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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K


ý

 

Annual report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014

o

 

Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from                             to                            

Commission file number: 0-25923

Eagle Bancorp, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Maryland
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  52-2061461
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)

7830 Old Georgetown Road,
Third Floor, Bethesda, Maryland

(Address of principal executive offices)

 


20814

(Zip Code)

        Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (301) 986-1800

        Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of class   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.01 par value   The NASDAQ Capital Market

        Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

        Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Section 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o

        Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act Yes o    No ý

        Indicate by check mark whether the registrant; (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports; and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

        Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

        Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

        Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer ý   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company o

        Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act. Yes o    No ý

        The aggregate market value of the outstanding Common Stock held by nonaffiliates as of June 30, 2014 was approximately $768.4 million.

        As of February 20, 2015, the number of outstanding shares of the Common Stock, $0.01 par value, of Eagle Bancorp, Inc. was 30,482,979.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

        Portions of the Company's definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 21, 2015 are incorporated by reference in part III hereof.

   


Table of Contents

EAGLE BANCORP, INC.
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page

Part I

   

Item 1.

 

Business

  3

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

  23

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

  35

Item 2.

 

Properties

  35

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

  36

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

  36


Part II


 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

  37

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

  40

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

  43

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

  79

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

  85

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

  147

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

  147

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

  149


Part III


 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

  149

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

  149

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

  149

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

  150

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

  150


Part IV


 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

  151


SIGNATURES


 

155

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PART I

ITEM 1.    BUSINESS

        In this report, unless otherwise expressly stated or the context otherwise requires, the terms "we," "us," the "Company," "Eagle," and "our" refer to Eagle Bancorp, Inc. and our subsidiaries on a combined basis, except in the description of any of our securities, in which case these terms refer solely to Eagle Bancorp, Inc. and not to any of our subsidiaries. References to "EagleBank" or "Bank" refer to EagleBank, Bethesda, Maryland, which is our principal subsidiary.

        Eagle Bancorp, Inc. (the "Company"), headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, was incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland on October 28, 1997, to serve as the bank holding company for EagleBank (the "Bank"). The Company was formed by a group of local businessmen and professionals with significant prior experience in community banking in the Company's market area, together with an experienced community bank senior management team. The Company has one direct non-banking subsidiary, Eagle Commercial Ventures, LLC ("ECV"), which provides subordinated financing for the acquisition, development and construction of real estate projects.

        The Bank, a Maryland chartered commercial bank, which is a member of the Federal Reserve System, is the Company's principal operating subsidiary. It commenced banking operations on July 20, 1998. The Bank operates twenty two banking offices: seven in Montgomery County, Maryland; five located in the District of Columbia; and ten in Northern Virginia. Refer to Properties on page 35 for a listing of banking offices. The Bank may seek additional banking offices consistent with its strategic plan, although there can be no assurance that the Bank will establish any additional offices, or that any branch office will prove to be profitable.

        The Bank has two active direct subsidiaries: Bethesda Leasing, LLC and Eagle Insurance Services, LLC. Bethesda Leasing, LLC holds title to and operates real estate owned and acquired through foreclosure. Eagle Insurance Services, LLC facilitates the placement of commercial and retail insurance products through a referral arrangement with The Meltzer Group, a large well known insurance brokerage within the Company's market area.

        The Bank operates as a community bank alternative to the super-regional financial institutions, which dominate its primary market area. The cornerstone of the Bank's philosophy is to provide superior, personalized service to its clients. The Bank focuses on relationship banking, providing each client with a number of services, familiarizing itself with, and addressing itself to, client needs in a proactive, personalized fashion. Management believes that the Bank's target market segments, small to medium-sized for profit and non-profit businesses and the consumer base working or living in and near the Bank's market area, demand the convenience and personal service that an independent locally based financial institution such as the Bank can offer. It is these themes of convenience and proactive personal service that form the basis for the Bank's business development strategies.

        Acquisition of Virginia Heritage Bank.    On October 31, 2014, the Company completed its acquisition of Virginia Heritage Bank ("Virginia Heritage"). The acquisition of Virginia Heritage was effected through the merger (the "Merger") of Virginia Heritage with and into EagleBank, in accordance with the Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the "Merger Agreement") among the Company, EagleBank and Virginia Heritage, dated June 9, 2014. Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, each share of Virginia Heritage common stock was converted into the right to receive 0.6632 shares of Company common stock and $7.50 in cash, plus cash in lieu of fractional shares. Outstanding options to acquire Virginia Heritage common stock were converted into fully vested options to purchase an aggregate of 401,497 shares of Company common stock. In connection with the Merger, the Company paid an aggregate of $45.4 million in cash to former shareholders of Virginia Heritage and issued 4,010,261 shares of Company common stock.

        Additionally, each of the 15,300 shares of Virginia Heritage's Senior Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series A, $1,000 liquidation amount per share ("Virginia Heritage Series A Preferred

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Stock"), issued to the U.S. Treasury pursuant to the Small Business Lending Fund Program ("SBLF"), was exchanged for one share of a new series of the Company's Senior Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series C, liquidation amount $1,000 per share (the "Series C Preferred Stock"), which ranks equally with and has substantially identical terms and conditions as the Company's existing Senior Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series B, liquidation amount $1,000 per share ("Series B Preferred Stock").

        The acquisition added approximately $800 million in loans, $3 million in loans held for sale, $645 million in deposits, and $95 million in borrowings. Identified intangibles related to core deposits were recorded for $4.6 million, which is being amortized over its estimated useful life of approximately 6 years and an initial intangible for goodwill was recorded for approximately $102.3 million. Additionally, in connection with the transaction, the Company recorded a fair value credit mark on the loan portfolio for approximately $12.5 million.

        The income and expenses of Virginia Heritage are included in the consolidated results of operations for the two month period subsequent to the acquisition only.

        Description of Services.    The Bank offers a full range of commercial banking services to its business and professional clients, as well as complete consumer banking services to individuals living or working in the service area. The Bank emphasizes providing commercial banking services to sole proprietorships, small, medium and large-sized businesses, partnerships, corporations, non-profit organizations and associations, and investors living and working in and near the Bank's primary service area. A full range of retail banking services are offered to accommodate the individual needs of both corporate customers as well as the community the Bank serves. The Bank also offers online banking, mobile banking and a remote deposit service, which allows clients to facilitate and expedite deposit transactions through the use of electronic devices.

        The Bank provides a variety of commercial and consumer lending products to small to medium sized businesses and to individuals for various business and personal purposes, including (i) commercial loans for a variety of business purposes such as for working capital, equipment purchases, real estate lines of credit, and government contract financing; (ii) asset based lending and accounts receivable financing (on a limited basis); (iii) construction and commercial real estate loans; (iv) business equipment financing; (v) consumer home equity lines of credit, personal lines of credit and term loans; (vi) consumer installment loans such as auto and personal loans; (v) personal credit cards offered through an outside vendor; and (vi) residential mortgage loans.

        The Bank maintains a loan portfolio consisting primarily of traditional business and real estate secured loans, with a substantial portion having variable and adjustable rates, and where the cash flow of the borrower/borrower's business is the principal source of debt service with a secondary emphasis on collateral. Real estate loans are made generally for commercial purposes and are structured using both variable and fixed rates and renegotiable rates which adjust in three to five years, with maturities of five to ten years.

        The Bank's consumer loans portfolio is comprised generally of three loan types: (i) home equity lines of credit that are structured with an interest only draw period followed either by a balloon maturity or a fully amortized repayment schedule; (ii) first lien residential mortgage loans, although the Bank's general practice is to sell conforming first trust loans on a servicing released basis to third party investors; and (iii) a portfolio of indirect automobile loans acquired from its Merger, which are fixed rate, have monthly principal and interest payments and general contractual terms up to 84 months, with expected lives of about 30 months.

        The Bank has also developed significant expertise and commitment as a Small Business Administration ("SBA") lender and has been recognized as a top originator of such loans in our market area.

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        The direct lending activities in which the Bank engages carry the risk that the borrowers will be unable to perform on their obligations. As such, interest rate policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the "Federal Reserve Board") and general economic conditions, nationally and in the Bank's primary market area, could have a significant impact on the Bank's and the Company's results of operations. To the extent that economic conditions deteriorate, business and individual borrowers may be less able to meet their obligations to the Bank in full, in a timely manner, resulting in decreased earnings or losses to the Bank. To the extent the Bank makes fixed rate loans or variable rate loans with fixed rate floors, general increases in interest rates will tend to reduce the Bank's spread as the interest rates the Bank must pay for deposits may increase while interest income may be unchanged. Economic conditions may also adversely affect the value of property pledged as security for loans.

        The Bank's goal is to mitigate risks in the event of unforeseen threats to the loan portfolio as a result of economic downturn or other negative influences. Plans for mitigating inherent risks in managing loan assets include: carefully enforcing loan policies and procedures, evaluating each borrower's business plan during the underwriting process and throughout the loan term, identifying and monitoring primary and alternative sources for loan repayment, and obtaining collateral to mitigate economic loss in the event of liquidation. Specific loan reserves are established based upon credit and/or collateral risks on an individual loan basis. A risk rating system is employed to proactively estimate loss exposure and provide a measuring system for setting general and specific reserve allocations.

        The Bank is an approved SBA lender. As a preferred lender under the SBA's Preferred Lender Program, the Bank can originate certain SBA loans in-house without prior SBA approval. SBA loans are made through programs designed by the federal government to assist the small business community in obtaining financing from financial institutions that are given government guarantees as an incentive to make the loans. Under certain circumstances, the Bank attempts to further mitigate commercial term loan losses by using loan guarantee programs offered by the SBA. SBA lending is subject to federal legislation that can affect the availability and funding of the program. From time to time, this dependence on legislative funding causes limitations and uncertainties with regard to the continued funding of such programs, which could potentially have an adverse financial impact on our business.

        The composition of the Bank's loan portfolio is heavily weighted toward commercial real estate, both owner occupied and income producing real estate. Owner occupied commercial real estate and owner occupied commercial real estate construction represent 12% of the loan portfolio. At December 31, 2014, non owner occupied commercial real estate and real estate construction represented approximately 58% of the loan portfolio. The, combined owner occupied and commercial real estate loans represent 70% of the loan portfolio. These loans are underwritten to mitigate lending risks typical of this type of loan such as declines in real estate values, changes in borrower cash flow and general economic conditions. The Bank typically requires a maximum loan to value of 80% and minimum cash flow debt service coverage of 1.15 to 1.0. Personal guarantees are generally required, but may be limited. In making real estate commercial mortgage loans, the Bank generally requires that interest rates adjust not less frequently than five years.

        The Bank is also an active traditional commercial lender providing loans for a variety of purposes, including cash flow, equipment and account receivable financing. This loan category represents approximately 21% of the Bank's loan portfolio at December 31, 2014 and is generally variable or adjustable rate. Commercial loans meet reasonable underwriting standards, including appropriate collateral, and cash flow necessary to support debt service. Personal guarantees are generally required, but may be limited. SBA loans represent approximately 2% of commercial loans. In originating SBA loans, the Bank assumes the risk of non-payment on the uninsured portion of the credit. The Bank generally sells the insured portion of the loan generating noninterest income from the gains on sale, as well as servicing income on the portion participated. SBA loans are subject to the same cash flow analyses as other commercial loans. SBA loans are subject to a maximum loan size established by the SBA.

        Approximately 6% of the loan portfolio at December 31, 2014 consists of home equity loans and lines of credit and other consumer loans, including indirect automobile loans acquired in the merger with

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Virginia Heritage. These credits, while making up a smaller portion of the loan portfolio, demand the same emphasis on underwriting and credit evaluation as other types of loans advanced by the Bank.

        Approximately 3% of the total loan portfolio consists of residential home mortgage loans. These credits represent first liens on residential property loans originated by the Bank. While the Bank's general practice is to originate and sell (servicing released) loans made by its Residential Lending department, certain loan characteristics do not meet the requirements of third party investors and are instead maintained in the Bank's portfolio.

        Our lending activities are subject to a variety of lending limits imposed by state and federal law. These limits will increase or decrease in response to increases or decreases in the Bank's level of capital. At January 31, 2015, the Bank had a legal lending limit of $102.1 million. In accordance with internal lending policies, the Bank occasionally sells participations in its loans to other area banks, which allows the Bank to manage risk involved in these loans and to meet the lending needs of its clients.

        From time to time the Company may make loans for its own portfolio or through its higher risk loan affiliate, ECV, which under its operating agreement conducts lending only to real estate projects. Such loans may have higher risk characteristics than loans made by the Bank, such as lower priority security interests and/or higher loan to value ratios. The Company seeks an overall financial return on these transactions commensurate with the risks and structure of each individual loan. Certain transactions bear current interest at a rate with a significant premium to normal market rates. Other loan transactions carry a standard rate of current interest, but also earn additional interest based on a fixed rate or a percentage of the profits of the underlying project. Refer to the discussion under "Management's Discussion and Analysis—Noninterest Income" at page 55 and "Loan Portfolio" at page 60, for further information on the Company's and ECV's higher risk lending activities. At December 31, 2014, ECV had four outstanding loan transactions totaling $6.2 million.

        The risk of nonpayment (or deferred payment) of loans is inherent in commercial banking. The Bank's marketing focus on small to medium-sized businesses may result in the assumption by the Bank of certain lending risks that are different from those attendant to loans to larger companies. Management and/or committees of the Bank carefully evaluate loan applications and attempt to minimize credit risk exposure by use of extensive loan application data, due diligence, and approval and monitoring procedures; however, there can be no assurance that such procedures can significantly reduce such lending risks.

        The Bank originates residential mortgage loans primarily as a correspondent lender. Activity in the residential mortgage loan market is highly sensitive to changes in interest rates and product availability. While the Bank does have delegated underwriting authority from most of its investors, it also employs the services of the investor to underwrite the loans. Because the loans are originated within investor guidelines and designated automated underwriting and product specific requirements as part of the loan application, the loans sold have a limited recourse provision. Most contracts with investors contain recourse periods. In general, the Bank may be required to repurchase a previously sold mortgage loan or indemnify the investor if there is non-compliance with defined loan origination or documentation standards, including fraud, negligence or material misstatement in the loan documents. In addition, the Bank may have an obligation to repurchase a loan if the mortgagor has defaulted early in the loan term. The potential default repurchase period varies by investor but can be up to approximately twelve months after sale of the loan to the investor. Mortgages subject to recourse are collateralized by single-family residential properties, have loan-to-value ratios of 80% or less, or have private mortgage insurance. In certain instances, the Bank may provide equity loans (second position financing) in combination with residential first mortgage lending for purchase money and refinancing purposes. The Bank also brokers loan transactions with two investors, where the Bank refers, but does not underwrite and does not close the loan transaction. In this situation the Bank has no recourse liability for the loan.

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        The Bank enters into commitments to originate residential mortgage loans whereby the interest rate on the loan is determined prior to funding (i.e. rate lock commitments). Such rate lock commitments on mortgage loans to be sold in the secondary market are considered to be derivatives. To protect against the price risk inherent in residential mortgage loan commitments, the Bank utilizes both "best efforts" and "mandatory delivery" forward loan sale commitments to mitigate the risk of potential decrease in the values of loans that would result from the exercise of the derivative loan commitments. Under a "best efforts" contract, the Bank commits to deliver an individual mortgage loan of a specified principal amount and quality to an investor and the investor commits to a price that it will purchase the loan from the Bank if the loan to the underlying borrower closes. The Bank protects itself from changes in interest rates through the use of best efforts forward delivery commitments, whereby the investor commits to purchase a loan at a price representing a premium on the day the borrower commits to an interest rate with the intent that the buyer/investor has assumed the interest rate risk on the loan. As a result, the Bank is not generally exposed to losses on loans sold utilizing best efforts. Nor will it realize gains, related to rate lock commitments due to changes in interest rates. The market values of rate lock commitments and best efforts contracts are not readily ascertainable with precision because rate lock commitments and best efforts contracts are not actively traded. Because of the high correlation between rate lock commitments and best efforts contracts, no gain or loss should occur on the rate lock commitments. Under a "mandatory delivery" contract, the Bank commits to deliver a certain principal amount of mortgage loans to an investor at a specified price on or before a specified date. If the Bank fails to deliver the amount of mortgages necessary to fulfill the commitment by the specified date, it is obligated to pay the investor a "pair-off" fee, based on then-current market prices, to compensate the investor for the shortfall. The rate lock commitments on mortgage loans to be sold in the secondary market are considered to be derivatives. The Bank manages the interest rate risk on rate lock commitments by entering into forward sale contracts of mortgage backed securities, whereby the Bank obtains the right to deliver securities to investors in the future at a specified price. Such contracts are accounted for as derivatives and are recorded at fair value in derivative assets or liabilities, with changes in fair value recorded in other income. The period of time between issuance of a loan commitment to the customer and closing and sale of the loan to an investor generally ranges from 30 to 90 days under current market conditions.

        The general terms and underwriting standards for each type of commercial real estate and construction loan are incorporated into the Bank's lending policies. These policies are analyzed periodically by management, and the policies are reviewed and approved by the Board. The Bank's loan policies and practices described in this report are subject to periodic change, and each guideline or standard is subject to waiver or exception in the case of any particular loan, by the appropriate officer or committee, in accordance with the Bank's loan policies. Policy standards are often stated in mandatory terms, such as "shall" or "must", but these provisions are subject to exceptions. Policy requires that loan value not exceed a percentage of "market value" or "fair value" based upon appraisals or evaluations obtained in the ordinary course of the Bank's underwriting practices.

        Loans are secured primarily by duly recorded first deeds of trust. In some cases, the Bank may accept a recorded second trust position. In general, borrowers will have a proven ability to build, lease, manage and/or sell a commercial or residential project and demonstrate satisfactory financial condition. Additionally, an equity contribution toward the project is required.

        Construction loans require that the financial condition and experience of the general contractor and major subcontractors be satisfactory to the Bank. Guaranteed, fixed price construction contracts are required whenever appropriate, along with payment and performance bonds or completion bonds for certain larger scale projects.

        Loans intended for residential land acquisition, lot development and construction are made on the premise that the land: (1) is or will be developed for building sites for residential structures; and (2) will ultimately be utilized for construction or improvement of residential zoned real properties, including the creation of housing. Residential development and construction loans will finance projects such as single

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family subdivisions, planned unit developments, townhouses, and condominiums. Residential land acquisition, development and construction loans generally are underwritten with a maximum term of 36 months, including extensions approved at origination.

        Commercial land acquisition and construction loans are secured by real property where loan funds will be used to acquire land and to construct or improve appropriately zoned real property for the creation of income producing or owner user commercial properties. Borrowers are required to contribute equity into each project at levels determined by the appropriate Loan Committee. Commercial land acquisition and construction loans generally are underwritten with a maximum term of 24 months.

        Loan-to-value ("LTV") ratios, with few exceptions, are maintained consistent with or below supervisory guidelines.

        Construction draw requests generally must be presented in writing on American Institute of Architects documents and certified by the contractor, the borrower and the borrower's architect. Each draw request shall also include the borrower's soft cost breakdown certified by the borrower or its Chief Financial Officer. Prior to an advance, the Bank or its contractor inspects the project to determine that the work has been completed, to justify the draw requisition.

        Commercial permanent loans are secured by improved real property, which is generating income in the normal course of operation. Debt service coverage, assuming stabilized occupancy, must be satisfactory to support a permanent loan. The debt service coverage ratio is ordinarily at least 1.15 to 1. As part of the underwriting process, debt service coverage ratios are stress tested assuming a 200 basis point increase in interest rates from their current levels.

        Commercial permanent loans are generally subject to re-pricing after 5 years and are underwritten with a term not greater than 10 years or the remaining useful life of the property, whichever is lower. The preferred term is between 5 to 7 years, with amortization to a maximum of 25 years.

        Personal guarantees are generally received from the principals on commercial real estate loans, and only in instances where the loan-to-value is sufficiently low and the debt service is sufficiently high is consideration given to either limiting or not requiring personal recourse.

        Updated appraisals for real estate secured loans are obtained as necessary and appropriate to borrower financial condition, project status, loan terms, and market conditions.

        The Company's loan portfolio includes loans made for real estate Acquisition, Development and Construction ("ADC") purposes, including both income producing and owner occupied projects. ADC loans amounted to $851.5 million at December 31, 2014. The ADC loans containing loan funded interest reserves represent approximately 31% of the outstanding ADC loan portfolio at December 31, 2014. The decision to establish a loan-funded interest reserve is made upon origination of the ADC loan and is based upon a number of factors considered during underwriting of the credit including: (i) the feasibility of the project; (ii) the experience of the sponsor; (iii) the creditworthiness of the borrower and guarantors; (iv) borrower equity contribution; and (v) the level of collateral protection. When appropriate, an interest reserve provides an effective means of addressing the cash flow characteristics of a properly underwritten ADC loan. The Company does not significantly utilize interest reserves in other loan products. The Company recognizes that one of the risks inherent in the use of interest reserves is the potential masking of underlying problems with the project and/or the borrower's ability to repay the loan. In order to mitigate this inherent risk, the Company employs a series of reporting and monitoring mechanisms on all ADC loans, whether or not an interest reserve is provided, including: (i) construction and development timelines which are monitored on an ongoing basis which track the progress of a given project to the timeline projected at origination; (ii) a construction loan administration department independent of the lending function; (iii) third party independent construction loan inspection reports; (iv) monthly interest reserve monitoring reports detailing the balance of the interest reserves approved at origination and the days of interest carry represented by the reserve balances as compared to the then current anticipated time to completion and/or sale of speculative projects; and (v) quarterly commercial real estate construction

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meetings among senior Company management which includes monitoring of current and projected real estate market conditions. If a project has not performed as expected, it is not the customary practice of the Company to increase loan funded interest reserves.

