10-K 1 epr-12312013x10k.htm 10-K EPR-12.31.2013-10K

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013
or
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission file number: 001-13561
 
EPR PROPERTIES
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Maryland
 
43-1790877
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
909 Walnut Street, Suite 200
Kansas City, Missouri
 
64106
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (816) 472-1700
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common shares of beneficial interest, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
5.75% Series C cumulative convertible redeemable preferred shares of beneficial interest, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
9.00% Series E cumulative convertible preferred shares of beneficial interest, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
6.625% Series F cumulative redeemable preferred shares of beneficial interest, par value $.01 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None.
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.     Yes  ý     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.     Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
 
ý
  
Accelerated filer
 
¨
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).     Yes  ¨    No  ý
The aggregate market value of the common shares of beneficial interest (“common shares”) of the registrant held by non-affiliates, based on the closing price on the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, as reported on the New York Stock Exchange, was $2,660,651,550.



At February 27, 2014, there were 52,927,224 common shares outstanding.
 
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed with the Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.



CAUTIONARY STATEMENT CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
With the exception of historical information, certain statements contained or incorporated by reference herein may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), such as those pertaining to our acquisition or disposition of properties, our capital resources, future expenditures for development projects, and our results of operations and financial condition. Forward-looking statements involve numerous risks and uncertainties and you should not rely on them as predictions of actual events. There is no assurance the events or circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will occur. You can identify forward-looking statements by use of words such as “will be,” “intend,” “continue,” “believe,” “may,” “expect,” “hope,” “anticipate,” “goal,” “forecast,” “pipeline,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “offers,” “plans” “would,” or other similar expressions or other comparable terms or discussions of strategy, plans or intentions in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In addition, references to our budgeted amounts and guidance are forward-looking statements.
Factors that could materially and adversely affect us include, but are not limited to, the factors listed below:
General international, national, regional and local business and economic conditions;
Volatility in the financial markets;
Adverse changes in our credit ratings;
The downgrade of the U.S. Government's credit rating and any future downgrade of the U.S. Government's credit rating;
Fluctuations in interest rates;
The duration or outcome of litigation, or other factors outside of litigation such as casino licensing, relating to our significant investment in a planned casino and resort development which may cause the development to be indefinitely delayed or cancelled;
Defaults in the performance of lease terms by our tenants;
Defaults by our customers and counterparties on their obligations owed to us;
A borrower's bankruptcy or default;
The obsolescence of older multiplex theatres owned by some of our tenants or by any overbuilding of megaplex theatres in their markets;
Our ability to renew maturing leases with theatre tenants on terms comparable to prior leases and/or our ability to lease any re-claimed space from some of our larger theatres at economically favorable terms;
Risks of operating in the entertainment industry;
Our ability to compete effectively;
A single tenant represents a substantial portion of our lease revenues;
A single tenant leases or is the mortgagor of a substantial portion of our investments related to metropolitan ski areas and a single tenant leases a significant number of our public charter school properties;
The ability of our public charter school tenants to comply with their charters and continue to receive funding from local, state and federal governments, the approval by applicable governing authorities of substitute operators to assume control of any failed public charter schools and our ability to negotiate the terms of new leases with such substitute tenants on acceptable terms, and our ability to complete collateral substitutions as applicable;
Risks associated with use of leverage to acquire properties;
Financing arrangements that require lump-sum payments;
Our ability to raise capital;
Covenants in our debt instruments that limit our ability to take certain actions;
The concentration and lack of diversification of our investment portfolio;
Our continued qualification as a real estate investment trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes;
The ability of our subsidiaries to satisfy their obligations;
Financing arrangements that expose us to funding or purchase risks;
Risks associated with security breaches and other disruptions;
We have a limited number of employees and the loss of personnel could harm operations;
Fluctuations in the value of real estate income and investments;

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Risks relating to real estate ownership, leasing and development, including local conditions such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for real estate in the area, competition from other available space, whether tenants and users such as customers of our tenants consider a property attractive, changes in real estate taxes and other expenses, changes in market rental rates, the timing and costs associated with property improvements and rentals, changes in taxation or zoning laws or other governmental regulation, whether we are able to pass some or all of any increased operating costs through to tenants, and how well we manage our properties;
Our ability to secure adequate insurance and risk of potential uninsured losses, including from natural disasters;
Risks involved in joint ventures;
Risks in leasing multi-tenant properties;
A failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act or other laws;
Risks of environmental liability;
Our real estate investments are relatively illiquid;
Risks with owning assets in foreign countries;
Risks associated with owning, operating or financing properties for which the tenants', mortgagors' or our operations may be impacted by weather conditions and climate change;
Risks associated with the development, redevelopment and expansion of properties and the acquisition of other real estate related companies.
Our ability to pay dividends in cash or at current rates;
Fluctuations in the market prices for our shares;
Certain limits on changes in control imposed under law and by our Declaration of Trust and Bylaws;
Policy changes obtained without the approval of our shareholders;
Equity issuances could dilute the value of our shares;
Future offerings of debt or equity securities, which may rank senior to our common shares;
Risks associated with changes in the Canadian exchange rate; and
Changes in laws and regulations, including tax laws and regulations.

Our forward-looking statements represent our intentions, plans, expectations and beliefs and are subject to numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties. Many of the factors that will determine these items are beyond our ability to control or predict. For further discussion of these factors see Item 1A - "Risk Factors" in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

For these statements, we claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or the date of any document incorporated by reference herein. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. We do not undertake any obligation to release publicly any revisions to our forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
Item 1B.
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
Item 7.
 
 
Item 7A.
 
 
Item 8.
 
 
Item 9.
 
 
Item 9A.
 
 
Item 9B.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
 
Item 11.
 
 
Item 12.
 
 
Item 13.
 
 
Item 14.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 

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PART I

Item 1. Business

General

EPR Properties (“we,” “us,” “our,” “EPR” or the “Company”) was formed on August 22, 1997 as a Maryland real estate investment trust (“REIT”), and an initial public offering of our common shares of beneficial interest (“common shares”) was completed on November 18, 1997. Since that time, the Company has grown into a leading specialty REIT with an investment portfolio that includes primarily entertainment, education and recreation properties. The underwriting of our investments is centered on key industry and property cash flow criteria. As further explained under “Growth Strategies” below, our investments are also guided by a focus on inflection opportunities that are associated with or support enduring uses, excellent executions, attractive economics and an advantageous market position.

We are a self-administered REIT. As of December 31, 2013, our total assets exceeded $3.2 billion (before accumulated depreciation of approximately $0.4 billion). Our investments are generally structured as long-term triple-net leases that require the tenants to pay substantially all expenses associated with the operation and maintenance of the property, or as long-term mortgages with economics similar to our triple-net lease structure.

Our total investments were approximately $3.6 billion at December 31, 2013. Total investments is defined herein as the sum of the carrying values of rental properties (before accumulated depreciation), land held for development, property under development, mortgage notes receivable (including related accrued interest receivable), net, investment in a direct financing lease, net, investment in joint ventures, intangible assets (before accumulated amortization) and notes receivable and related accrued interest receivable, net. Below is a reconciliation of the carrying value of total investments to the constituent items in the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2013 (in thousands):

        
Rental properties, net of accumulated depreciation
$
2,104,151

Add back accumulated depreciation on rental properties
409,643

Land held for development
201,342

Property under development
89,473

Mortgage notes and related accrued interest receivable, net
486,337

Investment in a direct financing lease, net
242,212

Investment in joint ventures
5,275

Intangible assets, gross(1)
18,444

Notes receivable and related accrued interest receivable, net(1)
4,992

Total investments
$
3,561,869

        
(1) Included in other assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet. Other assets includes the following:
Intangible assets, gross
$
18,444

Less: accumulated amortization on intangible assets
(11,633
)
Notes receivable and related accrued interest receivable, net
4,992

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
48,129

Total other assets
$
59,932

    
Management believes that total investments is a useful measure for management and investors as it illustrates across which asset categories the Company’s funds have been invested. Total investments is a non-GAAP financial measure and is not a substitute for total assets under GAAP. It is most directly comparable to the GAAP measure, “Total assets”. Furthermore, total investments may not be comparable to similarly titled financial measures reported by other companies due to differences in the way the Company calculates this measure. Below is a reconciliation of total investments to “Total assets” in the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2013 (in thousands):

1


Total investments
$
3,561,869

Cash and cash equivalents
7,958

Restricted cash
9,714

Deferred financing costs, net
23,344

Account receivable, net
42,538

Less: accumulated depreciation on rental properties
(409,643
)
Less: accumulated amortization on intangible assets
(11,633
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
48,129

Total assets
$
3,272,276

For financial reporting purposes, we group our investments into four reportable operating segments: Entertainment, Education, Recreation and Other. Our total investments of approximately $3.6 billion at December 31, 2013 consisted of interests in the following:

$2.3 billion or 64% related to entertainment properties which includes megaplex theatres, entertainment retail centers (centers typically anchored by an entertainment component such as a megaplex theatre or live performance venue and containing other entertainment-related or retail properties), family entertainment centers and other retail parcels;

$537.9 million or 15% related to education properties which consists of investments in public charter schools, early education centers and K-12 private schools;

$549.7 million or 15% related to recreation properties which includes metro ski parks, water-parks and golf entertainment complexes; and

$212.0 million or 6% related to other properties, consisting primarily of $196.9 million related to the land held for development in Sullivan County, New York.

As further described in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, during the year ended December 31, 2013, $42.3 million, or approximately 12% of our total revenue was derived from our four entertainment retail centers in Ontario, Canada. The Company’s wholly owned subsidiaries that hold the Canadian entertainment retail centers represent approximately $227.2 million or 13% of the Company’s equity as of December 31, 2013.

We believe destination entertainment, education and recreation are highly enduring sectors of the real estate industry and that, as a result of our focus on properties in these sectors, industry knowledge and the industry relationships of our management, we have a competitive advantage in providing capital to operators of these types of properties. We believe this focused niche approach offers the potential for higher growth and better yields.

We believe our management’s knowledge and industry relationships have facilitated favorable opportunities for us to acquire, finance and lease properties. Historically, our primary challenges have been locating suitable properties, negotiating favorable lease or financing terms, and managing our real estate portfolio as we have continued to grow. We are particularly focused on property categories which allow us to use our experience to mitigate some of the risks inherent in the current economic environment. We cannot provide any assurance that any such potential investment or acquisition opportunities will arise in the near future, or that we will actively pursue any such opportunities.

Although we are primarily a long-term investor, we may also sell assets if we believe that it is in the best interest of our shareholders.


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Entertainment

As of December 31, 2013, our Entertainment segment consisted of investments in megaplex theatres, entertainment retail centers, family entertainment centers and other retail parcels totaling approximately $2.3 billion with interests in:
121 megaplex theatre properties located in 33 states and Ontario, Canada;
eight entertainment retail centers located in Westminster, Colorado; New Rochelle, New York; Burbank, California; Suffolk, Virginia; and Ontario, Canada;
five family entertainment centers located in Illinois, Indiana, Florida and Texas;
land parcels leased to restaurant and retail operators adjacent to several of our theatre properties;
$58.2 million in mortgage notes receivable (including accrued interest) secured by two completed entertainment properties in Illinois and North Carolina;
$23.7 million in construction in progress for real estate development for six megaplex theatres and two other retail development projects; and
$4.5 million in undeveloped land inventory.

As of December 31, 2013, our owned real estate portfolio of megaplex theatre properties consisted of approximately 9.3 million square feet and was 100% leased and our remaining owned entertainment real estate portfolio consisted of 1.8 million square feet and was 92% leased. The combined owned entertainment real estate portfolio consisted of 11.1 million square feet and was 99% leased. Our owned theatre properties are leased to 16 different leading theatre operators. For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 25% of our total revenue was derived from rental payments by American Multi-Cinema, Inc. ("AMC").

A significant portion of our assets consist of megaplex theatres. Megaplex theatres typically are multi-screen with stadium-style seating (seating with elevation between rows to provide unobstructed viewing) and are equipped with amenities that significantly enhance the audio and visual experience of the patron. We believe the development of new generation megaplex theatres, including the introduction of new digital cinema and 3-D technology, has accelerated the obsolescence of many of the previous generation of multiplex theatres by setting new standards for moviegoers, who, in our experience, have demonstrated their preference for the more attractive surroundings, wider variety of films, enhanced quality of visual presentation and superior customer service typical of megaplex theatres.

