10-K 1 d263881d10k.htm FORM 10-K Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form 10-K

 

 

 

 

(Mark One)

 

[X]

  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
  For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011

[   ]

  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
  For the transition period from             to             .

Commission file number 0-25317

 

 

Life Technologies Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   33-0373077

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

5791 Van Allen Way  
Carlsbad, California   92008
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

760-603-7200

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value   NASDAQ Global Select Market
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights, $0.01 par value   NASDAQ Global Select Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  [X] or No  [   ]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  [   ] or No  [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  [X] or No  [   ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  [X]  No  [   ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  [   ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer [X]

  Accelerated filer [  ]  

Non-accelerated filer  [  ]

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  Smaller reporting company [  ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes  [   ] No    [X]

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2011 was $9,357,531,619.

The number of outstanding shares of the registrant’s common stock as of February 28, 2012 was 178,267,389.

 

 

 


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2011 Annual Report to Stockholders

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A in connection with the registrant’s 2012 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed subsequent to the date hereof, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this annual report on Form 10-K. Such proxy statement will be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after the conclusion of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.


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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

Annual Report on Form 10-K

for the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS   
PART I   
Item 1.   

Business

     2   
Item 1A.   

Risk Factors

     10   
Item 1B.   

Unresolved Staff Comments

     24   
Item 2.   

Properties

     24   
Item 3.   

Legal Proceedings

     25   
Item 4.   

Mine Safety Disclosures

     25   
PART II   
Item 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities      26   
Item 6.   

Selected Financial Data

     29   
Item 7.   

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     30   
Item 7A.   

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     53   
Item 8.   

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

     54   
Item 9.   

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

     102   
Item 9A.   

Controls and Procedures

     102   
Item 9B.   

Other Information

     105   
PART III   
Item 10.   

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

     105   
Item 11.   

Executive Compensation

     105   
Item 12.    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters      105   
Item 13.   

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

     105   
Item 14.   

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

     105   
PART IV   
Item 15.   

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

     106   
SIGNATURES      108   


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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Any statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K about our expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, prospects, financial condition, assumptions or future events or performance are not historical facts and are forward-looking statements. These statements are often, but not always, made through the use of words or phrases such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “should,” “intend,” “plan,” “will,” “expect(s),” “estimate(s),” “project(s),” “positioned,” “strategy,” “outlook” and similar expressions. Additionally, statements concerning future matters, such as the development of new products, enhancements of technologies, sales levels and operating results and other statements regarding matters that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements. Accordingly, all such forward-looking statements involve estimates, assumptions and relate to uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to the factors discussed throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Among the key factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those projected in our forward-looking statements, include our ability to:

 

   

continually develop and offer new products and services that are commercially successful;

 

   

successfully compete and maintain the pricing of products and services;

 

   

maintain our revenue and profitability during periods of adverse economic and business conditions;

 

   

successfully integrate and develop acquired businesses and technologies;

 

   

successfully acquire new products, services, and technologies through additional acquisitions;

 

   

successfully procure our products and supplies from our existing supply chain;

 

   

successfully secure and deploy capital;

 

   

satisfy our debt obligations; and

 

   

the additional risks and other factors described under the caption “Risk Factors” under Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Because the factors referred to above could cause our actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by us, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after such date.

 

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In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, unless the context requires otherwise, “Life Technologies,” “Life Technologies Corporation,” “Company,” “we,” “our,” and “us” means Life Technologies Corporation and its subsidiaries.

PART I

ITEM 1. Business

General Development of Our Business

Life Technologies Corporation is a global life sciences company dedicated to improving the human condition. Our systems, consumables and services enable scientific researchers and commercial markets to accelerate scientific exploration, leading to discoveries and developments that improve the quality of life. Our products are also used in forensics, food and water safety, animal health testing and other industrial applications.

The Company delivers a broad range of products and services, including systems, instruments, reagents, software, and custom services. Our growing portfolio of products includes innovative technologies for capillary electrophoresis-based sequencing, next generation sequencing, PCR, sample preparation, cell culture, RNA interference analysis, functional genomics research, proteomics and cell biology applications, as well as clinical diagnostic applications, forensics and animal, food, pharmaceutical and water testing analysis. We also provide our customers convenient and value-added purchasing options through thousands of sales and service professionals, e-commerce capabilities and onsite supply center solutions.

The Company began operations as a California partnership in 1987 and incorporated in California in 1989. In 1997, the Company reincorporated as a Delaware corporation. On November 21, 2008, Invitrogen Corporation (also referred to as “Invitrogen”), a predecessor company to Life Technologies, completed the acquisition of Applied Biosystems, Inc. (also referred to as “AB” or “Applied Biosystems”) to form a new company called “Life Technologies Corporation.” Life Technologies has a workforce of approximately 10,400 people, has a presence in more than 160 countries, and possesses a rapidly growing intellectual property estate. Currently, the Company owns and/or has exclusive license to over 4,000 patents. The corporate headquarters are in Carlsbad, California.

The Company has recently taken part in a noteworthy transaction that is helping to shape its future. In October 2010, the Company acquired Ion Torrent Systems Incorporated (Ion Torrenttm), a business that has transformed DNA sequencing through the use of semiconductor technology, resulting in a sequencing system that is simpler, faster, less expensive and more scalable than other sequencing technologies.

The Company’s website is www.lifetechnologies.com. This Annual Report on Form 10-K, our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, our Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments thereto are made available without charge on the website. These materials are available on the website as soon as reasonably practicable after filing these materials with, or furnishing them to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Financial Information About Our Segments and Geographic Areas

The Company determined, in accordance with The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC Topic 280, Segment Reporting, to operate as one operating segment. The Company believes our chief operating decision maker (CODM) makes decisions based on the Company as a whole. In addition to the CODM making decisions for the Company as a whole, the divisions within the Company share similar customers and types of products and services which derive revenues and have consistent product margins. Accordingly, the Company operates and reports as one reporting segment. The Company will disclose the revenues for each of its divisions in Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” to allow the reader of the financial statements the ability to gain some transparency into the operations of the Company.

Financial information about our revenues from foreign countries and assets located in those countries is also included in the Note 3 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Geographic Information”.

 

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Description of Our Business

Company Overview

We are a global life sciences company dedicated to helping our customers make scientific discoveries and applying those discoveries to ultimately improve the quality of life. Our systems, reagents, and services enable scientific researchers to accelerate scientific exploration, driving life-enhancing discoveries and developments. Life Technologies’ customers do their work across the biological spectrum, advancing genomic medicine, regenerative science, molecular diagnostics, agricultural and environmental research and 21st century forensics. The Company has a workforce of approximately 10,400 people, has a presence in more than 160 countries, and possesses a rapidly growing intellectual property estate of over 4,000 patents and exclusive licenses around the world.

Our systems and reagents enable, simplify and accelerate a broad spectrum of biological research of genes, proteins and cells within academic and life science research and commercial applications. Our scientific expertise assists in making biodiscovery research techniques more effective and efficient for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, agricultural, clinical, government and academic scientific professionals with backgrounds in a wide range of scientific disciplines.

The Company offers many different products and services, and is continually developing and/or acquiring others. Some of our specific product categories include the following:

 

   

Capillary electrophoresis, SOLiDTM, and Ion TorrentTM DNA sequencing systems and reagents, which are used to discover sources of genetic and epigenetic variation, to catalog the DNA structure of organisms, to verify the composition of genetic research material, and to apply these genetic analysis discoveries in markets such as forensic human identification and clinical diagnostics.

 

   

“High-throughput” gene cloning and expression technology, which allows customers to clone and expression-test genes on an industrial scale.

 

   

Pre-cast electrophoresis products, which improve the speed, reliability and convenience of separating nucleic acids and proteins.

 

   

Antibodies, which allow researchers to capture and label proteins, visualize their location through use of dyes and discern their role in disease.

 

   

Magnetic beads, which are used in a variety of settings, such as attachment of molecular labels, nucleic acid purification, and organ and bone marrow tissue type testing.

 

   

Molecular Probes fluorescence-based technologies, which facilitate the labeling of molecules for biological research and drug discovery.

 

   

Transfection reagents, which are widely used to transfer genetic elements into living cells enabling the study of protein function and gene regulation.

 

   

PCR and Real Time PCR systems, reagents and assays, which enable researchers to amplify and detect targeted nucleic acids (DNA and RNA molecules) for a host of applications in molecular biology.

 

   

Cell culture media and reagents used to preserve and grow mammalian cells, which are used in large scale cGMP bio-production facilities to produce large molecule biologic therapies.

 

   

RNA Interference reagents, which enable scientists to selectively “turn off” genes in biology systems to gain insight into biological pathways.

Scientific Background

The genome is the entirety of a living organism’s genetic information coded in the form of DNA. Within the genome are individual segments of DNA that form genes, which encode the instructions used by cells to create proteins. These instructions are relayed from the gene to the cell’s protein assembly machinery through the intermediary of a transcript composed of RNA. The total set of RNA transcripts expressed by the genome in a

 

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cell or organism is known as the transcriptome. The proteins, however, ultimately carry out most of the essential biological activities required for life. The total complement of proteins expressed by the genome in a cell or organism is known as the proteome. Proteins have many different functional properties, and are the key biological molecules involved in processes such as growth, development, reproduction, aging, and disease.

Researchers seeking to learn the causes of disease to develop treatments have historically used molecular biology techniques focused on the study of single or small numbers of genes and the proteins they code for, as opposed to the study of the genome or proteome as a whole. The study of the genome is known as genomics, while the study of the proteome is known as proteomics. Technological advances over the past two decades, including many developed and marketed by Life Technologies, have rapidly accelerated scientists’ ability to perform genomics and proteomics research. These advances include the development of automated instruments that can perform high-throughput analysis of samples and specialized reagents and consumables that enable scientific researchers to perform analysis accurately and efficiently. Genomics research has evolved from the sequencing of the first viral genome of just over 5,000 bases three decades ago to the complete sequencing of the more than 3 billion bases of the human genome in 2001. The recent advances in genomic and proteomic studies have also led to the rapid development of bioinformatics, which integrates biology and computing to analyze the massive amounts of data generated by such studies.

Following the sequencing of the complete human genome, functional genomics and the study of the transcriptome and proteome have come to prominence. Rather than replacing the study of single genes, these disciplines have complemented and enhanced such studies. For example, in the field of drug development, studies in genomics and proteomics combined with an understanding of drug action and efficacy can help to identify patient groups for which the drug may be particularly beneficial. Pharmaceutical-based research also includes the development of safe and effective methods of bioproduction for protein-based therapeutic agents.

In the field of disease treatment, research is often focused on the discovery of biomarkers. These are transcripts or proteins that are used as markers for the diagnosis of certain disease states and their prognosis for treatment. High-throughput production and screening of peptides (short chains of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins) can also assist in the design of vaccines against diseases for which current vaccines are ineffective or unavailable.

In medicine, basic research is focused on cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and cell death. These have wide applications in the study of regenerative medicine, which focuses on repairing organs damaged by trauma or disease. The study of aging is another important field in this category, and focuses on alleviating debilitating conditions associated with the aging process.

Customer Base

The Company divides its principal customer base into three primary categories:

 

   

Life Sciences. Our life sciences research customers consist of laboratories generally associated with universities, medical research centers, government institutions (such as the United States National Institutes of Health, or the NIH), and other research institutions as well as biotechnology, pharmaceutical and chemical companies. Researchers at these institutions use our products and services in a broad spectrum of scientific activities, such as searching for drugs or other techniques to combat a wide variety of diseases (namely cancer and viral and bacterial diseases); researching diagnostics for disease identification or for improving the efficacy of drugs to targeted patient groups; and assisting in vaccine design. Our products and services provide the research tools needed for genomics studies, proteomics studies, gene splicing, cellular analysis, and other key research applications that are required by these life science researchers.

 

   

Applied Sciences. Our applied sciences customers consist of businesses in a diverse range of industries. The current focus of our products within these industries is in the areas of: forensic analysis, which is used to identify individuals based on their DNA; quality and safety testing, such as testing required to measure food, beverage, or environmental quality and pharmaceutical manufacturing quality and safety; animal health testing, which enables the detection of pathogens in livestock; agricultural production, such as tools to support food processing and the commercial production of genetically-engineered

 

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products; synthetic biology, which enables our customers to explore ways to effectively harness the power of biology to replicate its systems and create biofuels; and biopharmaceutical manufacturing, such as the commercial production of rare or difficult to obtain substances, including proteins, interferons, interleukins, t-PA and monoclonal antibodies.

 

   

Medical Sciences. Our medical sciences customers consist of clinical labs and medical institutions that use our commercial technology for clinical and diagnostic purposes, and medical researchers that use our research technology to explore ways to advance medicine and deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. The current focus of our products is in the area of human diagnostics to better understand disease determination and targeted therapy selection, including use of our next generation sequencing technologies to better understand the nature of disease by unlocking the secrets of DNA; cell therapy; regenerative medicine; and tissue engineering.

While the Company does not believe that any single customer or small group of customers is material to our business as a whole or to our product segments, approximately 18% of our customers in our target markets in the United States are from university and research institutions which management believes are, to some degree, directly or indirectly supported by the United States government.

Our Products

As of December 31, 2011, the Company operated its business under three divisions: Molecular Biology Systems, (also referred to as “MBS”); Cell Systems, (also referred to as “CS”); and Genetic Systems, (also referred to as “GS”).

The MBS division includes the molecular biology-based technologies, including basic and real-time PCR, RNAi, DNA synthesis, sample prep, transfection, cloning and protein expression profiling, protein analysis and thermo-cycler instrumentation. The CS division includes all product lines used in the study of cell function, including cell culture media and sera, stem cells and related tools, cellular imaging products, antibodies, drug discovery services and cell therapy related products. The GS division includes capillary electrophoresis systems and reagents and next generation sequencing systems and reagents, including the SOLiDTM and Ion TorrentTM systems, as well as reagent kits developed specifically for applied markets, such as forensics and food safety, animal health and pharmaceutical quality monitoring.

The Company plans to continue to introduce new research products and services, as we believe continued new product development and rapid product introduction is a critical competitive factor in all of the industries that the Company serves. The Company expects to continue to increase expenditures in sales and marketing, manufacturing and research and development to support increased levels of sales and to augment our long-term competitive position.

Service and Support

The Company generally provides limited warranties on all equipment at the time of sale for periods of time ranging up to two years from the date of sale depending on the product subject to warranty. However, warranties included with any sale can vary, and may be excluded altogether, depending on the particular circumstances of the sale. The sale of some equipment includes installation, basic user training, and/or application support. The Company also offers service contracts to our customers that are generally one to five years in duration after the original warranty period. The Company provides both repair services and routine maintenance services under these arrangements, and also offers repair and maintenance services on a time and material basis to customers that do not have service contracts. Service in the United States and major markets outside of the United States is provided by our service staff and, in some foreign countries, service is provided through third-party arrangements. In addition, we offer custom services such as cell line development, custom media modification, development of primers and custom assays. These services are typically offered with limited warranties.

 

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Research and Development

The Company has a strong history of refining technology to create novel products for biosciences research through the combination of expertise in biology, chemistry, and engineering. The Company continues to generate innovative products across a broader continuum of discovery, development, and validation for the life sciences enterprise. In 2011, the Company launched nearly 240 products, representing approximately 800 new skus in fields ranging from genomic analysis to cell biology to human identification and diagnostics. The Company invested $377.9 million, $375.5 million and $337.1 million in research and development for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

As of December 31, 2011, the Company had approximately 1,200 employees engaged in research and development activities in the United States, Japan, Israel, Singapore, India, Germany, and Norway. The Company also continues to maintain a comprehensive network of collaborators and scientific advisors across the globe. Our research and development activities are focused in segments where we are a leader, and in emerging growth areas in which we can utilize our expertise in instrumentation, reagent and consumable solutions to develop new market opportunities.

Sales and Marketing

Our sales and marketing strategy supports our objective of building equity in Life Technologies as the brand that manufactures and delivers user-centered, innovative, premium products and services. Through our sub-brands, including Gibco, Ambion, Molecular Probes, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Novex, Ion TorrentTM, and others, we provide premiere offerings to life science researchers and professionals applying biology in their work, such as forensics and molecular diagnostics. We have well established go-to-market channels including an expansive commercial organization of approximately 3,100 employees and a presence in more than 160 countries, with a highly educated and specialized sales force; over 1,000 supply centers worldwide based in our customers’ laboratories to provide convenient access to our products; and world class e-commerce websites that deliver the easiest online experience to find, decide, and buy our products.

We are committed to being a partner of choice for our customers, which requires us to employ scientific personnel for our sales and service roles. The Company has two types of direct sales personnel: generalists and technical sales specialists. Generalists typically are responsible for total customer account management. They work closely with the technical specialists, who have an extensive background in biology or other scientific fields of study and focus on specific product offerings. Having a thorough understanding of biological techniques and the research process allows our sales representatives to act as advisors to our customers. Our technical sales representatives also help us identify market needs and new technologies that we can license and develop into new products. If our customers have questions about their products, orders or other support areas, they have full access by phone or online, to our highly trained technical and customer service professionals. We offer a full range of eProcurement solutions, allowing our customers electronic access to their accounts and ordering modules whenever they need it.

Technology Licensing

Some of our existing products are manufactured or sold under the terms of license agreements that require us to pay royalties to the licensor based on the sales of products containing the licensed materials or technology. These licenses also typically impose obligations on us to market the licensed technology. Although the Company emphasizes our own research and development, we believe our ability to in-license new technology from third-parties is, and will continue to be, critical to our ability to offer competitive new products. Our ability to obtain these in-licenses depends in part on our ability to convince inventors that the Company will be successful in bringing new products incorporating their technology to market. Several significant licenses or exclusivity rights expire at various times during the next 17 years. There are certain risks associated with relying on third-party licensed technologies, including our ability to identify attractive technologies, license them on acceptable terms, meet our obligations under the licenses, renew those licenses should they expire before the Company retires the related product and the risk that the third-party may lose patent protection. These risks are more fully described under the heading “Risks Related to the Development and Manufacturing of our Products” and “Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property” below.

 

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Patents and Proprietary Technologies

Our products are based on complex, rapidly-developing technologies. Some of these technologies are covered by patents the Company owns and others are owned by third-parties and are used by us under license. The Company has pursued a policy of seeking patent protection in the United States and other countries for developments, improvements, and inventions originating within our organization that are incorporated into our products or that fall within our fields of interest. The Company considers the protection of our proprietary technologies and products in our product divisions to be important to the success of our business and relies on a combination of patents and exclusive licenses to protect these technologies and products.

The Company currently owns and/or has exclusive license to over 4,000 patents, including over 1,500 in the United States. The Company also has numerous pending patent applications both domestically and internationally. Our success depends, to a significant degree, upon our ability to develop proprietary products and technologies and it is important to our success that we protect the intellectual property associated with these products and technologies. The Company intends to continue to file patent applications as we develop new products and technologies. Patents provide some degree of, but not complete, protection for our intellectual property.

The Company also relies in part on trade secret, copyright and trademark protection of our intellectual property. The Company protects our trade secrets by, among other things, entering into confidentiality agreements with third-parties, employees and consultants. It is our general policy to require employees and consultants to sign agreements to assign to us their interests in intellectual property arising from their work for us. There are risks related to our reliance on patents, trade secret, copyright and trademark protection laws, which are described in more detail under the heading “Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property” below.

The Company is currently, and could in the future, be subject to lawsuits, arbitrations, investigations, and other legal actions with private parties and governmental entities, particularly involving claims for infringement of patents and other intellectual property rights. From time to time, the Company has asserted that various competitors and others are infringing our patents, and, similarly, from time to time, others have asserted that we were or are infringing patents owned by them. These claims are sometimes settled by mutual agreement and result in the granting of licenses by or to us or the cessation of the alleged infringing activities. However, the Company cannot make any assurances as to the outcome of any pending or future claims. More information about the risk factors associated with our reliance on intellectual property is set forth under the heading “Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property” below.

Competition

The markets for our products are competitive and are characterized by the application of advanced technologies. New technologies in life sciences could make our products and services obsolete unless the Company continues to develop new and improved products and services and pursue new opportunities. Given the breadth of our product and service offerings, our competition comes from a wide array of competitors with a high degree of technical proficiency, ranging from specialized companies that have strengths in narrow segments of the life science markets to larger manufacturers and distributors offering a broad array of biotechnology products and services that have significant financial, operational, research and development, and sales and marketing resources. These and other companies may have developed or could in the future develop new technologies that compete with our products or even render our products obsolete. Additionally, there are numerous scientists making materials themselves instead of using kits. The Company believes that a company’s competitive position in the markets we compete in is determined by product function, product quality, speed of delivery, technical support, price, breadth of product line, distribution capabilities, and timely product development. Our customers are diverse and may place varying degrees of importance on the competitive attributes listed above. While it is difficult to rank these attributes for all our customers in the aggregate, the Company believes we are well positioned to compete in each category.

 

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Suppliers

Our manufacturing operations require a wide variety of raw materials, electronic and mechanical components, chemical and biochemical materials, and other supplies. The Company buys materials for our products from many suppliers and the Company has Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) arrangements with many third-parties for the manufacturing of various products sold under our platform brand. While there are some raw materials that the Company obtains from a single supplier, we are not dependent on any one supplier or group of suppliers for our business as a whole. Raw materials are generally available from a number of suppliers. Even so, due to factors out of our control, some supplies may occasionally be difficult to obtain. Any interruption in the availability of our manufacturing supplies could force us to suspend manufacturing of an affected product and therefore harm our operations. See also the risk factor regarding “Adverse conditions in the global economy and disruption of financial markets” below for further analysis.

Government Regulation

Certain of our products and services, including some products that are intended for in vitro diagnostics, as well as the manufacturing process of these products, are subject to regulation under various portions of the United States Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and the laws of other countries. In addition, a number of our manufacturing facilities are subject to periodic inspection by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), other product-oriented federal agencies and various state and local authorities in the United States as well as foreign governmental authorities. Additionally, some of our products must be manufactured in accordance with the requirements of the FDA’s Quality System Regulation, other federal, state and local regulations and other applicable quality standards such as ISO 9001 or ISO 13485. Portions of our business are subject to FDCA requirements including those relating to testing, safety, efficacy, premarket applications, marketing and labeling. Procedures are in place to comply with such requirements.

Materials used in development and testing activities at certain of our facilities are also subject to the Controlled Substances Act, administered by the Drug Enforcement Agency (or DEA). Procedures for control, use and inventory of these materials are in place at our Durham, North Carolina and Madison, Wisconsin facilities.

The Company also employs Centers for Disease Control/National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules, Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories and the hazard classification system recommendations for handling bacterial and viral agents, with capabilities through biosafety level three.

The Company is subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations, regulating the emission or discharge of materials into the environment, or otherwise relating to the protection of the environment, in those jurisdictions where we operate or maintain facilities. We do not believe that any liability arising under, or compliance with, these laws and regulations will have a material effect on our business and no material capital expenditures are expected for environmental control.

In addition to the foregoing, we are subject to other federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations applicable to our business, including the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act, Department of Transportation regulations, national restrictions on technology transfer, import, export and customs regulations, statutes and regulations relating to government contracting, and similar laws and regulations in foreign countries. In particular, the Company is subject to various foreign regulations sometimes restricting the importation or the exportation of animal-derived products such as fetal bovine serum.

Workforce

As of December 31, 2011, we had a workforce of approximately 10,400 people, approximately 4,350 of whom worked outside the United States. These numbers include part-time employees and independent contractors. Our success will depend in large part upon our ability to attract and retain employees. The Company faces competition in this regard from other companies, research and academic institutions, government entities and other organizations. None of our domestic employees are subject to collective bargaining agreements. The Company generally considers relations with our employees to be good.