        Despite the less than robust economic recovery, the Company has not experienced any significant issues with increased vacancy rates or lower rents for income producing properties financed. The construction loan portfolio has remained solid, particularly in the area of well located residential and multifamily, as the housing market has continued to improve and stabilize. The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area real estate market has been relatively stable, however, certain segments, including suburban office, has exhibited higher than normal vacancy and concessions in specific submarkets. The impact of disruptions in government spending patterns, i.e. sequestration, program cuts or terminations, leasing activity, and changes in geographic distribution of government spending, while within manageable levels to date, remains of concern. As a result the Company has maintained somewhat higher than pre-recession environmental allocation factors for the allowance for loan losses ("ALLL") for the real estate loan portfolio. As part of its overall risk assessments, management carefully reviews the Bank's loan portfolio and general economic and market conditions on a regular basis and will continue to adjust both the specific and environmental reserve factors as necessary.

        Deposit services include business and personal checking accounts, NOW accounts, tiered savings and money market account and time deposits with varying maturity structures and customer options. A complete individual retirement account program is available. The Bank also participates in the Promontory Interfinancial Network, LLC ("Promontory") Certificate of Deposit Account Registry Service ("CDARs") and its Insured Cash Sweep ("ICS") program, both of which networks function to assure full FDIC insurance for participating Bank customers. In cooperation with Goldman Sachs Asset Management, the Bank offers a Goldman Sachs Investment Sweep Account, a check writing cash management account that sweeps funds to one of several non-FDIC insured off-balance sheet investment accounts managed by Goldman Sachs.

        The Bank offers a full range of on-line banking services for both personal and business accounts and has a Mobile Banking application for both businesses and individuals. Other services include cash management services, business sweep accounts, lock box, remote deposit capture, account reconciliation services, merchant card services, safety deposit boxes and Automated Clearing House origination. After-hours depositories and ATM service are also available.

        The Bank and Company maintain portfolios of short term investments and investment securities consisting primarily of U.S. Government agency bonds and government sponsored enterprise mortgage backed securities, and municipal bonds. The Bank also owns equity investments related to membership in the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta ("FHLB"). The Bank's securities portfolio also consists of equity investments in the form of common stocks of a few local banking companies. These portfolios provide the following objectives: liquidity management, additional income to the Company and Bank in the form of interest and gain on sale opportunities, collateral to facilitate borrowing arrangements and assistance with meeting interest rate risk management objectives. The current Investment Policy limits the Bank to investments of high quality, U.S. Treasury securities, U.S. Government agency securities and high grade municipal securities. High risk investments and non-traditional investments are prohibited. Investment maturities are generally limited to ten to fifteen years, except as specifically approved by the Asset Liability Committee ("ALCO"), and mortgage backed pass through securities with average lives generally not to exceed eight years.

        The Company and Bank have formalized an asset and liability management process and have a standing ALCO consisting both of outside and inside directors and senior management. The ALCO operates under established policies and practices, which are updated and re-approved annually. A typical ALCO meeting includes discussion of current economic conditions and strategies, including interest rate trends and volumes positions, the current balance sheet and earnings position, cash flow estimates, liquidity positions and funding alternatives as necessary, interest rate risk position (quarterly), capital

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positions of the Company and Bank, reviews (including independent reviews) of the investment portfolio of the Bank and the Company, and the approval of investment transactions. Additionally, monthly ALCO meetings may include reports and analysis of outside firms to enhance the Committee's knowledge and understanding of various financial matters.

        The Bank's customer base has benefited from the extensive business and personal contacts of its directors and executive officers. To introduce new customers to the Bank, and particularly in light of the recent merger with Virginia Heritage, the Bank has placed enhanced reliance on proactively designed officer calling programs, active participation in business organizations, and enhanced referral programs.

        Internet Access to Company Documents.    The Company provides access to its Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") filings through its web site at www.eaglebankcorp.com. After accessing the web site, the filings are available upon selecting "Investor Relations/SEC Filings/Documents." Reports available include the annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after the reports are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC.


MARKET AREA AND COMPETITION


        The primary service area of the Bank is the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. With a population of nearly 6,300,000, the region is the 5th largest market in the U.S. Total employment in the region is approximately 2,600,000. The region has one of the highest total job creation records of any market in the country with reported new job creation of more than 310,000 jobs since 2004 and 37,300 new jobs created in 2014. The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area contains a substantial federal workforce, as well as supporting a variety of support industries such as attorneys, lobbyists, government contractors, real estate developers and investors, non-profit organizations, tourism and consultants. The Gross Domestic Product ("GDP") for the metropolitan area in 2013 was reported at $463 billion. Of this amount, approximately $104 billion or 22% is associated with spending by the government as of 2013. Other significant sectors include professional and business services, education, health and leisure and hospitality. The region also has a very active non-profit sector including trade associations, colleges and universities and major hospitals.

        Montgomery County, Maryland, with a total population estimated at 1,017,000 as of July 2013 and occupying an area of about 500 square miles, borders Washington, D.C. to the north and is roughly 30 miles southwest of Baltimore. Montgomery County represents a diverse and healthy segment of Maryland's economy. Montgomery County is a thriving business center and is Maryland's most populous jurisdiction. Population in the county is expected to grow 4.9% between 2015 and 2020. While the state of Maryland boasts a demographic profile superior to the U.S. economy at large, the economy in and around Montgomery County is among the very best in Maryland. The number of jobs in Montgomery County has been relatively stable in the recent past with the public sector contributing about 20% of the employment. The unemployment rate in Montgomery County is among the lowest in the state at 4.1% as of November 2014. A very educated population has contributed to favorable median household income of $98,221 with the number of households totaling 360,563. According to the U.S. census update, approximately 57% of the County's residents between 2009 and 2013 hold college or advanced degrees, placing the population of Montgomery County among the most educated in the nation. The area boasts a diverse business climate of over 33,000 businesses with 450,000 jobs in addition to a strong federal government presence. Major areas of employment include a substantial technology sector, biotechnology, software development, a housing construction and renovation sector, and a legal, financial services, health care, and professional services sector. Major private employers include Adventist Healthcare, Lockheed Martin, Giant Food, and Marriott International. The county is also an incubator for firms engaged in biotechnology and the area has traditionally attracted significant amounts of venture capital. Montgomery County is home to many major federal and private sector research and development and regulatory agencies, including the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institutes of Health, National Oceanic and

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Atmospheric Administration, Naval Research and Development Center, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Food and Drug Administration and the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda. Transportation congestion and federal government spending levels remain threats to future economic development and the quality of life in the area.

        Washington, D.C. in addition to being the seat of the federal government is a vibrant city with a well-educated, diverse population. According to survey data from the latest U.S. Census, the estimated July 2014 population of the District of Columbia is approximately 658,893, up from 601,767 in 2010. Median household income, at $65,830 between 2009 and 2013, is above the national median level of $53,046. The growth of residents in the city is due partially to improvements in the city's services and to the many housing options available, ranging from grand old apartment buildings to Federal era town homes to the most modern condominiums. As of July 2013, the housing market has grown to over 302,947 units. As of November 2014, the absorption of condominium units in the District has continued at a satisfactory pace. While the federal government and its employees are a major factor in the economy, over 100 million square feet of commercial office space support a dynamic business community of more than 35,000 companies. These include law and accounting firms, trade and professional associations, information technology companies, international financial institutions, health and education organizations and research and management companies. Unemployment has increased slightly with the rate for December 2014 at 7.2%, which is up from 6.9% in December 2013. The disparity between the high level of unemployment among District residents and the strong employment trends reflects the high level of jobs held by residents of the surrounding suburban jurisdictions. The District has a well-educated and highly paid work force. The federal government accounts for approximately 28% of the employment and private firms provide an additional 21%. Other large employers include the many local universities and hospitals. Another significant factor in the economy is the leisure and hospitality industry, as Washington, D.C. remains a popular tourist destination for both national and international travelers.

        As a result of the Merger, the Bank added a net of three branches in Fairfax County. Fairfax County, Virginia is a large, affluent jurisdiction with an estimated population of approximately 1,130,924 as of July 2013. This county covers about 395 square miles and is located west of Washington, D.C. Fairfax County is one of the leading technology centers in the United States. Ten Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the county and 35 of the largest 100 technology federal contractors in the Washington metropolitan area are located in Fairfax County. The county has over 115 million square feet of office space and is one of the largest suburban office markets in the United States. The midyear 2013 office vacancy rate was 15.2%, below the national average of 16.7%, as measured in fourth quarter 2014. It is a thriving residential as well as business center with 389,903 households, which is expected to grow at about 7.8% between 2010 and 2020. The county is among the most affluent in the country with average annual household income of $110,292 per annum between 2009 and 2013. Total employment was over 578,478 as of 2012. Major companies headquartered in the county, which are also major employers, include Capital One Financial, CSC, Gannett, General Dynamics, Hilton Hotels, Leidos and Sallie Mae. The county is also home to several federal entities including the CIA, Fort Belvoir and a major facility of the Smithsonian Institution.

        In 2011, the Bank's footprint expanded into Arlington County, Virginia, which has an estimated population of over 224,000 as of 2013. The county is made up of 26 square miles and is situated just west of Washington, D.C., directly across the Potomac River. There are approximately 94,454 households with a median household income of $103,208 between 2009 and 2013. There were over 162,956 employees as of March 2014, working predominantly in the public sector. Significant private sector employers include Deloitte, Lockheed Martin Corporation, Virginia Hospital Center and Marriott International, Inc. The unemployment rate was just 3.0% as of December 2014. These numbers compare favorably to the region, the rest of Virginia and the U.S. Arlington County has approximately 39.8 million square feet of office space. The population is highly educated, with about 72% of residents over 25 years of age holding at least a bachelor's degree as of 2013.

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        In early 2013, the Bank added a branch to its network in Alexandria, Virginia. Alexandria is a city with an estimated population of 148,892 as of July 2013. The city is made up of just over 15 square miles and sits on the west bank of the Potomac River just south of Arlington, Virginia. There are approximately 65,369 households with a median household income of $85,706 on average between 2009 and 2013. The employment base was approximately 98,627 employees as of November 2014, with 76% working in the private sector and 24% working in government roles. Alexandria has over 8,000 businesses and organizations, located in the more than 20 million square feet of office space and over 7 million square feet of retail space existing in the city as of March 2013. The unemployment rate was just 3.5% as of December 2014. The population is highly educated, with over 60% of residents over 25 years of age holding at least a bachelor's degree as of 2013.

        Throughout the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, competition is keen from large banking institutions headquartered outside of Maryland. Although we saw some consolidation in the market in 2014, the Bank continues to compete with other community banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, mortgage companies, finance companies and others providing financial services. Among the advantages that many of these large institutions have over the Bank are their abilities to finance extensive advertising campaigns, maintain extensive branch networks and technology investments, and to directly offer certain services, such as international banking and trust services, which are not offered directly by the Bank. Further, the greater capitalization of the larger institutions allows for substantially higher lending limits than the Bank, although the Bank's current lending limit is quite favorable and able to accommodate the credit needs of most businesses in the metropolitan area, which distinguishes it from most community banks. Some of these competitors have other advantages, such as tax exemption in the case of credit unions, and to some extent lesser regulation in the case of mortgage companies and finance companies, although this regulatory oversight has undergone dramatic change. As a result of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act"), enacted in July 2010, regulation of all financial firms has been heightened. Under current law, unlimited interstate de novo branching is available to all state and federally chartered banks. As a result, institutions, which previously were ineligible to establish de novo branches in the Bank's market area, may elect to do so.


EMPLOYEES


        At December 31, 2014 the Bank employed 427 persons on a full time basis (ten of whom are executive officers of the Bank), which compares to 386 employees at December 31, 2013. The Bank's staff grew by 36 employees as a result of the Merger. None of the Bank's employees are represented by any collective bargaining group and the Bank believes that its employee relations are good. At December 31, 2014, the Bank provided a benefit program, which included health and dental insurance, a 401(k) plan, life and short and long term disability insurance. Additionally, the Company maintains an employee stock purchase plan and a stock-based compensation plan for employees of the Bank who meet certain eligibility requirements.


REGULATION


        Our business and operations are subject to extensive federal and state governmental regulation and supervision. The following is a brief summary of certain statutes and rules and regulations that affect or will affect us. This summary is not intended to be an exhaustive description of the statutes or regulations applicable to our business. Supervision, regulation, and examination of the Company by the regulatory agencies are intended primarily for the protection of depositors and the deposit insurance fund, rather than our shareholders.

        The Company.    The Company is a bank holding company registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, (the "Act") and is subject to regulation and supervision by the Federal Reserve Board. The Act and other federal laws subject bank holding companies to restrictions on the types of activities in which they may engage, and to a range of supervisory requirements and activities, including regulatory enforcement actions for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe and unsound banking

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practices. As a bank holding company, the Company is required to file with the Federal Reserve Board an annual report and such other additional information as the Federal Reserve Board may require pursuant to the Act. The Federal Reserve Board may also examine the Company and each of its subsidiaries. The Company is subject to risk-based capital requirements adopted by the Federal Reserve Board, which are substantially identical to those applicable to the Bank, and which are described below.

        The Act requires approval of the Federal Reserve Board for, among other things, a bank holding company's direct or indirect acquisition of control of more than five percent (5%) of the voting shares, or substantially all the assets, of any bank or the merger or consolidation by a bank holding company with another bank holding company. The Act also generally permits the acquisition by a bank holding company of control or substantially all the assets of any bank located in a state other than the home state of the bank holding company, except where the bank has not been in existence for the minimum period of time required by state law; but if the bank is at least 5 years old, the Federal Reserve Board may approve the acquisition.

        With certain limited exceptions, a bank holding company is prohibited from acquiring control of any voting shares of any company which is not a bank or bank holding company and from engaging directly or indirectly in any activity other than banking or managing or controlling banks or furnishing services to or performing service for its authorized subsidiaries. A bank holding company may, however, engage in or acquire an interest in, a company that engages in activities which the Federal Reserve Board has determined by order or regulation to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be properly incident thereto. In making such a determination, the Federal Reserve Board is required to consider whether the performance of such activities can reasonably be expected to produce benefits to the public, such as convenience, increased competition or gains in efficiency, which outweigh possible adverse effects, such as undue concentration of resources, decreased or unfair competition, conflicts of interest or unsound banking practices. The Federal Reserve Board is also empowered to differentiate between activities commenced de novo and activities commenced by the acquisition, in whole or in part, of a going concern. Some of the activities that the Federal Reserve Board has determined by regulation to be closely related to banking include making or servicing loans, performing certain data processing services, acting as a fiduciary or investment or financial advisor, and making investments in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

        Subsidiary banks of a bank holding company are subject to certain restrictions imposed by the Federal Reserve Act on any extensions of credit to the bank holding company or any of its subsidiaries, or investments in the stock or other securities thereof, and on the taking of such stock or securities as collateral for loans to any borrower. Further, a bank holding company and any subsidiary bank are prohibited from engaging in certain tie-in arrangements in connection with the extension of credit. A subsidiary bank may not extend credit, lease or sell property, or furnish any services, or fix or vary the consideration for any of the foregoing on the condition that: (i) the customer obtain or provide some additional credit, property or services from or to such bank other than a loan, discount, deposit or trust service; (ii) the customer obtain or provide some additional credit, property or service from or to the Company or any other subsidiary of the Company; or (iii) the customer not obtain some other credit, property or service from competitors, except for reasonable requirements to assure the soundness of credit extended.

        The Gramm Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (the "GLB Act") allows a bank holding company or other company to certify status as a financial holding company, which allows such company to engage in activities that are financial in nature, that are incidental to such activities, or are complementary to such activities. The GLB Act enumerates certain activities that are deemed financial in nature, such as underwriting insurance or acting as an insurance principal, agent or broker, underwriting, dealing in or making markets in securities, and engaging in merchant banking under certain restrictions. It also authorizes the Federal Reserve Board to determine by regulation what other activities are financial in nature, or incidental or complementary thereto. The GLB Act allows a wider array of companies to own banks, which could result

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in companies with resources substantially in excess of the Company's entering into competition with the Company and the Bank. The Company has not elected financial holding company status.

        The Bank.    The Bank, as a Maryland chartered commercial bank which is a member of the Federal Reserve System (a "state member bank") and whose accounts are insured by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the "FDIC") up to the maximum legal limits of the FDIC, is subject to regulation, supervision and regular examination by the Maryland Department of Financial Institutions and the Federal Reserve Board. The regulations of these various agencies govern most aspects of the Bank's business, including required reserves against deposits, loans, investments, mergers and acquisitions, borrowing, dividends and location and number of branch offices.

        The laws and regulations governing the Bank generally have been promulgated to protect depositors and the deposit insurance fund, and not for the purpose of protecting shareholders.

        Competition among commercial banks, savings and loan associations, and credit unions has increased following enactment of legislation, which greatly expanded the ability of banks and bank holding companies to engage in interstate banking or acquisition activities. As a result of federal and state legislation, banks in the Washington, D.C./Maryland/Virginia area can, subject to limited restrictions, acquire or merge with a bank in another of the jurisdictions, and can branch de novo in any of the jurisdictions.

        Banking is a business, which depends on interest rate differentials. In general, the differences between the interest paid by a bank on its deposits and its other borrowings and the interest received by a bank on loans extended to its customers and securities held in its investment portfolio constitute the major portion of the bank's earnings. Thus, the earnings and growth of the Bank will be subject to the influence of economic conditions generally, both domestic and foreign, and also to the monetary and fiscal policies of the United States and its agencies, particularly the Federal Reserve Board, which regulates the supply of money through various means including open market dealings in United States government securities. The nature and timing of changes in such policies and their impact on the Bank cannot be predicted.

        Branching and Interstate Banking.    The federal banking agencies are authorized to approve interstate bank merger transactions without regard to whether such transaction is prohibited by the law of any state, unless the home state of one of the banks has opted out of the interstate bank merger provisions of the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 (the "Riegle-Neal Act") by adopting a law after the date of enactment of the Riegle-Neal Act and prior to June 1, 1997 which applies equally to all out-of-state banks and expressly prohibits merger transactions involving out-of-state banks. Interstate acquisitions of branches are permitted only if the law of the state in which the branch is located permits such acquisitions. Such interstate bank mergers and branch acquisitions are also subject to the nationwide and statewide insured deposit concentration limitations described in the Riegle-Neal Act. The District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia have each enacted laws, which permit interstate acquisitions of banks and bank branches. The Dodd-Frank Act authorizes national and state banks to establish de novo branches in other states to the same extent as a bank chartered by that state would be permitted to branch. Previously, banks could only establish branches in other states if the host state expressly permitted out-of-state banks to establish branches in that state. Although the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia had all enacted laws, which permitted banks in these jurisdictions to branch freely, the branching provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act could result in banks from a wider variety of states establishing de novo branches in the Bank's market area.

        The GLB Act made substantial changes in the historic restrictions on non-bank activities of bank holding companies, and allows affiliations between types of companies that were previously prohibited. The GLB Act also allows banks to engage in a wider array of nonbanking activities through "financial subsidiaries."

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        USA Patriot Act.    Under the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act, commonly referred to as the "USA Patriot Act" or the "Patriot Act," financial institutions are subject to prohibitions against specified financial transactions and account relationships, as well as enhanced due diligence standards intended to detect, and prevent, the use of the United States financial system for money laundering and terrorist financing activities. The Patriot Act requires financial institutions, including banks, to establish anti-money laundering programs, including employee training and independent audit requirements, meet minimum standards specified by the act, follow minimum standards for customer identification and maintenance of customer identification records, and regularly compare customer lists against lists of suspected terrorists, terrorist organizations and money launderers. The costs or other effects of the compliance burdens imposed by the Patriot Act or future anti-terrorist, homeland security or anti-money laundering legislation or regulation cannot be predicted with certainty.

        Capital Adequacy.    The Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC have adopted risk-based and leverage capital adequacy requirements, pursuant to which they assess the adequacy of capital in examining and supervising banks and bank holding companies and in analyzing bank regulatory applications. Risk-based capital requirements determine the adequacy of capital based on the risk inherent in various classes of assets and off-balance sheet items. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Federal Reserve Board is required to apply consolidated capital requirements to depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent than those currently applied to depository institutions. The Dodd-Frank Act additionally requires capital requirements to be countercyclical so that the required amount of capital increases in times of economic expansion and decreases in times of economic contraction, consistent with safety and soundness.

        State member banks are expected to meet a minimum ratio of total qualifying capital (the sum of core capital (Tier 1) and supplementary capital (Tier 2) to risk weighted assets of 8%. At least half of this amount (4%) should be in the form of core capital.

        The description below relates to the requirements, as they existed through December 31, 2014, subsequent to which the revised capital rules implementing Basel III became applicable to the Bank. See "Changes in Capital Requirements" below.

        Tier 1 Capital generally consists of the sum of common shareholders' equity and perpetual preferred stock (subject in the case of the latter to limitations on the kind and amount of such stock which may be included as Tier 1 Capital), less goodwill, without adjustment for changes in the market value of securities classified as "available-for-sale," together with a limited amount of other qualifying interests, including trust preferred securities. The Company's Series B Preferred Stock and Series C Preferred Stock (collectively the "SBLF Preferred Stock") are eligible for treatment as Tier 1 capital without limitation. Tier 2 Capital consists of the following: hybrid capital instruments; perpetual preferred stock which is not otherwise eligible to be included as Tier 1 Capital; term subordinated debt and intermediate-term preferred stock; and, subject to limitations, general allowances for loan losses and excess restricted core capital elements. Assets are adjusted under the risk-based guidelines to take into account different risk characteristics, with the categories ranging from 0% (requiring no risk-based capital) for assets such as cash, to 100% for the bulk of assets which are typically held by a bank holding company, including certain multi-family residential and commercial real estate loans, commercial business loans and consumer loans. Residential first mortgage loans on one to four family residential real estate and certain seasoned multi-family residential real estate loans, which are not 90 days or more past due or nonperforming and which have been made in accordance with prudent underwriting standards are assigned a 50% level in the risk-weighing system, as are certain privately-issued mortgage-backed securities representing indirect ownership of such loans. Off-balance sheet items also are adjusted to take into account certain risk characteristics. Under guidance adopted by the federal banking regulators, banks which have concentrations in construction, land development or commercial real estate loans (other than loans for majority owner occupied properties) would be expected to maintain higher levels of risk management and, potentially, higher levels of capital.