We expect the development of megaplex theatres to continue in the United States and abroad over the long-term. With the development of the stadium style megaplex theatre as the preeminent format for cinema exhibition, the older generation of smaller sloped theatres has generally experienced a significant downturn in attendance and performance. As a result of the significant capital commitment involved in building megaplex theatres and the experience and industry relationships of our management, we believe we will continue to have opportunities to provide capital to exhibition businesses for development of new megaplex theatres.

The success of several of our larger 24 and 30 screen properties has resulted in other exhibitors building properties that have reduced the 20 to 25 mile customer drawing range that these properties previously enjoyed. As a result of this and other competitive pressures, in some cases we have, at the expiration of the primary term of a lease, reduced the rental rate per square foot and/or reduced the number of screens at a property to better reflect the existing market demands. Such screen reductions may occur in the future as well but these reductions do create an opportunity to reclaim a portion of the former theatre for conversion to another use, while retaining the majority of the building for the newly re-configured theatre. In addition to positioning expiring theatre assets for continued success, the redevelopment of these assets creates an opportunity to diversify the Company's tenant base.

The theatre box office continues to reflect solid performance. Box office revenues reached a record high during 2013, according to Box Office Analyst. Many theatre operators are expanding their food and beverage offerings, including the introduction of in-theatre dining options and alcohol availability. In addition, as exhibitors further increase their focus on enhancing the customer experience, new seating formats continue to be introduced. Select exhibitors are introducing more spacious and comfortable seating options, including fully reclining seats. The introduction of these

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seating options has required theatre operators to make physical changes to the existing seating arrangements that can result in a significant loss of existing seats. Despite the seat loss, early customer response to this format indicates that increased ticket sales are overcoming the loss of seats, creating a net positive for the theatre operator.

We believe the introduction of enhanced food and beverage offerings as well as premium seating, along with the technological improvements of digital projection, large-format and 3-D presentation, should continue to drive future growth and create opportunities to deploy capital both in the U.S. and abroad.

We also continue to seek opportunities for the development of additional restaurant, retail and other entertainment venues around our existing portfolio. The opportunity to capitalize on the traffic generation of our market-dominant theatres to create entertainment retail centers (“ERCs”) not only strengthens the execution of the megaplex theatre but adds diversity to our tenant and asset base. We have and will continue to evaluate our existing portfolio for additional development of retail and entertainment density, and we will also continue to evaluate the purchase or financing of existing ERCs that have demonstrated strong financial performance and meet our quality standards. The leasing and property management requirements of our ERCs are generally met through the use of third-party professional service providers.

Our family entertainment center operators offer a variety of entertainment options including live performance, bowling and bocce ball as well as an observation deck on the 94th floor of the John Hancock building in downtown Chicago, Illinois. We will continue to evaluate the development, purchase or financing of family entertainment centers.

Education

As of December 31, 2013, our Education segment consisted of investments in public charter schools, early education centers and K-12 private schools totaling approximately $537.9 million with interests in:
21 public charter school properties located in 10 states;
$242.2 million in investments in a direct financing lease, net of initial direct costs of $1.7 million, relating to 27 public charter school properties leased under a master lease to Imagine Schools, Inc. ("Imagine"). We own the fee interest in these properties; however, due to the terms of this lease it is accounted for as a direct financing lease;
$56.5 million in mortgage financing secured by seven public charter school properties;
one early education center located in Arizona; and
$40.8 million in construction in progress for real estate development of four public charter schools, five early education centers and two K-12 private schools.

As of December 31, 2013, our owned education real estate portfolio consisted of approximately 2.9 million square feet and was 100% leased. We have 26 different operators for our owned public charter schools. For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 8% of our total revenue was derived from rental payments by Imagine.

Public charter schools are tuition-free, independent schools that are publicly funded by local, state and federal tax dollars based on enrollment. Driven by the need to improve the quality of public education and provide more school choice in the U.S., public charter schools are one of the fastest growing segments of the multi-billion dollar educational facilities sector, and we believe a critical need exists for the financing of new and refurbished educational facilities. To meet this need, we have established relationships with public charter school operators and developers across the country and expect to continue to develop our leadership position in providing real estate financing in this area. Public charter schools are operated pursuant to charters granted by various state or other regulatory authorities and are dependent upon funding from local, state and federal tax dollars. Like public schools, public charter schools are required to meet both state and federal academic standards.

Due to revenue shortfalls and other factors, various government bodies that provide educational funding have pressure to reduce their spending budgets and, as a result, have reduced educational funding in some cases and may continue to reduce educational funding in the future. This can impact our tenants' operations and potentially their ability to pay

4


our scheduled rent. However, these reductions differ state by state and have historically been more significant at the post-secondary education level than at the K-12 level that our tenants serve. Furthermore, while there can be no assurance as to the level of these cuts, we analyze each state's fiscal situation and commitment to the charter school movement before providing financing in a new state, and also factor in anticipated reductions (as applicable) in the states in which we do decide to do business.

As with public charter schools, the Company's expansion into both early childhood education centers and private schools is supported by strong unmet demand, and we expect to increase our investment in both of these areas.

We believe early childhood education centers continue to see demand due to the proliferation of dual income families and the increasing emphasis on early childhood education, beyond traditional daycare. Within this property type, larger centers with more amenities are emerging and enjoying enhanced economies of scale.

Within private schools, we believe K-12 private education has significant growth potential for schools that have differentiated, high quality offerings. Many private schools in large urban and suburban areas have constrained access with large waiting lists.

Recreation

As of December 31, 2013, our Recreation segment consisted of investments in metro ski parks, water-parks and golf entertainment complexes totaling approximately $549.7 million with interests in:
$366.6 million in mortgage financing secured by recreation properties including a water-park anchored entertainment village in Kansas as well as two other water-parks in Texas, and 11 metro ski parks, one golf entertainment complex located in Texas and development land located in New Hampshire, Vermont, Missouri, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania;
three metro ski parks in Ohio, Maryland and Pennsylvania;
four golf entertainment complexes in Texas; and
$25.0 million in construction in progress for real estate development.

As of December 31, 2013, our owned recreation real estate portfolio was 100% leased.

Our metro ski parks are leased to or we have mortgages receivable from three different operators, the largest operator of which is Peak Resorts, Inc. ("Peak"). For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 5% of our total revenue related to Peak. During 2013, we acquired the Camelback Mountain Ski Resort ("Camelback") which consists of 160 acres of skiable terrain and includes an outdoor waterpark, an outdoor adventure park, a 40 lane tubing facility and a base lodge. In addition, we have agreed to finance an additional $110.7 million to construct a water-park hotel on the property.

Our daily attendance ski park model provides a sustainable advantage for the value conscious consumer, providing outdoor entertainment during the winter. All of the ski parks that serve as collateral for our mortgage notes in this area, as well as our three owned properties, offer snowmaking capabilities and provide a variety of terrains and vertical drop options. We believe that the primary appeal of our ski parks lies in the convenient, low cost and reliable experience consumers can expect. Given that all of our ski parks are located near major metropolitan areas, they offer skiing and snowboarding without the expense, travel, or lengthy preparations of remote ski resorts. Furthermore, advanced snowmaking capabilities increase the reliability of the experience versus other ski areas that do not have such capabilities. We expect to continue to pursue opportunities in this area.

The three water-parks in Kansas and Texas offer innovative attractions that attract a diverse segment of customers. All of these water-parks serve as collateral for our mortgage notes and are operated by Schlitterbahn Waterparks and Resorts, an industry leader. Four of our golf entertainment complexes are leased to, and one is under mortgage, with TopGolf, which combines golf with entertainment, competition and food and beverage service. By combining an interactive entertainment and food and beverage experience with a long-lived recreational activity, we believe TopGolf provides

5


an innovative, enjoyable and repeatable customer experience. We expect to continue to pursue opportunities with TopGolf.

Other

As of December 31, 2013, our Other segment consisted of investments in land held for development and vineyards and wineries (before accumulated depreciation) totaling approximately $212.0 million with interests in:
$196.8 million related to the land held for development in Sullivan County, New York;
one winery located in Washington and one vineyard located in California; and
$5.0 million in mortgage financing related to two sold winery properties.

We continue to progress with the development of our planned casino and resort property in Sullivan County, New York. In early 2013, we received approval from the Town of Thompson Board on a comprehensive development plan allowing us to move forward with the submission of individual site plan applications, thus initiating the commencement of the build-out of the site. As submitted, the comprehensive development plan provides for the creation of a four-season destination resort.  The initial phase of the development and construction includes a casino resort comprising an approximate 117-acre development area. 

On November 5, 2013, New York State voters approved Proposition One, a constitutional amendment authorizing a limited number of full scale casino gaming licenses at certain locations to be determined by a commission jointly appointed by the governor and the legislature. The proposed ground lease tenant for a portion of our Sullivan County, New York property, Empire Resorts, has stated that it intends to apply for and actively pursue a license from the New York Gaming Commission to operate a full-scale casino on the proposed gaming parcel. In conjunction with their application, Empire Resorts has stated its intent to secure financing for all improvements to be located on the proposed gaming parcel.

We are in the process of liquidating our remaining vineyard and winery properties. During 2013, we completed the sale of five such investments for $49.8 million and recognized a net gain of $4.3 million. At December 31, 2013, we had approximately $7.6 million of net book value remaining in vineyard and winery assets and we expect to pursue sales of these assets in 2014.

Business Objectives and Strategies

Our long-term primary business objective is to enhance shareholder value by achieving predictable and increasing Funds From Operations (“FFO”) and dividends per share (See Item 7 – “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Funds From Operations” for a discussion of FFO, which is a non-GAAP measure). Our prevailing strategy is to focus on long-term investments in a limited number of categories in which we maintain a depth of knowledge and relationships, and which we believe offer sustained performance throughout all economic cycles. We intend to achieve this objective by continuing to execute the Growth Strategies, Operating Strategies and Capitalization Strategies described below.

Growth Strategies

As a part of our growth strategy, we will consider acquiring or developing additional entertainment, education, recreation or other specialty properties. We may also pursue opportunities to provide mortgage financing for these same property types in certain situations where this structure is more advantageous than owning the underlying real estate.

Our investing strategy centers on five guiding principles which we call our Five Star Investment Strategy:

Inflection Opportunity
We look for a new generation of facilities emerging as a result of age, technology, or change in the lifestyle of consumers which create development, renewal or restructuring opportunities requiring significant capital.


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Enduring Value
We look for real estate that supports activities that are commercially successful and have a reasonable basis for continued and sustainable customer demand in the future. Further, we seek circumstances where the magnitude of change in the new generation of facilities adds substantially to the customer experience.

Excellent Execution
We seek attractive locations and best-of-class executions that create market-dominant properties, which we believe create a competitive advantage and enhance sustainable customer demand within the category despite a potential change in tenant. We minimize the potential for turnover by seeking tenants with a reliable track record of customer service and satisfaction.

Attractive Economics
We seek investments that provide accretive returns initially and increasing returns over time with rent escalators and percentage rent features that allow participation in the financial performance of the property. Further, we are interested in investments that provide a depth of opportunity to invest sufficient capital to be meaningful to our total financial results and also provide diversity by market, geography or tenant operator.

Advantageous Position
In combination with the preceding principles, when investing we look for a competitive advantage such as unique knowledge of the category, access to industry information, a preferred tenant relationship or other relationships that provide access to sites and development projects.

Operating Strategies

Lease Risk Minimization
To avoid initial lease-up risks and produce a predictable income stream, we typically acquire or develop single-tenant properties that are leased under long-term leases. We believe our willingness to make long-term investments in properties offers our tenants financial flexibility and allows tenants to allocate capital to their core businesses. Although we will continue to emphasize single-tenant properties, we have acquired or developed, and may continue to acquire or develop, multi-tenant properties we believe add shareholder value.

Lease Structure
We have structured our leasing arrangements to achieve a positive spread between our cost of capital and the rentals paid by our tenants. We typically structure leases on a triple-net basis under which the tenants bear the principal portion of the financial and operational responsibility for the properties. During each lease term and any renewal periods, the leases typically provide for periodic increases in rent and/or percentage rent based upon a percentage of the tenant’s gross sales over a pre-determined level. In our multi-tenant property leases and some of our theatre leases, we generally require the tenant to pay a common area maintenance (“CAM”) charge to defray its pro rata share of insurance, taxes and maintenance costs.