 

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Executive Officers of the Registrant

The Board of Directors appoints executive officers of Life Technologies, and the Chief Executive Officer has authority to hire and terminate such officers. Each executive officer holds office until the earlier of his or her death, resignation, removal from office or the appointment of his or her successor. No family relationships exist among any of Life Technologies’ executive officers, directors or persons nominated to serve in those positions. We have listed the ages, positions held and the periods during which our current executive officers have served in those positions below:

Gregory T. Lucier (age 47) serves as Chairman of the Board at Life Technologies, a global biotechnology company with 75,000 customers in more than 160 countries. Ranked 9th out of the 50 most innovative companies in the world and No. 1 in life sciences by Fast Company magazine, Life Technologies has a heritage of providing more than 50,000 leading products and services that enable breakthrough discoveries across the entire biological research spectrum. Mr. Lucier creates a culture of relentless speed and innovation and leverages his broad experience in healthcare to position the company to usher in new era of personalized medicine. This initiative is expected to be facilitated through future deployment of the Ion Proton Sequencer, a technology that is designed to sequence a human genome in one day for $1,000. The rapid development of this technology, coupled with the company’s more than 4,000 patents and exclusive licenses, underscore the growing significance life science, research and biology will play in shaping the future of our health, agriculture and energy. Mr. Lucier serves on the Board of Directors at Synthetic Genomics, Inc. and CareFusion Corporation, where he is also the Chairman of the Human Resources and Compensation Committee. He is the former Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute. He received his B.S. in Engineering from Pennsylvania State University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

John A. Cottingham (age 57) serves as Chief Legal Officer and Secretary of Life Technologies. From May 2004 to November 2008, Mr. Cottingham served as Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of Life Technologies’ predecessor entity, Invitrogen Corporation. Mr. Cottingham served as Vice President, General Counsel of Invitrogen Corporation from September 2000 to May 2004. Prior to the merger of the former Life Technologies, Inc., or “LTI”, with Invitrogen Corporation in September 2000, Mr. Cottingham was the General Counsel and Assistant Secretary of LTI from January 1996 to September 2000. From May 1988 to December 1995, Mr. Cottingham served as an international corporate attorney with the Washington, D.C. office of Fulbright and Jaworski L.L.P. Mr. Cottingham received his B.S. in Political Science from Furman University, his J.D. from the University of South Carolina, his L.L.M. in Securities Regulation from Georgetown University and his M.S.E.L. from the University of San Diego.

David F. Hoffmeister (age 57) serves as Chief Financial Officer of Life Technologies. From October 2004 to November 2008, Mr. Hoffmeister served as Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President of Life Technologies’ predecessor entity, Invitrogen Corporation. Prior to joining Invitrogen Corporation, Mr. Hoffmeister held various positions over the course of twenty (20) years with McKinsey & Company, most recently as a senior partner serving clients in the healthcare, private equity and specialty chemicals industries. Prior to joining McKinsey & Company, Mr. Hoffmeister held financial positions at GTE and W.R.Grace. Mr. Hoffmeister is a member of the board of Celanese Corporation. Mr. Hoffmeister received his B.S. in Business from the University of Minnesota and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago.

Peter M. Leddy, Ph.D. (age 48) serves as Senior Vice President of Global Human Resources and Internal Communications of Life Technologies. From July 2005 to November 2008, Dr. Leddy served as Senior Vice President of Global Human Resources of Life Technologies’ predecessor entity, Invitrogen Corporation. Prior to joining Invitrogen Corporation, Dr. Leddy held several senior management positions with Dell Incorporated from 2000 to 2005 and was, most recently, Vice President of Human Resources for the Americas Operations. Prior to joining Dell Incorporated, Dr. Leddy served as the Executive Vice President of Human Resources at Promus Hotel Corporation (Doubletree, Embassy Suites). Dr. Leddy also served in a variety of executive and human resource positions at PepsiCo. Dr. Leddy received his B.A. in Psychology from Creighton University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Dr. Leddy serves on the Board of Directors at NuVasive, Inc. (where he serves on the Compensation Committee), is a member of the California State University Professional Science Master’s Executive Board of Directors, and is a former board member of the Biotechnology Institute.

 

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Kelli A. Richard (age 43) serves as Vice President of Finance and Chief Accounting Officer of Life Technologies. Ms. Richard served as Vice President of Finance and Chief Accounting Officer of Life Technologies’ predecessor entity, Invitrogen Corporation. Ms. Richard joined Invitrogen Corporation in August 2005 with more than fourteen (14) years of accounting and financial reporting experience, previously serving as Vice President of Accounting and Reporting. Prior to joining Invitrogen Corporation, Ms. Richard held the position of Principal Accounting Officer at Gateway, Inc. Ms. Richard is a certified public accountant with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of Iowa.

Mark P. Stevenson (age 49) serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of Life Technologies. From December 2007 to November 2008, Mr. Stevenson served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Life Technologies’ predecessor entity, Applied Biosystems. Mr. Stevenson joined Applied Biosystems in Europe in 1998, and held roles of increasing responsibility in Europe and Japan. Mr. Stevenson moved to the U.S. in 2004 to establish the Applied Markets Division of Applied Biosystems and, in 2006, was named President of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Division of Applied Biosystems. Mr. Stevenson has more than twenty (20) years of sales, marketing, and international executive management experience and received his B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Reading, UK, and an M.B.A. from Henley Management School, UK. Mr. Stevenson serves on the Board of Trustees of the Keck Graduate Institute and is an Executive Committee Board Member of BIOCOM, a life science association representing approximately 550 member companies in Southern California.

Available Information

We post on our public website our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). These materials can be found in the “Investor Relations” section of our website. Copies of any of these documents may be obtained free of charge through our website, www.lifetechnologies.com, or by contacting our Investor Relations Department at 5791 Van Allen Way, Carlsbad, California 92008 , or by calling 1-760-603-7208.

You may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains an Internet site that contains our reports, proxy and information statements, and other information at www.sec.gov.

We have included the certifications of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer required by Section 302 and 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and related rules, relating to the quality of our public disclosure, as exhibits to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

You should carefully consider the following risks, together with other matters described in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or incorporated herein by reference in evaluating our business and prospects. If any of the following risks occurs, our business, financial condition and/or operating results could be harmed. In such case, the trading price of our securities could decline, in some cases significantly. The risks described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks not presently known to us, or that we currently deem immaterial, may also impair our business operations.

Risks Related to the Growth of Our Business

The Company must continually offer new products and services

We sell our products and services in industries that are characterized by rapid and significant technological changes, frequent new product and service introductions and enhancements, and evolving industry standards. Our success depends in large part on continuous, timely and cost-effective development and introduction of new products and services as well as improvements to our existing products and services, which address these evolving market requirements and are attractive to customers. For example, if the Company does not

 

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appropriately innovate and invest in new technologies, then our technologies will become dated and our customers could move to new technologies offered by our competitors and we could lose our competitive position in the markets that we serve.

These facts require us to make appropriate investments in the development and identification of new technologies and products and services. As a result, we are continually looking to develop, license and acquire new technologies and products and services to further broaden and deepen our already broad product and service line. Once we have developed or obtained a new technology, to the extent that we fail to introduce new and innovative products and services that are accepted by our markets, we may not obtain an adequate return on our research and development, licensing and acquisition investments and could lose revenue opportunities to our competitors, which would be difficult to regain and could seriously damage our business. Some of the factors affecting customer acceptance of our products and services include:

 

   

availability, quality and price as compared to competitive products and services;

 

   

the functionality of new and existing products and services, and their conformity to industry standards and regulatory standards that may be applicable to our customers;

 

   

the timing of introduction of our products and services as compared to competitive products and services;

 

   

scientists’ and customers’ opinions of the product’s or services’ utility and our ability to incorporate their feedback into future products and services;

 

   

the extent to which new products and services are within the scope of our proven expertise;

 

   

citation of the products and services in published research; and

 

   

general trends in life sciences research and life science informatics software development.

The Company’s future growth depends in part on our ability to acquire new products, services, and technologies through additional acquisitions, which may absorb significant resources and may not be successful

As part of the Company’s strategy to develop and identify new products, services, and technologies, we have made, and continue to make, acquisitions and investments. Acquiring and integrating the operations of such businesses requires significant efforts, the initial outlay of capital and resources as well as the coordination of information technologies, research and development, sales and marketing, operations, manufacturing and finance. These efforts result in additional expenses and divert management’s time from other projects. Our failure to manage successfully the growth of the acquired company could also have an adverse impact on our business. In addition, there is no guarantee that some of the businesses we acquire will become profitable or remain so. If our acquisitions do not reach our initial expectations, we may record unexpected impairment charges. Our acquisitions involve a number of risks and financial, managerial and operational challenges, including the following, any of which could cause significant operating inefficiencies and adversely affect our growth and profitability:

 

   

any acquired business, technology, service or product could under-perform relative to our expectations and the price that the Company paid for it;

 

   

the Company could experience difficulty in integrating personnel, operations and financial and other systems;

 

   

the Company could have difficulty in retaining key managers and other employees of the acquired company;

 

   

acquisition-related earnings charges could adversely impact operating results;

 

   

acquisitions could place unanticipated demands on the Company’s management, operational resources and financial and internal control systems;

 

   

the Company may be unable to achieve cost savings anticipated in connection with the integration of an acquired business;

 

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in an acquisition, the Company may assume contingent liabilities that prove greater than anticipated, or deficiencies in internal controls, and the realization of any of these liabilities or deficiencies may increase our expenses and adversely affect the Company’s financial position; and

 

   

the Company may have disagreements or disputes with the prior owners of an acquired business, technology, service or product that may result in litigation and/or resolution expenses and a distraction of our management’s attention.

The Company may not successfully manage its current and future divestitures, and, as a result, may not achieve some or all of the expected benefits of such divestitures

We continually evaluate the performance and strategic fit of our businesses and may decide to sell a business, product line or technology based on such an evaluation. Divestitures could involve additional risks, including the following:

 

   

difficulties in the separation of operations, services, products and personnel;

 

   

the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns;

 

   

the need to agree to retain or assume certain current or future liabilities in order to complete the divestiture;

 

   

the disruption of our business; and

 

   

the potential loss of key employees.

Any divestitures may result in significant write-offs, including those related to goodwill and other intangible assets, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, we may encounter difficulty in finding buyers or alternative exit strategies at acceptable prices and terms and in a timely manner. We may not be successful in managing these or any other significant risks that we encounter in divesting a business or product line, and, as a result, may not achieve the expected benefits of the divestiture.

The Company faces significant competition

The markets for our products and services are very competitive and price sensitive. Our competitors, which could include some of our customers (such as large pharmaceutical companies) have significant financial, operational, sales and marketing resources, and experience in research and development. Our competitors could develop new technologies that compete with our products and services or even render our products and services obsolete. If a competitor develops superior technology or cost-effective alternatives to our products and services, our business could be seriously harmed.

The markets for some of our products are also subject to specific competitive risks. These markets are highly price competitive. Our competitors have competed in the past by lowering prices on certain products. If they do so again, we may be forced to respond by lowering our prices and thereby reducing our revenues and profits. Failure to anticipate and respond to price competition may hurt our competitive position.

The Company believes that customers in our markets display a significant amount of loyalty to their initial supplier of a particular product. Therefore, it may be difficult to generate sales to potential customers who have purchased products from competitors. Additionally, there are numerous scientists making materials themselves instead of using kits or reagents that we supply. To the extent we are unable to be the first to develop and supply new products, customers may buy from our competitors or make materials themselves, causing our competitive position to suffer.

Consolidation trends in both our market and that of our customers have increased competition

There has been a trend toward industry consolidation in our markets for the past several years. We expect this trend toward industry consolidation to continue as companies attempt to strengthen or hold their market positions in an evolving industry and as companies are acquired or are unable to continue operations. We believe that industry consolidation may result in stronger competitors that are better able to compete as sole-source vendors for customers. This could lead to more variability in operating results and could harm our business.

 

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Additionally, there has been a trend toward consolidation among our customers, notably, in the pharmaceutical industry. Consolidation in our customer markets results in increased competition for important market segments and fewer available accounts. Larger consolidated customers may be able to exert increased pricing pressure on us.

Adverse conditions in the global economy and disruption of financial markets may significantly harm our revenue, profitability and results of operations

The global economy has experienced a significant economic downturn. Continued or worsening economic conditions in the businesses or geographic areas in which we sell our products and/or services could reduce demand for our products and/or services and result in a decrease in sales volume that could have a negative impact on our results of operations. Global credit and capital markets have experienced unprecedented volatility and disruption. Business credit and liquidity have tightened in much of the world. Volatility and disruption of financial markets could limit our customers’ ability to obtain adequate financing or credit to purchase and pay for our products and/or services in a timely manner, or to maintain operations, which may result in a decrease in sales volume that could harm our results of operations. General concerns about the fundamental soundness of domestic and international economies may also cause our customers to reduce their purchases. Changes in governmental banking, monetary and fiscal policies to address liquidity and increase credit availability may not be effective. Significant government investment and allocation of resources to assist the economic recovery of sectors that do not include our customers may reduce the resources available for government grants and related funding for life sciences research and development. Economic conditions and market turbulence may also impact our suppliers’ ability to supply us with sufficient quantities of product components in a timely manner, which could impair our ability to manufacture our products. It is difficult to determine the extent of the economic and financial market problems and the many ways in which they may affect our suppliers, customers and our business in general. Continuation or further deterioration of these financial and macroeconomic conditions could significantly harm our sales, profitability and results of operations.

We may need additional financing in the future to meet our capital needs or to make opportunistic acquisitions and such financing may not be available on favorable terms, if at all, and may be dilutive to existing stockholders

We intend to continue to invest in our business, including investing in research and development activities, expanding our sales and marketing activities, and continuing to make acquisitions. Our ability to take these and other actions may be limited by our available liquidity. As a consequence, in the future, we may need to seek additional financing. We may be unable to obtain any desired additional financing on terms favorable to us, if at all. If we are unable to obtain any needed adequate funds for such matters on acceptable terms, we may be unable to fund our expansion, successfully develop or enhance products or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could negatively affect our business. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity securities, our stockholders will experience dilution of their ownership interest. If we raise additional funds by issuing debt, we may be subject to limitations on our operations due to restrictive covenants.

Additionally, our ability to make scheduled payments or refinance our obligations will depend on our operating and financial performance, which in turn is subject to prevailing economic conditions and financial, business and other factors beyond our control. Recent disruptions in the financial markets, including the bankruptcy or restructuring of a number of financial institutions and reduced lending activity, may adversely affect the availability, terms and cost of credit in the future. We cannot be sure that recent government initiatives in response to the disruptions in the financial markets will stabilize the markets in general or increase liquidity and the availability of credit to us.

 

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A significant portion of our sales are dependent upon our customers’ capital spending policies and research and development budgets, and government funding of research and development programs at universities and other organizations, which are each subject to significant and unexpected decreases

Our customers include pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions, government laboratories, and private foundations. Fluctuations in the research and development budgets at these organizations could have a significant effect on the demand for our products and services. Research and development budgets fluctuate due to changes in available resources, mergers of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, spending priorities, general economic conditions, and institutional and governmental budgetary policies. In addition, a significant portion of our instrument product sales are capital purchases by our customers, and these policies fluctuate due to similar factors. Our business could be seriously damaged by any significant decrease in capital equipment purchases or life sciences research and development expenditures by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions, government laboratories, or private foundations.

The timing and amount of revenues from customers that rely on government funding of research may vary significantly due to factors that can be difficult to forecast. Research funding for life science research has increased more slowly during the past several years compared to the previous years and has declined in some countries, including a slight decrease in 2011 in United States government funding for the NIH. Some grants have been frozen for extended periods of time or otherwise become unavailable to various institutions, sometimes without advance notice. Government funding of research and development is subject to the political process, which is inherently fluid and unpredictable. Other programs, such as homeland security or defense, or general efforts to reduce the federal budget deficit could be viewed by the United States government as a higher priority. These budgetary pressures may result in reduced allocations to government agencies that fund research and development activities. Past proposals to reduce budget deficits, for instance, have included reduced NIH and other research and development allocations. In addition, the majority of funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for research project grants will be coming to a close in 2012. Any shift away from the funding of life sciences research and development or delays surrounding the approval of government budget proposals may cause our customers to delay or forego purchases of our products, which could seriously damage our business.

Our United States customers generally receive funds from approved grants at particular times of the year, as determined by the United States federal government. In the past, such grants have been frozen for extended periods or have otherwise become unavailable to various institutions without advance notice. The timing of the receipt of grant funds affects the timing of purchase decisions by our customers and, as a result, can cause fluctuations in our sales and operating results.

Some of our customers are requiring us to change our sales arrangements to lower their costs, which may limit our pricing flexibility and harm our business

Some of our customers have developed purchasing initiatives to reduce the number of vendors from which they purchase to lower their supply costs. In some cases, these accounts have established agreements with large distributors, which include discounts and the distributors’ direct involvement with the purchasing process. These activities may force us to supply the large distributors with our products at a discount to reach those customers. For similar reasons, many larger customers, including the United States government, have requested and may in the future request, special pricing arrangements, including blanket purchase agreements. These agreements may limit our pricing flexibility, which could harm our business, financial condition, and results of operations. For a limited number of customers, we have, at the customer’s request, made sales through third-party online intermediaries, to whom we are required to pay commissions. If such intermediary sales grow, it could have a negative impact on our gross margins.

Risks Related to the Development and Manufacturing of Our Products

Our business depends on our ability to license new technologies from and to third parties

We believe our ability to in-license new technologies from third-parties is, and will continue to be, critical to our ability to offer new products to our customers. A significant portion of our current revenue is from

 

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products manufactured or sold under licenses from third parties. Our ability to gain access to technologies that we need for new products and services depends — in part — on our ability to convince inventors and their agents or assignees that we can successfully commercialize their inventions. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to continue to identify new technologies of interest to our customers, which are developed by others. Even if we are able to identify new technologies of interest, we may not be able to negotiate a license on acceptable terms, or at all.

In addition, several of our in-licenses, have finite terms and we may not be able to renew these existing in-licenses on favorable terms, or at all. If we lose the rights to a biological material or a patented technology, we may need to stop selling these products and/or services and possibly other products and services, redesign our products, and/or lose a competitive advantage. While some of our in-licenses are exclusive to us in certain markets, potential competitors could also in-license technologies that we fail to in-license exclusively and potentially erode our competitive position for these and other products and services. Our in-licenses also typically subject us to various economic and commercialization obligations. If we fail to comply with these obligations, we could lose important rights under an in-license, such as exclusivity. In some cases, we could lose all rights under an in-license. For example, the licensor could lose patent protection for a number of reasons, including invalidity of the licensed patent, or a third party could obtain a patent that curtails our freedom to operate under one or more licenses. Changes in patent law could affect the value of the licensed technology. We may also receive third-party claims of intellectual property infringement for which we may not be indemnified by the licensor. Loss of such rights could, in some cases, harm our business.

In the ordinary course of our business, we may determine to out-license technology we have developed or acquired to a third-party licensee. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in identifying appropriate third-party licensees, or that we will be successful in negotiating acceptable commercial license terms. In addition, any third-party licensee may not be successful in developing and commercializing the licensed technology, or may default on the payment or other commercial terms of the license. As a result, we may not recognize the benefits of any out-licensed arrangements, which could harm our ability to expand our business.

The Company must be able to manufacture new and improved products to meet customer demand on a timely and cost-effective basis

The Company must be able to resolve in a timely manner manufacturing issues that may arise from time to time as it commences production of its complex products. Unanticipated difficulties or delays in manufacturing of new and improved products in sufficient quantities to meet customer demand could diminish future demand for such products and harm the Company’s business.

The Company relies on other companies to manufacture some of its products and supply certain components of the products it manufactures on its own which may hinder its ability to satisfy customer demand

Although the Company has contracts with most of its manufacturers and suppliers, their operations could be disrupted. These disruptions could be caused by conditions unrelated to our business or operations, including a global economic downturn. Although we have our own manufacturing facilities, it could take considerable time and resources for us replace the capacity of such vendors. Accordingly, if these other manufacturers or suppliers are unable or fail to fulfill their obligations to us, we might not be able to satisfy customer demand in a timely manner, and our business could be harmed.

Violation of government regulations or quality programs could harm demand for our products or services

Some of our products and tests are regulated by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and comparable agencies in other countries. As applicable, we must comply with medical device and other FDA-related and comparable agency laws and regulations. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations can lead to sanctions by these agencies, including warning letters, product recalls, product seizures, consent decrees and civil and criminal sanctions. In addition, failure to comply with laws and regulations, could lead to disqualification of test data submitted in product applications. If the FDA were to take such actions, the FDA’s sanctions would be

 

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available to the public. Such publicity could harm our ability to sell these regulated products globally. In addition, we may not be able to obtain regulatory clearance or approval for our products in the United States and/or may incur significant costs in obtaining or maintaining such regulatory clearances or approvals in the United States. Additionally, any changes in FDA laws, regulations, and interpretations could adversely affect us and our customers, have an adverse impact on revenues, and result in government sanctions.

Medical device laws and regulations are also in effect in many countries, ranging from comprehensive device approval requirements to requests for product data or certifications. The number and scope of these requirements is increasing. We may not be able to obtain regulatory approvals in such countries and/or may incur significant costs in obtaining or maintaining our foreign regulatory approvals. In addition, our exports of certain of our products which have not yet been cleared or approved for United States commercial distribution may be subject to FDA, other export restrictions abroad, as well as import regulations in many countries.

Additionally, some of our customers use our products in the manufacturing or testing processes for their drug and medical device products, and such end-products or services may be regulated by the FDA under pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for drugs and Quality System Regulations (QSR) for medical devices or by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations. The customer is ultimately responsible for QSR, CLIA and other compliance requirements for their products; however, we may agree to comply with certain requirements, and, if we fail to do so, we could lose sales and customers and be exposed to product liability claims.

Our facilities in Benecia, California; Brown Deer, Wisconsin; Frederick, Maryland; Grand Island, New York; Australia; Inchinnan, Scotland; New Zealand; Oslo, Norway; and Singapore manufacture certain products under FDA QSR at 21 CFR Part 820. ISO 13485 and ISO 9001 are internationally-recognized, voluntary quality management system standards that may be used in the design, development, production, and installation and servicing of medical devices similar to the QSR. Our facilities in Austin, Texas; Benicia and Pleasanton, California; Brown Deer, Wisconsin; Framingham, Massachusetts; Frederick, Maryland; Grand Island, New York; Inchinnan, Scotland; Oslo, Norway; Singapore; and Warrington, United Kingdom are each certified for compliance with ISO 13485. Our facilities in Carlsbad and Foster City, California; Eugene, Oregon; Grand Island; New York; Madison, Wisconsin; Australia; Beijing, China; Burlington, Canada; Lohne, Germany; New Zealand; Israel; and Oslo, Norway are each certified for compliance with ISO 9001. Our facility in Austin, Texas has a USDA License. Failure to comply with ISO standards can lead to observations of non-compliance or even suspension of ISO certification or CE mark certificates by the registrar. If we were to lose ISO certification or CE mark certificates, some customers might purchase products from other suppliers as a result.

If the Company violates a government-mandated or voluntary quality program, we may incur additional expense to come back into compliance with the government mandated or voluntary standards. That expense may be material and we may not have anticipated that expense in our financial forecasts. Our financial results could suffer as a result of such increased expenses.

The regulatory clearance or approval process is expensive, time consuming and uncertain, and the failure to obtain and maintain required clearances or approvals could prevent us from commercializing our future products

Our diagnostic products are subject to 510(k) clearance or pre-market approval by the FDA prior to their marketing for commercial use in the United States, and to any approvals required by foreign governmental entities prior to their marketing outside the United States. In addition, any changes or modifications to a device that has received regulatory clearance or approval that could significantly affect its safety or effectiveness, or would constitute a major change in its intended use, may require the submission of a new application for 510(k) clearance, pre-market approval or foreign regulatory approvals.