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        In addition to the risk-based capital requirements, the Federal Reserve Board has established a minimum 3.0% Leverage Capital Ratio (Tier 1 Capital to total adjusted assets) requirement for the most highly-rated banks, with an additional cushion of at least 100 to 200 basis points for all other banks, which effectively increases the minimum Leverage Capital Ratio for such other banks to 4.0%—5.0% or more. The highest-rated banks are those that are not anticipating or experiencing significant growth and have well diversified risk, including no undue interest rate risk exposure, excellent asset quality, high liquidity, good earnings and, in general, those which are considered a strong banking organization. A bank having less than the minimum Leverage Capital Ratio requirement shall, within 60 days of the date as of which it fails to comply with such requirement, submit a reasonable plan describing the means and timing by which the bank shall achieve its minimum Leverage Capital Ratio requirement. A bank which fails to file such plan is deemed to be operating in an unsafe and unsound manner, and could subject the bank to a cease-and-desist order. Any insured depository institution with a Leverage Capital Ratio that is less than 2.0% is deemed to be operating in an unsafe or unsound condition pursuant to Section 8(a) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (the "FDIA") and is subject to potential termination of deposit insurance. However, such an institution will not be subject to an enforcement proceeding solely on account of its capital ratios, if it has entered into and is in compliance with a written agreement to increase its Leverage Capital Ratio and to take such other action as may be necessary for the institution to be operated in a safe and sound manner. The capital regulations also provide, among other things, for the issuance of a capital directive, which is a final order issued to a bank that fails to maintain minimum capital or to restore its capital to the minimum capital requirement within a specified time period. Such directive is enforceable in the same manner as a final cease-and-desist order.

        The capital ratios described above are the minimum levels that the federal banking regulators expect. Our state and federal regulators have the discretion to require us to maintain higher capital levels based upon our concentrations of loans, the risk of our lending or other activities, the performance of our loan and investment portfolios and other factors. Failure to maintain such higher capital expectations could result in a lower composite regulatory rating, which would impact our deposit insurance premiums and could affect our ability to borrow and costs of borrowing, and could result in additional or more severe enforcement actions. In respect of institutions with high concentrations of loans in areas deemed to be higher risk, or during periods of significant economic stress, regulators may require an institution to maintain a higher level of capital, and/or to maintain more stringent risk management measures, than those required by these regulations.

        Changes in Capital Requirements.    In December 2010, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision released its final framework for strengthening international capital and liquidity regulation ("Basel III"). The regulations adopted by the U.S. federal bank regulatory agencies, when fully phased-in, will require bank holding companies and their bank subsidiaries to maintain more capital, with a greater emphasis on common equity.

        The Basel III final capital framework, among other things, (i) introduces as a new capital measure "Common Equity Tier 1" ("CET1"), (ii) specifies that Tier 1 capital consists of CET1 and "Additional Tier 1 capital" instruments meeting specified requirements, (iii) defines CET1 narrowly by requiring that most adjustments to regulatory capital measures be made to CET1 and not to the other components of capital and (iv) expands the scope of the adjustments as compared to existing regulations.

        When fully phased in by January 1, 2019, Basel III requires banks to maintain: (i) as a newly adopted international standard, a minimum ratio of CET1 to risk-weighted assets of at least 4.5%, plus a "capital conservation buffer" of 2.5%; (ii) a minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 6.0%, plus the capital conservation buffer, or 8.5%; (iii) a minimum ratio of Total (Tier 1 plus Tier 2) capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 8.0% plus the capital conservation buffer, or 10.5%; and (iv) as a newly adopted international standard, a minimum leverage ratio of 3%, calculated as the ratio of Tier 1 capital to balance sheet exposures plus certain off-balance sheet exposures (computed as the average for each quarter of the month-end ratios for the quarter).

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        Basel III also provides for a "countercyclical capital buffer," generally to be imposed when national regulators determine that excess aggregate credit growth becomes associated with a buildup of systemic risk that would be a CET1 add-on to the capital conservation buffer in the range of 0% to 2.5% when fully implemented. The capital conservation buffer is designed to absorb losses during periods of economic stress.

        Banking institutions with a ratio of CET1 to risk-weighted assets above the minimum but below the conservation buffer (or below the combined capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer, when the latter is applied) may face constraints on its ability to pay dividends, effect equity repurchases and pay discretionary bonuses to executive officers, which constraints vary based on the amount of the shortfall.

        The Basel III final framework provides for a number of new deductions from and adjustments to CET1. These include, for example, the requirement that mortgage servicing rights, deferred tax assets dependent upon future taxable income and significant investments in non-consolidated financial entities be deducted from CET1 to the extent that any one such category exceeds 10% of CET1 or all such categories in the aggregate exceed 15% of CET1.

        The federal banking regulators adopted a final rulemaking in July 2013 (the "Basel III Rule") to implement Basel III under regulations substantially consistent with the above. The Basel III Rule also includes, as part of the definition of CET1 capital, a requirement that banking institutions include the amount of Additional Other Comprehensive Income ("AOCI," which primarily consists of unrealized gains and losses on available for sale securities, which are not required to be treated as other-than-temporary impairment, net of tax) in calculating regulatory capital, unless the institution makes a one-time opt-out election from this provision in connection with the filing of its first regulatory reports after applicability of the Basel III Rule to that institution. The Basel III Rule also proposes a 4% minimum leverage ratio.

        The Basel III Rule also makes changes to the manner of calculating risk weighted assets. New methodologies for determining risk weighted assets in the general capital rules are included, including revisions to recognition of credit risk mitigation, including a greater recognition of financial collateral and a wider range of eligible guarantors. They also include risk weighting of equity exposures and past due loans; and higher (greater than 100%) risk weighting for certain commercial real estate exposures that have higher credit risk profiles, including higher loan to value and equity components. In particular, loans categorized as "high-volatility commercial real estate" loans ("HVCRE loans") are required to be assigned a 150% risk weighting, and require additional capital support. HVCRE loans are defined to include any credit facility that finances or has financed the acquisition, development or construction of real property, unless it finances: 1-4 family residential properties; certain community development investments; agricultural land used or usable for, and whose value is based on, agricultural use; or commercial real estate projects in which: (i) the LTV is less than the applicable maximum supervisory LTV ratio established by the bank regulatory agencies; (ii) the borrower has contributed cash or unencumbered readily marketable assets, or has paid development expenses out of pocket, equal to at least 15% of the appraised "as completed" value; (iii) the borrower contributes its 15% before the bank advances any funds; and (iv) the capital contributed by the borrower, and any funds internally generated by the project, is contractually required to remain in the project until the facility is converted to permanent financing, sold or paid in full.

        As discussed below, the Basel III Rule also integrates the new capital requirements into the prompt corrective action provisions under Section 38 of the FDIA.

        The Basel III Rule became applicable to the Company and the Bank on January 1, 2015. The capital conservation buffer requirement will be phased in beginning January 1, 2016, at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets, increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019. We currently expect that the Company and the Bank will elect to exclude AOCI in calculating regulatory capital when they file their respective first regulatory reports in 2015, although we reserve the right to elect to include AOCI in the

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calculation of regulatory capital. Under the Basel III Rule, the higher risk loans made by ECV will be subject to higher risk weightings, and as such require additional capital, or require substantial restructuring in order to avoid such higher risk weights. Additionally, the Company's outstanding $9.3 million of subordinated notes due 2021 no longer qualifies as capital for regulatory purposes under the Basel III Rule. The Company expects that it will redeem the subordinated notes prior to the end of 2015. The Company's $70 million of subordinated notes due 2024 are intended to qualify for Tier 2 capital treatment under the Basel III Rule. Overall, the Company believes that implementation of the Basel III Rule will not have a material adverse affect on the Company's or the Bank's capital ratios, earnings, shareholder's equity, or its ability to pay dividends, effect stock repurchases or pay discretionary bonuses to executive officers.

        Prompt Corrective Action.    Under Section 38 of the FDIA, each federal banking agency is required to implement a system of prompt corrective action for institutions, which it regulates. The federal banking agencies have promulgated substantially similar regulations to implement the system of prompt corrective action established by Section 38 of the FDIA. Under the regulations effective through December 31, 2014, a bank shall be deemed to be: (i) "well capitalized" if it has a Total Risk Based Capital Ratio of 10.0% or more, a Tier 1 Risk Based Capital Ratio of 6.0% or more, a Leverage Capital Ratio of 5.0% or more and is not subject to any written capital order or directive; (ii) "adequately capitalized" if it has a Total Risk Based Capital Ratio of 8.0% or more, a Tier 1 Risk Based Capital Ratio of 4.0% or more and a Tier 1 Leverage Capital Ratio of 4.0% or more (3.0% under certain circumstances) and does not meet the definition of "well capitalized;" (iii) "undercapitalized" if it has a Total Risk Based Capital Ratio that is less than 8.0%, a Tier 1 Risk based Capital Ratio that is less than 4.0% or a Leverage Capital Ratio that is less than 4.0% (3.0% under certain circumstances); (iv) "significantly undercapitalized" if it has a Total Risk Based Capital Ratio that is less than 6.0%, a Tier 1 Risk Based Capital Ratio that is less than 3.0% or a Leverage Capital Ratio that is less than 3.0%; and (v) "critically undercapitalized" if it has a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%.

        An institution generally must file a written capital restoration plan which meets specified requirements with an appropriate federal banking agency within 45 days of the date the institution receives notice or is deemed to have notice that it is undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized or critically undercapitalized. A federal banking agency must provide the institution with written notice of approval or disapproval within 60 days after receiving a capital restoration plan, subject to extensions by the applicable agency.

        An institution which is required to submit a capital restoration plan must concurrently submit a performance guaranty by each company that controls the institution. Such guaranty shall be limited to the lesser of (i) an amount equal to 5.0% of the institution's total assets at the time the institution was notified or deemed to have notice that it was undercapitalized or (ii) the amount necessary at such time to restore the relevant capital measures of the institution to the levels required for the institution to be classified as adequately capitalized. Such a guaranty shall expire after the federal banking agency notifies the institution that it has remained adequately capitalized for each of four consecutive calendar quarters. An institution which fails to submit a written capital restoration plan within the requisite period, including any required performance guaranty, or fails in any material respect to implement a capital restoration plan, shall be subject to the restrictions in Section 38 of the FDIA which are applicable to significantly undercapitalized institutions.

        A "critically undercapitalized institution" is to be placed in conservatorship or receivership within 90 days unless the FDIC formally determines that forbearance from such action would better protect the deposit insurance fund. Unless the FDIC or other appropriate federal banking regulatory agency makes specific further findings and certifies that the institution is viable and is not expected to fail, an institution that remains critically undercapitalized on average during the fourth calendar quarter after the date it becomes critically undercapitalized must be placed in receivership. The general rule is that the FDIC will be appointed as receiver within 90 days after a bank becomes critically undercapitalized unless extremely

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good cause is shown and an extension is agreed to by the federal regulators. In general, good cause is defined as capital, which has been raised and is imminently available for infusion into the Bank except for certain technical requirements, which may delay the infusion for a period of time beyond the 90 day time period.

        Immediately upon becoming undercapitalized, an institution shall become subject to the provisions of Section 38 of the FDIA, which (i) restrict payment of capital distributions and management fees; (ii) require that the appropriate federal banking agency monitor the condition of the institution and its efforts to restore its capital; (iii) require submission of a capital restoration plan; (iv) restrict the growth of the institution's assets; and (v) require prior approval of certain expansion proposals. The appropriate federal banking agency for an undercapitalized institution also may take any number of discretionary supervisory actions if the agency determines that any of these actions is necessary to resolve the problems of the institution at the least possible long-term cost to the deposit insurance fund, subject in certain cases to specified procedures. These discretionary supervisory actions include: requiring the institution to raise additional capital; restricting transactions with affiliates; requiring divestiture of the institution or the sale of the institution to a willing purchaser; and any other supervisory action that the agency deems appropriate. These and additional mandatory and permissive supervisory actions may be taken with respect to significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized institutions.

        Additionally, under Section 11(c)(5) of the FDIA, a conservator or receiver may be appointed for an institution where: (i) an institution's obligations exceed its assets; (ii) there is substantial dissipation of the institution's assets or earnings as a result of any violation of law or any unsafe or unsound practice; (iii) the institution is in an unsafe or unsound condition; (iv) there is a willful violation of a cease-and-desist order; (v) the institution is unable to pay its obligations in the ordinary course of business; (vi) losses or threatened losses deplete all or substantially all of an institution's capital, and there is no reasonable prospect of becoming "adequately capitalized" without assistance; (vii) there is any violation of law or unsafe or unsound practice or condition that is likely to cause insolvency or substantial dissipation of assets or earnings, weaken the institution's condition, or otherwise seriously prejudice the interests of depositors or the insurance fund; (viii) an institution ceases to be insured; (ix) the institution is undercapitalized and has no reasonable prospect that it will become adequately capitalized, fails to become adequately capitalized when required to do so, or fails to submit or materially implement a capital restoration plan; or (x) the institution is critically undercapitalized or otherwise has substantially insufficient capital.

        As noted above, the Basel III Rule integrates the new capital requirements into the prompt corrective action category definitions. As of January 1, 2015, the following capital requirements apply to the Company for purposes of Section 38.

Capital Category
  Total Risk-Based
Capital Ratio
  Tier 1 Risk-Based
Capital Ratio
  Common Equity
Tier 1 Capital Ratio
  Leverage Ratio   Tangible Equity
to Assets
  Supplemental
Leverage Ratio

Well Capitalized

  10% or greater   8% or greater   6.5% or greater   5% or greater   n/a   n/a

Adequately Capitalized

  8% or greater   6% or greater   4.5% or greater   4% or greater   n/a   3% or greater

Undercapitalized

  Less than 8%   Less than 6%   Less than 4.5%   Less than 4%   n/a   Less than 3%

Significantly Undercapitalized

  Less than 6%   Less than 4%   Less than3%   Less than 3%   n/a   n/a

Critically Undercapitalized

  n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a   Less than 2%   n/a

        Regulatory Enforcement Authority.    Federal banking law grants substantial enforcement powers to federal banking regulators. This enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease-and-desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions against banking organizations and institution-affiliated parties. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with regulatory authorities.

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        As a result of the volatility and instability in the financial system in recent years, Congress, the bank regulatory authorities and other government agencies have called for or proposed additional regulation and restrictions on the activities, practices and operations of banks and their holding companies. While many of these proposals relate to institutions that have accepted investments from, or sold troubled assets to, the Department of the Treasury or other government agencies, or otherwise participate in government programs intended to promote financial stabilization, the Congress and the federal banking agencies have broad authority to require all banks and holding companies to adhere to more rigorous or costly operating procedures, corporate governance procedures, or to engage in activities or practices which they would not otherwise elect. Any such requirement could adversely affect the Company's business and results of operations.

        The Dodd-Frank Act.    The Dodd-Frank Act made significant changes to the current bank regulatory structure, which affects the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires a number of federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new rules and regulations, and to prepare various studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are giving significant discretion in drafting these rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for some time. Although it is not possible to determine the ultimate impact of this statute until the extensive rulemaking is complete and becomes effective, the following provisions are considered to be of greatest significance to the Company:

    Expands the authority of the Federal Reserve Board to examine bank holding companies and their subsidiaries, including insured depository institutions.

    Requires a bank holding company to be well capitalized and well managed to receive approval of an interstate bank acquisition.

    Provides mortgage reform provisions regarding a customer's ability to pay and making more loans subject to provisions for higher-cost loans and new disclosures.

    Creates the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ("CFPB"), which has rulemaking authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks, and has broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws.

    Creates the Financial Stability Oversight Council ("FSOC") with authority to identify institutions and practices that might pose a systemic risk.

    Introduces additional corporate governance and executive compensation requirements on companies subject to the 1934 Act, as amended.

    Permits FDIC-insured banks to pay interest on business demand deposits.

    Codifies the requirement that holding companies and other companies that directly or indirectly control an insured depository institution to serve as a source of financial strength.

    Makes permanent the $250 thousand limit for federal deposit insurance.

    Permits national and state banks to establish interstate branches to the same extent as the branch host state allows establishment of in-state branches.

        Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.    The Dodd-Frank Act created the CFPB, a new, independent federal agency within the Federal Reserve System having broad rulemaking, supervisory and enforcement powers under various federal consumer financial protection laws, including the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Truth in Lending Act, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the consumer financial privacy provisions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and certain other statutes. The CFPB, which began operations on July 21, 2011, has examination and primary enforcement authority with respect to depository institutions with $10 billion or more in assets. Smaller

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institutions, including the Bank, are subject to rules promulgated by the CFPB but continue to be examined and supervised by federal banking regulators for compliance with federal consumer protection laws and regulations. The CFPB also has authority to prevent unfair, deceptive or abusive practices in connection with the offering of consumer financial products. The Dodd-Frank Act permits states to adopt consumer protection laws and standards that are more stringent than those adopted at the federal level and, in certain circumstances, permits state attorneys general to enforce compliance with both the state and federal laws and regulations.

        The CFPB has proposed or issued a number of important rules affecting a wide range of consumer financial products. Many of these rules took effect in January 2014, which has created significant uncertainty for the financial services industry in general. It is difficult to predict at this time the specific impact the Dodd-Frank Act and CFPB rulemakings will have on our business. The changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act and CFPB rulemakings may impact the profitability of our business activities, limit our ability to make, or the desirability of making, certain types of loans, including non-qualified mortgage loans, require us to change our business practices, impose upon us more stringent capital, liquidity and leverage ratio requirements or otherwise adversely affect our business or profitability. The changes may also require us to dedicate significant management attention and resources to evaluate and make necessary changes to comply with the new statutory and regulatory requirements.

        The CFPB has concentrated much of its rulemaking efforts on reforms related to residential mortgage transactions. In 2013, the CFPB issued final rules related to a borrower's ability to repay and qualified mortgage standards, mortgage servicing standards, loan originator compensation standards, requirements for high-cost mortgages, appraisal and escrow standards and requirements for higher-priced mortgages. In November 2013, the CFPB issued final rules establishing integrated disclosure requirements for lenders and settlement agents in connection with most closed end, real estate secured consumer loans. These rules become effective August 2015, and we continue to analyze their requirements to determine the impact of the rules to our businesses. In July 2014, the CFPB issued a proposed rule which would, among other things, expand the scope of information lenders must report in connection with mortgage and other housing-related loan applications under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act. These rules include significant regulatory and compliance changes and are expected to have a broad impact on the financial services industry.

        The final rule implementing the Dodd-Frank Act requirement that lenders determine whether a consumer has the ability to repay a mortgage loan, which went into effect on January 10, 2014, establishes certain minimum requirements for creditors when making ability to pay determinations, and establishes certain protections from liability for mortgages meeting the definition of "qualified mortgages." Generally, the rule applies to all consumer-purpose, closed-end loans secured by a dwelling including home-purchase loans, refinances and home equity loans—whether first or subordinate lien. The rule does not cover, among other things, home equity lines of credit or other open-end credit; temporary or "bridge" loans with a term of 12 months or less, such as a loan to finance the initial construction of a dwelling; a construction phase of 12 months or less of a construction-to-permanent loan; and business-purpose loans, even if secured by a dwelling. The rule affords greater legal protections for lenders making qualified mortgages that are not "higher priced." Qualified mortgages must generally satisfy detailed requirements related to product features, underwriting standards, and a points and fees requirement whereby the total points and fees on a mortgage loan cannot exceed specified amounts or percentages of the total loan amount. Mandatory features of a qualified mortgage include: (1) a loan term not exceeding 30 years; and (2) regular periodic payments that do not result in negative amortization, deferral of principal repayment, or a balloon payment. Further, the rule clarifies that qualified mortgages do not include "no-doc" loans and loans with negative amortization, interest-only payments, or balloon payments. The rule creates special categories of qualified mortgages originated by certain smaller creditors. In January 2015, the CFPB issued a proposed rule that would provide regulatory relief to a broader set of smaller lenders. Among other things, the proposed rule would (1) increase the loan origination limit to qualify for "smaller

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creditor" status from 500 loans to 2,000 loans annually, (2) extend the transition period for smaller lenders seeking to make qualified mortgages with a balloon payment feature to April 1, 2016. Our business strategy, product offerings, and profitability may change as the rule is interpreted by the regulators and courts.

        The final rule adopting new mortgage servicing standards, which took effect January 2014, imposes new requirements regarding force-placed insurance, mandates certain notices prior to rate adjustments on adjustable rate mortgages, and establishes requirements for periodic disclosures to borrowers. These requirements will affect notices to be given to consumers as to delinquency, foreclosure alternatives, modification applications, interest rate adjustments and options for avoiding "force-placed" insurance. Servicers will be prohibited from processing foreclosures when a loan modification is pending, and must wait until a loan is more than 120 days delinquent before initiating a foreclosure action. Servicers must provide direct and ongoing access to its personnel, and provide prompt review of any loss mitigation application. Servicers must maintain accurate and accessible mortgage records for the life of a loan and until one year after the loan is paid off or transferred. These new standards are expected to increase the cost and compliance risks of servicing mortgage loans. While the Bank has a general practice of selling the residential mortgage loans it originates in the secondary market, it continues to engage in servicing activities for the loans it maintains in its portfolio. We cannot predict the ultimate outcome of these inquiries, actions, or regulatory changes or the impact that they could have on our financial condition, results of operations, or business.

        Additionally, the CFPB has focused on the area of automotive finance, particularly with respect to indirect financing arrangements and fair lending compliance. In March 2013, the CFPB provided guidance about compliance with fair lending requirements of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and its implementing regulations for indirect automotive finance companies that permit dealers to charge annual percentage rates to consumers in excess of buy rates used by the finance company to calculate the price paid to acquire an assignment of the retail installment sale contract. We acquired a portfolio of indirect automobile loans in connection with the merger with Virginia Heritage. While we do not expect that we will continue originations in this portfolio, additional CFPB initiatives on this product area could have an impact on our servicing of these loans.

        FDIC Insurance Premiums.    The FDIC maintains a risk-based assessment system for determining deposit insurance premiums. Four risk categories (I-IV), each subject to different premium rates, are established based upon an institution's status as well capitalized, adequately capitalized or undercapitalized, and the institution's supervisory rating. An insured institution is required to pay deposit insurance premiums on its assessment base in accordance with its risk category. There are three adjustments that can be made to an institution's initial base assessment rate: (1) a potential decrease for long-term unsecured debt, including senior and subordinated debt and, for small institutions, a portion of Tier 1 capital; (2) a potential increase for secured liabilities above a threshold amount; and (3) for non-Risk Category I institutions, a potential increase for brokered deposits above a threshold amount. The FDIC may also impose special assessments from time to time.