Mortgage Structure
We have structured our mortgages to achieve economics similar to our triple-net lease structure with a positive spread between our cost of capital and the interest paid by our tenants. During each mortgage term and any renewal periods, the notes typically provide for periodic increases in interest and/or participating features based upon a percentage of the tenant’s gross sales over a pre-determined level.

Development
We intend to continue developing properties that meet our guiding principles. We generally do not begin development of a single-tenant property without a signed lease providing for rental payments during the development period that are commensurate with our level of capital investment. In the case of a multi-tenant development, we generally require a significant amount of the development to be pre-leased prior to construction to minimize lease-up risks. In addition, to minimize overhead costs and to provide the greatest amount of flexibility, we generally outsource construction management to third-party firms.


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We believe our build-to-suit development program is a competitive advantage. First, we believe our strong relationships with our tenants and developers drive new investment opportunities that are often exclusive to us, rather than bid broadly, and with our deep knowledge of their businesses, we believe we are a value-added partner in the underwriting of each new investment. Second, we offer financing from start to finish for a build-to-suit project such that there is no need for a tenant to seek separate construction and permanent financing, which we believe makes us a more attractive partner. Third, we are actively developing strong relationships with tenants in our select segments leading to multiple investments without strict investment portfolio allocations. Finally, multiple investments with the same tenant allows us in most cases to include cross-default provisions in our lease or financing contracts, meaning a default in an obligation to us at one location is a default under all obligations with that tenant.
Tenant and Customer Relationships
We intend to continue developing and maintaining long-term working relationships with entertainment, education, recreation and other specialty business operators and developers by providing capital for multiple properties on an international, national or regional basis, thereby creating efficiency and value for both the operators and the Company.

Portfolio Diversification
We will endeavor to further diversify our asset base by property type, geographic location and tenant or customer. In pursuing this diversification strategy, we will target entertainment, education, recreation and other specialty business operators that we view as leaders in their market segments and have the ability to compete effectively and perform under their agreements with the Company.

Capitalization Strategies

Debt and Equity Financing
Our debt to gross assets ratio (i.e. debt of the Company as a percentage of total assets plus accumulated depreciation) was 40% at December 31, 2013. We expect to maintain a debt to gross assets ratio of between 35% and 45% going forward. While maintaining lower leverage mitigates the growth in per share results, we believe lower leverage and an emphasis on liquidity are prudent during the current economic environment.

Prior to 2010, we relied primarily on secured debt financings. Since that time we have moved our revolving credit line from secured to unsecured, completed three public senior unsecured note offerings as well as an unsecured term loan, and paid off significant secured debt. These steps are consistent with the implementation of our strategy to migrate to an unsecured debt structure. In the future, while we may obtain secured debt from time to time or assume secured debt financing obligations in acquisitions, we intend to issue primarily unsecured debt securities to satisfy our debt financing needs. We believe this strategy will increase our access to capital and permit us to more efficiently match available debt and equity financing to our ongoing capital requirements.

Our sources of equity financing consist of the issuance of common shares as well as the issuance of preferred shares (including convertible preferred shares). In addition to larger underwritten registered public offerings of both common and preferred shares, we have also offered shares pursuant to registered public offerings through the direct share purchase component of our Dividend Reinvestment and Direct Share Purchase Plan (“DSP Plan”). While such offerings are generally smaller than a typical underwritten public offering, issuing common shares under the direct share purchase component of our DSP Plan allows us to access capital on a more frequent basis in a cost-effective manner. We expect to opportunistically access the equity markets in the future and, depending primarily on the size and timing of our equity capital needs, may continue to issue shares under the direct share purchase component of our DSP Plan. Furthermore, we may issue shares in connection with acquisitions in the future.

Joint Ventures
We will examine and may pursue potential additional joint venture opportunities with institutional investors or developers if the investments to which they relate meet our guiding principles discussed above. We may employ higher leverage in joint ventures.


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Payment of Regular Dividends
We have historically paid quarterly dividend distributions to our common and preferred shareholders. We began to pay dividend distributions to our common shareholders on a monthly basis beginning in the second quarter of 2013 and expect to continue to do so in the future. We expect to continue to pay dividend distributions to our preferred shareholders on a quarterly basis. Our Series C cumulative convertible preferred shares (“Series C preferred shares”) have a dividend rate of 5.75%, our Series E cumulative convertible preferred shares (“Series E preferred shares”) have a dividend rate of 9.00% and our Series F cumulative redeemable preferred shares ("Series F preferred shares") have a dividend rate of 6.625%. Among the factors the Company’s board of trustees (“Board of Trustees”) considers in setting the common share dividend rate are the applicable REIT tax rules and regulations that apply to dividends, the Company’s results of operations, including FFO per share, and the Company’s Cash Available for Distribution (defined as net cash flow available for distribution after payment of operating expenses, debt service, preferred dividends and other obligations).

Competition

We compete for real estate financing opportunities with other companies that invest in real estate, as well as traditional financial sources such as banks and insurance companies. REITs have financed and may continue to seek to finance entertainment, education, recreation and other specialty properties as new properties are developed or become available for acquisition.

Employees

As of December 31, 2013, we had 38 full time employees.

Principal Executive Offices

The Company’s principal executive offices are located at 909 Walnut Street, Suite 200, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone (816) 472-1700.

Materials Available on Our Website

Our internet website address is www.eprkc.com. We make available, free of charge, through our website copies of our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission” or “SEC”). You may also view our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, Company Governance Guidelines, Independence Standards for Trustees and the charters of our audit, nominating/company governance, finance and compensation committees on our website. Copies of these documents are also available in print to any person who requests them. We do not intend for information contained in our website to be part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 1A. Risk Factors
There are many risks and uncertainties that can affect our current or future business, operating results, financial performance or share price. The following discussion describes important factors which could adversely affect our current or future business, operating results, financial condition or share price. This discussion includes a number of forward-looking statements. See “Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements.”

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Risks That May Impact Our Financial Condition or Performance
Continued global economic uncertainty and disruptions in the financial markets may impair our ability to refinance existing obligations or obtain new financing for acquisition or development of properties.
There continues to be global economic uncertainty, lower participation rates in the job market, reduced levels of economic activity, and it is uncertain as to when economic conditions will improve. These negative economic conditions in the markets in which we operate or own properties, and other events or factors that adversely affect demand for our properties, could adversely affect our business. We have also relied in part on debt financing to finance our investments and development. To the extent that turmoil in the financial markets returns or intensifies, it has the potential to adversely affect our ability to refinance our existing obligations as they mature or obtain new financing for acquisition or development of properties and adversely affect the value of our investments. If we are not able to refinance existing indebtedness on attractive terms at its maturity, we may be forced to dispose of some of our assets. Continued uncertain economic conditions and further disruptions in the financial markets could also result in a substantial decrease in the value of our investments, which could also make it more difficult to refinance existing obligations or obtain new financing.
Adverse changes in our credit ratings could impair our ability to obtain additional debt and equity financing on favorable terms, if at all, and negatively impact the market price of our securities, including our common shares.
The credit ratings of our senior unsecured debt and preferred equity securities are based on our operating performance, liquidity and leverage ratios, overall financial position and other factors employed by the credit rating agencies in their rating analyses of us. Our credit ratings can affect the amount and type of capital we can access, as well as the terms of any financings we may obtain. There can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain our current credit ratings and in the event that our current credit ratings deteriorate, we would likely incur a higher cost of capital and it may be more difficult or expensive to obtain additional financing or refinance existing obligations and commitments. Also, a downgrade in our credit ratings would trigger additional costs or other potentially negative consequences under our current and future credit facilities and debt instruments.
The downgrade of the U.S. Government's credit rating and any future downgrade of the U.S. Government's credit rating may result in economic uncertainty and a significant rise in interest rates, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and ability to make dividend payments to our shareholders.
In 2011, Standard and Poor's Ratings Services (or Standard & Poor's) downgraded the long-term debt rating of the United States from AAA to AA+ for the first time in history due to its belief that legislative solutions have been inadequate to address the country's growing debt burden. Standard & Poor's decision to further downgrade the U.S. Government's credit rating could create broader financial and global banking turmoil and uncertainty and could lead to a significant rise in interest rates. Moreover, these events could cause us to have a higher cost of capital. These consequences could be exacerbated if other statistical rating agencies decide to downgrade the U.S. Government's credit rating in the future. Each of Moody's Investors Service, Inc. (or Moody's) and Fitch, Inc. (or Fitch) has maintained its rating of U.S. debt at AAA, but has warned of potential future downgrades if legislative solutions to address the rising levels of U.S. Government debt are not found. Any of these outcomes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and ability to make dividend payments to our shareholders.
An increase in interest rates could increase interest cost on new debt, and could materially adversely impact our ability to refinance existing debt, sell assets and limit our acquisition and development activities.
If interest rates increase, so could our interest costs for any new debt. This increased cost could make the financing of any acquisition and development activity more costly. Rising interest rates could limit our ability to refinance existing debt when it matures, or cause us to pay higher interest rates upon refinancing and increase interest expense on refinanced indebtedness. In addition, an increase in interest rates could decrease the amount third parties are willing to pay for our assets, thereby limiting our ability to reposition our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions.

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We previously made a significant investment in a planned casino and resort development, which is now the subject of ongoing litigation. We cannot predict the duration or outcome of this litigation. In the event of prolonged litigation or an unfavorable outcome, or other factors outside of the litigation, the casino project and resort development may be indefinitely delayed or canceled, which, individually or together with an unfavorable outcome in the litigation, could have a material adverse effect on the casino project and resort development and/or our financial condition and results of operations.
In 2010, we reached a settlement agreement with the developer of the planned casino and resort project in Sullivan County, New York and certain related affiliates, pursuant to which we acquired certain land at the project. Entities affiliated with the developer of the casino property subsequently commenced litigation against us and certain of our subsidiaries regarding matters addressed by the settlement agreement. In addition, entities affiliated with the developer commenced additional litigation against us and certain of our subsidiaries relating to our potential relationship with certain parties, including Empire Resorts, Inc. and one of its subsidiaries. The plaintiffs in each of the foregoing cases are seeking significant monetary damages. In September 2013, a federal district court dismissed the complaint relating to some of this litigation. However, the court's dismissal of the related state claims was without prejudice, meaning the plaintiffs could further pursue such claims in state court, and the plaintiffs filed a motion for reconsideration of the dismissal as well as a notice of appeal. We believe we have meritorious defenses to this litigation and intend to defend it vigorously. There can be no assurances, however, as to the duration or ultimate outcome of this litigation, nor can there be any assurances as to the costs we may incur in defending against and/or resolving this litigation. In the event of prolonged litigation or an unfavorable outcome, or simply as a result of economic, regulatory or other conditions, the planned casino and resort development may be indefinitely delayed or canceled. There can be no assurance that such an indefinite delay or cancellation would not have a material adverse effect on our investment, which could cause us to record an impairment charge with respect to our interest in such property, and which could result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if the outcome of the litigation is unfavorable to us, it could result in a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
We previously made a significant investment in a planned casino and resort development, which is dependent upon the award of a gaming license by the New York Gaming Commission. In the event of a prolonged regulatory process or an unfavorable outcome, or other factors outside of the regulatory process, including the financing of the gaming operator, the casino project and resort development may be indefinitely delayed or canceled, and if we are unable to identify suitable alternative uses for the property, this could leave to a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
On November 5, 2013, New York State approved Proposition One, a constitutional amendment authorizing a limited number of full scale casino gaming licenses at certain locations to be determined by a commission jointly appointed by the governor and the legislature. The proposed tenant for a portion of our Sullivan County, New York property, Empire Resorts, which currently has a license to operate slot machines, electronic table games and a harness racing facility at a nearby location, has stated that it intends to apply for and actively pursue a license from the New York Gaming Commission to operate a full-scale casino on the site. There can be no assurance, however, that Empire Resorts or any other gaming operator will be successful in obtaining a license to operate a full-scale casino or, alternatively, relocating an existing license, or that either process will not be prolonged. Furthermore, there is no assurance that a suitable alternate use for the property, whether involving gaming or otherwise, will be identified which could result in a material adverse effect on our investment and on our financial condition and results of operations.