The 510(k) clearance and pre-market approval processes, as well as the process of obtaining foreign approvals, can be expensive, time consuming and uncertain. It generally takes from four to twelve months from submission to obtain 510(k) clearance, and from one to three years from submission to obtain pre-market approval; however, it may take longer, and 510(k) clearance or pre-market approval may never be obtained. Delays in receipt of, or failure to obtain, clearances or approvals for future products, including tests that are

 

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currently in design or development, would result in delayed, or no, realization of revenues from such products and in substantial additional costs which could decrease our profitability.

In addition, we are required to continue to comply with applicable FDA and other regulatory requirements once we have obtained clearance or approval for a product. There can be no assurance that we will obtain or maintain any required clearance or approval on a timely basis, or at all. Any failure to obtain or any material delay in obtaining FDA clearance or any failure to maintain compliance with FDA regulatory requirements could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Regulatory or legislative healthcare reforms may make it more difficult and costly for us to obtain regulatory clearance or approval of our products and to produce, market and distribute our products after clearance or approval is obtained

From time to time, legislation is drafted and introduced in Congress that could significantly change the statutory provisions governing the regulatory clearance or approval, manufacture and marketing of regulated products or the reimbursement thereof. In addition, FDA regulations and guidance are often revised or reinterpreted by the FDA in ways that may significantly affect our business and our products. Any new regulations or revisions or reinterpretations of existing regulations may impose additional costs or lengthen review times of our products. Delays in receipt of or failure to receive regulatory clearances or approvals for our new products would harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, political, economic and regulatory influences are subjecting the life sciences industry to significant changes. We cannot predict with certainty which initiatives affecting the life sciences industry, if any, will be implemented at the state or federal level, or what affect any future legislation, regulation or governmental policy may have on the Company or our customers’ purchasing decisions regarding our products and services. However, the implementation of new legislation, regulation and policies may adversely affect our business.

Risks Related to Our Operations

Loss of key personnel may adversely affect our business

Our products and services are highly technical in nature. In general, only highly qualified and trained scientists have the necessary skills to develop and market our products and provide our services. In addition, some of our manufacturing positions are highly technical as well. We face intense competition for these professionals from our competitors, customers, marketing partners, and other companies throughout our industry. As is customary in the United States, we do not generally enter into employment agreements requiring these employees to continue in our employment for any period of time. Any failure on our part to hire, train, and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees could seriously damage our business. Additionally, integration of acquired companies and businesses can be disruptive and may lead to the departure of key employees. Further, we use stock options, restricted stock, and restricted stock units/awards to provide incentives to these individuals to remain with us and to build their long-term stockholder value to align their interests with those of the Company. If our stock price decreases, this reduces the value of these equity awards and therefore a key employee’s incentive to stay. If we were to lose a sufficient number of our key employees and were unable to replace them, these losses could seriously damage our business.

We have substantial indebtedness, which could adversely affect our cash flows, business and financial condition

As of December 31, 2011, the carrying value of our outstanding indebtedness was approximately $2,748.5 million. As of December 31, 2011, we also had availability of $487.3 million (net of standby letters of credit of $12.7 million) under our revolving credit facility.

Our substantial level of debt could, among other things:

 

   

require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the servicing and repayment of our debt, thereby reducing funds available for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other purposes;

 

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increase our vulnerability to, and limit our flexibility in planning for, adverse economic and industry conditions;

   

adversely affect our credit rating, with the result that the cost of new indebtedness might increase;

   

limit our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, additional acquisitions and other general corporate requirements;

   

create competitive disadvantages compared to other companies with less indebtedness;

   

adversely affect our stock price;

   

limit our ability to apply proceeds from an offering, debt incurrence or asset sale to purposes other than the servicing and repayment of our debt; and

   

limit our ability to pay dividends and repurchase stock.

Our credit facility contains restrictions that limit our flexibility in operating our business

Our credit facility may contain various covenants that limit our ability to engage in specified types of transactions. These covenants may limit our and our subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things:

 

   

incur additional indebtedness (including guarantees or other contingent obligations);

   

pay dividends on, repurchase, or make distributions in respect to our common stock or make other restricted payments;

   

make specified investments (including loans and advances);

   

sell or transfer assets;

   

create liens;

   

consolidate, merge, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets; and

   

enter into certain transactions with our affiliates.

 

In addition, under our credit facility, we are required to satisfy and maintain specified financial ratios and other financial condition tests. Our ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot be assured that we will meet those ratios and tests. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under our credit facility. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under our credit facility, our lenders could elect to declare all amounts outstanding under our credit facility to be immediately due and payable and terminate all commitments to extend further credit. If we were unable to repay those amounts, the lenders under our credit facility could proceed to collect against all United States subsidiaries, as guarantors of the facility.

The Company could incur more indebtedness, which may increase the risks associated with our substantial leverage, including our ability to service our indebtedness

The indentures governing our senior unsecured notes and our credit facility permit us, under some circumstances, to incur certain amounts of additional indebtedness. If we incur additional debt, the risks associated with our leverage, including our ability to service our debt, would increase. This, in turn, could negatively affect the market price of our common stock.

Our federal, state and local income tax returns may, from time to time, be selected for audit by the taxing authorities or affected by a change in interpretation of legislation, either of which may result in tax assessments, penalties, or other results

The Company is subject to federal, state and local taxes in the United States and abroad. Significant judgment is required in determining the provision for taxes. Although the Company believes its tax estimates are reasonable, if the IRS or other taxing authority disagrees with the positions taken by the Company on its tax returns, the Company could incur additional tax liabilities, plus related interest and penalties. If potential assessments differ significantly from previously recorded reserves, payment of such additional amounts upon final adjudication of any disputes could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.

In addition, United States’ federal, state and local, as well as international, tax laws and regulations are extremely complex and subject to varying interpretations, and a change in interpretation could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.

 

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Tax legislation initiatives could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition

We are a large multinational corporation subject to the tax laws and regulations of the United States federal, state and local governments, and of many international jurisdictions. From time to time, new tax legislation may be proposed, which could adversely affect our current or future tax filings and/or negatively impact our effective tax rate and increase future tax payments.

The Company’s business, particularly the development and marketing of information-based products and services, depends on the continuous, effective, reliable, and secure operation of our computer hardware, software, and Internet applications and related tools and functions

The Company’s business requires manipulating and analyzing large amounts of data, and communicating the results of the analysis to our internal research personnel and to our customers via the Internet. In addition, we rely on a global enterprise software system to operate and manage our business. Our business therefore depends on the continuous, effective, reliable, and secure operation of our computer hardware, software, networks, Internet servers, and related infrastructure. To the extent that our hardware or software malfunctions or access to our data by internal research personnel or customers through the Internet is interrupted, our business could suffer.

The Company’s computer and communications hardware is protected through physical and software safeguards. However, it is still vulnerable to fire, storm, flood, power loss, earthquakes, telecommunications failures, physical or software break-ins, software viruses, and similar events. These events could lead to the unauthorized access, disclosure and use of non-public information,

including credit card data. The techniques used by criminal elements to attack computer systems are sophisticated, change frequently and may originate from less regulated and remote areas of the world. As a result, we may not be able to address these techniques proactively or implement adequate preventative measures. If our computer systems are compromised, we could be subject to fines, damages, litigation and enforcement actions, and users could curtail or cease using our applications, the occurrence of which could harm our business.

In addition, our online products and services are complex and sophisticated, and as such, could contain data, design, or software errors that could be difficult to detect and correct. Software defects could be found in current or future products. If we fail to maintain and further develop the necessary computer capacity and data to support our computational needs and our customers’ access to information-based product and service offerings, we could experience a loss of or delay in revenues or market acceptance. In addition, any sustained disruption in internet access provided by other companies could harm our business.

Business disruptions could seriously harm our future revenue and financial condition and increase our costs and expenses

The Company’s worldwide operations could be subject to earthquakes, power shortages, telecommunications failures, water shortages, tsunamis, floods, hurricanes, typhoons, fires, extreme weather conditions, medical epidemics and other natural or manmade disasters or business interruptions, for which we are predominantly self-insured. The occurrence of any of these business disruptions could seriously harm our revenue and financial condition and increase our costs and expenses. Our corporate headquarters, and a portion of our principal research and development, manufacturing and administrative facilities, are located in California, and other critical business operations and some of our suppliers are located in California, Japan, Singapore and other parts of Asia, near major earthquake faults and fire zones. The ultimate impact of being located near major earthquake faults, fire zones and being consolidated in certain geographical areas on us, our significant suppliers and our general infrastructure is unknown, but our revenue, profitability and financial condition could suffer in the event of a major earthquake, fire or other natural disaster.

Risks Related to Our International Operations

International unrest or foreign currency fluctuations could cause volatility in our international sales and our financial results

The Company’s products are currently marketed in approximately 160 countries throughout the world. Our international revenues, which include revenues from our foreign subsidiaries and export sales from the United

 

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States, represented 62% of our product revenues in 2011, 60% of our product revenues in 2010 and 61% of our product revenues in 2009. We expect that international revenues will continue to account for a significant percentage of our revenues for the foreseeable future. There are a number of risks arising from our international business, including those related to:

 

   

foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, potentially reducing the United States dollars we receive for sales denominated in foreign currency;

   

the possibility that unfriendly nations or groups could boycott our products;

   

general economic and political conditions in the markets in which we operate;

   

potential increased costs associated with overlapping tax structures;

   

potential trade restrictions and exchange controls;

   

more limited protection for intellectual property rights in some countries;

   

difficulties and costs associated with staffing and managing foreign operations;

   

unexpected changes in regulatory requirements;

   

the difficulties of compliance with a wide variety of foreign laws and regulations;

   

longer accounts receivable cycles in certain foreign countries, whether due to cultural differences, exchange rate fluctuation or other factors;

   

import and export licensing requirements; and

   

changes to our distribution networks.

A significant portion of the Company’s revenues are received in currencies other than the United States dollar, which is our reporting currency. Most of our costs, however, are incurred in United States dollars. While we have at times attempted to hedge our net cash flows in currencies other than the United States dollar, our hedging program relies in part on forecasts of these cash flows. As a result, we cannot guarantee this program will adequately protect our cash flows from the full risks and effects of exchange rate fluctuations. We also continually evaluate the costs and benefits of our hedging program and cannot guarantee that we will continue to conduct hedging activities. At the current time, we are not hedging net cash flow exposures on foreign currency revenue. As a result, fluctuations in exchange rates for the currencies in which we do business have caused, and will continue to cause, fluctuations in the United States dollar value of our financial results. We cannot predict the effects of currency exchange rate fluctuations upon our future financial results because of the number of currencies involved, the variability of currency exposures and the volatility of currency exchange rates.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

The Company may not be able to effectively and efficiently protect and enforce our proprietary technology

The Company’s success depends to a significant degree upon our ability to develop proprietary products and technologies. When we develop such technologies, we routinely seek patent protection in the United States and abroad. However, the intellectual property rights of biotechnology companies, including us, involve complex factual, scientific, and legal questions. We cannot assure that patents will be granted on any of our patent applications or that the scope of any of our issued patents will be sufficiently broad to offer meaningful protection. Even if we receive a patent that we believe is valid for a particular technology, we may not be able to realize the expected value to us from that technology due to several factors, including, without limitation, the following:

 

   

Although we have licensing programs to provide industry access to some of our patent rights, some other companies have in the past refused to participate in these licensing programs and some companies may refuse to participate in them in the future. In addition, our licenses typically provide our customers with access for limited use of our technology, such as for certain fields of use or to provide certain kinds of products and services. The validity of the restrictions contained in these licenses could be contested, and we cannot provide assurances that we would either be aware of an unauthorized use or be able to enforce the restrictions in a cost-effective manner;

   

Legal actions to enforce patent rights can be expensive and may involve the diversion of significant management time. Our enforcement actions may not be successful, and furthermore they could give

 

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risk to legal claims against us and could result in the invalidation of some of our intellectual property rights or legal determinations that they are not enforceable;

   

The Company only seeks to have patents issued in selected countries. Third-parties can make, use and sell products covered by our patents in any country in which we do not seek patent protection, unless such activity is covered by our other intellectual property;

   

The Company’s issued patents or patents we exclusively license from others could be successfully challenged through legal actions or other proceedings, such as by challenging the validity and scope of a patent with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, foreign patent offices, Federal Courts, or the International Trade Commission. These actions or proceedings could result in amendments to or rejection of certain patent claims; and

   

Judicial decisions in third-party litigation and legislative changes could harm the value of our patents, or could impact our exclusive licenses or the effectiveness of our label licenses associated with our products.

The Company is currently, and could in the future be, subject to lawsuits, arbitrations, investigations, and other legal actions with private parties and governmental entities, particularly involving claims for infringement of patents and other intellectual property rights, and we may need to obtain licenses to intellectual property from others

Our products are based on complex, rapidly developing technologies. These products could be developed without knowledge of previously filed patent applications that mature into patents that cover some aspect of these technologies. In addition, we may seek to protect and commercialize a technology even though we are aware that patents have been applied for and, in some cases, issued to others claiming technologies that are closely related to ours. Because patent litigation is complex and the outcome inherently uncertain, our belief that our products do not infringe on valid and enforceable patents owned by others could be successfully challenged. We have from time to time been notified that we may be infringing on the patents and other intellectual property rights of others. In addition, in the course of our business, we may from time to time have access to confidential or proprietary information of others, and they could bring a claim against us asserting that we had misappropriated their technologies, which, though not patented, are protected as trade secrets, and had improperly incorporated those technologies into our products. The outcome of legal actions is inherently uncertain, and we cannot be sure that we will prevail in any of these actions. An adverse determination in some of our current legal actions could harm our business and financial condition.

Due to these factors, litigation regarding patents and other intellectual property rights is extensive in the biotechnology industry, and there remains a constant risk of intellectual property litigation and other legal actions affecting us, which could include antitrust claims. From time to time, we have been made a party to litigation and have been subject to other legal actions regarding intellectual property matters, which have included claims of violations of antitrust laws. Some of these actions, if determined adversely, could harm our business and financial condition. To avoid or settle legal claims, it may be necessary or desirable in the future to obtain licenses relating to one or more products or relating to current or future technologies. We may not be able to obtain these licenses or other rights on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, and there is a risk that we may need to discontinue an important product or product line or alter our products and processes. In some situations, settlement of claims may require an agreement to cease allegedly infringing activities.

The Company is involved in several legal actions that could affect our intellectual property rights and our products and services. The cost of litigation and the amount of management time associated with these cases has been, and is expected to continue to be, significant. These matters might not be resolved favorably. If they are not resolved favorably, we could be enjoined from selling the products or services in question or other, related products or services, and monetary or other damages could be assessed against us. The damages assessed against us could include damages for past infringement, which, in some cases, can be trebled by the court. Such possible outcomes could harm our business or financial condition.

 

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Disclosure of trade secrets could cause harm to our business

The Company attempts to protect our trade secrets by, among other things, entering into confidentiality agreements with third-parties, our employees, and our consultants. However, these agreements can be breached and, if they are, there may not be an adequate remedy available to us. If our trade secrets become publicly known, we may lose our competitive position.

Some of the intellectual property that is important to our business is owned by other companies or institutions and licensed to us, and legal actions against them could harm our business

Even if we are not a party to these legal actions, an adverse outcome could harm our business because it might prevent these other companies or institutions from continuing to license intellectual property that we may need for our business. Furthermore, an adverse outcome could result in infringement or other legal actions being brought directly against us.

Risks Related to Environmental, Product Liability and Litigation Issues

Risks related to handling of hazardous materials and other regulations governing environmental and workplace safety

The Company’s research and development and manufacturing activities involve the use of potentially hazardous materials, including biological materials, chemicals, and various radioactive compounds. In addition, some of our products are hazardous materials or include hazardous materials. Our operations also involve the generation, transportation and storage of waste. These activities are subject to complex and stringent federal, state, local, and foreign environmental, health, safety and other governmental laws, regulations, and permits governing the use, storage, handling, transport, and disposal of hazardous materials and specified waste products, as well as the shipment and labeling of materials and products containing hazardous materials. Public officials and private individuals or organizations may seek to enforce these legal requirements against us. While we believe we are in material compliance with these laws, regulations, and permits, we could discover that we are not in material compliance. Under some laws and regulations, a party can be subject to “strict liability” for damages caused by some hazardous materials, which means that a party can be liable without regard to fault or negligence. Existing laws and regulations may also be revised or reinterpreted, or new laws and regulations may become applicable to us, whether retroactively or prospectively, that may have a negative effect on our business and results of operations. It is therefore impossible to eliminate completely the risk of contamination or injury from the hazardous and other materials that we use in our business and products. If we fail to comply with any of these laws, regulations, or permits, or if we are held strictly liable under any of these laws, regulations, or permits despite our compliance, we could be subject to substantial fines or penalties, payment of remediation costs, loss of permits, embargos, and/or other adverse governmental action, and we could be liable for substantial damages. Any of these events could harm our business and financial condition.

In acquiring Dexter Corporation in 2000, we assumed certain of Dexter Corporation’s environmental liabilities, including clean-up of formerly-owned locations as well as several hazardous waste sites under state and federal environmental laws. We also assumed certain Applied Biosystems environmental liabilities, including clean-up of formerly-owned locations as well as hazardous waste sites under state and federal environmental laws, in connection with our acquisition of Applied Biosystems in 2008. Unexpected results related to the investigation and clean-up of any of these sites could cause our financial exposure in these matters to exceed stated reserves and insurance, requiring us to allocate additional funds and other resources to address our environmental liabilities, which could cause a material adverse effect on our business.

Potential product liability and other litigation claims could cause harm to our business

We face a potential risk of liability claims based on our products or services. We carry product liability insurance coverage, which is limited in scope and amount. We cannot assure, however, that we will be able to maintain this insurance at a reasonable cost and on reasonable terms. We also cannot assure that this insurance will be adequate to protect us against a product liability claim, should one arise.

 

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Some of our services include the manufacture of biologic products to be tested in human clinical trials. We could be held liable for errors and omissions in connection with these services, even though we are not the party performing the clinical trials. In addition, we formulate, test and manufacture products intended for use by the public. These activities could expose us to risk of liability for personal injury or death to persons using such products. We seek to reduce our potential liability through measures such as contractual indemnification provisions with clients (the scope of which may vary from client-to-client and the performances of which are not secured), insurance maintained by clients and conducting certain of these businesses through subsidiaries. Nonetheless, we could be materially harmed if we were required to pay damages or incur defense costs in connection with a claim that is outside the scope of the indemnification agreements, if the indemnity, although applicable, is not performed in accordance with its terms or if our liability exceeds the amount of applicable insurance or indemnity. In addition, we could be held liable for errors and omissions in connection with the services we perform. We currently maintain product liability and errors and omissions insurance with respect to these risks. There can be no assurance, however, that our insurance coverage will be adequate or that insurance coverage will continue to be available on terms acceptable to us.

We are involved in a number of legal proceedings. Legal proceedings are inherently unpredictable, and the outcome can result in excessive verdicts and/or injunctive relief that may affect how we operate our business, or we may enter into settlements of claims for monetary damages that exceed our insurance coverage, if any. Future court decisions and legislative activity may increase our exposure to litigation and regulatory investigations. In some cases, substantial non-economic remedies or punitive damages may be sought.

Risks Related to the Market for Our Securities

Operating results and the market price of our stock and the senior unsecured notes could be volatile

Our operating results and the price of our stock and the senior unsecured notes have been in the past, and will continue to be, subject to fluctuations as a result of a number of factors, including those that we fail to foresee. Our stock price could also be affected by any of the following: inability to meet analysts’ expectations; general fluctuations in the stock market; actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results; fluctuations in the stock prices of companies in our industry or those of our customers; changes in earnings estimated by securities analysts or our ability to meet those estimates; domestic and foreign economic conditions; and publicity regarding the genomics, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, or life sciences industries generally, including, for example, comments by securities analysts or public officials regarding such matters. Such volatility has had a significant effect on the market prices of many companies’ securities for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and, in the past, has led to securities class action litigation. Securities litigation against us could result in substantial costs and a diversion of our management’s attention and resources, which could have an adverse effect on our business.

Certain provisions in our restated certificate of incorporation and seventh amended and restated bylaws, and of Delaware law, may prevent or delay an acquisition of our company, which could decrease the trading price of our common stock

Our restated certificate of incorporation, our seventh amended and restated bylaws and Delaware law contain provisions that are intended to deter coercive takeover practices and inadequate takeover bids by making such practices or bids unacceptably expensive to the raider and to encourage prospective acquirers to negotiate with our board of directors rather than to attempt a hostile takeover. These provisions include, among others:

 

   

the inability of our stockholders to call a special meeting;

   

rules regarding how stockholders may present proposals or nominate directors for election at stockholder meetings;

   

the right of our board to issue preferred stock without stockholder approval; and

   

the ability of our directors, and not stockholders, to fill vacancies on our board of directors.

Delaware law also imposes some restrictions on mergers and other business combinations between us and any holder of 15% or more of our outstanding common stock.

 

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We believe these provisions may help protect our stockholders from coercive or otherwise unfair takeover tactics by requiring potential acquirers to negotiate with our board of directors and by providing our board of directors with more time to assess any acquisition proposal. These provisions are not intended to make our company immune from takeovers. In addition, although we believe these provisions collectively provide for an opportunity to receive higher bids by requiring potential acquirers to negotiate with our board, they would apply even if the offer may be considered beneficial by some stockholders. These provisions may also frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management team by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our board, which is responsible for appointing the members of our management.

ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

Not applicable.

ITEM 2. Properties

We own or lease approximately 4,800,000 square feet of property being used in current operations at the following principal locations within the United States, each of which contains office, manufacturing, storage and/or laboratory facilities:

 

   

Austin, Texas (leased)

   

Bedford, Massachusetts (leased)

   

Benicia, California (leased)

   

Beverly, Massachusetts (leased)

   

Brown Deer, Wisconsin (leased)

   

Carlsbad, California (owned (land only) and leased)

   

Durham, North Carolina (leased)

   

Eugene, Oregon (owned and leased)

   

Foster City, California (owned and leased)

   

Framingham, Massachusetts (leased)

   

Frederick, Maryland (owned and leased)

   

Grand Island, New York (owned and leased)

   

Grand Prairie, Texas (leased)

   

Madison, Wisconsin (owned and leased)

   

Pleasanton, California (owned)

   

South San Francisco, California (leased)

   

Washington, District of Columbia (leased)

   

Woburn, Massachusetts (leased)

In addition, we own or lease approximately 1,500,000 square feet of property at locations outside the United States including these principal locations, each of which also contains office, manufacturing, storage and/or laboratory facilities:

 

   

Auckland, Christchurch and Nelson, New Zealand (owned)

   

Bangalore, India (leased)

   

Bleiswijk, Netherlands (leased)

   

Darmstadt, Germany (leased)

   

Oslo, Norway (owned (land only) and leased)

   

Melbourne and Newcastle, Australia (owned and leased)

   

Paisley, Scotland (leased)

   

Shanghai, Beijing and Guangzhou, China (leased)

   

Singapore (leased)

   

Tokyo, Japan (leased)

   

Warrington, United Kingdom (owned and leased)

 

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In addition to the principal properties listed above, we lease other properties in locations throughout the world, including: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, and Thailand. Many of our plants have been constructed, renovated or expanded during the past ten years. We are currently using substantially all of our finished space, with some space available for expansion at some of our locations. We consider the facilities to be in a condition suitable for their current uses. Because of anticipated growth in the business and due to the increasing requirements of customers or regulatory agencies, we may need to acquire additional space or upgrade and enhance existing space during the next five years. We believe that adequate facilities will be available upon the conclusion of our leases.