        The Dodd-Frank Act permanently increased the maximum deposit insurance amount for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor. The Dodd-Frank Act also broadened the base for FDIC insurance assessments. Assessments are now based on a financial institution's average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital. The Dodd-Frank Act requires the FDIC to increase the reserve ratio of the Deposit Insurance Fund from 1.15% to 1.35% of insured deposits by 2020 and eliminates the requirement that the FDIC pay dividends to insured depository institutions when the reserve ratio exceeds certain thresholds. The Dodd-Frank Act eliminated the statutory prohibition against the payment of interest on business checking accounts.

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ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

        An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Before making an investment decision, you should carefully read and consider the risk factors described below as well as the other information included in this report and other documents we file with the SEC, as the same may be updated from time to time. Any of these risks, if they actually occur, could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect us. In any such case, you could lose all or a portion of your original investment.

         The price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly, which may make it difficult for investors to resell shares of common stock at a time or price they find attractive.

        Our stock price may fluctuate significantly as a result of a variety of factors, many of which are beyond our control. In addition to those described in "Caution About Forward Looking Statements," these factors include:

    Actual or anticipated quarterly fluctuations in our operating results and financial condition;

    Changes in financial estimates or publication of research reports and recommendations by financial analysts or actions taken by rating agencies with respect to us or other financial institutions;

    Reports in the press or investment community generally or relating to our reputation or the financial services industry;

    Strategic actions by us or our competitors, such as acquisitions, restructurings, dispositions or financings;

    Fluctuations in the stock price and operating results of our competitors;

    Future sales of our equity or equity-related securities;

    Proposed or adopted regulatory changes or developments;

    Anticipated or pending investigations, proceedings, or litigation that may involve or affect us;

    Domestic and international economic and political factors unrelated to our performance; and

    General market conditions and, in particular, developments related to market conditions for the financial services industry.

        In addition, in recent years, the stock market in general has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has had a significant effect on the market price of securities issued by many companies, including for reasons unrelated to their operating performance. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect our stock price, notwithstanding our operating results. We expect that the market price of our common stock will continue to fluctuate and there can be no assurances about the levels of the market prices for our common stock.

         Trading in our common stock has been moderate. As a result, shareholders may not be able to quickly and easily sell their common stock, particularly in large quantities.

        Although our common stock is listed for trading on Nasdaq and a number of brokers offer to make a market in our common stock on a regular basis, trading volume to date has been limited, averaging approximately 82,382 shares per day for 2014 and 97,356 shares per day through February 27, 2015. There can be no assurance that a more active and liquid market for our common stock will develop or can be maintained. As a result, shareholders may find it difficult to sell a significant number of shares of our common stock at the prevailing market price.

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         Our ability to pay dividends on our common stock, or repurchase shares of common stock, may be limited.

        The terms of our SBLF Preferred Stock, restrict our ability to declare or pay dividends or distributions on, or purchase, redeem or otherwise acquire for consideration, shares of our common stock. No repurchases of our common stock may be effected, and no dividends may be declared or paid on our common stock during the current quarter and for the next three quarters following the failure to declare and pay dividends on the SBLF Preferred Stock.

        Additionally, under the terms of the SBLF Preferred Stock, the Company may only declare and pay a dividend on its common stock, or repurchase shares of any such class or series of stock, if, after payment of such dividend, the dollar amount of the Company's Tier 1 Capital would be at least 90% of the Signing Date Tier 1 Capital, as set forth in the Articles Supplementary relating to the SBLF Preferred Stock, excluding any subsequent net charge-offs and any redemption of the SBLF Preferred Stock or the "Tier 1 Dividend Threshold". The Tier 1 Dividend Threshold is subject to reduction, beginning on the second anniversary of issuance and ending on the tenth anniversary, by 10% for each one percent increase in qualified small business lending, or QSBL, over the baseline level. See "Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Common Equity" at page 37 for additional information on limitations of our ability to pay dividends.

         We may issue additional equity securities, or engage in other transactions, which could dilute our book value or affect the priority of our common stock, which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

        Our board of directors may determine from time to time that we need to raise additional capital by issuing additional shares of our common stock or other securities. Excepted as described under "Underwriting" we are not restricted from issuing additional shares of common stock, including securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of any future offerings, or the prices at which such offerings may be effected. Such offerings could be dilutive to common shareholders. New investors also may have rights, preferences and privileges that are senior to, and that adversely affect, our then current common shareholders. Additionally, if we raise additional capital by making additional offerings of debt or preferred equity securities, upon liquidation of the Company, holders of our debt securities and shares of preferred stock, and lenders with respect to other borrowings, will receive distributions of our available assets prior to the holders of our common stock. Additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing shareholders or reduce the market price of our common stock, or both. Holders of our common stock are not entitled to preemptive rights or other protections against dilution.

         We expect that we will issue additional securities in order to obtain a portion of the funds required to redeem outstanding securities.

        We currently expect that we will seek to redeem all of the outstanding shares of SBLF Preferred Stock from the Treasury before the dividend rate automatically adjusts, in January 2016, to 9%. The aggregate redemption price of the SBLF Preferred Stock is $71.9 million plus accrued but unpaid dividends to the date of redemption. Additionally, we have $9.3 million of subordinated notes, due 2021, outstanding, which no longer qualify as capital for regulatory purposes. The Company expects that it will redeem these subordinated notes in 2015. We expect that we will have to issue additional debt or equity securities to fund all or a portion of the redemption price. The amount to be funded through the sale of securities, and the type and terms of such securities, will be dependent, in part, on our earnings, rate of growth, capital requirements, market conditions and regulatory requirements.

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         We may not be successful in integrating the operations of Virginia Heritage.

        The success of the Virginia Heritage acquisition will depend, in part, on our ability to realize the estimated cost savings and revenue enhancements from combining the businesses of the Bank and Virginia Heritage. While we believe that these cost savings and revenue enhancement estimates are achievable, it is possible that the potential cost savings and revenue enhancements could turn out to be more difficult to achieve than we anticipated. Our estimates also depend on our ability to combine the businesses of the Bank and Virginia Heritage in a manner that permits those cost savings and revenue enhancements to be realized. Our ability to realize increases in revenue will depend, in part, on our ability to retain customers and employees, and to capitalize on existing relationships for the provision of additional products and services, while consolidating several branches and offices. If our estimates turn out to be incorrect or we are not able to successfully combine our two companies, the anticipated cost savings and increased revenues may not be realized fully or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected. It is possible that the integration process could result in the loss of key employees, the disruption of each company's ongoing business or inconsistencies in standards, controls, procedures and policies that adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with clients and employees or to achieve the anticipated benefits of the Merger. As with any combination of banking institutions, there also may be disruptions that cause us to lose customers or cause customers to withdraw their deposits from our banks. Customers may not readily accept changes to their banking arrangements that we make as part of or following the integration of Virginia Heritage.

         Changes in the value of goodwill and intangible assets could reduce our earnings.

        The Company accounts for goodwill and other intangible assets in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), which, in general, requires that goodwill not be amortized, but rather that it be tested for impairment at least annually at the reporting unit level using the two step approach. Testing for impairment of goodwill and intangible assets is performed annually and involves the identification of reporting units and the estimation of fair values. The estimation of fair values involves a high degree of judgment and subjectivity in the assumptions used. Changes in the local and national economy, the federal and state legislative and regulatory environments for financial institutions, the stock market, interest rates and other external factors (such as natural disasters or significant world events) may occur from time to time, often with great unpredictability, and may materially impact the fair value of publicly traded financial institutions and could result in an impairment charge at a future date.

         We may not be able to manage future growth and competition in the Northern Virginia market.

        The Merger resulted in a significant acceleration of our expansion in the Northern Virginia market. Although we have hired a number of lending and business development officers with experience in the Northern Virginia market, there can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully compete in this highly competitive market, or that it will be able to successfully manage additional growth.

        We have grown rapidly in the past several years, through acquisition and through organic growth. We cannot provide any assurance that we will continue to be able to maintain our rate of growth at acceptable risk levels and upon acceptable terms, while managing the costs and implementation risks associated with its growth strategy. We may be unable to continue to increase our volume of loans and deposits or to introduce new products and services at acceptable risk levels for a variety of reasons, including an inability to maintain capital and liquidity sufficient to support continued growth. If we are successful in continuing our growth, we cannot assure you that further growth would offer the same levels of potential profitability, or that it would be successful in controlling costs and maintaining asset quality. Accordingly, an inability to maintain growth, or an inability to effectively manage growth, could adversely affect our results of operations, financial condition and stock price.

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         Our directors and officers currently own approximately 10.69% of our outstanding shares of common stock. As a result of their combined ownership, they could make it more difficult to obtain approval for some matters submitted to shareholder vote, including acquisitions of the Company. The results of the vote may be contrary to the desires or interests of the public shareholders.

        Our directors and officers and their affiliates currently own approximately 10.69% of our outstanding shares of common stock, excluding shares, which may be acquired upon the exercise of options. By voting against a proposal submitted to shareholders, the directors and officers, as a group, may be able to make approval more difficult for proposals requiring the vote of shareholders, such as some mergers, share exchanges, asset sales, and amendments to the Articles of Incorporation.

         Substantial regulatory limitations on changes of control and anti-takeover provisions of Maryland law may make it more difficult for shareholders to receive a change in control premium.

        With certain limited exceptions, federal regulations prohibit a person or company or a group of persons deemed to be "acting in concert" from, directly or indirectly, acquiring more than 10% (5% if the acquiror is a bank holding company) of any class of the Company's voting stock or obtaining the ability to control in any manner the election of a majority of its directors or otherwise direct the management or policies of the Company without prior notice or application to and the approval of the Federal Reserve. There are comparable prior approval requirements for changes in control under Maryland law. Also, the Maryland General Corporation Law, as amended, or MGCL, contains several provisions that may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of the Company without the approval of its board of directors, and may make it more difficult or expensive for a third party to acquire a majority of its outstanding common stock.

         The economic environment continues to pose significant challenges for us and could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

        The Company and the Bank are operating in a challenging and uncertain economic environment. Financial institutions continue to be affected by some softness in the real estate market and constrained financial markets, highlighted by historically low market interest rates. Some concerns about the housing market remain, and higher levels of foreclosures and weak employment statistics continue in some parts of the country. While conditions continue to improve since the depths of the financial crisis, generally and in the Bank's market area, should declines in real estate values, home sales volumes, and financial stress on borrowers as a result of the uncertain economic environment re-emerge, such events could have an adverse effect on our borrowers or their customers, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. A worsening of these conditions would likely exacerbate the adverse effects on the Company and others in the financial institutions industry. For example, deterioration in local economic conditions in our market could drive losses beyond that which is provided for in our allowance for loan losses. The Company may also face the following risks in connection with these events:

    Economic conditions that negatively affect commercial real estate values and the job market may result in a deterioration in credit quality of our loan portfolio, and such deterioration in credit quality could have a negative impact on our business;

    Market developments may affect consumer confidence levels and may cause adverse changes in payment patterns, causing increases in delinquencies and default rates on loans and other credit facilities;

    A reduction in the size, spending or employment levels of the federal, state and/or local governments in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area could have a negative effect on the economy in the region, on our customers and on real estate prices;

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    The methodologies we use to establish our allowance for loan losses may no longer be reliable because they rely on complex judgments, including forecasts of economic conditions, which may no longer be capable of accurate estimation; and

    Compliance with increased regulation of the banking industry may increase our costs, limit our ability to pursue business opportunities, and divert management efforts.

        If these conditions or similar ones continue to exist or worsen, the Company could experience continuing or increased adverse effects on its financial condition and results of operations.

         Our financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected if our allowance for credit losses is not sufficient to absorb actual losses or if we are required to increase our allowance for loan losses.

        Historically, we have enjoyed a relatively low level of nonperforming assets and net charge-offs, both in absolute dollars, as a percentage of loans and as compared to many of our peer institutions. As a result of this historical experience, we have incurred a relatively lower loan loss provision expense, which has positively impacted our earnings. However, should a higher portion of our loans become delinquent, or if some of our loans are only partially repaid, we may experience losses for reasons beyond our control. Despite our underwriting criteria and historical experience, we may be particularly susceptible to losses due to: (1) the geographic concentration of our loans; (2) the concentration of higher risk loans, such as commercial real estate, construction and commercial and industrial loans; and (3) the relative lack of seasoning of certain of our loans. As a result, we may not be able to maintain our relatively low levels of nonperforming assets and charge-offs. Although we believe that our allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level adequate to absorb any inherent losses in our loan portfolio, these estimates of loan losses are necessarily subjective and their accuracy depends on the outcome of future events. If we need to make significant and unanticipated increases in our loss allowance in the future, our results of operations and financial condition would be materially adversely affected at that time.

        While we strive to carefully monitor credit quality and to identify loans that may become nonperforming, at any time there are loans included in the portfolio that will result in losses, but that have not been identified as nonperforming or potential problem loans. We cannot be sure that we will be able to identify deteriorating loans before they become nonperforming assets, or that we will be able to limit losses on those loans that are identified. As a result, future additions to the allowance may be necessary.

        Economic conditions and uncertainty in the financial markets could adversely affect our ability to accurately assess our allowance for credit losses. Our ability to assess the creditworthiness of our customers or to estimate the values of our assets and collateral for loans will be reduced if the models and approaches we use become less predictive of future behaviors, valuations, assumptions or estimates. We estimate losses inherent in our credit exposure, the adequacy of our allowance for loan losses and the values of certain assets by using estimates based on difficult, subjective, and complex judgments, including estimates as to the effects of economic conditions and how these economic conditions might affect the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans or the value of assets.

         Changes in accounting standards could impact reported earnings.

        From time to time there are changes in the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. In some instances, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in the restatement of prior period financial statements.

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         Our continued growth depends on our ability to meet minimum regulatory capital levels. Growth and shareholder returns may be adversely affected if sources of capital are not available to help us meet them.

        As we grow, we will have to maintain our regulatory capital levels at or above the required minimum levels, including the new capital requirements commencing January 1, 2015 under the Basel III Rule. If earnings do not meet our current estimates, if we incur unanticipated losses or expenses, or if we grow faster than expected, we may need to obtain additional capital sooner than expected or we may be required to reduce our level of assets or reduce our rate of growth in order to maintain regulatory compliance. Under those circumstances net income and the rate of growth of net income may be adversely affected. Additional issuances of equity securities could have a dilutive effect on existing shareholders. The significant level of real estate acquisition, development and construction loans in our portfolio, and new loans sought by customers, which may be required to be categorized as HVCRE loans under the Basel III Rule could require us to maintain additional capital for these loans as a result of the higher risk weighting attributed to such loans. While we expect that we will seek to structure loans in a manner so as to avoid characterization as HVCRE loans, customer relationships, customer desires and competitive pressures may prevent us from doing so, and we may not be able to obtain loan pricing or other accommodations, which fully offset the increased capital requirements. This could have an adverse effect on our net interest margin and net income.

         Our results of operations, financial condition and the value of our shares may be adversely affected if we are not able to maintain our historical growth rate.

        Since opening for business in 1998, our asset level and net income available to common shareholders have increased rapidly. We may not be able to achieve comparable results in future years. As our asset size and earnings increase, it may become more difficult to achieve high rates of increase in assets and earnings. Additionally, it may become more difficult to achieve continued improvements in our expense levels and efficiency ratio. We may not be able to maintain the relatively low levels of nonperforming assets that we have experienced to date. Declines in the rate of growth of income or assets or deposits, and increases in operating expenses or nonperforming assets may have an adverse impact on the value of the common stock.

         We are subject to liquidity risk in our operations.

        Liquidity risk is the possibility of being unable to meet obligations as they come due, pay deposits when withdrawn, and fund loan and investment opportunities as they arise because of an inability to liquidate assets or obtain adequate funding on a timely basis, at a reasonable cost and within acceptable risk tolerances. If a financial institution is unable to meet its payment obligations on a daily basis, it is subject to being placed into receivership, regardless of its capital levels. Our largest source of liquidity is customer deposit accounts, including noninterest bearing demand deposit accounts, which at December 31, 2014, constituted 27% of our total deposits. If we are unable to increase customer deposits in an amount sufficient to fund loan growth, we may be required to rely on other, potentially more expensive, sources of liquidity, such as FHLB borrowings, brokered deposits and repurchase agreements, to fund loan growth, which could adversely affect our earnings, or reduce our rate of growth, which could adversely affect our earnings and stock price.

        We also have a significant amount of deposits, which are in excess of the maximum FDIC insurance coverage limits. At any time, customers who have uninsured deposits may decide to move their deposits to institutions which are perceived as safer, sounder, or "too big to fail" or could elect to use other non-deposit funding products, such as repurchase agreements, that would require the Bank to pay higher interest and to provide securities as collateral for the Bank's repurchase obligation. At December 31, 2014, the Bank had approximately $1.64 billion of deposits that would be uninsured deposits, or 38% of our total deposits.

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        While we believe that our strong earnings, capital position, relationship banking model and reputation as a safe and sound institution mitigate the risk of losing deposits, there can be no assurance that we will not have to replace a significant amount of deposits with alternative funding sources, such as repurchase agreements, federal funds lines, certificates of deposit, brokered deposits, other categories of interest bearing deposits and FHLB borrowings, all of which are more expensive than noninterest bearing deposits, and can be more expensive than other categories of deposits. While we believe that we would be able to maintain adequate liquidity at reasonable cost, the loss of a significant amount of deposits, particularly noninterest bearing deposits, could have a material adverse affect on our earnings, net interest margin, rate of growth and stock price.

         We may not be able to successfully manage continued growth.

        We intend to seek further growth in the level of our assets and deposits and selectively in the number of our branches, both within our existing footprint and possibly to expand our footprint in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs, and in Washington, D.C., although no additional branches are currently anticipated in 2015. We may not be able to manage increased levels of assets and liabilities, and an expanded branch system, without increased expenses and higher levels of nonperforming assets. We may be required to make additional investments in equipment and personnel to manage higher asset levels and loan balances and a larger branch network, which may adversely impact earnings, shareholder returns and our efficiency ratio. Increases in operating expenses or nonperforming assets may have an adverse impact on the value of our common stock.

         We may face risks with respect to future expansion or acquisition activity.

        We selectively seek to expand our banking operations through limited de novo branching or opportunistic acquisition activities. We cannot be certain that any expansion activity, through de novo branching, acquisition of branches of another financial institution or a whole institution, or the establishment or acquisition of nonbanking financial service companies, will prove profitable or will increase shareholder value. The success of any acquisition will depend, in part, on our ability to realize the estimated cost savings and revenue enhancements from combining the businesses of the Company and the target company. Our ability to realize increases in revenue will depend, in part, on our ability to retain customers and employees, and to capitalize on existing relationships for the provision of additional products and services. If our estimates turn out to be incorrect or we are not able to successfully combine companies, the anticipated cost savings and increased revenues may not be realized fully or at all, or may take longer to realize than expected. It is possible that the integration process could result in the loss of key employees, the disruption of each company's ongoing business or inconsistencies in standards, controls, procedures and policies that adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with clients and employees or to achieve the anticipated benefits of the merger. As with any combination of banking institutions, there also may be disruptions that cause us to lose customers or cause customers to withdraw their deposits from our bank. Customers may not readily accept changes to their banking arrangements that we make as part of or following an acquisition. Additionally, the value of an acquisition to the Company is dependent on our ability to successfully identify and estimate the magnitude of any asset quality issues of acquired companies.

         Our concentrations of loans may create a greater risk of loan defaults and losses.

        A substantial portion of our loans are secured by real estate in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area and substantially all of our loans are to borrowers in that area. We also have a significant amount of real estate construction loans and land related loans for residential and commercial developments. At December 31, 2014, 76% of our loans were secured by real estate, primarily commercial real estate. Management believes that the commercial real estate concentration risk is mitigated by diversification among the types and characteristics of real estate collateral properties, sound underwriting practices, and

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ongoing portfolio monitoring and market analysis. Of these loans, $798.2 million, or 19% of portfolio loans, were construction and land development loans. An additional $902.0 million, or 21% of portfolio loans, were commercial and industrial loans, which are generally not secured by real estate. The repayment of these loans often depends on the successful operation of a business or the sale or development of the underlying property and as a result, are more likely to be adversely affected by adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy in general. While we believe that our loan portfolio is well diversified in terms of borrowers and industries, these concentrations expose us to the risk that adverse developments in the real estate market, or in the general economic conditions in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, could increase the levels of nonperforming loans and charge-offs, and reduce loan demand. In that event, we would likely experience lower earnings or losses. Additionally, if, for any reason, economic conditions in our market area deteriorate, or there is significant volatility or weakness in the economy or any significant sector of the area's economy, our ability to develop our business relationships may be diminished, the quality and collectability of our loans may be adversely affected, the value of collateral may decline and loan demand may be reduced.

        Commercial, commercial real estate and construction loans tend to have larger balances than single family mortgages loans and other consumer loans. Because the loan portfolio contains a significant number of commercial and commercial real estate and construction loans with relatively large balances, the deterioration of one or a few of these loans may cause a significant increase in nonperforming assets. An increase in nonperforming loans could result in: a loss of earnings from these loans, an increase in the provision for loan losses, or an increase in loan charge-offs, which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

        Additionally, through ECV, we provide subordinated financing for the acquisition, development and construction of real estate projects, the primary financing for which may be provided by the Bank. These subordinated financings and the business of ECV will generally entail a higher risk profile (including lower lien priority and higher loan to value ratios) than loans made by the Bank. A portion of the amount, which the Company expects to receive for such loans, will be payments based on the success, sale or completion of the underlying project, and as such the income of the Company may be more volatile from period to period, based on the status of such projects. The Company may not be able to successfully operate or manage the business of providing higher loan to value financing.

         Our concentrations of loans may require us to maintain higher levels of capital.