We depend on leasing space to tenants on economically favorable terms and collecting rent from our tenants, who may not be able to pay.
At any time, a tenant may experience a downturn in its business that may weaken its financial condition. Similarly, a general decline in the economy may result in a decline in demand for space at our commercial properties. Our financial results depend significantly on leasing space at our properties to tenants on economically favorable terms. In addition, because a majority of our income comes from leasing real property, our income, funds available to pay indebtedness and funds available for distribution to our shareholders will decrease if a significant number of our tenants cannot pay their rent or if we are not able to maintain our levels of occupancy on favorable terms. If our tenants cannot pay their rent or we are not able to maintain our levels of occupancy on favorable terms, there is also a risk that the fair value of the underlying property will be considered less than its carrying value and we may have to take a charge against earnings. In addition, if a tenant does not pay its rent, we might not be able to enforce our rights as landlord without delays and might incur substantial legal costs.

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If a tenant becomes bankrupt or insolvent, that could diminish or eliminate the income we expect from that tenant's leases. If a tenant becomes insolvent or bankrupt, we cannot be sure that we could recover the premises from the tenant promptly or from a trustee or debtor-in-possession in a bankruptcy proceeding relating to the tenant. On the other hand, a bankruptcy court might authorize the tenant to terminate its leases with us. If that happens, our claim against the bankrupt tenant for unpaid future rent would be subject to statutory limitations that might be substantially less than the remaining rent owed under the leases. In addition, any claim we have for unpaid past rent would likely not be paid in full and we would also have to take a charge against earnings for any accrued straight-line rent receivable related to the leases.
We are exposed to the credit risk of our customers and counterparties and their failure to meet their financial obligations could adversely affect our business.
Our business is subject to credit risk. There is a risk that a customer or counterparty will fail to meet its obligations when due, particularly given the current state of the economy. Customers and counterparties that owe us money may default on their obligations to us due to bankruptcy, lack of liquidity, operational failure or other reasons. Although we have procedures for reviewing credit exposures to specific customers and counterparties to address present credit concerns, default risk may arise from events or circumstances that are difficult to detect or foresee. Some of our risk management methods depend upon the evaluation of information regarding markets, clients or other matters that are publicly available or otherwise accessible by us. That information may not, in all cases, be accurate, complete, up-to-date or properly evaluated. In addition, concerns about, or a default by, one customer or counterparty could lead to significant liquidity problems, losses or defaults by other customers or counterparties, which in turn could adversely affect us. We may be materially and adversely affected in the event of a significant default by our customers and counterparties.
We could be adversely affected by a borrower's bankruptcy or default.
If a borrower becomes bankrupt or insolvent or defaults under its loan, that could force us to declare a default and foreclose on any available collateral. As a result, future interest income recognition related to the applicable note receivable could be significantly reduced or eliminated. There is also a risk that the fair value of the collateral, if any, will be less than the carrying value of the note and accrued interest receivable at the time of a foreclosure and we may have to take a charge against earnings. If a property serves as collateral for a note, we may experience costs and delays in recovering the property in foreclosure or finding a substitute operator for the property. If a mortgage we hold is subordinated to senior financing secured by the property, our recovery would be limited to any amount remaining after satisfaction of all amounts due to the holder of the senior financing. In addition, to protect our subordinated investment, we may desire to refinance any senior financing. However, there is no assurance that such refinancing would be available or, if it were to be available, that the terms would be attractive.
Our theatre tenants may be adversely affected by the obsolescence of any older multiplex theatres they own or by any overbuilding of megaplex theatres in their markets.
The development of megaplex theatres has rendered many older multiplex theatres obsolete. To the extent our tenants own a substantial number of multiplexes, they have been, or may in the future be, required to take significant charges against their earnings resulting from the impairment of these assets. Megaplex theatre operators have also been and could in the future be adversely affected by any overbuilding of megaplex theatres in their markets and the cost of financing, building and leasing megaplex theatres.
The base term of some of our original theatre leases are expiring and there is no assurance that such leases will be renewed at existing lease terms or that we can lease any re-claimed space from some of our larger theatres at economically favorable terms.
The base term of some of our original theatre leases are expiring. For theatres that are not performing as well as they did in the past, the tenants have and may continue to seek rent or other concessions or not renew at all. Furthermore, some tenants of our larger megaplex theatres desire to down-size the theatres they lease to respond to market trends. As a result, these tenants have and may continue to seek rent or other concessions from us, including requiring us to down-size the theatres or otherwise modify the properties in order to renew their leases. Furthermore, while any such screen reductions would likely create opportunities to reclaim a portion of the former theatres for conversion to other uses, there is no guarantee that we can re-lease such space or that such leases would be at economically favorable terms.

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Operating risks in the entertainment industry may affect the ability of our tenants to perform under their leases.
The ability of our tenants to operate successfully in the entertainment industry and remain current on their lease obligations depends on a number of factors, including the availability and popularity of motion pictures, the performance of those pictures in tenants' markets, the allocation of popular pictures to tenants, the release window (represents the time that elapses from the date of a picture's theatrical release to the date it is available on other mediums) and the terms on which the pictures are licensed. Neither we nor our tenants control the operations of motion picture distributors. The success of “out-of-home” entertainment venues such as megaplex theatres, entertainment retail centers and recreational properties also depends on general economic conditions and the willingness of consumers to spend time and money on out-of-home entertainment.
Real estate is a competitive business.
Our business operates in highly competitive environments. We compete with a large number of real estate property owners and developers, some of which may be willing to accept lower returns on their investments. Principal factors of competition are rent or interest charged, attractiveness of location, the quality of the property and breadth and quality of services provided. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below the rental rates we are currently charging our tenants, we may lose potential tenants, and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge in order to retain tenants when our tenants' leases expire. Our success depends upon, among other factors, trends of the national and local economies, financial condition and operating results of current and prospective tenants and customers, availability and cost of capital, construction and renovation costs, taxes, governmental regulations, legislation and population trends.
A single tenant represents a substantial portion of our lease revenues.
For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 25% of our total revenue was derived from rental payments by AMC, one of the nation's largest movie exhibition companies, under leases for megaplex theatre properties. AMCE Entertainment, Inc. (“AMCE”) has guaranteed AMC's performance under substantially all of their leases. We have diversified and expect to continue to diversify our real estate portfolio by entering into lease transactions with a number of other leading operators. Nevertheless, our revenues and our continuing ability to service our debt and pay shareholder dividends are currently substantially dependent on AMC's performance under its leases and AMCE's performance under its guarantee.
We believe AMC occupies a strong position in the industry and we intend to continue acquiring and leasing back or developing new AMC theatres. However, AMC and AMCE are susceptible to the same risks as our other tenants described herein. If for any reason AMC failed to perform under its lease obligations and AMCE did not perform under its guarantee, we could be required to reduce or suspend our shareholder dividends and may not have sufficient funds to support operations or service our debt until substitute tenants are obtained. If that happened, we cannot predict when or whether we could obtain substitute quality tenants on acceptable terms.
A single tenant leases or is the mortgagor of a substantial portion of our investments related to metropolitan ski areas and a single tenant leases a significant number of our public charter school properties.
Peak is the lessee of our metropolitan ski area in Ohio and is the mortgagor on six notes receivable secured by 11 metropolitan ski areas and related development land. Similarly, Imagine is the lessee of a significant number of our public charter school properties. If Peak failed to perform under its lease and mortgage loan obligations, and/or Imagine failed to perform under its master lease, we may need to reduce our shareholder dividends and may not have sufficient funds to support operations or service our debt until substitute operators are obtained. If that happened, we cannot predict when or whether we could obtain quality substitute tenants or mortgagors on acceptable terms.
Public charter schools are operated pursuant to charters granted by various state or other regulatory authorities and are dependent upon compliance with the terms of such charters in order to obtain funding from local, state and federal governments. We could be adversely affected by a public charter school's failure to comply with its charter, non-renewal of a charter upon expiration or by its reduction or loss of funding.
Our public charter school properties operate pursuant to charters granted by various state or other regulatory authorities, which are generally shorter than our lease terms, and most of the schools have undergone or expect to undergo compliance audits or reviews by such regulatory authorities. Such audits and reviews examine the financial as well as the academic

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performance of the school. Adverse audit or review findings could result in non-renewal or revocation of a public charter school's charter, or in some cases, a reduction in the amount of state funding, repayment of previously received state funding or other economic sanctions. Our public charter school tenants are also dependent upon funding from local, state and federal governments, which are currently experiencing budgetary constraints, and any reduction or loss of such funding could adversely affect a public charter school's ability to comply with its charter and/or pay its obligations.
Imagine, an operator of public charter schools, is a lessee of a substantial number of our public charter school properties. In the past, some of the Company's public charter school properties operated by Imagine have been subject to compliance audits or reviews that resulted in probationary actions and, in some cases, charter revocation. As of December 31, 2013, 12 of the Company's public charter school properties operated by Imagine have had their charters revoked. We are currently in the process of resolving these issues with Imagine; however, there can be no assurances that any such solutions will satisfy either the respective regulatory body or the Company, and could result in the Company pursuing its remedies under the lease.
Our master lease agreement with Imagine provides certain contractual protections designed to mitigate risk, such as risk arising from the revocation of a charter of one or more Imagine schools. For instance, Imagine is required to maintain irrevocable letters of credit to secure a portion of their annual lease payment owed to us under the master lease agreement. Subject to our approval and certain other terms and conditions, the master lease agreement also allows Imagine to repurchase from us the public charter school properties that are causing technical defaults and, in substitution for such properties, sell to us public charter school properties that would otherwise comply with the lease agreement. As of December 31, 2013, Imagine has exercised this right with respect to six of the properties that suffered a charter revocation and such repurchases have been completed. In addition, three schools have been sub-leased by Imagine. However, with respect to other schools without charters for which Imagine is still paying rent, there is no guarantee that acceptable schools will be available for substitutions or that such substitutions will be completed. In addition, while governing authorities may approve substitute operators for failed public charter schools to ensure continuity for students, we cannot predict when or whether applicable governing authorities would approve such substitute operators, nor can we predict whether we could reach lease agreements with such substitute tenants on acceptable terms. If Imagine or any other operator is unable to provide adequate substitute collateral under its lease with us, and/or is unable to pay its obligations, we may be required to record an impairment loss or sell schools for less than their net book value.
There are risks inherent in having indebtedness and the use of such indebtedness to fund acquisitions.
We currently use debt to fund portions of our operations and acquisitions. In a rising interest rate environment, the cost of our variable rate debt and any new variable rate debt will increase. We have used leverage to acquire properties and expect to continue to do so in the future. Although the use of leverage is common in the real estate industry, our use of debt exposes us to some risks. If a significant number of our tenants fail to make their lease payments and we don't have sufficient cash to pay principal and interest on the debt, we could default on our debt obligations. A substantial amount of our debt financing is secured by mortgages on our properties. If we fail to meet our mortgage payments, the lenders could declare a default and foreclose on those properties.
Most of our debt instruments contain balloon payments which may adversely impact our financial performance and our ability to pay dividends.
Most of our financing arrangements require us to make a lump-sum or "balloon" payment at maturity. There can be no assurance that we will be able to refinance such debt on favorable terms or at all. To the extent we cannot refinance such debt on favorable terms or at all, we may be forced to dispose of properties on disadvantageous terms or pay higher interest rates, either of which would have an adverse impact on our financial performance and ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.
We must obtain new financing in order to grow.
As a REIT, we are required to distribute at least 90% of our taxable net income to shareholders in the form of dividends. Other than deciding to make these dividends in our common shares, we are limited in our ability to use internal capital to acquire properties and must continually raise new capital in order to continue to grow and diversify our investment portfolio. Our ability to raise new capital depends in part on factors beyond our control, including conditions in equity

