ability to lease the affected property;

    our tenant's or manager's desire to purchase the affected property;

    our tenant's or manager's desire to cease operating at the affected property;

    proposed sale price;

    strategic fit of the property or investment with the rest of our portfolio; and

    existence of alternative sources, uses or needs for capital.

Financing Policies.

        There are no limitations in our organizational documents on the amount of indebtedness we may incur. Our revolving credit facility and our senior note indenture and its supplements contain financial covenants which, among other things, restrict our ability to incur indebtedness and require us to maintain financial ratios and a minimum net worth. However, our Board of Trustees may seek to amend these covenants or seek replacement financings with less restrictive covenants. In the future, we may decide to seek changes in the financial covenants which currently restrict our debt leverage based upon then current economic conditions, the relative availability and costs of debt versus equity capital and our need for capital to take advantage of acquisition opportunities or otherwise.

        Our Board of Trustees may also determine to seek additional capital through equity offerings, debt financings, retention of cash flows in excess of distributions to shareholders, or a combination of these methods. To the extent that our Board of Trustees decides to obtain additional debt financing, we may do so on an unsecured basis or a secured basis. We may seek to obtain lines of credit or to issue securities senior to our common shares, including preferred shares or debt securities, some of which may be convertible into common shares or be accompanied by warrants to purchase common shares. We may also finance acquisitions by assuming debt, through an exchange of properties or through the issuance of equity or other securities.

Manager.

        Our day to day operations are conducted by Reit Management & Research LLC, or RMR. RMR originates and presents investment and divestment opportunities to our Board of Trustees and provides management and administrative services to us. RMR is a Delaware limited liability company

4


Table of Contents

beneficially owned by Barry M. Portnoy and Adam D. Portnoy, our Managing Trustees. RMR has a principal place of business at Two Newton Place, 255 Washington Street, Suite 300, Newton, Massachusetts 02458-1634, and its telephone number is (617) 796-8390. RMR also acts as the manager to CommonWealth REIT, or CWH, Government Properties Income Trust, or GOV, and Hospitality Properties Trust, or HPT, and provides management services to other public and private companies, including Five Star Quality Care, Inc., or Five Star, TravelCenters of America LLC, or TA, and Sonesta International Hotels Corporation, or Sonesta. Barry M. Portnoy is the Chairman of RMR, and its other directors are Adam D. Portnoy, Gerard M. Martin, formerly one of our Managing Trustees, and David J. Hegarty, our President and Chief Operating Officer. The executive officers of RMR are: Adam D. Portnoy, President and Chief Executive Officer; Jennifer B. Clark, Executive Vice President and General Counsel; David J. Hegarty, Executive Vice President and Secretary; Mark L. Kleifges, Executive Vice President; Bruce J. Mackey, Jr., Executive Vice President; John A. Mannix, Executive Vice President; John G. Murray, Executive Vice President; Thomas M. O'Brien, Executive Vice President; John C. Popeo, Executive Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer; David M. Blackman, Senior Vice President; Ethan S. Bornstein, Senior Vice President; Richard A. Doyle, Senior Vice President; Paul V. Hoagland, Senior Vice President; Vern D. Larkin, Senior Vice President; David M. Lepore, Senior Vice President; Andrew J. Rebholz, Senior Vice President; and Mark R. Young, Senior Vice President. David J. Hegarty and Richard A. Doyle are also our executive officers. Other executive officers of RMR also serve as officers of other companies to which RMR provides management services.

Employees.

        We have no employees. Services which would otherwise be provided by employees are provided by RMR and by our Managing Trustees and officers. As of February 17, 2012, RMR had approximately 740 full time employees, including a headquarters staff and regional offices and other personnel located throughout the United States.

Government Regulation and Reimbursement.

        The regulatory environment of the senior living and healthcare industries is extensive. Most of these laws and regulations affect the manner in which our tenants and managers operate our properties, but these laws and regulations can also impact the values of our properties. Some of the laws that impact or may impact us or our tenants or managers include: state and local licensure laws, laws protecting consumers against deceptive practices and laws generally affecting the operation of our properties and how our tenants and managers otherwise conduct their operations, such as fire, health and safety laws and privacy laws; federal and state laws affecting assisted living communities that participate in Medicaid and skilled nursing facilities, or SNFs, hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities that participate in both Medicaid and Medicare, mandating allowable costs, pricing, reimbursement procedures and limitations, quality of services and care, food service and physical plants; resident rights (including abuse and neglect laws) and fraud laws; anti-kickback and physician referral laws; the Americans with Disabilities Act; and safety and health standards set by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Medicaid funding is available in some, but not all, states for assisted living services. State licensure standards for assisted living communities, SNFs, hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities typically cover facility policies, staffing, quality of services and care, resident rights, fire safety and physical plant, and related matters. We are unable to predict the future course of federal, state and local legislation or regulation. Changes in the regulatory framework could have a material adverse effect on the abilities of our tenants to pay our rents, the profitability of our Managed Communities and the values of our properties.

        State and local health and social service agencies or other regulatory authorities regulate and license many senior living communities. State health authorities regulate and license hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities. In most states in which we own properties, we and our tenants and

5


Table of Contents

managers are prohibited from providing certain levels of service without first obtaining the appropriate licenses. In addition, most states require a certificate of need before opening a SNF or hospital or expanding the services at an existing facility. In some states, certificate of need requirements also apply to assisted living communities and some other healthcare facilities. Senior living facilities, hospitals and other healthcare facilities must also comply with applicable state and local building, zoning, fire and food service codes before licensing or Medicare/Medicaid certification may be granted. These laws and regulatory requirements could affect our ability and the ability of our tenants and managers to expand into new markets or to expand facilities in existing markets. In addition, the operation of our properties outside of the scope of applicable licensed authority can result in us, our tenants or managers being subject to penalties, including closure of facilities.

        Governmental authorities seem to be subjecting healthcare facilities like those that we own to increasing numbers of inspections or surveys and potential enforcement actions. Unannounced surveys or inspections may occur annually or biannually, or following a state's receipt of a complaint about the facility. From time to time in the ordinary course of business, we or our tenants and managers may receive deficiency reports from state regulatory bodies resulting from such inspections or surveys. We or our tenants and managers resolve most inspection deficiencies through an agreed plan of corrective action relating to the affected facility's operations, but the governmental agency typically has the authority to take or seek further action against a licensed or certified facility, which could result in the imposition of civil money penalties or fines, suspension, modification, or revocation of a license or Medicare/Medicaid participation, suspension or denial of admissions, partial or full denial of payments, state oversight, temporary management or receivership or imposition of other sanctions, including criminal penalties. Loss, suspension or modification of a license or certification or other sanctions or penalties could adversely affect the ability of a tenant to pay its rents, the profitability of a Managed Community and the values of our properties. We and our tenants and managers may also expend considerable resources to respond to federal and state inspections, surveys, investigations, audits or other enforcement actions under applicable laws or regulations. We or our tenants and managers may receive notices of potential sanctions and enforcement remedies from time to time, and authorities may impose such sanctions and penalties from time to time on us or our tenants or managers. If we or any of our tenants or managers fails to comply with any applicable legal requirements, or is unable to cure deficiencies that have been identified or are identified in the future, such sanctions may be imposed and if imposed, may adversely affect the affected tenants' abilities to pay their rents, the profitability of affected Managed Communities and the values of our properties. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, has increased its oversight of state survey agencies in recent years, focusing survey and enforcement efforts on nursing homes with findings of substandard care or continuing deficiencies, seeking to identify chain operated facilities with patterns of noncompliance, and providing more information about nursing homes to consumers. State Attorneys General typically enforce consumer protection laws relating to senior living services, hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities. Also, state Medicaid fraud control agencies sometimes may investigate and prosecute assisted living communities and nursing facilities, hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities under fraud and patient abuse and neglect laws even if the facilities and their residents do not receive federal or state funds.

        Certain current state laws and regulations allow enforcement officials to make determinations as to whether the care provided by our tenants or managers at our healthcare facilities exceeds the level of care for which a particular facility is licensed. A finding that a facility is delivering care beyond the scope of its license might result in the immediate discharge and transfer of residents, which could adversely affect the ability of a tenant to pay rent to us, the profitability of a Managed Community and the values of a property. Furthermore, certain states and the federal government may allow citations in one facility to impact other facilities operated by the same entity or a related entity in the state or, in certain circumstances, in another state. Revocation of a license or certification at one facility could therefore impact our or a tenant's or manager's ability to obtain new licenses or certifications or to

6


Table of Contents

maintain or renew existing licenses at other facilities, which could adversely affect the ability of that tenant to pay rent to us or our profitability. In addition, an adverse finding by survey officials may serve as the basis for lawsuits by private plaintiffs and may lead to investigations under federal and state laws, which could result in civil and/or criminal penalties against the facility or a related individual or entity.

        As of December 31, 2011, approximately 92% of our current net operating income, or NOI, as defined in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, from our properties came from properties where a majority of the NOI is derived from private resources, and the remaining 8% of our NOI from our properties came from properties where a majority of the NOI is dependent upon Medicare and Medicaid programs. Our tenants operate facilities in many states and participate in federal and state health care payment programs, including the federal Medicare and state Medicaid benefit programs for services in SNFs, hospitals and other similar facilities, state Medicaid programs for services in assisted living communities and other federal and state health care payment programs. With the background of the current federal budget deficit and other federal priorities and continued difficult state fiscal conditions, there have been numerous recent legislative and regulatory actions or proposed actions with respect to federal Medicare rates and state Medicaid rates and federal payments to states for Medicaid programs. Examples include:

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or PPACA, enacted in March 2010, contains insurance changes, payment changes and healthcare delivery systems changes with a stated intent of expanding access to health insurance coverage and reducing the growth of healthcare expenditures while simultaneously maintaining or improving the quality of healthcare. Under PPACA, beginning in federal fiscal year 2012, a productivity adjustment will reduce the Medicare SNF and IRF market basket updates for inflation, which may result in payment rates for a fiscal year being less than for the preceding fiscal year. PPACA also reduced the Medicare IRF adjustment for inflation and will reduce future IRF Medicare market basket updates for inflation by specified percentages in each federal fiscal year through 2019. PPACA establishes an Independent Payment Advisory Board to submit legislative proposals to Congress and take other actions with a goal of reducing Medicare spending growth and includes various other provisions affecting Medicare and Medicaid providers, including enforcement reforms and increased funding for Medicare and Medicaid program integrity control initiatives. The U.S. House of Representative has voted to repeal PPACA, and members of Congress have proposed legislation to deny funding to implement PPACA or parts of PPACA and to make substantial changes to PPACA. Members of Congress and the Obama Administration have also proposed various reforms to Medicare and Medicaid, such as substantial structural changes to the programs and long-term reductions in federal funding, reducing Medicare rates of payment to some providers including SNFs, IRFs and pharmaceutical companies, changing Medicare to a system of premium support payments, and changing the formula for federal payments to states for Medicaid programs. In addition, the constitutionality of provisions of PPACA have been challenged in various lawsuits, and petitions for Supreme Court reviews of resulting U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals decisions have been filed and accepted. We anticipate that the U.S. Supreme Court may rule on the constitutionality of PPACA in 2012.

    Medicare reimburses SNFs under a prospective payment system, or PPS, providing a fixed payment for each day of care provided to a Medicare beneficiary, in accordance with the Resource Utilization Group, or RUG, to which the beneficiary is assigned based on individual medical characteristics and service needs. The PPS payments cover substantially all Medicare Part A services the beneficiary receives. Capital costs are part of the PPS rate and are not facility specific. Many states have similar Medicaid PPSs. CMS implemented the PPS pursuant to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, or the BBA, and subsequent federal legislation. CMS updates PPS payments for SNFs each year by a market basket update to account for inflation, and periodically implements changes to the RUG categories and payment rates. Effective on

7


Table of Contents

      October 1, 2011, CMS adopted rules that it estimates will, on a net basis, reduce aggregate Medicaid payments for SNFs by approximately 11.1% in federal fiscal year 2012. The rules include a reduction in rates of approximately 12.6% as a result of a recalibration of the case mix indexes under the RUG IV system. This reduction is partially offset by an annual increase of approximately 1.7% due to an inflation increase of 2.7% reduced by a productivity adjustment of 1.0% pursuant to PPACA.

    The federal government is also seeking to slow the growth of Medicare and Medicaid payments to SNFs pursuant to the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, or the DRA. The DRA reduced Medicare bad debt reimbursement from 100% to 70% for uncollected cost sharing payments from Medicare beneficiaries who are not eligible for Medicaid. In addition, the DRA increased the "look-back" period for prohibited asset transfers that disqualify individuals from Medicaid nursing home benefits from three to five years. The period of Medicaid ineligibility begins on the date of the prohibited transfer or the date an individual has entered the nursing home and would otherwise be eligible for Medicaid coverage, whichever occurs later, rather than on the date of the prohibited transfer, effectively extending the Medicaid penalty period. Also, the DRA effectuated limits on Medicare Part B payments for outpatient therapies subject to an exemption if Medicare found additional services to be medically necessary for an individual. The federal government has temporarily extended the Medicare outpatient therapy exemption process through February 29, 2012.

    Pursuant to the Budget Control Act of 2011, the federal budget will include automatic reductions in discretionary and mandatory spending starting in 2013, including reductions of not more than 2% to payments to Medicare providers. Medicaid is exempt from the automatic reductions, as are certain Medicare benefits. We are unable to predict the financial impact on us of the automatic payment cuts beginning in 2013; however such impact may be adverse and material to some of our tenants' abilities to pay rents to us and on the value of our properties.

    The DRA and PPACA also include provisions that encourage states to provide long term care services in home and community based settings rather than in nursing homes or other inpatient facilities, including increased federal Medicaid spending for some states. PPACA extended and expanded eligibility for a program to award competitive grants to states for demonstration projects to provide home and community based long term care services to qualified individuals relocated from SNFs, providing certain increased federal medical assistance for each qualifying beneficiary. States are also permitted to include home and community based services as optional services under their Medicaid state plans. States must establish needs based criteria for the services, and more stringent needs based criteria for nursing home services. PPACA expanded the services that states may provide and limited their ability to set caps on enrollment, waiting lists or geographic limitations on home and community based services.

    Under the CMS rule known as the "60% Rule," many rehabilitation hospitals have needed to reduce the number of non-qualifying patients treated and replace them with qualifying patients, establish other sources of revenue or both. The Obama Administration has proposed raising the 60% requirement to 75% beginning in federal fiscal year 2013. If Congress enacts such an increase, it will be more difficult for a tenant to maintain compliance with this rule. If a tenant is unable to maintain compliance with this rule, or if it were determined by retroactive audit not to have complied, the tenant's Medicare rates at these hospitals could be materially adversely affected.

    Medicare reimburses IRFs under a per discharge PPS implemented pursuant to the BBA. The PPS classifies patients into case mix groups based on their clinical characteristics and expected resource needs, and CMS calculates separate payment rates for each group. Payments under the PPS cover substantially all costs of furnishing covered inpatient rehabilitation services, and capital costs are not facility-specific. CMS updates PPS payments for IRFs each year by a

8


Table of Contents

      market basket update to account for inflation, and periodically implements changes to the case mix groups and payment rates. For certain recent years, CMS has frozen Medicare inflation related rate increases at zero percent, and taken other actions resulting in decreases in Medicare payments to IRFs. Effective on October 1, 2011, CMS adopted rules that it estimates will, on a net basis, increase aggregate Medicare payment rates for IRFs by approximately 2.2% in federal fiscal year 2012, as the result of various increases and reductions. Also effective as of October 1, 2011, CMS has adopted rules that establish a new quality reporting program that provides for a 2% reduction in the annual payment update beginning in 2014 for failure to report required quality data to the federal Secretary of HHS.

    Some of the states in which our tenants and managers operate have not raised Medicaid rates by amounts sufficient to offset increased costs or have frozen or reduced such rates. Effective June 30, 2011, Congress ended certain temporary increases in federal payments to states for Medicaid programs that had been in effect since 2008. We expect the ending of these temporary payments, combined with continued difficult state fiscal conditions, may result in those or other states freezing or reducing Medicaid payments to healthcare service providers like some of our tenants as a part of an effort to balance their budgets.

    The Medicare Physician Fee Schedule is scheduled to be reduced by approximately 27% on February 29, 2012. Congress is scheduled to vote on legislation that would delay the reduction until the end of 2012, but the scheduled reduction in 2013 would be greater than 27%. Any such material reduction could materially and adversely affect our tenants who receive Medicare payments for physicians' services and certain other outpatient services such as rehabilitation therapies.

        We are unable to predict the impact of these or other recent legislative and regulatory actions or proposed actions with respect to state Medicaid rates and federal Medicare rates and federal payments to states for Medicaid programs on those of our tenants or managers that derive a material portion of their revenues from Medicare, Medicaid or other governmental programs. The changes implemented or to be implemented as a result of such actions could result in the failure of Medicare, Medicaid or private payment reimbursement rates to cover increasing costs, in reductions in payments or other circumstances that could have a material adverse effect on the ability of some of our tenants to pay rent to us, the profitability of affected Managed Communities and the values of our properties.

        Federal and state efforts to target false claims, fraud and abuse and violations of anti-kickback, physician referral and privacy laws by Medicare and Medicaid providers and providers under other public and private programs have increased in recent years, as have civil monetary penalties, treble damages, repayment requirements and criminal sanctions for noncompliance. The federal False Claims Act, as amended and expanded by the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 and PPACA, provides significant civil money penalties and treble damages for false claims and authorizes individuals to bring claims on behalf of the federal government for false claims. The federal Civil Monetary Penalties Law authorizes the Secretary of HHS to impose substantial civil penalties, treble damages, and program exclusions administratively for false claims or violations of the federal Anti-Kickback statute. Governmental authorities are devoting increasing attention and resources to the prevention, detection, and prosecution of healthcare fraud and abuse. CMS contractors are also expanding the retroactive audits of Medicare claims submitted by IRFs, SNFs and other providers, and recouping alleged overpayments for services determined by auditors not to have been medically necessary or not to meet Medicare coverage criteria as billed. State Medicaid programs and other third party payers are conducting similar medical necessity and compliance audits.

9


Table of Contents

        Federal and state laws designed to protect the confidentiality and security of individual patient health and financial information apply to us, our tenants and our managers. HHS has issued rules pursuant to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act that govern our and our tenants' and managers' use and disclosure of health information and security rules for electronic personal health information, with civil monetary penalties and criminal sanctions for noncompliance.

        We require our tenants and managers to comply with all laws that regulate the operation of our senior living communities. While we do not believe that the costs to comply with these laws will have a material adverse effect on us, those costs may adversely affect the profitability of our Managed Communities and the abilities of our tenants to pay their rent to us. It is impossible to predict how our properties or our tenants or managers could be affected if we or any of our tenants or managers were subject to an action alleging violations of such laws, and any adverse determination concerning any of our or our tenants' or managers' licenses or eligibility for Medicare or Medicaid reimbursement or any substantial penalties, repayments or sanctions may adversely affect the profitability of our Managed Communities and the ability of our tenants to pay rent to us. If any of our tenants or managers becomes unable to operate our properties or if any of our tenants becomes unable to pay our rents because it has violated government regulations or payment laws, we may have great difficulty finding a substitute tenant or manager or selling the affected property for a fair price and the value of an affected property may decline materially.

        Federal, state and local entities regulate our MOB tenants who provide healthcare services. Many states require medical clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, clinical laboratories and other outpatient healthcare facilities to be licensed and inspected for compliance with licensure regulations concerning professional staffing, services, patient rights and physical plant requirements, among other matters. Healthcare providers and suppliers, including physicians and other licensed medical practitioners, who receive federal or state reimbursement under Medicare, Medicaid or other federal or state programs must comply with the requirements for their participation in those programs and are subject to reimbursement rates that are increasingly subject to cost control pressures and may be reduced or may not be increased sufficiently to cover increasing provider costs, including our rents.

        The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or the FDA, and other federal, state and local authorities extensively regulate our biotechnology laboratory tenants who seek to develop, manufacture or market and distribute new drugs, biologicals or medical devices for human use. The FDA and such other agencies regulate the clinical development, testing, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, labeling, storage, record keeping, advertising and promotion of such products. Before a new pharmaceutical or device may be marketed and distributed in the United States, the FDA must approve it as safe and effective for human use. Preclinical and clinical studies and documentation in connection with FDA approval of new pharmaceuticals or medical devices involve significant time, expense and risks of failure. Once a product is approved, the FDA has continuing oversight authority, including over manufacturing practices and facilities, and can withdraw approval, recall products, suspend production, impose or seek to impose civil or criminal penalties or take other governmental actions for failure to comply with regulatory requirements or with anti-fraud, false claims, anti-kickback or physician referral laws. Other concerns affecting such tenants include the potential for later discovery of safety concerns and related litigation, whether the product qualifies for reimbursement under Medicare, Medicaid or other federal or state programs, cost control initiatives of such programs, the potential for litigation over the validity or infringement of intellectual property rights related to the product and eventual expiration of product patents. Costs of compliance with such regulations and the risks described in this paragraph, among others, could adversely affect the ability of an affected tenant to pay rent to us.

10


Table of Contents


Competition.

        Investing in senior living facilities, wellness centers, MOBs and other real estate is a very competitive business. We compete against other REITs, numerous financial institutions, individuals and public and private companies who are actively engaged in this business. Also, we compete for investments based on a number of factors including rates, financings offered, underwriting criteria and reputation. Our ability to successfully compete is also impacted by economic and population trends, availability of acceptable investment opportunities, our ability to negotiate beneficial investment terms, availability and cost of capital and new and existing laws and regulations. We do not believe we have a dominant position in any of the geographic or property markets in which we operate, but some of our competitors are dominant in selected markets. Many of our competitors have greater financial and other resources than we have. We believe the geographic diversity of our investments, the experience and abilities of our management, our affiliation with RMR, the quality of our assets and the financial strength of many of our tenants and operators affords us some competitive advantages which have and will allow us to operate our business successfully despite the competitive nature of our business.

        The tenants and managers that operate our healthcare facilities compete on a local and regional basis with operators of facilities that provide comparable services. Operators compete for residents and patients based on quality of care, reputation, physical appearance of properties, services offered, family preferences, physicians, staff, price and location. We and our tenants and managers also face competition from other healthcare facilities for tenants, such as physicians and other healthcare providers that provide comparable facilities and services.

        For additional information on competition and the risks associated with our business, please see "Risk Factors" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Environmental and Climate Change Matters.

        Under various laws, owners as well as tenants and operators of real estate may be required to investigate and clean up or remove hazardous substances present at or migrating from properties they own, lease or operate and may be held liable for property damage or personal injuries that result from hazardous substances. These laws also expose us to the possibility that we may become liable to reimburse governments for damages and costs they incur in connection with hazardous substances. We reviewed environmental conditions surveys of the properties we own prior to their purchase. Based upon those surveys we do not believe that there are environmental conditions at any of our properties that have had or will have a material adverse effect on us. However, no assurances can be given that conditions are not present at our properties or that costs we may be required to incur in the future to remediate contamination will not have a material adverse effect on our business or financial condition.

        The current political debate about world climate change has resulted in various treaties, laws and regulations which are intended to limit carbon emissions. We believe these laws being enacted or proposed may cause energy costs at our properties to increase, but we do not expect the direct impact of these increases to be material to our results of operations, because the increased costs either would be the responsibility of our tenants directly or in large part may be passed through by us to our tenants as additional lease payments. Although we do not believe it is likely in the foreseeable future, laws enacted to mitigate climate change may make some of our buildings obsolete or cause us to make material investments in our properties which could materially and adversely affect our financial condition.

Internet Website.

        Our internet website address is www.snhreit.com. Copies of our governance guidelines, code of business conduct and ethics, or Code of Conduct, our policy outlining procedures for handling concerns or complaints about accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters and the charters of

11


Table of Contents

our audit, compensation and nominating and governance committees are posted on our website and may be obtained free of charge by writing to our Secretary, Senior Housing Properties Trust, Two Newton Place, 255 Washington Street, Suite 300, Newton, Massachusetts 02458-1634 or at our website. We make available, free of charge, on our website, our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to these reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after these forms are filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC. Any shareholder or other interested party who desires to communicate with our non-management Trustees, individually or as a group, may do so by filling out a report on our website. Our Board of Trustees also provides a process for security holders to send communications to the entire Board of Trustees. Information about the process for sending communications to our Board of Trustees can be found on our website. Our website address is included several times in this Annual Report on Form 10-K as a textual reference only and the information in the website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Segment Reporting.

        As of December 31, 2011, we have three operating segments. The first operating segment provides short term and long term residential care communities that offer dining for residents. Properties in this segment include leased and managed independent living communities, assisted living communities, skilled nursing facilities and rehabilitation hospitals. We earn rental income revenues from the tenants of our leased communities and we earn fees and services revenues from the residents of our Managed Communities. We acquired our Managed Communities beginning in June 2011. The second operating segment provides properties where medical related activities occur but where residential overnight stays or dining services are not provided. Properties in this segment include those leased to medical providers or medical related businesses, clinics and biotech laboratory tenants. The third operating segment includes amounts related to corporate business activities and the operating results of certain properties that offer fitness, wellness and spa services to members, which we do not consider to be sufficiently material as to constitute a separate reporting segment. See our consolidated financial statements included in "Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further financial information on our operating segments.


FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

        The following summary of federal income tax considerations is based on existing law, and is limited to investors who own our shares as investment assets rather than as inventory or as property used in a trade or business. The summary does not discuss all of the particular tax consequences that might be relevant to you if you are subject to special rules under federal income tax law, for example if you are:

    a bank, insurance company, regulated investment company, REIT or other financial institution;

    a broker, dealer or trader in securities or foreign currency;

    a person who has a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar;

    a person who acquires our shares in connection with employment or other performance of services;

    a person subject to alternative minimum tax;

    a person who owns our shares as part of a straddle, hedging transaction, constructive sale transaction, constructive ownership transaction, or conversion transaction; or

12


Table of Contents

    except as specifically described in the following summary, a tax-exempt entity or a foreign person.

        The sections of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the IRC, that govern federal income tax qualification and treatment of a REIT and its shareholders are complex. This presentation is a summary of applicable IRC provisions, related rules and regulations and administrative and judicial interpretations, all of which are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. Future legislative, judicial, or administrative actions or decisions could also affect the accuracy of statements made in this summary. We have not received a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, with respect to any matter described in this summary, and we cannot assure you that the IRS or a court will agree with the statements made in this summary. The IRS or a court could, for example, take a different position from that described in this summary with respect to our acquisitions, operations, restructurings or other matters, which, if successful, could result in significant tax liabilities for applicable parties. In addition, this summary is not exhaustive of all possible tax consequences, and does not discuss any estate, gift, state, local, or foreign tax consequences. For all these reasons, we urge you and any prospective acquiror of our shares to consult with a tax advisor about the federal income tax and other tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our shares. Our intentions and beliefs described in this summary are based upon our understanding of applicable laws and regulations that are in effect as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. If new laws or regulations are enacted which impact us directly or indirectly, we may change our intentions or beliefs.

        Your federal income tax consequences may differ depending on whether or not you are a "U.S. shareholder." For purposes of this summary, a "U.S. shareholder" is:

    a citizen or resident of the United States, including an alien individual who is a lawful permanent resident of the United States or meets the substantial presence residency test under the federal income tax laws;

    an entity treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes that is created or organized in or under the laws of the United States, any state thereof or the District of Columbia;

    an estate the income of which is subject to federal income taxation regardless of its source; or

    a trust if a court within the United States is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of the trust and one or more United States persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust, or an electing trust in existence on August 20, 1996, to the extent provided in Treasury regulations;

whose status as a U.S. shareholder is not overridden by an applicable tax treaty. Conversely, a "non-U.S. shareholder" is a beneficial owner of our shares who is not a U.S. shareholder. If a partnership (including any entity treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes) is a beneficial owner of our shares, the tax treatment of a partner in the partnership generally will depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. A beneficial owner that is a partnership and partners in such a partnership should consult their tax advisors about the federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our shares.

Taxation as a REIT

        We have elected to be taxed as a REIT under Sections 856 through 860 of the IRC, commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 1999. Our REIT election, assuming continuing compliance with the then applicable qualification tests, continues in effect for subsequent taxable years. Although no assurance can be given, we believe that we have been organized and have operated, and will continue to be organized and to operate, in a manner that qualified and will continue to qualify us to be taxed under the IRC as a REIT.

13


Table of Contents

        As a REIT, we generally are not subject to federal income tax on our net income distributed as dividends to our shareholders. Distributions to our shareholders generally are included in their income as dividends to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits. Our dividends are not generally entitled to the favorable 15% rate on qualified dividend income (scheduled to increase to ordinary income rates for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012), but a portion of our dividends may be treated as capital gain dividends, all as explained below. No portion of any of our dividends is eligible for the dividends received deduction for corporate shareholders. Distributions in excess of current or accumulated earnings and profits generally are treated for federal income tax purposes as returns of capital to the extent of a recipient shareholder's basis in our shares, and will reduce this basis. Our current or accumulated earnings and profits are generally allocated first to distributions made on our preferred shares, if any, and thereafter to distributions made on our common shares. For all these purposes, our distributions include both cash distributions and any in kind distributions of property that we might make. Our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, has opined that we have been organized and have qualified as a REIT under the IRC for our 1999 through 2011 taxable years, and that our current investments and plan of operation enable us to continue to meet the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT under the IRC. Our continued qualification and taxation as a REIT will depend upon our compliance with various qualification tests imposed under the IRC and summarized below. While we believe that we will satisfy these tests, our counsel does not review compliance with these tests on a continuing basis. If we fail to qualify as a REIT, we will be subject to federal income taxation as if we were a C corporation and our shareholders will be taxed like shareholders of C corporations. In this event, we could be subject to significant tax liabilities, and the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders could be reduced or eliminated.

        If we qualify as a REIT and meet the tests described below, we generally will not pay federal income tax on amounts we distribute to our shareholders. However, even if we qualify as a REIT, we may be subject to federal tax in the following circumstances:

    We will be taxed at regular corporate rates on any undistributed "real estate investment trust taxable income," including our undistributed net capital gains.

    If our alternative minimum taxable income exceeds our taxable income, we may be subject to the corporate alternative minimum tax on our items of tax preference.

    If we have net income from the disposition of "foreclosure property" that is held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business or from other nonqualifying income from foreclosure property, we will be subject to tax on this income at the highest regular corporate rate, currently 35%.

    If we have net income from prohibited transactions—that is, dispositions of inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business other than dispositions of foreclosure property and other than dispositions excepted under a statutory safe harbor—we will be subject to tax on this income at a 100% rate.

    If we fail to satisfy the 75% gross income test or the 95% gross income test discussed below, but nonetheless maintain our qualification as a REIT, we will be subject to tax at a 100% rate on the greater of the amount by which we fail the 75% or the 95% test, with adjustments, multiplied by a fraction intended to reflect our profitability.

    If we fail to distribute for any calendar year at least the sum of 85% of our REIT ordinary income for that year, 95% of our REIT capital gain net income for that year, and any undistributed taxable income from prior periods, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on the excess of the required distribution over the amounts actually distributed.

    If we acquire an asset from a corporation in a transaction in which our basis in the asset is determined by reference to the basis of the asset in the hands of a present or former C

14


Table of Contents

      corporation, and if we subsequently recognize gain on the disposition of this asset during a specified period (generally, ten years) beginning on the date on which the asset ceased to be owned by the C corporation, then we will pay tax at the highest regular corporate tax rate, which is currently 35%, on the lesser of the excess of the fair market value of the asset over the C corporation's basis in the asset on the date the asset ceased to be owned by the C corporation, or the gain we recognize in the disposition.

    If we acquire a corporation in a transaction where we succeed to its tax attributes, to preserve our status as a REIT we must generally distribute all of the C corporation earnings and profits inherited in that acquisition, if any, not later than the end of our taxable year of the acquisition. However, if we fail to do so, relief provisions would allow us to maintain our status as a REIT provided we distribute any subsequently discovered C corporation earnings and profits and pay an interest charge in respect of the period of delayed distribution. As discussed below, we have acquired C corporations in connection with our acquisition of real estate. Our investigations of these C corporations indicated that they did not have undistributed earnings and profits that we inherited but failed to timely distribute. However, upon review or audit, the IRS may disagree.

    As summarized below, REITs are permitted within limits to own stock and securities of a TRS. A TRS is separately taxed on its net income as a C corporation, and is subject to limitations on the deductibility of interest expense paid to its REIT parent. In addition, its REIT parent is subject to a 100% tax on the difference between amounts charged and redetermined rents and deductions, including excess interest.

If and to the extent we invest in properties in foreign jurisdictions, our income from those properties will generally be subject to tax in those jurisdictions. If we continue to operate as we do, then we will distribute all of our taxable income to our shareholders such that we will generally not pay federal income tax. As a result, we cannot recover the cost of foreign income taxes imposed on our foreign investments by claiming foreign tax credits against our federal income tax liability. Also, we cannot pass through to our shareholders any foreign tax credits.

        If we fail to qualify or elect not to qualify as a REIT, we will be subject to federal income tax in the same manner as a C corporation. Distributions to our shareholders if we do not qualify as a REIT will not be deductible by us nor will distributions be required under the IRC. In that event, distributions to our shareholders will generally be taxable as ordinary dividends potentially eligible for the 15% income tax rate (scheduled to increase to ordinary income rates for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012) discussed below in "Taxation of U.S. Shareholders" and, subject to limitations in the IRC, will be eligible for the dividends received deduction for corporate shareholders. Also, we will generally be disqualified from qualification as a REIT for the four taxable years following disqualification. Our failure to qualify as a REIT for even one year could result in reduction or elimination of distributions to our shareholders, or in our incurring substantial indebtedness or liquidating substantial investments in order to pay the resulting corporate-level taxes. The IRC provides certain relief provisions under which we might avoid automatically ceasing to be a REIT for failure to meet certain REIT requirements, all as discussed in more detail below.

REIT Qualification Requirements

        General Requirements.    Section 856(a) of the IRC defines a REIT as a corporation, trust or association:

    (1)
    that is managed by one or more trustees or directors;

    (2)
    the beneficial ownership of which is evidenced by transferable shares or by transferable certificates of beneficial interest;

    (3)
    that would be taxable, but for Sections 856 through 859 of the IRC, as a C corporation;

15


Table of Contents

    (4)
    that is not a financial institution or an insurance company subject to special provisions of the IRC;

    (5)
    the beneficial ownership of which is held by 100 or more persons;

    (6)
    that is not "closely held" as defined under the personal holding company stock ownership test, as described below; and

    (7)
    that meets other tests regarding income, assets and distributions, all as described below.

Section 856(b) of the IRC provides that conditions (1) through (4) must be met during the entire taxable year and that condition (5) must be met during at least 335 days of a taxable year of 12 months, or during a pro rata part of a taxable year of less than 12 months. Section 856(h)(2) of the IRC provides that neither condition (5) nor (6) need be met for our first taxable year as a REIT. We believe that we have met conditions (1) through (7) during each of the requisite periods ending on or before the close of our most recently completed taxable year, and that we can continue to meet these conditions in future taxable years. There can, however, be no assurance in this regard.

        By reason of condition (6), we will fail to qualify as a REIT for a taxable year if at any time during the last half of a year more than 50% in value of our outstanding shares is owned directly or indirectly by five or fewer individuals. To help comply with condition (6), our declaration of trust restricts transfers of our shares that would otherwise result in concentrated ownership positions. In addition, if we comply with applicable Treasury regulations to ascertain the ownership of our shares and do not know, or by exercising reasonable diligence would not have known, that we failed condition (6), then we will be treated as having met condition (6). However, our failure to comply with these regulations for ascertaining ownership may result in a penalty of $25,000, or $50,000 for intentional violations. Accordingly, we have complied and will continue to comply with these regulations, including requesting annually from record holders of significant percentages of our shares information regarding the ownership of our shares. Under our declaration of trust, our shareholders are required to respond to these requests for information.

        For purposes of condition (6), the term "individuals" is defined in the IRC to include natural persons, supplemental unemployment compensation benefit plans, private foundations and portions of a trust permanently set aside or used exclusively for charitable purposes, but not other entities or qualified pension plans or profit-sharing trusts. As a result, REIT shares owned by an entity that is not an "individual" are considered to be owned by the direct and indirect owners of the entity that are individuals (as so defined), rather than to be owned by the entity itself. Similarly, REIT shares held by a qualified pension plan or profit-sharing trust are treated as held directly by the individual beneficiaries in proportion to their actuarial interests in such plan or trust. Consequently, five or fewer such trusts could own more than 50% of the interests in an entity without jeopardizing that entity's federal income tax qualification as a REIT. However, as discussed below, if a REIT is a "pension-held REIT," each qualified pension plan or profit-sharing pension trust owning more than 10% of the REIT's shares by value generally may be taxed on a portion of the dividends it receives from the REIT.

        The IRC provides that we will not automatically fail to be a REIT if we do not meet conditions (1) through (6), provided we can establish reasonable cause for any such failure. Each such excused failure will result in the imposition of a $50,000 penalty instead of REIT disqualification. It is impossible to state whether in all circumstances we would be entitled to the benefit of this relief provision. This relief provision applies to any failure of the applicable conditions, even if the failure first occurred in a prior taxable year.

        Our Wholly-Owned Subsidiaries and Our Investments through Partnerships.    Except in respect of TRSs as discussed below, Section 856 (i) of the IRC provides that any corporation, 100% of whose stock is held by a REIT and its disregarded subsidiaries, is a qualified REIT subsidiary and shall not be treated as a separate corporation. The assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit of a

16


Table of Contents

qualified REIT subsidiary are treated as the REIT's. We believe that each of our direct and indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries, other than the TRSs discussed below, will be either a qualified REIT subsidiary within the meaning of Section 856(i) of the IRC, or a noncorporate entity that for federal income tax purposes is not treated as separate from its owner under regulations issued under Section 7701 of the IRC. Thus, except for the TRSs discussed below, in applying all the federal income tax REIT qualification requirements described in this summary, all assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit of our direct and indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries are treated as ours.

        We may invest in real estate both through one or more entities that are treated as partnerships for federal income tax purposes, including limited or general partnerships, limited liability companies, or foreign entities. In the case of a REIT that is a partner in a partnership, regulations under the IRC provide that, for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements regarding income and assets discussed below, the REIT is deemed to own its proportionate share of the assets of the partnership corresponding to the REIT's proportionate capital interest in the partnership and is deemed to be entitled to the income of the partnership attributable to this proportionate share. In addition, for these purposes, the character of the assets and gross income of the partnership generally retain the same character in the hands of the REIT. Accordingly, our proportionate share of the assets, liabilities, and items of income of each partnership in which we become a partner is treated as ours for purposes of the income tests and asset tests discussed below. In contrast, for purposes of the distribution requirement discussed below, we would take into account as a partner our share of the partnership's income as determined under the general federal income tax rules governing partners and partnerships under Sections 701 through 777 of the IRC.

        Taxable REIT Subsidiaries.    We are permitted to own any or all of the securities of a "taxable REIT subsidiary" as defined in Section 856(l) of the IRC, provided that no more than 25% of the total value of our assets, at the close of each quarter, is comprised of our investments in the stock or securities of our TRSs. (For our 2001 through 2008 taxable years, no more than 20% of the total value of our assets, at the close of each quarter, was permitted to be comprised of our investments in the stock or securities of our TRSs; before the introduction of TRSs in 2001, our ability to own separately taxable corporate subsidiaries was more limited.) Among other requirements, a TRS of ours must:

    (1)
    be a non-REIT corporation for federal income tax purposes in which we directly or indirectly own shares;

    (2)
    join with us in making a TRS election;

    (3)
    not directly or indirectly operate or manage a lodging facility or a health care facility; and

    (4)
    not directly or indirectly provide to any person, under a franchise, license, or otherwise, rights to any brand name under which any lodging facility or health care facility is operated, except that in limited circumstances a subfranchise, sublicense or similar right can be granted to an independent contractor to operate or manage a lodging facility or, after our 2008 taxable year, a health care facility.

        In addition, a corporation other than a REIT in which a TRS directly or indirectly owns more than 35% of the voting power or value will automatically be treated as a TRS. Subject to the discussion below, we believe that we and each of our TRSs have complied with, and will continue to comply with, on a continuous basis, the requirements for TRS status at all times during which we intend for the subsidiary's TRS election to be in effect, and we believe that the same will be true for any TRS that we later form or acquire.

17


Table of Contents

        We have elected to treat as a TRS a particular corporate subsidiary of Five Star with whom we do not have a rental relationship. This intended TRS manages and operates an independent living facility for us, and in the future may operate additional independent facilities for us. In that role, the intended TRS provides amenities and services to our tenants, the independent living residents; for the duration of our ownership of these independent facilities, there have not been, and are not expected to be, assisted living or skilled nursing residents at these facilities, and neither we nor the intended TRS have provided or expect to provide health care services at these facilities or elsewhere. Although the law is unclear on this point, and in fact a close read of the statute and legislative history might suggest otherwise, IRS private letter rulings conclude and imply that the management and operation of independent living facilities do not constitute operating or managing a health care facility such that TRS status is precluded, provided that there are no assisted living or skilled nursing residents in the facilities and provided further that neither the REIT nor the intended TRS provide health care services. Although IRS private letter rulings do not generally constitute binding precedent, they do represent the reasoned, considered judgment of the IRS and thus provide insight into how the IRS applies and interprets the federal income tax laws. Based on these IRS private letter rulings, our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, has opined that it is more likely than not that our intended TRS that manages and operates pure independent living facilities will qualify as a TRS, provided that there are no assisted living or skilled nursing residents in the subject facilities and provided further that neither we nor the intended TRS provide health care services.

        Our ownership of stock and securities in TRSs is exempt from the 10% and 5% REIT asset tests discussed below. Also, as discussed below, TRSs can perform services for our tenants without disqualifying the rents we receive from those tenants under the 75% or 95% gross income tests discussed below. Moreover, because TRSs are taxed as C corporations that are separate from us, their assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit generally are not imputed to us for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements described in this summary. Therefore, TRSs can generally undertake third-party management and development activities and activities not related to real estate. Finally, while a REIT is generally limited in its ability to earn qualifying rental income from a TRS, a REIT can earn qualifying rental income from the lease of a qualified health care property to a TRS for taxable years beginning after July 30, 2008 if an eligible independent contractor operates the facility, as discussed more fully below.

        Restrictions are imposed on TRSs to ensure that they will be subject to an appropriate level of federal income taxation. For example, a TRS may not deduct interest paid in any year to an affiliated REIT to the extent that the interest payments exceed, generally, 50% of the TRS's adjusted taxable income for that year. However, the TRS may carry forward the disallowed interest expense to a succeeding year, and deduct the interest in that later year subject to that year's 50% adjusted taxable income limitation. In addition, if a TRS pays interest, rent, or other amounts to its affiliated REIT in an amount that exceeds what an unrelated third party would have paid in an arm's length transaction, then the REIT generally will be subject to an excise tax equal to 100% of the excessive portion of the payment. Finally, if in comparison to an arm's length transaction, a tenant has overpaid rent to the REIT in exchange for underpaying the TRS for services rendered, and if the REIT has not adequately compensated the TRS for services provided to or on behalf of a tenant, then the REIT may be subject to an excise tax equal to 100% of the undercompensation to the TRS. There can be no assurance that arrangements involving our TRSs will not result in the imposition of one or more of these deduction limitations or excise taxes, but we do not believe that we are or will be subject to these impositions.

        Income Tests.    There are two gross income requirements for qualification as a REIT under the IRC:

    At least 75% of our gross income (excluding: (a) gross income from sales or other dispositions of property held primarily for sale; (b) any income arising from "clearly identified" hedging transactions that we enter into after July 30, 2008 to manage interest rate or price changes or

18


Table of Contents

      currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings we incur to acquire or carry real estate assets; (c) any income arising from "clearly identified" hedging transactions that we enter into after July 30, 2008 primarily to manage risk of currency fluctuations relating to any item that qualifies under the 75% or 95% gross income tests (or any property which generates such income or gain); (d) real estate foreign exchange gain (as defined in Section 856(n)(2) of the IRC) that we recognize after July 30, 2008; and (e) income from the repurchase or discharge of indebtedness) must be derived from investments relating to real property, including "rents from real property" as defined under Section 856 of the IRC, interest and gain from mortgages on real property, income and gain from foreclosure property, gain from the sale or other disposition of real property other than dealer property, or dividends and gain from shares in other REITs. When we receive new capital in exchange for our shares or in a public offering of five-year or longer debt instruments, income attributable to the temporary investment of this new capital in stock or a debt instrument, if received or accrued within one year of our receipt of the new capital, is generally also qualifying income under the 75% gross income test.

    At least 95% of our gross income (excluding: (a) gross income from sales or other dispositions of property held primarily for sale; (b) any income arising from "clearly identified" hedging transactions that we enter into to manage interest rate or price changes or currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings we incur to acquire or carry real estate assets; (c) any income arising from "clearly identified" hedging transactions that we enter into after July 30, 2008 primarily to manage risk of currency fluctuations relating to any item that qualifies under the 75% or 95% gross income tests (or any property which generates such income or gain); (d) passive foreign exchange gain (as defined in Section 856(n)(3) of the IRC) that we recognize after July 30, 2008; and (e) income from the repurchase or discharge of indebtedness) must be derived from a combination of items of real property income that satisfy the 75% gross income test described above, dividends, interest, or gains from the sale or disposition of stock, securities, or real property.

For purposes of the 75% and 95% gross income tests outlined above, income derived from a "shared appreciation provision" in a mortgage loan is generally treated as gain recognized on the sale of the property to which it relates. Although we will use our best efforts to ensure that the income generated by our investments will be of a type that satisfies both the 75% and 95% gross income tests, there can be no assurance in this regard.

        In order to qualify as "rents from real property" under Section 856 of the IRC, several requirements must be met:

    The amount of rent received generally must not be based on the income or profits of any person, but may be based on receipts or sales.

    Rents do not qualify if the REIT owns 10% or more by vote or value of the tenant, whether directly or after application of attribution rules. While we intend not to lease property to any party if rents from that property would not qualify as rents from real property, application of the 10% ownership rule is dependent upon complex attribution rules and circumstances that may be beyond our control. For example, an unaffiliated third party's ownership directly or by attribution of 10% or more by value of our shares, as well as an ownership position in the stock of one of our tenants which, when added to our own ownership position in that tenant, totals 10% or more by vote or value of the stock of that tenant, would result in that tenant's rents not qualifying as rents from real property; in this regard, we already own close to, but less than, 10% of the outstanding common shares of Five Star, and Five Star has undertaken to limit its redemptions of outstanding common shares so that we do not come to own 10% or more of its outstanding common shares. Our declaration of trust disallows transfers or purported acquisitions, directly or by attribution, of our shares to the extent necessary to maintain our

19


Table of Contents

      REIT status under the IRC. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that these provisions in our declaration of trust will be effective to prevent our REIT status from being jeopardized under the 10% affiliated tenant rule. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to monitor and enforce these restrictions, nor will our shareholders necessarily be aware of ownership of shares attributed to them under the IRC's attribution rules.

    There is a limited exception to the above prohibition on earning "rents from real property" from a 10% affiliated tenant, if the tenant is a TRS. If at least 90% of the leased space of a property is leased to tenants other than TRSs and 10% affiliated tenants, and if the TRS's rent for space at that property is substantially comparable to the rents paid by nonaffiliated tenants for comparable space at the property, then otherwise qualifying rents paid by the TRS to the REIT will not be disqualified on account of the rule prohibiting 10% affiliated tenants.

    Commencing with our 2009 taxable year, there is an additional exception to the above prohibition on earning "rents from real property" from a 10% affiliated tenant. For this additional exception to apply, a real property interest in a "qualified health care property" must be leased by the REIT to its TRS, and the facility must be operated on behalf of the TRS by a person who is an "eligible independent contractor," all as described in Sections 856(d)(8)-(9) and 856(e)(6)(D) of the IRC. As described below, we believe our leases with our TRSs have satisfied and will continue to satisfy these requirements.

    In order for rents to qualify, we generally must not manage the property or furnish or render services to the tenants of the property, except through an independent contractor from whom we derive no income or through one of our TRSs. There is an exception to this rule permitting a REIT to perform customary tenant services of the sort that a tax-exempt organization could perform without being considered in receipt of "unrelated business taxable income" as defined in Section 512(b)(3) of the IRC. In addition, a de minimis amount of noncustomary services will not disqualify income as "rents from real property" so long as the value of the impermissible services does not exceed 1% of the gross income from the property.

    If rent attributable to personal property leased in connection with a lease of real property is 15% or less of the total rent received under the lease, then the rent attributable to personal property will qualify as "rents from real property"; if this 15% threshold is exceeded, the rent attributable to personal property will not so qualify. The portion of rental income treated as attributable to personal property is determined according to the ratio of the fair market value of the personal property to the total fair market value of the real and personal property that is rented.

We believe that all or substantially all our rents have qualified and will qualify as rents from real property for purposes of Section 856 of the IRC, subject to the considerations in the following paragraph.

        As discussed above, we currently own an independent living facility that we purchased to be managed and operated by a TRS; the TRS provides amenities and services, but not health care services, to the facility's residents, who are our tenants. We may from time to time in the future acquire additional properties to be managed and operated in this manner. Our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, has opined that it is more likely than not that our intended TRS that manages and operates independent living facilities will qualify as a TRS, provided that there are no assisted living or skilled nursing residents in the subject facilities and provided further that neither we nor the intended TRS provide health care services. Accordingly, we expect that the rents we receive from these facilities' independent living residents will qualify as rents from real property because services and amenities to them are provided through a TRS. If the IRS should assert, contrary to its current private letter ruling practice, that our intended TRS does not in fact so qualify, and if a court should agree, then the rental income we receive from the independent facility residents who are our tenants would be nonqualifying

20


Table of Contents

income for purposes of the 75% and 95% gross income tests, possibly jeopardizing our compliance with the 95% gross income test. Under those circumstances, however, we expect we would qualify for the gross income tests' relief provision described below, and thereby would preserve our qualification as a REIT. If the relief provision below were to apply to us, we would be subject to tax at a 100% rate on the amount by which we failed the 95% gross income test, with adjustments, multiplied by a fraction intended to reflect our profitability for the taxable year; however, in a typical taxable year, we have little or no nonqualifying income from other sources and thus would expect to owe little tax in such circumstances.

        In order to qualify as mortgage interest on real property for purposes of the 75% test, interest must derive from a mortgage loan secured by real property with a fair market value, at the time the loan is made, at least equal to the amount of the loan. If the amount of the loan exceeds the fair market value of the real property, the interest will be treated as interest on a mortgage loan in a ratio equal to the ratio of the fair market value of the real property to the total amount of the mortgage loan.

        Absent the "foreclosure property" rules of Section 856(e) of the IRC, a REIT's receipt of business operating income from a property would not qualify under the 75% and 95% gross income tests. But as foreclosure property, gross income from such a business operation would so qualify. In the case of property leased by a REIT to a tenant, foreclosure property is defined under applicable Treasury regulations to include generally the real property and incidental personal property that the REIT reduces to possession upon a default or imminent default under the lease by the tenant, and as to which a foreclosure property election is made by attaching an appropriate statement to the REIT's federal income tax return. Any gain that a REIT recognizes on the sale of foreclosure property held as inventory or primarily for sale to customers, plus any income it receives from foreclosure property that would not qualify under the 75% gross income test in the absence of foreclosure property treatment, reduced by expenses directly connected with the production of those items of income, would be subject to income tax at the maximum corporate rate, currently 35%, under the foreclosure property income tax rules of Section 857(b)(4) of the IRC. Thus, if a REIT should lease foreclosure property in exchange for rent that qualifies as "rents from real property" as described above, then that rental income is not subject to the foreclosure property income tax.

        Other than sales of foreclosure property, any gain we realize on the sale of property held as inventory or other property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business will be treated as income from a prohibited transaction that is subject to a penalty tax at a 100% rate. This prohibited transaction income also may adversely affect our ability to satisfy the 75% and 95% gross income tests for federal income tax qualification as a REIT. We cannot provide assurances as to whether or not the IRS might successfully assert that one or more of our dispositions is subject to the 100% penalty tax. However, we believe that dispositions of assets that we have made or that we might make in the future will not be subject to the 100% penalty tax, because we intend to:

    own our assets for investment with a view to long-term income production and capital appreciation;

    engage in the business of developing, owning, leasing and managing our existing properties and acquiring, developing, owning, leasing and managing new properties; and

    make occasional dispositions of our assets consistent with our long-term investment objectives.