        Under guidance adopted by the federal banking regulators, banks which have concentrations in construction, land development or commercial real estate loans (other than loans for majority owner occupied properties) would be expected to maintain higher levels of risk management and, potentially, higher levels of capital. Although not currently anticipated, we may be required to maintain higher levels of capital than we would otherwise be expected to maintain as a result of our levels of construction, development and commercial real estate loans, which may require us to obtain additional capital sooner than we would otherwise seek it, which may reduce shareholder returns.

         Our Residential Lending department may not continue to provide us with significant noninterest income.

        In 2014, the Bank originated $572 million and sold $570 million of loans to investors, as compared to $983 million originated and $1.2 billion sold to investors in 2013. The residential mortgage business is highly competitive, and highly susceptible to changes in market interest rates, consumer confidence levels, employment statistics, the capacity and willingness of secondary market purchasers to acquire and hold or securitize loans, and other factors beyond our control. Additionally, in many respects, the mortgage origination business is relationship based, and dependent on the services of individual mortgage loan officers. The loss of services of one or more loan officers could have the effect of reducing the level of our mortgage production, or the rate of growth of production. As a result of these factors we cannot be certain

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that we will not be able to continue to increase the volume or percentage of revenue or net income produced by the residential mortgage business.

         Our financial condition, earnings and asset quality could be adversely affected if we are required to repurchase loans originated for sale by our Residential Lending department.

        The Bank originates residential mortgage loans for sale to secondary market investors, subject to contractually specified and limited recourse provisions. Because the loans are intended to be originated within investor guidelines, using designated automated underwriting and product specific requirements as part of the loan application, the loans sold have a limited recourse provision. In general, the Bank may be required to repurchase a previously sold mortgage loan or indemnify the investor if there is non-compliance with defined loan origination or documentation standards, including fraud, negligence, material misstatement in the loan documents or noncompliance with applicable law. In addition, the Bank may have an obligation to repurchase a loan if the mortgagor has defaulted early in the loan term. The potential mortgagor early default repurchase period is up to approximately twelve months after sale of the loan to the investor. The recourse period for fraud, material misstatement, breach of representations and warranties, noncompliance with law, or similar matters could be as long as the term of the loan. Mortgages subject to recourse are collateralized by single-family residential properties, have loan-to-value ratios of 80% or less, or have private mortgage insurance. Our experience to date has been minimal in the case of loan repurchases due to default, fraud, breach of representations, material misstatement, or legal noncompliance. Should repurchases become a material issue, our earnings and asset quality could be adversely impacted, which could adversely impact our share price.

         Our financial condition, earnings and asset quality could be adversely affected if our consumer facing operations do not operate in compliance with applicable regulations.

        While all aspects of our operations are subject to detailed and complex compliance regimes, those portions of our lending operations which most directly deal with consumers, our Residential Mortgage operations and the indirect automobile loan portfolio, which we acquired from Virginia Heritage and are in the process of amortizing, pose particular challenges given the emphasis on consumer compliance by bank regulators at all levels. While we are not aware of any material issues with our compliance, residential mortgage lending raises significant compliance risks resulting from the detailed and complex nature of mortgage lending regulations imposed by federal regulatory agencies, and the relatively independent operating environment in which mortgage lending officers operate. As a result, despite the education, compliance training, supervision and oversight we exercise in these areas, individual loan officers intentionally trying to conceal improper activities could result in the Bank being strictly liable for restitution or damages to individual borrowers, and to regulatory enforcement activity.

         Changes in interest rates and other factors beyond our control could have an adverse impact on our financial performance and results.

        Our operating income and net income depend to a great extent on our net interest margin, i.e., the difference between the interest yields we receive on loans, securities and other interest bearing assets and the interest rates we pay on interest bearing deposits and other liabilities. Net interest margin is affected by changes in market interest rates, because different types of assets and liabilities may react differently, and at different times, to market interest rate changes. When interest bearing liabilities mature or re-price more quickly than interest earning assets in a period, an increase in market rates of interest could reduce net interest income. Similarly, when interest earning assets mature or re-price more quickly than interest bearing liabilities, falling interest rates could reduce net interest income. These rates are highly sensitive to many factors beyond our control, including competition, general economic conditions and monetary and fiscal policies of various governmental and regulatory authorities, including the Federal Reserve Board.

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        We attempt to manage our risk from changes in market interest rates by adjusting the rates, maturity, re-pricing, and balances of the different types of interest earning assets and interest bearing liabilities, but interest rate risk management techniques are not exact. As a result, a rapid increase or decrease in interest rates could have an adverse effect on our net interest margin and results of operations. At December 31, 2014, our cumulative net asset sensitive twelve month gap position was 6.62% of total assets, which includes loans currently at their floor rates. As such, we expect modest decreases of approximately minus 2.2% and minus 6.1%, respectively, in projected net interest income and net income over a twelve month period resulting from a 100 basis point increase in rates, as loans currently at floor rates which are above the calculated contractual rate do not adjust upon a rate increase, and our residential mortgage origination and sale volume could decline as interest rates increase. The results of our interest rate sensitivity simulation model depend upon a number of assumptions, which may not prove to be accurate. There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully manage our interest rate risk.

        Adverse changes in the real estate market in our market area could also have an adverse effect on our cost of funds and net interest margin, as we have a large amount of noninterest bearing deposits related to real estate sales and development. While we expect that we would be able to replace the liquidity provided by these deposits, the replacement funds would likely be more costly, negatively impacting earnings.

         We may not be able to successfully compete with others for business.

        The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in which we operate is considered highly attractive from an economic and demographic viewpoint, and is a highly competitive banking market. We compete for loans, deposits, and investment dollars with numerous regional and national banks, online divisions of out-of-market banks, and other community banking institutions, as well as other kinds of financial institutions and enterprises, such as securities firms, insurance companies, savings associations, credit unions, mortgage brokers, and private lenders. Many competitors have substantially greater resources than us, and some operate under less stringent regulatory environments. The differences in resources and regulations may make it harder for us to compete profitably, reduce the rates that we can earn on loans and investments, increase the rates we must offer on deposits and other funds, and adversely affect our overall financial condition and earnings.

        The Bank has been very successful in developing new customer relationships. These new relationships have resulted in significant increases in both loans and deposits, and have contributed to increased earnings. As the economy improves and competition increases, we are subject to the risk that we may not be able to retain the loans and deposits produced by these new relationships. While we believe that our relationship banking model will enable us to keep a significant percentage of these new relationships, there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so, that we would be able to maintain favorable pricing, margins and asset quality, or that we will be able to grow at the same rate we did when such alternative financing was not widely available.

         Government regulation will significantly affect the Bank's business, and may result in higher costs and lower shareholder returns.

        The banking industry is heavily regulated. Banking regulations are primarily intended to protect the federal deposit insurance fund and depositors, not shareholders. The Company and Bank are regulated and supervised by the Maryland Department of Financial Regulation, the Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC. The Bank is also subject to regulations promulgated by the CFPB. The burden imposed by federal and state regulations puts banks at a competitive disadvantage compared to less regulated competitors such as finance companies, mortgage banking companies and leasing companies. Changes in the laws, regulations and regulatory practices affecting the banking industry may increase our costs of doing business or otherwise adversely affect us and create competitive advantages for others. Regulations affecting banks and financial services companies undergo continuous change, and we cannot predict the ultimate effect of these changes, which could have a material adverse effect on our profitability or financial condition.

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Federal economic and monetary policy may also affect our ability to attract deposits and other funding sources, make loans and investments, and achieve satisfactory interest spreads.

         New or changed legislation or regulation and regulatory initiatives could subject us to increased regulation, increase our costs of doing business and adversely affect us.

        Changes in federal and state legislation and regulation may affect our operations. New and modified regulation, such as the Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III, may have unforeseen or unintended consequences on our industry. The Dodd-Frank Act has implemented, and is expected to further implement, significant changes to the U.S. financial system, including the creation of new regulatory agencies (such as the FSOC to oversee systemic risk and the CFPB to develop and enforce rules for consumer financial products), changes in retail banking regulations, and changes to deposit insurance assessments. Additionally, the Basel III Rules has revised risk-based and leverage capital requirements and also limit capital distributions and certain discretionary bonuses if a banking organization does not hold a "capital conservation buffer." This additional regulation could increase our compliance costs and otherwise adversely affect our operations. The potential also exists for additional federal or state laws or regulations, or changes in policy or interpretations, affecting many of our operations, including capital levels, lending and funding practices, insurance assessments, and liquidity standards. The effect of any such changes and their interpretation and application by regulatory authorities cannot be predicted, may increase the Company's cost of doing business and otherwise affect our operations, may significantly affect the markets in which the Company does business, and could have a material adverse effect on the Company.

        In addition, recent government responses to the condition of the global financial markets and the banking industry has, among other things, increased our costs and may further increase our costs for items such as federal deposit insurance. The FDIC insures deposits at FDIC-insured institutions, such as the Bank, up to applicable limits. The FDIC charges the insured financial institutions premiums to maintain the Deposit Insurance Fund at a certain level. Increases in deposit insurance premiums to increase the coverage ratio to required levels, or to pay depositors of additional failed institutions could adversely affect the Company's net income.

        While the full impact of the Dodd-Frank Act and the CFPB rulemakings cannot be assessed until all implementing regulations are released, become effective and are interpreted by regulators and the courts, the Dodd-Frank Act's extensive requirements may have a significant effect on the financial markets, and may affect the availability or terms of financing from our lender counterparties and the availability or terms of mortgage-backed securities, both of which may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. The CFPB's rules are likely to result in increased compliance costs and fees, along with possible restrictions on our operations, any of which may have a material adverse affect on our operating results and financial condition.

         Our customers and businesses in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in general, may be adversely impacted as a result of changes in government spending.

        The Washington, D.C. metropolitan area is characterized by a significant number of businesses that are federal government contractors or subcontractors, or which depend on such businesses for a significant portion of their revenues. While the Company does not have a significant level of loans to federal government contractors or their subcontractors, the impact of a decline in federal government spending, a reallocation of government spending to different industries or different areas of the country, or a delay in payments to such contractors, could have a ripple effect. Temporary layoffs, salary reductions or furloughs of government employees or government contractors could have adverse impacts on other businesses in the Company's market and the general economy of the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and may indirectly lead to a loss of revenues by the Company's customers, including vendors and lessors to the federal government and government contractors or to their employees, as well as a wide variety of commercial and retail businesses. Accordingly, such potential federal government activities could lead to

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increases in past due loans, nonperforming loans, loan loss reserves, and charge-offs, and a decline in liquidity.

         We rely upon independent appraisals to determine the value of the real estate, which secures a significant portion of our loans, and the values indicated by such appraisals may not be realizable if we are forced to foreclose upon such loans.

        A significant portion of our loan portfolio consists of loans secured by real estate, 76% at December 31, 2014. We rely upon independent appraisers to estimate the value of such real estate. Appraisals are only estimates of value and the independent appraisers may make mistakes of fact or judgment, which adversely affect the reliability of their appraisals. In addition, events occurring after the initial appraisal may cause the value of the real estate to increase or decrease. As a result of any of these factors, the real estate securing some of our loans may be more or less valuable than anticipated at the time the loans were made. If a default occurs on a loan secured by real estate that is less valuable than originally estimated, we may not be able to recover the outstanding balance of the loan and will suffer a loss.

         We are exposed to risk of environmental liabilities with respect to properties to which we take title.

        In the course of our business we lend against, and may foreclose and take title to, real estate, potentially becoming subject to environmental liabilities associated with the properties. We may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage, personal injury, investigation and cleanup costs or we may be required to investigate or clean up hazardous or toxic substances or chemical releases at a property. Costs associated with investigation or remediation activities can be substantial. If the Bank is the lender to, or owner or former owner of, a contaminated site, it may be subject to common law claims by third parties based on damages and costs resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the property. These costs and claims could adversely affect our business.

         Our operations rely on certain external vendors.

        Our business is dependent on the use of outside service providers that support our day-to-day operations including data processing and electronic communications. Our operations are exposed to risk that a service provider may not perform in accordance with established performance standards required in our agreements for any number of reasons including equipment or network failure, a change in their senior management, their financial condition, their product line or mix and how they support existing customers, or a simple change in their strategic focus. While we have comprehensive policies and procedures in place to mitigate risk at all phases of service provider management from selection, to performance monitoring and renewals, the failure of a service provider to perform in accordance with contractual agreements could be disruptive to our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial conditions and results of our operations.

         A breach of information security could negatively affect our earnings.

        Increasingly, we depend upon data processing, communication and information exchange on a variety of computing platforms and networks, and over the Internet from internal sources and external, third party vendors. While to date we have not been subject to material cyber-attacks or other cyber incidents, we cannot guarantee all our systems are free from vulnerability to attack, despite safeguards we and our vendors have instituted. In addition, disruptions to our vendors' systems may arise from events that are wholly or partially beyond our and our vendors' control (including, for example, computer viruses or electrical or telecommunications outages). If information security is breached, despite the controls we and our third-party vendors have instituted, information can be lost or misappropriated, resulting in financial losses or costs to us or damages to others. These costs or losses could materially exceed the amount of insurance coverage, if any, which would adversely affect our earnings. In addition, our reputation could be damaged which could result in loss of customers, greater difficulty in attracting new customers, or an adverse effect on the value of our common stock.

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ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None

ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES

        All properties out of which the Company operates are leased properties. As of December 31, 2014, the Company and its subsidiaries operated out of 33 leased facilities; 22 of which are leased for branch offices in the Washington, D.C. metro area: seven in Montgomery County, Maryland; 10 located in Northern Virginia; and five in the District of Columbia.

Maryland Branch Locations:    

Bethesda Main Office
7815 Woodmont Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland 20814

Chevy Chase Office
15 Wisconsin Circle
Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815

Park Potomac Office
12505 Park Potomac Avenue
Potomac, Maryland 20854

Rockville Office
110 North Washington Street
Rockville, Maryland 20850

Rollins Avenue Office
130 Rollins Avenue
Rockville, Maryland 20852

Shady Grove Office
9600 Blackwell Road
Rockville, Maryland 20850

Silver Spring Office
8665-B Georgia Avenue
Silver Spring, Maryland 20910

Virginia Branch Locations:

Alexandria Office
277 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314

Arlington Office
4040 N. Fairfax Drive
Arlington, Virginia 22203

Ballston Office
4420 N. Fairfax Drive
Arlington, Virginia 22203

K Street Office
2001 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006

 

Chantilly Office
13986 Metrotech Drive
Chantilly, Virginia 20151

Dulles Office
45745 Nokes Boulevard
Sterling, Virginia 20166

Fairfax Office
11166 Fairfax Boulevard
Fairfax, Virginia 22030

Merrifield Office
2905 District Avenue
Fairfax, Virginia 22201

Reston Office
12011 Sunset Hills Road
Reston, Virginia 20190

Rosslyn Office
1919 N. Lynn Street
Arlington, Virginia 22209

Tysons Corner Office
8245 Boone Boulevard
Tysons Corner, Virginia 22182

Washington, D.C. Branch Locations:

Dupont Circle Office
1228 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

Gallery Place Office
700 7th Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20001

Georgetown Office
1044 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20007

McPherson Square Office
1425 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20005

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Corporate Offices and Commercial Lending Centers:    

Executive Offices and Commercial Lending Center
7830 Old Georgetown Road
Bethesda, Maryland 20814

Tysons Corner Corporate Offices/
Commercial Lending Center
8245 Boone Boulevard
Tysons Corner, Virginia 22182

K Street Corporate/ Commercial Lending Center
2001 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006

Residential Lending Centers:

Park Potomac Office—5th Floor
Residential Lending Center
12505 Park Potomac Avenue
Potomac, Maryland 20854

Reston Office
Residential Lending Center
12011 Sunset Hills Drive
Reston, Virginia 20190

Other Properties:

Operations Center
11961 Tech Road
Silver Spring, Maryland 20904

 

 

        The Bank leases an office facility in Bethesda at 7809 Woodmont Avenue, consisting of 6,406 square feet under a nine year lease (with options), which expires in April 2018. This facility is currently under sublease arrangements. Additionally, the Bank leases a 4,688 square foot office facility in Vienna Virginia, previously used for a branch office, and which is being marketed for sublease. The lease expires in January 2016. The Bank leases two office facilities, a 3,962 square foot facility and a 2,671 square foot facility in Chantilly, Virginia, previously used for a residential mortgage production office by Virginia Heritage, and which are being marketed for sublease.

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        From time to time the Company and its subsidiaries are participants in various legal proceedings incidental to their business. In the opinion of management, the liabilities (if any) resulting from such legal proceedings will not have a material effect on the financial position of the Company.

ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

        Not applicable.

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PART II

ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF COMMON EQUITY

        Market for Common Stock.    The Company's common stock is listed for trading on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol "EGBN." Over the twelve month period ended December 31, 2014, the average daily trading volume amounted to approximately 82,382 shares, an increase from approximately 76,351 shares over the twelve month period ended December 31, 2013. No assurance can be given that a highly active trading market will develop or can be maintained. The following table sets forth the high and low sale prices for the common stock during each calendar quarter during the last two fiscal years, as adjusted for a 10% stock dividend paid on June 14, 2013. No cash dividends for common shareholders were declared during such periods. As of February 20, 2015, there were 30,482,979 shares of common stock outstanding, held by approximately 9,521 beneficial shareholders, including approximately 1,039 shareholders of record.

 
  2014   2013  
Quarter
  High   Low   High   Low  

First

  $ 37.00   $ 29.24   $ 20.91   $ 18.18  

Second

  $ 36.99   $ 30.22   $ 23.21   $ 18.13  

Third

  $ 35.48   $ 31.61   $ 28.45   $ 22.29  

Fourth

  $ 36.70   $ 30.94   $ 33.25   $ 26.04  

        Dividends.    The Company does not currently pay a cash dividend on its common stock.

        The payment of a cash dividend on common stock will depend largely upon the ability of the Bank, the Company's principal operating business, to declare and pay dividends to the Company. Payment of dividends on the common stock will also depend upon the Bank's earnings, financial condition, and need for funds, as well as governmental policies and regulations applicable to the Company and the Bank.

        Regulations of the Federal Reserve Board and Maryland law place limits on the amount of dividends the Bank may pay to the Company without prior approval. Prior regulatory approval is required to pay dividends which exceed the Bank's net profits for the current year plus its retained net profits for the preceding two calendar years, less required transfers to surplus. Under Maryland law, dividends may only be paid out of retained earnings. State and federal bank regulatory agencies also have authority to prohibit a bank from paying dividends if such payment is deemed to be an unsafe or unsound practice, and the Federal Reserve Board has the same authority over bank holding companies. At December 31, 2014 the Bank could pay dividends to the Company to the extent of its earnings so long as it maintained required capital ratios.

        The Federal Reserve Board has established requirements with respect to the maintenance of appropriate levels of capital by registered bank holding companies. Compliance with such standards, as presently in effect, or as they may be amended from time to time, could possibly limit the amount of dividends that the Company may pay in the future. In 1985, the Federal Reserve Board issued a policy statement on the payment of cash dividends by bank holding companies. In the statement, the Federal Reserve Board expressed its view that a holding company experiencing earnings weaknesses should not pay cash dividends exceeding its net income, or which could only be funded in ways that weaken the holding company's financial health, such as by borrowing. As a depository institution, the deposits of which are insured by the FDIC, the Bank may not pay dividends or distribute any of its capital assets while it remains in default on any assessment due the FDIC. The Bank currently is not in default under any of its obligations to the FDIC.

        The Company's ability to pay dividends on the common stock is also restricted by the provisions of the SBLF Preferred Stock. Under the SBLF Preferred Stock, no repurchases may be effected, and no

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dividends may be declared or paid on preferred shares ranking pari passu with the SBLF Preferred Stock, junior preferred shares, or other junior securities (including the common stock) during the current quarter and for the next three quarters following the failure to declare and pay dividends on the SBLF Preferred Stock, except that, in any such quarter in which the dividend is paid, dividend payments on shares ranking pari passu may be paid to the extent necessary to avoid any resulting material covenant breach. The Company at December 31, 2014 was not in default of any obligations to declare and pay dividends on the SBLF Preferred Stock.

        Under the terms of the SBLF Preferred Stock, the Company may only declare and pay a dividend on the common stock or other stock junior to the SBLF Preferred Stock, or repurchase shares of any such class or series of stock, if, after payment of such dividend, the dollar amount of the Company's Tier 1 Capital would be at least 90% of the Signing Date Tier 1 Capital, as set forth in the Articles Supplementary relating to the Series B Preferred Stock and Series C Preferred Stock, excluding any subsequent net charge-offs and any redemption of the Series B Preferred Stock or the Series C Preferred Stock (the "Tier 1 Dividend Threshold"). The Tier 1 Dividend Threshold is subject to reduction, beginning on the second anniversary of issuance and ending on the tenth anniversary, by 10% for each one percent increase in QSBL over the baseline level.

        Issuer Repurchase of Common Stock.    No shares of the Company's Common Stock were repurchased by or on behalf of the Company during 2014 or 2013.

        See Item 12—Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters for "Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans."

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        Stock Price Performance.    The following table compares the cumulative total return on a hypothetical investment of $100 in the Company's common stock on December 31, 2009 through December 31, 2014, with the hypothetical cumulative total return on the NASDAQ Stock Market Index (U.S. Companies) and the NASDAQ Bank Index for the comparable period, including reinvestment of dividends.


Eagle Bancorp, Inc.

Total Return Performance

GRAPHIC

 
  Period Ending  
Index
  12/31/09   12/31/10   12/31/11   12/31/12   12/31/13   12/31/14  

Eagle Bancorp, Inc. 

    100.00     137.82     138.87     190.74     321.81     373.18  

NASDAQ Stock Market Index-(U.S. Companies)

    100.00     118.15     117.22     138.02     193.47     222.16  

NASDAQ Bank Index

    100.00     114.16     102.17     121.26     171.86     180.31  

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ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

        The following table shows selected historical consolidated financial data for the Company. It should be read in conjunction with Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes included elsewhere in this report.

Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

        The information set forth below contains certain financial information determined by methods other than in accordance with GAAP. These non-GAAP financial measures are "tangible common equity," and "tangible book value per common share." Our management uses these non-GAAP measures in its analysis of our performance because it believes these measures are material and will be used as a measure of our performance by investors.