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and credit markets, conditions in the industries in which our tenants are engaged and the performance of real estate investment trusts generally. We continually consider and evaluate a variety of potential transactions to raise additional capital, but we cannot assure that attractive alternatives will always be available to us, nor that our share price will increase or remain at a level that will permit us to continue to raise equity capital publicly or privately.
Covenants in our debt instruments could adversely affect our financial condition and our acquisitions and development activities.
The mortgages on our properties contain customary covenants such as those that limit our ability, without the prior consent of the lender, to further mortgage the applicable property or to discontinue insurance coverage. Our unsecured revolving credit facility, term loan facility, senior notes and other loans that we may obtain in the future contain certain cross-default provisions as well as customary restrictions, requirements and other limitations on our ability to incur indebtedness, including covenants that limit our ability to incur debt based upon the level of our ratio of total debt to total assets, our ratio of secured debt to total assets, our ratio of EBITDA to interest expense and fixed charges. Our ability to borrow under both our unsecured revolving credit facility and our term loan facility is also subject to compliance with certain other covenants. In addition, failure to comply with our covenants could cause a default under the applicable debt instrument, and we may then be required to repay such debt with capital from other sources. Under those circumstances, other sources of capital may not be available to us, or be available only on unattractive terms. Additionally, our ability to satisfy current or prospective lenders' insurance requirements may be adversely affected if lenders generally insist upon greater insurance coverage against acts of terrorism than is available to us in the marketplace or on commercially reasonable terms.
We rely on debt financing, including borrowings under our unsecured revolving credit facility, term loan facility, issuances of debt securities and debt secured by individual properties, to finance our acquisition and development activities and for working capital. If we are unable to obtain financing from these or other sources, or to refinance existing indebtedness upon maturity, our financial condition and results of operations would likely be adversely affected.
Our real estate investments are concentrated in entertainment, education and recreation properties and a significant portion of those investments are in megaplex theatre properties, making us more vulnerable economically than if our investments were more diversified.
We acquire, develop or finance entertainment, education and recreation properties. A significant portion of our investments are in megaplex theatre properties. Although we are subject to the general risks inherent in concentrating investments in real estate, the risks resulting from a lack of diversification become even greater as a result of investing primarily in entertainment, education and recreation properties. These risks are further heightened by the fact that a significant portion of our investments are in megaplex theatre properties. Although a downturn in the real estate industry could significantly adversely affect the value of our properties, a downturn in the entertainment, education and recreation industries could compound this adverse effect. These adverse effects could be more pronounced than if we diversified our investments to a greater degree outside of entertainment, education and recreation properties or, more particularly, outside of megaplex theatre properties.
If we fail to qualify as a REIT, we would be taxed as a corporation, which would substantially reduce funds available for payment of dividends to our shareholders.
If we fail to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we will be taxed as a corporation. We are organized and believe we qualify as a REIT, and intend to operate in a manner that will allow us to continue to qualify as a REIT. However, we cannot provide any assurance that we have always qualified and will remain qualified in the future. This is because qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, on which there are only limited judicial and administrative interpretations, and depends on facts and circumstances not entirely within our control. In addition, future legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions may significantly change the tax laws, the application of the tax laws to our qualification as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of that qualification.
If we were to fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year (including any prior taxable year for which the statute of limitations remains open) we would face tax consequences that could substantially reduce the funds available for the service of our debt and payment of dividends:

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we would not be allowed a deduction for dividends paid to shareholders in computing our taxable income and would be subject to federal income tax at regular corporate rates;
we could be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax and possibly increased state and local taxes;
unless we are entitled to relief under statutory provisions, we could not elect to be treated as a REIT for four taxable years following the year in which we were disqualified; and
we could be subject to tax penalties and interest.
In addition, if we fail to qualify as a REIT, we will no longer be required to pay dividends. As a result of these factors, our failure to qualify as a REIT could adversely affect the market price for our shares.
We will depend on distributions from our direct and indirect subsidiaries to service our debt and pay dividends to our shareholders. The creditors of these subsidiaries, and our direct creditors, are entitled to amounts payable to them before we pay any dividends to our shareholders.
Substantially all of our assets are held through our subsidiaries. We depend on these subsidiaries for substantially all of our cash flow. The creditors of each of our direct and indirect subsidiaries are entitled to payment of that subsidiary's obligations to them, when due and payable, before distributions may be made by that subsidiary to us. In addition, our creditors, whether secured or unsecured, are entitled to amounts payable to them before we may pay any dividends to our shareholders. Thus, our ability to service our debt obligations and pay dividends to holders of our common and preferred shares depends on our subsidiaries' ability first to satisfy their obligations to their creditors and then to pay distributions to us and our ability to satisfy our obligations to our direct creditors. Our subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligations, other than guaranties of our debt, to make funds available to us.
Our development financing arrangements expose us to funding and purchase risks.
Our ability to meet our construction financing obligations which we have undertaken or may enter into in the future depends on our ability to obtain equity or debt financing in the required amounts. There is no assurance we can obtain this financing or that the financing rates available will ensure a spread between our cost of capital and the rent or interest payable to us under the related leases or mortgage notes receivable. As a result, we could fail to meet our construction financing obligations which, in turn, could result in failed projects and related foreclosures and penalties, each of which could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and business.
We have a limited number of employees and loss of personnel could harm our operations and adversely affect the value of our common shares.
We had 38 full-time employees as of December 31, 2013 and, therefore, the impact we may feel from the loss of an employee may be greater than the impact such a loss would have on a larger organization. We are dependent on the efforts of the following individuals: David M. Brain, our President and Chief Executive Officer; Gregory K. Silvers, our Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer; Mark A. Peterson, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer; Morgan G. Earnest, our Senior Vice President and Chief Investment Officer; Neil E. Sprague, our Senior Vice President and General Counsel; and Michael L. Hirons, our Vice President - Strategic Planning. While we believe that we could find replacements for our personnel, the loss of their services could harm our operations and adversely affect the value of our common shares.
Security breaches and other disruptions could compromise our information and expose us to liability, which would cause our business and reputation to suffer.
In the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store sensitive data, including our proprietary business information and that of our tenants and clients and personally identifiable information of our employees, in our facility and on our network. Despite our security measures, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by hackers or breached due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. Any such breach could compromise our network and the information stored there could be accessed, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. Any such access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, disrupt our operations, damage our reputation, and cause a loss of confidence, which could adversely affect our business.

16


Risks That Apply to our Real Estate Business
Real estate income and the value of real estate investments fluctuate due to various factors.
The value of real estate fluctuates depending on conditions in the general economy and the real estate business. These conditions may also limit our revenues and available cash.
The factors that affect the value of our real estate include, among other things:
international, national, regional and local economic conditions;
consequences of any armed conflict involving, or terrorist attack against, the United States or Canada;
the threat of domestic terrorism, which could cause customers of our tenants to avoid public places where large crowds are in attendance, such as megaplex theatres or recreational properties operated by our tenants;
our ability to secure adequate insurance;
natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes and floods, which could exceed the aggregate limits of insurance coverage;
local conditions such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for real estate in the area;
competition from other available space;
whether tenants and users such as customers of our tenants consider a property attractive;
the financial condition of our tenants, including the extent of tenant bankruptcies or defaults;
whether we are able to pass some or all of any increased operating costs through to tenants;
how well we manage our properties;
fluctuations in interest rates;
changes in real estate taxes and other expenses;
changes in market rental rates;
the timing and costs associated with property improvements and rentals;
changes in taxation or zoning laws;
government regulation;
our failure to continue to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes;
availability of financing on acceptable terms or at all;
potential liability under environmental or other laws or regulations; and
general competitive factors.
The rents and interest we receive and the occupancy levels at our properties may decline as a result of adverse changes in any of these factors. If our revenues decline, we generally would expect to have less cash available to pay our

17


indebtedness and distribute to our shareholders. In addition, some of our unreimbursed costs of owning real estate may not decline when the related rents decline.
There are risks associated with owning and leasing real estate.
Although our lease terms obligate the tenants to bear substantially all of the costs of operating the properties, investing in real estate involves a number of risks, including:
the risk that tenants will not perform under their leases, reducing our income from the leases or requiring us to assume the cost of performing obligations (such as taxes, insurance and maintenance) that are the tenant's responsibility under the lease;
the risk that changes in economic conditions or real estate markets may adversely affect the value of our properties;
the risk that local conditions could adversely affect the value of our properties;
we may not always be able to lease properties at favorable rates or certain tenants may require significant capital expenditures by us to conform existing properties to their requirements;
we may not always be able to sell a property when we desire to do so at a favorable price; and
changes in tax, zoning or other laws could make properties less attractive or less profitable.
If a tenant fails to perform on its lease covenants, that would not excuse us from meeting any debt obligation secured by the property and could require us to fund reserves in favor of our lenders, thereby reducing funds available for payment of dividends. We cannot be assured that tenants will elect to renew their leases when the terms expire. If a tenant does not renew its lease or if a tenant defaults on its lease obligations, there is no assurance we could obtain a substitute tenant on acceptable terms. If we cannot obtain another quality tenant, we may be required to modify the property for a different use, which may involve a significant capital expenditure and a delay in re-leasing the property.
Some potential losses are not covered by insurance.
Our leases require the tenants to carry comprehensive liability, casualty, workers' compensation, extended coverage and rental loss insurance on our properties. We believe the required coverage is of the type, and amount, customarily obtained by an owner of similar properties. We believe all of our properties are adequately insured. However, there are some types of losses, such as catastrophic acts of nature, acts of war or riots, for which we or our tenants cannot obtain insurance at an acceptable cost. If there is an uninsured loss or a loss in excess of insurance limits, we could lose both the revenues generated by the affected property and the capital we have invested in the property. We would, however, remain obligated to repay any mortgage indebtedness or other obligations related to the property. Since September 11, 2001, the cost of insurance protection against terrorist acts has risen dramatically. There can be no assurance our tenants will be able to obtain terrorism insurance coverage, or that any coverage they do obtain will adequately protect our properties against loss from terrorist attack.
Joint ventures may limit flexibility with jointly owned investments.
We may continue to acquire or develop properties in joint ventures with third parties when those transactions appear desirable. We would not own the entire interest in any property acquired by a joint venture. Major decisions regarding a joint venture property may require the consent of our partner. If we have a dispute with a joint venture partner, we may feel it necessary or become obligated to acquire the partner's interest in the venture. However, we cannot ensure that the price we would have to pay or the timing of the acquisition would be favorable to us. If we own less than a 50% interest in any joint venture, or if the venture is jointly controlled, the assets and financial results of the joint venture may not be reportable by us on a consolidated basis. To the extent we have commitments to, or on behalf of, or are dependent on, any such “off-balance sheet” arrangements, or if those arrangements or their properties or leases are subject to material contingencies, our liquidity, financial condition and operating results could be adversely affected by those commitments or off-balance sheet arrangements.

18


Our multi-tenant properties expose us to additional risks.
Our entertainment retail centers in Westminster, Colorado, New Rochelle, New York, Burbank, California, Suffolk, Virginia and Ontario, Canada, and similar properties we may seek to acquire or develop in the future, involve risks not typically encountered in the purchase and lease-back of real estate properties which are operated by a single tenant. The ownership or development of multi-tenant retail centers could expose us to the risk that a sufficient number of suitable tenants may not be found to enable the centers to operate profitably and provide a return to us. This risk may be compounded by the failure of existing tenants to satisfy their obligations due to various factors, including the current economic crisis. These risks, in turn, could cause a material adverse impact to our results of operations and business.
Retail centers are also subject to tenant turnover and fluctuations in occupancy rates, which could affect our operating results. Multi-tenant retail centers also expose us to the risk of potential “CAM slippage,” which may occur when the actual cost of taxes, insurance and maintenance at the property exceeds the CAM fees paid by tenants.
Failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other laws could result in substantial costs.
Most of our properties must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). The ADA requires that public accommodations reasonably accommodate individuals with disabilities and that new construction or alterations be made to commercial facilities to conform to accessibility guidelines. Failure to comply with the ADA can result in injunctions, fines, damage awards to private parties and additional capital expenditures to remedy noncompliance. Our leases require the tenants to comply with the ADA.
Our properties are also subject to various other federal, state and local regulatory requirements. We do not know whether existing requirements will change or whether compliance with future requirements will involve significant unanticipated expenditures. Although these expenditures would be the responsibility of our tenants, if tenants fail to perform these obligations, we may be required to do so.
Potential liability for environmental contamination could result in substantial costs.
Under federal, state and local environmental laws, we may be required to investigate and clean up any release of hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum products at our properties, regardless of our knowledge or actual responsibility, simply because of our current or past ownership of the real estate. If unidentified environmental problems arise, we may have to make substantial payments, which could adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to service our debt and pay dividends to our shareholders. This is because:
as owner we may have to pay for property damage and for investigation and clean-up costs incurred in connection with the contamination;
the law may impose clean-up responsibility and liability regardless of whether the owner or operator knew of or caused the contamination;
even if more than one person is responsible for the contamination, each person who shares legal liability under environmental laws may be held responsible for all of the clean-up costs; and
governmental entities and third parties may sue the owner or operator of a contaminated site for damages and costs.
These costs could be substantial and in extreme cases could exceed the value of the contaminated property. The presence of hazardous substances or petroleum products or the failure to properly remediate contamination may adversely affect our ability to borrow against, sell or lease an affected property. In addition, some environmental laws create liens on contaminated sites in favor of the government for damages and costs it incurs in connection with a contamination. Most of our loan agreements require the Company or a subsidiary to indemnify the lender against environmental liabilities. Our leases require the tenants to operate the properties in compliance with environmental laws and to indemnify us against environmental liability arising from the operation of the properties. We believe all of our properties are in material compliance with environmental laws. However, we could be subject to strict liability under environmental laws because we own the properties. There is also a risk that tenants may not satisfy their environmental compliance and indemnification obligations under the leases. Any of these events could substantially increase our cost of operations,