        If we fail to satisfy one or both of the 75% or the 95% gross income tests in any taxable year, we may nevertheless qualify as a REIT for that year if we satisfy the following requirements:

    our failure to meet the test is due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect, and

21


Table of Contents

    after we identify the failure, we file a schedule describing each item of our gross income included in the 75% or 95% gross income tests for that taxable year.

It is impossible to state whether in all circumstances we would be entitled to the benefit of this relief provision for the 75% and 95% gross income tests. Even if this relief provision does apply, a 100% tax is imposed upon the greater of the amount by which we failed the 75% test or the 95% test, with adjustments, multiplied by a fraction intended to reflect our profitability. This relief provision applies to any failure of the applicable income tests, even if the failure first occurred in a year prior to the taxable year in which the failure was discovered.

        Asset Tests.    At the close of each quarter of each taxable year, we must also satisfy the following asset percentage tests in order to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes:

    At least 75% of our total assets must consist of real estate assets, cash and cash items, shares in other REITs, government securities, and temporary investments of new capital (that is, stock or debt instruments purchased with proceeds of a stock offering or a public offering of our debt with a term of at least five years, but only for the one-year period commencing with our receipt of the offering proceeds).

    Not more than 25% of our total assets may be represented by securities other than those securities that count favorably toward the preceding 75% asset test.

    Of the investments included in the preceding 25% asset class, the value of any one non-REIT issuer's securities that we own may not exceed 5% of the value of our total assets. In addition, we may not own more than 10% of the vote or value of any one non-REIT issuer's outstanding securities, unless that issuer is our TRS or the securities are "straight debt" securities or otherwise excepted as discussed below.

    Our stock and securities in a TRS are exempted from the preceding 10% and 5% asset tests. However, no more than 25% (for our 2008 taxable year and earlier, 20%) of our total assets may be represented by stock or securities of TRSs.

        When a failure to satisfy the above asset tests results from an acquisition of securities or other property during a quarter, the failure can be cured by disposition of sufficient nonqualifying assets within 30 days after the close of that quarter.

        In addition, if we fail the 5% value test or the 10% vote or value tests at the close of any quarter and do not cure such failure within 30 days after the close of that quarter, that failure will nevertheless be excused if (a) the failure is de minimis and (b) within 6 months after the last day of the quarter in which we identify the failure, we either dispose of the assets causing the failure or otherwise satisfy the 5% value and 10% vote and value asset tests. For purposes of this relief provision, the failure will be "de minimis" if the value of the assets causing the failure does not exceed the lesser of (a) 1% of the total value of our assets at the end of the relevant quarter or (b) $10,000,000. If our failure is not de minimis, or if any of the other REIT asset tests have been violated, we may nevertheless qualify as a REIT if (a) we provide the IRS with a description of each asset causing the failure, (b) the failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, (c) we pay a tax equal to the greater of (1) $50,000 or (2) the highest rate of corporate tax imposed (currently 35%) on the net income generated by the assets causing the failure during the period of the failure, and (d) within 6 months after the last day of the quarter in which we identify the failure, we either dispose of the assets causing the failure or otherwise satisfy all of the REIT asset tests. These relief provisions apply to any failure of the applicable asset tests, even if the failure first occurred in a year prior to the taxable year in which the failure was discovered.

        The IRC also provides an excepted securities safe harbor to the 10% value test that includes among other items (a) "straight debt" securities, (b) certain rental agreements in which payment is to

22


Table of Contents

be made in subsequent years, (c) any obligation to pay rents from real property, (d) securities issued by governmental entities that are not dependent in whole or in part on the profits of or payments from a nongovernmental entity, and (e) any security issued by another REIT.

        We have maintained and will continue to maintain records of the value of our assets to document our compliance with the above asset tests, and intend to take actions as may be required to cure any failure to satisfy the tests within 30 days after the close of any quarter.

        Our Relationships with Five Star.    On December 31, 2001, we and CWH spun off substantially all of our Five Star common shares. In August 2009, we closed a mortgage financing with the Federal National Mortgage Association, or FNMA, and in connection with the FNMA transaction, we realigned our leases with Five Star. Pursuant to the terms of the realignment agreement, we also purchased 3,200,000 common shares from Five Star, which, when aggregated with our prior ownership of Five Star common shares, then represented approximately 9% of the total common shares of Five Star outstanding (approximately 8.8% as of December 31, 2011, including the 1,000,000 shares of Five Star common stock we purchased from the underwriters in Five Star's public equity offering it completed in June 2011), determined after this new issuance. Our leases with Five Star, Five Star's charter, the transaction agreement governing the 2001 spin off, and the realignment agreement collectively contain restrictions upon the ownership of Five Star common shares and require Five Star to refrain from taking any actions that may result in any affiliation with us that would jeopardize our qualification as a REIT under the IRC. Accordingly, commencing with our 2002 taxable year, we expect that the rental income we receive from Five Star and its subsidiaries will be "rents from real property" under Section 856(d) of the IRC, and therefore qualifying income under the 75% and 95% gross income tests described above.

        In addition, as described above, we have elected to treat as a TRS a particular corporate subsidiary of Five Star with whom we do not have a rental relationship, and our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, has opined that it is more likely than not that this intended TRS will so qualify. Finally, as described below, we have engaged as an intended eligible independent contractor another corporate subsidiary of Five Star with whom we do not have a rental relationship.

        Our Relationship with Our Taxable REIT Subsidiaries.    In addition to the TRS described above that manages and operates independent living facilities for us, we also have wholly-owned TRSs that lease properties from us. We may from time to time in the future acquire additional properties to be leased in this manner. In addition, in response to a lease default or expiration, we may choose to lease a reclaimed qualified health care property to a TRS.

        In lease transactions involving our TRSs, our intent is that the rents paid to us by the TRS qualify as "rents from real property" under the REIT gross income tests summarized above. In order for this to be the case, the manager operating the leased property on behalf of the applicable TRS must be an "eligible independent contractor" within the meaning of Section 856(d)(9)(A) of the IRC, and the properties leased to the TRS must be "qualified health care property" within the meaning of Section 856(e)(6)(D)(i) of the IRC. Qualified health care property is defined as health care facilities and other properties necessary or incidental to the use of a health care facility.

        For these purposes, a contractor qualifies as an "eligible independent contractor" if it is less than 35% affiliated with the REIT and, at the time the contractor enters into the agreement with the TRS to operate the qualified health care property, that contractor or any person related to that contractor is actively engaged in the trade or business of operating qualified health care properties for persons unrelated to the TRS or its affiliated REIT. For these purposes, an otherwise eligible independent contractor is not disqualified from that status on account of the TRS bearing the expenses of the operation of the qualified health care property, the TRS receiving the revenues from the operation of the qualified health care property, net of expenses for that operation and fees payable to the eligible independent contractor, or the REIT receiving income from the eligible independent contractor pursuant to a preexisting or otherwise grandfathered lease of another property.

23


Table of Contents

        We have engaged as an intended eligible independent contractor a particular corporate subsidiary of Five Star with whom we do not have a rental relationship. This contractor and its affiliates at Five Star are actively engaged in the trade or business of operating qualified health care properties for their own accounts, including pursuant to management contracts among themselves and including properties that we do not lease to them; however, this contractor and its affiliates have few if any management contracts for qualified health care properties for third parties other than us and our TRSs. Based on a plain reading of the statute as well as applicable legislative history, our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, has opined that this intended eligible independent contractor should in fact so qualify. If the IRS or a court determines that this opinion is incorrect, then the rental income we receive from our TRSs in respect of properties managed by this particular contractor would be nonqualifying income for purposes of the 75% and 95% gross income tests, possibly jeopardizing our compliance with the 95% gross income test. Under those circumstances, however, we expect we would qualify for the gross income tests' relief provision described above, and thereby would preserve our qualification as a REIT. If the relief provision below were to apply to us, we would be subject to tax at a 100% rate on the amount by which we failed the 95% gross income test, with adjustments, multiplied by a fraction intended to reflect our profitability for the taxable year; even though we have little or no nonqualifying income from other sources in a typical taxable year, imposition of this 100% tax in this circumstance could be material because to date all of the properties leased to our TRSs are managed for the TRSs by this contractor.

        As explained above, we will be subject to a 100% tax if the IRS successfully asserts that the rents paid by our TRS to us exceed an arm's length rental rate. Although there is no clear precedent to distinguish for federal income tax purposes among leases, management contracts, partnerships, financings, and other contractual arrangements, we believe that our leases and our TRSs' management agreements will be respected for purposes of the requirements of the IRC discussed above. Accordingly, we expect that the rental income from our current and future TRSs will qualify as "rents from real property," and that the 100% tax on excessive rents from a TRS will not apply.

        Annual Distribution Requirements.    In order to qualify for taxation as a REIT under the IRC, we are required to make annual distributions other than capital gain dividends to our shareholders in an amount at least equal to the excess of:

    (A)
    the sum of 90% of our "real estate investment trust taxable income," as defined in Section 857 of the IRC, computed by excluding any net capital gain and before taking into account any dividends paid deduction for which we are eligible, and 90% of our net income after tax, if any, from property received in foreclosure, over

    (B)
    the sum of our qualifying noncash income, e.g., imputed rental income or income from transactions inadvertently failing to qualify as like-kind exchanges.

The distributions must be paid in the taxable year to which they relate, or in the following taxable year if declared before we timely file our federal income tax return for the earlier taxable year and if paid on or before the first regular distribution payment after that declaration. If a dividend is declared in October, November, or December to shareholders of record during one of those months, and is paid during the following January, then for federal income tax purposes the dividend will be treated as having been both paid and received on December 31 of the prior taxable year. A distribution which is not pro rata within a class of our beneficial interests entitled to a distribution, or which is not consistent with the rights to distributions among our classes of beneficial interests, is a preferential distribution that is not taken into consideration for purposes of the distribution requirements, and accordingly the payment of a preferential distribution could affect our ability to meet the distribution requirements. Taking into account our distribution policies, including the dividend reinvestment plan we have adopted, we do not believe that we have made or will make any preferential distributions. The distribution requirements may be waived by the IRS if a REIT establishes that it failed to meet them

24


Table of Contents

by reason of distributions previously made to meet the requirements of the 4% excise tax discussed below. To the extent that we do not distribute all of our net capital gain and all of our real estate investment trust taxable income, as adjusted, we will be subject to federal income tax on undistributed amounts.

        In addition, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax to the extent we fail within a calendar year to make required distributions to our shareholders of 85% of our ordinary income and 95% of our capital gain net income plus the excess, if any, of the "grossed up required distribution" for the preceding calendar year over the amount treated as distributed for that preceding calendar year. For this purpose, the term "grossed up required distribution" for any calendar year is the sum of our taxable income for the calendar year without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and all amounts from earlier years that are not treated as having been distributed under the provision. We will be treated as having sufficient earnings and profits to treat as a dividend any distribution by us up to the amount required to be distributed in order to avoid imposition of the 4% excise tax.

        If we do not have enough cash or other liquid assets to meet the 90% distribution requirements, we may find it necessary and desirable to arrange for new debt or equity financing to provide funds for required distributions in order to maintain our REIT status. We can provide no assurance that financing would be available for these purposes on favorable terms.

        We may be able to rectify a failure to pay sufficient dividends for any year by paying "deficiency dividends" to shareholders in a later year. These deficiency dividends may be included in our deduction for dividends paid for the earlier year, but an interest charge would be imposed upon us for the delay in distribution.

        In addition to the other distribution requirements above, to preserve our status as a REIT we are required to timely distribute C corporation earnings and profits that we inherit from acquired corporations.

Acquisition of C Corporations

        On each of January 11, 2002, March 31, 2008, and November 1, 2008, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of a C corporation. At the time of those acquisitions, certain of those C corporations directly or indirectly owned all of the outstanding equity interests in various corporate and noncorporate subsidiaries. On October 1, 2006, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of an S corporation and its disregarded entity subsidiary, which were formerly C corporations. Upon these acquisitions, each of the acquired entities became either our qualified REIT subsidiary under Section 856(i) of the IRC or a disregarded entity under Treasury regulations issued under Section 7701 of the IRC. Thus, after the acquisition, all assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit of the acquired entities have been treated as ours for purposes of the various REIT qualification tests described above. In addition, we generally were treated as the successor to the acquired entities' federal income tax attributes, such as those entities' adjusted tax bases in their assets and their depreciation schedules; we were also treated as the successor to the acquired corporate entities' earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes, if any.

        Built-in Gains from C Corporations.    As described above, notwithstanding our qualification and taxation as a REIT, we may still be subject to corporate taxation in particular circumstances. Specifically, if we acquire an asset from a corporation in a transaction in which our adjusted tax basis in the asset is determined by reference to the adjusted tax basis of that asset in the hands of a present or former C corporation, and if we subsequently recognize gain on the disposition of that asset during a specified period (generally, ten years) beginning on the date on which the asset ceased to be owned by the C corporation, then we will generally pay tax at the highest regular corporate tax rate, currently 35%, on the lesser of (1) the excess, if any, of the asset's fair market value over its adjusted tax basis, each determined as of the time the asset ceased to be owned by the C corporation, or (2) our gain

25


Table of Contents

recognized in the disposition. Accordingly, any taxable disposition of an asset so acquired during the specified period (generally, ten years) could be subject to tax under these rules. However, we have not disposed, and have no present plan or intent to dispose, of any material assets acquired in such transactions.

        To the extent of our gains in a taxable year that are subject to the built-in gains tax described above, net of any taxes paid on such gains with respect to that taxable year, our taxable dividends paid to you in the following year will be potentially eligible for treatment as qualified dividends that are taxed to our noncorporate U.S. shareholders at the maximum capital gain rate of 15% (scheduled to expire for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012).

        Earnings and Profits.    A REIT may not have any undistributed C corporation earnings and profits at the end of any taxable year. Upon the closing of our corporate acquisitions, we succeeded to the undistributed earnings and profits, if any, of the acquired corporate entities. Thus, we needed to distribute any such earnings and profits no later than the end of the applicable tax year. If we failed to do so, we would not qualify to be taxed as a REIT for that year and a number of years thereafter, unless we are able to rely on the relief provision described below.

        Although Sullivan & Worcester LLP is unable to render an opinion on factual determinations such as the amount of undistributed earnings and profits, we made an investigation of or retained accountants to compute the amount of undistributed earnings and profits that we inherited in our corporate acquisitions. Based on these calculations, we believe that we did not inherit any undistributed earnings and profits that remained undistributed at the end of the applicable tax year. However, there can be no assurance that the IRS would not, upon subsequent examination, propose adjustments to our calculation of the undistributed earnings and profits that we inherited, including adjustments that might be deemed necessary by the IRS as a result of its examination of the companies we acquired. In any such examination, the IRS might consider all taxable years of the acquired subsidiaries as open for review for purposes of its proposed adjustments. If it is subsequently determined that we had undistributed earnings and profits as of the end of the applicable tax year, we may be eligible for a relief provision similar to the "deficiency dividends" procedure described above. To utilize this relief provision, we would have to pay an interest charge for the delay in distributing the undistributed earnings and profits; in addition, we would be required to distribute to our shareholders, in addition to our other REIT distribution requirements, the amount of the undistributed earnings and profits less the interest charge paid.

Depreciation and Federal Income Tax Treatment of Leases

        Our initial tax bases in our assets will generally be our acquisition cost. We will generally depreciate our real property on a straight-line basis over 40 years and our personal property over the applicable shorter periods. These depreciation schedules may vary for properties that we acquire through tax-free or carryover basis acquisitions.

        We are entitled to depreciation deductions from our facilities only if we are treated for federal income tax purposes as the owner of the facilities. This means that the leases of the facilities must be classified for federal income tax purposes as true leases, rather than as sales or financing arrangements, and we believe this to be the case. In the case of sale-leaseback arrangements, the IRS could assert that we realized prepaid rental income in the year of purchase to the extent that the value of a leased property, at the time of purchase, exceeded the purchase price for that property. While we believe that the value of leased property at the time of purchase did not exceed purchase prices, because of the lack of clear precedent we cannot provide assurances as to whether the IRS might successfully assert the existence of prepaid rental income in any of our sale-leaseback transactions.

26


Table of Contents

Taxation of U.S. Shareholders

        For noncorporate U.S. shareholders, the maximum federal income tax rate for long-term capital gains is generally 15% (scheduled to increase to 20% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012) and for most corporate dividends is generally also 15% (scheduled to increase to ordinary income rates for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012). However, because we are not generally subject to federal income tax on the portion of our REIT taxable income or capital gains distributed to our shareholders, dividends on our shares generally are not eligible for such 15% tax rate on dividends while that rate is in effect. As a result, our ordinary dividends continue to be taxed at the higher federal income tax rates applicable to ordinary income. However, the favorable federal income tax rates for long-term capital gains, and while in effect, for dividends, generally apply to:

    (1)
    your long-term capital gains, if any, recognized on the disposition of our shares;

    (2)
    our distributions designated as long-term capital gain dividends (except to the extent attributable to real estate depreciation recapture, in which case the distributions are subject to a maximum 25% federal income tax rate);

    (3)
    our dividends attributable to dividends, if any, received by us from non-REIT corporations such as TRSs; and

    (4)
    our dividends to the extent attributable to income upon which we have paid federal corporate income tax.

        As long as we qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, a distribution to our U.S. shareholders that we do not designate as a capital gain dividend will be treated as an ordinary income dividend to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits. Distributions made out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits that we properly designate as capital gain dividends generally will be taxed as long-term capital gains, as discussed below, to the extent they do not exceed our actual net capital gain for the taxable year. However, corporate shareholders may be required to treat up to 20% of any capital gain dividend as ordinary income under Section 291 of the IRC.

        In addition, we may elect to retain net capital gain income and treat it as constructively distributed. In that case:

    (1)
    we will be taxed at regular corporate capital gains tax rates on retained amounts;

    (2)
    each U.S. shareholder will be taxed on its designated proportionate share of our retained net capital gains as though that amount were distributed and designated a capital gain dividend;

    (3)
    each U.S. shareholder will receive a credit for its designated proportionate share of the tax that we pay;

    (4)
    each U.S. shareholder will increase its adjusted basis in our shares by the excess of the amount of its proportionate share of these retained net capital gains over its proportionate share of the tax that we pay; and

    (5)
    both we and our corporate shareholders will make commensurate adjustments in our respective earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes.

If we elect to retain our net capital gains in this fashion, we will notify our U.S. shareholders of the relevant tax information within 60 days after the close of the affected taxable year.

        As discussed above, for noncorporate U.S. shareholders, long-term capital gains are generally taxed at maximum rates of 15% (scheduled to increase to 20% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012) or 25%, depending upon the type of property disposed of and the previously claimed depreciation with respect to this property. If for any taxable year we designate capital gain dividends for U.S. shareholders, then a portion of the capital gain dividends we designate will be

27


Table of Contents

allocated to the holders of a particular class of shares on a percentage basis equal to the ratio of the amount of the total dividends paid or made available for the year to the holders of that class of shares to the total dividends paid or made available for the year to holders of all classes of our shares. We will similarly designate the portion of any capital gain dividend that is to be taxed to noncorporate U.S. shareholders at the maximum rates of 15% (scheduled to increase to 20% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012) or 25% so that the designations will be proportionate among all classes of our shares.

        Distributions in excess of current or accumulated earnings and profits will not be taxable to a U.S. shareholder to the extent that they do not exceed the shareholder's adjusted tax basis in the shareholder's shares, but will reduce the shareholder's basis in those shares. To the extent that these excess distributions exceed the adjusted basis of a U.S. shareholder's shares, they will be included in income as capital gain, with long-term gain generally taxed to noncorporate U.S. shareholders at a maximum rate of 15% (scheduled to increase to 20% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012). No U.S. shareholder may include on his federal income tax return any of our net operating losses or any of our capital losses.

        If a dividend is declared in October, November, or December to shareholders of record during one of those months, and is paid during the following January, then for federal income tax purposes the dividend will be treated as having been both paid and received on December 31 of the prior taxable year. Also, items that are treated differently for regular and alternative minimum tax purposes are to be allocated between a REIT and its shareholders under Treasury regulations which are to be prescribed. It is possible that these Treasury regulations will require tax preference items to be allocated to our shareholders with respect to any accelerated depreciation or other tax preference items that we claim.

        A U.S. shareholder will generally recognize gain or loss equal to the difference between the amount realized and the shareholder's adjusted basis in our shares that are sold or exchanged. This gain or loss will be capital gain or loss, and will be long-term capital gain or loss if the shareholder's holding period in the shares exceeds one year. In addition, any loss upon a sale or exchange of our shares held for six months or less will generally be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of our long-term capital gain dividends during the holding period.

        For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012, U.S. holders who are individuals, estates or trusts will generally be required to pay a new 3.8% Medicare tax on their net investment income (including dividends on and gains from the sale or other disposition of our shares), or in the case of estates and trusts on their net investment income that is not distributed, in each case to the extent that their total adjusted income exceeds applicable thresholds.

        The IRC imposes a penalty for the failure to properly disclose a "reportable transaction." A reportable transaction currently includes, among other things, a sale or exchange of our shares resulting in a tax loss in excess of (a) $10 million in any single year or $20 million in any combination of years in the case of our shares held by a C corporation or by a partnership with only C corporation partners or (b) $2 million in any single year or $4 million in any combination of years in the case of our shares held by any other partnership or an S corporation, trust or individual, including losses that flow through pass through entities to individuals. A taxpayer discloses a reportable transaction by filing IRS Form 8886 with its federal income tax return and, in the first year of filing, a copy of Form 8886 must be sent to the IRS's Office of Tax Shelter Analysis. The penalty for failing to disclose a reportable transaction is generally $10,000 in the case of a natural person and $50,000 in any other case.

        Noncorporate U.S. shareholders who borrow funds to finance their acquisition of our shares could be limited in the amount of deductions allowed for the interest paid on the indebtedness incurred. Under Section 163(d) of the IRC, interest paid or accrued on indebtedness incurred or continued to purchase or carry property held for investment is generally deductible only to the extent of the

28


Table of Contents

investor's net investment income. A U.S. shareholder's net investment income will include ordinary income dividend distributions received from us and, if an appropriate election is made by the shareholder, capital gain dividend distributions and qualified dividends received from us; however, distributions treated as a nontaxable return of the shareholder's basis will not enter into the computation of net investment income.

Taxation of Tax-Exempt Shareholders

        Subject to the pension-held REIT rules discussed below, our distributions made to shareholders that are tax-exempt pension plans, individual retirement accounts, or other qualifying tax-exempt entities should not constitute unrelated business taxable income, provided that the shareholder has not financed its acquisition of our shares with "acquisition indebtedness" within the meaning of the IRC, and provided further that, consistent with our present intent, we do not hold a residual interest in a real estate mortgage investment conduit.

        Tax-exempt pension trusts that own more than 10% by value of a "pension-held REIT" at any time during a taxable year may be required to treat a percentage of all dividends received from the pension-held REIT during the year as unrelated business taxable income. This percentage is equal to the ratio of:

    (1)
    the pension-held REIT's gross income derived from the conduct of unrelated trades or businesses, determined as if the pension-held REIT were a tax-exempt pension fund, less direct expenses related to that income, to

    (2)
    the pension-held REIT's gross income from all sources, less direct expenses related to that income,

except that this percentage shall be deemed to be zero unless it would otherwise equal or exceed 5%. A REIT is a pension-held REIT if:

    the REIT is "predominantly held" by tax-exempt pension trusts; and

    the REIT would fail to satisfy the "closely held" ownership requirement discussed above if the stock or beneficial interests in the REIT held by tax-exempt pension trusts were viewed as held by tax-exempt pension trusts rather than by their respective beneficiaries.

A REIT is predominantly held by tax-exempt pension trusts if at least one tax-exempt pension trust owns more than 25% by value of the REIT's stock or beneficial interests, or if one or more tax-exempt pension trusts, each owning more than 10% by value of the REIT's stock or beneficial interests, own in the aggregate more than 50% by value of the REIT's stock or beneficial interests. Because of the share ownership concentration restrictions in our declaration of trust, we believe that we are not and will not be a pension-held REIT. However, because our shares are publicly traded, we cannot completely control whether or not we are or will become a pension-held REIT.

        Social clubs, voluntary employee benefit associations, supplemental unemployment benefit trusts and qualified group legal services plans exempt from federal income taxation under Sections 501(c)(7), (c)(9), (c)(17) and (c)(20) of the IRC, respectively, are subject to different unrelated business taxable income rules, which generally will require them to characterize distributions from a REIT as unrelated business taxable income. In addition, these prospective investors should consult their own tax advisors concerning any "set aside" or reserve requirements applicable to them.

Taxation of Non-U.S. Shareholders

        The rules governing the United States federal income taxation of non-U.S. shareholders are complex, and the following discussion is intended only as a summary of these rules. If you are a non-U.S. shareholder, we urge you to consult with your own tax advisor to determine the impact of

29


Table of Contents

United States federal, state, local, and foreign tax laws, including any tax return filing and other reporting requirements, with respect to your investment in our shares.

        In general, a non-U.S. shareholder will be subject to regular United States federal income tax in the same manner as a U.S. shareholder with respect to its investment in our shares if that investment is effectively connected with the non-U.S. shareholder's conduct of a trade or business in the United States (and, if provided by an applicable income tax treaty, is attributable to a permanent establishment or fixed base the non-U.S. shareholder maintains in the United States). In addition, a corporate non-U.S. shareholder that receives income that is or is deemed effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States may also be subject to the 30% branch profits tax under Section 884 of the IRC, which is payable in addition to regular United States federal corporate income tax. The balance of this discussion of the United States federal income taxation of non-U.S. shareholders addresses only those non-U.S. shareholders whose investment in our shares is not effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business in the United States.

        A distribution by us to a non-U.S. shareholder that is not attributable to gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest and that is not designated as a capital gain dividend will be treated as an ordinary income dividend to the extent that it is made out of current or accumulated earnings and profits. A distribution of this type will generally be subject to United States federal income tax and withholding at the rate of 30%, or at a lower rate if the non-U.S. shareholder has in the manner prescribed by the IRS demonstrated its entitlement to benefits under a tax treaty. In the case of any in kind distributions of property, we or other applicable withholding agents will collect the amount required to be withheld by reducing to cash for remittance to the IRS a sufficient portion of the property that the non-U.S. shareholder would otherwise receive, and the non-U.S. shareholder may bear brokerage or other costs for this withholding procedure. Because we cannot determine our current and accumulated earnings and profits until the end of the taxable year, withholding at the rate of 30% or applicable lower treaty rate will generally be imposed on the gross amount of any distribution to a non-U.S. shareholder that we make and do not designate a capital gain dividend. Notwithstanding this withholding on distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits, these distributions are a nontaxable return of capital to the extent that they do not exceed the non-U.S. shareholder's adjusted basis in our shares, and the nontaxable return of capital will reduce the adjusted basis in these shares. To the extent that distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits exceed the non-U.S. shareholder's adjusted basis in our shares, the distributions will give rise to tax liability if the non-U.S. shareholder would otherwise be subject to tax on any gain from the sale or exchange of these shares, as discussed below. A non-U.S. shareholder may seek a refund from the IRS of amounts withheld on distributions to him in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits.

        From time to time, some of our distributions may be attributable to the sale or exchange of United States real property interests. However, capital gain dividends that are received by a non-U.S. shareholder, as well as dividends attributable to our sales of United States real property interests, will be subject to the taxation and withholding regime applicable to ordinary income dividends and the branch profits tax will not apply, provided that (1) these dividends are received with respect to a class of shares that is "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" such as the New York Stock Exchange, or the NYSE, both as defined by applicable Treasury regulations, and (2) the non-U.S. shareholder does not own more than 5% of that class of shares at any time during the one-year period ending on the date of distribution of the capital gain dividends. If both of these provisions are satisfied, qualifying non-U.S. shareholders will not be subject to withholding either on capital gain dividends or on dividends that are attributable to our sales of United States real property interests as though those amounts were effectively connected with a United States trade or business, and qualifying non-U.S. shareholders will not be required to file United States federal income tax returns or pay branch profits tax in respect of these dividends. Instead, these dividends will be subject to United States federal

30


Table of Contents

income tax and withholding as ordinary dividends, currently at a 30% tax rate unless reduced by applicable treaty, as discussed below. Although there can be no assurance in this regard, we believe that our common shares have been and will remain "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" within the meaning of applicable Treasury regulations; however, we can provide no assurance that our shares will continue to be "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" in future taxable years.

        Except as discussed above, for any year in which we qualify as a REIT, distributions that are attributable to gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest are taxed to a non-U.S. shareholder as if these distributions were gains effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States conducted by the non-U.S. shareholder. Accordingly, a non-U.S. shareholder that does not qualify for the special rule above will be taxed on these amounts at the normal capital gain and other tax rates applicable to a U.S. shareholder, subject to any applicable alternative minimum tax and to a special alternative minimum tax in the case of nonresident alien individuals; such a non-U.S. shareholder will be required to file a United States federal income tax return reporting these amounts, even if applicable withholding is imposed as described below; and such a non-U.S. shareholder that is also a corporation may owe the 30% branch profits tax under Section 884 of the IRC in respect of these amounts. We or other applicable withholding agents will be required to withhold from distributions to such non-U.S. shareholders, and remit to the IRS, 35% of the maximum amount of any distribution that could be designated as a capital gain dividend. In addition, for purposes of this withholding rule, if we designate prior distributions as capital gain dividends, then subsequent distributions up to the amount of the designated prior distributions will be treated as capital gain dividends. The amount of any tax withheld is creditable against the non-U.S. shareholder's United States federal income tax liability, and the non-U.S. shareholder may file for a refund from the IRS of any amount of withheld tax in excess of that tax liability.

        A special "wash sale" rule applies to a non-U.S. shareholder who owns any class of our shares if (1) the shareholder owns more than 5% of that class of shares at any time during the one-year period ending on the date of the distribution described below, or (2) that class of our shares is not, within the meaning of applicable Treasury regulations, "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" such as the NYSE. Although there can be no assurance in this regard, we believe that our common shares have been and will remain "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" within the meaning of applicable Treasury regulations, all as discussed above; however, we can provide no assurance that our shares will continue to be "regularly traded" on a domestic "established securities market" in future taxable years. We thus anticipate this wash sale rule to apply, if at all, only to a non-U.S. shareholder that owns more than 5% of either our common shares or any class of our preferred shares. Such a non-U.S. shareholder will be treated as having made a "wash sale" of our shares if it (1) disposes of an interest in our shares during the 30 days preceding the ex-dividend date of a distribution by us that, but for such disposition, would have been treated by the non-U.S. shareholder in whole or in part as gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest, and then (2) acquires or enters into a contract to acquire a substantially identical interest in our shares, either actually or constructively through a related party, during the 61-day period beginning 30 days prior to the ex-dividend date. In the event of such a wash sale, the non-U.S. shareholder will have gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest in an amount equal to the portion of the distribution that, but for the wash sale, would have been a gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest. As discussed above, a non-U.S. shareholder's gain from the sale or exchange of a United States real property interest can trigger increased United States taxes, such as the branch profits tax applicable to non-U.S. corporations, and increased United States tax filing requirements.

        If for any taxable year we designate capital gain dividends for our shareholders, then a portion of the capital gain dividends we designate will be allocated to the holders of a particular class of shares on

31


Table of Contents

a percentage basis equal to the ratio of the amount of the total dividends paid or made available for the year to the holders of that class of shares to the total dividends paid or made available for the year to holders of all classes of our shares.

        Tax treaties may reduce the withholding obligations on our distributions. Under some treaties, however, rates below 30% that are applicable to ordinary income dividends from United States corporations may not apply to ordinary income dividends from a REIT or may apply only if the REIT meets certain additional conditions. You must generally use an applicable IRS Form W-8, or substantially similar form, to claim tax treaty benefits. If the amount of tax withheld with respect to a distribution to a non-U.S. shareholder exceeds the shareholder's United States federal income tax liability with respect to the distribution, the non-U.S. shareholder may file for a refund of the excess from the IRS. The 35% withholding tax rate discussed above on some capital gain dividends corresponds to the maximum income tax rate applicable to corporate non-U.S. shareholders but is higher than the current 15% and 25% maximum rates on capital gains generally applicable to noncorporate non-U.S. shareholders. Treasury regulations also provide special rules to determine whether, for purposes of determining the applicability of a tax treaty, our distributions to a non-U.S. shareholder that is an entity should be treated as paid to the entity or to those owning an interest in that entity, and whether the entity or its owners are entitled to benefits under the tax treaty. In the case of any in kind distributions of property, we or other applicable withholding agents will have to collect the amount required to be withheld by reducing to cash for remittance to the IRS a sufficient portion of the property that the non-U.S. shareholder would otherwise receive, and the non-U.S. shareholder may bear brokerage or other costs for this withholding procedure.

        Non-U.S. stockholders should generally be able to treat amounts we designate as retained but constructively distributed capital gains in the same manner as actual distributions of capital gain dividends by us. In addition, a non-U.S. stockholder should be able to offset as a credit against its federal income tax liability the proportionate share of the tax paid by us on such retained but constructively distributed capital gains. A non-U.S. stockholder may file for a refund from the IRS for the amount that the non-U.S. stockholder's proportionate share of tax paid by us exceeds its federal income tax liability on the constructively distributed capital gains.

        If our shares are not "United States real property interests" within the meaning of Section 897 of the IRC, then a non-U.S. shareholder's gain on sale of these shares generally will not be subject to United States federal income taxation, except that a nonresident alien individual who was in the United States for 183 days or more during the taxable year may be subject to a 30% tax on this gain. Our shares will not constitute a United States real property interest if we are a "domestically controlled REIT." A domestically controlled REIT is a REIT in which at all times during the preceding five-year period less than 50% in value of its shares is held directly or indirectly by foreign persons. We believe that we have been and will remain a domestically controlled REIT and thus a non-U.S. shareholder's gain on sale of our shares will not be subject to United States federal income taxation. However, because our shares are publicly traded, we can provide no assurance that we have been or will remain a domestically controlled REIT. If we are not a domestically controlled REIT, a non-U.S. shareholder's gain on sale of our shares will not be subject to United States federal income taxation as a sale of a United States real property interest if that class of shares is "regularly traded," as defined by applicable Treasury regulations, on an established securities market like the NYSE, and the non-U.S. shareholder has at all times during the preceding five years owned 5% or less by value of that class of shares. In this regard, because the shares of others may be redeemed, a non-U.S. shareholder's percentage interest in a class of our shares may increase even if it acquires no additional shares in that class. If the gain on the sale of our shares were subject to United States federal income taxation, the non-U.S. shareholder will generally be subject to the same treatment as a U.S. shareholder with respect to its gain, will be required to file a United States federal income tax return reporting that gain, and a corporate non-U.S. shareholder might owe branch profits tax under Section 884 of the IRC. A

32


Table of Contents

purchaser of our shares from a non-U.S. shareholder will not be required to withhold on the purchase price if the purchased shares are regularly traded on an established securities market or if we are a domestically controlled REIT. Otherwise, a purchaser of our shares from a non-U.S. shareholder may be required to withhold 10% of the purchase price paid to the non-U.S. shareholder and to remit the withheld amount to the IRS.

Withholding and Information Reporting

        Information reporting and backup withholding may apply to distributions or proceeds paid to our shareholders under the circumstances discussed below. The backup withholding rate is currently 28% and is scheduled to increase to 31% after 2012. Amounts withheld under backup withholding are generally not an additional tax and may be refunded by the IRS or credited against the shareholder's federal income tax liability. In the case of any in kind distributions of property by us to a shareholder, we or other applicable withholding agents will have to collect any applicable backup withholding by reducing to cash for remittance to the IRS a sufficient portion of the property that our shareholder would otherwise receive, and the shareholder may bear brokerage or other costs for this withholding procedure.

        A U.S. shareholder will be subject to backup withholding when it receives distributions on our shares or proceeds upon the sale, exchange, redemption, retirement or other disposition of our shares, unless the U.S. shareholder properly executes, or has previously properly executed, under penalties of perjury an IRS Form W-9 or substantially similar form that:

    provides the U.S. shareholder's correct taxpayer identification number; and

    certifies that the U.S. shareholder is exempt from backup withholding because it comes within an enumerated exempt category, it has not been notified by the IRS that it is subject to backup withholding, or it has been notified by the IRS that it is no longer subject to backup withholding.

If the U.S. shareholder has not provided and does not provide its correct taxpayer identification number on the IRS Form W-9 or substantially similar form, it may be subject to penalties imposed by the IRS, and we or other applicable withholding agents may have to withhold a portion of any distributions or proceeds paid to such U.S. shareholder. Unless the U.S. shareholder has established on a properly executed IRS Form W-9 or substantially similar form that it comes within an enumerated exempt category, distributions or proceeds on our shares paid to it during the calendar year, and the amount of tax withheld, if any, will be reported to it and to the IRS.

        Distributions on our shares to a non-U.S. shareholder during each calendar year and the amount of tax withheld, if any, will generally be reported to the non-U.S. shareholder and to the IRS. This information reporting requirement applies regardless of whether the non-U.S. shareholder is subject to withholding on distributions on our shares or whether the withholding was reduced or eliminated by an applicable tax treaty. Also, distributions paid to a non-U.S. shareholder on our shares may be subject to backup withholding, unless the non-U.S. shareholder properly certifies its non-U.S. shareholder status on an IRS Form W-8 or substantially similar form in the manner described above. Similarly, information reporting and backup withholding will not apply to proceeds a non-U.S. shareholder receives upon the sale, exchange, redemption, retirement or other disposition of our shares, if the non-U.S. shareholder properly certifies its non-U.S. shareholder status on an IRS Form W-8 or substantially similar form. Even without having executed an IRS Form W-8 or substantially similar form, however, in some cases information reporting and backup withholding will not apply to proceeds that a non-U.S. shareholder receives upon the sale, exchange, redemption, retirement or other disposition of our shares if the non-U.S. shareholder receives those proceeds through a broker's foreign office.

33


Table of Contents

        Increased reporting obligations are scheduled to be imposed on non-United States financial institutions and other non-United States entities for purposes of identifying accounts and investments held directly or indirectly by United States persons. The failure to comply with these additional information reporting, certification and other specified requirements could result in withholding tax being imposed on payments of dividends and sales proceeds to applicable shareholders or intermediaries. Specifically, a 30% withholding tax is imposed on dividends on and gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition of our shares paid to a foreign financial institution or to a foreign nonfinancial entity, unless (1) the foreign financial institution undertakes applicable diligence and reporting obligations or (2) the foreign nonfinancial entity either certifies it does not have any substantial United States owners or furnishes identifying information regarding each substantial United States owner. In addition, if the payee is a foreign financial institution, it generally must enter into an agreement with the United States Treasury that requires, among other things, that it undertake to identify accounts held by applicable United States persons or United States-owned foreign entities, annually report specified information about such accounts, and withhold 30% on payments to noncertified holders. Pursuant to IRS guidance, future regulations will provide that such withholding applies only to dividends paid on or after January 1, 2014, and to other "withholdable payments" (including payments of gross proceeds from a sale or other disposition of our shares) made on or after January 1, 2015. If you hold our shares through a non-United States intermediary or if you are a non-United States person, we urge you to consult your own tax advisor regarding foreign account tax compliance.

Other Tax Consequences

        Our tax treatment and that of our shareholders may be modified by legislative, judicial, or administrative actions at any time, which actions may be retroactive in effect. The rules dealing with federal income taxation are constantly under review by the Congress, the IRS and the Treasury Department, and statutory changes, new regulations, revisions to existing regulations, and revised interpretations of established concepts are issued frequently. Likewise, the rules regarding taxes other than federal income taxes may also be modified. No prediction can be made as to the likelihood of passage of new tax legislation or other provisions, or the direct or indirect effect on us and our shareholders. Revisions to tax laws and interpretations of these laws could adversely affect the tax or other consequences of an investment in our shares. We and our shareholders may also be subject to taxation by state, local or other jurisdictions, including those in which we or our shareholders transact business or reside. These tax consequences may not be comparable to the federal income tax consequences discussed above.


ERISA PLANS, KEOGH PLANS AND INDIVIDUAL RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS

General Fiduciary Obligations

        Fiduciaries of a pension, profit-sharing or other employee benefit plan subject to Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended, or ERISA, must consider whether:

    their investment in our shares satisfies the diversification requirements of ERISA;

    the investment is prudent in light of possible limitations on the marketability of our shares;

    they have authority to acquire our shares under the applicable governing instrument and Title I of ERISA; and

    the investment is otherwise consistent with their fiduciary responsibilities.

        Trustees and other fiduciaries of an ERISA plan may incur personal liability for any loss suffered by the plan on account of a violation of their fiduciary responsibilities. In addition, these fiduciaries may be subject to a civil penalty of up to 20% of any amount recovered by the plan on account of a

34


Table of Contents

violation. Fiduciaries of any IRA, Roth IRA, tax-favored account (such as an Archer MSA, Coverdell education savings account or health savings account), Keogh Plan or other qualified retirement plan not subject to Title I of ERISA, or non-ERISA plans, should consider that a plan may only make investments that are authorized by the appropriate governing instrument.

        Fiduciaries considering an investment in our securities should consult their own legal advisors if they have any concern as to whether the investment is consistent with the foregoing criteria or is otherwise appropriate. The sale of our securities to a plan is in no respect a representation by us or any underwriter of the securities that the investment meets all relevant legal requirements with respect to investments by plans generally or any particular plan, or that the investment is appropriate for plans generally or any particular plan.

Prohibited Transactions

        Fiduciaries of ERISA plans and persons making the investment decision for an IRA or other non-ERISA plan should consider the application of the prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and the IRC in making their investment decision. Sales and other transactions between an ERISA or non-ERISA plan, and persons related to it, are prohibited transactions. The particular facts concerning the sponsorship, operations and other investments of an ERISA plan or non-ERISA plan may cause a wide range of other persons to be treated as disqualified persons or parties in interest with respect to it. A prohibited transaction, in addition to imposing potential personal liability upon fiduciaries of ERISA plans, may also result in the imposition of an excise tax under the IRC or a penalty under ERISA upon the disqualified person or party in interest with respect to the plan. If the disqualified person who engages in the transaction is the individual on behalf of whom an IRA or Roth IRA is maintained or his beneficiary, the IRA or Roth IRA may lose its tax-exempt status and its assets may be deemed to have been distributed to the individual in a taxable distribution on account of the prohibited transaction, but no excise tax will be imposed. Fiduciaries considering an investment in our securities should consult their own legal advisors as to whether the ownership of our securities involves a prohibited transaction.

"Plan Assets" Considerations

        The U.S. Department of Labor, which has administrative responsibility over ERISA plans as well as non-ERISA plans, has issued a regulation defining "plan assets." The regulation generally provides that when an ERISA or non-ERISA plan acquires a security that is an equity interest in an entity and that security is neither a "publicly offered security" nor a security issued by an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, the ERISA plan's or non-ERISA plan's assets include both the equity interest and an undivided interest in each of the underlying assets of the entity, unless it is established either that the entity is an operating company or that equity participation in the entity by benefit plan investors is not significant.

        Each class of our shares (that is, our common shares and any class of preferred shares that we may issue) must be analyzed separately to ascertain whether it is a publicly offered security. The regulation defines a publicly offered security as a security that is "widely held," "freely transferable" and either part of a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act, or sold under an effective registration statement under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, provided the securities are registered under the Exchange Act within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year of the issuer during which the offering occurred. Each class of our outstanding shares has been registered under the Exchange Act within the necessary time frame to satisfy the foregoing condition.

        The regulation provides that a security is "widely held" only if it is part of a class of securities that is owned by 100 or more investors independent of the issuer and of one another. However, a security will not fail to be "widely held" because the number of independent investors falls below 100

35


Table of Contents

subsequent to the initial public offering as a result of events beyond the issuer's control. We believe our common shares have been and will remain widely held, and we expect the same to be true of any class of preferred shares that we may issue, but we can give no assurances in this regard.

        The regulation provides that whether a security is "freely transferable" is a factual question to be determined on the basis of all relevant facts and circumstances. The regulation further provides that, where a security is part of an offering in which the minimum investment is $10,000 or less, some restrictions on transfer ordinarily will not, alone or in combination, affect a finding that these securities are freely transferable. The restrictions on transfer enumerated in the regulation as not affecting that finding include:

    any restriction on or prohibition against any transfer or assignment which would result in a termination or reclassification for federal or state tax purposes, or would otherwise violate any state or federal law or court order;

    any requirement that advance notice of a transfer or assignment be given to the issuer and any requirement that either the transferor or transferee, or both, execute documentation setting forth representations as to compliance with any restrictions on transfer which are among those enumerated in the regulation as not affecting free transferability, including those described in the preceding clause of this sentence;

    any administrative procedure which establishes an effective date, or an event prior to which a transfer or assignment will not be effective; and

    any limitation or restriction on transfer or assignment that is not imposed by the issuer or a person acting on behalf of the issuer.

        We believe that the restrictions imposed under our declaration of trust on the transfer of shares do not result in the failure of our shares to be "freely transferable." Furthermore, we believe that there exist no other facts or circumstances limiting the transferability of our shares which are not included among those enumerated as not affecting their free transferability under the regulation, and we do not expect or intend to impose in the future, or to permit any person to impose on our behalf, any limitations or restrictions on transfer which would not be among the enumerated permissible limitations or restrictions.

        Assuming that each class of our shares will be "widely held" and that no other facts and circumstances exist which restrict transferability of these shares, we have received an opinion of our counsel, Sullivan & Worcester LLP, that our shares will not fail to be "freely transferable" for purposes of the regulation due to the restrictions on transfer of the shares under our declaration of trust and that under the regulation each class of our currently outstanding shares is publicly offered and our assets will not be deemed to be "plan assets" of any ERISA plan or non-ERISA plan that acquires our shares in a public offering.

Item 1A.    Risk Factors.

        Our business faces many risks. The risks described below may not be the only risks we face, but are the risks we know of that we believe may be material at this time. Additional risks that we do not yet know of, or that we currently think are immaterial, may also impair our business operations or financial results. If any of the events or circumstances described in the following risks occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could suffer and the trading price of our securities could decline. Investors and prospective investors should consider the following risks and the information contained under the heading "Warning Concerning Forward Looking Statements" before deciding whether to invest in our securities.

36


Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Tenants and Operators

Financial and other difficulties at Five Star could adversely affect us.

        As of December 31, 2011, Five Star pays approximately 44.6% of our total annualized rental income and operates approximately 57.4% of our assets, at cost (less impairments). Five Star has not been consistently profitable since it became a public company in 2001. Also, while Five Star has access to a revolving line of credit from a financial institution for $35.0 million maturing in March 2013, Five Star has limited resources and has substantial lease obligations to us and others. Five Star's business is subject to a number of risks, including the following:

    Five Star has high operating leverage. A small percentage decline in Five Star's revenue or increase in Five Star's expenses could have a material negative impact on Five Star's operating results;

    Medicare and Medicaid payments account for some of Five Star's total revenues. A reduction in these payment rates or a failure of these payment rates to match Five Star's cost increases may materially adversely affect Five Star;

    Current general economic conditions may adversely affect Five Star's operations. For example, tight credit market conditions may make it more expensive for Five Star to access the working capital it requires for its operations. Similarly, the recent slowness of the housing market may make it more difficult for potential residents of our properties operated by Five Star to sell their homes, causing these persons to defer relocating to Five Star facilities and reducing Five Star's occupancies, revenues and operating income;

    Five Star's growth strategy, including recent acquisitions, may not succeed and may result in reduced profits or recurring losses;

    Increases in liability insurance costs have in the past negatively impacted Five Star's operating results and may adversely impact its future results;

    Increases in labor costs could have a material adverse effect on Five Star; and

    Extensive regulation applicable to Five Star's business increases Five Star's costs and may result in losses.

        If Five Star's operations are unprofitable, Five Star may default its rent obligations to us. Additionally, if Five Star were to fail to provide quality services, our income from these properties may be adversely affected. Further if we were required to replace Five Star as our tenant, this could result in significant disruptions at the affected properties and declines in our income and cash flows.

Increases in labor costs at our Managed Communities may have a material adverse effect on us.

        Wages and employee benefits represent a significant part of our senior living operating expenses, incurred by communities leased to our TRSs. Five Star, our manager of these communities, competes with other operators of senior living communities and rehabilitation hospitals to attract and retain qualified personnel responsible for the day to day operations of each of these communities. The market for qualified nurses, therapists and other healthcare professionals is highly competitive. Periodic and geographic area shortages of nurses or other trained personnel may require Five Star to increase the wages and benefits offered to employees in order to attract and retain these personnel or to hire more expensive temporary personnel. Also, Five Star may have to compete with numerous other employers for lesser skilled workers. As we lease additional communities to our TRSs, our manager of these communities may be required to pay increased compensation or offer other incentives to retain key personnel and other employees. Employee benefits costs, including employee health insurance and workers' compensation insurance costs, have materially increased in recent years. Increasing employee

37


Table of Contents

health and workers' compensation insurance costs may materially negatively affect our earnings at our Managed Communities. We can give no assurance that labor costs at our Managed Communities will not increase or that any increase will be matched by corresponding increases in rates charged to residents. Any significant failure by Five Star to control labor costs or to pass on any increased labor costs to residents through rate increases at our managed senior living communities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Termination of assisted living resident agreements and resident attrition could adversely affect our revenues and earnings at our Managed Communities.

        State regulations governing assisted living communities typically require a written resident agreement with each resident. Most of these regulations also require that each resident have the right to terminate these assisted living resident agreements for any reason on reasonable notice. Consistent with these regulations, most resident agreements at our Managed Communities allow residents to terminate their agreements on 30 days' notice. Thus, Five Star may be unable to contract with assisted living residents to stay for longer periods of time, unlike typical apartment leasing arrangements that involve lease agreements with terms of up to a year or longer. If a large number of residents elected to terminate their resident agreements at or around the same time, our revenues and earnings from our Managed Communities could be materially and adversely affected. In addition, the advanced ages of senior living residents at our Managed Communities mean that the resident turnover rate in these senior living communities, and as a result the occupancy, is difficult to predict.

Five Star may not be able to profitably operate the two rehabilitation hospitals we own.

        We lease two rehabilitation hospitals to Five Star. Medicare pays a significant amount of the revenues at these rehabilitation hospitals and these hospitals may be subject to prospective or retroactive rate adjustments. For example, during Medicare cost periods, 60% of a facility's total inpatient population must require intensive rehabilitation services associated with treatment of at least one of 13 designated medical conditions, and if the hospitals' operations do not remain in compliance with this 60% rule, CMS may reclassify these facilities as a different type of Medicare provider that would lower their reimbursement rates. If Congress enacts the Obama Administration's proposal to raise the 60% rule to 75% beginning in federal fiscal year 2013, Five Star's compliance with this rule will become more difficult. Also, retroactive audits of Medicare claims submitted by IRFs and other providers are expanding, and CMS is recouping amounts paid for services determined by auditors not to have been medically necessary or not to meet Medicare criteria for coverage as billed. Five Star may be required to make substantial repayments to Medicare if the auditors make such findings. Unprofitable operations at these hospitals could jeopardize Five Star's ability to pay rent to us.

Sunrise's operation of our properties may adversely affect us.

        In March 2003, Marriott International, Inc., or Marriott, sold its subsidiary, Marriott Senior Living Services, Inc., to Sunrise Senior Living, Inc., or Sunrise. As of December 31, 2011, Sunrise's annual rent to us for the 14 communities it leases was $32.9 million, or 7.3% of our total annualized rental income. Sunrise has recently reported significant losses and Sunrise may become unable to pay rent due to us. In December 2011, Sunrise provided notice to us that leases for 10 of the 14 communities will be terminated effective December 31, 2013. The rent under our current leases with Sunrise is guaranteed by Marriott, which formerly owned the communities now operated by Sunrise; however, Marriott is no longer in the senior living business. Marriott may be unwilling or unable to assume these operations and may have declined to permit Sunrise to extend Marriott's guarantee obligations for 10 of the 14 communities, resulting in Sunrise's termination of such leases. We and Sunrise may continue to discuss leasing the 10 communities before the scheduled lease expirations at year end 2013. If the leases with Sunrise expire and the income from such rental income is not replaced, the reduction in

38


Table of Contents

overall income will have an adverse effect on us. In addition, if, pursuant to its guarantee, Marriott assumes the operations of any or all of the 14 communities Sunrise leases or if some other operator assumes these operations after a Sunrise default or after the Sunrise leases terminate, these operations may deteriorate and the value of our investment in these communities may decline materially.

Some of our tenants are faced with significant potential litigation and rising insurance costs that not only affect their ability to obtain and maintain adequate liability and other insurance, but also may affect their ability to pay their lease payments and fulfill their insurance and indemnification obligations to us.

        In some states, advocacy groups monitor the quality of care at skilled nursing facilities and assisted and independent living facilities, and these groups have brought litigation against operators. Also, in several instances, private litigations by skilled nursing facility patients, assisted and independent living facility residents or their families have succeeded in winning very large damage awards for alleged neglect. The effect of this litigation and potential litigation has been to materially increase the costs of monitoring and reporting quality of care compliance incurred by some of our tenants. The cost of liability and medical malpractice insurance has increased and may continue to increase so long as the present litigation environment in many parts of the United States continues. This has affected the ability of some of our tenants to obtain and maintain adequate liability and other insurance and manage their related risk exposures. In addition to causing some of our tenants to be unable to fulfill their insurance, indemnification and other obligations to us under their leases and thereby potentially exposing us to those risks, these litigation risks and costs could cause some of our tenants to become unable to pay rents due to us.

The operations of some of our facilities are dependent upon payments from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

        As of December 31, 2011, approximately 92% of our current NOI from our properties came from properties where a majority of the NOI is derived from private resources, and the remaining 8% of our NOI from our properties came from properties where a majority of the NOI is dependent upon Medicare and Medicaid programs. Operations at most Medicare and Medicaid dependent properties currently produce sufficient cash flow to pay our allocated rents, but operations at certain of these properties do not. Even at properties where less than a majority of the revenues come from Medicare or Medicaid payments, a reduction in such payments can materially adversely impact profits or result in losses by our tenants. With the background of the current federal budget deficit and other federal priorities and continued difficult state fiscal conditions, there have been numerous recent legislative and regulatory actions or proposed actions with respect to federal Medicare and state Medicaid rates and federal payments to states for Medicaid programs. These actions have included, among others: the enactment and implementation of PPACA, which includes provisions that reduce annual Medicare rate updates during the next several years; recently adopted Medicare rules that CMS estimates will result in a net reduction of approximately 11.1% in aggregate Medicare payment rates for SNFs in federal fiscal year 2012; rules that update Medicare prospective payment rates for IRFs; efforts by the Obama Administration and members of Congress to reduce or slow the growth of Medicare and Medicaid expenditures; federal budget savings measures pursuant to the BCA; reduced federal payments to states for Medicaid programs; limitations on increases of, or reductions of, state Medicaid rates; and proposals to make substantial structural changes in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Some of these actions are expected to result in increases in rates that are insufficient to offset increasing costs or in reductions in payments to us and our tenants. We are unable to estimate how recent or future Medicare and Medicaid policy changes or rate changes will affect us or certain of our tenants. If and to the extent Medicare or Medicaid rates are reduced from current levels or if rate increases are less than increases in operating costs, it could have a material adverse effect on the ability of some of our tenants to pay rent to us.

39


Table of Contents

Provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could adversely affect us or our tenants and managers.

        PPACA contains insurance changes, payment changes and healthcare delivery systems changes that will affect us, our tenants and managers. PPACA includes provisions that took effect in federal fiscal year 2012 that may result in SNF and IRF Medicare payment rates for a fiscal year being less than for the preceding fiscal year and also reduced various updates for inflation affecting the current and future federal fiscal years. PPACA also establishes an Independent Payment Advisory Board to submit legislative proposals to Congress and take other actions with a goal of reducing Medicare spending growth and includes various other provisions affecting Medicare and Medicaid providers, including enforcement reforms and increased funding for Medicare and Medicaid program integrity control initiatives. We are unable to predict the impact on our tenants of the productivity adjustments or other PPACA provisions on future Medicare rates for SNFs and IRFs and other providers, or of the insurance, payment, and healthcare delivery systems changes contained in and to be developed pursuant to PPACA on us or our tenants and managers. Changes to be implemented under PPACA resulting in reduced payments for services or the failure of Medicare, Medicaid or insurance payment rates to cover increasing costs could adversely and materially affected the ability of our tenants to pay rents to us or the value of our properties.

Financial markets are still recovering from a period of disruption and recession, and we are unable to predict if and when the economy will stabilize or improve.

        The financial markets are still recovering from a recession, which created volatile market conditions, resulted in a decrease in availability of business credit and led to the insolvency, closure or acquisition of a number of financial institutions. While the markets currently show signs of stabilizing, it remains unclear when the economy will fully recover to pre-recession levels. Continued economic weakness in the U.S. economy generally or a new recession would likely adversely affect our financial condition and that of our tenants, and could impact the ability of our tenants to pay rent to us.

We are not permitted to operate our properties and we are dependent on the managers and tenants of our properties.

        Because federal income tax laws restrict REITs and their subsidiaries from operating senior living communities, we do not manage our senior living communities. Instead, we lease our communities to operating companies or to our subsidiaries that qualify as a TRS under applicable REIT tax laws. We have retained Five Star to manage communities that are leased to our TRSs. Our income from our properties may be adversely affected if our tenants or managers fail to provide quality services and amenities to residents or if they fail to maintain quality service. While we monitor our tenants' and managers' performances, we have limited recourse under our leases and management agreements if we believe that the tenants or managers are not performing adequately. Failure by our tenants or managers to fully perform the duties agreed to in our leases and management agreements could adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, our tenants and managers manage, and in some cases own or have invested in, properties that compete with our properties, which may result in conflicts of interest. As a result, our tenants or tenants have, in the past made, and may in the future make, decisions regarding competing properties that are not or would not be in our best interests.

40


Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Business

If the ongoing weakness in the U.S. economy continues for a substantial period, our operating and financial results may be harmed by further declines in occupancy at our senior living facilities, wellness centers and MOBs.

        The performance of the U.S. healthcare industry has historically been correlated with the performance of the U.S. economy in general. From 2008 through 2011, the U.S. economy experienced significant weakness due primarily to weakness in the housing market, reduced consumer and business spending and constrained credit markets. As a result, the U.S. healthcare industry generally, and our senior housing properties specifically, experienced declines in occupancy, revenues and profitability in 2011 that are expected to continue into 2012 and potentially beyond 2012. For example, the continuing inability for seniors to sell their houses has likely caused some not to relocate to our senior living properties, discretionary medical expenditures are often deferred during weak economic periods causing some of our MOB tenants to reduce their space needs and the operations at our wellness centers may be adversely impacted by the deteriorating economic conditions if consumers reduce discretionary spending for wellness activities. If the ongoing economic weakness in the United States continues or gets worse, our operating and financial results likely will decline.

We may be unable to access the capital necessary to repay debts or fund required distributions to remain a REIT.

        To retain our status as a REIT, we are required to distribute at least 90% of our annual REIT taxable income (excluding capital gains) and satisfy a number of organizational and operational requirements to which REITs are subject. Accordingly, we are generally not able to retain sufficient cash from operations to repay debts, invest in our properties and fund acquisitions. Our business and growth strategies depend, in part, upon our ability to raise additional capital at reasonable costs to repay our debts, invest in our properties and fund new acquisitions. Because of the significant reduction in the past three years in the amount of capital available to businesses on a global basis, our ability to raise reasonably priced capital is not guaranteed; we may be unable to raise reasonably priced capital because of reasons related to our business or for reasons beyond our control, such as market conditions. If we are unable to raise reasonably priced capital, our business and growth strategies may fail and we may be unable to remain a REIT.

Increasing interest rates may adversely affect us and the value of an investment in our shares.

        There are three principal ways that increasing interest rates may adversely affect us and the value of an investment in our shares:

    Funds borrowed under our revolving credit facility bear interest at variable rates. If interest rates increase, so will our interest costs, which could adversely affect our cash flow, our ability to pay principal and interest on our debt, our cost of refinancing our debt when it becomes due and our ability to pay distributions.

    An increase in interest rates likely could decrease the amount buyers may be willing to pay for our properties, thereby reducing the market value of our properties and limiting our ability to sell properties or to obtain mortgage financing secured by our properties.

    We expect to pay regular distributions on our shares. When interest rates on debt investments available to investors rise, the market prices of distribution paying securities often decline. Accordingly, if interest rates rise, the market price of our shares may decline.

41


Table of Contents

Our properties and their operations are subject to complex regulations.

        Various governmental authorities mandate certain physical characteristics of senior housing properties, hospitals, clinics, other health care facilities and biotech laboratories. Changes in these regulations may require significant expenditures. Our leases, other than our MOB leases, and our management agreements generally require our tenants or managers to maintain our properties in compliance with applicable laws, and we try to monitor their compliance. However, our tenants or managers may neglect maintenance of our properties if they suffer financial distress. Under some of our leases, we have agreed to fund capital expenditures in return for rent increases. Our available financial resources or those of our tenants or managers may be insufficient to fund expenditures required to keep our properties operating in accordance with regulations, and if we fund these expenditures, our tenants' financial resources may be insufficient to meet increased rental obligations to us.

        Licensing, Medicare and Medicaid laws also require our tenants who operate senior living communities, hospitals, clinics and other healthcare facilities to comply with extensive standards governing operations. Various laws administered by the FDA and other agencies extensively regulate the operations of our tenants who operate biotech laboratories that develop, manufacture, market or distribute pharmaceuticals or medical devices. Various laws prohibit fraud by senior living operators, hospitals and other healthcare facilities, including civil and criminal laws that prohibit false claims in Medicare, Medicaid and other programs and that regulate patient referrals. In recent years, the federal and state governments have devoted increasing resources to monitoring the quality of care at senior living communities and to anti-fraud investigations in healthcare operations generally. When violations of anti-fraud, false claims, anti-kickback or physician referral laws are identified, federal or state authorities may impose civil or criminal penalties, treble damages and other governmental sanctions. Healthcare facilities may also be subject to license revocation or conditional licensure and exclusion from Medicare and Medicaid participation or conditional participation. The FDA may also withdraw approvals or limit approvals held by biotech laboratories, recall products, or suspend production by biotech laboratories. When quality of care deficiencies or improper billing are identified, various laws may authorize sanctions, including denial of new admissions, exclusion from Medicare or Medicaid program participation, monetary penalties, governmental oversight, temporary management, receivership or loss of licensure. We, our tenants and managers receive notices of potential sanctions and remedies from time to time, and authorities impose such sanctions from time to time on our facilities which they operate. If our tenants or managers are unable to cure deficiencies which have been identified or which are identified in the future, these sanctions may be imposed, and if imposed, may adversely affect our tenants' ability to pay rents to us and our ability to identify substitute tenants or managers. Federal and state requirements for change in control of healthcare facilities, including, as applicable, approvals of the proposed operator for licensure, certificate of need, and Medicare and Medicaid participation, may also limit or delay our ability to identify substitute tenants or managers. If any of our tenants becomes unable to operate our properties or to pay our rents or if any of our managers becomes unable to operate our properties because it has violated government regulations or payment laws, we may have difficulty finding a substitute tenant or manager and the value of an affected property may decline materially.

Our acquisitions may not be successful.

        Our business strategy contemplates acquisitions of additional properties. We cannot assure you that acquisitions we make will prove to be successful. We might encounter unanticipated difficulties and expenditures relating to any acquired properties. Newly acquired properties might require significant management attention that would otherwise be devoted to our ongoing business. We might never realize the anticipated benefits of our acquisitions. Notwithstanding pre-acquisition due diligence, we do not believe that it is possible to fully understand a property before it is owned and operated for an

42


Table of Contents

extended period of time. For example, we could acquire a property that contains undisclosed defects in design or construction. In addition, after our acquisition of a property, the market in which the acquired property is located may experience unexpected changes that adversely affect the property's value. The occupancy of properties that we acquire may decline during our ownership, and rents that are in effect at the time a property is acquired may decline thereafter. Also, our property operating costs for acquisitions may be higher than we anticipate and acquisitions of properties may not yield the returns we expect and, if financed using debt or new equity issuances, may result in shareholder dilution. For these reasons, among others, our property acquisitions may cause us to experience losses.

We face significant competition and we may be unable to profit from our Managed Communities.

        We face competition for acquisition opportunities from other investors and this competition may subject us to the following risks:

    we may be unable to acquire a desired property because of competition from other well capitalized real estate investors, including publicly traded and private REITs, numerous financial institutions, private equity funds, individuals and public and private companies who are actively engaged in our business; and

    competition from other real estate investors, which may increase if access to credit becomes more readily available and lending terms become more lenient, may significantly increase the purchase price we must pay to acquire properties.

        In addition, our properties, particularly our MOBs, face competition for tenants. Some competing properties may be newer, better located and more attractive to tenants. Competing properties may have lower rates of occupancy than our properties, which may result in competing owners leasing available space at lower rents than we offer at our properties. This competition may affect our ability to attract and retain tenants and may reduce the rents we are able to charge.

        Furthermore, as the owner and manager of our Managed Communities, our TRSs and Five Star compete with numerous other companies that provide senior living, rehabilitation hospital and pharmacy services, including home healthcare companies and other real estate based service providers. Although some states require certificates of need to develop new skilled nursing facilities, there are fewer barriers to competition for home healthcare or for independent and assisted living services. We cannot provide any assurances that our TRSs and Five Star will be able to attract a sufficient number of residents to our Managed Communities or that they will be able to attract employees and keep wages and other employee benefits, insurance costs and other operating expenses at levels which will allow our Managed Communities to compete successfully or to operate profitably.

Increasing investor interest in healthcare related real estate may increase competition and reduce our growth.

        Our business is highly competitive and we expect that it may become more competitive in the future. We compete with a number of other REITs, numerous financial institutions, private equity funds, individuals and public and private companies who are actively engaged in our business, some of which are larger and have a lower cost of capital than we do. In the past, periods of economic recession in the economy generally have sometimes caused some investors to focus on healthcare and healthcare real estate investments because some investors believe these types of investments may be less affected by general economic circumstances than most other investments. These developments could result in increased competition for investments, fewer investment opportunities available to us and lower spreads over our cost of our capital, all of which would limit our ability to grow our business and improve our financial results.

43


Table of Contents

Competition from new facilities may adversely affect some of our facilities.

        Until recently, a large number of new assisted living properties were being developed. In most states these properties are subject to less stringent regulations than nursing homes and can operate with comparatively fewer personnel and at comparatively lower costs. As a result of offering newer accommodations at equal or lower costs, these assisted living properties and other senior living alternatives, including home healthcare, often attract persons who would have previously become nursing home residents. Many of the residents attracted to new assisted living properties were the most profitable nursing home patients, since they paid higher rates than Medicaid or Medicare would pay and they required lesser amounts of care. Historically, state requirements of obtaining certificates of need to develop new properties have somewhat protected nursing homes from competition; however, many states are eliminating these barriers. Also, there are few regulatory barriers to competition for home healthcare or for independent and assisted living services. These competitive factors have caused some nursing homes which we own to decline in value. This decline may continue as assisted living facilities or other elderly care alternatives such as home healthcare expand their businesses. Each of our tenants face similar risks. These competition risks may prevent our tenants and operators from maintaining or improving occupancy at our properties, which may increase the risk of default under our leases.

Real estate ownership creates risks and liabilities.

        Our business is subject to risks associated with real estate ownership, including:

    leases which are not renewed at expiration and may be relet at lower rents;

    increased supply of similar properties in our markets;

    defaults and bankruptcies by our tenants;

    the illiquid nature of real estate markets which limits our ability to sell our assets rapidly to respond to changing market conditions;

    property and casualty losses, some of which may be uninsured; and

    costs that may be incurred relating to property maintenance and repair, and the need to make expenditures due to changes in governmental regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Acquisition and ownership of real estate is subject to environmental and climate change risks.

        Acquisition and ownership of real estate is subject to risks associated with environmental hazards. We may be liable for environmental hazards at, or migrating from, our properties, including those created by prior owners or occupants, existing tenants, abutters or other persons. Our properties may be subject to environmental laws for certain hazardous substances used to maintain these properties, such as chemicals used to clean, pesticides and lawn maintenance materials, and for other conditions, such as the presence of harmful mold. Various federal and state laws impose environmental liabilities upon property owners, such as us, for any environmental damages arising on properties they own or occupy, and we are not assured that we will not be held liable for environmental investigation and clean up at, or near, our properties, including environmental damages at sites we own and lease to our tenants. As an owner or previous owner of properties which contain environmental hazards, we also may be liable to pay damages to governmental agencies or third parties for costs and damages they incur arising from environmental hazards at the properties. Moreover, the costs and damages which may arise from environmental hazards are often difficult to project.

        The current political debate about climate change has resulted in various treaties, laws and regulations which are intended to limit carbon emissions. We believe these laws being enacted or

44


Table of Contents

proposed may cause energy costs at our properties to increase, but we do not expect the direct impact of these increases to be material to our results of operations, because the increased costs either would be the responsibility of our tenants directly or in large part may be passed through by us to our tenants as additional lease payments. Although we do not believe it is likely in the foreseeable future, laws enacted to mitigate climate change may make some of our buildings obsolete or cause us to make material investments in our properties which could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

We have substantial debt obligations and may incur additional debt.

        As of February 17, 2012, we have $1.9 billion in debt outstanding, which was 43.1% of our total book capitalization. Our note indenture and revolving credit facility permit us and our subsidiaries to incur additional debt, including secured debt. If we default in paying any of our debts or honoring our debt covenants, it may create one or more cross defaults, our debts may be accelerated and we could be forced to liquidate our assets for less than the values we would receive in a more orderly process.

We may experience losses from our business dealings with Affiliates Insurance Company.

        We have invested approximately $5.2 million in Affiliates Insurance Company, or AIC, we have purchased substantially all our property insurance in a program designed and reinsured in part by AIC, and we are currently investigating the possibilities to expand our relationship with AIC to other types of insurance. We, RMR, and five other companies to which RMR provides management services each own approximately 14.29% of AIC and we and those other AIC shareholders participate in a combined insurance program designed and reinsured in part by AIC. Our principal reason for investing in AIC and for purchasing insurance in these programs is to seek to improve our financial results by obtaining improved insurance coverages at lower costs than may be otherwise available to us or by participating in any profits which we may realize as an owner of AIC. These beneficial financial results may not occur and we may need to invest additional capital in order to continue to pursue these results. AIC's business involves the risks typical of an insurance business, including the risk that it may be insufficiently capitalized. Accordingly, our anticipated financial benefits from our business dealings with AIC may be delayed or not achieved, and we may experience losses from these dealings.

We rely on information technology in our operations, and any material failure, inadequacy, interruption or security failure of that technology could harm our business.

        We rely on information technology networks and systems, including the Internet, to process, transmit and store electronic information, and to manage or support a variety of business processes, including financial transactions and records, personal identifying information, tenant and lease data. We purchase some of our information technology from vendors, on whom our systems depend. We rely on commercially available systems, software, tools and monitoring to provide security for processing, transmission and storage of confidential tenant and other customer information, such as individually identifiable information, including information relating to financial accounts. Although we have taken steps to protect the security of our information systems and the data maintained in those systems, it is possible that our safety and security measures will not be able to prevent the systems' improper functioning or damage, or the improper access or disclosure of personally identifiable information such as in the event of cyber attacks. Security breaches, including physical or electronic break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers and similar breaches, can create system disruptions, shutdowns or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. Any failure to maintain proper function, security and availability of our information systems could interrupt our operations, damage our reputation, subject us to liability claims or regulatory penalties and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

45


Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Relationships with RMR and Five Star

We are dependent upon RMR to manage our business and implement our growth strategy.

        We have no employees. Personnel and services that we require are provided to us under contract by RMR. Our ability to achieve our business objectives depends on RMR and its ability to manage our properties, source and complete new acquisitions for us on favorable terms and to execute our financing strategy. Accordingly, our business is dependent upon RMR's business contacts, its ability to successfully hire, train, supervise and manage its personnel and its ability to maintain its operating systems. If we lose the services provided by RMR or its key personnel, our business and growth prospects may decline. We may be unable to duplicate the quality and depth of management available to us by becoming a self managed company or by hiring another manager. Also, in the event RMR is unwilling or unable to continue to provide management services to us, our cost of obtaining substitute services may be greater than the fees we pay RMR, and as a result our expenses may increase.

Our management structure, our manager's other activities and our transaction agreements with certain other entities managed by RMR may restrict our investing activities, create conflicts of interest or create the perception of conflicts of interest.

        RMR is authorized to follow broad operating and investment guidelines and, therefore, has discretion in determining the types of properties that will be appropriate investments for us, as well as making our individual operating and investment decisions. Our Board of Trustees periodically reviews our operating and investment guidelines and our individual operating activities and investments, but it does not review or approve each decision made by RMR on our behalf. In addition, in conducting periodic reviews, our Board of Trustees relies primarily on information provided to it by RMR. RMR is beneficially owned by our Managing Trustees, Barry Portnoy and Adam Portnoy.

        In our management agreements with RMR, we acknowledge that RMR manages other businesses, including three other NYSE-listed REITs, and is not required to present us with investment opportunities that RMR determines are within the investment focus of another business managed by RMR. RMR has discretion to determine which investment or leasing opportunities to present to us or to other businesses it manages. We also have agreed with RMR to first offer any property within the principal investment focus of another REIT to which RMR provides management services to such REIT prior to entering into any sale or other disposition arrangement with respect to such property. Accordingly, we may lose investment opportunities to, and may compete for tenants with other businesses managed by RMR.

        RMR also acts as the manager for three other publicly traded REITs: CWH, which primarily owns and operates commercial office and industrial buildings and leased industrial land; HPT, which owns hotels and travel centers; and GOV, which owns properties that are majority leased to government tenants. RMR also provides management services to other public and private companies, including Five Star, our largest tenant, TA, which operates and franchises travel centers, and Sonesta, which operates, manages and franchises hotels. These multiple responsibilities to public companies and RMR's other businesses could create competition for the time and efforts of RMR and Messrs. Barry Portnoy and Adam Portnoy. Also, RMR's multiple responsibilities to us, Five Star and CWH may create potential conflicts of interest, or the appearance of such conflicts of interest. Our transaction agreements with Five Star and CWH have restrictions on our right to make investments in properties that are within the investment focus of those other businesses. In addition, we participate with RMR, GOV, HPT, CWH, Five Star and TA in a combined insurance program through AIC. RMR, GOV, HPT, CWH, Five Star and TA have each invested in AIC and all of our Trustees are directors of this company.

        Barry Portnoy is Chairman and an employee of RMR, and Adam Portnoy serves as President and Chief Executive Officer and as a director of RMR. All of the members of our Board of Trustees, including our Independent Trustees, are members of one or more boards of trustees or directors of

46


Table of Contents

other companies to which RMR provides management services. All of our executive officers are also executive officers of RMR, and David J. Hegarty, our President and Chief Operating Officer, is also a director of RMR. The foregoing individuals may hold equity in or positions with other companies to which RMR provides management services. Such equity ownership and positions by our Trustees and officers could create, or appear to create, conflicts of interest with respect to matters involving us, RMR and its affiliates.

Our management agreements with RMR were negotiated between affiliated parties and may not be as favorable to us as they would have been if negotiated between unaffiliated parties.

        We pay RMR business management fees based in part upon the historical cost of our investments (including acquisition costs) which at any time may be more or less than the fair market value thereof, plus an incentive fee based upon certain increases in our funds from operations, or FFO, per share, as defined in our business management agreement with RMR. We also pay RMR property management fees for the properties in our MOB portfolio based in part upon the gross rents we collect from tenants and the cost of construction we incur, as defined in our property management agreement with RMR. For more information, see "Business—Manager." Our fee arrangements with RMR could encourage RMR to advocate acquisitions of properties, to undertake unnecessary construction activities or to overpay for acquisitions or construction. These arrangements may also encourage RMR to discourage our sales of properties. Our management agreements were negotiated between affiliated parties, and the terms, including the fees payable to RMR, may not be as favorable to us as they would have been were they negotiated on an arm's length basis between unaffiliated parties.

Our management agreements with RMR may discourage our change of control.

        Termination of our management agreements with RMR would be a default under our revolving credit facility unless approved by a majority of our lenders. RMR can terminate its management agreements with us if we experience a change of control. The quality and depth of management available to us by contracting with RMR may not be able to be duplicated by our being a self managed company or by our contracting with unrelated third parties, without considerable cost increases. For these reasons, our management agreements may discourage a change of control of us, including a change of control which might result in payment of a premium for your shares.

The potential for conflicts of interest as a result of our management structure may provoke dissident shareholder activities that result in significant costs.

        In the past, in particular following periods of volatility in the overall market or declines in the market price of a company's securities, shareholder litigation, dissident trustee nominations and dissident proposals have often been instituted against companies alleging conflicts of interest in business dealings with affiliated persons and entities. Our relationship with RMR, with the other businesses and entities to which RMR provides management services, with Messrs. Barry Portnoy and Adam Portnoy and with RMR affiliates may precipitate such activities. These activities, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs and a diversion of our management's attention, even if the allegations are not substantiated.

Our business dealings with Five Star may create conflicts of interest.

        Five Star was originally organized as our subsidiary. We distributed substantially all our Five Star ownership to our shareholders on December 31, 2001. One of our Managing Trustees, Mr. Barry Portnoy, serves as a managing director of Five Star. RMR provides management services to both us and Five Star. As of December 31, 2011, our leases with Five Star accounted for 44.6% of our annual rents. As of December 31, 2011, Five Star also managed 21 senior living communities which are leased to our TRS and managed one independent living community for our account. In the future, we expect

47


Table of Contents

to do additional business with Five Star. We believe that our current leases, management contracts and other business dealings with Five Star were entered on commercially reasonable terms and that our historical, continuing and increasing business dealings with Five Star have been beneficial to both us and Five Star. Our transactions with Five Star have been approved by our Independent Trustees; however, because of the historical and continuing relationships which we have with Five Star, each of our historical, continuing and expanding business dealings may not be on the same or as favorable terms as we might achieve with a third party with whom we do not have such relationships.

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

Ownership limitations and anti-takeover provisions in our declaration of trust, bylaws and rights agreement, as well as certain provisions of Maryland law, may prevent our shareholders from receiving a takeover premium or implementing beneficial changes.

        Our declaration of trust prohibits any shareholder other than CWH, RMR and their affiliates from owning more than 9.8% of the number or value of our outstanding shares. This provision of our declaration of trust is intended to assist with our REIT compliance under the IRC and otherwise to promote our orderly governance. However, this provision also inhibits acquisitions of a significant stake in us and may prevent a change in our control. Additionally, many provisions contained in our declaration of trust and bylaws and under Maryland law may further deter persons from attempting to acquire control of us and implement changes that may be considered beneficial by some shareholders, including, for example, provisions relating to:

    the division of our Trustees into three classes, with the term of one class expiring each year, and, in each case, until a successor is elected and qualifies, which could delay a change in our control;

    shareholder voting rights and standards for the election of Trustees and other provisions which require larger majorities for approval of actions which are not approved by our Trustees than for actions which are approved by our Trustees;

    required qualifications for an individual to serve as a Trustee and a requirement that certain of our Trustees be "Managing Trustees" and other Trustees be "Independent Trustees";

    limitations on the ability of, and various requirements that must be satisfied in order for, our shareholders to propose nominees for election as Trustees and propose other business to be considered at a meeting of our shareholders;

    limitations on the ability of our shareholders to remove our Trustees;

    the authority of our Board of Trustees, and not our shareholders, to adopt, amend or repeal our bylaws;

    the fact that only the Board of Trustees may call shareholder meetings and that shareholders are not entitled to act without a meeting;

    because of our ownership of AIC, we are an insurance holding company under applicable state law; accordingly, anyone who intends to solicit proxies for a person to serve as one of our Trustees or for another proposal of business not approved by our Board of Trustees may be required to receive pre-clearance from the concerned insurance regulators; and

    the authority of our Board of Trustees to adopt certain amendments to our declaration of trust without shareholder approval, including the authority to increase or decrease the number of authorized shares, to create new classes or series of shares (including a class or series of shares that could delay or prevent a transaction or a change in our control that might involve a premium for our shares or otherwise be in the best interests of our shareholders), to increase or

48


Table of Contents

      decrease the number of shares of any class or series, and to classify or reclassify any unissued shares from time to time by setting or changing the preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to distributions, qualifications or terms or conditions of redemption of our shares or any new class or series of shares created by our Board of Trustees.

        We maintain a rights agreement whereby, in the event a person or group of persons acquires 10% or more of our outstanding common shares, our shareholders, other than such person or group, will be entitled to purchase additional shares or other securities or property at a discount. In addition, certain provisions of Maryland law may have an anti-takeover effect. For all of these reasons, our shareholders may be unable to realize a change of control premium for any of our shares they own or otherwise effect a change of our policies.

Our rights and the rights of our shareholders to take action against our Trustees and officers are limited.

        Our declaration of trust limits the liability of our Trustees and officers to us and our shareholders for money damages to the maximum extent permitted under Maryland law. Under current Maryland law, our Trustees and officers will not have any liability to us and our shareholders for money damages other than liability resulting from:

    actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or services; or

    active and deliberate dishonesty by the Trustee or officer that was established by a final judgment as being material to the cause of action adjudicated.

        Our declaration of trust and indemnity contracts require us to indemnify any present or former trustee or officer to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law, who is made or threatened to be made a party to a proceeding by reason of his or her service in that capacity. However, except with respect to proceedings to enforce rights to indemnification, we will indemnify any person referenced in the previous sentence in connection with a proceeding initiated by such person against us only if such proceeding is authorized by our declaration of trust or bylaws or by our Board of Trustees or shareholders. In addition, we may be obligated to pay or reimburse the expenses incurred by our present and former Trustees and officers without requiring a preliminary determination of their ultimate entitlement to indemnification. As a result, we and our shareholders may have more limited rights against our present and former Trustees and officers than might otherwise exist absent the provisions in our declaration of trust and indemnity contracts or that might exist with other companies, which could limit your recourse in the event of actions not in your best interest.

Disputes with Five Star, CWH and RMR and shareholder litigation against us or our Trustees and officers may be referred to arbitration proceedings.

        Our contracts with Five Star, CWH and RMR provide that any dispute arising under those contracts may be referred to binding arbitration. Similarly, our bylaws provide that actions by our shareholders against us or against our Trustees and officers, including derivative and class actions, may be referred to binding arbitration. As a result, we and our shareholders would not be able to pursue litigation for these disputes in courts against Five Star, CWH, RMR or our Trustees and officers. In addition, the ability to collect attorneys' fees or other damages may be limited in the arbitration, which may discourage attorneys from agreeing to represent parties wishing to commence such a proceeding.

We may change our operational and investment policies without shareholder approval.

        Our Board of Trustees determines our operational and investment policies and may amend or revise our policies, including our policies with respect to our intention to qualify for taxation as a REIT, acquisitions, dispositions, growth, operations, indebtedness, capitalization and distributions or approve

49


Table of Contents

transactions that deviate from these policies, without a vote of, or notice to, our shareholders. Policy changes could adversely affect the market value of our shares and our ability to make distributions to you.

Risks Related to Our Taxation

The loss of our tax status as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes could have significant adverse consequences.

        As a REIT, we generally do not pay federal and state income taxes. However, actual qualification as a REIT under the IRC depends on satisfying complex statutory requirements, for which there are only limited judicial and administrative interpretations. We believe that we have been organized and have operated, and will continue to be organized and to operate, in a manner that qualified and will continue to qualify us to be taxed under the IRC as a REIT. However, we cannot be certain that, upon review or audit, the IRS will agree with this conclusion. Furthermore, there is no guarantee that the federal government will not someday eliminate REITs under the IRC.

        Maintaining our status as a REIT will require us to continue to satisfy certain tests concerning, among other things, the nature of our assets, the sources of our income and the amounts we distribute to shareholders. In order to meet these requirements, it may be necessary for us to sell or forego attractive investments. If we cease to be a REIT, then our ability to raise capital might be adversely affected, we will be in breach under our revolving credit facility, we may be subject to material amounts of federal and state income taxes and the value of our securities likely would decline. In addition, if we lose or revoke our tax status as a REIT for a taxable year, we will generally be prevented from requalifying as a REIT for the next four taxable years.

Distributions to shareholders generally will not qualify for reduced tax rates.

        The maximum tax rate for dividends payable by U.S. corporations to individual stockholders is 15% through 2012. Distributions paid by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for this reduced rate. The more favorable rates for corporate dividends may cause investors to perceive that investment in REITs is less attractive than investment in non-REIT entities that pay dividends, thereby reducing the demand and market price of our shares.

Risks Related to Our Securities

There is no assurance that we will continue to make distributions.

        We intend to continue to pay regular quarterly distributions to our shareholders. However:

    our ability to pay distributions will be adversely affected if any of the risks described herein occur;

    our payment of distributions is subject to compliance with restrictions contained in our revolving credit facility and our note indenture; and

    any distributions are made at the discretion of our Board of Trustees and will depend upon various factors that our Board of Trustees deems relevant, including our cash available for distribution, our financial condition, our results from operations, our capital requirements, our FFO, economic conditions and restrictions under Maryland law and maintenance of our REIT status. There are no assurances of our ability to pay distributions or regarding the form of distributions in the future. In addition, our distributions in the past have included, and may in the future include, a return of capital.

        For these reasons, among others, our cash distribution rate may decline or we may cease making distributions.

50


Table of Contents

Any notes we may issue will be effectively subordinated to the debts of our subsidiaries and to our secured debt.

        We conduct substantially all of our business through, and substantially all of our properties are owned by, subsidiaries. Consequently, our ability to pay debt service on our outstanding notes and any notes we issue in the future will be dependent upon the cash flow of our subsidiaries and payments by those subsidiaries to us as dividends or otherwise. Our subsidiaries are separate legal entities and have their own liabilities. Payments due on our outstanding notes, and any notes we may issue, are, or will be, effectively subordinated to liabilities of our subsidiaries, including guaranty liabilities. Most of our subsidiaries have guaranteed our revolving credit facility; none of our subsidiaries guaranty our outstanding notes. In addition, as of February 17, 2012, our subsidiaries had $847.1 million of secured debt. Our outstanding notes are, and any notes we may issue will be, effectively subordinated to any secured debt with regard to our assets pledged to secure those debts.

We may be required to prepay our debts upon a change of control.

        In certain change of control circumstances, our current and future noteholders and some of our other lenders may have the right to require us to purchase our notes which they own or repay our debt owing to them at their principal amount plus accrued interest and a premium.

Our notes may permit redemption before maturity, and our noteholders may be unable to reinvest proceeds at the same or a higher rate.

        The terms of our notes may permit us to redeem all or a portion of our outstanding notes after a certain amount of time, or up to a certain percentage of the notes prior to certain dates. Generally, the redemption price will equal the principal amount being redeemed, plus accrued interest to the redemption date, plus any applicable premium. If a redemption occurs, our noteholders may be unable to reinvest the money they receive in the redemption at a rate that is equal to or higher than the rate of return on the applicable notes.

There may be no public market for notes we may issue and one may not develop.

        Generally, any notes we may issue will be a new issue for which no trading market currently exists. We may not list our notes on any securities exchange or seek approval for price quotations to be made available through any automated quotation system. There is no assurance that an active trading market for any of our notes will exist in the future. Even if a market develops, the liquidity of the trading market for any of our notes and the market price quoted for any such notes may be adversely affected by changes in the overall market for fixed income securities, by changes in our financial performance or prospects, or by changes in the prospects for REITs or for the senior living industry generally.

Rating agency downgrades may increase our cost of capital.

        Our notes and certain other obligations are rated by two rating agencies. These rating agencies may elect to downgrade their ratings on our notes or certain other obligations at any time. Such downgrades may negatively affect our access to the capital markets and increase our cost of capital, including the interest rate and fees payable under our revolving credit facility.

Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments.

        None.

51


Table of Contents


Item 2.    Properties.

        At December 31, 2011, we had real estate investments totaling $4.7 billion, at undepreciated cost, after impairment write downs, in 369 properties. At December 31, 2011, 81 properties with an aggregate cost of $1.3 billion were mortgaged or subject to capital lease obligations totaling $861.6 million.

        The following table summarizes some information about our properties as of December 31, 2011. All dollar amounts are in thousands.

Location of Properties by State
  Number of
Properties
  Undepreciated
Carrying Value
  Net Book
Value
 

Alabama

    5   $ 29,483   $ 25,696  

Arizona

    10     122,888     93,014  

California

    25     622,613     562,617  

Colorado

    9     44,531     28,705  

Connecticut

    2     9,440     9,229  

Delaware

    6     89,413     70,868  

Florida

    29     585,277     496,558  

Georgia

    18     180,682     165,901  

Illinois

    7     112,351     94,697  

Indiana

    12     126,337     112,720  

Iowa

    6     14,223     8,510  

Kansas

    4     56,552     46,317  

Kentucky

    9     94,439     67,564  

Maryland

    14     289,795     255,009  

Massachusetts

    22     245,308     211,053  

Michigan

    5     16,836     13,061  

Minnesota

    7     89,843     82,879  

Mississippi

    2     13,041     11,412  

Missouri

    1     2,455     1,513  

Nebraska

    13     61,617     51,489  

Nevada

    1     52,122     52,067  

New Hampshire

    1     23,659     23,152  

New Jersey

    4     108,582     95,572  

New Mexico

    10     106,661     95,704  

New York

    6     102,468     97,557  

North Carolina

    13     146,085     138,954  

Ohio

    4     47,496     36,630  

Oklahoma

    4     28,338     26,791  

Pennsylvania

    22     190,668     159,854  

Rhode Island

    1     10,598     9,706  

South Carolina

    19     116,367     105,711  

South Dakota

    3     7,589     3,912  

Tennessee

    10     49,391     40,859  

Texas

    20     365,988     311,100  

Virginia

    19     219,059     180,699  

Washington

    1     5,193     2,676  

Washington, D.C. 

    2     62,716     60,270  

Wisconsin

    21     263,230     236,952  

Wyoming

    2     8,257     4,352  
               

Total

    369   $ 4,721,591   $ 4,091,330  
               

        Of the properties listed above, 249 are senior living communities, two are rehabilitation hospitals, 108 are MOBs and 10 are wellness centers.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings.

        None.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures.

        Not applicable.

52


Table of Contents


PART II

Item 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

        Our common shares are traded on the NYSE (symbol: SNH). The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low sale prices for our common shares as reported in the NYSE Composite Transactions reports:

 
  High   Low  

2010

             

First Quarter

  $ 22.57   $ 19.59  

Second Quarter

    23.36     19.25  

Third Quarter

    24.57     19.31  

Fourth Quarter

    25.28     20.42  

2011

             

First Quarter

  $ 24.66   $ 21.28  

Second Quarter

    24.50     22.55  

Third Quarter

    24.64     19.09  

Fourth Quarter

    23.22     20.17  

        The closing price of our common shares on the NYSE on February 16, 2012 was $21.99 per share.

        As of February 15, 2012, there were approximately 2,130 shareholders of record, and we estimate that as of such date there were in excess of 76,500 beneficial owners of our common shares.

        Information about distributions declared to common shareholders is summarized in the table below. Common share distributions to our shareholders are generally paid in the quarter following the quarter to which they relate.

 
  Distributions Per
Common Share
 
 
  2011   2010  

First Quarter

  $ 0.37   $ 0.36  

Second Quarter

    0.37     0.36  

Third Quarter

    0.38     0.37  

Fourth Quarter

    0.38     0.37  

        All common share distributions shown in the table above have been paid. We currently intend to continue to declare and pay common share distributions on a quarterly basis. However, distributions are made at the discretion of our Board of Trustees and depend on our earnings, Normalized FFO, cash available for distribution, financial condition, capital market conditions, growth prospects and other factors which our Board of Trustees deems relevant.

Item 6.    Selected Financial Data.

        The following table sets forth selected financial data for the periods and dates indicated. Comparative results are affected by property acquisitions and dispositions during the periods shown. This data should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and the

53


Table of Contents

consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Dollars are in thousands, except per share information.

 
  2011   2010   2009   2008   2007  

Income Statement Data:

                               

Rental income

  $ 422,166   $ 340,113   $ 297,399   $ 233,436   $ 186,162  

Residents fees and services(1)

    27,851                  

Net income(2)(3)

    151,419     116,485     109,715     106,511     85,303  

Common distributions declared(4)

   
232,849
   
191,387
   
177,238
   
153,462
   
117,215
 

Weighted average shares outstanding

   
149,577
   
128,092
   
121,863
   
105,153
   
83,168
 

Per Common Share Data:

                               

Net income(2)(3)

  $ 1.01   $ 0.91   $ 0.90   $ 1.01   $ 1.03  

Cash distributions declared to common shareholders(4)

    1.50     1.46     1.43     1.40     1.38  

Balance Sheet Data:

                               

Real estate properties, at undepreciated cost, net of impairment losses

  $ 4,721,591   $ 3,761,712   $ 3,317,983   $ 2,807,256   $ 1,940,347  

Total assets

    4,383,048     3,392,656     2,987,926     2,496,874     1,701,894  

Total indebtedness

    1,827,385     1,204,890     1,042,219     730,433     426,852  

Total shareholders' equity

    2,472,606     2,127,977     1,900,650     1,731,358     1,249,410  

(1)
We earn our residents fees and services primarily by providing housing and services to our residents. We recognize residents fees and services as services are provided. Lease agreements with residents generally have a term of one year and are cancelable by the residents with 30 days' notice.

(2)
Includes an impairment of assets charge of $2.0 million ($0.01 per share) and loss on early extinguishment of debt of $427,000 (less than $0.01 per share) in 2011. Includes an impairment of assets charge of $6.0 million ($0.05 per share) and loss on early extinguishment of debt of $2.4 million ($0.02 per share) in 2010. Includes an impairment of assets charge of $15.5 million ($0.13 per share) in 2009. Includes an impairment of assets charge of $8.4 million ($0.08 per share) in 2008. Includes an impairment of assets charge of $1.4 million ($0.02 per share) and loss on early extinguishment of debt of $2.0 million ($0.02 per share) in 2007.

(3)
Includes a gain on sale of properties of $21.3 million ($0.14 per share), $109,000 (less than $0.01 per share), $397,000 (less than $0.01 per share) and $266,000 (less than $0.01 per share) in 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

(4)
On January 4, 2012, we declared a distribution of $0.38 per share, or $61.8 million, to be paid to common shareholders of record on January 17, 2012. This distribution was paid on February 9, 2012.

54


Table of Contents

Item 7.    Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

        The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

PORTFOLIO OVERVIEW

        The following tables present an overview of our portfolio (dollars in thousands except per living unit/bed or square foot data):

(As of December 31, 2011)
  Number of
Properties
  Number of
Units/Beds or
Square Feet
  Investment
Carrying
Value(1)
  % of
Investment
  Investment per
Unit/Bed or
Square Foot(2)
  2011 NOI(3)   % of
2011 NOI
 

Facility Type

                                         

Independent living communities(4)

    56     14,163   $ 1,638,263   34.7%   $ 115,672   $ 117,402     30.9%  

Assisted living communities(4)

    145     10,491     1,217,449   25.8%   $ 116,047     101,956     26.8%  

Skilled nursing facilities(4)

    48     5,024     205,155   4.3%   $ 40,835     19,184     5.0%  

Rehabilitation hospitals

    2     364     70,792   1.5%   $ 194,484     10,362     2.7%  

Wellness centers

    10     812,000  sq. ft.   180,017   3.8%   $ 222     17,705     4.6%  

MOBs

    108     7,630,000  sq. ft.   1,409,915   29.9%   $ 185     114,441     30.0%  
                                   

Total

    369         $ 4,721,591   100.0%         $ 381,050     100.0%  
                                   

Tenant/Operator/Managed Properties

                                         

Five Star (Lease No. 1)

    89     6,539   $ 672,904   14.2%   $ 102,906   $ 55,731     14.7%  

Five Star (Lease No. 2)

    48     6,140     556,609   11.8%   $ 90,653     52,354     13.7%  

Five Star (Lease No. 3)

    28     5,618     650,218   13.8%   $ 115,738     63,714     16.8%  

Five Star (Lease No. 4)

    25     2,614     270,991   5.7%   $ 103,669     23,611     6.2%  

Sunrise/Marriott(5)

    14     4,091     325,165   6.9%   $ 79,483     32,871     8.6%  

Brookdale

    18     894     61,122   1.3%   $ 68,369     8,643     2.3%  

5 private companies (combined)

    7     959     36,087   0.8%   $ 37,630     5,730     1.5%  

TRS Managed(6)

    22     3,187     558,563   11.8%   $ 175,263     6,250     1.6%  

Wellness centers

    10     812,000  sq. ft.   180,017   3.8%   $ 222     17,705     4.6%  

Multi-tenant MOBs

    108     7,630,000  sq. ft.   1,409,915   29.9%   $ 185     114,441     30.0%  
                                   

Total

    369         $ 4,721,591   100.0%         $ 381,050     100.0%  
                                   

55


Table of Contents

Tenant/Managed Properties Operating Statistics(7)

 
  Rent Coverage   Occupancy  
 
  2011   2010   2011   2010  

Five Star (Lease No. 1)

    1.23x     1.28x     84.3%     87.3%  

Five Star (Lease No. 2)

    1.42x     1.34x     82.2%     81.7%  

Five Star (Lease No. 3)

    1.48x     1.51x     86.2%     87.9%  

Five Star (Lease No. 4)

    1.13x     1.09x     84.2%     83.4%  

Sunrise/Marriott(5)

    1.60x     1.35x     89.6%     89.6%  

Brookdale

    2.23x     2.18x     92.1%     92.8%  

5 private companies (combined)

    2.75x     2.21x     84.0%     83.6%  

TRS Managed(6)

    NA     NA     84.2%     NA  

Wellness centers

    2.14x     2.18x     100.0%     100.0%  

Multi-tenant MOBs(8)

    NA     NA     95.9%     97.0%  

(1)
Amounts are before depreciation, but after impairment write downs, if any.

(2)
Represents investment carrying value divided by the number of living units, beds or leased square feet at December 31, 2011.

(3)
NOI is defined and calculated by reportable segment and reconciled to net income below in this Item 7.

(4)
Senior living properties are categorized by the type of living units or beds which constitute a majority of the living units or beds at the property.

(5)
Marriott guarantees this lease.

(6)
These 22 senior living communities acquired since June 2011 are leased to our TRSs and managed by Five Star.

(7)
Operating data for TRS managed properties are presented from the date of acquisitions through December 31, 2011 and operating data for multi-tenant MOBs are presented as of December 31, 2011 and 2010; operating data for other properties and tenants are presented based upon the operating results provided by our tenants for the 12 months ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, or the most recent prior period for which tenant operating results are available to us. Rent coverage is calculated as operating cash flow from our tenants' operations of our properties, before subordinated charges, divided by minimum rents payable to us. We have not independently verified our tenants' operating data. The table excludes data for periods prior to our ownership of some of these properties.

(8)
Our MOB leases include both triple-net leases where, in addition to paying fixed rents, the tenants assume the obligation to operate and maintain the properties at their expense, and some net and modified gross leases where we are responsible to operate and maintain the properties and we charge tenants for some or all of the property operating costs. A small percentage of our MOB leases are so-called "full-service" leases where we receive fixed rent from our tenants and no reimbursement for our property operating costs.

        We have two reportable operating segments: (i) short term and long term residential care communities that offer dining for residents and (ii) properties where medical related activities occur but where residential overnight stays or dining services are not provided, or MOBs. Properties in the short term and long term residential care communities segment include leased and managed independent living communities, assisted living communities, skilled nursing facilities and rehabilitation hospitals. We earn rental income revenues from the tenants of our leased communities and we earn

56


Table of Contents

fees and services revenues from the residents of our Managed Communities. We acquired our Managed Communities beginning in June 2011. Properties in the MOB segment include those leased to medical providers or medical related businesses, clinics and biotech laboratory tenants. The "All Other Operations" category in the following table includes amounts related to corporate business activities and the operating results of certain properties that offer fitness, wellness and spa services to members.

Short and Long Term Residential Care Communities.

        The following chart presents a summary of our triple-net senior living property leases as of December 31, 2011 (dollars in thousands). This summary should be read in conjunction with the more detailed description of our leases set forth below.

Tenant
  Number of
Properties
  Units/Beds   Undepreciated
Carrying Value
of Properties
  Net Book
Value of
Properties
  Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
  Lease
Expiration
  Renewal Options

Five Star Quality Care, Inc. (Lease No. 1)(2)

    89     6,539   $ 672,904   $ 587,068   $ 57,219     12/31/24   2 for 15 years each.

Five Star Quality Care, Inc. (Lease No. 2)

    48     6,140     556,609     431,348     54,159     6/30/26   2 for 10 years each.

Five Star Quality Care, Inc. (Lease No. 3)(3)

    28     5,618     650,218     505,214     64,613     12/31/28   2 for 15 years each.

Five Star Quality Care, Inc. (Lease No. 4)(4)

    25     2,614     270,991     229,336     24,104     4/30/17   2 for 15 years each.

Sunrise Senior Living, Inc./Marriott International, Inc.(5)

    14     4,091     325,165     196,972     32,859     12/31/13   4 for 5 years each.

Brookdale Senior Living, Inc. 

    18     894     61,122     47,150     8,638     12/31/17   2 for 15 years each.

ABE Briarwood Corp

    1     140     15,598     5,369     937     12/31/15   None.

HealthQuest, Inc. 

    3     361     7,589     3,912     1,314     6/30/21   1 for 10 years.

Covenant Care, LLC

    1     180     3,503     1,954     1,167     9/30/15   1 for 15 years.

Evergreen Washington Healthcare, LLC

    1     103     5,193     2,676     930     12/31/15   1 for 10 years.

The MacIntosh Company

    1     175     4,204     2,623     599     6/30/19   1 for 10 years.
                               

Totals

    229     26,855   $ 2,573,096   $ 2,013,622   $ 246,539          
                               

(1)
Annualized rental income is rents pursuant to signed leases as of December 31, 2011. Includes percentage rent totaling $11.3 million based on increases in gross revenues at certain properties.

(2)
Lease No. 1 is comprised of five separate leases. Four of these five leases exist to accommodate our mortgage obligations in effect at the time we acquired the properties; we have agreed with the tenants to combine all five of these leases into one lease when these mortgage financings are paid.

(3)
Lease No. 3 exists to accommodate certain mortgage financing by us.

(4)
Lease No. 4 is comprised of three separate leases. Two of these three leases exist to accommodate our mortgage obligations in effect at the time we acquired the properties; we have agreed with the tenants to combine all three of these leases into one lease when these mortgage financings are paid.

(5)
These properties are leased to Sunrise; this lease is guaranteed by Marriott.

57


Table of Contents

        Five Star Quality Care, Inc.    We lease 188 senior living communities and two rehabilitation hospitals to Five Star for annual rent of $200.1 million, including percentage rent based on increases in gross revenues at certain properties ($4.9 million in 2011). Substantially all of the revenues at most of these senior living communities are paid to Five Star by residents from their private resources. Five Star pays percentage rent equal to 4% of the increase in gross revenues at 181 of the 188 senior living communities over base year gross revenues as specified in the lease terms and pays no percentage rent at the two rehabilitation hospitals.

        Lease No. 1 (comprised of five separate leases) expires in 2024 and includes 89 communities, including independent living communities, assisted living communities and skilled nursing facilities, of which 29 secure mortgage debt payable to third parties. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for Lease No. 1 was $57.2 million, including percentage rent of $1.2 million.

        Lease No. 2 expires in 2026 and includes 48 communities including independent living communities, assisted living communities, skilled nursing facilities and two rehabilitation hospitals. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for Lease No. 2 was $54.2 million, including percentage rent of $1.6 million.

        Lease No. 3 expires in 2028 and includes 28 communities, including independent living and assisted living communities, all of which secure mortgage debt payable to FNMA. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for Lease No. 3 was $64.6 million, including percentage rent of $1.7 million.

        Lease No. 4 (comprised of three separate leases) expires in 2017 and includes 25 communities, including independent living communities, assisted living communities and skilled nursing facilities, of which one secures mortgage debt payable to two third parties. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for Lease No. 4 was $24.1 million, including percentage rent of $384,000.

        For more information about our dealings and relationships with Five Star, and about the risks which may arise as a result of these related person transactions, please see "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Relationships with RMR and Five Star" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Related Person Transactions" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

        Sunrise Senior Living, Inc.    We lease 14 communities to Sunrise Senior Living Services, Inc., or SLS, a subsidiary of Sunrise that until 2003 was owned by Marriott. These communities are leased through 2013. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for this lease was $32.9 million, including percentage rent of $4.8 million based on increases in gross revenues at these communities. Marriott continues to guarantee the rent due to us for these 14 communities leased to SLS. In December 2011, SLS notified us that it will extend the leases on four of these communities for the first extension term, that Marriott will continue to guarantee these four communities in the extension term and that they will terminate the leases for the other 10 communities effective December 31, 2013.

        Brookdale Senior Living, Inc.    We lease 18 assisted living communities to a subsidiary of Brookdale Senior Living, Inc., or Brookdale, until 2017. At December 31, 2011, the annual rent for this lease was $8.6 million per year, including percentage rent of $1.6 million based on increases in gross revenues at these communities. Residents pay a large majority of the revenues at these communities from their private resources. Brookdale guarantees this rent to us.

        ABE Briarwood Corp.    We lease one skilled nursing facility in Canonsburg, PA to a subsidiary of ABE Briarwood Corp., a privately owned company, for $937,000 of annual rent until December 31, 2015. Our property is sub-leased to THI of Pennsylvania at Greenery of Canonsburg, LLC, a subsidiary of another private company, THI of Baltimore, Inc. Our lease is guaranteed by ABE Briarwood Corp., IHS Long Term Care, Inc. and THI of Baltimore, Inc., and is secured by a security deposit of $600,000.

58


Table of Contents

        HealthQuest, Inc.    We lease two skilled nursing facilities and one independent living community located in Huron and Sioux Falls, SD to HealthQuest, Inc., a privately owned company, until 2021. The lease is guaranteed by the individual shareholder of HealthQuest, Inc. The rent payable to us is approximately $1.3 million per year and will increase at agreed times during the lease term.

        Covenant Care, LLC.    We lease one skilled nursing facility in Fresno, CA to a subsidiary of Covenant Care, LLC, a privately owned company, for $1.2 million of annual rent until 2015. The rent is scheduled to increase at agreed times during the lease term. Covenant Care, LLC guarantees the lease and has secured its obligation with a security deposit of $900,000.

        Evergreen Washington Healthcare, LLC.    We lease one skilled nursing facility in Seattle, WA to a subsidiary of Evergreen Washington Healthcare, LLC, a privately owned company, until 2015. The rent payable to us averages $930,000 per year during the lease term and will increase at agreed times during the lease term. Evergreen Washington Healthcare, LLC guarantees this lease and its lease obligations are secured by a security deposit of $385,000.

        The MacIntosh Company.    We lease one skilled nursing facility in Grove City, OH to The MacIntosh Company for $599,000 per year until 2019. A management company affiliate of this tenant and the former and current majority shareholders of the tenant guarantee this lease.

        We also lease 22 senior living communities with 3,187 living units that we have acquired since June 2011 to our TRSs. These 22 communities are all managed by Five Star under long term contracts. These communities had an undepreciated carrying value of $558.6 million and a net book value of $556.0 million at December 31, 2011. We derive our revenues at these Managed Communities primarily from services to residents and we record revenues when services are provided. Our share of the net operating results of our Managed Communities in excess of the minimum returns due to us, or additional returns, are generally determined annually. We recognize additional returns due to us under our management agreements at year end when all contingencies are met and the income is earned. We had no additional returns in 2011. Under the Management Contracts for the Managed Communities, Five Star will be paid a management fee equal to 3% of the Gross Revenues, as defined in the Management Contracts, realized at the Managed Communities, plus an incentive fee equal to 35% of the Net Operating Income, as defined in the Management Contracts, after payment to us of an agreed upon minimum return equal to 8% of Invested Capital, as defined in the Management Contracts. The Management Contracts have an initial term of 20 years, and Five Star has options of two consecutive renewal terms of 15 years each to extend all, but not less than all, of the Management Contracts. All of our Management Contracts with Five Star have been made subject to a pooling agreement we entered with Five Star in connection with the communities we agreed to acquire in March 2011 referred to above, except for a community Five Star manages for our account that only includes independent living apartments. Communities with only independent living apartments will be subject to a separate pooling agreement. Under the pooling agreement currently in effect, determinations of fees and expenses of the various communities that are subject to the applicable pooled Management Contracts are aggregated, including determination of our return of our invested capital and Five Star's incentive fees. Under the pooling agreements, Five Star has a limited right to require underperforming facilities subject to the Management Contracts to be sold, and after December 31, 2017, we have the right under the pooling agreements to terminate all, but not less than all, the Management Contracts if we do not receive our minimum return in each of three consecutive years, subject to certain cure rights. We may also terminate the Management Contracts after January 15, 2015 in our discretion, upon payment of a specified termination fee and either party may terminate the Management Contracts upon the occurrence of certain change of control events.

59


Table of Contents

Properties Leased to Medical Providers or Medical Related Businesses, Clinics and Biotech Laboratory Tenants (MOBs).

        At December 31, 2011, we owned 108 multi-tenant MOBs located in 22 states and Washington, D.C. These properties range in size from 1,700 to 256,000 square feet and have a total of 7.6 million square feet. These leases have current terms expiring between 2012 and 2034, plus renewal options in some cases. The annual rent payable to us by tenants of these 108 MOBs is $184.7 million per year, including some scheduled increases and reimbursements of certain operating and tax expenses and excluding lease value amortization.

        During the year ended December 31, 2011, we signed MOB lease renewals for 534,062 square feet and new leases for 41,047 square feet, at weighted average rental rates that were 3.3% below rents previously charged for the same space (excluding one lease renewal with 95,010 square feet that converted from a gross lease to a triple-net lease during 2011, the weighted average rental rates would have been 6.7% above rents previously charged for the same space). These leases have average rent of $22.48 per square foot (excluding the property that converted from a gross lease to a triple-net lease, the average rent would have been $24.28 per square foot). Average lease terms for leases signed during 2011 were 6.1 years. Commitments for tenant improvement and leasing costs for leases signed during 2011 totaled $6.1 million, or $10.66 per square foot on average (approximately $1.74 per square foot per year of the lease term).

        The following chart presents a summary of our MOB properties by state as of December 31, 2011 (dollars in thousands).

State
  Number of
Properties
  Sq. Ft.   Undepreciated
Carrying Value
of Properties
  Net Book
Value of
Properties
  Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
  % of Total
Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
 

Arizona

    2     222,771   $ 18,220   $ 18,013   $ 3,317     1.8%  

California

    9     820,779     387,181     375,576     43,573     23.7%  

Colorado

    1     14,695     3,843     3,696     737     0.4%  

Connecticut

    2     96,962     9,440     9,229     1,268     0.7%  

Florida

    7     204,789     35,737     34,798     3,771     2.0%  

Georgia

    3     184,899     32,659     31,730     3,766     2.0%  

Illinois

    3     262,836     39,347     38,871     6,436     3.5%  

Indiana

    1     94,238     6,036     6,025     2,474     1.3%  

Maryland

    1     41,796     7,044     6,661     753     0.4%  

Massachusetts

    19     849,412     143,226     135,814     20,100     11.0%  

Minnesota

    4     298,860     34,012     33,379     4,996     2.7%  

New Hampshire

    1     210,879     23,659     23,152     2,857     1.5%  

New Mexico

    6     615,584     43,480     42,635     8,573     4.6%  

New York

    6     597,174     102,468     97,557     17,318     9.4%  

Ohio

    2     232,016     5,566     5,492     967     0.5%  

Oklahoma

    4     210,348     28,338     26,791     2,814     1.5%  

Pennsylvania

    9     833,898     74,903     72,183     11,442     6.2%  

Rhode Island

    1     62,000     10,598     9,706     1,438     0.8%  

South Carolina

    3     218,693     15,542     15,302     3,658     2.0%  

Texas

    7     476,775     105,200     98,732     12,901     7.0%  

Virginia

    5     226,933     51,700     49,645     5,200     2.8%  

Washington, D.C

    2     210,565     62,716     60,270     9,447     5.1%  

Wisconsin

    10     643,499     169,000     160,136     16,896     9.1%  
                           

Totals

    108     7,630,401   $ 1,409,915   $ 1,355,393   $ 184,702     100.0%  
                           

(1)
Annualized rental income is rents pursuant to signed leases as of December 31, 2011, including expense reimbursements for certain net and modified gross leases and excluding lease value amortization.

60


Table of Contents

        The following chart presents a summary of our MOB tenants that represent 1% or more of total MOB annualized rental income as of December 31, 2011 (dollars in thousands).

Tenant
  Sq. Ft.
Leased
  % of Total MOB
Sq. Ft. Leased
  Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
  % of Total
MOB
Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
  Lease
Expiration
 

Aurora Health Care, Inc. 

    643,499     8.8%   $ 16,896     9.1%   2024  

The Scripps Research Institute

    164,091     2.2%     10,258     5.6%   2019  

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    111,282     1.5%     9,562     5.2%   2012 - 2017  

Reliant Medical Group, Inc. 

    381,283     5.2%     7,594     4.1%   2019  

Covidien PLC

    315,203     4.3%     5,721     3.1%   2017  

Abbott Laboratories

    197,976     2.7%     4,447     2.4%   2017  

Presbyterian Healthcare

    316,871     4.3%     4,315     2.3%   2014 - 2015  

Columbia/HCA/St. David's Health

    117,359     1.6%     4,311     2.3%   2015 - 2020  

Health Insurance Plan of GNY

    121,500     1.7%     4,076     2.2%   2015 & 2034  

Children's Hospital

    83,021     1.1%     3,655     2.0%   2028  

Boston Scientific Corporation

    169,668     2.3%     3,640     2.0%   2013  

WellPoint, Inc. 

    210,879     2.9%     2,857     1.5%   2014  

Oklahoma City Clinics

    210,348     2.9%     2,814     1.5%   2016  

Hematology-Oncology Association of NY

    65,853     0.9%     2,276     1.2%   2023  

Stryker Corporation

    122,092     1.7%     2,248     1.2%   2020  

Quest Diagnostics Incorporated

    125,959     1.7%     2,068     1.1%   2013 - 2016  

Boeing Company

    94,521     1.3%     1,953     1.1%   2012  

Emory Healthcare, Inc. 

    109,031     1.5%     1,937     1.0%   2017 - 2020  

WuXi PharmaTech (Cayman) Inc. 

    82,854     1.1%     1,896     1.0%   2019  

Winthrop University Hospital

    47,591     0.7%     1,834     1.0%   2015 - 2021  

All other MOB tenants

    3,629,541     49.6%     90,344     49.1%   2012 - 2034  
                       

Totals

    7,320,422     100.0%   $ 184,702     100.0%      
                       

(1)
Annualized rental income is rents pursuant to signed leases as of December 31, 2011, including expense reimbursements for certain net and modified gross leases and excluding lease value amortization.

61


Table of Contents

Wellness Centers (included in our "All Other Operations" segment).

        The following chart presents a summary of our wellness center leases as of December 31, 2011 (dollars in thousands). This summary should be read in conjunction with the more detailed description of our leases set forth below.

Tenant
  Number of
Properties
  Sq. Ft.   Undepreciated
Carrying Value
of Properties
  Net Book
Value of
Properties
  Annualized
Rental
Income(1)
  Lease
Expiration
  Renewal Options

Starmark Holdings, LLC (Wellbridge)(2)

    3     129,500   $ 32,438   $ 29,368   $ 3,015     2/28/23   3 for 10 years each.

Starmark Holdings, LLC (Wellbridge)(2)

    1     38,500     11,206     10,538     832     2/28/23   3 for 10 years each.

Starmark Holdings, LLC (Wellbridge)(2)

    2     186,000     36,364     33,702     3,139     11/30/23   3 for 10 years each.

Life Time Fitness, Inc.(3)

    4     458,000     100,009     92,734     10,550     8/31/28   6 for 5 years each.
                               

Totals

    10     812,000   $ 180,017   $ 166,342   $ 17,536          
                               

(1)
Annualized rental income is rents pursuant to signed leases as of December 31, 2011, excluding lease value amortization.

(2)
These properties are leased to subsidiaries of, and are guaranteed by, Starmark Holdings, LLC, or Starmark, under three separate leases.

(3)
These properties are leased to a subsidiary of, and are guaranteed by, Life Time Fitness, Inc, or Life Time Fitness.

        Starmark Holdings, LLC (Wellbridge).    We lease six wellness centers located in four states under three separate leases to subsidiaries of Starmark, a private company. Starmark is a subsidiary of Central Sports Co. LTD, a publicly owned company listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. These properties operate under the brand Wellbridge and the leases are guaranteed by Starmark. These leases have a current term expiring in 2023 and require aggregate annual rent of $7.0 million, plus consumer price index based increases.

        Life Time Fitness, Inc.    We lease four wellness centers located in four states under one lease agreement to a subsidiary of Life Time Fitness. This lease is guaranteed by Life Time Fitness. The lease has a current term expiring in 2028. The aggregate annual rent payable to us is $10.5 million per year during the lease term.

62


Table of Contents

        The following tables set forth information regarding our lease expirations as of December 31, 2011 (dollars in thousands):

 
   
   
   
   
   
  Cumulative
Percentage of
Annualized
Rental
Income
Expiring
 
 
  Annualized Rental Income(1)   Percent of
Total
Annualized
Rental Income
Expiring
 
Year
  Short and Long
Term Residential
Care Communities(2)
  MOBs   Wellness
Centers
  Total  

2012

  $   $ 17,363   $   $ 17,363     3.9%     3.9%  

2013

    32,859     15,395         48,254     10.8%     14.7%  

2014

        21,198         21,198     4.7%     19.4%  

2015

    3,034     17,100         20,134     4.5%     23.9%  

2016

    1,314     16,723         18,037     4.0%     27.9%  

2017

    32,742     19,914         52,656     11.7%     39.6%  

2018

        6,833         6,833     1.5%     41.1%  

2019

    599     26,965         27,564     6.1%     47.2%  

2020

        9,819         9,819     2.2%     49.4%  

2021 and thereafter

    175,991     33,392     17,536     226,919     50.6%     100.0%  
                             

Total

  $ 246,539   $ 184,702   $ 17,536   $ 448,777     100.0%        
                             

        Average remaining lease term for all properties (weighted by rent): 9.5 years

(1)
Annualized rental income is rents pursuant to signed leases as of December 31, 2011, including expense reimbursements for certain net and modified gross leases and excluding lease value amortization at certain of our MOBs and wellness centers.

(2)
Excludes rent received from our TRSs.

 
  Number of Tenants    
   
 
 
   
  Cumulative
Percentage
of Number
of Tenants
Expiring
 
Year
  Short and
Long Term
Residential
Care Communities(1)
  MOBs   Wellness
Centers
  Total   Percent of Total
Number of
Tenants
Expiring
 

2012

        132         132     24.1%     24.1%  

2013

    1     67         68     12.4%     36.5%  

2014

        82         82     15.0%     51.5%  

2015

    3     63         66     12.1%     63.6%  

2016

    1     62         63     11.5%     75.1%  

2017

    2     40         42     7.7%     82.8%  

2018

        24         24     4.4%     87.2%  

2019

    1     21         22     4.0%     91.2%  

2020

        17         17     3.1%     94.3%  

2021 and thereafter

    3     26     2     31     5.7%     100.0%  
                             

Total

    11     534     2     547     100.0%        
                             

(1)
Excludes our TRSs as tenants.

63


Table of Contents


Number of Living Units / Beds or Square Feet with Leases Expiring

 
  Living Units / Beds   Square Feet  
Year
  Short and
Long Term
Residential
Care
Communities
(Units / Beds)(1)
  Percent
of Total
Living
Units / Beds
Expiring
  Cumulative
Percentage
of Total
Living
Units / Beds
Expiring
  MOBs
(Square
Feet)
  Wellness
Centers
(Square
Feet)
  Total
Square
Feet
  Percent
of Total
Square
Feet
Expiring
  Cumulative
Percent of
Total
Square
Feet
Expiring
 

2012

        0.0%     0.0%     752,006         752,006     9.2%     9.2%  

2013

    4,091     15.2%     15.2%     547,044         547,044     6.7%     15.9%  

2014

        0.0%     15.2%     982,845         982,845     12.1%     28.0%  

2015

    423     1.6%     16.8%     758,663         758,663     9.3%     37.3%  

2016

    361     1.3%     18.1%     764,506         764,506     9.4%     46.7%  

2017

    3,508     13.1%     31.2%     829,917         829,917     10.2%     56.9%  

2018

        0.0%     31.2%     210,905         210,905     2.6%     59.5%  

2019

    175     0.7%     31.9%     888,623         888,623     11.0%     70.5%  

2020

        0.0%     31.9%     454,610         454,610     5.6%     76.1%  

2021 and thereafter

    18,297     68.1%     100.0%     1,131,303     812,000     1,943,303     23.9%     100.0%  
                                       

Total

    26,855     100.0%           7,320,422     812,000     8,132,422     100.0%        
                                       

(1)
Excludes 3,187 living units leased to our TRSs.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (dollars and square feet in thousands, unless otherwise noted)

        The following table summarizes the results of operations of each of our segments for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009.

 
  For the Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   2009  

Revenues:

                   

Short and long term residential care communities

  $ 270,503   $ 237,578   $ 226,247  

MOBs

    161,809     85,152     53,862  

All other operations

    17,705     17,383     17,290  
               

Total revenues

  $ 450,017   $ 340,113   $ 297,399  
               

Net income (loss):

                   

Short and long term residential care communities

  $ 154,190   $ 129,344   $ 140,441  

MOBs

    74,149     38,806     12,803  

All other operations

    (76,920 )   (51,665 )   (43,529 )
               

Net income

  $ 151,419   $ 116,485   $ 109,715  
               

        The following sections analyze and discuss the results of operations of each of our segments for the periods presented.

64


Table of Contents

Year Ended December 31, 2011 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2010:

Short and long term residential care communities:

 
  All Properties   Comparable Properties(1)  
 
  As of the Year Ended December 31,   As of the Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   2011   2010  

Total properties

    251     228     223     223  

# of units / beds

    30,042     26,744     26,176     26,176  

Occupancy:

                         

Leased communities(2)

    85.2%     86.2%     85.3%     86.2%  

TRS managed communities(3)

    84.2%              

Rent coverage(2)

    1.44x     1.40x     1.46x     1.40x  

Rental income(2)

  $ 242,652   $ 237,578   $ 237,515   $ 234,884  

Residents fees and services(3)

  $ 27,851   $   $   $  

(1)
Consists of short and long term residential care communities we have owned continuously since January 1, 2010.

(2)
Excludes rents from our Managed Communities. All tenant operating data presented are based upon the operating results provided by our tenants for the 12 months ended September 30, 2011 and 2010, or the most recent prior period for which tenant operating results are available to us. Rent coverage is calculated as operating cash flow from our triple-net tenants' operations of our properties, before subordinated charges, divided by triple-net minimum rents payable to us. We have not independently verified our tenants' operating data. The table excludes data for periods prior to our ownership of some of these properties.

(3)
Represents the average occupancy for our 22 Managed Communities from the date of acquisitions through December 31, 2011 and our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Short and long term residential care communities, all properties:

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 242,652   $ 237,578   $ 5,074     2.1%  

Residents fees and services(1)

    27,851         27,851     —    

Property operating expenses(1)

    (21,639 )       (21,639 )   —    
                   

Net operating income (NOI)

    248,864     237,578     11,286     4.8%  

Depreciation expense

    (71,020 )   (66,172 )   (4,848 )   (7.3)%  

Impairment of assets

    (1,028 )   (1,095 )   67     6.1%  
                   

Operating income

    176,816     170,311     6,505     3.8%  

Interest expense

    (43,862 )   (41,076 )   (2,786 )   (6.8)%  

Gain on sale of properties

    21,236     109     21,127     19,382.6%  
                   

Net income

  $ 154,190   $ 129,344   $ 24,846     19.2%  
                   

(1)
Includes data for our Managed Communities.

65


Table of Contents

        Rental income.    Rental income increased because of rents from the purchase of approximately $65.2 million of improvements made to our properties which are leased by Five Star since January 1, 2010 and the acquisition of five communities during the second quarter of 2011 and one community during the third quarter of 2011 which are leased by Five Star, offset by a reduction in rental income resulting from the sale of five properties during the second quarter of 2011 and four properties in August 2010. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments (reductions) totaling $2.0 million and $(1.0) million for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Rental income increased year over year on a comparable basis related to improvement purchases at certain of the 223 communities we have owned continuously since January 1, 2010.

        Residents fees and services.    Residents fees and services are the revenues earned on our 22 senior living communities which we acquired since June 2011 that are leased to our TRSs. We recognize these revenues as services are provided. Lease agreements with residents generally have a term of one year and are cancelable by the residents with 30 days' notice.

        Property operating expenses.    Property operating expenses include expenses incurred on our 22 senior living communities that are leased to our TRSs.

        Net operating income.    NOI increased because of the changes in rental income, residents fees and services and property operating expenses described above. The reconciliation of NOI to net income for our short and long term residential care communities segment is shown in the table above. Our definition of NOI and our consolidated reconciliation of NOI to net income is included below in "Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense increased as a result of our purchase of approximately $65.2 million of improvements made to our properties which are leased by Five Star since January 1, 2010 and the acquisition of 28 communities acquired since January 1, 2010, offset by the sale of five properties during the second quarter of 2011 and four properties in August 2010.

        Impairment of assets.    During the year ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $1.0 million and $1.1 million, respectively related to one property to reduce the carrying value of this property to its estimated sale price less costs to sell.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our short and long term residential care communities arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The increase in interest expense is the result of the assumption of $204.0 million of mortgage debt in connection with certain of our 2011 acquisitions occurring in the second, third and fourth quarter, offset by the amortization of our mortgage debt and the reduction in a variable rate of interest applicable to one mortgage debt.

66


Table of Contents

        Gain on sale of properties.    Gain on sale of properties is a result of the sale of five senior living communities during the second quarter of 2011 and the sale of four senior living communities during the third quarter of 2010.

MOBs:

 
  All Properties   Comparable Properties(1)  
 
  As of the Year Ended December 31,   As of the Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   2011   2010  

Total properties

    108     82     54     54  

Total square feet(2)

    7,630     5,163     2,852     2,852  

Occupancy(3)

    95.9%     97.0%     98.6%     98.8%  

Rental income

  $ 161,809   $ 85,152   $ 79,435   $ 78,900  

Property operating expenses

  $ 47,328   $ 20,169   $ 18,204   $ 18,234  

(1)
Consists of MOBs we have owned continuously since January 1, 2010.

(2)
Prior periods exclude space remeasurements made during the current period.

(3)
MOB occupancy includes (i) space being fitted out for occupancy pursuant to signed leases and (ii) space which is leased, but is not occupied or is being offered for sublease by tenants.

MOBs, all properties:

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 161,809   $ 85,152   $ 76,657     90.0%  

Property operating expenses

    (47,328 )   (20,169 )   (27,159 )   (134.7)%  
                   

Net operating income (NOI)

    114,481     64,983     49,498     76.2%  

Depreciation expense

    (38,453 )   (20,445 )   (18,008 )   (88.1)%  

Impairment of assets

    (962 )   (4,870 )   3,908     80.2%  
                   

Operating income

    75,066     39,668     35,398     89.2%  

Interest expense

    (996 )   (862 )   (134 )   (15.5)%  

Gain on sale of properties

    79         79      
                   

Net income

  $ 74,149   $ 38,806   $ 35,343     91.1%  
                   

        Rental income.    Rental income increased because of rents from 54 MOBs we acquired since January 1, 2010, offset by the sale of two MOBs during the second quarter of 2011. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $8.0 million and $5.6 million and amortization of $(128,046) and $(1.1) million of acquired real estate leases and obligations for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

        Property operating expenses.    Property operating expenses increased because of our MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2010, offset by the sale of two MOBs during the second quarter of 2011.

        Net operating income.    NOI increased because of the changes in rental income and property operating expenses described above. The reconciliation of NOI to net income for our MOB segment is shown in the table above. Our definition of NOI and our consolidated reconciliation of NOI to net income is included below in "Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

67


Table of Contents

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense increased because of our MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2010, offset by the sale of two MOBs during the second quarter of 2011.

        Impairment of assets.    During the year ended December 31, 2011, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $1.0 million related to three properties to reduce the carrying value of these properties to their estimated sales prices less costs to sell. During the year ended December 31, 2010, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $4.9 million related to two properties to reduce the carrying value of these properties to their estimated sales prices less costs to sell.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our MOBs arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The change in interest expense is the result of the assumption of $13.3 million of mortgage debt in connection with the acquisition of one MOB in July 2011 and one MOB in November 2011, offset by the amortization of our mortgage debt.

        Gain on sale of properties.    Gain on sale of properties is a result of the sale of two MOBs during the second quarter of 2011.

MOBs, comparable properties (MOBs we have owned continuously since January 1, 2010):

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 79,435   $ 78,900   $ 535     0.7%  

Property operating expenses

    (18,204 )   (18,234 )   30     0.1%  
                   

Net operating income (NOI)

    61,231     60,666     565     0.9%  

Depreciation expense

    (19,558 )   (19,440 )   (118 )   (0.6)%  
                   

Operating income

    41,673     41,226     447     1.1%  

Interest expense

    (662 )   (731 )   69     9.4%  
                   

Net income

  $ 41,011   $ 40,495   $ 516     1.3%  
                   

        Rental income.    Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $4.6 million and $5.3 million and amortization of $(1.0) million and $(1.2) million of acquired real estate leases and obligations for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

        Property operating expenses.    Property operating expenses decreased slightly due to better control of expenses.

        Net operating income.    NOI increased because of the changes in rental income and property operating expenses described above. The reconciliation of NOI to net income for our MOB segment for comparable properties is shown in the table above. Our definition of NOI and our consolidated reconciliation of NOI to net income is included below in "Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense increased primarily because of the amortization of leasing costs offset by a reduction in amortization of above and below market lease adjustments that we amortize over the respective lease terms.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our MOBs arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The change in interest expense is the result of the amortization of our mortgage debt.

68


Table of Contents


All other operations:(1)

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 17,705   $ 17,383   $ 322     1.9%  

Expenses:

                         

Depreciation

    3,792     3,792         —    

General and administrative

    26,041     21,677     4,364     20.1%  

Acquisition related costs

    12,239     3,610     8,629     239.0%  
                   

Total expenses

    42,072     29,079     12,993     44.7%  
                   

Operating loss

    (24,367 )   (11,696 )   (12,671 )   (108.3)%  

Interest and other income

    1,451     844     607     71.9%  

Interest expense

    (53,404 )   (38,079 )   (15,325 )   (40.2)%  

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (427 )   (2,433 )   2,006     82.4%  

Equity in earnings (losses) of an investee

    139     (1 )   140     14,000.0%  
                   

Loss before income tax expense

    (76,608 )   (51,365 )   (25,243 )   (49.1)%  

Income tax expense

    (312 )   (300 )   (12 )   (4.0)%  
                   

Net loss

  $ (76,920 ) $ (51,665 ) $ (25,255 )   (48.9)%  
                   

(1)
All other operations includes our wellness center operations that we do not consider a significant, separately reportable segment of our business and corporate business activities, and our operating expenses that are not attributable to a reportable specific segment.

        Rental income.    Rental income for our wellness centers increased because of consumer price index based increases since January 1, 2010 at certain of our wellness centers. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $1.5 million and amortization of $220,746 of acquired real estate leases and obligations in both the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

        Total expenses.    Depreciation expense remained consistent as there were no wellness center acquisitions nor capital improvement funding for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010. General and administrative expenses increased principally as a result of senior living community and MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2010, offset by the sale of seven properties during the second quarter of 2011 and four properties in August 2010. Acquisition related costs increased because of a higher number and value of acquisitions during the year ended December 31, 2011 than the prior year.

        Interest and other income.    The increase in interest and other income is mainly due to $593,000 of interest received from our Bridge Loan, as defined below, with Five Star. Interest and other income also includes interest on our investable cash and dividend income related to the 250,000 common shares of CWH that we own.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense increased because of our issuance of $200.0 million of unsecured senior notes with an interest rate of 6.75% in April 2010, our issuance of $250.0 million of unsecured senior notes with an interest rate of 4.30% in January 2011, our issuance of $300.0 million of unsecured senior notes with an interest rate of 6.75% in December 2011 and greater amounts outstanding under our revolving credit facility at higher weighted average interest rates, offset by reduced interest because of the redemption in May 2010 of all $97.5 million of our 7.875% unsecured senior notes due 2015. Our weighted average balance outstanding and interest rate under our revolving credit facility was $40.5 million and 1.7%, and $39.5 million and 1.1%, for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

69


Table of Contents

        Loss on early extinguishment of debt.    In June 2011, we entered into a new $750.0 million unsecured revolving credit facility. The new facility replaced our previous $550.0 million unsecured revolving credit facility which had a maturity date of December 31, 2011. As a result of this refinancing, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $427,000 consisting of the write off of unamortized deferred financing fees. In May 2010, we redeemed all $97.5 million of our outstanding 7.875% senior notes due 2015; as a result of this redemption, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $2.4 million consisting of the debt prepayment premium of approximately $1.3 million and the write off of unamortized deferred financing fees of approximately $1.1 million.

Year Ended December 31, 2010 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2009:

Short and long term residential care communities:

 
  All Properties   Comparable Properties(1)  
 
  As of the Year Ended
December 31,
  As of the Year Ended
December 31,
 
 
  2010   2009   2010   2009  

Total properties

    228     232     217     217  

# of units / beds

    26,744     26,937     25,874     25,874  

Occupancy(2)

    86.2%     86.7%     86.2%     86.9%  

Rent coverage(2)

    1.40x     1.40x     1.41x     1.40x  

Rental income(2)

  $ 237,578   $ 226,247   $ 216,678   $ 215,288  

(1)
Consists of short and long term residential care communities we have owned continuously since January 1, 2009.

(2)
Excludes rents from our Managed Communities. All tenant operating data presented are based upon the operating results provided by our tenants for the 12 months ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, or the most recent prior period for which tenant operating results are available to us. Rent coverage is calculated as operating cash flow from our triple-net tenants' operations of our properties, before subordinated charges, divided by triple-net minimum rents payable to us. We have not independently verified our tenants' operating data. The table excludes data for periods prior to our ownership of some of these properties.

Short and long term residential care communities, all properties:

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2010   2009   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 237,578   $ 226,247   $ 11,331     5.0%  

Depreciation expense

   
(66,172

)
 
(61,122

)
 
(5,050

)
 
(8.3)%
 

Impairment of assets

    (1,095 )   (3,784 )   2,689     71.1%  
                   

Operating income

    170,311     161,341     8,970     5.6%  

Interest expense

   
(41,076

)
 
(21,297

)
 
(19,779

)
 
(92.9)%
 

Gain on sale of properties

    109     397     (288 )   (72.5)%  
                   

Net income

  $ 129,344   $ 140,441   $ (11,097 )   (7.9)%  
                   

        Rental income.    Rental income increased because of rents from the purchase of approximately $68.6 million of improvements made to our properties which are leased by Five Star since January 1, 2009 and the acquisition of 11 communities during the fourth quarter of 2009 which are leased by Five Star, offset by a reduction in rental income resulting from the sale of four properties in August 2010

70


Table of Contents

and two properties in the fourth quarter of 2009. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent reductions totaling $1.0 million and $832,845 for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Rental income increased year over year on a comparable basis related to improvement purchases at certain of the 217 communities we have owned continuously since January 1, 2009.

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense increased as a result of our purchase of approximately $68.6 million of improvements made to our properties which are leased by Five Star since January 1, 2009 and the acquisition of 11 communities acquired since January 1, 2009, offset by the sale of four properties in August 2010 and two properties in the fourth quarter of 2009.

        Impairment of assets.    During the year ended December 31, 2010, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $1.1 million related to one property to reduce the carrying value of this property to its estimated sale price less costs to sell. During the year ended December 31, 2009, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $3.8 million related to seven properties to reduce the carrying value of these properties to their estimated sales prices less costs to sell.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our short and long term residential care communities arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The increase in interest expense is due to interest on our $512.9 million FNMA mortgage financing entered in August 2009 and the amortization of $13.6 million of deferred financing fees incurred in connection with this mortgage financing.

        Gain on sale of properties.    Gain on sale of properties is a result of the sale of four senior living communities during the third quarter of 2010 and the sale of two senior living communities during the fourth quarter of 2009.

MOBs:

 
  All Properties   Comparable Properties(1)  
 
  As of the Year Ended
December 31,
  As of the Year Ended
December 31,
 
 
  2010   2009   2010   2009  

Total properties

    82     56     36     36  

Total square feet(2)

    5,163     2,868     1,604     1,604  

Occupancy(3)

    97.0%     96.4%     98.4%     94.9%  

Rental income

  $ 85,152   $ 53,862   $ 40,752   $ 39,043  

Property operating expenses

  $ 20,169   $ 14,901   $ 12,603   $ 12,003  

(1)
Consists of MOBs we have owned continuously since January 1, 2009.

(2)
Prior periods exclude space remeasurements made during the current period.

(3)
MOB occupancy includes (i) space being fitted out for occupancy pursuant to signed leases and (ii) space which is leased, but is not occupied or is being offered for sublease by tenants.

71


Table of Contents

MOBs, all properties:

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2010   2009   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 85,152   $ 53,862   $ 31,290     58.1%  

Property operating expenses

    (20,169 )   (14,901 )   (5,268 )   (35.4)%  
                   

Net operating income (NOI)

    64,983     38,961     26,022     66.8%  

Depreciation expense

   
(20,445

)
 
(13,669

)
 
(6,776

)
 
(49.6)%
 

Impairment of assets

    (4,870 )   (11,746 )   6,876     58.5%  
                   

Operating income

    39,668     13,546     26,122     192.8%  

Interest expense

   
(862

)
 
(743

)
 
(119

)
 
(16.0)%
 
                   

Net income

  $ 38,806   $ 12,803   $ 26,003     203.1%  
                   

        Rental income.    Rental income increased because of rents from 46 MOBs we acquired since January 1, 2009, offset by the sale of two MOBs during 2009. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $5.6 million and $4.0 million and amortization of $(1.1) million and $(1.2) million of acquired real estate leases and obligations for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

        Property operating expenses.    Property operating expenses increased because of our MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2009, offset by the sale of two MOBs during 2009.

        Net operating income.    NOI increased because of the changes in rental income and property operating expenses described above. The reconciliation of NOI to net income for our MOB segment is shown in the table above. Our definition of NOI and our consolidated reconciliation of NOI to net income is included below in "Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense increased because of our MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2009, offset by the sale of two MOBs during 2009.

        Impairment of assets.    During the year ended December 31, 2010, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of $4.9 million related to two properties to reduce the carrying value of these properties to their estimated sales prices less costs to sell. During the year ended December 31, 2009, we recorded an impairment of assets charge of approximately $11.7 million related to four properties to reduce the carrying value of these properties to their estimated sales prices less costs to sell.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our MOBs arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The change in interest expense is the result of the assumption of $2.5 million of mortgage debt in connection with the acquisition of one MOB in April 2010, offset by the amortization of our mortgage debt.

72


Table of Contents


MOBs, comparable properties (MOBs we have owned continuously since January 1, 2009):

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2010   2009   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 40,752   $ 39,043   $ 1,709     4.4%  

Property operating expenses

    (12,603 )   (12,003 )   (600 )   (5.0)%  
                   

Net operating income (NOI)

    28,149     27,040     1,109     4.1%  

Depreciation expense

   
(9,705

)
 
(9,927

)
 
222
   
2.2%
 
                   

Operating income

    18,444     17,113     1,331     7.8%  

Interest expense

   
(731

)
 
(743

)
 
12
   
1.6%
 
                   

Net income

  $ 17,713   $ 16,370   $ 1,343     8.2%  
                   

        Rental income.    Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $1.8 million and $2.7 million and amortization of $(773,564) and $(877,688) of acquired real estate leases and obligations for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

        Property operating expenses.    The 5.0% increase in property operating expenses at the properties we have owned continuously since January 1, 2009 was mainly due to increases in real estate taxes .

        Net operating income.    NOI increased because of the changes in rental income and property operating expenses described above. The reconciliation of NOI to net income for our MOB segment for comparable properties is shown in the table above. Our definition of NOI and our consolidated reconciliation of NOI to net income is included below in "Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

        Depreciation expense.    Depreciation expense decreased primarily because of reductions in the amortization of leasing costs and amortization of above and below market lease adjustments that we amortize over the respective lease terms.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense for our MOBs arises from mortgage debts secured by certain of these properties. The change in interest expense is the result of the amortization of our mortgage debt.

73


Table of Contents


All other operations:(1)

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2010   2009   Change   % Change  

Rental income

  $ 17,383   $ 17,290   $ 93     0.5%  

Expenses:

                         

Depreciation

    3,792     3,792          

General and administrative

    21,677     19,825     1,852     9.3%  

Acquisition related costs

    3,610     3,327     283     8.5%  
                   

Total expenses

    29,079     26,944     2,135     7.9%  
                   

Operating loss

    (11,696 )   (9,654 )   (2,042 )   (21.2)%  

Interest and other income

   
844
   
935
   
(91

)
 
(9.7)%
 

Interest expense

    (38,079 )   (34,364 )   (3,715 )   (10.8)%  

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (2,433 )       (2,433 )    

Equity in losses of an investee

    (1 )   (134 )   133     99.3%  
                   

Loss before income tax expense

    (51,365 )   (43,217 )   (8,148 )   (18.9)%  

Income tax expense

    (300 )   (312 )   12     3.8%  
                   

Net loss

  $ (51,665 ) $ (43,529 ) $ (8,136 )   (15.7)%  
                   

(1)
All other operations includes our wellness center operations that we do not consider a significant, separately reportable segment of our business and corporate business activities, and our operating expenses that are not attributable to a reportable specific segment.

        Rental income.    Rental income for our wellness centers increased because of consumer price index based increases since January 1, 2009 at certain of our wellness centers. Rental income includes non-cash straight line rent adjustments totaling $1.5 and amortization of $220,746 of acquired real estate leases and obligations in both the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009.

        Total expenses.    Depreciation expense remained consistent as there were no wellness center acquisitions nor capital improvement funding for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009. General and administrative expenses increased principally as a result of senior living community and MOB acquisitions since January 1, 2009, offset by the sale of four properties in August 2010 and four properties in 2009. The increase in acquisition related costs was a function of higher volume of acquisitions in 2010.

        Interest and other income.    Interest and other income decreased primarily as a result of lesser amounts of investable cash and lower yields realized on our investments. Interest and other income also includes dividend income related to the 250,000 common shares of CWH that we own.

        Interest expense.    Interest expense increased because of the sale of $200.0 million of unsecured senior notes with an interest rate of 6.75% in April 2010 offset by reduced interest because of the redemption of all $97.5 million of our 7.875% unsecured senior notes due 2015 in May 2010 and lesser amounts outstanding under our revolving credit facility at lower interest rates. Our weighted average balance outstanding and interest rate under our revolving credit facility was $39.5 million and 1.1%, and $134.5 million and 1.3%, for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

        Loss on early extinguishment of debt.    In May 2010, we redeemed all $97.5 million of our outstanding 7.875% senior notes due 2015. As a result of this redemption, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $2.4 million consisting of the debt prepayment premium of approximately $1.3 million and the write off of unamortized deferred financing fees of approximately $1.1 million.

74


Table of Contents

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

        We provide below calculations of our FFO, Normalized FFO and NOI for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009. We believe that this data may facilitate an understanding of our consolidated historical operating results. These measures should be considered in conjunction with net income and cash flow from operating activities as presented in our consolidated statements of income and consolidated statements of cash flows. These measures do not represent cash generated by operating activities in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, and should not be considered as alternatives to net income or cash flow from operating activities determined in accordance with GAAP, as indicators of our financial performance or liquidity, nor are these measures necessarily indicative of sufficient cash flow to fund all of our needs. Other REITs and real estate companies may calculate FFO, Normalized FFO or NOI differently than we do.

Funds From Operations and Normalized Funds From Operations

        We calculate FFO and Normalized FFO as shown below. FFO is calculated on the basis defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, or NAREIT, which is net income, calculated in accordance with GAAP, excluding gain or loss on sale of properties and impairment of assets, plus real estate depreciation and amortization. Our calculation of Normalized FFO differs from the NAREIT definition of FFO because we include percentage rent and exclude loss on early extinguishment of debt and acquisition related costs. We consider FFO and Normalized FFO to be appropriate measures of performance for a REIT, along with net income and cash flow from operating, investing and financing activities. We believe that FFO and Normalized FFO provides useful information to investors because by excluding the effects of certain historical amounts, such as depreciation expense, FFO and Normalized FFO can facilitate a comparison of operating performances between periods. FFO and Normalized FFO are among the factors considered by our Board of Trustees when determining the amount of distributions to shareholders. Other factors include, but are not limited to, requirements to maintain our status as a REIT, limitations in our revolving credit facility and public debt covenants, the availability of equity and debt capital to us and our expectation of our future capital requirements and operating performance.

        Our calculations of FFO and Normalized FFO for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 and reconciliations of FFO and Normalized FFO to net income, the most directly comparable

75


Table of Contents

financial measure under GAAP reported in our consolidated financial statements, appear in the following table.

 
  For the Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2011   2010   2009  

Net income

  $ 151,419   $ 116,485   $ 109,715  

Depreciation expense

    113,265     90,409     78,583  

Impairment of assets

    1,990     5,965     15,530  

Gain on sale of properties

    (21,315 )   (109 )   (397 )
               

FFO

    245,359     212,750     203,431  

Acquisition related costs

    12,239     3,610     3,327  

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    427     2,433      
               

Normalized FFO

  $ 258,025   $ 218,793   $ 206,758  
               

Weighted average shares outstanding

   
149,577
   
128,092
   
121,863
 
               

FFO per share

 
$

1.64
 
$

1.66
 
$

1.67
 
               

Normalized FFO per share

  $ 1.73   $ 1.71   $ 1.70  
               

Net income per share

  $ 1.01   $ 0.91   $ 0.90  
               

Distributions declared per share

  $ 1.50   $ 1.46   $ 1.43  
               

Property Net Operating Income (NOI)

        We calculate NOI as shown below. We define NOI as income from real estate less our property operating expenses. We consider NOI to be appropriate supplemental information to net income because it helps both investors and management to understand the operations of our properties. We use NOI internally to evaluate individual and company wide property level performance and believe NOI provides useful information to investors regarding our results of operations because it reflects only those income and expense items that are incurred at the property level and may facilitate comparisons of our operating performance between periods. The calculation of NOI excludes depreciation and amortization, acquisition related costs, and general and administrative expenses from the calculation of net income in order to provide results that are more closely related to our properties' results of operations.

        The calculation of NOI by reportable segment is included above in this Item 7. The following table includes the reconciliation of NOI to net income, the most directly comparable financial measure under

76


Table of Contents

GAAP reported in our consolidated financial statements, for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009.

 
  For the Year Ended December 31,  
Reconciliation of NOI to Net Income:
  2011   2010   2009  

Short and long term residential care communities NOI

  $ 248,864   $ 237,578   $ 226,247  

MOB NOI

    114,481     64,983     38,961  

All other operations NOI

    17,705     17,383     17,290  
               

Total NOI

    381,050     319,944     282,498  

Depreciation

    (113,265 )   (90,409 )   (78,583 )

General and administrative

    (26,041 )   (21,677 )   (19,825 )

Acquisition related costs

    (12,239 )   (3,610 )   (3,327 )

Impairment of assets

    (1,990 )   (5,965 )   (15,530 )
               

Operating income

    227,515     198,283     165,233  

Interest and other income

   
1,451
   
844
   
935
 

Interest expense

    (98,262 )   (80,017 )   (56,404 )

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

    (427 )   (2,433 )    

Gain on sale of properties

    21,315     109     397  

Equity in earnings (losses) of an investee

    139     (1 )   (134 )
               

Income before income tax expense

    151,731     116,785     110,027  

Income tax expense

    (312 )   (300 )   (312 )
               

Net income

  $ 151,419   $ 116,485   $ 109,715  
               

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

        Rental income revenues and residents fees and services revenues from our leased and managed properties is our principal source of funds to pay operating expenses, debt service and distributions to shareholders. We believe that our operating cash flow will be sufficient to meet our operating expenses and debt service and pay distributions on our shares for the next 12 months and for the foreseeable future thereafter. Our future cash flows from operating activities will depend primarily upon our ability to:

    maintain or improve the occupancy of, and the current rental rates at, our properties;

    control operating cost increases at our MOB properties and our managed senior living communities; and

    purchase additional properties which produce cash flows in excess of our cost of acquisition capital and property operating expenses.

Our Operating Liquidity and Resources

        We generally receive minimum rents monthly or quarterly from our tenants, we receive percentage rents from our residential community tenants monthly, quarterly or annually and we receive residents fees and services revenues from our Managed Communities monthly. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, we generated $255.6 million, $215.3 million and $209.4 million, respectively, of cash from operations. The increase in our cash from operations over the prior year is primarily attributable to increases in net income, excluding non-cash items. Net income increased primarily as a result of our property acquisitions, as further described below.

77


Table of Contents


Our Investment and Financing Liquidity and Resources

        At December 31, 2011, we had $23.6 million of cash and cash equivalents and $750.0 million available under our unsecured revolving credit facility. We expect to use cash balances, borrowings under our revolving credit facility and net proceeds of offerings of equity or debt securities to fund future working capital requirements, property acquisitions and expenditures related to the repair, maintenance or renovation of our properties.

        In order to fund acquisitions and to accommodate cash needs that may result from timing differences between our receipts of rents and our need or desire to pay operating expenses and distributions to our shareholders, we maintain a $750.0 million revolving credit facility with a group of institutional lenders. This facility replaced our previous $550.0 million revolving credit facility which had a maturity date of December 31, 2011. The maturity date of the new facility is June 24, 2015 and includes an option, subject to certain conditions and the payment of a fee, for us to extend the facility for one year as well as includes a feature under which maximum borrowings may be increased up to $1.5 billion in certain circumstances. Borrowings under our revolving credit facility are unsecured. We may borrow, repay and reborrow funds until maturity, and no principal repayment is due until maturity. We pay interest on borrowings under the revolving credit facility at LIBOR plus a spread. At December 31, 2011, the weighted average interest rate payable on our revolving credit facility was 1.9%. As of December 31, 2011 and February 17, 2012, we had no amounts and $276.0 million outstanding, respectively, outstanding under our revolving credit facility.

        When significant amounts are outstanding under our revolving credit facility or as the maturity dates of our revolving credit facility and term debts approach, we will explore alternatives for the repayment of amounts due. Such alternatives may include incurring additional debt and issuing new equity securities. We have an effective shelf registration statement that allows us to issue public securities on an expedited basis, but it does not assure that there will be buyers for such securities.

        During the year ended December 31, 2011, we acquired 56 properties located in 19 states for combined purchase prices totaling $991.6 million, excluding closing costs. Our weighted average capitalization rate for these acquisitions was 8.1% based on estimated annual NOI. Capitalization rate is the ratio of the estimated GAAP revenues less property operating expenses, if any, to the purchase price on the date of acquisition. Details of these acquisitions are as follows:

        In November 2010, we entered into a series of agreements to acquire 27 MOBs located in 12 states from CWH for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $470.0 million, excluding closing costs. During November and December 2010, we acquired 21 of these properties containing 2.1 million square feet for approximately $374.1 million, excluding closing costs. In January 2011, we acquired the remaining six properties containing 737,000 square feet for approximately $95.9 million, excluding closing costs. We funded these acquisitions using cash on hand, proceeds from equity and debt issuances and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        In January 2011, we acquired one MOB with 84,474 square feet located in Mendota Heights, Minnesota for approximately $14.2 million, excluding closing costs. Upon acquisition, this property was 100% leased to WuXi AppTec, a medical biotech research company, for 8.2 years. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and proceeds from a debt offering.

        In May 2011, we acquired one MOB with 49,809 square feet located in Shoreview, Minnesota for approximately $7.2 million, excluding closing costs. Upon acquisition, this property was 100% leased to four tenants for weighted (by rents) average lease terms of 7.7 years. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        In June 2011, we acquired three MOBs with 125,990 square feet located in Alachua, Florida for approximately $14.5 million, excluding closing costs. In July 2011, we acquired one additional MOB located in Alachua, Florida, with 32,476 square feet for approximately $5.2 million, excluding closing

78


Table of Contents

costs. Upon acquisition, these properties were 87% leased to 14 tenants for weighted (by rents) average lease terms of 2.8 years. In August 2011, we acquired 47 acres of land adjacent to these four MOBs for future development for $4.0 million, excluding closing costs. We funded these acquisitions with cash on hand, borrowings under our revolving credit facility and by assuming a mortgage loan for approximately $3.7 million in July 2011.

        In September 2011, we acquired 13 MOBs located in eight states with 1.3 million square feet from CWH for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $167.0 million, excluding closing costs. Upon acquisition, these properties were 95% leased to 105 tenants for weighted (by rents) average lease terms of 5.0 years. We funded these acquisitions using cash on hand and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        In November 2011, we acquired two MOBs with 45,645 square feet located in Richmond, Virginia for approximately $11.4 million, excluding closing costs. Upon acquisition, these properties were 100% leased to three tenants for weighted (by rents) average lease terms of 6.5 years. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and by assuming a mortgage loan for approximately $9.6 million.

        In December 2011, we acquired one MOB with 94,238 square feet located in Greenwood, Indiana for approximately $21.0 million, excluding closing costs. Upon acquisition, this property was 94.8% leased to eight tenants for weighted (by rents) average lease terms of 9.8 years. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        In March 2011, we agreed to acquire 20 senior living communities located in five states in the southeastern United States with an aggregate 2,111 living units (814 independent living units, 939 assisted living units, 311 Alzheimer's care units and 47 skilled nursing beds) for approximately $304.0 million, excluding closing costs. Substantially all the residents at these communities pay for services with private resources. In June 2011, we acquired 14 of these 20 communities for approximately $196.6 million, excluding closing costs; in July 2011, we acquired three of these communities for approximately $44.7 million, excluding closing costs; and in August 2011 we acquired one of these communities for approximately $17.2 million, excluding closing costs. We funded these acquisitions using cash on hand, proceeds from an equity offering, borrowings under our revolving credit facility and by assuming approximately $48.1 million of mortgage loans in June 2011, $12.8 million of mortgage loans in July 2011 and $12.5 million of mortgage loans in August 2011. We currently expect to acquire the remaining two of these 20 communities for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $45.3 million, including the assumption of approximately $4.9 million of mortgage debt and excluding closing costs, in 2012, subject to various closing conditions; accordingly, we can provide no assurance that we will purchase these properties.

        In May 2011, we acquired one senior living community located in Rockford, Illinois with 73 assisted living units for approximately $7.5 million, excluding closing costs. All the residents at this community pay for services with private resources. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        Between May and June 2011, we sold seven properties, including four skilled nursing facilities, one assisted living community and two MOBs, for combined sales prices totaling $39.5 million, excluding closing costs. We recognized a gain on sale of these properties of approximately $21.3 million.

        In July 2011, we agreed to acquire nine senior living communities located in six states with an aggregate 2,226 living units (1,708 independent living units, 471 assisted living units and 47 Alzheimer's care units) for approximately $478.0 million, excluding closing costs. All the residents at these communities pay for services with private resources. In December 2011, we acquired eight of these nine communities for approximately $379.0 million, excluding closing costs. We funded these acquisitions using cash on hand, proceeds from a debt offering and by assuming approximately $130.8 million of

79


Table of Contents

mortgage loans. We currently expect to acquire the remaining community in 2012, subject to various closing conditions; accordingly, we can provide no assurance that we will purchase this property.

        In December 2011, we acquired one senior living community located in Walnut Creek, California with 57 assisted living units for approximately $11.3 million, excluding closing costs. All the residents at this community pay for services with private resources. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand and borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        In February 2012, we acquired one senior living community located in Priceville, Alabama with 92 assisted living units for approximately $11.3 million, excluding closing costs. All the residents at this community pay for services with private resources. We funded this acquisition using cash on hand.

        In December 2011 and January and February 2012, we entered five separate agreements to acquire one senior living community and four MOBs for an aggregate purchase price of $144.8 million, excluding closing costs. The senior living community is located in Missouri and includes 87 independent living units, and all the residents at this community pay for services with private resources. The four MOBs are located in Connecticut, Georgia and Hawaii and include an aggregate of 514,409 square feet. The closings of these acquisitions are contingent upon completion of our diligence and other customary closing conditions; accordingly, we can provide no assurance that we will purchase these properties.

        In May 2011, we and Five Star entered into a loan agreement, or the Bridge Loan, under which we agreed to lend Five Star up to $80.0 million to fund Five Star's pu