        These disclosures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for results determined in accordance with GAAP, and are not necessarily comparable to non-GAAP performance measures which may be presented by other bank holding companies. Management compensates for these limitations by providing detailed reconciliations between GAAP information and the non-GAAP financial measures. A reconciliation table is set forth below following the selected historical consolidated financial data.

 
  Years Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands except per share data)
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  

Balance Sheets—Period End

                               

Securities

  $ 404,903   $ 389,405   $ 310,514   $ 324,053   $ 237,576  

Loans held for sale

    44,317     42,030     226,923     176,826     80,571  

Loans

    4,312,399     2,945,158     2,493,095     2,056,256     1,675,500  

Allowance for credit losses

    46,075     40,921     37,492     29,653     24,754  

Intangible assets, net

    109,908     3,510     3,785     4,145     4,188  

Total assets

    5,247,880     3,771,503     3,409,441     2,831,255     2,089,370  

Deposits

    4,310,768     3,225,414     2,897,222     2,392,095     1,726,798  

Borrowings

    280,420     119,771     140,638     152,662     146,884  

Total liabilities

    4,627,121     3,377,640     3,059,465     2,564,544     1,884,654  

Preferred shareholders' equity

    71,900     56,600     56,600     56,600     22,582  

Common shareholders' equity

    548,859     337,263     293,376     210,111     182,134  

Total shareholders' equity

    620,759     393,863     349,976     266,711     204,716  

Tangible common equity(1)

    438,951     333,753     289,591     205,966     177,946  

Statements of Operations

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Interest income

  $ 191,573   $ 157,294   $ 141,943   $ 119,124   $ 96,658  

Interest expense

    13,095     12,504     14,414     20,077     19,832  

Provision for credit losses

    10,879     9,602     16,190     10,983     9,308  

Noninterest income

    18,345     24,716     21,364     13,501     9,242  

Noninterest expense(2)

    99,728     84,579     76,531     63,276     51,005  

Income before taxes

    86,216     75,325     56,172     38,289     25,755  

Income tax expense

    31,958     28,318     20,883     13,731     9,098  

Net income(2)

    54,258     47,007     35,289     24,558     16,657  

Preferred dividends

    614     566     566     1,511     1,299  

Net income available to common shareholders(2)

    53,644     46,441     34,723     23,047     15,358  

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  Years Ended December 31,  
(dollars in thousands except per share data)
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  

Per Common Share Data(3)

                               

Net income, basic(2)

  $ 2.01   $ 1.81   $ 1.50   $ 1.05   $ 0.71  

Net income, diluted(2)

    1.95     1.76     1.46     1.04     0.70  

Book value

    18.21     13.03     11.62     9.57     8.41  

Tangible book value(4)

    14.56     12.89     11.47     9.38     8.21  

Common shares outstanding

    30,139,396     25,885,863     25,250,378     21,948,128     21,670,426  

Weighted average common shares outstanding, basic

    26,683,759     25,726,062     23,135,886     21,819,087     21,613,450  

Ratios

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Net interest margin

    4.44 %   4.30 %   4.32 %   3.99 %   4.09 %

Efficiency ratio(2)(5)

    50.67 %   49.90 %   51.40 %   56.22 %   59.26 %

Return on average assets(2)

    1.31 %   1.37 %   1.18 %   0.97 %   0.86 %

Return on average common equity(2)

    13.50 %   14.60 %   14.14 %   11.71 %   8.74 %

Total capital (to risk weighted assets)

    12.97 %   13.01 %   12.20 %   11.84 %   11.64 %

Tier 1 capital (to risk weighted assets)

    10.39 %   11.53 %   10.80 %   10.33 %   9.91 %

Tier 1 capital (to average assets)

    10.69 %   10.93 %   10.44 %   8.21 %   9.32 %

Asset Quality

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Nonperforming assets and loans 90+ past due

  $ 35,667   $ 33,927   $ 35,983   $ 36,019   $ 31,988  

Nonperforming assets and loans 90+ past due to total assets

    0.68 %   0.90 %   1.06 %   1.27 %   1.53 %

Nonperforming loans to total loans

    0.52 %   0.84 %   1.23 %   1.59 %   1.51 %

Allowance for credit losses to loans

    1.07 %   1.39 %   1.50 %   1.44 %   1.48 %

Allowance for credit losses to nonperforming loans

    205.30 %   165.66 %   122.19 %   90.42 %   97.89 %

Net charge-offs

  $ 5,724   $ 6,173   $ 8,351   $ 6,084   $ 5,173  

Net charge-offs to average loans

    0.17 %   0.23 %   0.37 %   0.32 %   0.35 %

(1)
Tangible common equity, a non-GAAP financial measure, is defined as total common shareholders' equity reduced by goodwill and other intangible assets.

(2)
The reported figure includes the effect of $4.7 million and $3.2 million of merger related expenses ($3.5 million and $2.2 million net of tax) for the twelve and three months ended December 31, 2014. As the magnitude of the merger expenses distorts the operational results of the Company, we present in the GAAP reconciliation below and in the Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations certain performance ratios excluding the effect of the merger expenses during the year and three months period ended December 31, 2014. We believe this information is important to enable shareholders and other interested parties to assess the core operational performance of the Company.

(3)
Presented giving retroactive effect to the 10% stock dividend paid on the common stock on June 14, 2013.

(4)
Tangible book value per common share, a non-GAAP financial measure, is defined as tangible common shareholders' equity divided by total common shares outstanding.

(5)
Computed by dividing noninterest expense by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income.

 
  Years Ended December 31,  
Non-GAAP Reconciliation (Unaudited)
(dollars in thousands except per share data)

  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  

Common shareholders' equity

  $ 548,859   $ 337,263   $ 293,376   $ 210,111   $ 182,134  

Less: Intangible assets

    (109,908 )   (3,510 )   (3,785 )   (4,145 )   (4,188 )

Tangible common equity

  $ 438,951   $ 333,753   $ 289,591   $ 205,966   $ 177,946  

Book value per common share

  $ 18.21   $ 13.03   $ 11.62   $ 9.57   $ 8.41  

Less: Intangible book value per common share

    (3.65 )   (0.14 )   (0.15 )   (0.19 )   (0.20 )

Tangible book value per common share

  $ 14.56   $ 12.89   $ 11.47   $ 9.38   $ 8.21  

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Non-GAAP Reconciliation (Unaudited)
(dollars in thousands except per share data)

  December 31, 2014   December 31, 2013  

Common shareholders' equity

  $ 548,859   $ 337,263  

Less: Intangible assets

    (109,908 )   (3,510 )

Tangible common equity

  $ 438,951   $ 333,753  

Book value per common share

  $ 18.21   $ 13.03  

Less: Intangible book value per common share

    (3.65 )   (0.14 )

Tangible book value per common share

  $ 14.56   $ 12.89  

Total assets

  $ 5,247,880   $ 3,771,503  

Less: Intangible assets

    (109,908 )   (3,510 )

Tangible assets

  $ 5,137,972   $ 3,767,993  

Tangible common equity ratio

    8.54 %   8.86 %

 

Non-GAAP Reconciliation (Unaudited)
(dollars in thousands except per share data)

  Twelve Months
Ended
December 31, 2014
  Three Months
Ended
December 31, 2014
 

Net income

  $ 54,258   $ 14,727  

Adjustments to net income

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    3,472     2,173  

Operating net income

  $ 57,730   $ 16,900  

Net income available to common shareholders

  $ 53,644   $ 14,547  

Adjustments to net income available to common shareholders

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    3,472     2,173  

Operating earnings

  $ 57,116   $ 16,720  

Earnings per weighted average common share, basic

  $ 2.01   $ 0.51  

Adjustments to earnings per weighted average common share, basic

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    0.13     0.08  

Operating earnings per weighted average common share, basic

  $ 2.14   $ 0.59  

Earnings per weighted average common share, diluted

  $ 1.95   $ 0.49  

Adjustments to earnings per weighted average common share, diluted

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    0.13     0.07  

Operating earnings per weighted average common share, diluted

  $ 2.08   $ 0.56  

Summary Operating Results:

             

Noninterest expense

  $ 99,728   $ 29,352  

Merger-related expenses

    4,699     3,239  

Adjusted noninterest expense

  $ 95,029   $ 26,113  

Adjusted efficiency ratio

    48.28 %   45.71 %

Adjusted noninterest expense as a % of average assets

   
2.30

%
 
2.14

%

Return on average assets

   
 
   
 
 

Net income

  $ 54,258   $ 14,727  

Adjustments to net income

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    3,472     2,173  

Operating net income

  $ 57,730   $ 16,900  

Adjusted return on average assets

    1.40 %   1.38 %

Return on average common equity

   
 
   
 
 

Net income available to common shareholders

  $ 53,644   $ 14,547  

Adjustments to net income available to common shareholders

             

Merger-related expenses, net of tax

    3,472     2,173  

Operating earnings

  $ 57,116   $ 16,720  

Adjusted return on average common equity

    14.38 %   13.43 %

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ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        The following discussion provides information about the results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, and capital resources of the Company. The Company's primary subsidiaries are the Bank, Bethesda Leasing, LLC, Eagle Insurance Services, LLC, and ECV. This discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the audited Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto, appearing elsewhere in this report.

        Caution About Forward Looking Statements.    This report contains forward looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. These forward looking statements represent plans, estimates, objectives, goals, guidelines, expectations, intentions, projections and statements of our beliefs concerning future events, business plans, objectives, expected operating results and the assumptions upon which those statements are based. Forward looking statements include without limitation, any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate or imply future results, performance or achievements, and are typically identified with words such as "may," "could," "should," "will," "would," "believe," "anticipate," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "plan," or words or phases of similar meaning. These forward looking statements are based largely on our expectations and are subject to a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that are subject to change based on factors which are, in many instances, beyond our control. Actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, or implied by the forward looking statements.

        The following factors, among others, could cause our financial performance to differ materially from that expressed in such forward looking statements:

    The strength of the United States economy in general and the strength of the local economies in which we conduct operations;

    Geopolitical conditions, including acts or threats of terrorism, actions taken by the United States or other governments in response to acts or threats of terrorism and/or military conflicts, which could impact business and economic conditions in the United States and abroad;

    The effects of, and changes in, trade, monetary and fiscal policies and laws, including interest rate policies of the Federal Reserve Board, inflation, interest rate, market and monetary fluctuations;

    The timely development of competitive new products and services and the acceptance of these products and services by new and existing customers;

    Results of examinations of us by our regulators, including the possibility that our regulators may, among other things, require us to increase our allowance for credit losses or to write-down assets;

    Changing bank regulatory conditions, policies or programs, whether arising as new legislation or regulatory initiatives, that could lead to restrictions on activities of banks generally, or our subsidiary bank in particular, more restrictive regulatory capital requirements, increased costs, including deposit insurance premiums, regulation or prohibition of certain income producing activities or changes in the secondary market for loans and other products;

    The willingness of users to substitute competitors' products and services for our products and services;

    The impact of changes in financial services policies, laws and regulations, including laws, regulations and policies concerning taxes, banking, securities and insurance, and the application thereof by regulatory bodies;

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    The effect of changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted from time-to-time by bank regulatory agencies, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"), the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board or the Financial Accounting Standards Board;

    Technological and social media changes;

    The effect of acquisitions we may make, including, without limitation, the failure to achieve the expected revenue growth and/or expense savings from such acquisitions;

    The growth and profitability of noninterest or fee income being less than expected;

    Changes in the level of our nonperforming assets and charge-offs;

    Changes in consumer spending and savings habits; and

    Unanticipated regulatory or judicial proceedings.

        If one or more of the factors affecting our forward looking information and statements proves incorrect, then our actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, forward looking information and statements contained in this report. You should not place undue reliance on our forward looking information and statements. We will not update the forward looking statements to reflect actual results or changes in the factors affecting the forward looking statements.


GENERAL


        The Company is a growth oriented, one-bank holding company headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, which has completed sixteen years of successful operations. The Company provides general commercial and consumer banking services through the Bank, its wholly owned banking subsidiary, a Maryland chartered bank which is a member of the Federal Reserve System. The Company was organized in October 1997, to be the holding company for the Bank. The Bank was organized in 1998 as an independent, community oriented, full service banking alternative to the super regional financial institutions, which dominate the Company's primary market area. The Company's philosophy is to provide superior, personalized service to its customers. The Company focuses on relationship banking, providing each customer with a number of services and becoming familiar with and addressing customer needs in a proactive, personalized fashion. The Bank currently has a total of twenty two branch offices, including ten in Northern Virginia, seven in Montgomery County, Maryland, and five in Washington, D.C.

        The Bank offers a broad range of commercial banking services to its business and professional clients as well as full service consumer banking services to individuals living and/or working primarily in the Bank's market area. The Bank emphasizes providing commercial banking services to sole proprietors, small, medium sized businesses, non-profit organizations and associations, and investors living and working in and near the primary service area. These services include the usual deposit functions of commercial banks, including business and personal checking accounts, "NOW" accounts and money market and savings accounts, business, construction, and commercial loans, residential mortgages and consumer loans, and cash management services. The Bank is also active in the origination and sale of residential mortgage loans and the origination of SBA loans. The residential mortgage loans are originated for sale to third-party investors, generally large mortgage and banking companies, under best efforts and mandatory delivery commitments with the investors to purchase the loans subject to compliance with pre-established criteria. The Bank generally sells the guaranteed portion of the SBA loans in a transaction apart from the loan origination generating noninterest income from the gains on sale, as well as servicing income on the portion participated. Bethesda Leasing, LLC, a subsidiary of the Bank, holds title to and manages Other Real Estate Owned ("OREO") assets. Eagle Insurance Services, LLC, a subsidiary of the Bank, offers access to insurance products and services through a referral program with a third party insurance broker. Additionally, the Bank offers investment advisory services through referral programs with two third

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parties. ECV, a subsidiary of the Company, provides subordinated financing for the acquisition, development and/or construction of real estate projects. ECV lending involves higher levels of risk, together with commensurate expected returns.

        Throughout 2014, economic conditions in the U.S. economy were quite mixed as monthly reports fluctuated from generally good to weak with sub-par economic growth being a persistent theme. Actual GDP growth in 2014 in the U.S. was slightly below expectations while worldwide growth was very anemic with European Union growth being close to zero. The U.S. official unemployment levels declined throughout 2014 but were impacted significantly by a much lower job participation level. Arguably, the lack of solid job growth weighed heavily on Federal Reserve monetary policy, which continued short-term interest rates at historically low levels while exiting quantitative easing policies (i.e. purchase of U.S. Treasury and mortgage backed securities) by year-end 2014. Longer-term U.S. interest rates fell on average for each quarter of 2014, with the ten year U.S. Treasury rate ending the year at 2.17% as compared to 3.03% at December 31, 2013. These lower long-term interest rates were a function of both a flight to quality in U.S. Treasury securities, as persistent weaknesses continued in European Union economies generally, along with geopolitical risks, combined with very low inflation levels and inflation expectations worldwide. In fact, fear of deflation existed in Japan and parts of Europe. Additionally, substantially lower energy prices brought about by enhanced production in the U.S. was a key driver of economic and currency factors in 2014. As the ten year U.S. Treasury rate subsided throughout 2014, the volume of residential lending increased in the latter half of the year. Overall, real estate values were stable to increasing in 2014 as interest rates declined and personal income levels rose modestly. Additionally, continued political gridlock in Washington, D.C. over concerns of public debt and deficits, tax policy and spending levels persisted in 2014, which resulted in a continued heighted level of business uncertainty with respect to everyday economic activity. Such uncertainty kept private investment weak throughout 2014 and average liquidity very high. As we moved through 2014, the yield curve flattened as average short term interest rates increased in each quarter of 2014, and longer term rates decreased in part due to the market's expectation of the Federal Reserve beginning a path of increasing the federal funds rate after ending its quantitative easing programs. Even considering the impact of lower federal government spending in 2014, the Company's primary market, the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, has been relatively less impacted by recessionary type forces than other parts of the country, due to growth in the private sector. Private sector growth was attributable in part to a diverse economy including a large healthcare component, substantial business services, and a highly educated work force.

        During 2014, the Company enhanced its marketplace positioning by remaining proactive in growing client relationships and expanding its presence in the Northern Virginia sub-market with the acquisition of Virginia Heritage. The Company has had the financial resources to meet, and has remained committed to meeting, the credit needs of its community, resulting in substantial growth in the Bank's loan portfolio during 2014. Furthermore, the Company's capital position was enhanced in 2014 by very strong and consistent earnings and a successful subordinated debt offering in August 2014. The Company believes its strategies of remaining growth oriented, adding talented staff and maintaining focus on seeking quality lending and deposit relationships has proven successful and is evidenced in its financial and performance ratios. Additionally, the Company believes such focus and strategy of relationship building has fostered future growth opportunities. At December 31, 2014, the Company had aggregate assets of approximately $5.2 billion, loans and deposits in excess of $4.3 billion and twenty two branches in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

        Operating in this economic environment, the Bank was able to produce good growth in deposits and loans in 2014, both from organic growth and Merger related growth. Additionally, the Bank was able to grow its net interest spread earnings substantially, maintain a solid position regarding asset quality and generate enhanced operating leverage due to its seasoned and professional staff. The Company increased net income in each quarter of 2014, continuing a trend of consecutive quarters of increasing net earnings dating to the first quarter of 2009.

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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES


        The Company's Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP and follow general practices within the banking industry. Application of these principles requires management to make estimates, assumptions, and judgments that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. These estimates, assumptions and judgments are based on information available as of the date of the Consolidated Financial Statements; accordingly, as this information changes, the Consolidated Financial Statements could reflect different estimates, assumptions, and judgments. Certain policies inherently have a greater reliance on the use of estimates, assumptions and judgments and as such have a greater possibility of producing results that could be materially different than originally reported. Estimates, assumptions, and judgments are necessary when assets and liabilities are required to be recorded at fair value, when a decline in the value of an asset not carried on the financial statements at fair value warrants an impairment write-down or a valuation reserve to be established, or when an asset or liability needs to be recorded contingent upon a future event. Carrying assets and liabilities at fair value inherently results in more financial statement volatility.

        The fair values and the information used to record valuation adjustments for investment securities available-for-sale are based either on quoted market prices or are provided by other third-party sources, when available. The Company's investment portfolio is categorized as available-for-sale with unrealized gains and losses net of income tax being a component of shareholders' equity and accumulated other comprehensive income.

        Business combinations are accounted for by applying the acquisition method in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 805, Business Combinations. Under the acquisition method, identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed, and any non-controlling interest in the acquiree at the acquisition date are measured at their fair values as of that date, and are recognized separately from goodwill. Results of operations of the acquired entities are included in the consolidated statement of income from the date of acquisition.

        The allowance for credit losses is an estimate of the losses that may be sustained in our loan portfolio. The allowance is based on two principles of accounting: (a) ASC Topic 450, "Contingencies," which requires that losses be accrued when they are probable of occurring and are estimable and (b) ASC Topic 310, "Receivables," which requires that losses be accrued when it is probable that the Company will not collect all principal and interest payments according to the contractual terms of the loan. The loss, if any, can be determined by the difference between the loan balance and the value of collateral, the present value of expected future cash flows, or values observable in the secondary markets.

        Three components comprise our allowance for credit losses: a specific allowance, a formula allowance and a nonspecific or environmental factors allowance. Each component is determined based on estimates that can and do change when actual events occur.

        The specific allowance allocates a reserve to identified impaired loans. Impaired loans are assigned specific reserves based on an impairment analysis. Under ASC Topic 310, "Receivables," a loan for which reserves are individually allocated may show deficiencies in the borrower's overall financial condition, payment record, support available from financial guarantors and for the fair market value of collateral. When a loan is identified as impaired, a specific reserve is established based on the Company's assessment of the loss that may be associated with the individual loan.

        The formula allowance is used to estimate the loss on internally risk rated loans, exclusive of those identified as requiring specific reserves. The portfolio of unimpaired loans is stratified by loan type and risk assessment. Allowance factors relate to the type of loan and level of the internal risk rating, with loans exhibiting higher risk and loss experience receiving a higher allowance factor.

        The environmental allowance is also used to estimate the loss associated with pools of non-classified loans. These non-classified loans are also stratified by loan type, and environmental allowance factors are

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assigned by management based upon a number of conditions, including delinquencies, loss history, changes in lending policy and procedures, changes in business and economic conditions, changes in the nature and volume of the portfolio, management expertise, concentrations within the portfolio, quality of internal and external loan review systems, competition, and legal and regulatory requirements.

        The allowance captures losses inherent in the loan portfolio, which have not yet been recognized. Allowance factors and the overall size of the allowance may change from period to period based upon management's assessment of the above described factors, the relative weights given to each factor, and portfolio composition.

        Management has significant discretion in making the judgments inherent in the determination of the provision and allowance for credit losses, including in connection with the valuation of collateral, a borrower's prospects of repayment, and in establishing allowance factors on the formula and environmental components of the allowance. The establishment of allowance factors involves a continuing evaluation, based on management's ongoing assessment of the global factors discussed above and their impact on the portfolio. The allowance factors may change from period to period, resulting in an increase or decrease in the amount of the provision or allowance, based upon the same volume and classification of loans. Changes in allowance factors can have a direct impact on the amount of the provision, and a related after tax effect on net income. Errors in management's perception and assessment of the global factors and their impact on the portfolio could result in the allowance not being adequate to cover losses in the portfolio, and may result in additional provisions or charge-offs. Alternatively, errors in management's perception and assessment of the global factors and their impact on the portfolio could result in the allowance being in excess of amounts necessary to cover losses in the portfolio, and may result in lower provisions in the future. For additional information regarding the provision for credit losses, refer to the discussion under the caption "Provision for Credit Losses" below.

        The Company follows the provisions of ASC Topic 718, "Compensation," which requires the expense recognition for the fair value of share based compensation awards, such as stock options, restricted stock awards, and performance based shares. This standard allows management to establish modeling assumptions as to expected stock price volatility, option terms, forfeiture rates and dividend rates which directly impact estimated fair value. The accounting standard also allows for the use of alternative option pricing models which may impact fair value as determined. The Company's practice is to utilize reasonable and supportable assumptions.