19


require us to fund environmental indemnities in favor of our lenders, limit the amount we could borrow under our unsecured revolving credit facility and term loan facility and reduce our ability to service our debt and pay dividends to shareholders.
Real estate investments are relatively illiquid.
We may desire to sell a property in the future because of changes in market conditions, poor tenant performance or default of any mortgage we hold, or to avail ourselves of other opportunities. We may also be required to sell a property in the future to meet debt obligations or avoid a default. Specialty real estate projects such as megaplex theatres cannot always be sold quickly, and we cannot assure you that we could always obtain a favorable price. In addition, the Internal Revenue Code limits our ability to sell our properties. We may be required to invest in the restoration or modification of a property before we can sell it. The inability to respond promptly to changes in the performance of our property portfolio could adversely affect our financial condition and ability to service our debt and pay dividends to our shareholders.
There are risks in owning assets outside the United States.
Our properties in Canada are subject to the risks normally associated with international operations. The rentals under our Canadian leases and the debt service on our Canadian mortgage financing are payable or collectible (as applicable) in Canadian dollars, which could expose us to losses resulting from fluctuations in exchange rates to the extent we have not hedged our position. Canadian real estate and tax laws are complex and subject to change, and we cannot assure you we will always be in compliance with those laws or that compliance will not expose us to additional expense. We may also be subject to fluctuations in Canadian real estate values or markets or the Canadian economy as a whole, which may adversely affect our Canadian investments.
Additionally, we have made initial investments in projects located in China and may enter other international markets, which may have similar risks as described above as well as unique risks associated with a specific country.
There are risks in owning or financing properties for which the tenant's, mortgagor's or our operations may be impacted by weather conditions and climate change.
We have acquired and financed metropolitan ski areas and may continue to do so in the future. The operators of these properties, our tenants or mortgagors, are dependent upon the operations of the properties to pay their rents and service their loans. The ski area operator's ability to attract visitors is influenced by weather conditions and climate change in general, each of which may impact the amount of snowfall during the ski season. Adverse weather conditions may discourage visitors from participating in outdoor activities. In addition, unseasonably warm weather may result in inadequate natural snowfall, which increases the cost of snowmaking, and could render snowmaking wholly or partially ineffective in maintaining quality skiing conditions. Excessive natural snowfall may materially increase the costs incurred for grooming trails and may also make it difficult for visitors to obtain access to the ski resorts. Prolonged periods of adverse weather conditions, or the occurrence of such conditions during peak visitation periods, could have a material adverse effect on the operator's financial results and could impair the ability of the operator to make rental payments or service our loans.
We face risks associated with the development, redevelopment and expansion of properties and the acquisition of other real estate related companies.
We may develop, redevelop or expand new or existing properties or acquire other real estate related companies, and these activities are subject to various risks.  We may not be successful in pursuing such development or acquisition opportunities. In addition, newly developed or redeveloped/expanded properties or newly acquired companies may not perform as well as expected. We are subject to other risks in connection with any such development or acquisition activities, including the following:

we may not succeed in in completing developments or consummating desired acquisitions on time;
we may face competition in pursuing development or acquisition opportunities, which could increase our costs;

20


we may face difficulties in integrating acquisitions, which may prove costly or time-consuming and could divert management's attention;
we may undertake developments or acquisitions in new markets or industries where we do not have the same level of market knowledge, which may expose us to unanticipated risks in those markets and industries to which we are unable to effectively respond;
we may incur construction costs in connection with developments, which may be higher than projected, potentially making the project unfeasible or unprofitable;
we may be unable to obtain zoning, occupancy or other governmental approvals;
we may experience delays in receiving rental payments for developments that are not completed on time;
our developments or acquisitions may not be profitable; and
we may need the consent of third parties such as anchor tenants, mortgage lenders and joint venture partners, and those consents may be withheld.
In addition, there is no assurance that planned third party financing related to development and acquisition opportunities will be provided on a timely basis or at all, thus increasing the risk that such opportunities are delayed or fail to be completed as originally contemplated. We may also abandon development or acquisition opportunities that we have begun pursuing and consequently fail to recover expenses already incurred and have devoted management time to a matter not consummated.  In some cases, we may agree to lease or other financing terms for a development project in advance of completing and funding the project, in which case we are exposed to the risk of an increase in our cost of capital during the interim period leading up to the funding, which can reduce, eliminate or result in a negative spread between our cost of capital and the payments we expect to receive from the project. Furthermore, our acquisitions of new properties or companies will expose us to the liabilities of those properties or companies, some of which we may not be aware at the time of acquisition. In addition, development of our existing properties presents similar risks.  If a development or acquisition is unsuccessful, either because it is not meeting our expectations or was not completed according to our plans, we could lose our investment in the development or acquisition.
Risks That May Affect the Market Price of our Shares
We cannot assure you we will continue paying cash dividends at current rates.
Our dividend policy is determined by our Board of Trustees. Our ability to continue paying dividends on our common shares, to pay dividends on our preferred shares at their stated rates or to increase our common share dividend rate will depend on a number of factors, including our liquidity, our financial condition and results of future operations, the performance of lease and mortgage terms by our tenants and customers, our ability to acquire, finance and lease additional properties at attractive rates, and provisions in our loan covenants. If we do not maintain or increase our common share dividend rate, that could have an adverse effect on the market price of our common shares and possibly our preferred shares. Furthermore, if the Board of Trustees decides to pay dividends on our common shares partially or substantially all in common shares, that could have an adverse effect on the market price of our common shares and possibly our preferred shares.
Market interest rates may have an effect on the value of our shares.
One of the factors that investors may consider in deciding whether to buy or sell our common shares or preferred shares is our dividend rate as a percentage of our share price, relative to market interest rates. If market interest rates increase, prospective investors may desire a higher dividend rate on our common shares or seek securities paying higher dividends or interest.
Market prices for our shares may be affected by perceptions about the financial health or share value of our tenants and mortgagors or the performance of REIT stocks generally.

21


To the extent any of our tenants or customers, or their competition, report losses or slower earnings growth, take charges against earnings or enter bankruptcy proceedings, the market price for our shares could be adversely affected. The market price for our shares could also be affected by any weakness in the performance of REIT stocks generally or weakness in any of the sectors in which our tenants and customers operate.
Limits on changes in control may discourage takeover attempts which may be beneficial to our shareholders.
There are a number of provisions in our Declaration of Trust, Bylaws, Maryland law and agreements we have with others which could make it more difficult for a party to make a tender offer for our shares or complete a takeover of the Company which is not approved by our Board of Trustees. These include:
a staggered Board of Trustees that can be increased in number without shareholder approval;
a limit on beneficial ownership of our shares, which acts as a defense against a hostile takeover or acquisition of a significant or controlling interest, in addition to preserving our REIT status;
the ability of the Board of Trustees to issue preferred or common shares, to reclassify preferred or common shares, and to increase the amount of our authorized preferred or common shares, without shareholder approval;
limits on the ability of shareholders to remove trustees without cause;
requirements for advance notice of shareholder proposals at shareholder meetings;
provisions of Maryland law restricting business combinations and control share acquisitions not approved by the Board of Trustees;
provisions of Maryland law protecting corporations (and by extension REITs) against unsolicited takeovers by limiting the duties of the trustees in unsolicited takeover situations;
provisions in Maryland law providing that the trustees are not subject to any higher duty or greater scrutiny than that applied to any other director under Maryland law in transactions relating to the acquisition or potential acquisition of control;
provisions of Maryland law creating a statutory presumption that an act of the trustees satisfies the applicable standards of conduct for trustees under Maryland law;
provisions in loan or joint venture agreements putting the Company in default upon a change in control; and
provisions of employment agreements and other compensation arrangements with our officers calling for severance compensation and vesting of equity compensation upon a change in control.
Any or all of these provisions could delay or prevent a change in control of the Company, even if the change was in our shareholders' interest or offered a greater return to our shareholders.
We may change our policies without obtaining the approval of our shareholders.
Our operating and financial policies, including our policies with respect to acquiring or financing real estate or other companies, growth, operations, indebtedness, capitalization and dividends, are exclusively determined by our Board of Trustees. Accordingly, our shareholders do not control these policies.
Dilution could affect the value of our shares.
Our future growth will depend in part on our ability to raise additional capital. If we raise additional capital through the issuance of equity securities, the interests of holders of our common shares could be diluted. Likewise, our Board of Trustees is authorized to cause us to issue preferred shares in one or more series, the holders of which would be entitled to dividends and voting and other rights as our Board of Trustees determines, and which could be senior to or convertible into our common shares. Accordingly, an issuance by us of preferred shares could be dilutive to or otherwise

22


adversely affect the interests of holders of our common shares. As of December 31, 2013, our Series C preferred shares are convertible, at each of the holder's option, into our common shares at a conversion rate of 0.3655 common shares per $25.00 liquidation preference, which is equivalent to a conversion price of approximately $68.40 per common share (subject to adjustment in certain events). Additionally, as of December 31, 2013, our Series E preferred shares are convertible, at each of the holder's option, into our common shares at a conversion rate of 0.4546 common shares per $25.00 liquidation preference, which is equivalent to a conversion price of approximately $54.99 per common share (subject to adjustment in certain events). Under certain circumstances in connection with a change in control of our Company, holders of our Series F preferred shares may elect to convert some or all of their Series F preferred shares into a number of our common shares per Series F preferred share equal to the lesser of (a) the $25.00 per share liquidation preference, plus accrued and unpaid dividends divided by the market value of our common shares or (b) 1.1008 shares. Depending upon the number of Series C, Series E and Series F preferred shares being converted at one time, a conversion of Series C, Series E and Series F preferred shares could be dilutive to or otherwise adversely affect the interests of holders of our common shares.
Future offerings of debt or equity securities, which may rank senior to our common shares, may adversely affect the market price of our common shares.
If we decide to issue debt securities in the future, which would rank senior to our common shares, it is likely that they will be governed by an indenture or other instrument containing covenants restricting our operating flexibility. Additionally, any equity securities or convertible or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common shares and may result in dilution to owners of our common shares. We and, indirectly, our shareholders, will bear the cost of issuing and servicing such securities. Because our decision to issue debt or equity securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. Thus, holders of our common shares will bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the market price of our common shares and diluting the value of their share holdings in us.
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates may have an impact on the value of our shares.
The functional currency for our Canadian operations is the Canadian dollar. As a result, our future operating results could be affected by fluctuations in the exchange rate between U.S. and Canadian dollars, which in turn could affect our share price. We have attempted to mitigate our exposure to Canadian currency exchange risk by entering into foreign currency exchange contracts to hedge in part our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. Foreign currency derivatives are subject to future risk of loss. We do not engage in purchasing foreign exchange contracts for speculative purposes.
Additionally, we have made investments in China and may enter other international markets which pose similar currency fluctuation risks as described above.
We may be subject to adverse legislative or regulatory tax changes that could reduce the market price of our shares.
At any time, the U.S. federal income tax laws or regulations governing REITs or the administrative interpretations of those laws or regulations may be changed, possibly with retroactive effect. We cannot predict if or when any new U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, or any amendment to any existing U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, will be adopted, promulgated or become effective or whether any such law, regulation or interpretation may take effect retroactively. We and our shareholders could be adversely affected by any such change in, or any new, U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation.
Tax reform could adversely affect the value of our shares.
There have been a number of proposals in Congress for major revision of the federal income tax laws, including proposals to adopt a flat tax or replace the income tax system with a national sales tax or value-added tax. Any of these proposals, if enacted, could change the federal income tax laws applicable to REITs, subject us to federal tax or reduce or eliminate the current deduction for dividends paid to our shareholders, any of which could negatively affect the market for our shares.

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

There are no unresolved comments from the staff of the SEC required to be disclosed herein as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 2. Properties

As of December 31, 2013, our real estate portfolio consisted of 121 megaplex theatre properties and various restaurant, retail and other properties including 48 public charter schools and one early education center and certain properties under construction located in 37 states, the District of Columbia and Ontario, Canada. Except as otherwise noted, all of the real estate investments listed below are owned or ground leased directly by us. The following table lists our owned properties (excluding properties under development) listed by segment, their locations, acquisition dates, number of theatre screens (if applicable), number of seats (if applicable), gross square footage, and the tenant.