We also have leases in Bethesda, Maryland; Branford, Connecticut; San Carlos, California; Darmstadt, Germany; and Heathrow, United Kingdom that are subleased or are being offered for sublease. These properties are not used in current operations and therefore are not included in the discussion above.

Most of our products and services are manufactured or provided from our facilities in Austin, Texas; Bedford, Massachusetts; Carlsbad, Foster City and Pleasanton, California; Eugene, Oregon; Frederick, Maryland; Grand Island, New York; Madison, Wisconsin; Auckland, New Zealand; Oslo, Norway; Paisley, Scotland; and Warrington, United Kingdom. We also have manufacturing facilities in Israel, Japan and Singapore.

Additional information regarding our properties is contained in Notes 1 and 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 3. Legal Proceedings

We are subject to potential liabilities under government regulations and various claims and legal actions that are pending or may be asserted. These matters arise in the ordinary course and conduct of our business, and, at times, as a result of our acquisitions and dispositions. They include, for example, commercial, intellectual property, environmental, securities, and employment matters. Some are expected to be covered, at least partly, by insurance. We intend to continue to defend ourselves vigorously in such matters. We regularly assess contingencies to determine the degree of probability and range of possible loss for potential accrual in our financial statements. An estimated loss contingency is accrued in our financial statements if it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Based on our assessment, we currently have accrued an immaterial amount in our financial statements for contingent liabilities associated with these legal actions and claims. Litigation is inherently unpredictable, and unfavorable resolutions could occur. As a result, assessing contingencies is highly subjective and requires judgment about future events. The amount of ultimate loss may exceed our current accruals, and it is possible that our cash flows or results of operations could be materially affected in any particular period by the unfavorable resolution of one or more of these contingencies.

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

None.

 

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PART II

ITEM 5.  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market and Stockholder Information

The Company’s common stock trades on The NASDAQ Global Select Market® under the symbol “LIFE.” Our common stock previously traded under the symbol “IVGN”. The trading symbol was changed in November 2008 in connection with the change of our corporate name from Invitrogen Corporation to Life Technologies Corporation. The table below provides the high and low sales prices of our common stock for the periods indicated, as reported by The NASDAQ Global Select Market.

 

     High      Low  

Year ended December 31, 2011

     

Fourth quarter

   $ 43.31       $ 36.07   

Third quarter

     52.61         35.30   

Second quarter

     56.71         49.85   

First quarter

     57.25         49.18   

Year ended December 31, 2010

     

Fourth quarter

   $ 56.78       $ 45.19   

Third quarter

     48.67         41.10   

Second quarter

     56.19         46.63   

First quarter

     54.06         46.32   

On February 27, 2012, the last reported sale price of our common stock was $47.89. As of February 27, 2012, there were approximately 4,214 stockholders of record of our common stock. The approximate number of holders is based upon the actual number of holders registered in our records at such date and excludes holders of shares in “street name” or persons, partnerships, associations, corporations, or other entities identified in security positions listings maintained by depository trust companies. The calculations of the market value of shares of Life Technologies stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2011, shown on the cover of this report, was made on the assumption that there were no affiliates other than executive officers and directors as of the date of calculation.

 

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Price Performance Graph

Set forth below is a graph comparing the total return on an indexed basis of a $100 investment in the Company’s common stock, the NASDAQ Composite® (US) Index and the NASDAQ BioPharmaceutical Index. The measurement points utilized in the graph consist of the last trading day in each calendar year, which closely approximates the last day of the respective fiscal year of the Company.

 

LOGO

Dividends

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and currently do not anticipate paying such cash dividends. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our future earnings for use in the development and expansion of our business, debt repayment, stock repurchase programs, and general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon our results of operations, financial condition, tax laws and other factors as the Board of Directors, in its discretion, deems relevant.

Securities Purchased Under Life Technologies Stock Repurchase Programs

In July 2011, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the July 2011 program) authorizing management to repurchase up to $200.0 million of common stock. No shares have been repurchased under this program.

In December 2010, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the December 2010 program), authorizing management to repurchase up to $500.0 million of common stock. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company repurchased 6.4 million shares of its common stock under this program at a total cost of approximately $303.0 million. As of December 31, 2011, there was $197.0 million of authorization remaining under this program.

In July 2010, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the July 2010 program) authorizing management to repurchase up to $520.0 million of common stock over the next two years. As of

 

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December 31, 2010, the Company completed repurchasing 8.4 million shares at a total cost of $436.6 million. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company repurchased an additional 1.5 million shares of its common stock at a total cost of $83.4 million, thereby completing the July 2010 program by repurchasing an aggregate of 9.9 million shares at a total cost of $520.0 million, the maximum amount authorized.

The cost of repurchasing shares is included in treasury stock and reported as a reduction in total equity when a repurchase occurs.

The following table represents stock repurchases under the publicly announced programs during the fourth quarter of 2011:

 

Period

   (a)
Total Number
of Shares
(or Units)
purchased
     (b)
Average Price
Paid per
Share
     (c)
Total Dollar
of Shares
(or Units)
Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced
Plans or
Programs
     (d)
Maximum Number
(or Approximate
Dollar Value) of
Shares (or Units)
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Plans or
Programs
 

October 1 — October 31

     687,927       $ 38.37       $ 26,393,073       $ 396,994,199   

November 1 — November 30

                             396,994,199   

December 1 — December 31

                             396,994,199   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     687,927       $ 38.37       $ 26,393,073       $ 396,994,199   

The Company did not make any share purchases other than through publicly announced plans.

 

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ITEM 6.  Selected Financial Data

The following selected data should be read in conjunction with our financial statements located elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”.

FIVE YEAR SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

(in thousands, except per share data)    2011      2010      2009      2008      2007  

Revenues

   $ 3,775,672       $ 3,588,094       $ 3,280,344       $ 1,620,323       $ 1,281,747   

Gross profit

     2,109,977         2,106,141         1,824,725         940,752         715,887   

Net income from continuing operations

     377,834         377,858         144,594         4,356         106,238   

Net income from discontinued operations

                             1,358         12,911   

Net income

     377,834         377,858         144,594         5,714         119,149   

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

     658         437                           

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

     378,492         378,295         144,594         5,714         119,149   

Earnings from continuing operations per common share attributable to Life Technologies:

              

Basic

   $ 2.11       $ 2.06       $ 0.82       $ 0.05       $ 1.13   

Diluted

   $ 2.05       $ 1.99       $ 0.80       $ 0.04       $ 1.10   

Earnings from discontinued operations per common share attributable to Life Technologies:

              

Basic

                           $ 0.01       $ 0.14   

Diluted

                           $ 0.01       $ 0.13   

Net income per share attributable to Life Technologies:

              

Basic

   $ 2.11       $ 2.06       $ 0.82       $ 0.06       $ 1.27   

Diluted

   $ 2.05       $ 1.99       $ 0.80       $ 0.05       $ 1.23   

Current assets

   $ 2,093,617       $ 2,046,525       $ 1,796,164       $ 1,612,171       $ 1,090,484   

Noncurrent assets

     7,094,346         7,439,674         7,319,576         7,286,588         2,225,966   

Current liabilities (including convertible debt)

     1,496,306         1,146,385         1,385,723         1,007,242         234,413   

Noncurrent liabilities (including convertible debt)

     3,092,431         3,901,785         3,703,349         4,434,979         1,232,406   

Total equity

   $ 4,599,226       $ 4,438,029       $ 4,026,668       $ 3,456,538       $ 1,847,125   

The fiscal year 2008 financial data includes the results of operations of Applied Biosystems, Inc. from November 21, 2008, the date of acquisition, and the one-time purchase accounting charges associated with the merger such as in-process research and development, which affects the comparability of the Selected Financial Data. For more information on our business combinations accounting, refer to Note 2 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Combinations and Divestitures”.

 

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ITEM 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

OVERVIEW

We are a global life sciences company dedicated to helping our customers make scientific discoveries and ultimately improve the quality of life. Our systems, reagents, and services enable scientific researchers to accelerate scientific exploration, driving to discoveries and developments that make life better. Life Technologies customers do their work across the biological spectrum, working to advance genomic medicine, regenerative science, molecular diagnostics, agricultural and environmental research, and 21st century forensics. In 2011, the Company had sales of approximately $3.8 billion, had a workforce of approximately 10,400 people, had a presence in more than 160 countries, and possessed a rapidly-growing intellectual property estate of over 4,000 patents and exclusive licenses.

The Company’s systems and reagents enable, simplify and improve a broad spectrum of biological research of genes, proteins and cells within academic and life science research and commercial applications. Our scientific know-how is making biodiscovery research techniques more effective and efficient to pharmaceutical, biotechnology, agricultural, government and academic researchers with backgrounds in a wide range of scientific disciplines.

The Company offers many different products and services, and is continually developing and/or acquiring others. Some of our specific product categories include the following:

 

 

Capillary electrophoresis, SOLiDtm, and Ion Torrenttm DNA sequencing systems and reagents, which are used to discover sources of genetic and epigenetic variation, to catalog the DNA structure of organisms de novo, to verify the composition of genetic research material, and to apply these genetic analysis discoveries in markets such as forensic human identification.

  “High-throughput” gene cloning and expression technology, which allows customers to clone and expression-test genes on an industrial scale.
  Pre-cast electrophoresis products, which improve the speed, reliability and convenience of separating nucleic acids and proteins.
  Antibodies, which allow researchers to capture and label proteins, visualize their location through use of Molecular Probes dyes and discern their role in disease.
  Magnetic beads, which are used in a variety of settings, such as attachment of molecular labels, nucleic acid purification, and organ and bone marrow tissue-type testing.
  Molecular Probes fluorescence-based technologies, which facilitate the labeling of molecules for biological research and drug discovery.
  Transfection reagents, which are widely used to transfer genetic elements into living cells enabling the study of protein function and gene regulation.
  PCR and Real Time PCR systems and reagents, which enable researchers to amplify and detect targeted nucleic acids (DNA and RNA molecules) for a host of applications in molecular biology.
  Cell culture media and reagents used to preserve and grow mammalian cells, which are used in large scale cGMP bio-production facilities to produce large molecule biologic therapies.
  RNA Interference reagents, which enable scientists to selectively “turn off” genes in biology systems to gain insight into biological pathways.

The Company aligns our products and services into the following three divisions: Molecular Biology Systems (MBS), Genetic Systems (GS) and Cell Systems (CS). The MBS division includes the molecular biology-based technologies including basic and real-time PCR, RNAi, DNA synthesis, sample prep, transfection, cloning and protein expression profiling, protein analysis and thermo-cycler instrumentation. The CS division includes all product lines used in the study of cell function, including cell culture media and sera, stem cells and related tools, cellular imaging products, antibodies, drug discovery services, and cell therapy related products. The GS division includes capillary electrophoresis systems and reagents and next generation sequencing systems and reagents, including the SOLiDTM system, and Ion TorrentTM sequencing systems, as well as reagent kits developed specifically for applied markets, such as forensics, food safety, animal health and pharmaceutical quality monitoring.

 

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We divide our principal customer base into three primary categories:

Life Sciences. Our life sciences research customers consist of laboratories generally associated with universities, medical research centers, government institutions (such as the United States National Institutes of Health, or the NIH), and other research institutions as well as biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical companies. Researchers at these institutions use our products and services in a broad spectrum of scientific activities, such as searching for drugs or other techniques to combat a wide variety of diseases (namely cancer and viral and bacterial diseases); researching for disease identification or for improving the efficacy of drugs to targeted patient groups; and assisting in vaccine design. Our products and services provide the research tools needed for genomics studies, proteomics studies, gene splicing, cellular analysis, and other key research applications that are required by these life science researchers.

Applied Sciences. Our applied sciences customers consist of businesses in a diverse range of industries that apply our technology to solve some of humankind’s most pressing issues. The current focus of our products within these industries is in the areas of: forensic analysis, which is used to identify individuals based on their DNA; quality and safety testing, such as testing required to measure food, beverage, or environmental quality, and pharmaceutical manufacturing quality and safety; animal health testing, which enables the detection of pathogens in livestock; agricultural production, such as tools to support food processing and the commercial production of genetically-engineered products; synthetic biology, which enables our customers to explore ways to effectively harness the power of biology to replicate its systems and create biofuels; and biopharmaceutical manufacturing, such as the commercial production of rare or difficult to obtain substances, including proteins, interferons, interleukins, t-PA and monoclonal antibodies.

Medical Sciences. Our medical sciences customers consist of clinical labs and medical institutions that use our commercial technology for clinical and diagnostic purposes, and medical researchers that use our research technology to explore ways to advance medicine and deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. The current focus of our products is in the area of human diagnostics to better understand disease determination and targeted therapy selection, including use of our next generation sequencing technologies to better understand the nature of disease by unlocking the secrets of DNA; cell therapy; regenerative medicine; and tissue engineering.

Our Strategy

Our objective is to provide essential life science technologies for basic research, drug discovery, and development of diagnostic and commercial applications.

Our strategies to achieve this objective include:

 

Ø New Product Innovation and Development

 

  Ø Developing innovative new products. We place a great emphasis on developing new technologies internally for life sciences research. Additionally, we are looking to utilize the broad range of our technologies to create unique customer application-based solutions. A significant portion of our growth and current revenue base has been created by the application of technology to accelerate our customer’s research process, and to various standardized testing environments such as human identification and animal health.

 

  Ø In-licensing technologies. We actively and selectively in-license new technologies which we modify to create high value kits, many of which address bottlenecks in the research or drug discovery laboratories. We have a dedicated group of individuals that focus on in-licensing technologies from academic and government institutions, as well as biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.

 

  Ø Acquisitions. We actively and selectively seek to acquire and integrate companies with complementary products and technologies, trusted brand names, strong market positions and strong intellectual property positions. We have made numerous acquisitions over the course of the Company’s history. We take a disciplined approach in evaluating potential deals, which includes targeting attractive markets and requiring specific return on capital metrics.

 

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Ø Utilize Existing Sales, Distribution and Manufacturing Infrastructure

 

  Ø Multi-national sales footprint. We have developed a broad sales and distribution network with a sales presence in more than 160 countries. Our sales force is highly trained, with many of our sales people possessing degrees in molecular biology, biochemistry or related fields. We believe our sales force has successfully marketed our products across the globe and we expect to leverage this capacity to increase sales of our existing, newly developed and acquired products. In addition, to drive enhanced productivity for the Company and its customers, Life Technologies has a significant and growing e-commerce platform.

 

  Ø High degree of customer satisfaction. Our sales, marketing, customer service and technical support and service teams provide our customers exceptional service and have been highly rated in customer satisfaction surveys. We use this strength to attract new customers and maintain existing customers.

 

  Ø Rapid product delivery. We have the ability to ship typical consumable orders on a same-day or next-day basis. We use this ability to provide convenient service to our customers and to generate additional product revenues.

 

Ø Invest in High Growth Industries

We will focus our investments and resources in segments that provide high growth opportunities, particularly in four areas:

 

  Ø

Next Generation DNA Sequencing. Our Ion TorrentTM semiconductor technology represents innovation in next generation sequencing. We will continue to invest in innovative technologies, customer collaborations, and sales force expertise to remain a leader in this important area of research. We will also continue to invest in future sequencing technologies that will allow for more rapid and lower cost sequencing. Robust sequencing capabilities are critical to the advancement of genomic medicine, as the treatment of disease shifts to therapies that are specific to an individual’s unique genetic makeup.

 

  Ø Emerging Geographies. We continue to focus and invest in high-growth geographic segments such as China, India and Brazil, with direct sales and marketing personnel, as well as manufacturing and distribution facilities. We will further optimize our presence in these areas by enhancing relationships with key government and academic institutions and local companies.

 

  Ø Regenerative Medicine. We are a leading provider of biological products and services for advancing the field of regenerative medicine. We will continue to invest in supplementing our comprehensive suite of product offerings, including animal origin free reagents for stem cell research, and unique primary and stem cells for drug discovery screening. Today, our products enable cutting edge tissue-engineered transplants and research into innovative cell therapy efforts. With a large array of products and services for advancing stem cell research and cell therapy, we will continue to enable our customers to focus on regenerative medicine.

 

  Ø Applied Markets. We will leverage the growing trend of applying biology to segments beyond basic life science research. We have a strong presence in many of the markets, such as forensics, quality and safety testing, animal health testing, agricultural production, synthetic biology and biopharmaceutical manufacturing. We will continue to invest to further add to our product portfolio and customer contacts in many applied markets.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Comparison of Years Ended December 31, 2011 and 2010

 

(in millions)    2011     2010     $ Increase
(Decrease)
    % Increase  

Molecular Biology Systems revenues

   $ 1,722.4      $ 1,725.8      $ (3.4     0

Cell Systems revenues

     969.8        903.7        66.1        7

Genetic Systems revenues

     1,028.1        946.1        82.0        9

Corporate and other revenues

     55.4        12.5        42.9        NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues

   $ 3,775.7      $ 3,588.1      $ 187.6        5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total gross profit

   $ 2,110.0      $ 2,106.1      $ 3.9        0

Total gross profit %

     56     59    

Revenues

The Company’s revenues increased by $187.6 million or 5% for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the year ended December 31, 2010. The increase in revenue was primarily driven by increases of $90.1 million related to volume, pricing, and royalties including $38.8 million of revenue recognized upon a licensing settlement, $51.8 million as a result of acquisitions, and $42.8 million in favorable foreign currency impacts, net of hedging. Volume and pricing relates to the impact of revenue due to total unit sales for existing and new products as well as year over year change in unit pricing and its impact on gross revenue. Acquisition revenue relates to revenue from acquired entities in the first twelve months subsequent to acquisition.

The Company operates our business under three divisions—Molecular Biology Systems, Cell Systems, and Genetic Systems. The Molecular Biology Systems (MBS) division includes the molecular biology based technologies including basic and real-time PCR, RNAi, DNA synthesis, thermo-cycler instrumentation, cloning and protein expression profiling and protein analysis. Revenue in this division decreased by $3.4 million in 2011 compared to 2010. This decrease was driven primarily by $32.9 million in decreased volume, pricing, and royalties, partially offset by $19.8 million in favorable currency impacts, net of hedging and $11.3 million associated with acquisitions. The Cell Systems (CS) division includes all product lines used in the study of cell function, including cell culture media and sera, stem cells and related tools, cellular imaging products, antibodies, drug discovery services, and cell therapy related products. Revenue in this division increased $66.1 million or 7% for 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was driven primarily by $53.6 million in increased volume, pricing, and royalties, and by $11.4 million in favorable foreign currency impacts, net of hedging. The Genetic System (GS) division includes sequencing systems and reagents, including capillary electrophoresis, Ion TorrentTM and the SOLiDTM sequencing systems, as well as reagent kits developed specifically for applied markets, such as forensics and food safety and animal health. Revenue in this division increased by $82.0 million or 9% for 2011 compared to 2010. This increase was driven primarily by $39.9 million associated with acquisitions, $28.3 million in increased volume, pricing, and royalties, and $11.5 million in favorable currency impacts, net of hedging. The Company records revenues that do not correspond to any of the divisions in the Corporate and other revenues line. The $42.9 million increase in Corporate and other revenues from 2010 to 2011 was driven primarily by revenue of $38.8 million recognized upon a licensing settlement.

Changes in exchange rates of foreign currencies, especially in the euro, British pound, and Japanese yen, can significantly increase or decrease our reported revenue on sales made in these currencies and could result in a material positive or negative impact on our reported results. In addition to currency exchange rates, we expect that future revenues will be affected by, among other things, new product introductions, competitive conditions, customer research budgets, government research funding, the rate of expansion of our customer base, price increases, product discontinuations, and acquisitions or dispositions of businesses or product lines.

 

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Gross Profit

Gross profit increased by $3.9 million and was flat in 2011 compared to 2010. The increase in gross profit was primarily driven by a net increase of $48.0 million from price, volume, royalties and product mix, including $38.8 million of revenue recognized upon a licensing settlement mentioned in revenue drivers, $23.3 million as a result of acquisitions, and $10.1 million in favorable currency impacts, net of hedging, partially offset by a judgment of $52.0 million on a case in litigation, an increase of $15.0 million in purchased intangible amortization and a decrease in contingent consideration fair value adjustments of $3.6 million.

Operating Expenses

 

      For the Years Ended December 31,              
      2011     2010              
(in millions)    Operating
Expense
     As a
Percentage
of
Revenues
    Operating
Expense
     As a
Percentage
of
Revenues
    $  Increase
(Decrease)
    %  Increase
(Decrease)
 

Operating Expenses

              

Selling, general and administrative

   $ 1,009.0         27   $ 1,023.2         29   $ (14.2     (1 )% 

Research and development

     377.9         10     375.5         10     2.4        1

Business consolidation costs

     75.3         2     93.5         3     (18.2     (19 )% 

Purchased in-process research and development

             NM        1.7         NM        (1.7     NM   

Selling, General and Administrative. For the year ended December 31, 2011, selling, general and administrative expenses decreased by $14.2 million or 1% compared to the year ended December 31, 2010. This decrease was driven primarily by a $33.2 million decrease in compensation and benefits which included a decrease of $9.5 million of accelerated compensation expense as a result of an acquisition, a $5.9 million decrease in travel and discretionary spending, and a $5.8 million decrease in general overhead and infrastructure costs, partially offset by $21.9 million in unfavorable foreign currency impacts, and an increase of $12.7 million in purchased services. As a percentage of revenue, the costs are down from the prior year as a result of the restructuring activities that have contributed to the reduction of overall overhead related costs year over year.

Research and Development. For the year ended December 31, 2011, research and development expenses increased by $2.4 million or 1% compared to the year ended December 31, 2010. This increase was driven primarily by a $13.7 million fair value adjustment to the contingent consideration liability, partially offset by a $10.2 million decrease in compensation and benefits, which included a decrease of $9.4 million of accelerated compensation expense as a result of an acquisition. The Company continues to invest in research and development programs and as a percentage of revenue, overall costs are comparable period over period.

Business Consolidation Costs. For the year ended December 31, 2011, business consolidation costs were $75.3 million, compared to $93.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2010, and represent costs to integrate recent and pending acquisitions and divestitures into the Company’s operations. The expenses for both periods related primarily to integration and restructuring efforts, including severance and site consolidation, related to various mergers, acquisitions and divestitures that took place in each of the periods, respectively.

Other Income (Expense)

Interest Income. Interest income was $3.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $4.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010.

Interest income in the future will be affected by changes in short-term interest rates and changes in cash balances, which may materially increase or decrease as a result of acquisitions, debt repayment, and stock repurchase programs, and other financing activities.

 

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Interest Expense. Interest expense was $162.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $152.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The increase in interest expenses was primarily driven by higher debt balances driven by the $1,500.0 million of fixed rate unsecured notes issued in February 2010 and the $800.0 million of fixed rate unsecured notes issued in December 2010, partially offset by the pay off of the term loans in February 2010 and the pay off of the 2025 and the 2023 Convertible Senior Notes in June 2011 and August 2010, respectively.

The Company adopted a bifurcation requirement on our convertible senior notes, as prescribed by ASC Topic 470-20, Debt with Conversion and Other Options and as a result has incurred an additional $24.6 million and $38.0 million in interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

During February 2010, the Company fully repaid the remaining outstanding term loans, and recognized a loss of $54.2 million of deferred financing costs. The loss is separately identified in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a “Loss on early extinguishment of debt”.

Other Expense, Net. Other expense, net, was $10.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to $5.9 million for the same period of 2010. Included in 2011 were foreign currency losses of $8.3 million driven by fluctuations in major currencies. Included in 2010 was a loss on the discontinuance of cash flow hedges of $12.9 million and a $1.2 million expense related to the amortization of purchased intangibles and amortization of deferred revenue fair market value adjustments attributable to the joint venture, offset by a gain from the recovery on an impaired security of $7.1 million and a gain of $0.6 million on the discontinuance of a cash flow hedge.

During January 2010, the Company completed the sale of its 50% ownership stake in the Applied Biosystems/MDS Analytical Technologies Instruments joint venture and selected assets and liabilities directly attributable to the joint venture for $428.1 million in cash, excluding related tax obligations and transactions costs, and recorded a gain of $37.3 million. The gain is separately identified in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a “Gain on divestiture of equity investments”.

Provision for Income Taxes. The provision for income taxes as a percentage of pre-tax income from continuing operations was 21.1% for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared with 14.4% for the year ended December 31, 2010. The effective tax rate for 2011 is higher than 2010 primarily due to large prior year tax benefits associated with one-time repatriation benefits from the Company’s global restructuring activities and acquisitions which significantly exceeded similar current year tax benefits.

Comparison of Years Ended December 31, 2010 and 2009

 

(in millions)    2010     2009     $ Increase      % Increase  

Molecular Biology Systems revenues

   $ 1,725.8      $ 1,633.3      $ 92.5         6

Cell Systems revenues

     903.7        802.9        100.8         13

Genetic Systems revenues

     946.1        856.2        89.9         10

Corporate and other

     12.5        (12.1     24.6         NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

Total revenues

   $ 3,588.1      $ 3,280.3      $ 307.8         9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

Total gross profit

   $ 2,106.1      $ 1,824.7      $ 281.4         15

Total gross profit %

     59     56     

Revenues

The Company’s revenues increased by $307.8 million or 9% for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to the year ended December 31, 2009. The increase in revenue was primarily driven by increases of $219.5 million related to volume, pricing, and royalties, $44.3 million in favorable foreign currency impacts including hedging, $33.8 million associated with acquisitions, and a decrease of $16.1 million in amortization of purchase accounting deferred revenue, partially offset by $11.8 million from the divestiture of a product line.

 

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The Molecular Biology Systems (MBS) division includes the molecular biology based technologies including basic and real-time PCR, RNAi, DNA synthesis, thermo-cycler instrumentation, cloning and protein expression profiling and protein analysis. Revenue in this division increased by $92.5 million or 6% in 2010 compared to 2009. This increase was driven primarily by $40.8 million in increased volume, pricing, and royalties, $31.6 million associated with acquisitions, and $20.1 million in favorable currency impacts including hedging. The Cell Systems (CS) division includes all product lines used in the study of cell function, including cell culture media and sera, stem cells and related tools, cellular imaging products, antibodies, drug discovery services, and cell therapy related products. Revenue in this division increased $100.8 million or 13% for 2010 compared to 2009. This increase was driven primarily by $91.2 million in increased volume, pricing, and royalties, and by $9.5 million in favorable foreign currency impacts including hedging. The Genetic System (GS) division includes sequencing systems and reagents, including capillary electrophoresis, Ion Torrenttm and the SOLiDtm sequencing systems, as well as reagent kits developed specifically for applied markets, such as forensics and food safety and animal health. Revenue in this division increased by $89.9 million or 10% for 2010 compared to 2009. This increase was driven primarily by $84.6 million in increased volume, pricing, and royalties, $14.6 million in favorable currency impacts including hedging, and $2.2 million associated with acquisitions, partially offset by $11.8 million from the divestiture of a product line.

Gross Profit

Gross profit increased by $281.4 million or 15% in 2010 compared to 2009. The increase in gross profit was primarily driven by a $165.2 million increase in volume, pricing, and product mix (including an increase in royalty revenue), a $59.8 million decrease in acquired inventory fair market value adjustments, $34.1 million in favorable foreign currency impacts including hedging, a $16.1 million decrease in the amortization of purchased deferred revenue, a $10.6 million net increase associated with acquisitions and a divestiture, and $6.2 million in increased royalty revenue, offset primarily by an increase of $11.2 million in purchased intangible amortization. The $59.8 million and $16.1 million decreases in acquired inventory fair market value adjustments and the amortization of purchased deferred revenue, respectively, were primarily driven by recording the impact of these items in 2009 as a result of the AB acquisition. In accordance with business combination accounting guidance, the acquired deferred revenue and inventory is adjusted to fair value and the Company amortizes this fair value adjustment into income in line with the underlying acquired assets and liabilities.

Operating Expenses

 

      For the Years Ended December 31,              
      2010     2009              
(in millions)    Operating
Expense
     As a
Percentage
of
Revenues
    Operating
Expense
     As a
Percentage
of
Revenues
    $ Increase/
(Decrease)
    %  Increase/
(Decrease)
 

Operating Expenses

              

Selling, general and administrative

   $ 1,023.2         29   $ 987.1         30   $ 36.1        4

Research and development

     375.5         10     337.1         10     38.4        11

Business consolidation costs

     93.5         3     112.9         3     (19.4     (17 )% 

In-process research and development

     1.7         NM        1.7         NM                 

Selling, General and Administrative. For the year ended December 31, 2010, selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $36.1 million or 4% compared to the year ended December 31, 2009. This increase was driven primarily by a $30.1 million increase in compensation, bonuses and benefits, a $14.3 million increase in depreciation and amortization, $9.5 million due to accelerated compensation expense related to a business acquisition, and $6.4 million in unfavorable foreign currency impacts, partially offset by a decrease of $26.4 million in purchased services.

 

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Research and Development. For the year ended December 31, 2010, research and development expenses increased by $38.4 million or 11% compared to the year ended December 31, 2009. This increase was driven primarily by an $11.4 million increase in compensation, bonuses and benefits, $9.4 million due to accelerated compensation expense related to a business acquisition, and a $12.2 million increase in facilities, general overhead and infrastructure costs. As a percentage of revenues, the costs are comparable period over period.

Business Consolidation Costs. For the year ended December 31, 2010, business consolidation costs were $93.5 million, compared to $112.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, and represent costs to integrate recent and pending acquisitions and to complete divestitures into or out of the Company’s operations. The expenses for both periods related primarily to integration and restructuring efforts, including severance and site consolidation, related to various mergers, acquisitions and divestitures.

Other Income (Expense)

Interest Income. Interest income was $4.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to $4.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2009.

Interest Expense. Interest expense was $152.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to $192.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2009. The decrease in interest expense was primarily driven by lower average debt balances driven by the payoff of the 2023 Convertible Senior Notes in August 2010 and the payoffs of Term Loan A and Term Loan B in February 2010, partially offset with interest expenses incurred related to the issuance of $2,300.0 million of fixed rate unsecured senior notes, $1,500.0 million of which was issued in February 2010 and $800.0 million of which was issued in December 2010.

The Company adopted a bifurcation requirement on our convertible senior notes, as prescribed by ASC Topic 470-20, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, in the first quarter of 2009 and as a result has incurred an additional $38.0 million and $42.9 million in interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

In February 2010, the Company fully repaid the remaining outstanding Term Loans A and B, and recognized a loss of $54.2 million of deferred financing costs. During the year ended December 31, 2009, the Company made an early principal payment of $350.0 million on our Term Loan B, which resulted in a loss of $12.5 million of deferred financing costs attributable to the principal paid. The loss is separately indentified in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a “Loss on early extinguishment of debt.”

Other Income (Expense), Net. Other income, net, was $(5.9) million for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to $9.4 million for the same period of 2009. Included in 2010 was a loss on the discontinuance of cash flow hedges of $12.9 million and a $1.2 million expense related to the amortization of purchased intangibles and amortization of deferred revenue fair market value adjustments attributable to the joint venture, offset by a gain from the recovery on an impaired security of $7.1 million and a gain of $0.6 million on the discontinuance of a cash flow hedge.

In January 2010, the Company completed the sale of its 50% ownership stake in the Applied Biosystems/MDS Analytical Technologies Instruments joint venture and selected assets and liabilities directly attributable to the joint venture to Danaher Corporation for $428.1 million in cash, excluding related tax obligations and transactions costs, and recorded a gain of $37.3 million. The gain is separately identified in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as a “Gain on divestiture of equity investments”.

Provision for Income Taxes. The provision for income taxes as a percentage of pre-tax income from continuing operations was 14.4% for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared with 25.7% for the year ended December 31, 2009. The effective tax rate for 2010 was significantly lower than 2009 primarily due to the release of certain tax reserves relating to prior acquisitions; large one-time repatriation benefits from the Company’s global restructuring activities and increased domestic production tax benefits.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Our future capital requirements and the adequacy of our available funds will depend on many factors, including future business acquisitions, debt repayment, share repurchases, scientific progress in our research and

 

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development programs and the magnitude of those programs, our ability to establish collaborative and licensing arrangements, the cost involved in preparing, filing, prosecuting, maintaining and enforcing patent claims and competing technological and market developments. We intend to continue our strategic investment activities in new product development, in-licensing technologies and acquisitions that support our platforms.

Our working capital factors, such as inventory turnover and days sales outstanding, are seasonal and, on an interim basis during the year, may require an influx of short-term working capital. We believe our current cash and cash equivalents, investments, cash provided by operations and cash available from bank loans and lines of credit will satisfy our working capital requirements, debt obligations and capital expenditures for the foreseeable future. In addition, we will continue to monitor the global economic environment, including that of the eurozone, to ensure that we continue to have adequate available funds to support domestic and international operations.

The Company has, and expects to be able to, continue to generate positive cash flow from operations. Future debt repayment, share repurchases, future acquisitions or additional payments for contingent consideration upon the achievement of milestones pertaining to previous acquisitions may be financed by a combination of cash on hand, our positive cash flow generation, a revolving credit facility, or an issuance of new debt or stock.

The Company will continuously assess the most appropriate method of financing the Company’s short and long term operations. While conditions of the credit market at any given time may impact our ability to obtain credit, the Company believes that it has the ability to raise funding, if needed, through public and private markets at reasonable rates based on the Company’s risk profile, along with its history of strong cash generation and timely debt repayments.

Cash and cash equivalents were $838.8 million at December 31, 2011, an increase of $25.2 million from December 31, 2010, primarily due to cash provided by operating activities of $809.1 million, offset by cash used in investing activities of $151.9 million, cash used in financing activities of $627.3 million and the effect of exchange rate on cash of $4.8 million. Further discussion surrounding the makeup of each cash flow component movement for the year is listed below.

Operating Activities. Operating activities provided net cash of $809.1 million during 2011 primarily from net income of $377.8 million plus net non-cash charges of $458.3 million. Changes in operating assets and liabilities provided a net decrease of $27.0 million in cash during the period. Within the non-cash charges in operating activities, the primary drivers were amortization of intangible assets of $313.9 million, depreciation charges of $123.6 million, share based compensation of $77.0 million, and debt discount amortization and other non-cash charges of $45.4 million, partially offset by a change in deferred income taxes which resulted in a use of cash of $109.0 million. The primary drivers of the $27.0 million decrease in cash from changes in operating assets and liabilities were an increase in trade accounts receivable of $59.8 million and an increase in inventories of $58.5 million, which were partially offset by an increase in income tax liabilities of $32.7 million, an increase in accrued expenses and other liabilities of $27.2 million, and a decrease in other assets of $26.0 million. The movement in cash as a result of changes in operating assets and liabilities is consistent with normal ongoing operations. The Company received a judgment on a case in litigation in the amount of approximately $52.0 million, recorded in cost of revenues and accrued expenses and other current liabilities during the year ended December 31, 2011. The case, depending on the final outcome, could require the Company to pay additional damages of up to three times the judgment plus the plaintiff’s attorney fees. The Company is considering all its options in view of the judgment, including filing various post-trial motions and an appeal.

As of December 31, 2011, we had cash and cash equivalents of $838.8 million, restricted cash of $16.7 million, and short-term investments of $26.6 million. Our working capital was $597.3 million as of December 31, 2011, including restricted cash. Our funds for cash and cash equivalents are primarily invested in marketable securities, money market funds, and bank deposits with maturities of less than three months. Cash and cash equivalents held by our foreign subsidiaries at December 31, 2011 was approximately $252.3 million. It is the Company’s intention to indefinitely reinvest a majority of, if not all, current foreign earnings in order to ensure sufficient working capital and expand existing operations outside the United States. Additionally, the Company intends to use unrepatriated cash held by our foreign subsidiaries to fund future foreign investments, including acquisitions. While the Company has repatriated significant earnings in the past, primarily due to certain debt obligations and covenants which no longer exist, similar repatriation of earnings is no longer expected or required. In addition to cash on hand in the United States, the Company has the ability to raise cash

 

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through bank loans, debt obligations or by settling loans with its foreign subsidiaries in order to cover the domestic needs. Accordingly, it is the intention of the Company management to indefinitely reinvest a majority of, if not all, current earnings from foreign operations. For those limited foreign earnings which the Company, in the past, had determined will not be indefinitely reinvested, management has recorded the appropriate tax obligations in the statement of operations. In the event the Company is required to repatriate funds outside of the United States, such repatriation would be subject to local laws and tax consequences.

The Company’s pension plans and post retirement benefit plans are funded in accordance with local statutory requirements and supplemented by voluntary contributions. The funding requirement is based on the funded status, which is measured by using various actuarial assumptions, such as interest rate, rate of compensation increase and expected return on plan assets. The Company’s qualified pension plans are adequately funded at December 31, 2011. Based on the level of our contributions to the qualified pension plans and the qualified post retirement medical benefit plan during previous and current fiscal years, we do not expect to have to fund these pension plans in fiscal year 2012 in order to meet minimum statutory funding requirements. However, we may contribute to the funds to maintain the desired funding level at the Company’s discretion. The Company’s funding policy is based upon the amount needed to meet the minimum funding standards according to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). The Company may also make additional contributions from time to time consistent with the Company’s cash flow and business conditions. Based on the actuarial estimates at December 31, 2011, the Company expects to contribute $6.4 million to domestic non-qualified pension plans and post retirement benefit plans during 2012, a portion of which has already been funded in our rabbi trust. The Company has other postretirement plans that are unfunded, however, these are partially funded by insurance policies. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company contributed $17.3 million, $4.9 million, and $4.9 million to domestic pension plans, foreign pension plans, and postretirement plans, respectively. A significant portion of the 2011 contributions were voluntary. The aggregate current liabilities related to our domestic, foreign and postretirement plans were $2.3 million, $1.8 million, and $4.7 million, respectively at December 31, 2011.

The Company’s current funding requirements are based on the Company’s current asset balance in relation to the current obligation, taking into account past contributions and other actuarial measures. In the event the actual returns lag expected asset returns or the discount rates fall below current rates, the Company could be required to fund additional amounts in future periods. The amount of such funding would be based on the actual returns of plan assets, the correlation to the change in discount rates, the actuarial calculation of funding levels and the usage of prior service credits. The Company is constantly monitoring the status of its pension plans and does not believe there would be a material impact on the Company’s cash flows should either of the above situations occur.

Our most significant pension plan is a qualified domestic pension plan, which constituted approximately 81% of our consolidated pension plan assets and approximately 74% of our projected benefit obligations as of December 31, 2011. The accrual of future service benefits for participants in the qualified domestic pension plan was frozen as of June 30, 2004. Effective on July 1, 2005, the expected rate of compensation increase was no longer factored into the determination of our net periodic pension expense as the accrual for future service benefits was frozen. A one hundred basis point increase or decrease in the discount rate for the qualified domestic pension plan for the period ended December 31, 2011 would result in a corresponding decrease or increase of our net periodic pension expense by approximately $0.3 million. Also, a one hundred basis point increase or decrease in the expected rate of return on the pension asset for the period ended December 31, 2011 would result in a corresponding decrease or increase our net periodic pension expense by approximately $0.4 million.

Investing Activities. Net cash used by investing activities during 2011 was $151.9 million. The primary drivers were $105.1 million for the purchases of property, plant, and equipment, cash outflows associated with the divesture of the joint venture of $39.4 million, and purchases of investments of $13.8 million, partially offset by cash received from the sale of property and equipment of $5.8 million.

For 2012, the Company expects capital expenditures to be in the range of $120.0 million to $140.0 million. The capital will include additional capital equipment, information technology, and integration related capital to support ongoing business.

 

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The Company completed several acquisitions in the past that were not material individually or collectively to the overall consolidated financial statements and its results of operations. The results of operations for these acquisitions were included in the Company’s results from the date of acquisition. Pursuant to the purchase agreements for certain acquisitions, the Company could be required to make additional contingent payments in cash or a combination of cash and equity based on certain technological milestones, patent milestones and the achievement of future gross sales of the acquired companies. Some of the purchase agreements the Company has entered into do not limit the payments to a maximum amount, nor restrict the payment deadlines. The Company has sufficient cash on hand, positive cash flow generation and a revolving credit facility to fund such contingent payments if they become due.

In October 2010, the Company completed the acquisition of Ion Torrent for a total purchase price of $683.3 million, of which $263.2 million was paid in cash, $159.3 million was paid in the Company’s common stock, and $260.8 million was accrued for as contingent consideration liabilities at the time of acquisition for the time and technological milestone due in January 2012. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the milestone was achieved, therefore, as of December 31, 2011, the Company held $282.2 million of contingent consideration liabilities along with a $17.8 million deferred compensation accrual to satisfy this obligation, which was settled during January 2012. Refer to Note 14 of the Consolidated Financial Statements “Subsequent Events” for further information on the transactions that occurred subsequent to the year ended December 31, 2011.

Due to the structure of certain acquisitions, the Company used aggregate cash of $4.0 million and $54.4 million in financing activities for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, to increase our ownership interests in controlled subsidiaries and for acquisition related milestone payments.

For more information on our business combination accounting, refer to Note 2 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Combinations and Divestitures”.

Financing Activities. Net cash used by financing activities totaled $627.3 million in 2011. The primary drivers were $393.9 million for the purchases of treasury stock and $350.4 million for principal payments on long-term obligations, partially offset by proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options and purchase rights of $111.3 million.

Senior Notes

In February 2010, the Company filed a prospectus that allows the Company to issue, in one or more offerings, senior or subordinated debt securities covered by the prospectus by filing a prospectus supplement that contains specific information about the securities and specific terms being offered. In aggregate, the Company has issued a principal amount of $2,300.0 million of fixed unsecured and unsubordinated Senior Notes (the “Notes”) as of December 31, 2011, of which $1,500.0 million were offered in February 2010 and $800.0 million were offered in December 2010.

The aggregate net proceeds from the offering in February 2010 were $1,484.8 million after deducting debt discounts as well as an underwriting discount of $11.9 million. Total deferred financing costs associated with the issuance of these senior notes were $14.4 million, including the $11.9 million underwriting discount and $2.5 million of legal and accounting fees. The aggregate net proceeds from the offering in December 2010 were $791.6 million after deducting debt discounts, as well as underwriting discounts of $6.0 million. Total deferred financing costs were $7.4 million, including the $6.0 million underwriting discount and $1.4 million of legal and accounting fees.

The Company, at its option, may redeem the Notes (prior to October 15, 2020 for the 2021 Notes) in whole or in part at any time at a redemption price equal to the greater of 100% of the principal amount of the notes to be redeemed or the sum of the present values of the remaining scheduled payments of the notes to be redeemed discounted on a semi-annual basis at a treasury rate equal to a comparable United States Treasury Issue at the redemption date plus 25 basis points for the 2016 Notes, 30 basis points for the 2013 Notes, the 2015 Notes, and the 2021 Notes, and 35 basis points for the 2020 Notes, plus accrued and unpaid interest through the date of redemption, if any. Commencing on October 15, 2020, the Company may redeem the 2021 Notes, in whole or in part, at any time, at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the notes being redeemed plus

 

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accrued and unpaid interest through the redemption date. Upon the occurrence of a change of control of the Company that results in a downgrade of the notes below an investment grade rating, the indenture requires under certain circumstances that the Company makes an offer to purchase then outstanding Senior Notes equal to 101% of the principal amount plus any accrued and unpaid interest to the date of repurchase upon the occurrence of a change of control.

The indentures governing the Senior Notes contain certain covenants that, among other things, limit the Company’s ability to create or incur certain liens and engage in sale and leaseback transactions. In addition, the indenture limits the Company’s ability to consolidate, merge, sell, convey, transfer, lease or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of its property and assets. These covenants are subject to certain exceptions and qualifications.

The entire net proceeds from the 2013, 2015, and 2020 Notes offering in February 2010 were used to repay the outstanding balance of the term loans, together with the net of tax proceeds from the sale of our Applied Biosystems/MDS Analytical Technologies Instruments joint venture, and cash on hand. A portion of the net proceeds from the 2016 and 2021 Notes offering in December 2010 was used to retire the Company’s $350.0 million 3 1/4% Convertible Senior Notes (2025 Notes) in June 2011. The remaining proceeds will be used for general corporate purposes, including the settlement of the 1  1/2% Convertible Senior Notes (the 2024 Notes) during the first quarter of 2012.

The Company paid $95.4 million and $40.2 million in cash for the interest expense on the Senior Notes during the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

The Credit Agreement

The Company had a revolving credit facility of $500.0 million, of which $127.0 million was withdrawn and repaid during the year ended December 31, 2010. As of December 31, 2011, the Company had outstanding $12.7 million of letters of credit through the revolving credit facility, and accordingly, the remaining credit available under the facility was $487.3 million. During February 2012, the Company entered into a new credit agreement for a revolving credit facility for ongoing working capital and general corporate purposes to replace the existing facility. Refer to Note 14 of the Consolidated Financial Statements “Subsequent Events” for further information on the transactions that occurred subsequent to the year ended December 31, 2011, and for details on the revolving credit facility as well as the Company’s other lines of credit, refer to Note 4 of the Consolidated Financial Statements “Lines of Credit”.

Convertible Senior Notes

At December 31, 2011, the Company held a carrying value of $448.3 million of the 2024 Notes in current liabilities. During January 2012, the Company notified the holders of its 2024 Notes of its intention to redeem all of the outstanding 2024 Notes on February 15, 2012. The settlement was funded by cash on hand, which includes proceeds from the Senior Notes offering in December 2010, and a portion from cash drawn on a revolving credit facility which was entered in during February 2012. Refer to Note 14 of the Consolidated Financial Statements “Subsequent Events” for further information on the transactions that occurred subsequent to the year ended December 31, 2011

In June 2011, the Company repaid the outstanding balance of the 3 1/4% Convertible Senior Notes (the 2025 Notes). Total cash consideration of $350.0 million and 0.4 million shares of the Company’s common stock were issued to settle the par value and the excess of the Notes’ conversion value based on a conversion price of $49.13 per share. The Company funded the repayment of the 2025 Notes by using cash on hand, cash generated from operating activities and a portion of the net proceeds from the 2016 and 2021 Notes offering in December 2010.

In August 2010, the Company repaid the remaining outstanding balance of the 2% Convertible Senior Notes (2023 Notes). Total cash consideration of $347.8 million and 2.4 million shares of the Company’s common stock were issued to settle the par value and the excess of the Notes’ conversion value based on a conversion price of $34.12 per share. The Company funded the repayment of the 2023 Notes by using cash on hand and cash generated from operating activities.

 

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The Company paid $12.4 million, $25.1 million, and $25.1 million in cash for the interest expense for convertible senior notes while the notes were outstanding for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively.

For more details of the Company’s long-term debt obligations, refer to Note 5 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Long-Term Debt”.

Stock Repurchase Program

In July 2011, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the July 2011 program) authorizing management to repurchase up to $200.0 million of common stock. No shares have been repurchased under this program.

In December 2010, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the December 2010 program), authorizing management to repurchase up to $500.0 million of common stock. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company repurchased 6.4 million shares of its common stock under this program at a total cost of approximately $303.0 million. As of December 31, 2011, there was $197.0 million of authorization remaining under this program. The Company will continue to purchase shares under this program in 2012.

In July 2010, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program (the July 2010 program) authorizing management to repurchase up to $520.0 million of common stock over the next two years. As of December 31, 2010, the Company completed repurchasing 8.4 million shares at a total cost of $436.6 million. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company repurchased an additional 1.5 million shares of its common stock at a total cost of $83.4 million, thereby completing the July 2010 program by repurchasing an aggregate of 9.9 million shares at a total cost of $520.0 million, the maximum amount authorized.

The cost of repurchasing shares is included in treasury stock and reported as a reduction in total equity when a repurchase occurs. The Company has been and anticipates using cash generated from operating activities to fund current and future share repurchases under the authorized programs.

CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at December 31, 2011 and the effect such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods.

 

     Payments Due by Period(1)  
(in thousands)    Total      Less than
1  Year
     Years
1-3
     Years
3-5
     More than  5
Years
     All Other(2)  

Convertible senior notes

   $ 450,848       $ 450,848       $       $       $       $   

Senior notes

     2,983,020         109,438         453,383         1,047,945         1,372,254           

Capital lease obligations

     5,284         2,789         2,225         270                   

Operating lease obligations

     227,412         42,091         58,948         36,307         90,066           

Licensing and purchase obligations

     84,268         37,614         42,192         3,375         1,087           

Uncertain tax liability and interest(2)

     103,615         734                                 102,881   

Contingent considerations from business combinations(3)

     175,531         175,531                                   

Other obligations

     19,781         16,140         2,670         632         339           
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 4,049,759       $ 835,185       $ 559,418       $ 1,088,529       $ 1,463,746       $ 102,881   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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(1) Total contractual obligations exclude potential contingent consideration payments not earned pursuant to certain acquisitions the Company has completed. The contingent consideration for these previous acquisitions were due if specified future events occur or conditions are met such as the achievement of certain technological milestones, patent milestones or the achievement of targeted revenue milestones. Some acquisitions do not limit the maximum payment amount, nor restrict the payment deadlines. For more information on our accounting for business combinations and contingent considerations, refer to Note 2 “Business Combinations and Divestitures” and Note 6 “Commitments and Contingencies” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
(2) As of December 31, 2011, the Company’s expected cash payments on unrecognized tax benefits, including interest and penalties, were $103.6 million. We were unable to reasonably estimate the timing of uncertain tax liabilities and interest payments in individual periods beyond twelve months due to uncertainties in the timing of the effective settlement of tax positions.
(3) Includes the earned contingent consideration as a result of Ion Torrent acquisition due in January 2012. For more information on our accounting for business combinations and contingent considerations, refer to Note 2 “Business Combinations and Divestitures” and Note 6 “Commitments and Contingencies” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Revenue Recognition. We derive our revenue from the sale of our products, services and technology. We recognize revenue from product sales upon transfer of title of the product or performance of services. Transfer of title generally occurs upon shipment to the customer. We generally ship to our customers FOB shipping point. Concurrently, we record provisions for warranty, returns, and installation based on historical experience and anticipated product performance. Revenue is not recognized at the time of shipment of products in situations where risks and rewards of ownership are transferred to the customer at a point other than upon shipment to the customer due to the shipping terms, the existence of an acceptance clause, the achievement of milestones, or certain return or cancellation privileges. Revenue is recognized according to the shipping terms, at the time of customer acceptance, the lapse of acceptance provisions or cancellation privileges, or achievement of milestones. Service revenue is recognized over the period services are performed. If our shipping policies or sales terms were to change, materially different reported results could occur. In cases where customers order and pay for products and request that we store a portion of their order for them at our cost, we record any material up-front payments as deferred revenue in current or long-term liabilities, depending on the length of the customer prepayment, in the Consolidated Balance Sheets and recognize revenue upon shipment of the product to the customer. For instruments where installation is determined to be a separate earnings process, the portion of the sales price allocable to the fair value of the installation is deferred and recognized when installation is complete. We determine the fair value of the installation process based on technician labor billing rates, the expected number of hours to install the instrument based on historical experience, and amounts charged by third-parties. We continually monitor the level of effort required for the installation of our instruments to ensure that appropriate fair values have been determined. Deferred revenue, which includes customer prepayments and unearned service revenue, totaled $141.9 million at December 31, 2011.

We also enter into arrangements whereby revenues are derived from multiple deliverables. In these arrangements, the Company records revenue as separate elements if the delivered items have value to the customer on a standalone basis, and if the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item, delivery or performance of the undelivered items is considered probable and substantially in the seller’s control. Our revenue arrangements generally do not include a general right of return related to the delivered products. Arrangement consideration should be allocated at the inception of the arrangement to all deliverables using the relative selling price method based on a three-tier hierarchy. The relative selling price method requires that the allocation of arrangement consideration for each deliverable should be based on vendor-specific objective evidence (VSOE) of fair value, which represents the price charged for a deliverable when it is sold separately or for a deliverable not yet being sold separately, the price established by management having the relevant authority. When VSOE of fair value is not available, third-party evidence (TPE) of fair value is acceptable, or a best estimate of selling price if VSOE and TPE are not available. A best estimate of selling price

 

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should be consistent with the objective of determining the price at which we would transact if the deliverable were sold regularly on a standalone basis and also take into account market conditions and company specific factors. The relative selling price method allocates any discount in the arrangement proportionally to each deliverable on the basis of each deliverable’s estimated selling price. Applicable revenue recognition criteria are also considered separately for separate units of accounting. Revenues from multiple-element arrangements involving license fees, up-front payments and milestone payments, which are received and/or billable in connection with other rights and services that represent our continuing obligations, are deferred until all applicable revenue recognition criteria are met for each separable element. Contract interpretation is normally required to determine the appropriate accounting, including whether the deliverables specified in a multiple element arrangement should be treated as separate units of accounting for revenue recognition purposes, and if so, how the price should be allocated among the multiple-elements, when to begin to recognize revenue for each element, and the period over which revenue should be recognized.

We recognize royalty revenue, including upfront licensing fees, when the amounts are earned and determinable during the applicable period based on historical activity, and make revisions for actual royalties received in the following quarter. Materially different reported results would be likely if any of the estimated royalty revenue were significantly different from actual royalties received, however, historically, these revisions have not been material to our consolidated financial statements. For those arrangements where royalties cannot be reasonably estimated, we recognize revenue on the receipt of cash or royalty statements from our licensees. Since we are not able to forecast product sales by licensees, royalty payments that are based on product sales by the licensees are not determinable until the licensee has completed their computation of the royalties due and/or remitted their cash payment to us. In addition, we recognize up-front nonrefundable license fees when payments become due under contractual agreement, unless we have specific continuing performance obligations requiring deferral of all or a portion of these fees. If it cannot be concluded that a licensee fee is fixed or determinable at the outset of an arrangement, revenue is recognized as payments from third-parties become due. Should information on licensee product sales become available so as to enable us to recognize royalty revenue on an accrual basis, materially different revenues and results of operations could occur. Royalty revenue totaled $121.8 million, $130.4 million and $122.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Revenue recorded under proportional performance for projects in process is designed to approximate the amount of revenue earned based on the percentage of efforts completed within the scope of the contractual arrangement. We undertake a review of these arrangements to determine the percentage of the work that has completed and the appropriate amount of revenue to recognize.

Shipping and handling costs are included in costs of sales. Shipping and handling costs charged to customers is recorded as revenue in the period the related product sales revenue is recognized.

Use of Estimates. Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or GAAP. In preparing these statements, we are required to use estimates and assumptions. While we believe we have considered all available information, actual results could affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Estimates represent management’s best estimate given current economic conditions, and as a result, changes in economic conditions can materially alter actual results from management’s best estimates. We believe that, of the significant accounting policies discussed in Note 1 to our Consolidated Financial Statements, the following accounting policies require our most difficult, subjective or complex judgments:

 

Ø

Allowance for doubtful accounts. We provide a reserve against our accounts receivables for estimated losses that may result from our customers’ inability to pay. We determine the amount of the reserve by analyzing known uncollectible accounts, aged receivables, economic conditions in the customers’ country or industry, historical losses and our customers’ credit-worthiness. Amounts later determined and specifically identified by management to be uncollectible are charged or written off against this reserve. To minimize the likelihood of uncollectability, customers’ credit-worthiness is reviewed periodically based on external credit reporting services and our experience with the account and adjusted accordingly. Should a customer’s

 

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  account become past due, we generally place a hold on the account and discontinue further shipments to that customer, minimizing further risk of loss. Bad debt expense is recorded as necessary to maintain an appropriate level of allowance for doubtful accounts. Additionally, our policy is to fully reserve for all accounts with aged balances greater than one year, with certain exceptions determined necessary by management. The likelihood of a material loss on an uncollectible account would be mainly dependent on deterioration in the financial condition of that customer or in the overall economic conditions in a particular country or environment. Reserves are fully provided for all expected or probable losses of this nature. Gross trade accounts receivables totaled $647.2 million and the allowance for doubtful accounts was $10.2 million at December 31, 2011. Historically, the Company’s reserves have been adequate to cover losses.

 

Ø Inventory adjustments. Inventories are stated at lower of cost or market. We review the components of our inventory on a regular basis for excess, obsolete and impaired inventory based on estimated future usage and sales. The Company generally fully reserves for stock levels in excess of one year’s expected usage with certain exceptions deemed necessary by management. For those inventories less susceptible to obsolescence, the Company provides reserves for an estimation of spoilage of materials or specific to the inventory as determined by management. In the event a lower of cost or market issue arises, the Company will reserve for the value of the inventory in excess of current replacement cost. The likelihood of any material inventory write-down is dependent on customer demand, competitive conditions or new product introductions by us or our competitors that vary from our current expectations. Gross inventory totaled $466.6 million and the allowance for excess and obsolete and price impairment was $88.7 million at December 31, 2011. Historically, the Company’s reserve has been adequate to cover its losses.

 

Ø Valuation of goodwill. We are required to perform a review for impairment of goodwill in accordance with ASC Topic 350, Intangible — Goodwill and Other. The Company performs its goodwill impairment analysis at the reporting unit level, which aligns with the Company’s divisional reporting structure. Goodwill is considered to be impaired if we determine that the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value. In addition to the annual review, an interim review is required if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. Examples of such events or circumstances include:

 

   

macroeconomic conditions such as a deterioration in general economic conditions;

 

   

industry and market considerations such as a deterioration in the environment in which an entity operates, an adverse change in the market for our products and services including an unanticipated competition, or adverse regulatory or political developments;

 

   

significant cost factors including increases in raw materials or other costs that have a negative effect on earnings and cash flows;

 

   

a significant decline in our projected revenue or earnings growth or cash flows;

 

   

a significant loss of key personnel, significant adverse changes in strategy, customers, or litigation;

 

   

an event affecting our reporting units including a change in the composition or carry amount of its net assets, a more-likely-than-not expectation of selling or disposing of all, or a portion, of a reporting unit, the testing for recoverability of a significant asset group of a reporting unit, or goodwill impairment recognized at the subsidiary level of a reporting unit; and

 

   

a significant decline in our stock price or the stock price of comparable companies.

Assessing the impairment of goodwill requires us to make assumptions and judgments regarding the fair value of the net assets of our reporting units. Additionally, since our reporting units share the majority of our assets and liabilities, we must make assumptions and estimates in allocating the carrying value as well as the fair value of net assets to each reporting unit. Changes in the assumptions are considered in the analysis, and the Company performs an internal sensitivity analysis to further support the Company’s assessment.

In accordance with our policy, we completed our most recent annual evaluation for impairment of goodwill as of October 1, 2011 and determined that no goodwill impairment existed. In this analysis, it was

 

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determined that no reporting unit of the Company was at risk of impairment when assessing the unit’s fair value compared to its carrying value. Our evaluation included management estimates of cash flow projections based on an internal strategic review. Key assumptions from this strategic review included revenue growth and future gross and operating margin growth. The Company also makes key assumptions related to its weighted cost of capital and terminal growth rates. The revenue and margin growth was based on increased sales of new and existing products as we expect to maintain our investment in research and development, the effect and growth from business acquisitions already consummated and lower selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenue. Additional value creators assumed included increased efficiencies from capital spending. The resulting cash flows were discounted using a weighted average cost of capital. Operating mechanisms to ensure that these growth and efficiency assumptions will ultimately be realized were also considered in our evaluation. Our market capitalization at October 1, 2011 was also compared to the discounted cash flow analysis. No indicators of impairments were noted through December 31, 2011 and consequently, no impairment charge has been recorded during the year.

We cannot guarantee our future annual or other periodic reviews for impairment of goodwill will not result in an impairment charge. Goodwill totaled $4,366.6 million at December 31, 2011.

 

Ø Valuation of intangible and other long-lived assets. We periodically assess the carrying value of intangible and other long-lived assets, including capitalized in-process research and development, which require us to make assumptions and judgments regarding the future cash flows of these assets. The assets are considered to be impaired if we determine that the carrying value may not be recoverable based upon our assessment of the following events or changes in circumstances:

 

   

the asset’s ability to continue to generate income from operations and positive cash flow in future periods;

 

   

loss of legal ownership or title to the asset;

 

   

significant changes in our strategic business objectives and utilization of the asset(s); and

 

   

the impact of significant negative industry or economic trends.

If the assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment charge we recognize is the amount by which the carrying value of the assets exceeds the fair value of the assets. Intangible assets acquired in a business combination that are used for in-process research and development activities, or capitalized in-process research and development, are considered indefinite lived until the completion or abandonment of the associated research and development efforts. Until capitalized in-process research and development is no longer considered to be indefinite, these assets are reviewed annually, or an interim review is required if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of an intangible asset below its carrying amount in accordance with ASC Topic 350, Intangible–Goodwill and Other. Fair value is determined by a combination of third-party sources and discounted cash flows. In addition, we base the useful lives and related amortization or depreciation expense on our estimate of the period that the assets will generate revenues or otherwise be used by the Company. We also periodically review the lives assigned to our intangible assets to ensure that our initial estimates do not exceed any revised estimated periods from which we expect to realize cash flows from the technologies. If a change were to occur in any of the above-mentioned factors or estimates, the likelihood of a material change in our reported results would increase.

At December 31, 2011, the net book value of identifiable intangible assets that are subject to amortization totaled $1,676.9 million, the carrying value of identifiable intangible assets with indefinite lives totaled $69.9 million and the net book value of property, plant and equipment totaled $833.7 million.

 

Ø

Valuation of financial instruments. We account for our financial instruments at fair value based on ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures and ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. In determining fair value, we consider both the credit risk of our counterparties and our own creditworthiness. ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements for financial instruments. The framework requires the valuation of investments using a three tiered approach in the

 

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  valuation of investments. The Company reviews and evaluates the adequacy of the valuation techniques periodically. In the current year, there have not been any changes to the Company’s valuation methodologies. For details on the assets and liabilities subject to fair value measurements and the related valuation techniques used, refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of Financial Instruments”.

A derivative is an instrument whose value is derived from an underlying instrument or index, such as interest rates, equity securities, currencies, commodities or credit spreads. Derivatives include futures, forwards, swaps, or option contracts, or other financial instruments with similar characteristics. Derivative contracts often involve future commitments to exchange interest payment streams or currencies based on a notional or contractual amount (e.g., interest rate swaps or currency forwards).

The accounting for changes in fair value of a derivative instrument depends on the nature of the derivative and whether the derivative qualifies as a hedging instrument in accordance with ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. Those hedging instruments that qualify for hedge accounting are included as an adjustment to revenue or interest expense, depending upon the underlying transactions the Company is hedging for. Those hedges that do not qualify for hedging accounting are included in non-operating income. Materially different reported results would be likely if volatility of the markets was different, or the Company’s forecasted transactions were significantly different from actual.

 

Ø Allocation of purchase price to acquired assets and liabilities in business combinations. The cost of an acquired business is assigned to the tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed on the basis of their fair values at the date of acquisition. We assess fair value, which is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, using a variety of methods including an income approach such as a present value technique or a cost approach such as the estimation of current selling prices and replacement values. Fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, including intangible assets, in-process research and development (IPR&D), and contingent payments, are measured based on the assumptions and estimations with regards to the variable factors such as the amount and timing of future cash flows for the asset or liability being measured, appropriate risk-adjusted discount rates, nonperformance risk, or other factors that market participants would consider. Upon acquisition, we determine the estimated economic lives of the acquired intangible assets for amortization purposes, which are based on the underlying expected cash flows of such assets or per the Company policy. Adjustments to inventory are based on the fair market value of inventory and amortized into income based on the period in which the underlying inventory is sold. Goodwill is an asset representing the future economic benefits arising from other assets acquired in a business combination that are not individually identified and separately recognized. Actual results may vary from projected results and assumptions used in the fair value assessments.

 

Ø Accrued merger- and restructuring- related costs. To the extent that exact amounts are not determinable, we have estimated amounts for direct costs of our acquisitions, merger-related expenses and liabilities related to our business combinations and restructurings in accordance with ASC Topic 420, Exit or Disposal Cost Obligations. The Company expenses such costs in the periods in which the costs are incurred. Our accrued costs for merger and restructuring related charges were $8.7 million at December 31, 2011, which are expected to be paid in full in early 2012. Materially different reported results would be likely if any of the estimated costs or expenses were significantly different from actual or if the approach, timing and extent of the restructuring plans adopted by management were different.

 

Ø

Benefit and pension plans. We sponsor and manage several pension plans and postretirement health plans for employees and former employees, and nonqualified supplemental benefit plans for select domestic and foreign employees. A majority of the Company’s current employees do not participate in these plans. Accounting and reporting for the pension plans and postretirement health plans requires the use of assumptions for discount rates, expected returns on plan assets and rates of compensation increase that are used by our actuaries to determine our liabilities and annual expenses for these plans in addition to the value of the plan assets included in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the weighted average discount rates we used to determine the benefit obligation were 4.60%, 4.57%, and

 

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  4.15% for domestic pension plans, foreign pension plans, and postretirement health plans, respectively. The discount rates we used to determine the net periodic pension cost were 5.45%, 4.83%, and 4.80% for domestic pension plans, foreign pension plans, and postretirement health plans, respectively. The long-term rates of expected return on plan assets were 5.45% to 8.00%, 5.14%, and 8.00% for domestic pension plans, foreign pension plans, and postretirement health plans, respectively. Our actuaries also rely on assumptions, such as mortality rates, in preparing their estimates for us. The liabilities for the pension plans and postretirement plans are generally determined using the unit credit method, which is to expense each participant’s benefit under the plan as they accrue. The discount rate is derived by the yield curve and consists of spot interest rates at half year increments for each of the next 30 years based on pricing and yield information for high quality corporate bonds. The Company determines the best-fit regression curve to the bond data, and converts this coupon yield curve to a spot yield curve, using techniques which assume no arbitrage opportunities. The Company matches the pension cash flow to the spot rates to determine a single equivalent discount rate. The rate of expected return on plan assets is an expected weighted average rate of earnings on the funds, which is a blended rate of historical returns and forward-looking capital market assumptions over the next 20 years adjusted by taking into account the benefits of diversification and rebalancing of the funds.

The likelihood of materially different valuations for assets, liabilities or expenses, would depend on interest rates, investment returns, actual non-investment experience or actuarial assumptions that are different from our current expectations. Actual weighted average allocation of our plan assets or valuation of our plan assets and benefit obligations may fluctuate significantly year over year. These fluctuations can be caused by conditions unrelated to our actuarial assumptions, including shifts in the global economic environment, market performance and plan funding status. Unexpected unrealized gains or losses in the plan assets or benefit obligation are reflected in other comprehensive income in our Consolidated Balance Sheets and amortized into income over the expected plan lives.

 

Ø Income taxes. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of a global business, there are many transactions for which the ultimate tax outcome is uncertain. Some of these uncertainties arise as a consequence of intercompany arrangements to share revenue and costs. In such arrangements, there are uncertainties about the amount and manner of such sharing, which could ultimately result in changes once the arrangements are reviewed by taxing authorities. Although we believe that our approach to determining the amount of such arrangements is reasonable, no assurance can be given that the final resolution of these matters will not be materially different than reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals. Such differences could have a material effect on our income tax provisions or benefits in the period in which such determination is made.

Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. The likelihood of a material change in our expected realization of these assets depends on our ability to generate sufficient future taxable income of the proper character and in the necessary jurisdictions. Our ability to generate enough taxable income to utilize our deferred tax assets depends on many factors, among which are our ability to deduct tax operating loss and capital loss carryforwards against future taxable income, the effectiveness of our tax planning strategies, reversing deferred tax liabilities, changes in the deductibility of interest paid on our convertible senior notes and any significant changes in the tax treatment received on our business combinations. We believe that our deferred tax assets, net of our valuation allowance, should be realizable due to our estimate of future profitability in the United States and foreign jurisdictions, as applicable. Subsequent revisions to estimates of future taxable profits and losses and tax planning strategies could change the amount of the deferred tax asset we would be able to realize in the future, and therefore could increase or decrease the valuation allowance.

ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes defines the confidence level that a tax position must meet in order to be recognized in the financial statements. In accordance, we regularly assess uncertain tax positions in each of the tax jurisdictions in which we have operations and account for the related financial statement implications. Unrecognized tax benefits have been reported in accordance with ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes two-step approach under which the tax effect of a position is recognized only if it is “more-likely-than-not” to be sustained and the amount of the tax benefit recognized is equal to the largest tax benefit that

 

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is greater than fifty percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement of the tax position. Determining the appropriate level of unrecognized tax benefits requires us to exercise judgment regarding the uncertain application of tax law. The amount of unrecognized tax benefits is adjusted when new information becomes available or when an event occurs indicating a change is appropriate. Future changes in required unrecognized tax benefits could have a material impact on our results of operations.

The Company has resolved the United States federal tax audit for the tax years 2006 and 2007. As a result of the examination, the Company released approximately $5.0 million of acquired tax reserves through income tax expense during the year ended December 31, 2011.

The Company continues to benefit from reduced tax rates in Singapore and Israel. Singapore’s taxing authority granted the Company pioneer company status which provides an incentive encouraging companies to undertake activities that have the effect of promoting economic or technological development in Singapore. This incentive equates to a tax exemption on earnings associated with most of the Company’s manufacturing activities and continues through June 30, 2014. The Company qualifies for an incentive tax benefit in Israel which provides for a reduced 3.5% tax rate on earnings from its subsidiary in Israel. This incentive has been granted for an indefinite period given minimum sales and investment levels are maintained. The impact of the tax holiday in Singapore decreased Singapore taxes by $17.2 million, $21.2 million and $20.1 million during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. As residual United States deferred tax liabilities were provided on the earnings of Singapore for the year ended December 31, 2009, income tax expense was reduced only for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2011 for the reduction in Singapore taxes. The impact of the tax holiday in Israel decreased both taxes paid and income tax expense by $1.7 million, $1.5 million and $1.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

Ø Share-based compensation. We grant share-based awards to eligible employees and directors to purchase or receive shares of our common stock. In addition, we have qualified employee stock purchase plans in which eligible employees may elect to withhold up to 15% of their compensation to purchase shares of our common stock on a quarterly basis at a discounted price equal to 85% of the lower of the employee’s offering price or the closing price of the stock on the date of purchase. The benefits provided by these plans qualify as share-based compensation under the provisions of ASC Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation, which requires us to recognize compensation expense based on their estimated fair values determined on the date of grant for all share-based awards granted, and the cumulative expense is adjusted by modified or cancelled shares subsequently.

For the year ended December 31, 2011, we recognized $29.2 million and $47.4 million of pre-tax compensation expense for employee stock options and purchase rights, and restricted stock units, respectively. At December 31, 2011, there was $23.3 million and $101.8 million remaining in unrecognized compensation cost related to employee stock options and restricted stock units, respectively, which are expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 1.3 years and 2.7 years, respectively.

We estimate the fair value of share-based awards on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing method (Black-Scholes method). The determination of fair value of share-based awards using an option-pricing model requires the use of certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of share-based compensation cost recognized in our Consolidated Statements of Income. These include estimates of the expected term of share-based awards, expected volatility of our stock price, expected dividends and the risk-free interest rate. These estimates and assumptions are highly subjective and may result in materially different amounts should circumstances change and we employ different assumptions in our application of fair value assessment in future periods. The Company uses historical forfeiture rate trends as a basis for estimating pre-vesting forfeitures. Should there be a material shift in employee vesting trends, there could be a material change in actual forfeiture experience. During 2011, the Company made an adjustment of $4.2 million to restricted stock unit compensation expense as result of applying an adjusted forfeit estimate on such awards. Previously, the Company did not estimate a forfeiture rate on restricted stock units as historical grants were granted primarily to executives and directors with minimal forfeiture activity, thus the Company’s history of restricted stock unit pre-vesting forfeitures was minimal. As a result

 

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of recent changes where restricted stock units are granted to a larger population of employees, causing increased forfeiture activity, the Company applied the estimated forfeiture rates during 2011.

For share-based awards issued during the year ended December 31, 2011, we estimated the expected term by considering various factors including the vesting period of options granted, employees’ historical exercise and post-employment termination behavior and aggregation by homogeneous employee groups. Our estimated volatility was derived using a combination of our historical stock price volatility and the implied volatility of market-traded options of our common stock with terms of up to approximately one year. Our decision to use a combination of historical and implied volatility was based upon the availability of actively traded options of our common stock and our assessment that such a combination was more representative of future expected stock price trends. We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and currently do not anticipate paying such cash dividends. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our future earnings for use in the development and expansion of our business and for general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon our results of operations, financial condition, financial covenants, tax laws and other factors as the Board of Directors, in its discretion, deems relevant. The risk-free interest rate is based upon United States Treasury securities with remaining terms similar to the expected term of the share-based awards.

 

Ø Insurance, environmental, divestiture, and warranty reserves. We maintain self-insurance reserves to cover potential property, casualty and workers’ compensation exposures from current operations and certain former businesses the Company acquired. These reserves are based on loss probabilities and take into account loss history as well as projections based on industry statistics. We also maintain environmental reserves to cover estimated costs for certain environmental exposures assumed in previous acquisitions. The environmental reserves, which are not discounted, are determined by management based upon currently available information. Historically, the Company’s environmental reserves have been adequate to cover its costs. Divestiture reserves are maintained for known claims and warranties assumed in the acquisition. The product liability and warranty reserves are based on management estimates that consider historical claims. As actual losses and claims become known to us, we may need to make a material change in our estimated reserves, which could also materially impact our results of operations. Our insurance, environmental, divestiture, and warranty reserves totaled $18.1 million at December 31, 2011.

 

Ø Litigation reserves. Estimated amounts for claims that are probable and can be reasonably estimated are recorded as liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The likelihood of a material change in these estimated reserves would be dependent on new claims as they may arise and the favorable or unfavorable outcome of the particular litigation. Both the amount and range of loss on pending litigation is uncertain. As such, we are unable to make a reasonable estimate of the liability that could result from unfavorable outcomes in litigation. As additional information becomes available, we assess the potential liability related to our pending litigation and revise our estimates. Such revisions in our estimates of the potential liability could materially impact our results of operations and financial position.

Segment Information. The Company has determined in accordance with ASC Topic 280, Segment Reporting to operate as one operating segment. The Company believes our chief operating decision maker (CODM) makes decisions based on the Company as a whole. In addition, the Company shares the common basis of organization, types of products and services that derive revenues, and economic environments. Accordingly, we believe it is appropriate to operate as one reporting segment. The Company has disclosed the revenues for each of its internal divisions to allow the reader of the financial statements the ability to gain transparency into the operations of the Company.

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

For information on the recent accounting pronouncements impacting our business, refer to Note 1 of the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8.

 

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MARKET RISK

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates, and we selectively use financial instruments to manage these risks. We do not enter into financial instruments for speculation or trading purposes. These financial exposures are monitored and managed by us as an integral part of our overall risk management program, which recognizes the unpredictability of financial markets and seeks to reduce potentially adverse effects on our results.

Foreign Currency

We translate the financial statements of each foreign subsidiary with a functional currency other than the United States dollar into the United States dollar for consolidation using end-of-period exchange rates for assets and liabilities and average exchange rates during each reporting period for results of operations. Net gains or losses resulting from the translation of foreign financial statements and the effect of exchange rate changes on intercompany receivables and payables of a long-term investment nature are recorded as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. These adjustments will affect net income only upon sale or liquidation of the underlying investment in foreign subsidiaries. Net gains and losses resulting from the effect of exchange rate changes on intercompany receivables and payables of a short-term nature are recorded in the results of operations as other income (expense).

Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can affect our reported results of operations, which are reported in United States dollars. Based on the foreign currency rate in effect at the time of the translation of our foreign operations into United States dollars, reported results could be different from prior periods even if the same amount and mix of our products were sold at the same local prices during the two periods. This will affect our reported results of operations and also makes the comparison of our business performance in two periods more difficult. For example, our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2011 were approximately $3,775.7 million using applicable foreign currency exchange rates for that period. However, applying the foreign currency exchange rates in effect during the year ended December 31, 2010 to our revenues generated by foreign subsidiaries whose functional currencies differ from the United States dollars for the year ended December 31, 2011, including the results of our hedging program, would result in approximately $42.8 million less revenue for that period. These changes in currency exchange rates have affected and will continue to affect, our reported results, including our revenues, revenue growth rates, gross margins, income and losses as well as assets and liabilities.

Foreign Currency Transactions

We have operations through legal entities in Europe, Asia-Pacific and the Americas. As a result, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows can be affected by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. As of December 31, 2011, the Company had $438.6 million of accounts receivable and $37.3 million of accounts payable, respectively, denominated in a foreign currency. The Company has accounts receivables and payables denominated in both the functional currency of the legal entity as well as receivables and payables denominated in a foreign currency that differs from the functional currency of the legal entity. For receivables and payables denominated in the legal entity’s functional currency, the Company does not have financial statement risk, and therefore does not hedge such transactions. For those receivables and payables denominated in a currency that differs from the functional currency of the legal entity, the Company hedges such transactions to prevent financial statement risk. As a result, a hypothetical movement in foreign currency rates would not be expected to have a material financial statement impact on the settlement of these outstanding receivables and payables.

Both realized and unrealized gains and losses on the value of these receivables and payables were included in other income and expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Net currency exchange gains and (losses) recognized on business transactions, net of hedging transactions, were $(8.3) million, $0.4 million and $(9.0) million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively, and are included in other income and expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. These gains and losses arise from the timing of cash collections compared to the hedged transactions, which can vary based on timing of actual customer payments.

 

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The Company’s intercompany foreign currency receivables and payables are primarily concentrated in the euro, British pound, and Japanese yen. Historically, we have used foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate foreign currency risk on these intercompany foreign currency receivables and payables. At December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company had a notional principal amount of $940.4 million and $1,012.7 million, respectively, in foreign currency forward contracts outstanding to hedge currency risk on specific intercompany receivables and payables denominated in a currency that differs from the legal entity’s functional currency. These foreign currency forward contracts, as of December 31, 2011, which settle in January 2012 through April 2012, effectively fix the exchange rate at which these specific receivables and payables will be settled, so that gains or losses on the forward contracts offset the losses or gains from changes in the value of the underlying receivables and payables. At December 31, 2011, the Company does not expect there will be a significant impact from unhedged foreign currency intercompany transactions.

The notional principal amounts provide one measure of the transaction volume outstanding as of period end, but do not represent the amount of our exposure to market loss. In many cases, outstanding principal amounts offset assets and liabilities and the Company’s exposure is less than the notional amount. The estimates of fair value are based on applicable and commonly used pricing models using prevailing financial market information. The amounts ultimately realized upon settlement of these financial instruments, together with the gains and losses on the underlying exposures, will depend on actual market conditions during the remaining life of the instruments.

Refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of Financial Instruments” for more information on the Company’s hedging programs.

Cash Flow Hedges

The ultimate United States dollar value of future foreign currency sales generated by our reporting units is subject to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The Company used foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate foreign currency risk on forecasted foreign currency sales during the year ended December 31, 2011 to limit the exposure from changes in currency exchange rates. The change in fair value prior to their maturity was accounted for as cash flow hedges, and recorded in other comprehensive income, net of tax, in the Consolidated Balance Sheets according to ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. To the extent any portion of the forward contracts was determined to not be an effective hedge, the increase or decrease in value prior to the maturity was recorded in other income or expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. The fair value of foreign currency forward contracts was reported in other current assets or other current liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheet while outstanding and as appropriate. The Company reclassed deferred gains or losses reported in accumulated other comprehensive income into revenue when the underlying foreign currency sales occurred and were recognized in consolidated earnings. The Company used an inventory turnover ratio for each international operating unit to align the timing of a hedged item and a hedging instrument to impact the Consolidated Statements of Operations during the same reporting period.

During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company did not recognize any material ineffective portion of its hedging instruments, and no hedging relationships were terminated as a result of ineffective hedging or forecasted transactions no longer probable of occurring for foreign currency forward contracts. At December 31, 2011, the Company did not have any foreign currency forward contracts outstanding to hedge foreign currency revenue risk under ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. The Company will continuously monitor the impact of foreign currency risk upon the financial results as part of the Company’s risk management program and at management’s discretion may enter into derivative transactions.

Commodity Prices

Our exposure to commodity price changes relates to certain manufacturing operations that utilize certain commodities as raw materials. We manage our exposure to changes in those prices primarily through our procurement and sales practices.

 

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Interest Rates

Our investment portfolio is maintained in accordance with our investment policy that defines allowable investments, specifies credit quality standards and limits the credit exposure of any single issuer. The fair value of our cash equivalents, marketable securities, short-term investments, and derivatives is subject to change as a result of changes in market interest rates and investment risk related to the issuers’ credit worthiness or our own credit risk. The Company uses credit default swap spread to derive risk-adjusted discount rate to measure the fair value of some of our financial instruments. At December 31, 2011, we had $882.0 million in cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and short-term investments, all of which approximated the fair value. Changes in market interest rates would not be expected to have a material impact on the fair value of these assets at December 31, 2011, as the assets consisted of highly liquid securities with short-term maturities. The Company accounts for the $25.0 million of its long-term investments under the cost method and due to the nature of these investments, mainly non-public and early stage companies, the Company believes calculating a fair value thereon not to be practicable. Changes in market interest rates would not be expected to have an impact on these investments. Refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of Financial Instruments”.

As of December 31, 2011, the Company had a carrying value of $2,743.7 million in debt with fixed interest rates, thus, the variability in market interest rates would not be expected to have a material impact on our scheduled interest payments. The Company will continuously assess the most appropriate method of financing the Company’s short and long term operations.

Fair Value Measurements

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures requires certain financial and non-financial assets and liabilities to be measured at fair value using a three tiered approach. There were zero and $284.8 million of assets and liabilities, respectively, for which the Company used level 3, or significant unobservable inputs, to measure fair value at December 31, 2011. During 2011, the Company transferred $4.7 million of contingent consideration liabilities into level 3. Using level 3 estimates, the Company also recorded an increase to research and development expense of $13.7 million upon the achievement of a technological and time based milestone and time value accretion of $6.2 million to interest expense, which were offset by a reduction of $2.7 million to cost of revenues based on a revised probability of achievement of milestones. For further discussion on the Company’s fair value measurements and valuation methodologies, refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of Financial Instruments”.

OFF BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

The Company does not have any material off balance sheet arrangements. For further discussion on the Company’s commitments and contingencies, refer to Note 6 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Commitments and Contingencies”.

ITEM 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

See discussion under Market Risk in “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

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ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To The Board of Directors and the Stockholders of Life Technologies Corporation:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Life Technologies Corporation as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(c). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of Life Technologies Corporation’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Life Technologies Corporation at December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Life Technologies Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 29, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/  Ernst & Young LLP

San Diego, California

February 29, 2012

 

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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except par value and share data)

 

     December 31,  
     2011     2010  
ASSETS   

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 838,762      $ 813,569   

Short-term investments

     26,559        23,079   

Restricted cash

     16,673        18,153   

Trade accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $10,200 and $10,389, respectively

     636,998        587,456   

Inventories, net

     377,866        323,318   

Deferred income tax assets

     40,079        90,947   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     156,680        190,003   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     2,093,617        2,046,525   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term investments

     24,996        22,448   

Property and equipment, net

     833,678        847,984   

Goodwill

     4,366,584        4,372,073   

Intangible assets, net

     1,746,701        2,040,175   

Deferred income tax assets

     28,805        26,752   

Other assets

     93,582        130,242   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 9,187,963      $ 9,486,199   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY   

Current liabilities:

    

Current portion of long-term debt

   $ 450,839      $ 347,749   

Accounts payable

     178,374        174,449   

Deferred compensation and related benefits

     201,689        202,229   

Deferred revenues and reserves

     113,048        109,981   

Contingent considerations

     283,098          

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

     269,258        257,987   

Accrued income taxes

            53,990   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     1,496,306        1,146,385   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term debt

     2,297,653        2,727,624   

Pension liabilities

     190,692        145,298   

Deferred income tax liabilities

     410,565        557,982   

Income taxes payable

     102,881        114,726   

Other long-term obligations

     90,640        356,155   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     4,588,737        5,048,170   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock; $0.01 par value, 6,405,884 shares authorized; no shares issued or outstanding

              

Common stock; $0.01 par value, 400,000,000 shares authorized; 211,652,864 and 207,243,588 shares issued, respectively

     2,117        2,072   

Additional paid-in-capital

     5,441,061        5,222,859   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     64,656        96,612   

Retained earnings

     910,991        532,499   

Less cost of treasury stock; 33,100,712 shares and 24,992,450 shares, respectively

     (1,819,599     (1,419,966
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Life Technologies stockholders’ equity

     4,599,226        4,434,076   

Noncontrolling interest

            3,953   

Total equity

     4,599,226        4,438,029   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 9,187,963      $ 9,486,199   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes for additional information.

 

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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
     2011     2010     2009  

Revenues

   $ 3,775,672      $ 3,588,094      $ 3,280,344   

Cost of revenues

     1,356,967        1,188,199        1,173,057   

Purchased intangibles amortization

     308,728        293,754        282,562   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     2,109,977        2,106,141        1,824,725   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

      

Selling, general and administrative

     1,008,973        1,023,179        987,116   

Research and development

     377,924        375,465        337,099   

Purchased in-process research and development

            1,650        1,692   

Business consolidation costs

     75,324        93,450        112,943   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     1,462,221        1,493,744        1,438,850   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     647,756        612,397        385,875   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

      

Interest income

     3,932        4,266        4,698   

Interest expense

     (162,073     (152,322     (192,911

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

            (54,185     (12,478

Gain on divestiture of equity investments

            37,260          

Other income (expense), net

     (10,913     (5,864     9,362   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense, net

     (169,054     (170,845     (191,329
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before provision for income taxes

     478,702        441,552        194,546   

Income tax provision

     (100,868     (63,694     (49,952
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     377,834        377,858        144,594   

Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

     658        437          
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

   $ 378,492      $ 378,295      $ 144,594   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings per common share attributable to Life Technologies stockholders:

      

Basic

   $ 2.11      $ 2.06      $ 0.82   

Diluted

   $ 2.05      $ 1.99      $ 0.80   

Weighted average shares used in per share calculations:

      

Basic

     179,390        183,398        175,872   

Diluted

     185,595        190,591        181,415   

See accompanying notes for additional information.

 

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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(in thousands)

 

     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in-

Capital
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

Income
    Retained
Earnings
    Treasury Stock     Total Life Tech.
Stockholders’

Equity
    Noncontrolling
Interests
    Total
Equity
 
     Shares     Amount           Shares     Amount        

Balance at December 31, 2008

    189,629      $ 1,896      $ 4,508,259      $ (98,807   $ 9,610        (16,159   $ (964,420   $ 3,456,538      $      $ 3,456,538   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive Income:

                   

Pension liability, net of deferred taxes

                         30,090                             30,090               30,090   

Realized loss on cash flow hedges, reclassed into earnings, net of deferred taxes

                         8,563                             8,563               8,563   

Unrealized loss on cash flow hedges, net of deferred taxes

                         (5,557                          (5,557            (5,557

Translation adjustment

                         117,679                             117,679               117,679   

Net income

                                144,594                      144,594               144,594   
               

 

 

     

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

                  295,369               295,369   

Common stock issuances for business combination

    760        8        38,930                                    38,938               38,938   

Common stock issuances under employee stock plans

    5,771        58        172,090                      (7     (240     171,908               171,908   

Tax benefit of employee stock plans

                  5,406                                    5,406               5,406   

Purchase of treasury shares

                                                                     

Issuance of restricted shares, net of shares repurchased for minimum tax liability

    137        1        (1                   (48     (1,593     (1,593            (1,593

Amortization of stock-based compensation

                  60,102                                    60,102               60,102   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2009

    196,297      $ 1,963      $ 4,784,786      $ 51,968      $ 154,204        (16,214   $ (966,253   $ 4,026,668      $      $ 4,026,668   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive Income:

                   

Pension liability, net of deferred taxes

                         (11,343                          (11,343            (11,343

Realized gain on cash flow hedges, reclassed into earnings, net of deferred taxes

                         (9,880                          (9,880            (9,880

Unrealized loss on cash flow hedges, net of deferred taxes

                         (5,538                          (5,538            (5,538

Translation adjustment

                         71,405                             71,405        1,728        73,133   

Net income (loss)

                                378,295                      378,295        (437     377,858   
               

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

                  422,939        1,291        424,230   

Common stock issuances for business combination

    3,374        34        159,320                                    159,354        35,177        194,531   

Purchase of subsidiaries shares

                  (5,393                                 (5,393     (32,515     (37,908

Common stock issuances under employee stock plans

    4,428        44        131,933                      (3     (109     131,868               131,868   

Tax benefit of employee stock plans

                  29,763                                    29,763               29,763   

Common stock issuances for convertible debt

    2,403        24        43,409                                    43,433               43,433   

Purchase of treasury shares

                                       (8,442     (436,629     (436,629            (436,629

Issuance of restricted shares, net of shares repurchased for minimum tax liability

    742        7        (8                   (333     (16,975     (16,976            (16,976

Amortization of stock-based compensation

                  79,049                                    79,049               79,049   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2010

    207,244      $ 2,072      $ 5,222,859      $ 96,612      $ 532,499        (24,992   $ (1,419,966   $ 4,434,076      $ 3,953      $ 4,438,029   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive Income:

                   

Pension liability, net of deferred taxes

                         (46,643                          (46,643            (46,643

Realized loss on cash flow hedges, reclassed into earnings, net of deferred taxes

                         39,662                             39,662               39,662   

Unrealized loss on cash flow hedges, net of deferred taxes

                         (13,856                          (13,856            (13,856

Translation adjustment

                         (11,119                          (11,119     285        (10,834

Net income (loss)

                                378,492                      378,492        (658     377,834   
               

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

                  346,536        (373     346,163   

Common stock issuances for business combination

                  (28                                 (28            (28

Purchase of subsidiaries shares

                  (1,128                                 (1,128     (3,580     (4,708

Common stock issuances under employee stock plans

    3,340        34        109,608                      (1     (28     109,614               109,614   

Tax benefit of employee stock plans

                  12,266                                    12,266               12,266   

Common stock issuances for convertible debt

    442        5        9,014                                    9,019               9,019   

Purchase of treasury shares

                                       (7,912     (386,377     (386,377            (386,377

Issuance of restricted shares, net of shares repurchased for minimum tax liability

    514        5        (5                   (195     (7,451     (7,451            (7,451

Issuance of deferred stock

    113        1        11,507                      (1     (5,777     5,731               5,731   

Amortization of stock-based compensation

                  76,968                                    76,968               76,968   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

    211,653      $ 2,117      $ 5,441,061      $ 64,656      $ 910,991        (33,101   $ (1,819,599   $ 4,599,226      $      $ 4,599,226   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes for additional information.

 

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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
     2011      2010      2009  

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

        

Net income

   $ 377,834       $ 377,858       $ 144,594   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities, including effects of businesses acquired and divested:

        

Depreciation

     123,578         122,978         115,691   

Amortization of intangible assets

     313,948         299,616         295,954   

Amortization of deferred debt issuance costs

     6,860         62,972         31,847   

Amortization of inventory fair market value adjustments

     529         940         62,747   

Amortization of deferred revenue fair market value adjustment

     2,881         7,015         34,791   

Share-based compensation expense

     76,968         79,049         60,102   

Incremental tax benefits from stock options exercised

     (12,971      (21,053      (14,058

Deferred income taxes

     (108,956      (107,067      18,252   

Loss on disposal of assets

     3,827         4,351         7,920   

Gain on sale of equity investment

             (37,260        

Purchase of in-process research and development

             1,650         1,692   

Debt discount amortization and other non-cash expense

     45,400         38,035         42,866   

Other non-cash adjustments

     6,196         11,442         13,040   

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

        

Trade accounts receivable

     (59,825      (57,334      (10,448

Inventories

     (58,527      (21,456      11,808   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     3,119         (14,281      (3,576

Other assets

     26,015         (4,862      (6,108

Accounts payable

     (2,584      (62,889      6,525   

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     27,203         (2,680      36,725   

Income taxes

     32,677         36,946         (122,751

Currency impact on intercompany settlements

     4,963         25,119         16,395   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     809,135         739,089         744,008   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

        

Purchases of investments

     (13,842      (26,733      (11,363

Proceeds from sale of investments

     3,414         2,071           

Net cash paid for business combinations

     (28      (343,387      (55,036

Net cash paid for asset purchases

     (2,771      (6,450      (31,251

Proceeds from asset divestiture

                     15,239   

Net cash received (paid) for divestiture of equity investment

     (39,364      379,512           

Purchases of property and equipment

     (105,132      (124,817      (180,631

Proceeds from sale of property and equipment

     5,839                 5,044   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (151,884      (119,804      (257,998
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

        

Principal payments on long-term obligations

     (350,354      (2,320,299      (425,000

Proceeds from long-term obligations

             2,288,277           

Principal payments on short-term obligations

             (127,000        

Proceeds from short-term obligations

             127,000           

Cash paid in business combination milestones and non-controlling interest acquisitions

     (4,001      (54,388        

Issuance cost payments on long-term obligations

     (1,082      (17,938        

Incremental tax benefits from stock options exercised

     12,971         21,053         14,058   

Proceeds from sale of common stock

     111,265         131,346         171,238   

Capital lease payments

     (2,189      (2,146      (805

Purchase of treasury stock

     (393,878      (453,713      (1,832
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (627,268      (407,808      (242,341

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash

     (4,790      5,505         16,988   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

     25,193         216,982         260,657   

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

     813,569         596,587         335,930   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

   $ 838,762       $ 813,569       $ 596,587   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See accompanying notes for additional information.

 

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LIFE TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2011, 2010 AND 2009

 

1. BUSINESS ACTIVITY, SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTS
1. BUSINESS ACTIVITY, SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTS

Business Activity

We are a global life sciences company dedicated to helping our customers make scientific discoveries and applying those discoveries to ultimately improve the quality of life. Our systems, reagents, and services enable scientific researchers to accelerate scientific exploration, driving life-enhancing discoveries and developments. Life Technologies’ customers do their work across the biological spectrum, advancing genomic medicine, regenerative science, molecular diagnostics, agricultural and environmental research and 21st century forensics. The Company has a workforce of approximately 10,400 people, has a presence in more than 160 countries, and possesses a rapidly growing intellectual property estate of over 4,000 patents and exclusive licenses around the world.

Our systems and reagents enable, simplify and accelerate a broad spectrum of biological research of genes, proteins and cells within academic and life science research and commercial applications. Our scientific expertise assists in making biodiscovery research techniques more effective and efficient for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, agricultural, clinical, government and academic scientific professionals with backgrounds in a wide range of scientific disciplines.

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Life Technologies Corporation and its majority owned or controlled subsidiaries, collectively referred to as Life Technologies (the Company). All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. When there is a portion of equity in an acquired subsidiary not attributable, directly or indirectly, to the parent, the Company records the fair value of the noncontrolling interests at the acquisition date and classifies the amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests separately in equity in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements. Any subsequent changes in a parent’s ownership interest while the parent retains its controlling financial interest in its subsidiary are accounted for as equity transactions. For details on the noncontrolling interests, refer to the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income.

For purposes of these Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, gross profit is defined as revenues less cost of revenues and purchased intangibles amortization and gross margin is defined as gross profit divided by revenues. Operating income is defined as gross profit less operating expenses and operating margin is defined as operating income divided by revenues.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Reclassifications and Segment Information

The Company has reclassified the historical presentation of cash impact from hedging activities on the Statement of Cash Flows to align to the current year presentation.

The Company has determined in accordance with ASC Topic 280, Segment Reporting to operate as one operating segment. The Company believes our chief operating decision maker (CODM) makes decisions based on the Company as a whole. In addition, the Company shares the common basis of organization, types of

 

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products and services that derive revenues, and economic environments. Accordingly, we believe it is appropriate to operate as one reporting segment. The Company has disclosed the revenues for each of its internal divisions to allow the reader of the financial statements the ability to gain transparency into the operations of the Company.

Concentrations of Risks

Approximately $696.3 million, $712.3 million and $655.8 million, or 18%, 20% and 21% of the Company’s revenues during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively, were derived from university and research institutions which management believes are, to some degree, directly or indirectly supported by the United States Government. If there were to be a significant change in current research funding, particularly with respect to the National Institute of Health, it could have a material adverse impact on the Company’s future revenues and results of operations.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In September 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2011-08, Testing Goodwill for Impairment, updating ASC Topic 350, Intangibles- Goodwill and Other. Under the amended ASC Topic 350, an entity has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than the carrying amount of the unit as a basis for determining if it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test as required under ASC Topic 350. The more-likely-than-not threshold is defined as having a likelihood of more than 50 percent. If, after assessing the totality of events or circumstances, an entity determines it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. If the entity concludes otherwise, it must proceed with the first step of the two-step impairment test. The Update provides examples of events and circumstances an entity should consider in evaluating whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than the carrying value. These examples are not all-inclusive, and an entity may identify other relevant events or circumstances to consider in its assessment. Under this Update, an entity is no longer permitted to carry forward its detailed calculation of a reporting unit’s fair value from a prior year as previously permitted. This guidance is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, with early adoption permitted. The Company does not believe the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements or on future operating results.

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, Presentation of Comprehensive Income, updating ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income. Under the amended ASC Topic 220, an entity has the option to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The guidance eliminates the current option to present other comprehensive income and its components in the Statement of Stockholders’ Equity. This guidance does not change the components that are recognized in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-12, Deferral of the Effective Date for the Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05, updating ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income. This guidance defers changes in ASU 2011-05 that relate to the presentation of reclassification adjustments. The guidance in ASU 2011-05 and ASU 2011-12 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011, and is to be applied retrospectively. The Company does not believe the adoption of this guidance in the first quarter of 2012 will have an impact on its consolidated financial statements or on future operating results.

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS, updating ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement. This guidance clarifies existing fair value guidance and expands disclosure requirements on, among other things, fair value measurements using Level 3 unobservable inputs. Level 3 unobservable inputs refer to prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable (i.e. supported by little or no market activity). This guidance requires disclosures of quantitative information about the inputs used in Level 3 valuations, the valuation process used, and the sensitivity of the fair value measurements to changes in unobservable inputs. Refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of

 

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Financial Instruments” for more description on fair value measurements using Level 3 unobservable inputs. This guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011, and is to be applied prospectively. The Company does not believe the adoption of this guidance in the first quarter of 2012 will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements or on future operating results.

Revenue Recognition

We derive our revenue from the sale of our products, services and technology. We recognize revenue from product sales upon transfer of title of the product or performance of services. Transfer of title generally occurs upon shipment to the customer. We generally ship to our customers FOB shipping point. Concurrently, we record provisions for warranty, returns, and installation based on historical experience and anticipated product performance. Revenue is not recognized at the time of shipment of products in situations where risks and rewards of ownership are transferred to the customer at a point other than upon shipment to the customer due to the shipping terms, the existence of an acceptance clause, the achievement of milestones, or certain return or cancellation privileges. Revenue is recognized according to the shipping terms, at the time of customer acceptance, the lapse of acceptance provisions or cancellation privileges, or achievement of milestones. Service revenue is recognized over the period services are performed. If our shipping policies or sales terms were to change, materially different reported results could occur. In cases where customers order and pay for products and request that we store a portion of their order for them at our cost, we record any material up-front payments as deferred revenue in current or long-term liabilities, depending on the length of the customer prepayment, in the Consolidated Balance Sheets and recognize revenue upon shipment of the product to the customer. For instruments where installation is determined to be a separate earnings process, the portion of the sales price allocable to the fair value of the installation is deferred and recognized when installation is complete. We determine the fair value of the installation process based on technician labor billing rates, the expected number of hours to install the instrument based on historical experience, and amounts charged by third-parties. We continually monitor the level of effort required for the installation of our instruments to ensure that appropriate fair values have been determined. Deferred revenue, which includes customer prepayments and unearned service revenue, totaled $141.9 million at December 31, 2011.

We also enter into arrangements whereby revenues are derived from multiple deliverables. In these arrangements, the Company records revenue as separate elements if the delivered items have value to the customer on a standalone basis, and if the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item, delivery or performance of the undelivered items is considered probable and substantially in the seller’s control. Arrangement consideration should be allocated at the inception of the arrangement to all deliverables using the relative selling price method that is based on a three-tier hierarchy. The relative selling price method requires that the estimated selling price for each deliverable should be based on vendor-specific objective evidence (VSOE) of fair value, which represents the price charged for a deliverable when it is sold separately or for a deliverable not yet being sold separately, the price established by management having the relevant authority. When VSOE of fair value is not available, third-party evidence (TPE) of fair value is acceptable, or a best estimate of selling price if VSOE and TPE are not available. A best estimate of selling price should be consistent with the objective of determining the price at which we would transact if the deliverable were sold regularly on a standalone basis and also take into account market conditions and company specific factors. The relative selling price method allocates any discount in the arrangement proportionally to each deliverable on the basis of each deliverable’s estimated selling price. Applicable revenue recognition criteria are also considered separately for separate units of accounting. Revenues from multiple-element arrangements involving license fees, up-front payments and milestone payments, which are received and/or billable in connection with other rights and services that represent our continuing obligations, are deferred until all applicable revenue recognition criteria are met for each separable element. Contract interpretation is normally required to determine the appropriate accounting, including whether the deliverables specified in a multiple element arrangement should be treated as separate units of accounting for revenue recognition purposes, and if so, how the price should be allocated among the multiple-elements, when to begin to recognize revenue for each element, and the period over which revenue should be recognized.

We recognize royalty revenue, including upfront licensing fees, when the amounts are earned and determinable during the applicable period based on historical activity, and make revisions for actual royalties

 

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received in the following quarter. Materially different reported results would be likely if any of the estimated royalty revenue were significantly different from actual royalties received; however, historically, these revisions have not been material to our consolidated financial statements. For those arrangements where royalties cannot be reasonably estimated, we recognize revenue on the receipt of cash or royalty statements from our licensees. Since we are not able to forecast product sales by licensees, royalty payments that are based on product sales by the licensees are not determinable until the licensee has completed their computation of the royalties due and/or remitted their cash payment to us. In addition, we recognize up-front nonrefundable license fees when due under contractual agreement, unless we have specific continuing performance obligations requiring deferral of all or a portion of these fees. If it cannot be concluded that a licensee fee is fixed or determinable at the outset of an arrangement, revenue is recognized as payments from third-parties become due. Should information on licensee product sales become available so as to enable us to recognize royalty revenue on an accrual basis, materially different revenues and results of operations could occur. Royalty revenue totaled $121.8 million, $130.4 million and $122.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Revenue recorded under proportional performance for projects in process is designed to approximate the amount of revenue earned based on the percentage of efforts completed within the scope of the contractual arrangement. We undertake a review of these arrangements to determine the percentage of the work that has completed and the appropriate amount of revenue to recognize.

Shipping and handling costs are included in costs of sales. Shipping and handling costs charged to customers are recorded as revenue in the period the related product sales revenue is recognized.

Restricted Cash and Related Liabilities

The Company had restricted cash of $16.7 million and $18.2 million at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, which was held in Rabbi Trusts for the payment of certain non-qualified pension plan liabilities. The funds are invested primarily in money market accounts. At December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company had $19.1 million and $18.3 million, respectively, for non-qualified pension plan liabilities recognized in current liabilities and pension liabilities in our Consolidated Balance Sheets in association with the funds held in the Rabbi Trusts. Rabbi Trusts remain in place for the term of benefits payable, which in the case of non-qualified pension plans is the death of the participants or their designated beneficiaries. The Rabbi Trust assets are subject to the claims of the Company’s creditors in the event of the Company’s insolvency. No further contributions are required to be made to the Rabbi Trusts as of December 31, 2011.

Accounts Receivable

The Company provides reserves against trade receivables for estimated losses that may result from a customers’ inability to pay. The amount is determined by analyzing known uncollectible accounts, aged receivables, economic conditions in the customers’ country or industry, historical losses and customer credit-worthiness. Bad debt expense is recorded as necessary to maintain an appropriate level of allowance for doubtful accounts in selling, general and administrative expense. Additionally, our policy is to fully reserve for all accounts with aged balances greater than one year, with certain exceptions determined necessary by management. Amounts determined to be uncollectible are charged or written off against the reserve. The allowances for doubtful accounts were $10.2 million and $10.4 million at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Inventories

Inventories are generally stated at lower of cost (first-in, first-out method) or market. Cost is determined principally on the standard cost method for manufactured goods that approximates cost on the first-in, first-out method. The Company reviews the components of its inventory on a regular basis for excess, obsolete and impaired inventory and makes appropriate dispositions as obsolete inventory is identified. Reserves for excess, obsolete and impaired inventory were $88.7 million and $92.4 million at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Inventories include material, labor and overhead costs in addition to purchase accounting adjustments to write-up acquired inventory to estimated selling prices less costs to complete, costs of disposal and a reasonable profit allowance.

 

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Inventories consist of the following at December 31:

 

(in thousands)    2011      2010  

Raw materials and components

   $ 105,628       $ 87,557   

Work in process (materials, labor and overhead)

     93,738         63,772   

Finished goods (materials, labor and overhead)

     178,500         171,989   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total inventories, net

   $ 377,866       $ 323,318   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets

Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets include hedge assets, prepaid assets, and other current assets, none of which was material at December 31, 2011 and 2010.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

We account for our financial instruments at fair value based on ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures and ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. In determining fair value, we consider both the credit risk of our counterparties and our own creditworthiness. ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, defines fair value and establishes a framework for measuring fair value. The framework requires the valuation of investments using a three tiered approach. The Company reviews and evaluates the adequacy of the valuation techniques periodically. In the current year, there have not been any changes to the Company’s valuation methodologies.

A derivative is an instrument whose value is derived from an underlying instrument or index, such as interest rates, equity securities, currencies, commodities or credit spreads. Derivatives include futures, forwards, swaps, or option contracts, or other financial instruments with similar characteristics. Derivative contracts often involve future commitments to exchange interest payment streams or currencies based on a notional or contractual amount (e.g., interest rate swaps or currency forwards).

The accounting for changes in fair value of a derivative instrument depends on the nature of the derivative and whether the derivative qualifies as a hedging instrument in accordance with ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. Those hedging instruments that qualify for hedge accounting are included as an adjustment to revenue or interest expense, depending upon the nature of the underlying transactions the Company is hedging for. Those hedges that do not qualify for hedge accounting are included in other income (expense).

For details on the assets and liabilities subject to fair value measurements and the related valuation techniques used, and for details on derivative instruments, refer to Note 11 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Fair Value of Financial Instruments”.

Valuation of Long-Lived Assets and Intangibles

The Company reviews long-lived assets and intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. We periodically evaluate the original assumptions and rationale utilized in the establishment of the carrying value and estimated lives of our long-lived assets. The criteria used for these evaluations include management’s estimate of the asset’s continuing ability to generate income from operations and positive cash flow in future periods as well as the strategic significance of any intangible asset in the Company’s business objectives. If assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment recognized is the amount by which the carrying value of the assets exceeds the fair value of the assets, which is determined by applicable market prices, when available. For intangible assets not subject to amortization, the Company assesses for impairment at least annually. There was no material impairment loss recognized for long-lived assets during the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009.

 

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Property and Equipment

We capitalize major renewals and improvements that significantly add to productive capacity or extend the life of an asset. We expense repairs, maintenance, and minor renewals and improvements as incurred. We remove the cost of assets and related depreciation from the related accounts on the balance sheet when assets are sold, or otherwise disposed of, and any related gains or losses are reflected in current earnings. Leased capital assets are included in property and equipment. Depreciation of property and equipment under capital leases is included in depreciation expense. We compute depreciation expense of owned property and equipment based on the expected useful lives of the assets primarily using the straight-line method. We amortize leasehold improvements over their estimated useful lives or the term of the applicable lease, whichever is less.

Capitalized internal-use software costs include only those direct costs associated with the actual development or acquisition of computer software for internal use, including costs associated with the design, coding, installation and testing of the system. Costs associated with preliminary development, such as the evaluation and selection of alternatives, as well as training, maintenance and support are expensed as incurred. At December 31, 2011 and 2010 the Company had $137.8 million and $129.0 million in unamortized capitalized software costs, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, the Company amortized into expense $27.0 million, $25.2 million and $19.6 million, respectively, related to capitalized computer software costs.

Property and equipment consist of the following at December 31:

 

(in thousands)    Estimated
Useful  Life
(in years)
     2011     2010  

Land

           $ 140,738      $ 139,638   

Building and improvements

     1-50         449,124        449,962   

Machinery and equipment

     1-10         445,880        413,004   

Internal use software

     1-10         246,520        207,904   

Construction in process

             63,485        59,236   
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total gross property and equipment

        1,345,747        1,269,744   

Accumulated depreciation and amortization

        (512,069     (421,760
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total property and equipment, net

      $ 833,678      $ 847,984   
     

 

 

   

 

 

 

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets are amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives. Amortization expense related to intangible assets associated with product sales for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 was $308.7 million, $293.8 million and $282.6 million, respectively. Acquired in-process research and development assets are accounted for as indefinite life intangible assets subject to annual impairment test, or earlier if an event or circumstance indicates that impairment may have occurred, until completion or abandonment of the acquired projects. Upon reaching the end of the relevant research and development project, the Company will amortize the acquired in-process research and development over its estimated useful life or expense the acquired in-process research and development should the research and development project be unsuccessful with no future alternative use. In connection with acquisitions, $1.7 million of the purchase price was allocated to in-process research and development and expensed in the Consolidated Statements of Operations for each of the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 according to SFAS 141, Accounting for Business Combinations. In addition, the Company recorded $0.8 million and $9.7 million of amortization expense in other income (expense) for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, in connection with the joint venture investment which was divested in January 2010.

 

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Intangible assets consist of the following:

 

     December 31, 2011     December 31, 2010  
(in thousands)    Weighted
average
life
     Gross
carrying
amount
     Accumulated
amortization
    Weighted
average
life
     Gross
carrying
amount
     Accumulated
amortization
 

Amortized intangible assets:

                

Purchased technology

     7 years       $ 1,239,574       $ (909,246     7 years       $ 1,227,942       $ (797,694

Purchased tradenames and trademarks

     9 years         322,906         (150,840     9 years         323,863         (120,573

Purchased customer base

     11 years         1,441,472         (424,039     12 years         1,441,781         (305,865

Other intellectual properties

     6 years         336,312         (179,289     6 years         299,586         (111,216
     

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

 
      $ 3,340,264       $ (1,663,414      $ 3,293,172       $ (1,335,348
     

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

 

Intangible assets not subject to amortization:

                

Purchased tradenames

      $ 7,451            $ 7,451      

In-process research and development

        62,400              74,900      

Estimated amortization expense for amortizable intangible assets owned as of December 31, 2011 for each of the five succeeding fiscal years is as follows:

 

(in thousands)       

Years Ending December 31,

  

2012

   $ 292,691   

2013

     280,223   

2014

     239,748   

2015

     219,068   

2016

     164,481   

Goodwill

Goodwill represents the excess purchase price of net tangible and intangible assets acquired in business combinations over their estimated fair value. In accordance with ASC Topic 350, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other, goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis and earlier if there is an indicator of impairment. The Company performs its goodwill impairment tests annually during the fourth quarter of its fiscal year and earlier if an event or circumstance indicates that impairment has occurred. The Company utilized a discounted cash flow analysis to estimate the fair value of each reporting unit. The evaluation included management estimates of cash flow projections based on an internal strategic review. Key assumptions from this strategic review included revenue growth, future gross and operating margin growth, and the Company’s weighted cost of capital. The Company also used internal allocations of assets and liabilities and Company specific discount rates to determine the estimated value of each reporting unit. Based on this analysis, the Company determined that no impairment exists at October 1, 2011. No indicators of impairments were noted through December 31, 2011 and consequently, no impairment charge has been recorded during the year.

 

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Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 are as follows:

 

(in thousands)    Total  

Balance at December 31, 2009

   $ 3,783,806   

Purchase adjustments of income tax considerations

     (4,944

Other adjustments

     1,265   

Goodwill acquired during the year

     593,297   

Foreign currency translation

     (1,351
  

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2010

   $ 4,372,073   

Purchase adjustments of income tax considerations

     (282

Other adjustments

     1,544   

Foreign currency translation

     (6,751
  

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 4,366,584   
  

 

 

 

Goodwill acquired during 2010 primarily consisted of the goodwill acquired from the Ion Torrent acquisition. Refer to Note 2 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Business Combinations” for further details on business acquisitions.

Product Warranties

We accrue warranty costs for product sales at the time of shipment, or when the associated revenue is recognized, based on historical experience as well as anticipated product performance. Our product warranties extend over a specified period of time ranging up to two years from the date of sale depending on the product subject to warranty. The product warranty accrual covers parts and labor for repairs and replacements covered by our product warranties. We periodically review the adequacy of our warranty reserve, and adjust, if necessary, the warranty percentage and accrual based on actual experience and estimated costs to be incurred. At December 31, 2011 and 2010, the outstanding balance of product warranties was $6.9 million and $7.2 million, respectively.

Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities

Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities include accrued royalties, hedge liabilities, product warranties, interest accruals, and other current liabilities. At December 31, 2011 and 2010, accrued royalties were $44.1 million and $64.6 million, respectively. None of the other liabilities in Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities were material at December 31, 2011 and 2010.

Research and Development Costs

Costs incurred in research and development activities are expensed as incurred. Research and development costs incurred for collaborations that generate revenue where there are specific product deliverables, and research and development services incurred for defined performances or other design specifications are recorded in cost of sales. During the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 research and development expenses were $377.9 million, $375.5 million and $337.1 million, respectively.

Income Taxes

Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes, using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

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Accounting for Share-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for share-based compensation under the guidance prescribed by ASC Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model (Black-Scholes model) to estimate the fair value of share-based compensation cost at the grant date, which is recognized as expense over the employee’s requisite service period for all share-based awards granted and adjusted by modification or cancellation as necessary. For details on the share-based compensation recognized and assumptions used, refer to Note 10 of the Consolidated Financial Statements, “Employee Stock Plans”.

Computation of Earnings Per Share

Basic earnings per share was computed by dividing net income attributable to Life Technologies by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur from the following items:

 

   

Convertible senior notes where the effect of those securities is dilutive;

   

Dilutive contingently issuable shares from business combinations;

   

Dilutive stock options and restricted stock units;

   

Dilutive performance awards; and

   

Dilutive Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP) .

 

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Computations for basic and diluted earnings per share for the years ending December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are as follows:

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts)     

 

Net Income

(Numerator)

  

  

    

 

Shares

(Denominator)

  

  

     Amount   

2011

        

Basic earnings per share:

        

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

   $ 378,492         179,390       $ 2.11   
        

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share:

        

Dilutive stock options and restricted stock units

             4,229      

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

             13      

Business combination contingently issuable shares

     1,169         1,438      

1 1/2% Convertible Senior Notes due 2024

     131         250      

3 1/4% Convertible Senior Notes due 2025

             275      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net income attributable to Life Technologies plus assumed conversions

   $ 379,792         185,595       $ 2.05   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Potentially dilutive securities not included above since they are antidilutive:

        

Antidilutive stock options and restricted stock units

        3,582      

2010

        

Basic earnings per share:

        

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

   $ 378,295         183,398       $ 2.06   
        

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share:

        

Dilutive stock options and restricted stock units

             4,647      

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

             108      

Dilutive performance awards

             66      

2% Convertible Senior Notes due 2023

     44         2,109      

1 1/2% Convertible Senior Notes due 2024

     127         73      

3 1/4% Convertible Senior Notes due 2025

             190      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net income attributable to Life Technologies plus assumed conversions

   $ 378,466         190,591       $ 1.99   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Potentially dilutive securities not included above since they are antidilutive:

        

Antidilutive stock options and restricted stock units

        3,396      

2009

        

Basic earnings per share:

        

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

   $ 144,594         175,872       $ 0.82   
        

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share:

        

Dilutive stock options and restricted stock units

             3,372      

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

             63      

Dilutive performance awards

             400      

2% Convertible Senior Notes due 2023

     170         1,693      

3 1/4% Convertible Senior Notes due 2025

             15      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

Net income attributable to Life Technologies plus assumed conversions

   $ 144,764         181,415       $ 0.80   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Potentially dilutive securities not included above since they are antidilutive:

        

Antidilutive stock options

        6,683      

1 1/2% Convertible Senior Notes due 2024

        8,821      

 

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Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

Accumulated other comprehensive income, including unrealized gains and losses that are excluded from the Consolidated Statements of Operations, is reported as a separate component in stockholders’ equity. The unrealized gains and losses include foreign currency translation adjustments, cash flow hedge adjustments, and pension liability adjustments, net of tax.

Accumulated other comprehensive income, net of taxes, consists of the following at December 31,

 

(in thousands)    2011     2010  

Foreign currency translation adjustment

   $ 146,987      $ 158,106   

Cash flow hedge adjustments

     1,960        (23,846

Pension liability adjustment

     (84,291     (37,648
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 64,656      $ 96,612   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ownership Interest in Subsidiaries

The effects of changes in the Company’s ownership interest in its subsidiaries during the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 are as follows:

 

(in thousands)    2011     2010  

Net income attributable to Life Technologies

   $ 378,492      $ 378,295   

Decrease in Life Technologies’ paid-in capital for purchases of subsidiaries’ shares

     (1,128     (5,393
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Change from net income attributable to Life Technologies and transfers to noncontrolling interests

   $ 377,364      $ 372,902   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

2. BUSINESS COMBINATIONS AND DIVESTITURES

Business Combinations

The Company completed several acquisitions, including Ion Torrent Systems Incorporated (Ion Torrent), that were not individually or collectively considered material to the overall consolidated financial statements and the results of the Company’s operations. These acquisitions have been included in the consolidated financial statements from the respective dates of the acquisitions. Certain acquisitions contain contingent consideration arrangements that require the Company to assess the acqu