RESULTS OF OPERATIONS


Overview

        Due to the Merger, the Company incurred various merger related expenses in 2014, which make it difficult for readers to analyze the Company's core operating earnings. For comparison purposes, the Company provides parenthetically in the discussion below the operating amounts and ratios which it feels are more useful to the reader. For a reconciliation of these non-GAAP financial measures to the GAAP equivalents, please refer to footnote 2 to the Selected Financial Data appearing at Item 6 of this report.

        For the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company's net income was $54.3 million ($57.7 million on an operating basis), a 15% increase (23% on an operating basis) over the $47.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. Net income available to common shareholders was $53.6 million ($57.1 million on an operating basis) as compared to $46.4 million for 2013, a 16% increase (23% on an operating basis).

        Net income per basic and diluted common share for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $2.01 and $1.95, respectively ($2.14 per basic common share and $2.08 per diluted common share on an operating basis), as compared to $1.81 per basic common share and $1.76 per diluted common share for 2013, an 11% increase per basic and diluted share (18% on an operating basis per basic and diluted share).

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        For the three months ended December 31, 2014, the Company reported net income of $14.7 million ($16.9 million on an operating basis), a 23% increase on a net income basis (41% on an operating basis) over the $12.0 million net income for the three months ended December 31, 2013. Net income available to common shareholders for the three months ended December 31, 2014 increased 23% (41% increase on an operating basis) to $14.5 million ($16.7 million on an operating basis) as compared to $11.9 million for the same period in 2013.

        Net income per basic and diluted common share for the three months ended December 31, 2014 was $0.51 and $0.49, respectively ($0.59 per basic common share and $0.56 per diluted common share on an operating basis), as compared to $0.46 per basic common share and $0.45 per diluted common share for the same period in 2013.

        For the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company reported a return on average assets ("ROAA") of 1.31% (1.40% on an operating basis) as compared to 1.37% for the year ended December 31, 2013, while the return on average common equity ("ROAE") was 13.50% (14.38% on an operating basis), as compared to 14.60% for the year ended December 31, 2013.

        For the three months ended December 31, 2014, the Company reported an annualized ROAA of 1.21% (1.38% on an operating basis) as compared to 1.33% for the three months ended December 31, 2013. The annualized ROAE for the three months ended December 31, 2014 was 11.68% (13.43% on an operating basis), as compared to 14.07% for the three months ended December 31, 2013.

        The Company's earnings are largely dependent on net interest income, the difference between interest income and interest expense, which represented 91% and 85% of total revenue (defined as net interest income plus noninterest income) for the full year in 2014 and 2013, respectively.

        The net interest margin, which measures the difference between interest income and interest expense (i.e. net interest income) as a percentage of earning assets, increased 14 basis points from 4.30% for the year ended December 31, 2013 to 4.44% for the year ended December 31, 2014. For 2014, the Company maintained its loan portfolio yields relatively close to 2013 levels (5.37% versus 5.51%) due to disciplined loan pricing practices, and reduced its cost of funds (0.33% versus 0.37%), while maintaining a favorable deposit mix, largely resulting from ongoing efforts to increase and expand client relationships. Average earning assets yields were higher by 10 basis points (4.77% versus 4.67%). This increase in average earning asset yields compares to a decline of 7 basis points (from 0.56% to 0.49%) in the cost of interest bearing liabilities. A higher mix of average loans as a percentage of total earning assets (from 79% to 84%) and lower average liquidity during the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to the same period in 2013, were the primary contributors to the increase in average earning asset yields in 2014 versus 2013.

        The net interest spread increased by 17 basis points for the year ended December 31, 2014 (4.28% versus 4.11%) as compared to 2013, as the Company has managed its cost of funds aggressively and been extremely disciplined in setting new loan rates. The benefit of noninterest sources funding earning assets declined by 3 basis points from 19 basis points to 16 basis points for the year ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The combination of a 17 basis point increase in the net interest spread and a 3 basis point decline in the value of noninterest sources resulted in the 14 basis point increase in the net interest margin for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013.

        For the three months ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, the ratio of average interest bearing liabilities to average earning assets was 66%. For the three months ended December 31, 2014 average loan yields declined by 11 basis points from 5.40% to 5.29% and average investment yields increased by 1 basis point from 2.29% to 2.30%. Additionally, due to an increase in the mix of higher yielding earning assets in the three months ended December 31, 2014, as compared to the same period in 2013, the average rate on earning assets for the three months ended December 31, 2014 increased from 4.74% to 4.78% as compared to the same period in 2013. The cost of interest bearing liabilities for the three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013 increased by 4 basis points from 0.51% to

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0.55%. The net interest spread was 4.23% for the three months ended December 31, 2014 and 2013. The net interest margin increased 2 basis points from 4.40% for the three months ended December 31, 2013 to 4.42% for the three months ended December 31, 2014. The benefit of noninterest sources funding earning assets increased from 17 basis points for the three months ended December 31, 2013 to 19 basis points for same period in 2014. The combination of no change in the net interest spread and 2 basis points increase in the value of noninterest sources resulted in the 2 basis point increase in the net interest margin.

        The Company believes it effectively managed its net interest margin and net interest income during 2014 as market interest rates (on average) have remained relatively low. This factor has been significant to overall earnings performance during 2014 as net interest income (at 91%) represents the most significant component of the Company's revenues.

        In order to fund growth in average loans of 24% over the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013, as well as sustain significant liquidity, the Company has relied primarily upon core deposit growth, while decreasing the levels of brokered and wholesale deposits as compared to total deposits. The major component of the growth in core deposits has been growth in money market accounts and noninterest bearing deposits primarily as a result of effectively building new and enhanced client relationships. Average growth of total deposits was 21% for the year of 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013.

        In terms of the average balance sheet composition or mix, loans, which generally have higher yields than securities and other earning assets, increased from 79% of average earning assets for the year ended December 31, 2013, to 84% of average earning assets for the year ended December 31, 2014. The lower growth of average funding sources as compared to loans has reduced average liquidity to the balance sheet for 2014 as compared to 2013 ($208 million as compared to $280 million). For the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to the same period in 2013, average loans, excluding loans held for sale, increased $717 million, a 27% increase. The increase in average loans for 2014 as compared to 2013 was primarily attributable to growth in commercial real estate loans and commercial loans. As noted above, increases in average deposits for the year of 2014, as compared to the year of 2013, is attributable to growth in money market accounts and noninterest bearing deposits. Average investment securities for the year ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 amounted to 10% of average earning assets. The combination of federal funds sold, interest bearing deposits with other banks and loans held for sale averaged 6% of average earning assets for 2014 as compared to 11% for 2013.

        The provision for credit losses was $10.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $9.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2013. The higher provisioning for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013 was due to higher loan growth. For the year ended December 31, 2014 net charge-offs totaled $5.7 million (0.17% of average loans) compared to $6.2 million (0.23% of average loans) for the year ended December 31, 2013. Net charge-offs for the year ended December 31, 2014 were attributable primarily to land development and construction loans ($2.6 million), commercial and industrial loans ($1.7 million), owner occupied-commercial real estate loans ($745 thousand) and real estate mortgage residential, home equity and other consumer ($606 thousand).

        The provision for credit losses was $3.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $2.5 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013. The higher provisioning in the fourth quarter of 2014, as compared to the fourth quarter of 2013, was due primarily to higher net charge-offs. Net charge-offs of $2.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2014 represented an annualized 0.26% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale, as compared to $1.3 million or an annualized 0.18% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale, in the fourth quarter of 2013. Charge-offs in the fourth quarter of 2014 were attributable primarily to land development and construction loans ($1.3 million), owner occupied-commercial real estate loans ($717 thousand) and commercial and industrial loans ($486 thousand).

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        At December 31, 2014, the allowance for credit losses represented 1.07% of loans outstanding, as compared to 1.39% at December 31, 2013. The decrease in the allowance for credit losses as a percentage of total loans at December 31, 2014, as compared to December 31, 2013, from 1.39% to 1.07%, respectively, was due to accounting for the loans acquired from Virginia Heritage at fair value. As a result, the acquired loans will not have any allowance component attributed against them, except to the extent of future deterioration, if any. The credit mark recorded in connection with the Merger was 1.59% of loans acquired, or approximately $12.8 million, which represents expected lifetime losses on the acquired loan portfolio. The allowance for credit losses was 205% of nonperforming loans at December 31, 2014, as compared to 166% at December 31, 2013.

        Total noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2014 decreased to $18.3 million from $24.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, a 26% decrease. This decrease was primarily due to a decline of $6.9 million in gains on the sale of residential mortgage loans due to lower origination and sales volume, and a decrease of $791 thousand in income from sales of SBA loans. This decrease was partially offset by an increase of $299 thousand in service charges on deposits and an increase in income of $563 thousand from Bank Owned Life Insurance ("BOLI"). There were $22 thousand of investment securities gains recorded for the year of 2014, as compared to $19 thousand of investment securities gains for the year of 2013.

        Total noninterest income for the three months ended December 31, 2014 increased to $5.3 million from $4.3 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013, a 23% increase. This increase was primarily due to an increase of $992 thousand in gains on the sale of residential mortgage loans due to higher origination volume and a decrease of $15 thousand in income from sales of SBA loans. There were $12 thousand of investment securities gains recorded for the fourth quarter of 2014, as compared to $4 thousand of investment securities losses for the fourth quarter of 2013.

        The efficiency ratio, which measures the ratio of noninterest expense to total revenue, remained favorable at 50.67% (48.28% on an operating basis) for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to 49.90% for the same period in 2013. Total noninterest expenses for the year ended 2014 were $99.7 million ($95.0 million on an operating basis) compared to $84.6 million for 2013, an 18% increase (12% on an operating basis). Cost increases for salaries and employee benefits were $9.8 million, due primarily to additional personnel acquired in the merger, to merit increases, higher benefit costs and higher incentive compensation. Premises and equipment expenses were $1.4 million higher, due to costs of additional branches and office space acquired in the merger, and to normal increases in leasing costs. Legal, accounting and professional fees increased by $470 thousand. The decrease in other expenses of $1.8 million was due to lower OREO expenses and a decrease in other losses. For 2014, expenses of $4.7 million were specifically attributable to the merger with Virginia Heritage. As a percentage of average assets, total noninterest expense was 2.41% (2.30% on an operating basis) for the year of 2014 as compared to 2.46% for the same period in 2013.

        Noninterest expenses totaled $29.4 million ($26.1 million on an operating basis) for the three months ended December 31, 2014, as compared to $21.5 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013, a 36% increase (21% increase on an operating basis). Cost increases for salaries and benefits were $2.9 million, due primarily to increased staff from the merger, merit increases, employee benefit expense increases and incentive compensation. Premises and equipment expenses were $773 thousand higher, due to costs of additional branches and office space acquired in the merger and to increases in leasing costs. Data processing expense increased $124 thousand primarily due to increases associated with the merger and higher network expenses. Legal, accounting and professional fees increased by $183 thousand. Merger related expenses attributable to the merger with Virginia Heritage were $3.2 million for the quarter. As a percentage of average assets, total noninterest expense (annualized) was 2.40% (2.14% on an operating basis) for the fourth quarter of 2014 as compared to 2.39% for the same period in 2013. The efficiency ratio was 51.38% (45.71% on an operating basis) for the fourth quarter of 2014, as compared to 50.03% for the fourth quarter of 2013.

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        The ratio of common equity to total assets increased from 8.94% at December 31, 2013 to 10.46% at December 31, 2014 due to growth from earnings and the issuance of new common equity to consummate the Merger. As discussed below, the regulatory capital ratios of the Bank and Company remain above well capitalized levels.

Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin

        Net interest income is the difference between interest income on earning assets and the cost of funds supporting those assets. Earning assets are composed primarily of loans, loans held for sale, investment securities, and interest bearing deposits with banks. The cost of funds comprises interest expense on deposits, customer repurchase agreements and other borrowings, which are federal funds purchased and advances from the FHLB. Noninterest bearing deposits and capital are other components representing funding sources. Changes in the volume and mix of assets and funding sources, along with the changes in yields earned and rates paid, determine changes in net interest income. Net interest income in 2014 was $178.5 million compared to $144.8 million in 2013 and $127.5 million in 2012. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, net interest income was $51.8 million as compared to $38.7 million and $34.7 million for the same periods in 2013 and 2012, respectively.

        For the year ended December 31, 2014, net interest income increased 23% over the same period for 2013. Average loans increased $717 million and average deposits increased by $599 million. The net interest margin was 4.44% for the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to 4.30% for the same period in 2013. The Company has been able to maintain its loan yields in 2014 relatively close to 2013 levels due to loan pricing practices, and has been able to reduce its funding costs while maintaining a favorable deposit mix; much of which has occurred from sales efforts to increase and deepen client relationships. The Company believes its net interest margin remains favorable.

        Net interest income increased 34% for the three months ended December 31, 2014 over the same period for 2013. Average loans increased $1.1 billion and average deposits increased by $987 million. For the three months ended December 31, 2014 the net interest margin was 4.42% as compared to 4.40% for the same three months in 2013.

        The tables below present the average balances and rates of the various categories of the Company's assets and liabilities for the years and three months ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012. Included in the tables is a measurement of interest rate spread and margin. Interest rate spread is the difference (expressed as a percentage) between the interest rate earned on earning assets less the interest expense on interest bearing liabilities. While the interest rate spread provides a quick comparison of earnings rates versus cost of funds, management believes that margin provides a better measurement of performance. Margin includes the effect of noninterest bearing sources in its calculation and is net interest income expressed as a percentage of average earning assets.

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Consolidated Average Balances, Interest Yields And Rates (Unaudited)

 
  Years Ended December 31,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
(dollars in thousands)
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
 

Assets

                                                       

Interest earning assets:

                                                       

Interest bearing deposits with other banks and other short-term investments

  $ 207,530   $ 496     0.24 % $ 280,399   $ 689     0.25 % $ 186,157   $ 475     0.26 %

Loans held for sale

    33,541     1,337     3.99 %   90,161     3,140     3.48 %   140,167     4,945     3.53 %

Loans(1)(2)

    3,361,696     180,438     5.37 %   2,644,892     145,661     5.51 %   2,281,027     129,655     5.68 %

Investment securities available for sale(2)

    401,153     9,286     2.31 %   348,143     7,792     2.24 %   330,670     6,824     2.06 %

Federal funds sold

    9,205     16     0.17 %   6,871     12     0.17 %   15,396     44     0.29 %

Total interest earning assets

    4,013,125     191,573     4.77 %   3,370,466     157,294     4.67 %   2,953,417     141,943     4.81 %

Noninterest earning assets

    160,543                 107,844                 77,827              

Less: allowance for credit losses

    43,173                 39,207                 33,250              

Total noninterest earning assets

    117,370                 68,637                 44,577              

Total Assets

  $ 4,130,495               $ 3,439,103               $ 2,997,994              

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Interest bearing liabilities:

                                                       

Interest bearing transaction

  $ 119,835   $ 178     0.15 % $ 103,763   $ 298     0.29 % $ 94,848   $ 289     0.30 %

Savings and money market

    1,950,138     6,265     0.32 %   1,516,699     5,765     0.38 %   1,183,402     5,946     0.50 %

Time deposits

    449,108     3,195     0.71 %   481,576     4,551     0.95 %   481,661     5,822     1.21 %

Total interest bearing deposits                 

    2,519,081     9,638     0.38 %   2,102,038     10,614     0.50 %   1,759,911     12,057     0.69 %

Customer repurchase agreements and federal funds purchased

    63,490     143     0.23 %   94,566     254     0.27 %   96,141     325     0.34 %

Other short-term borrowings

    7,288     31     0.42 %   30             697     3      

Long-term borrowings

    77,081     3,283     4.20 %   39,300     1,636     4.11 %   46,704     2,029     4.27 %

Total interest bearing liabilities

    2,666,940     13,095     0.49 %   2,235,934     12,504     0.56 %   1,903,453     14,414     0.76 %

Noninterest bearing liabilities:

                                                       

Noninterest bearing demand

    994,007                 811,757                 781,240              

Other liabilities

    12,925                 16,709                 11,067              

Total noninterest bearing liabilities

    1,006,932                 828,466                 792,307              

Shareholders' equity

    456,623                 374,703                 302,234              

Total Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

  $ 4,130,495               $ 3,439,103               $ 2,997,994              

Net interest income

        $ 178,478               $ 144,790               $ 127,529        

Net interest spread

                4.28 %               4.11 %               4.05 %

Net interest margin

                4.44 %               4.30 %               4.32 %

(1)
Loans placed on nonaccrual status are included in average balances. Net loan fees and late charges included in interest income on loans totaled $11.5 million, $7.9 million and $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, 2013, and 2012 respectively.

(2)
Interest and fees on loans and investments exclude tax equivalent adjustments.

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Consolidated Average Balances, Interest Yields And Rates (Unaudited)

 
  Three Months Ended December 31,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
(dollars in thousands)
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Average
Yield/Rate
 

Assets

                                                       

Interest earning assets:

                                                       

Interest bearing deposits with other banks and other short-term investments

  $ 202,182   $ 117     0.23 % $ 204,193   $ 125     0.24 % $ 258,577   $ 177     0.27 %

Loans held for sale

    39,387     381     3.87 %   27,767     282     4.06 %   186,122     1,600     3.44 %

Loans(1)(2)

    3,993,020     53,213     5.29 %   2,867,955     39,040     5.40 %   2,442,418     34,839     5.67 %

Investment securities available for sale(2)

    409,627     2,375     2.30 %   380,689     2,203     2.29 %   310,851     1,545     1.98 %

Federal funds sold

    10,207     5     0.19 %   4,942     2     0.16 %   5,494     3     0.22 %

Total interest earning assets

    4,654,423     56,091     4.78 %   3,485,546     41,652     4.74 %   3,203,462     38,164     4.74 %

Noninterest earning assets

    234,775                 131,249                 80,580              

Less: allowance for credit losses

    44,789                 40,080                 36,544              

Total noninterest earning assets                 

    189,986                 91,169                 44,036              

Total Assets

  $ 4,844,409               $ 3,576,715               $ 3,247,498              

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Interest bearing liabilities:

                                                       

Interest bearing transaction

  $ 132,516   $ 43     0.13 % $ 104,466   $ 71     0.27 % $ 110,688   $ 93     0.33 %

Savings and money market

    2,111,968     1,682     0.32 %   1,621,712     1,471     0.36 %   1,312,792     1,528     0.46 %

Time deposits

    594,850     988     0.66 %   448,838     950     0.84 %   471,591     1,306     1.10 %

Total interest bearing deposits

    2,839,334     2,713     0.38 %   2,175,016     2,492     0.45 %   1,895,071     2,927     0.61 %

Customer repurchase agreements and federal funds purchased

    62,663     36     0.22 %   87,084     57     0.26 %   97,622     75     0.31 %

Other short-term borrowings

    28,916     31     0.42 %   25             603     1      

Long-term borrowings

    145,822     1,495     4.01 %   39,300     389     3.86 %   39,300     424     4.22 %

Total interest bearing liabilities                 

    3,076,735     4,275     0.55 %   2,301,425     2,938     0.51 %   2,032,596     3,427     0.67 %

Noninterest bearing liabilities:

                                                       

Noninterest bearing demand

    1,186,566                 863,933                 853,496              

Other liabilities

    19,641                 20,321                 18,005              

Total noninterest bearing liabilities

    1,206,207                 884,254                 871,501              

Shareholders' equity

    561,467                 391,036                 343,401              

Total Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

  $ 4,844,409               $ 3,576,715               $ 3,247,498              

Net interest income

        $ 51,816               $ 38,714               $ 34,737        

Net interest spread

                4.23 %               4.23 %               4.07 %

Net interest margin

                4.42 %               4.40 %               4.31 %

(1)
Loans placed on nonaccrual status are included in average balances. Net loan fees and late charges included in interest income on loans totaled $3.1 million, $2.3 million and $1.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2014, 2013, and 2012 respectively.

(2)
Interest and fees on loans and investments exclude tax equivalent adjustments.

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Rate/Volume Analysis of Net Interest Income

        The rate/volume table below presents the composition of the change in net interest income for the periods indicated, as allocated between the change in net interest income due to changes in the volume of average earning assets and interest bearing liabilities, and the changes in net interest income due to changes in interest rates. As the table shows, the increase in net interest income in 2014 as compared to 2013 was primarily a function of an increase in the volume of earning assets. For 2013 over 2012, the change was due to an increase in the volume of earning assets, and lower funding costs offsetting the decrease in interest income on earning assets.

 
  2014 compared with 2013   2013 compared with 2012  
(dollars in thousands)
  Change Due
to Volume
  Change Due
to Rate
  Total
Increase
(Decrease)
  Change Due
to Volume
  Change Due
to Rate
  Total
Increase
(Decrease)
 

Interest earned on

                                     

Loans

  $ 39,476   $ (4,699 ) $ 34,777   $ 20,682   $ (4,676 ) $ 16,006  

Loans held for sale

    (1,972 )   169     (1,803 )   (1,764 )   (41 )   (1,805 )

Investment securities

    1,186     308     1,494     361     607     968  

Interest bearing bank deposits

    (179 )   (14 )   (193 )   240     (26 )   214  

Federal funds sold

    4     0     4     (24 )   (8 )   (32 )

Total interest income

    38,515     (4,236 )   34,279     19,495     (4,144 )   15,351  

Interest paid on

                                     

Interest bearing transaction

    46     (166 )   (120 )   27     (18 )   9  

Savings and money market

    1,648     (1,148 )   500     1,675     (1,856 )   (181 )

Time deposits

    (307 )   (1,049 )   (1,356 )   (1 )   (1,270 )   (1,271 )

Customer repurchase agreements

    (83 )   (28 )   (111 )   (5 )   (66 )   (71 )

Other borrowings

    1,573     105     1,678     (325 )   (71 )   (396 )

Total interest expense

    2,877     (2,286 )   591     1,371     (3,281 )   (1,910 )

Net interest income

  $ 35,638   $ (1,950 ) $ 33,688   $ 18,124   $ (863 ) $ 17,261  

Provision for Credit Losses

        The provision for credit losses represents the amount of expense charged to current earnings to fund the allowance for credit losses. The amount of the allowance for credit losses is based on many factors which reflect management's assessment of the risk in the loan portfolio. Those factors include economic conditions and trends, the value and adequacy of collateral, volume and mix of the portfolio, performance of the portfolio, and internal loan processes of the Company and Bank.

        Management has developed a comprehensive analytical process to monitor the adequacy of the allowance for credit losses. This process and guidelines were developed utilizing among other factors, the guidance from federal banking regulatory agencies. The results of this process, in combination with conclusions of the Bank's outside loan review consulting firm, support management's assessment as to the adequacy of the allowance at the balance sheet date. Please refer to the discussion under the caption "Critical Accounting Policies" for an overview of the methodology management employs on a quarterly basis to assess the adequacy of the allowance and the provisions charged to expense. Also, refer to the table under "Allowance for Credit Losses" at page 62, which reflects the comparative charge-offs and recoveries.

        The allowance for credit losses increased $5.2 million as of December 31, 2014 as compared to December 31, 2013, reflecting $10.9 million in provision for credit losses and $5.7 million in net charge-offs

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during 2014. The provision for credit losses was $10.9 million for 2014 as compared to $9.6 million in 2013. The higher provisioning for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013 was due to higher loan growth. Net charge-offs totaled $5.7 million (0.17% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale) for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $6.2 million (0.23% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale) for the year ended December 31, 2013, a dollar decline of 8%. Net charge-offs for the year ended December 31, 2014, were attributable primarily to land development and construction loans ($2.6 million), commercial and industrial loans ($1.7 million), owner occupied-commercial real estate loans ($745 thousand) and real estate mortgage residential, home equity and other consumer ($606 thousand).

        The provision for credit losses was $3.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $2.5 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013. The higher provisioning in the fourth quarter of 2014, as compared to the fourth quarter of 2013, was due primarily to higher net charge-offs. Net charge-offs of $2.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2014 represented 0.26% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale, as compared to $1.3 million or 0.18% of average loans, excluding loans held for sale, in the fourth quarter of 2013. Net charge-offs in the fourth quarter of 2014 were attributable primarily to land development and construction loans ($1.3 million), owner occupied commercial real estate loans ($717 thousand) and commercial and industrial loans ($486 thousand).

        At December 31, 2014 the allowance for credit losses represented 1.07% of loans outstanding, as compared to 1.39% at December 31, 2013. The decline in the ratio of the allowance for credit losses to total loans was due to accounting for the loans acquired from Virginia Heritage at fair value. As a result, the acquired loans will not have any allowance component attributed against them, except to the extent of future deterioration, if any. The credit mark recorded in connection with the merger was 1.59% of loans acquired, or approximately $12.8 million, which represents expected lifetime losses on the acquired loan portfolio. The allowance for credit losses represented 205% of nonperforming loans at December 31, 2014, as compared to 166% at December 31, 2013.

        As part of its comprehensive loan review process, the Bank's Board of Directors and Loan Committee or Credit Review Committee carefully evaluate loans which are past-due 30 days or more. The Committees make a thorough assessment of the conditions and circumstances surrounding each delinquent loan. The Bank's loan policy requires that loans be placed on nonaccrual if they are ninety days past-due, unless they are well secured and in the process of collection. Additionally, Credit Administration specifically analyzes the status of development and construction projects, sales activities and utilization of interest reserves in order to carefully and prudently assess potential increased levels of risk requiring additional reserves.

        The maintenance of a high quality loan portfolio, with an adequate allowance for possible credit losses, will continue to be a primary management objective for the Company.

Noninterest Income

        Total noninterest income includes service charges on deposits, gain on sale of loans, gain on sale of investments, income from BOLI and other income.

        Total noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2014 decreased to $18.3 million from $24.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, a 26% decrease. This decrease was primarily due to a decline of $6.9 million in gains on the sale of residential mortgage loans due to lower origination and sales volume, and a decrease of $791 thousand in income from sales of SBA loans. This decrease was partially offset by a $299 thousand increase from service charges on deposits and a $563 thousand increase from BOLI. There were $22 thousand of investment securities gains recorded for the year of 2014, as compared to $19 thousand of investment securities gains for the year of 2013.

        Total noninterest income for the three months ended December 31, 2014 increased to $5.3 million from $4.3 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013, a 23% increase. This increase was

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primarily due to an increase of $992 thousand in gains on the sale of residential mortgage loans due to higher origination volume and a decrease of $15 thousand in income from sales of SBA loans. There were $12 thousand of investment securities gains recorded for the fourth quarter of 2014, as compared to $4 thousand of investment securities losses for the fourth quarter of 2013.

        For the year ended December 31, 2014, service charges on deposit accounts increased $299 thousand to $4.9 million from $4.6 million, an increase of 7% over 2013. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, service charges on deposit accounts increased $12 thousand to $1.3 million compared to the same period in 2013, an increase of 1%. This increase in service charges for the year and three months ended December 31, 2014 was primarily related to growth in the number of accounts.

        Gain on sale of loans consists of SBA and residential mortgage loans. For the year ended December 31, 2014, gain on sale of loans decreased from $14.6 million to $6.9 million compared to the same period in 2013. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, gain on sale of loans increased from $1.2 million to $2.2 million compared to the same period in 2013.

        The Company originates residential mortgage loans and utilizes both "mandatory delivery" and "best efforts" forward loan sale commitments to sell those loans, servicing released. Sales of these mortgage loans yielded gains of $5.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $12.5 million in the same period in 2013, as refinancing activity declined beginning in the third quarter of 2013 due to increases in interest rates. For the three months ended December 31, 2014 and 2013 gains on the sales of residential mortgages were $2.0 million and $1.0 million, respectively. Loans sold are subject to repurchase in circumstances where documentation is deficient or the underlying loan becomes delinquent or pays off within a specified period following loan funding and sale. The Bank considers these potential recourse provisions to be a minimal risk, but has established a reserve for possible repurchases. The reserve amounted to $101 thousand at December 31, 2014 and is included in other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. There were no repurchases due to fraud by the borrower during the year ended December 31, 2014. The Bank does not originate "sub-prime" loans and has no exposure to this market segment.

        The Company is an originator of SBA loans and its current practice is to sell the guaranteed portion of those loans at a premium. Income from this source was $1.3 million and $186 thousand for the year and three months ended December 31, 2014 compared to $2.1 million and $202 thousand for the same periods in 2013. Activity in SBA loan sales to secondary markets can vary widely from quarter to quarter.

        Other income totaled $5.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $4.8 million for the same period in 2013, an increase of 10%. ATM fees increased from $1.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, to $1.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, an 11% increase. SBA service fees increased from $74 thousand for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $260 thousand for the year ended December 31, 2014, a 254% increase. Noninterest loan fees increased from $2.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $2.8 million for the same period in 2014, a 14% increase. Other noninterest fee income was $1.0 million for 2014 compared to $1.2 million for 2013, a 16% decrease. Other income totaled $1.5 million for both the three months periods ended December 31, 2014 and 2013.

        The increase in the cash surrender value of BOLI to $56.6 million at December 31, 2014, as compared to $39.7 million at December 31, 2013 was due primarily to the acquisition of approximately $15.8 million in BOLI as a result of the Merger.

        Net investment gains amounted to $22 thousand for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to $19 thousand for the year ended December 31, 2013. For the three months ended December 31, 2013 net investment gains amounted to $12 thousand compared to net investment losses of $4 thousand for the same period in 2013.

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Noninterest Expense

        Total noninterest expense consists of salaries and employee benefits, premises and equipment expenses, marketing and advertising, data processing, legal, accounting and professional fees, FDIC insurance premiums and other expenses.

        Total noninterest expenses for the year ended December 31, 2014 were $99.7 million ($95.0 million on an operating basis) compared to $84.6 million for the same period in 2013, an 18% increase (12% on an operating basis). For the three months ended December 31, 2014, total noninterest expenses totaled $29.4 million ($26.1 million on an operating basis), as compared to $21.5 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013, a 36% increase (21% increase on an operating basis).

        Salaries and employee benefits were $57.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to $47.5 million for the same period in 2013, a 21% increase. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, salaries and employee benefits amounted to $15.7 million, as compared to $12.8 million for the same period in 2013, a 23% increase. Cost increases for salaries and benefits for both the year and three month periods were due primarily to increased staff from the Merger, merit increases, employee benefit expense increases and incentive compensation. At December 31, 2014, the Company's staff numbered 427, as compared to 386 at December 31, 2013 and 393 at December 31, 2012.

        Premises and equipment expenses amounted to $13.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $11.9 million for the same period in 2013, a 12% increase. Premises and equipment expenses amounted to $3.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to $3.0 million for the same period in 2013, a 26% increase. For both the year and three month periods, premises and equipment expenses were higher due to costs of additional branches and office space acquired in the Merger and to increases in leasing costs. For the year and three months ended December 31, 2014, the Company recognized $114 thousand and $30 thousand, respectively, of sublease revenue as compared to $57 thousand and $20 thousand for the same period in 2013. The sublease revenue is a direct offset of premises and equipment expenses.

        Marketing and advertising expenses increased from $1.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $2.0 million for 2014, an increase of 19%. Marketing and advertising expenses increased from $519 thousand for the three months ended December 31, 2013 to $578 thousand for the same period in 2014, an 11% increase. The primary reason for the increase in both the year and three month periods in 2014 was more expansive third party marketing support from a new full-service marketing agency. The scope of the services has also expanded to include the redesign of the Bank's website and various social media platforms.

        Data processing expenses increased from $5.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013 to $6.2 million for 2014, an increase of 4%. Data processing expenses increased from $1.4 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013 to $1.6 million for the same period in 2014, a 9% increase. The increase in expense for the year and three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same periods in 2013 was due to increases associated with the Merger and higher network expenses.

        Legal, accounting and professional fees were $3.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, as compared to $3.0 million for 2013, an increase of 16%. Legal, accounting and professional fees were $743 thousand for the three months ended December 31, 2013, as compared to $926 thousand for the comparable period in 2014, a 25% increase. The increase for the year and three months ended December 31, 2014 as compared to the same periods in 2013 was primarily due to increases in professional and consulting fees and collection costs related to problem loans.

        FDIC insurance premiums increased $70 thousand to $2.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of 3% compared to 2013 due to average asset growth. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, FDIC insurance premiums amounted to $653 thousand as compared to $483 thousand for the same period in 2013, a 35% increase due to average asset growth.

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        Other expenses decreased to $10.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2014 from $12.4 million for the same period in 2013, a decrease of 15%. For the three months ended December 31, 2014, other expenses amounted to $2.9 million as compared to $2.6 million for the same period in 2013, an increase of 13%. The major components of cost in this category include insurance expenses, deposit fees, director fees, OREO expenses and Virginia franchise taxes. The increase for the year ended December 31, 2014 compared to the same period in 2013 was primarily due to an decrease of $1.9 million of other losses and a decrease of $1.4 million in expenses for the operations of OREO properties partially offset by an increase of $401 thousand in director fees and an increase of $368 thousand in Virginia franchise tax. The increase for the three month period ended December 31, 2014 compared to the same period in 2013 was primarily due to $335 thousand of expenses for Virginia franchise taxes and $216 thousand of other losses offset by a $559 thousand decrease in expenses for the operations of OREO properties.

        As a percentage of average assets, total noninterest expense was 2.41% (2.30% on an operating basis) for the year of 2014 as compared to 2.46% for the same period in 2013. For the year of 2014, the efficiency ratio remained favorable at 50.67% (48.28% on an operating basis) as compared to 49.90% for the same period in 2013. Cost control remains a significant operating objective of the Company.

Income Tax Expense

        The Company recorded income tax expense of $32.0 million in 2014 compared to $28.3 million in 2013, resulting in an effective tax rate of 37.1% and 37.6%, respectively. The lower effective tax rate for 2014 reflects a higher level of tax exempt income.


BALANCE SHEET ANALYSIS


Overview

        At December 31, 2014, total assets were $5.25 billion, compared to $3.77 billion at December 31, 2013, a 39% increase. Total loans (excluding loans held for sale) were $4.31 billion at December 31, 2014 compared to $2.95 billion at December 31, 2013, a 46% increase. Total deposits were $4.31 billion at December 31, 2014, compared to deposits of $3.23 billion at December 31, 2013, a 34% increase. Such increases were primarily due to the Merger, complemented by organic growth. Loans held for sale amounted to $44.3 million at December 31, 2014 as compared to $42.0 million at December 31, 2013, a 5% increase.

        The investment portfolio totaled $382.3 million at December 31, 2014, a 1% increase from the $378.1 million balance at December 31, 2013. Total borrowed funds (excluding customer repurchase agreements) were $219.3 million at December 31, 2014 as compared to $39.3 million at December 31, 2013, a 458% increase. Included in the increase in borrowed funds at December 31, 2014 is the issuance of $70 million of ten-year non-callable 5.75% subordinated debt issued in August 2014. The subordinated debt qualifies as Tier 2 capital for regulatory purposes at the Company.

        Total shareholders' equity increased to $620.8 million at December 31, 2014, compared to $393.9 million and $442.6 million at December 31, 2013 and September 30, 2014, respectively, primarily due to growth from earnings and the issuance of 4,010,261 shares of common stock in the Merger. The ratio of common equity to total assets was 10.46% at December 31, 2014 as compared to 8.94% at December 31, 2013. The Company's capital position remains substantially in excess of regulatory requirements for well capitalized status, with a total risk based capital ratio of 12.97% at December 31, 2014, as compared to a total risk based capital ratio of 13.01% at December 31, 2013. In addition, the tangible common equity ratio (tangible common equity to tangible assets) was 8.54% at December 31, 2014, compared to 8.86% at December 31, 2013.

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Investment Securities Available-for-Sale and Short-Term Investments

        The tables below and Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements provide additional information regarding the Company's investment securities categorized as "available-for-sale" ("AFS"). The Company classifies all its investment securities as AFS. This classification requires that investment securities be recorded at their fair value with any difference between the fair value and amortized cost (the purchase price adjusted by any discount accretion or premium amortization) reported as a component of shareholders' equity (accumulated other comprehensive income), net of deferred income taxes. At December 31, 2014, the Company had a net unrealized gain in AFS securities of $4.4 million with a deferred income tax liability of $1.8 million, as compared to a net unrealized loss in AFS securities of $5.5 million at December 31, 2013, with a deferred tax asset of $2.2 million, respectively.

        The AFS portfolio is comprised of U.S. Government agency securities (8% of AFS securities) with an average duration of 3.2 years, seasoned mortgage backed securities that are 100% agency issued (63% of AFS securities) which have an average expected life of 3.6 years with contractual maturities of the underlying mortgages of up to thirty years, municipal bonds (29% of AFS securities) which have an average duration of 5.2 years, and equity investments which comprise less than 1% of AFS securities. The equity investment consists of common stock of three community banking companies which have an estimated fair value of $417 thousand. Ninety nine percent of the investment securities which are debt instruments are rated AAA or AA or have the implicit guarantee of the U.S. Treasury.

        At December 31, 2014, the investment portfolio amounted to $382.3 million as compared to $378.1 million at December 31, 2013, an increase of 1%. The investment portfolio is managed to achieve goals related to liquidity, income, interest rate risk management and to provide collateral for customer repurchase agreements and other borrowing relationships.

        The following table provides information regarding the composition of the Company's investment securities portfolio at the dates indicated. As earlier noted, amounts are reported at estimated fair value. The change in composition of the portfolio at December 31, 2014 as compared to 2013 was due principally to ALCO decisions to increase the mix of municipal bonds and to increase holdings of structured residential mortgage backed securities issued by U.S. Government agencies or government sponsored enterprises to well position the Company in the current interest rate environment. The decrease in holdings of U.S. Government agency securities was the result of decisions to sell certain securities in order to realize gains that would otherwise mature at par in the next few years. During the year ended December 31, 2014, the investment portfolio balances increased as compared to balances at December 31, 2013, as cash flow from declines in loans held for sale was deployed into a combination of higher yielding loans, and higher average yielding investments. Cash flows from mortgage backed securities and sales of U.S. Government agency securities were reinvested primarily into a combination of structured mortgage backed securities and additional investments have been made in high quality municipal bonds.

 
  Years Ended December 31,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
(dollars in thousands)
  Balance   Percent
of Total
  Balance   Percent
of Total
  Balance   Percent
of Total
 

U. S. Government agency securities

  $ 29,894     7.8 % $ 47,335     12.5 % $ 49,082     16.4 %

Residential mortgage backed securities

    240,320     62.9 %   228,674     60.5 %   173,083     57.7 %

Municipal bonds

    111,712     29.2 %   101,740     26.9 %   77,313     25.8 %

Other equity investments

    417     0.1 %   384     0.1 %   342     0.1 %

  $ 382,343     100 % $ 378,133     100 % $ 299,820     100 %

        The increase in the investment portfolio in 2013 over 2012 was due in large part to the cash flow from declines in loans held for sale being deployed into a combination of higher yielding loans and higher average investments.

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        The following table provides information, on an amortized cost basis, regarding the contractual maturity and weighted-average yield of the investment portfolio at December 31, 2014. Expected maturities will differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties. Yields on tax exempt securities have not been calculated on a tax equivalent basis.

        At December 31, 2014, there were no issuers, other than the U.S. Government and its agencies, whose securities owned by the Company had a book or fair value exceeding 10% of the Company's shareholders' equity.

 
  One Year or Less   After One Year
Through Five Years
  After Five Years
Through Ten Years
  After Ten Years   Total  
(dollars in thousands)
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
 

U. S. Government agency securities

  $ 2,998     2.18 % $ 19,947     1.72 % $ 6,489     2.36 % $       $ 29,434     1.91 %

Residential mortgage backed securities

    8,072     2.24 %   197,466     1.95 %   32,547     2.12 %   3,035     3.28 %   241,120     2.00 %

Muncipal bonds

    2,410     4.25 %   47,038     3.14 %   54,983     2.83 %   2,552     4.01 %   106,983     3.03 %

Other equity investments

                                    396      

  $ 13,480     2.59 % $ 264,451     2.14 % $ 94,019     2.55 % $ 5,587     3.61 % $ 377,933     2.28 %

        The Company also has a portfolio of short-term investments utilized for asset liability management needs which consist from time-to-time of discount notes, commercial paper, money market investments, and other bank certificates of deposit. This portfolio amounted to $10.3 million at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

        Federal funds sold amounted to $3.5 million at December 31, 2014 as compared to $5.7 million at December 31, 2013. These funds represent excess daily liquidity which is invested on an unsecured basis with well capitalized banks, in amounts generally limited both in the aggregate and to any one bank.

        Interest bearing deposits with banks and other short-term investments amounted to $243.4 million at December 31, 2014 as compared to $291.7 million at December 31, 2013. These overnight funds represent daily liquidity held at the Federal Reserve to meet future loan demand, to fund future increases in investment securities and to meet other general liquidity needs of the Company.

Loan Portfolio

        In its lending activities, the Company seeks to develop substantial relationships with clients whose businesses and individual banking needs will grow with the Bank. There has been a significant effort to grow the loan portfolio and to be responsive to the lending needs in the markets served by the Bank, while maintaining sound asset quality.

        Loan growth over the past year has been favorable, with loans outstanding reaching $4.31 billion at December 31, 2014, an increase of $1.37 billion or 46% as compared to $2.95 billion at December 31, 2013, and increased $1.82 billion or 73% as compared to $2.49 billion at December 31, 2012. The acquisition of Virginia Heritage contributed approximately $800 million in loans in 2014, while the remaining increase of approximately $569 million (19%) was due to organic growth.

        The loan growth in 2014 was predominantly in the commercial and investment commercial real estate segments, along with significant percentage increases in the construction—C&I owner occupied and other consumer. Despite an increased level of in-market competition for business, the Bank continued to experience strong organic loan growth across the portfolio, with the largest dollar increase in the income producing property segment. Additionally, the portfolio increased approximately $800 million in the fourth quarter as a result of completion of the Merger. Multi-family commercial real estate leasing in the Bank's

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market area has held up well, particularly for well located close in projects, while suburban office leasing softened somewhat. Overall, commercial real estate values have generally held up well with upward price pressure in prime pockets. Construction lending picked up in 2014 on both the commercial and residential fronts. The housing market has remained stable to increasing, with well located, Metro accessible properties at a premium.

        Owner occupied commercial real estate and owner occupied commercial real estate construction represent 12% of the loan portfolio. The Bank has a large portion of its loan portfolio related to real estate, with 70% consisting of commercial real estate and real estate construction loans. When owner occupied commercial real estate is excluded, the percentage of total loans represented by commercial real estate decreases to 58%. Real estate also serves as collateral for loans made for other purposes, resulting in 76% of loans being secured by real estate.

        The following table shows the trends in the composition of the loan portfolio over the past five years.

 
  Years Ended December 31,  
 
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  
(dollars in thousands)
  Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   %  

Commercial

  $ 916,226     21 % $ 694,350     24 % $ 545,070     22 % $ 478,886     23 % $ 411,744     26 %

Investment—commercial real estate

    1,703,172     40 %   1,119,800     38 %   914,638     37 %   756,645     37 %   619,714     37 %

Owner occupied—commercial real estate

    461,581     11 %   317,491     11 %   297,857     12 %   250,174     12 %   223,986     13 %

Real estate mortgage—residential

    148,018     3 %   90,418     3 %   61,871     3 %   39,552     2 %   15,977     1 %

Construction—commercial and residential

    793,432     18 %   574,167     19 %   533,722     21 %   395,267     19 %   298,272     18 %

Construction—C&I (owner occupied)

    58,032     1 %   34,659     1 %   28,808     1 %   34,402     2 %   9,809      

Home equity

    122,536     3 %   110,242     4 %   106,844     4 %   97,103     5 %   89,885     5 %

Other consumer

    109,402     3 %   4,031         4,285         4,227         6,113      

Total loans

    4,312,399     100 %   2,945,158     100 %   2,493,095     100 %   2,056,256     100 %   1,675,500     100 %

Less: Allowance for credit losses

    (46,075 )         (40,921 )         (37,492 )         (29,653 )         (24,754 )      

Net loans

  $ 4,266,324         $