24


Property
 
Location
 
Acquisition
date
 
Screens
 
Seats
 
Building
(gross sq. ft)
 
Tenant
Entertainment Properties:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Huebner Oaks 14
 
San Antonio, TX
 
11/97
 
24

 
4,400

 
53,583

 
Regal
Studio Movie Grill
 
Dallas, TX
 
11/97
 
14

 
2,962

 
56,430

 
Studio Movie Grill
First Colony 24 (1)(22)
 
Sugar Land, TX
 
11/97
 
24

 
5,098

 
107,690

 
AMC
Leawood Town Center 20 (23)
 
Leawood, KS
 
11/97
 
20

 
2,995

 
75,224

 
AMC
Oakview Plaza 24
 
Omaha, NE
 
11/97
 
24

 
5,098

 
107,402

 
AMC
Lennox Town Center 24 (1)
 
Columbus, OH
 
11/97
 
24

 
4,412

 
98,261

 
AMC
Mission Valley 20 (1)
 
San Diego, CA
 
11/97
 
20

 
4,361

 
84,352

 
AMC
Ontario Mills 30
 
Ontario, CA
 
11/97
 
30

 
5,469

 
131,534

 
AMC
Promenade 16
 
Los Angeles, CA
 
11/97
 
16

 
2,860

 
129,822

 
AMC
Studio 30
 
Houston, TX
 
11/97
 
30

 
6,032

 
136,154

 
AMC
West Olive 16
 
Creve Coeur, MO
 
11/97
 
16

 
2,817

 
60,418

 
AMC
Huebner Oaks Adjacent Retail
 
San Antonio, TX
 
11/97
 

 

 
27,485

 
Vacant
Gulf Pointe 30 (2)
 
Houston, TX
 
2/98
 
30

 
6,008

 
130,891

 
AMC
South Barrington 30
 
South Barrington, IL
 
3/98
 
30

 
6,210

 
130,757

 
AMC
Mesquite 30 (2)
 
Mesquite, TX
 
4/98
 
30

 
6,008

 
130,891

 
AMC
Hampton Town Center 24
 
Hampton, VA
 
6/98
 
24

 
5,098

 
107,396

 
AMC
Raleigh Grande 16 (3)
 
Raleigh, NC
 
8/98
 
16

 
2,596

 
51,450

 
Carolina Cinemas
Paradise 24 and XD (16)
 
Davie, FL
 
11/98
 
24

 
4,180

 
96,497

 
Cinemark
Broward 18 (3)
 
Pompano Beach, FL
 
11/98
 
18

 
3,424

 
73,637

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Aliso Viejo Stadium 20 (15)
 
Aliso Viejo, CA
 
12/98
 
20

 
4,352

 
98,557

 
Regal
Boise Stadium 22 (1)(3)
 
Boise, ID
 
12/98
 
22

 
4,928

 
140,300

 
Regal
Mesquite Retail Center
 
Mesquite, TX
 
1/99
 

 

 
27,201

 
Various
Woodridge 18 (2)
 
Woodridge, IL
 
6/99
 
18

 
4,384

 
82,000

 
AMC
Starlight 20
 
Tampa, FL
 
6/99
 
20

 
3,928

 
84,000

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Westminster Promenade 24 (5)
 
Westminster, CO
 
6/99
 
24

 
4,812

 
89,260

 
AMC
Cary Crossroads Stadium 20
 
Cary, NC
 
12/99
 
20

 
3,936

 
77,475

 
Regal
Palm Promenade 24
 
San Diego, CA
 
2/00
 
24

 
4,586

 
88,610

 
AMC
Gulf Pointe Retail Center
 
Houston, TX
 
5/00
 

 

 
24,008

 
Various
Westminster Promenade
 
Westminster, CO
 
12/01
 

 

 
134,226

 
Various
Clearview Palace 12 (1)
 
Metairie, LA
 
3/02
 
12

 
2,495

 
70,000

 
AMC
Elmwood Palace 20
 
Harahan, LA
 
3/02
 
20

 
4,357

 
90,391

 
AMC
Hammond Palace 10
 
Hammond, LA
 
3/02
 
10

 
1,531

 
39,850

 
AMC
Houma Palace 10
 
Houma, LA
 
3/02
 
10

 
1,871

 
44,450

 
AMC
Westbank Palace 16
 
Harvey, LA
 
3/02
 
16

 
3,176

 
71,607

 
AMC
Cherrydale Stadium 16
 
Greenville, SC
 
6/02
 
16

 
2,744

 
52,800

 
Regal
Forum 30
 
Sterling Heights, MI
 
6/02
 
30

 
5,041

 
107,712

 
AMC
Olathe Studio 30
 
Olathe, KS
 
6/02
 
28

 
4,191

 
100,251

 
AMC
Cherrydale Shops
 
Greenville, SC
 
6/02
 

 

 
10,000

 
Various
Livonia 20
 
Livonia, MI
 
8/02
 
20

 
3,808

 
75,106

 
AMC
Hoffman Center 22 (1)
 
Alexandria, VA
 
10/02
 
22

 
4,150

 
132,903

 
AMC
Colonel Glenn 18 (3)
 
Little Rock, AR
 
12/02
 
18

 
4,122

 
79,330

 
Cinemark
AmStar 16-Macon (10)
 
Macon, GA
 
3/03
 
16

 
2,950

 
66,400

 
Southern
Star Southfield 20
 
Southfield, MI
 
5/03
 
20

 
7,000

 
112,119

 
AMC
Star Southfield Center
 
Southfield, MI
 
5/03
 

 

 
48,028

 
Various
South Wind 12 (21)
 
Lawrence, KS
 
6/03
 
12

 
2,481

 
42,497

 
Regal
New Roc Stadium 18
 
New Rochelle, NY
 
10/03
 
18

 
3,400

 
102,267

 
Regal
New Roc City
 
New Rochelle, NY
 
10/03
 

 

 
343,809

 
Various
Columbiana Grande Stadium 14 (7)
 
Columbia, SC
 
11/03
 
14

 
3,000

 
56,705

 
Regal
Harbour View Grande 16
 
Suffolk, VA
 
11/03
 
16

 
3,036

 
61,500

 
Regal
Harbour View Marketplace
 
Suffolk, VA
 
11/03
 

 

 
96,624

 
Various
Cobb Grand 18
 
Hialeah, FL
 
12/03
 
18

 
4,900

 
77,400

 
Cobb
Deer Valley 30 (3)
 
Phoenix, AZ
 
3/04
 
30

 
5,877

 
113,768

 
AMC
Mesa Grand 14 (14)
 
Mesa, AZ
 
3/04
 
14

 
2,956

 
94,774

 
AMC
Hamilton 24 (3)
 
Hamilton, NJ
 
3/04
 
24

 
4,268

 
95,466

 
AMC
Courtney Park 16 (33)
 
Mississagua, ON
 
3/04
 
16

 
3,856

 
92,971

 
Cineplex
Kanata 24 (33)
 
Kanata, ON
 
3/04
 
24

 
4,764

 
89,290

 
Landmark Cinemas
Whitby 24 (33)
 
Whitby, ON
 
3/04
 
24

 
4,688

 
89,290

 
Landmark Cinemas
Winston Churchill 24 (33)
 
Oakville, ON
 
3/04
 
24

 
4,772

 
89,290

 
Cineplex
Subtotal Entertainment Properties, carried over to next page
 
1,034

 
206,388

 
5,182,109

 
 

25


Property
 
Location
 
Acquisition
date
 
Screens
 
Seats
 
Building
(gross sq. ft)
 
Tenant
Entertainment Properties:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subtotal from previous page
 
n/a
 
n/a
 
1,034

 
206,388

 
5,182,109

 
 
Mississauga Entertainment Centrum (33)
Mississagua, ON
 
3/04
 

 

 
115,934

 
Various
Kanata Entertainment Centrum (33)
 
Kanata, ON
 
3/04
 

 

 
390,067

 
Various
Whitby Entertainment Centrum (33)
 
Whitby, ON
 
3/04
 

 

 
145,048

 
Various
Oakville Entertainment Centrum (33)
 
Oakville, ON
 
3/04
 

 

 
134,222

 
Various
The Grand 16-Layafette (1)(11)
 
Lafayette, LA
 
7/04
 
16

 
2,744

 
61,579

 
Southern
Grand Prairie 18
 
Peoria, IL
 
7/04
 
18

 
4,063

 
82,330

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Cantera Retail Shops
 
Warrenville, IL
 
7/04
 

 

 
19,255

 
Various
North East Mall 18 (13)
 
Hurst, TX
 
11/04
 
18

 
3,886

 
94,000

 
Cinemark
The Grand 18-D'lberville (17)
 
D'Iberville, MS
 
12/04
 
18

 
2,844

 
59,533

 
Southern
Avenue 16
 
Melbourne, FL
 
12/04
 
16

 
3,600

 
75,850

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Mayfaire Stadium 16 (8)
 
Wilmington, NC
 
2/05
 
16

 
3,050

 
57,338

 
Regal
East Ridge 18 (24)
 
Chattanooga, TN
 
3/05
 
18

 
4,133

 
82,330

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Burbank 16 (6)
 
Burbank, CA
 
3/05
 
16

 
4,232

 
86,551

 
AMC
Burbank Village (6)
 
Burbank, CA
 
3/05
 

 

 
34,818

 
Various
The Grand 14-Conroe
 
Conroe, TX
 
6/05
 
14

 
2,400

 
45,000

 
Southern
Washington Square 12 (19)
 
Indianapolis, IN
 
6/05
 
12

 
2,200

 
45,700

 
AMC
The Grand 18-Hattiesburg (20)
 
Hattiesurg, MS
 
9/05
 
18

 
2,675

 
57,367

 
Southern
Arroyo Grand Staduim 10 (12)
 
Arroyo Grande, CA
 
12/05
 
10

 
1,714

 
34,500

 
Regal
Auburn Stadium 10 (4)
 
Auburn, CA
 
12/05
 
10

 
1,573

 
32,185

 
Regal
Manchester Stadium 16 (18)
 
Fresno, CA
 
12/05
 
16

 
3,860

 
80,600

 
Regal
Modesto Stadium 10 (9)
 
Modesto, CA
 
12/05
 
10

 
1,885

 
38,873

 
Regal
Columbia 14 (1)
 
Columbia, MD
 
3/06
 
14

 
2,512

 
77,731

 
AMC
Firewheel 18 (25)
 
Garland, TX
 
3/06
 
18

 
3,156

 
75,252

 
AMC
White Oak Stadium 14
 
Garner, NC
 
4/06
 
14

 
2,626

 
50,810

 
Regal
The Grand 18 - Winston Salem (1)
 
Winston Salem, NC
 
7/06
 
18

 
3,496

 
75,605

 
Southern
Valley Bend 18
 
Huntsville, AL
 
8/06
 
18

 
4,150

 
90,200

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Cityplace 14
 
Kalamazoo, MI
 
11/06
 
14

 
2,770

 
63,942

 
Alamo Draft House Cinemas
The Grand 16-Slidell (1)(26)
 
Slidell, LA
 
12/06
 
16

 
2,750

 
62,300

 
Southern
Pensacola Bayou 15
 
Pensacola, FL
 
12/06
 
15

 
3,361

 
74,400

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
The Grand 16 - Pier Park
 
Panama City Beach, FL
 
5/07
 
16

 
3,496

 
75,605

 
Southern
Austell Promenade
 
Austell, GA
 
7/07
 

 

 
18,410

 
Various
Stadium 14 Cinema
 
Kalispell, MT
 
8/07
 
14

 
2,000

 
44,650

 
Cinemark
The Grand 18 - Four Seasons Stations (1)
Greensboro, NC
 
11/07
 
18

 
3,343

 
74,517

 
Southern
Glendora 12 (1)
 
Glendora, CA
 
10/08
 
12

 
2,264

 
50,710

 
AMC
Harbour View Station
 
Suffolk, VA
 
6/09
 

 

 
21,416

 
Various
Ann Arbor 20
 
Ypsilanti, MI
 
12/09
 
20

 
5,602

 
131,098

 
Cinemark
Buckland Hills 18
 
Manchester, CT
 
12/09
 
18

 
4,317

 
87,700

 
Cinemark
Centreville 12
 
Centreville, VA
 
12/09
 
12

 
3,094

 
73,500

 
Cinemark
Davenport 18
 
Davenport, IA
 
12/09
 
18

 
3,772

 
93,755

 
Cinemark
Fairfax Corner 14
 
Fairfax, VA
 
12/09
 
14

 
3,544

 
74,689

 
Cinemark
Flint West 14
 
Flint, MI
 
12/09
 
14

 
3,493

 
85,911

 
Cinemark
Hazlet 12
 
Hazlet, NJ
 
12/09
 
12

 
3,000

 
58,300

 
Cinemark
Huber Heights 16
 
Huber Heights, OH
 
12/09
 
16

 
3,511

 
95,830

 
Cinemark
North Haven 12
 
North Haven, CT
 
12/09
 
12

 
2,704

 
70,195

 
Cinemark
Preston Crossing 16
 
Okolona, KY
 
12/09
 
16

 
3,264

 
79,453

 
Cinemark
Ritz Center 16
 
Voorhees, NJ
 
12/09
 
16

 
3,098

 
62,658

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Stonybrook 20
 
Louisville, KY
 
12/09
 
20

 
3,194

 
84,202

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
The Greene 14
 
Beaver Creek, OH
 
12/09
 
14

 
3,211

 
73,634

 
Cinemark
West Springfield 15
 
West Springfield, MA
 
12/09
 
15

 
3,775

 
111,166

 
Cinemark
Western Hills 14
 
Cincinnati, OH
 
12/09
 
14

 
3,152

 
63,829

 
Cinemark
Tinseltown 15
 
Beaumont, TX
 
6/10
 
15

 
2,874

 
63,352

 
Cinemark
Tinseltown USA and XD
 
Colorado Springs, CO
 
6/10
 
20

 
4,613

 
109,986

 
Cinemark
Tinseltown USA 20
 
El Paso, TX
 
6/10
 
20

 
4,760

 
109,030

 
Cinemark
Movies 16
 
Grand Prairie, TX
 
6/10
 
15

 
2,717

 
53,880

 
Cinemark
Subtotal Entertainment Properties, carried over to next page
 
1,748

 
354,866

 
9,392,905

 
 

26


Property
 
Location
 
Acquisition
date
 
Screens
 
Seats
 
Building
(gross sq. ft)
 
Tenant
Entertainment Properties:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subtotal from previous page
 
n/a
 
n/a
 
1,748

 
354,866

 
9,392,905

 
 
Tinseltown 290
 
Houston, TX
 
6/10
 
16

 
4,332

 
100,656

 
Cinemark
Movies 14
 
McKinney, TX
 
6/10
 
14

 
2,704

 
56,088

 
Cinemark
Movies 14-Mishawaka
 
Mishawaka, IN
 
6/10
 
14

 
2,999

 
62,088

 
Cinemark
Hollywood Movies 20
 
Pasadena, TX
 
6/10
 
20

 
3,156

 
77,324

 
Cinemark
Tinseltown 20
 
Pflugerville, TX
 
6/10
 
20

 
4,896

 
103,250

 
Cinemark
Movies 10
 
Plano, TX
 
6/10
 
10

 
1,612

 
34,046

 
Cinemark
Tinseltown
 
Pueblo, CO
 
6/10
 
14

 
2,649

 
55,231

 
Cinemark
Redding 14
 
Redding, CA
 
6/10
 
14

 
2,101

 
46,793

 
Cinemark
Beach Movie Bistro
 
Virginia Beach, VA
 
12/10
 
7

 
640

 
20,745

 
Beach Cinema Bistro Group, Inc.
Studio Movie Grill Adjacent Retail
 
Dallas, TX
 
12/10
 

 

 
33,250

 
Toby Keith's I Love This Bar & Grill
Cinemagic in Merrimack (29)
 
Merrimack, NH
 
3/11
 
12

 
1,810

 
42,400

 
Cinemagic
Cinemagic & IMAX in Hooksett NH
 
Hooksett, NH
 
3/11
 
15

 
2,248

 
55,000

 
Cinemagic
Cinemagic & IMAX in Saco
 
Saco, ME
 
3/11
 
13

 
2,256

 
54,000

 
Cinemagic
Cinemagic in Westbrook
 
Westbrook, ME
 
3/11
 
16

 
2,292

 
53,000

 
Cinemagic
Magic Valley Mall Theatre (1)
 
Twin Falls, ID
 
4/11
 
13

 
2,100

 
38,736

 
Cinema West
Pinstripes - Northbrook (1)
 
Northbrook, IL
 
7/11
 

 

 
39,289

 
Pinstripes
Latitude 30
 
Jacksonville, FL
 
2/12
 

 

 
46,000

 
Latitude Global, Inc.
Latitude 39
 
Indianapolis, IN
 
2/12
 

 

 
67,000

 
Latitude Global, Inc.
Look Cinemas-Prestonwood (1)
 
Dallas, TX
 
3/12
 
11

 
1,672

 
58,684

 
LOOK Cinemas
Pinstripes - Oakbrook (1)
 
Oakbrook, IL
 
3/12
 

 

 
66,442

 
Pinstripes
Sandhills 10
 
Southern Pines, NC
 
6/12
 
10

 
1,696

 
36,180

 
Frank Theatres, LLC
Regal Winrock (1)
 
Albuquerque, NM
 
6/12
 
16

 
3,000

 
71,156

 
Regal
Alamo Draft House-Austin
 
Austin, TX
 
9/12
 
10

 
946

 
35,900

 
Alamo Draft House Cinemas
Carmike Champaign (1)
 
Champaign, IL
 
9/12
 
13

 
2,896

 
55,063

 
Carmike Cinemas, Inc.
Regal Virginia Gateway (1)
 
Gainesville, VA
 
2/13
 
10

 
2,965

 
57,213

 
Regal
The Ambassador Theatre (1)(27)
 
Lafayette, LA
 
8/13
 
14

 
2,161

 
52,957

 
Southern
New Iberia Theatre (1)(27)
 
New Iberia, LA
 
8/13
 
10

 
1,469

 
32,760

 
Southern
Hollywood 16 Theatre (1)(28)
 
Tuscaloosa, AL
 
9/13
 
16

 
2,912

 
65,442

 
Cobb
Cantera Stadium 17 (2)
 
Warrenville, IL
 
10/13
 
17

 
3,943

 
95,757

 
Regal
Tampa Veterans 24
 
Tampa, FL
 
10/13
 
24

 
4,344

 
94,774

 
AMC
Subtotal Entertainment Properties
 
2,097

 
418,665

 
11,100,129

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Education Properties:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Academy of Columbus
 
Columbus, OH
 
9/07
 

 

 
71,949

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
East Mesa Charter Elementary
 
Mesa, AZ
 
9/07
 

 

 
45,214

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Rosefield
 
Surprise, AZ
 
9/07
 

 

 
45,578

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
South Lake Charter Elementary
 
Clermont, FL
 
9/07
 

 

 
62,473

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
100 Academy of Excellence
 
Las Vegas, NV
 
10/07
 

 

 
59,060

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Groveport Community School
 
Groveport, OH
 
10/07
 

 

 
66,420

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Harvard Avenue Charter School
 
Cleveland, OH
 
10/07
 

 

 
57,652

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Hope Community Charter School
 
Washington, DC
 
10/07
 

 

 
34,962

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Charter Elementary
 
Phoenix, AZ
 
10/07
 

 

 
47,186

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Marietta Charter School
 
Marietta, GA
 
10/07
 

 

 
24,503

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Academy of Environmental Science and Math
 
St. Louis, MO
 
6/08
 

 

 
153,000

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Int'l Academy of Mableton
 
Mableton, GA
 
6/08
 

 

 
43,188

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Master Academy
 
Fort Wayne, IN
 
6/08
 

 

 
161,500

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Romig Road Community School
 
Akron, OH
 
6/08
 

 

 
40,400

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Wesley International Academy
 
Atlanta, GA
 
6/08
 

 

 
40,358

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Groveport Prep
 
Groveport, OH
 
1/10
 

 

 
72,346

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Indiana Life Sciences Academy East
 
Indianapolis, IN
 
1/10
 

 

 
121,933

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Indiana Life Sciences Academy West
 
Indianapolis, IN
 
1/10
 

 

 
84,454

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Schools at South Vero
 
Vero Beach, FL
 
1/10
 

 

 
79,091

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Schools at West Melbourne
 
W. Melbourne, FL
 
1/10
 

 

 
62,427

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Mentorship Academy of Digital Arts and Science
 
Baton Rouge, LA
 
3/11
 

 

 
54,975

 
CSDC
Subtotal Education Properties, carried over to next page
 

 

 
1,428,669

 
 

27


Property
 
Location
 
Acquisition
date
 
Screens
 
Seats
 
Building
(gross sq. ft)
 
Tenant
Education Properties:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subtotal from previous page
 
n/a
 
n/a
 

 

 
1,428,669

 
 
Ben Franklin Academy (1)
 
Highlands Ranch, CO
 
4/11
 

 

 
64,779

 
Benjamin Franklin Acad Project Development
Bradley Academy of Excellence
 
Goodyear, AZ
 
4/11
 

 

 
37,502

 
Bradley Project Development
American Leadership Academy
 
Gilbert, AZ
 
6/11
 

 

 
43,807

 
PCI ALA Gilbert LLC
Champions School
 
Phoenix, AZ
 
6/11
 

 

 
24,582

 
Phoenix Charter Properties
Loveland Classical
 
Loveland, CO
 
6/11
 

 

 
44,600

 
Loveland Classical School Project Development
Prospect Ridge Academy
 
Broomfield, CO
 
8/11
 

 

 
60,818

 
Prospect Ridge Acad Project Development
South Phoenix Academy
 
Phoenix, AZ
 
11/11
 

 

 
56,724

 
Skyline Schools Project Development
Pacific Heritage
 
Salt Lake City, UT
 
3/12
 

 

 
45,125

 
Pacific Heritage Acad Project Development
Valley Academy
 
Hurricane, UT
 
3/12
 

 

 
25,324

 
Valley Acad Project Development
Odyssey Institute for International & Advanced Studies
 
Buckeye, AZ
 
4/12
 

 

 
85,154

 
Schoolhouse Buckeye LLC
American Leadership Academy-Queen Creek Campus
 
Gilbert, AZ
 
5/12
 

 

 
168,192

 
Schoolhouse Queen Creek LLC
The Environmental Charter School at Frick Park
 
Pittsburg, PA
 
7/12
 

 

 
34,530

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine School at Land O'Lakes
 
Land O'Lakes, FL
 
7/12
 

 

 
40,037

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
North East Carolina Prep Academy
 
Tarboro, NC
 
7/12
 

 

 
94,429

 
NE Carolina Prep Acad Project Development
Chester Community Charter School
 
Chester Upland, PA
 
3/13
 

 

 
25,200

 
CSMI
Lowcountry Leadership
 
Hollywood, SC
 
3/13
 

 

 
44,181

 
Lowcountry Leadership Project Development
Children's Learning Adventure
 
Lake Pleasant, AZ
 
3/13
 

 

 
15,309

 
CLA Properties
Camden Community Charter School
 
Camden, NJ
 
4/13
 

 

 
32,762

 
CSMI
Bella Mente Academy
 
Vista, CA
 
5/13
 

 

 
26,454

 
Bella Mente Project Development
Imagine Academy at Sullivant
 
Columbus, OH
 
5/13
 

 

 
41,575

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Klepinger Community School
 
Dayton, OH
 
5/13
 

 

 
52,112

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Madison Avenue
 
Toledo, OH
 
05/13
 

 

 
48,375

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Imagine Columbia Leadership
 
Columbia, SC
 
05/13
 

 

 
21,690

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Learning Foundation & Performing Arts Academy
 
Gilbert, AZ
 
05/13
 

 

 
52,723

 
CAFA Gilbert Investments
McKinley Academy
 
Chicago, IL
 
05/13
 

 

 
34,900

 
Concept Schools
Global Village Academy-Colorado Springs
 
Colorado Springs, CO
 
06/13
 

 

 
110,000

 
GVA CS Project Development
Skyline Chandler
 
Chandler, AZ
 
07/13
 

 

 
70,000

 
Skyline Chandler Project Development
Harrisburg Pike Community
 
Columbus, OH
 
11/13
 

 

 
67,043

 
Imagine Schools, Inc.
Subtotal Education Properties
 

 

 
2,896,596

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Recreation Properties: