10-K 1 d450617d10k.htm FORM 10-K Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number: 000-30110

 

 

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Florida   65-0716501

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

5900 Broken Sound Parkway NW

Boca Raton, Florida

  33487
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (561) 995-7670

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Class A Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
  (NASDAQ Global Select Market)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   x    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-Accelerated filer   ¨    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act)    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was approximately $6.2 billion as of June 30, 2012.

The number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s common stock (as of February 15, 2013): Class A common stock — 126,954,515 shares

Documents Incorporated By Reference

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement for its 2013 annual meeting of shareholders, which proxy statement will be filed no later than 120 days after the close of the Registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, are hereby incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

         Page  

PART I

  

ITEM 1.

 

BUSINESS

     1   

ITEM 1A.

 

RISK FACTORS

     10   

ITEM 2.

 

PROPERTIES

     22   

ITEM 3.

 

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

     23   

ITEM 4.

 

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

     23   

PART II

  

ITEM 5.

 

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

     24   

ITEM 6.

 

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

     26   

ITEM 7.

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     28   

ITEM 7A.

 

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

     55   

ITEM 8.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

     58   

ITEM 9.

 

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

     58   

ITEM 9A.

 

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

     58   

ITEM 9B.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

     61   

PART III

  

ITEM 10.

 

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

     61   

ITEM 11.

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

     61   

ITEM 12.

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

     61   

ITEM 13.

 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

     62   

ITEM 14.

 

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

     62   

PART IV

  

ITEM 15.

 

EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

     63   

SIGNATURES

     67   


Table of Contents

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

General

We are a leading independent owner and operator of wireless communications towers. Our principal operations are in the United States and its territories. In addition, we own and operate towers in Canada, Central America and South America. Our primary business line is our site leasing business, which contributed 97.4% of our total segment operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2012. In our site leasing business, we lease antenna space primarily to wireless service providers on towers and other structures that we own, manage or lease from others. The towers that we own have been constructed by us at the request of a wireless service provider, built or constructed based on our own initiative or acquired. As of December 31, 2012, we owned 17,491 tower sites, the majority of which have been built by us or built by other tower owners or operators who, like us, have built such towers to lease space to multiple wireless service providers. We also managed or leased approximately 4,800 actual or potential communications sites, approximately 500 of which were revenue producing as of December 31, 2012. Our other business line is our site development business, through which we assist wireless service providers in developing and maintaining their own wireless service networks.

Site Leasing Services

Our primary focus is the leasing of antenna space on our multi-tenant towers to a variety of wireless service providers under long-term lease contracts in the United States, Canada, Central America and South America. Site leasing revenues are received primarily from wireless service provider tenants, including AT&T, Sprint, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Digicel, Claro, and Telefonica. Wireless service providers enter into numerous different tenant leases with us, each of which relates to the lease or use of space at an individual tower site. In the United States and Canada our tenant leases are generally for an initial term of five to ten years with five 5-year renewal periods at the option of the tenant. These tenant leases typically contain specific rent escalators, which average 3-4% per year, including the renewal option periods. Tenant leases in our Central and South America markets typically have an initial term of 10 years with 5-year renewal periods. In Central America, we have similar rent escalators to that of leases in the United States and Canada while our leases in South America typically escalate in accordance with a standard cost of living index.

We expand our tower portfolio, both domestically and internationally, through the construction of new towers, or new builds, and through the acquisition of towers from third parties. In our new build program, we construct towers in locations that were strategically chosen by us or under build-to-suit arrangements. Under build-to-suit arrangements, we build towers for wireless service providers at locations that they have identified. We retain ownership of the tower and the exclusive right to co-locate additional tenants on the tower. When we construct towers in locations chosen by us, we utilize our knowledge of our customers’ network requirements to identify locations where we believe multiple wireless service providers need, or will need, to locate antennas to meet capacity or service demands. We seek to identify attractive locations for new towers and complete pre-construction procedures necessary to secure the site concurrently with our leasing efforts. We generally will have at least one signed tenant lease for each new build tower on the day that it is completed and expect that some will have multiple tenants. During 2013, we intend to build between 380 and 400 new towers, domestically and internationally.

In our tower acquisition program, we pursue towers that meet or exceed our internal guidelines regarding current and future potential returns. For each acquisition, we prepare various analyses that include projections of a five-year unlevered internal rate of return, review of available capacity, future lease up projections and a summary of current and future tenant/technology mix.

 

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The table below provides information regarding the development and status of our tower portfolio over the past three years.

 

      For the year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  

Towers owned at beginning of period

     8,324        9,111        10,524   

Towers acquired

     712        1,085        6,630   

Towers constructed

     124        388        356   

Towers reclassified/disposed of (1)

     (49     (60     (19
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Towers owned at end of period

     9,111        10,524        17,491   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) Reclassifications reflect the combination for reporting purposes of multiple tower structures on a single parcel of real estate, which we market and customers view as a single location, into a single owned tower site. Dispositions reflect the decommissioning, sale, conveyance or other legal transfer of owned tower sites.

As of December 31, 2012, we had an average of 2.0 tenants per tower.

Our site leasing business generates substantially all of our total segment operating profit. Our site leasing business generated 88.7% of our total revenues during the year ended December 31, 2012 and has represented 97.4% or more of our total segment operating profit for the past three years. For the year ended December 31, 2012, site leasing revenues generated outside the U.S. and its territories was less than 6% of total revenue.

International Operations

In 2012, we continued to focus on growing our international operations, including the acquisition of 800 towers in Brazil. We believe that we can create substantial value by expanding our site leasing services into select international markets which we believe have a high-growth wireless industry and relatively stable political and regulatory environments. At December 31, 2012, we owned 2,562 towers in Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Panama, and intend to continue expanding in these and other international markets. The majority of these international markets typically have less mature wireless networks with limited wireline infrastructure and wireless data penetration. Accordingly, our expansion in these markets is primarily driven by (i) wireless service providers seeking to increase the quality and coverage of their networks, (ii) consumers’ increased use of high data applications, such as email, internet access and video, and (iii) incremental spectrum auctions, which have resulted in new market entrants, as well as incremental voice and data network deployments. For example, we have had a meaningful build-out of our new towers and communication sites in Costa Rica as a result of spectrum auctions in that country. We expect to continue expanding internationally through buying or building towers, managing communication sites and leasing space to wireless service providers on assets we control.

We consider various factors when identifying a market for our international expansion, including:

 

   

Country analysis – We consider the country’s political stability, and whether the country’s general business, legal and regulatory environment is conducive to the sustainability and growth of our business.

 

   

Market potential – We analyze the expected demand for wireless services, and whether a country has multiple wireless service providers who are actively seeking to invest in deploying voice and data networks, as well as spectrum auctions that have occurred or that are anticipated to occur.

 

   

Risk adjusted return criteria – We consider whether buying or building towers in a country, and providing our management and leasing services, will meet our return criteria. As part of this analysis, we consider the risk of entering into an international market, and how our expansion meets our long-term strategic objectives for the region and our business generally.

 

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Site Development Services

Our site development business, which is conducted in the United States only, is complementary to our site leasing business and provides us the ability to keep in close contact with the wireless service providers who generate substantially all of our site leasing revenue and to capture ancillary revenues that are generated by our site leasing activities, such as antenna and equipment installation at our tower locations. Site development services revenues are received primarily from providing a full range of end to end services to wireless service providers or companies providing development or project management services to wireless service providers. Our services include: (1) network pre-design; (2) site audits; (3) identification of potential locations for towers and antennas; (4) support in buying or leasing of the location; (5) assistance in obtaining zoning approvals and permits; (6) tower and related site construction; (7) antenna installation; and (8) radio equipment installation, commissioning and maintenance.

We provide our site development services on a local basis, through regional offices, territory offices and project offices. The regional offices are responsible for all site development operations, including hiring employees and opening or closing project offices, and a substantial portion of the sales in such area.

For financial information about our operating segments, please see Note 21 of our Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Form 10-K.

Industry Developments

We believe that growing wireless traffic (particularly data and video), the deployment of additional spectrum, and technology advancements will require wireless service providers to improve their network infrastructure and increase their network capacity resulting in an increase in the number of communication sites that they use or the number of antennas at existing communication sites. The following is a discussion of certain growth trends in the wireless communications industry:

 

   

As wireless data usage grows rapidly, all four U.S. nationwide carriers are deploying new and upgraded networks and we believe that the continued deployment of 4G wireless technologies, such as LTE, will require our customers to add large numbers of additional cell sites and additional equipment at current cell sites.

 

   

We have seen, and anticipate there could be other, new entrants into the wireless communications industry that could deploy regional or national wireless networks for voice and data services.

 

   

Spectrum licensed by the Federal Communications Commission in 2006 and 2008 has enabled continued network development, and we expect this and the potential availability of additional spectrum should enable continued network development in the U.S. In August 2012, Verizon received regulatory approval to purchase spectrum originally auctioned in 2006 to SpectrumCo, a joint venture of cable companies. Also, in December, 2012, Dish Networks received regulatory approval to terrestrially deploy certain of its spectrum that was previously limited for use in satellite based networks.

 

   

Consumers are increasing their use of wireless data services due to expansion of wireless data applications, such as email, web browsing, social networking, music and video, and continued wireline to wireless migration. Wireless devices are trending toward more bandwidth intensive devices such as smartphones, laptops, netbooks, tablets and other emerging and embedded devices. As a result, management believes that North American mobile data traffic will grow at an approximately 56% compound annual growth rate from 2012 to 2017.

 

   

Consumers list network coverage and quality as two of the greatest contributors to their dissatisfaction when terminating or changing service. To decrease subscriber churn rate and drive revenue growth, wireless carriers have made substantial capital expenditures on wireless networks to improve service quality and expand coverage. For example, U.S. wireless carriers’ capital expenditures have increased from an estimated $19.9 billion in 2009 to an estimated $28.6 billion in 2012, and we expect capital expenditures in the foreseeable future to remain elevated as wireless carriers continue to improve their networks.

 

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Despite the recent economic challenges affecting the global marketplace, based on these factors, we believe that the world-wide wireless industry will continue to grow and is well-capitalized, highly competitive and focused on quality and advanced services. Therefore, we expect that we will see a multi-year trend of strong additional cell site demand from our customers, which we believe will translate into strong leasing growth for us.

Business Strategy

Our primary strategy is to continue to focus on expanding our site leasing business due to its attractive characteristics such as long-term contracts, built-in rent escalators, high operating margins and low customer churn. The long-term nature of the revenue stream of our site leasing business makes it less volatile than our site development business, which is more cyclical. By focusing on our site leasing business, we believe that we can maintain a stable, recurring cash flow stream and reduce our exposure to cyclical changes in customer spending. Key elements of our strategy include:

Maximizing Use of Tower Capacity. We generally have constructed or acquired towers that accommodate multiple tenants and a majority of our towers are high capacity towers. Most of our towers have significant capacity available for additional antennas and we believe that increased use of our towers can be achieved at a low incremental cost. We actively market space on our towers through our internal sales force.

Disciplined Growth of our Tower Portfolio. We believe that our tower operations are highly scalable. Consequently, we believe that we are able to materially increase our tower portfolio without proportionately increasing selling, general and administrative expenses. During 2013, we intend to continue to grow our tower portfolio, domestically and internationally, by 5% to 10%; through tower acquisitions and the construction of new towers. In connection with our international expansion, we have targeted select international markets that we believe have relatively stable political environments and a growing wireless communication industry. We intend to use our available cash from operating activities and available liquidity, including borrowings, to build and/or acquire new towers at prices that we believe will be accretive to our shareholders both in the short and long term and which allow us to maintain our long-term target leverage ratios.

Capitalizing on our Scale and Management Experience. We are a large owner, operator and developer of tower and other communication sites, with substantial capital, human and operating resources. We have been developing communication sites for wireless service providers in the U.S. since 1989 and owned and operated tower sites for ourselves since 1997. We believe our size, experience, capabilities and resources make us a preferred partner for wireless service providers both in the U.S. and internationally. Our management team has extensive experience in site leasing and site development, with some of the longest tenures in the tower and site development industries. Management believes that its industry expertise and strong relationships with wireless service providers will allow us to expand our position as a leading provider of site leasing and site development services.

Controlling our Underlying Land Positions. We have purchased and intend to continue to purchase and/or enter into perpetual easements or long-term leases for the land that underlies our towers, to the extent available at commercially

 

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reasonable prices. We believe that these purchases, perpetual easements, and/or long-term leases will increase our margins, improve our cash flow from operations and minimize our exposure to increases in ground lease rents in the future. For the quarter ended December 31, 2012, approximately 70% of our tower sites were located on land that we own or control for more than 20 years and the average remaining life under our ground leases, including renewal options under our control, was 31 years. As of December 31, 2012, approximately 6.1% of our tower sites have ground leases maturing in the next 10 years.

Using our Local Presence to Build Strong Relationships with Major Wireless Service Providers. Given the nature of towers as location specific communications facilities, we believe that substantially all of what we do is done best locally. Consequently, we have a broad field organization that allows us to develop and capitalize on our experience, expertise and relationships in each of our local markets which in turn enhances our customer relationships. We are seeking to replicate this operating model internationally. Due to our presence in local markets, we believe we are well positioned to capture additional site leasing business and new tower build opportunities in our markets and identify and participate in site development projects across our markets.

Customers

Since commencing operations, we have performed site leasing and site development services for all of the large U.S. wireless service providers. In both our site leasing and site development businesses, we work with large national providers and smaller regional, local or private operators.

We depend on a relatively small number of customers for our site leasing and site development revenues. The following customers represented at least 10% of our total revenues during the last three years:

 

     Percentage of Total Revenues
For the year ended December  31,
 
     2010     2011     2012  

Sprint

     20.4     19.8     21.2

AT&T

     23.9     23.8     20.4

T-Mobile

     11.6     10.7     12.7

Verizon Wireless

     14.8     14.8     12.7

During the past two years, we provided services for a number of customers, including:

 

Alcatel-Lucent    Metro PCS
AT&T    Millicom
Bechtel Corporation    Nextel International
Bell Canada    Nortel
Cable & Wireless    Nsoro Mastec, LLC
Cellular South    Oi
Claro    Rogers
Cleartalk    Sprint
Clearwire    T-Mobile
Cricket    Telus
Digicel    Telefonica
Ericsson    TIM
General Dynamics    U.S. Cellular
Goodman Networks    VelociTel
ITT Corporation    Verizon Wireless

 

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Sales and Marketing

Our sales and marketing goals are to:

 

   

use existing relationships and develop new relationships with wireless service providers to lease antenna space on and sell related services with respect to our owned or managed towers, enabling us to grow our site leasing business; and

 

   

successfully bid and win those site development services contracts that will contribute to our operating margins and/or provide a financial or strategic benefit to our site leasing business.

We approach sales on a company-wide basis, involving many of our employees. We have a dedicated sales force that is supplemented by members of our executive management team. Our dedicated salespeople are based regionally as well as in the corporate office. We also rely on our vice presidents, general managers and other operations personnel to sell our services and cultivate customers. Our strategy is to delegate sales efforts to those employees of ours who have the best relationships with our customers. Most wireless service providers have national corporate headquarters with regional and local offices. We believe that wireless service providers make most decisions for site development and site leasing services at the regional and local levels with input from their corporate headquarters. Our sales representatives work with wireless service provider representatives at the regional and local levels and at the national level when appropriate. Our sales staff compensation is heavily weighted to incentive-based goals and measurements.

Competition

Site Leasing – Our primary competitors for our site leasing activities are (1) the national independent tower companies including American Tower Corporation, Crown Castle International and Global Tower Partners, (2) a large number of regional independent tower owners, (3) wireless service providers that own and operate their own towers and lease, or may in the future decide to lease, antenna space to other providers, and (4) alternative facilities such as rooftops, outdoor and indoor distributed antenna system (“DAS”) networks, billboards and electric transmission towers. As a result of several large mergers and acquisitions, American Tower and Crown Castle have more towers and greater financial resources than we do. Wireless service providers that own and operate their own tower networks are also generally larger and have greater financial resources than we do. We believe that tower location and capacity, quality of service to our tenants, and, to a lesser extent, price have been and will continue to be the most significant competitive factors affecting the site leasing business. Internationally, to date, the competition we have encountered has been from both independent tower companies and wireless service providers that own and operate their own tower networks. In our Central American and Canadian markets, the majority of existing towers are owned by wireless service providers. In Brazil, our competition includes wireless service providers, as well as, independent tower companies.

Site Development – The site development business is extremely competitive and price sensitive. We believe that the majority of our competitors in the U.S. site development business operate within local market areas exclusively, while some firms offer their services nationally. The market includes participants from a variety of market segments offering individual, or combinations of, competing services. The field of competitors includes site development consultants, zoning consultants, real estate firms, right-of-way consulting firms, construction companies, tower owners/managers, radio frequency engineering consultants, telecommunications equipment vendors, which provide end-to-end site development services through multiple subcontractors, and wireless service providers’ internal staff. We believe that providers base their decisions for site development services on a number of criteria, including: company experience, price, track record, local reputation, geographic reach and time for completion of a project.

 

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Employees

Our executive, corporate development, accounting, finance, human resources, legal and regulatory, information technology and site administration personnel, and our network operations center, are located in our headquarters in Boca Raton, Florida. Certain sales, new tower build support and tower maintenance personnel are also located in our Boca Raton office. Our remaining employees are based in our international, regional, and local offices.

As of December 31, 2012, we had 1,022 employees, none of whom are represented by a collective bargaining agreement. Of these 1,022 employees, 103 were based outside of the U.S. and its territories. We consider our employee relations to be good.

Regulatory and Environmental Matters

Federal Regulations. In the U.S., which accounted for 94.3% of our total site leasing revenue for the year ended December 31, 2012, both the FCC and the Federal Aviation Administration (the “FAA”) regulate antenna towers and structures that support wireless communications and radio or television antennas. Many FAA requirements are implemented in FCC regulations. These regulations govern the construction, lighting and painting or other marking of towers and structures, as well as the maintenance, inspection, and record keeping related to towers and structures, and may, depending on the characteristics of particular towers or structures, require prior approval and registration of towers or structures before they may be constructed, altered or used. Wireless communications equipment and radio or television stations operating on towers or structures are separately regulated and may require independent customer licensing depending upon the particular frequency or frequency band used. In addition, any applicant for an FCC antenna tower or structure registration must certify that, consistent with the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, neither the applicant nor its principals are subject to a denial of Federal benefits because of a conviction for the possession or distribution of a controlled substance.

Pursuant to the requirements of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, the FCC, in conjunction with the FAA, has developed standards to consider proposals involving new or modified antenna towers or structures. These standards mandate that the FCC and the FAA consider the height of the proposed tower or structure, the relationship of the tower or structure to existing natural or man-made obstructions and the proximity of the tower or structure to runways and airports. Proposals to construct or to modify existing towers or structures above certain heights must be reviewed by the FAA to ensure the structure will not present a hazard to air navigation. The FAA may condition its issuance of a no-hazard determination upon compliance with specified lighting and/or painting requirements. Antenna towers that meet certain height and location criteria must also be registered with the FCC. A tower or structure that requires FAA clearance will not be registered by the FCC until it is cleared by the FAA. Upon registration, the FCC may also require special lighting and/or painting. Owners of wireless communications antenna towers and structures may have an obligation to maintain painting and lighting or other marking in conformance with FAA and FCC regulations. Antenna tower and structure owners and licensees that operate on those towers or structures also bear the responsibility of monitoring any lighting systems and notifying the FAA of any lighting outage or malfunction.

Owners and operators of antenna towers and structures may be subject to, and therefore must comply with, environmental laws. Any licensed radio facility on an antenna tower or structure is subject to environmental review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, among other statutes, which requires federal agencies to evaluate the environmental impact of their decisions under certain circumstances. The FCC has issued regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act. These regulations place responsibility on applicants to investigate potential environmental effects of their operations and to disclose any potential

 

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significant effects on the environment in an environmental assessment prior to constructing or modifying an antenna tower or structure and prior to commencing certain operations of wireless communications or radio or television stations from the tower or structure. In the event the FCC determines the proposed structure or operation would have a significant environmental impact based on the standards the FCC has developed, the FCC would be required to prepare an environmental impact statement, which will be subject to public comment. This process could significantly delay the registration of a particular tower or structure.

We generally indemnify our customers against any failure to comply with applicable regulatory standards relating to the construction, modification, or placement of antenna towers or structures. Failure to comply with the applicable requirements may lead to civil penalties.

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 amended the Communications Act of 1934 by preserving state and local zoning authorities’ jurisdiction over the construction, modification and placement of towers. The law, however, limits local zoning authority by prohibiting any action that would discriminate among different providers of personal wireless services or ban altogether the construction, modification or placement of radio communication towers. Finally, the Telecommunications Act of 1996 requires the federal government to help licensees for wireless communications services gain access to preferred sites for their facilities. This may require that federal agencies and departments work directly with licensees to make federal property available for tower facilities.

As an owner and operator of real property, we are subject to certain environmental laws that impose strict, joint and several liability for the cleanup of on-site or off-site contamination and related personal or property damage. We are also subject to certain environmental laws that govern tower or structure placement, including pre-construction environmental studies. Operators of towers or structures must also take into consideration certain radio frequency (“RF”) emissions regulations that impose a variety of procedural and operating requirements. Certain proposals to operate wireless communications and radio or television stations from antenna towers and structures are also reviewed by the FCC to ensure compliance with requirements relating to human exposure to RF emissions. Exposure to high levels of RF energy can produce negative health effects. The potential connection between low-level RF energy and certain negative health effects, including some forms of cancer, has been the subject of substantial study by the scientific community in recent years. We believe that we are in substantial compliance with and we have no material liability under any applicable environmental laws. These costs of compliance with existing or future environmental laws and liability related thereto may have a material adverse effect on our prospects, financial condition or results of operations.

State and Local Regulations. Most states regulate certain aspects of real estate acquisition, leasing activities and construction activities. Where required, we conduct the site acquisition portions of our site development services business through licensed real estate brokers’ agents, who may be our employees or hired as independent contractors, and conduct the construction portions of our site development services through licensed contractors, who may be our employees or independent contractors. Local regulations include city and other local ordinances, zoning restrictions and restrictive covenants imposed by community developers. These regulations vary greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but typically require tower and structure owners to obtain approval from local officials or community standards organizations, or certain other entities prior to tower or structure construction and establish regulations regarding maintenance and removal of towers or structures. In addition, many local zoning authorities require tower and structure owners to post bonds or cash collateral to secure their removal obligations. Local zoning authorities generally have been unreceptive to construction of new antenna towers and structures in their communities because of the height and visibility of the towers or structures, and have, in some instances, instituted moratoria.

International. Regulatory regimes outside of the U.S. and its territories vary by country and locality, however these regulations typically require tower owners and/or licensees to obtain approval from local officials or government agencies prior to tower construction or modification or the addition of a new antenna to an existing

 

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tower. Additionally, some regulations include ongoing obligations regarding painting, lighting, and maintenance. Our international operations may also be subject to limitations on foreign ownership of land in certain areas. Based on our experience to date, these regimes have been similar to, but not more rigorous, burdensome or comprehensive than, those in the U.S. Non-compliance with such regulations may lead to monetary penalties or deconstruction orders. Our international operations are also subject to various regulations and guidelines regarding employee relations and other occupational health and safety matters. As we expand our operations into additional international geographic areas, we will be subject to regulations in these jurisdictions.

Backlog

Backlog related to our site leasing business consists of lease agreements and amendments, which have been signed, but have not yet commenced. As of December 31, 2012, excluding the Sprint Network Vision Amendment, we had 1,052 new leases and amendments which had been executed with customers but which had not begun generating revenue. These leases and amendments will contractually provide for approximately $8.1 million of annual revenue. By comparison, as of December 31, 2011, we had 251 new leases and amendments which had been executed with customers but which had not begun generating revenue. These leases and amendments contractually provided for approximately $5.1 million of annual revenue.

Our backlog for site development services consists of the value of work that has not yet been completed on executed contracts. As of December 31, 2012, we had approximately $45.9 million of contractually committed revenue as compared to approximately $14.5 million as of December 31, 2011.

Availability of Reports and Other Information

SBA Communications Corporation was incorporated in the State of Florida in March 1997. Our corporate website is www.sbasite.com. We make available, free of charge, access to our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A and amendments to those materials filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, on our website under “Investor Relations – Reports and Results – SEC Filings,” as soon as reasonably practicable after we file electronically such material with, or furnish it to, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”).

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Our Business

If our wireless service provider customers combine their operations to a significant degree, our future operating results and our ability to service our indebtedness could be adversely affected.

Significant consolidation among our wireless service provider customers may result in our customers failing to renew existing leases for tower space or reducing future capital expenditures in the aggregate because their existing networks and expansion plans may overlap or be very similar. In connection with the combinations of Verizon Wireless and ALLTEL (to form Verizon Wireless), Cingular and AT&T Wireless (to form AT&T Mobility) and Sprint PCS and Nextel (to form Sprint Nextel), the combined companies have rationalized and may continue to rationalize duplicative parts of their networks, which has led and may continue to lead to the non-renewal of certain leases on our towers. If our wireless service provider customers continue to consolidate as a result of, among other factors, limited wireless spectrum for commercial use in the U.S., this consolidation could significantly impact the number of tower leases that are not renewed or the number of new leases that our wireless service provider customers require to expand their networks, which could materially and adversely affect our future operating results.

We have a substantial level of indebtedness which may have an adverse effect on our business or limit our ability to take advantage of business, strategic or financing opportunities.

As indicated below, we have and will continue to have a significant amount of indebtedness relative to our equity. The following table sets forth our total principal amount of debt and shareholders’ equity as of December 31, 2011 and 2012.

 

     As of December 31,  
     2011     2012  
     (in thousands)  

Total principal amount of indebtedness

   $ 3,512,500      $ 5,440,073   

Shareholders’ (deficit) equity

   $ (11,313   $ 652,991   

Our substantial level of indebtedness increases the possibility that we may be unable to generate cash sufficient to pay the principal, interest or other amounts due on our indebtedness. Subject to certain restrictions under our existing indebtedness, we and our subsidiaries may also incur significant additional indebtedness in the future, some of which may be secured debt. This may have the effect of increasing our total leverage.

As a consequence of our indebtedness, (1) demands on our cash resources may increase, (2) we are subject to restrictive covenants that further limit our financial and operating flexibility and (3) we may choose to institute self-imposed limits on our indebtedness based on certain considerations including market interest rates, our relative leverage and our strategic plans. For example, as a result of our substantial level of indebtedness and the uncertainties arising in the credit markets and the U.S. economy:

 

   

we may be more vulnerable to general adverse economic and industry conditions;

 

   

we may have to pay higher interest rates upon refinancing or on our variable rate indebtedness if interest rates rise, thereby reducing our cash flows;

 

   

we may find it more difficult to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate requirements that would be in our best long-term interests;

 

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we may be required to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the payment of principal and interest on our debt, reducing the available cash flow to fund other investments, including tower acquisition and new build capital expenditures;

 

   

we may be required to reduce our annual tower acquisition or new build goals;

 

   

we may have limited flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business or in the industry;

 

   

we may have a competitive disadvantage relative to other companies in our industry that are less leveraged; and

 

   

we may be required to sell debt or equity securities or sell some of our core assets, possibly on unfavorable terms, in order to meet payment obligations.

These restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our business by limiting our ability to take advantage of financing, new tower development, mergers and acquisitions or other opportunities.

In addition, fluctuations in market interest rates may increase interest expense relating to our floating rate indebtedness, which we expect to incur under our Revolving Credit Facility and Term Loans, and may make it difficult to refinance our existing indebtedness at a commercially reasonable rate or at all. There is no guarantee that the future refinancing of our indebtedness will have fixed interest rates or that interest rates on such indebtedness will be equal to or lower than the rates on our current indebtedness.

We depend on a relatively small number of customers for most of our revenue, and the loss, consolidation or financial instability of any of our significant customers may materially decrease our revenues.

We derive a significant portion of our revenue from a small number of customers. Consequently, a reduction in demand for site leasing, reduced future capital expenditures on the networks, or the loss, as a result of bankruptcy, merger with other customers of ours or otherwise, of any of our largest customers could materially decrease our revenue and have an adverse effect on our growth. Our substantial acquisitions in 2012 further increased our client concentration and exacerbated the risks associated with such concentration.

The following is a list of significant customers (representing at least 10% of revenue in any of the last three years) and the percentage of our total revenues for the specified time periods derived from these customers:

 

      Percentage of Total Revenues
For the year ended December  31,
 
     2010     2011     2012  

Sprint

     20.4     19.8     21.2

AT&T

     23.9     23.8     20.4

T-Mobile

     11.6     10.7     12.7

Verizon Wireless

     14.8     14.8     12.7

We also have client concentrations with respect to revenues in each of our financial reporting segments:

 

      Percentage of Site Leasing Revenues
For the year ended  December 31,
 
     2010     2011     2012  

Sprint

     23.6     22.3     23.8

AT&T

     28.0     26.8     22.9

T-Mobile

     11.7     11.2     13.6

Verizon Wireless

     15.4     15.5     13.2

 

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      Percentage of Site Development Revenues
For the year ended  December 31,
 
     2010     2011     2012  

Ericsson, Inc.

     3.0     9.0     24.5

Nsoro Mastec, LLC

     31.2     35.6     16.2

Verizon Wireless

     11.2     9.5     8.9

T-Mobile

     10.6     7.0     5.8

Revenue from these clients is derived from numerous different site leasing contracts and site development contracts. Each site leasing contract relates to the lease of space at an individual tower site and is generally for an initial term of five to ten years in the U.S. and Canada, and renewable for five 5-year periods at the option of the tenant. Our Central and South America markets typically have an initial term of 10 years with 5-year renewal periods. However, if any of our significant site leasing clients were to experience financial difficulty, substantially reduce their capital expenditures or reduce their dependence on leased tower space and fail to renew their leases with us, our revenues, future revenue growth and results of operations would be adversely affected.

Our site development customers engage us on a project-by-project basis, and a customer can generally terminate an assignment at any time without penalty. In addition, a customer’s need for site development services can decrease, and we may not be successful in establishing relationships with new customers. Furthermore, our existing customers may not continue to engage us for additional projects.

A slowdown in demand for wireless communications services or for tower space could materially and adversely affect our future growth and revenues.

If wireless service subscribers significantly reduce their minutes of use, or fail to widely adopt and use wireless data applications, our wireless service provider customers would experience a decrease in demand for their services. Regardless of consumer demand, each wireless service customer must have substantial capital resources and capabilities to build out their wireless networks, including licenses for spectrum. In addition, our wireless service customers have engaged in increased use of network sharing, roaming or resale arrangements. As a result of all of the above, wireless carriers may scale back their business plans or otherwise reduce their spending, which could materially and adversely affect demand for our tower space and our wireless communications services business, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

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Our international operations are subject to economic, political and other risks, including risks associated with foreign currency exchange rates, that could materially and adversely affect our revenues or financial position.

Our current business operations in Canada, Central America and South America, and our expansion into any other international markets in the future, could result in adverse financial consequences and operational problems not typically experienced in the United States. Although the consolidated revenues generated by our international operations were less than 6% during the year ended December 31, 2012, we anticipate that our revenues from our international operations will grow in the future. Accordingly, our business is and will in the future be subject to risks associated with doing business internationally, including:

 

   

changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic conditions;

 

   

laws and regulations that tax or otherwise restrict repatriation of earnings or other funds or otherwise limit distributions of capital;

 

   

laws and regulations that dictate how we operate our communications sites and conduct business, including zoning, maintenance and environmental matters, and laws related to ownership of real property;

 

   

laws and regulations governing our employee relations, including occupational health and safety matters;

 

   

changes to existing or new domestic or international tax laws or fees directed specifically at the ownership and operation of tower sites, which may be applied and enforced retroactively;

 

   

expropriation and governmental regulation restricting foreign ownership;

 

   

restricting or revoking spectrum licenses;

 

   

our ability to comply with, and the costs of compliance with, anti-bribery laws such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar local anti-bribery laws;

 

   

our ability to compete with owners and operators of wireless communications towers that have been in the international market for a longer period of time than we have;

 

   

uncertainties regarding legal or judicial systems, including inconsistencies between and within laws, regulations and decrees, and judicial application thereof, and delays in the judicial process;

 

   

health or similar issues, such as a pandemic or epidemic;

 

   

difficulty in recruiting and retaining trained personnel; and

 

   

language and cultural differences.

The majority of our international operations are denominated in United States dollars. However, for some of our international operations, particularly Brazil, we face risks associated with changes in foreign currency exchange rates, including those arising from our operations, investments and financing transactions related to our international business. Volatility in foreign currency exchange rates can also affect our ability to plan, forecast and budget for our international operations and expansion efforts.

If we are unable to protect our rights to the land under our towers, it could adversely affect our business and operating results.

Our real property interests relating to our towers consist primarily of leasehold and sub-leasehold interests, fee interests, easements, licenses, rights-of-way, and other similar interests. From time to time, we experience disputes with landowners regarding the terms of the agreements for the land under our towers, which can affect our ability to access and operate such towers. Further, landowners may not want to renew their agreements with us, they may lose their rights to the land, or they may transfer their land interests to third parties, including ground lease aggregators and our competitors, which could affect our ability to renew agreements on commercially viable terms or at all. Our inability to protect our rights to the land under our towers may have a future material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

In addition, we may not always have the ability to analyze and verify all information regarding title, access and other issues regarding the land underlying acquired towers. To the extent that we do not have complete access to, or use of, the land underlying the acquired towers, it could require us to incur additional expenses before we can operate and generate revenue from such tower.

 

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Increasing competition may negatively impact our ability to grow our tower portfolio long term.

We currently intend to grow our tower portfolio 5% to 10% annually, domestically and internationally, through acquisitions and new builds. Our ability to meet these growth targets significantly depends on our ability to acquire existing towers that meet our investment requirements. Traditionally, our acquisition strategy has focused on acquiring towers from smaller tower companies, independent tower developers and wireless service providers. However, as a result of consolidation in the tower industry there are fewer of these mid-sized tower transactions available and there is more competition to acquire existing towers. Increased competition for acquisitions may result in fewer acquisition opportunities for us, higher acquisition prices, and increased difficulty in negotiating and consummating agreements to acquire such towers. Furthermore, to the extent that the tower acquisition opportunities are for significant tower portfolios, many of our competitors are significantly larger and have greater financial resources than us. As a result of these risks, the cost of acquiring these towers may be higher than we expect or we may not be able to add as many towers as we had planned in 2013. If we are not able to successfully address these challenges, we may not be able to materially increase our tower portfolio in the long-term.

Our convertible note hedge transactions may not cover all of the potential dilution or additional cash outlay, if we settled the notes in cash, to which we may be subject upon conversion of the notes.

Concurrently with the pricing of our 1.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2013 (the “1.875% Notes”) and our 4.0% Convertible Senior Notes due 2014 (the “4.0% Notes”) we entered into convertible note hedge transactions and warrant transactions with affiliates of certain of the initial purchasers of the convertible note offerings. The initial strike price of the convertible note hedge transactions relating to our 1.875% Notes is $41.46 per share of our Class A common stock (the same as the initial conversion price of our 1.875% convertible notes) and the upper strike price of the warrants is $67.37 per share. The initial strike price of the convertible note hedge transactions relating to our 4.0% convertible Notes is $30.38 per share of our Class A common stock (the same as the initial conversion price of the 4.0% Notes) and the upper strike price of the warrant transactions is $44.64 per share. Pursuant to the terms of the warrant transaction, we are responsible for the dilution or costs, to the extent that we settle in cash or stock, arising from the conversion of the notes to the extent that the market price of our Class A common stock exceeds the strike price of the warrants. We have purchased an aggregate of $81.2 million in principal amount of the 1.875% Notes, and $468.8 million remains outstanding. If the market price of our Class A common stock significantly exceeded either of these strike prices on their respective conversion dates we would be subject to material dilution or, to the extent we elected to settle in cash, material additional costs.

Initially we entered into convertible note hedge and warrant transactions to cover the full amount of the shares that were issuable upon conversion of the 1.875% Notes and the 4.0% Notes. However, as a result of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc. (“Lehman Derivatives”), we terminated the convertible note hedge transaction that we had entered into with Lehman Derivatives. The terminated convertible note hedge transaction had originally covered 55% of the 13,265,780 shares of our Class A common stock potentially issuable upon conversion of our 1.875% Notes. Consequently, we do not currently have a hedge with respect to that percentage of the shares issuable upon conversion of the 1.875% Notes To the extent that the market price of our Class A common stock exceeds $41.46 per share upon conversion of the notes, we will be subject to dilution or if we settle in cash, additional costs, upon conversion of that portion of the 1.875% Notes. If any of the other counterparties to our convertible hedge transactions were to default in their obligations, then our potential dilution or costs upon conversion of the respective notes would be materially increased.

At the end of the first quarter of 2012 the 4.0% Notes became convertible by the note holders because our Class A common stock closing price per share exceeded $39.49 for at least 20 trading days during the 30 consecutive trading day period ending on March 31, 2012. The requisite conditions were again met as of the end of the second, third and fourth quarters of 2012 and the 4.0% Notes remained convertible by the note holders. The 4.0% Notes will continue to be convertible through March 31, 2013, and will still be convertible thereafter, if one or more of the conversion conditions are satisfied.

 

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At the end of the third quarter of 2012, the conversion right for the 1.875% Notes was triggered because our Class A common stock closing price per share exceeded $53.90 for at least 20 trading days during the 30 consecutive trading day period ending on September 30, 2012. The requisite conditions were again met as of the end of the fourth quarter of 2012 and the 1.875% Notes remained convertible by the note holders. The 1.875% Notes will continue to be convertible until March 31, 2013, and may be convertible thereafter, if one or more of the conversion conditions are satisfied.

New technologies and their use by carriers may have a material adverse effect on our growth rate and results of operations.

The emergence of new technologies could reduce the demand for space on our towers. For example, the increased use by wireless service providers of signal combining and related technologies and products that allow two or more wireless service providers to provide services on different transmission frequencies using the same communications antenna and other facilities normally used by only one wireless service provider (i.e. network sharing) could reduce the demand for our tower space. Additionally, the use of technologies that enhance spectral capacity, such as beam forming or “smart antennae,” that can increase the range and capacity of an antenna could reduce the number of additional sites a wireless service provider needs to adequately serve a certain subscriber base and therefore reduce demand for our tower space. The development and growth of communications and other new technologies that do not require ground-based sites, such as the growth in delivery of video, voice and data services by satellites or other technologies, could also adversely affect the demand for our tower space. If any of these or other new technologies are widely adopted in the future it could have a material adverse effect on our growth and results of operations.

Our acquisition initiatives may disrupt our operations or heighten the risks inherent in our growth strategy. In addition, future acquisitions that are material in the aggregate may increase our debt levels and our leverage.

A key element of our growth strategy is to increase our tower portfolio through acquisitions. Consequently, as part of our business, we evaluate potential acquisitions, some of which may be, individually or in the aggregate, materially significant in terms of the number of towers to be acquired or the price that we would need to pay. Any future acquisitions that we may consummate that are material could increase our absolute level of debt and our pro forma leverage ratio.

In addition, acquisitions which would be material in the aggregate may exacerbate the risks inherent with our growth strategy, such as (i) an adverse impact on our overall profitability if the acquired towers do not achieve the financial results projected in our valuation models, (ii) unanticipated costs associated with the acquisitions that may impact our results of operations for a period, (iii) increased demands on our cash resources that may, among other things, impact our ability to explore other opportunities, (iv) undisclosed and assumed liabilities that we may be unable to recover, (v) increased vulnerability to general economic conditions, (vi) an adverse impact on our existing customer relationships, (vii) additional expenses and exposure to new regulatory, political and economic risks if such acquisitions were in new jurisdictions and (viii) diversion of managerial attention.

We may not successfully integrate acquired towers into our operations.

As part of our growth strategy, we have made and expect to continue to make acquisitions. The process of integrating any acquired towers into our operations may result in unforeseen operating difficulties and large expenditures and may absorb significant management attention that would otherwise be available for the ongoing development of our business. It may also result in the loss of key customers and/or personnel and expose us to unanticipated liabilities. These risks may be exacerbated in those circumstances in which we acquire a material number of towers. Further, we may not be able to retain the key employees that may be necessary to operate the business we acquire, and, we may not be able to timely attract new skilled employees and management to replace them. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in integrating acquisitions into our existing business.

 

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Delays or changes in the deployment or adoption of new technologies or slowing consumer adoption rates may have a material adverse effect on our growth rate.

There can be no assurances that 3G, 4G or other new wireless technologies will be deployed or adopted as rapidly as projected or that these new technologies will be implemented in the manner anticipated. The deployment of 3G experienced delays from the original projected timelines of the wireless and broadcast industries, and deployment of 4G has been limited to date. Additionally, the demand by consumers and the adoption rate of consumers for these new technologies once deployed may be lower or slower than anticipated. These factors could have a material adverse effect on our growth rate since growth opportunities and demand for our tower space as a result of such new technologies may not be realized at the times or to the extent anticipated.

We may not secure as many site leasing tenants as planned or our lease rates for new tenant leases may decline.

If wireless service provider demand for tower space or our lease rates on new leases decrease, we may not be able to successfully grow our site leasing business as expected. This may have a material adverse effect on our strategy, revenue growth and our ability to satisfy our financial and other contractual obligations. Our plan for the growth of our site leasing business largely depends on our management’s expectations and assumptions concerning future tenant demand and potential lease rates for our towers.

Increasing competition in the tower industry may create pricing pressures that may materially and adversely affect us.

Our industry is highly competitive, and our customers sometimes have alternatives for leasing antenna space. Some of our competitors, such as (1) U.S. and international wireless carriers that allow collocation on their towers and (2) large independent tower companies, are substantially larger and have greater financial resources than us. This could provide them with advantages with respect to establishing favorable leasing terms with wireless service providers or in their ability to acquire available towers.

In the site leasing business, we compete with:

 

   

wireless service providers that own and operate their own towers and lease, or may in the future decide to lease, antenna space to other providers;

 

   

national and regional tower companies; and

 

   

alternative facilities such as rooftops, outdoor and indoor DAS networks, billboards and electric transmission towers.

We believe that tower location and capacity, quality of service, density within a geographic market and, to a lesser extent, price historically have been and will continue to be the most significant competitive factors affecting the site leasing business. However, competitive pricing pressures for tenants on towers from these competitors could materially and adversely affect our lease rates. In addition, we may not be able to renew existing customer leases or enter into new customer leases, resulting in a material adverse impact on our results of operations and growth rate. Increasing competition could also make the acquisition of high quality tower assets more costly, or limit the acquisition opportunities altogether. Any of these factors could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

The site development segment of our industry is also extremely competitive. There are numerous large and small companies that offer one or more of the services offered by our site development business. As a result of

 

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this competition, margins in this segment continue to be under pressure. Many of our competitors have lower overhead expenses and therefore may be able to provide services at prices that we consider unprofitable. If margins in this segment were to further decrease, our consolidated revenues and our site development segment operating profit could be adversely affected.

The documents governing our indebtedness contain restrictive covenants that could adversely affect our business by limiting our flexibility.

The indentures governing the 8.25% Notes, the 5.75% Notes and the 5.625% Notes, the Senior Credit Agreement and the Secured Tower Revenue Securities contain restrictive covenants imposing significant operational and financial restrictions on us, including restrictions that may limit our ability to engage in acts that may be in our long-term best interests. Among other things, the covenants under each indenture limit our ability to:

 

   

Merge, consolidate or sell assets;

 

   

Make restricted payments, including pay dividends or make other distributions;

 

   

Enter into transactions with affiliates;

 

   

Enter into sale and leaseback transactions; and

 

   

Issue guarantees of indebtedness.

We are required to maintain certain financial ratios under the Senior Credit Agreement. The Senior Credit Agreement requires SBA Senior Finance II and SBACC to maintain specific financial ratios, including, at the SBA Senior Finance II level, (1) a ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Annualized Borrower EBITDA not to exceed 6.0 times for any fiscal quarter, (2) a ratio of Consolidated Total Debt and Net Hedge Exposure (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) to Annualized Borrower EBITDA for the most recently ended fiscal quarter not to exceed 6.0 times for 30 consecutive days and (3) a ratio of Annualized Borrower EBITDA to Annualized Cash Interest Expense (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) of not less than 2.0 times for any fiscal quarter. In addition, SBACC’s ratio of Consolidated Total Net Debt to Consolidated Adjusted EBITDA (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) for any fiscal quarter on an annualized basis cannot exceed 9.5 times.

Additionally, the mortgage loan relating to our Tower Securities contains financial covenants that require that the mortgage loan borrowers maintain, on a consolidated basis, a minimum debt service coverage ratio. To the extent that the debt service coverage ratio, as of the end of any calendar quarter, falls to 1.30 times or lower, then all cash flow in excess of amounts required to make debt service payments, to fund required reserves, to pay management fees and budgeted operating expenses and to make other payments required under the loan documents, referred to as “excess cash flow,” will be deposited into a reserve account instead of being released to the Borrowers. The funds in the reserve account will not be released to the Borrowers unless the debt service coverage ratio exceeds 1.30 times for two consecutive calendar quarters. If the debt service coverage ratio falls below 1.15 times as of the end of any calendar quarter, then an “amortization period” will commence and all funds on deposit in the reserve account will be applied to prepay the mortgage loan until such time that the debt service coverage ratio exceeds 1.15 times for a calendar quarter.

These covenants could place us at a disadvantage compared to some of our competitors which may have fewer restrictive covenants and may not be required to operate under these restrictions. Further, these covenants could have an adverse effect on our business by limiting our ability to take advantage of financing, new tower development, merger and acquisitions or other opportunities. If we fail to comply with these covenants, it could result in an event of default under our debt instruments. If any default occurs, all amounts outstanding under our outstanding notes and the Senior Credit Agreement may become immediately due and payable.

 

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Our variable rate indebtedness and refinancing obligations subject us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.

Fluctuations in market interest rates may increase interest expense relating to our floating rate indebtedness, which we expect to incur under the Revolving Credit Facility and Term Loans or upon refinancing our fixed rate debt. As a result, we are exposed to interest rate risk. If interest rates were to increase, our debt service obligations on the variable rate indebtedness would increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our indebtedness, will correspondingly decrease. There is no guarantee that any future refinancing of our indebtedness will have fixed interest rates or that interest rates on such indebtedness will be equal to or lower than the rates on our current indebtedness. In the future, we may enter into interest rate swaps that involve the exchange of floating for fixed rate interest payments in order to reduce interest rate volatility. However, we may not maintain interest rate swaps with respect to all of our variable rate indebtedness, and any swaps we enter into may not fully mitigate our interest rate risk.

Our dependence on our subsidiaries for cash flow may negatively affect our business.

We are a holding company with no business operations of our own. Our only significant assets are, and are expected to be, the outstanding capital stock and membership interests of our subsidiaries. We conduct, and expect to continue conducting, all of our business operations through our subsidiaries. Accordingly, our ability to pay our obligations is dependent upon dividends and other distributions from our subsidiaries to us. Most of our indebtedness is owed directly by our subsidiaries, including the mortgage loan underlying the Tower Securities, the 8.25% Notes, the 5.75% Notes, the Term Loans and any amounts that we may borrow under the Revolving Credit Facility. Consequently, the first use of any cash flow from operations generated by such subsidiaries will be payments of interest and principal, if any, under their respective indebtedness. Other than the cash required to repay amounts due under our outstanding convertible notes, we currently expect that substantially all the earnings and cash flow of our subsidiaries will be retained and used by them in their operations, including servicing their respective debt obligations. The ability of our operating subsidiaries to pay dividends or transfer assets to us is restricted by applicable state law and contractual restrictions, including the terms of their outstanding debt instruments.

Our quarterly operating results for our site development services fluctuate and therefore we may not be able to adjust our cost structure on a timely basis with regard to such fluctuations.

The demand for our site development services fluctuates from quarter to quarter and should not be considered indicative of long-term results. Numerous factors cause these fluctuations, including:

 

   

the timing and amount of our customers’ capital expenditures;

 

   

the size and scope of our projects;

 

   

the business practices of customers, such as deferring commitments on new projects until after the end of the calendar year or the customers’ fiscal year;

 

   

delays relating to a project or tenant installation of equipment;

 

   

seasonal factors, such as weather, vacation days and total business days in a quarter;

 

   

the use of third party providers by our customers;

 

   

the rate and volume of wireless service providers’ network development; and

 

   

general economic conditions.

 

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Although the demand for our site development services fluctuates, we incur significant fixed costs, such as maintaining a staff and office space, in anticipation of future contracts. In addition, the timing of revenues is difficult to forecast because our sales cycle may be relatively long. Therefore, we may not be able to adjust our cost structure on a timely basis to respond to the fluctuations in demand for our site development services.

We are not profitable and expect to continue to incur losses.

We are not profitable. The following chart shows the net losses we incurred for the periods indicated:

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     (in thousands)  

Net loss

   $ (194,421   $ (126,892   $ (181,390

Our losses are principally due to depreciation, amortization and accretion expenses, interest expense (including non-cash interest expense and amortization of deferred financing fees), and losses from the extinguishment of debt in the periods presented above. We expect to continue to incur significant losses, which may affect our ability to service our indebtedness.

The loss of the services of certain of our key personnel or a significant number of our employees may negatively affect our business.

Our success depends to a significant extent upon performance and active participation of our key personnel. We cannot guarantee that we will be successful in retaining the services of these key personnel. We have employment agreements with Jeffrey A. Stoops, our President and Chief Executive Officer, Kurt L. Bagwell, our Senior Vice President and President—International, Thomas P. Hunt, our Senior Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel, and Brendan T. Cavanagh, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. We do not have employment agreements with any of our other key personnel. If we were to lose any key personnel, we may not be able to find an appropriate replacement on a timely basis and our results of operations could be negatively affected. Further, the loss of a significant number of employees or our inability to hire a sufficient number of qualified employees could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our business is subject to government regulations and changes in current or future regulations could harm our business.

We are subject to federal, state and local regulation of our business, both in the U.S. and internationally. In the U.S., both the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) and the FCC regulate the construction, modification and maintenance of antenna towers and structures that support wireless communications and radio and television antennas. In addition, the FCC separately licenses and regulates wireless communications equipment and television and radio stations operating from such towers and structures. FAA and FCC regulations govern construction, lighting, painting and marking of towers and structures and may, depending on the characteristics of the tower or structure, require registration of the tower or structure. Certain proposals to construct new towers or structures or to modify existing towers or structures are reviewed by the FAA to ensure that the tower or structure will not present a hazard to air navigation.

Antenna tower owners and antenna structure owners may have an obligation to mark or paint towers or structures or install lighting to conform to FAA and FCC regulations and to maintain such marking, painting and lighting. Antenna tower owners and antenna structure owners may also bear the responsibility of notifying the FAA of any lighting outages. Certain proposals to operate wireless communications and radio or television stations from antenna towers and structures are also reviewed by the FCC to ensure compliance with

 

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environmental impact requirements. Failure to comply with existing or future applicable requirements may lead to civil penalties or other liabilities and may subject us to significant indemnification liability to our customers against any such failure to comply. In addition, new regulations may impose additional costly burdens on us, which may affect our revenues and cause delays in our growth.

Local regulations, including municipal or local ordinances, zoning restrictions and restrictive covenants imposed by community developers, vary greatly, but typically require antenna tower and structure owners to obtain approval from local officials or community standards organizations prior to tower or structure construction or modification. Local regulations can delay, prevent, or increase the cost of new construction, co-locations, or site upgrades, thereby limiting our ability to respond to customer demand. In addition, new regulations may be adopted that increase delays or result in additional costs to us. Furthermore, with respect to our international new builds, our tower construction may be delayed or halted as a result of local zoning restrictions, inconsistencies between laws or other barriers to construction in international markets. These factors could have a material adverse effect on our future growth and operations.

Our towers are subject to damage from natural disasters.

Our towers are subject to risks associated with natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes and earthquakes. We maintain insurance to cover the estimated cost of replacing damaged towers, but these insurance policies are subject to loss limits and deductibles. We also maintain third party liability insurance, subject to loss limits and deductibles, to protect us in the event of an accident involving a tower. A tower accident for which we are uninsured or underinsured, or damage to a significant number of our towers, could require us to incur significant expenditures and may have a material adverse effect on our operations or financial condition.

To the extent that we are not able to meet our contractual obligations to our customers, due to a natural disaster or other catastrophic circumstances, our customers may not be obligated or willing to pay their lease expenses; however, we would be required to continue paying our fixed expenses related to the affected tower, including ground lease expenses. If we are unable to meet our contractual obligations to our customers for a material portion of our towers, our operations could be materially and adversely affected.

We could have liability under environmental laws that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our operations, like those of other companies engaged in similar businesses, are subject to the requirements of various federal, state, local and foreign environmental and occupational safety and health laws and regulations, including those relating to the management, use, storage, disposal, emission and remediation of, and exposure to, hazardous and non-hazardous substances, materials, and wastes. As owner, lessee or operator of numerous tower sites, we may be liable for substantial costs of remediating soil and groundwater contaminated by hazardous materials, without regard to whether we, as the owner, lessee or operator, knew of or were responsible for the contamination. We may be subject to potentially significant fines or penalties if we fail to comply with any of these requirements. The current cost of complying with these laws is not material to our financial condition or results of operations. However, the requirements of these laws and regulations are complex, change frequently, and could become more stringent in the future. It is possible that these requirements will change or that liabilities will arise in the future in a manner that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We could suffer adverse tax and other financial consequences if taxing authorities do not agree with our tax positions, or we are unable to utilize our net operating losses.

We are periodically subject to a number of tax examinations by taxing authorities in the states and countries where we do business. We also have significant deferred tax assets related to our net operating losses (“NOLs”)

 

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in U.S. federal and state taxing jurisdictions. Generally, for U.S. federal and state tax purposes, NOLs can be carried forward and used for up to twenty years, and all of our tax years will remain subject to examination until three years after our NOLs are used or expire. We expect that we will continue to be subject to tax examinations in the future. In addition, U.S. federal, state and local, as well as international, tax laws and regulations are extremely complex and subject to varying interpretations. We recognize tax benefits of uncertain tax positions when we believe the positions are more likely than not of being sustained upon a challenge by the relevant tax authority. We believe our judgments in this area are reasonable and correct, but there is no guarantee that we will be successful if challenged by a tax authority. If there are tax benefits, including from our use of NOLs or other tax attributes, that are challenged successfully by a taxing authority, we may be required to pay additional taxes or we may seek to enter into settlements with the taxing authorities, which could require significant payments or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, we may be limited in our ability to utilize our NOLs to offset future taxable income and thereby reduce our otherwise payable income taxes. We have substantial federal and state NOLs, including significant portions obtained through acquisitions and dispositions, as well as those generated through our historic business operations. In addition, we have disposed of some entities and restructured other entities in conjunction with financing transactions and other business activities.

To the extent we believe that a position with respect to an NOL is not more likely than not to be sustained, we do not record the related deferred tax asset. In addition, for NOLs that meet the recognition threshold, we assess the recoverability of the NOL and establish a valuation allowance against the deferred tax asset related to the NOL if recoverability is questionable. Given the uncertainty surrounding the recoverability of certain of our NOLs, we have established a valuation allowance to offset the related deferred tax asset so as to reflect what we believe to be the recoverable portion of our NOLs.

Our ability to utilize our NOLs is also dependent, in part, upon us having sufficient future earnings to utilize our NOLs before they expire. If market conditions change materially and we determine that we will be unable to generate sufficient taxable income in the future to utilize our NOLs, we could be required to record an additional valuation allowance. We review our uncertain tax position and the valuation allowance for our NOLs periodically and make adjustments from time to time, which can result in an increase or decrease to the net deferred tax asset related to our NOLs. Our NOLs are also subject to review and potential disallowance upon audit by the taxing authorities of the jurisdictions where the NOLs were incurred, and future changes in tax laws or interpretations of such tax laws could limit materially our ability to utilize our NOLs. If we are unable to use our NOLs or use of our NOLs is limited, we may have to make significant payments or otherwise record charges or reduce our deferred tax assets, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our issuance of equity securities and other associated transactions may trigger a future ownership change which may negatively impact our ability to utilize net operating loss deferred tax assets in the future.

The issuance of equity securities and other associated transactions may increase the chance that we will have a future ownership change under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. We may also have a future ownership change, outside of our control, caused by future equity transactions by our current shareholders. Depending on our market value at the time of such future ownership change, an ownership change under Section 382 could negatively impact our ability to utilize our net operating loss deferred tax assets in the event we generate future taxable income. Currently, we have recorded a full valuation allowance against our net operating loss deferred tax asset because we have concluded that our loss history indicates that it is not “more likely than not” that such deferred tax assets will be realized.

 

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Future sales of our Class A common stock in the public market or the issuance of other equity may cause dilution or adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock and our ability to raise funds in new equity or equity-related offerings.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our Class A common stock or other equity-related securities in the public market, including sales by any selling shareholder or conversion of our convertible notes, could depress the market price of our Class A common stock and impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities.

Our costs could increase and our revenues could decrease due to perceived health risks from RF energy.

The U.S. government imposes requirements and other guidelines relating to exposure to RF energy. Exposure to high levels of RF energy can cause negative health effects. The potential connection between exposure to low levels of RF energy and certain negative health effects, including some forms of cancer, has been the subject of substantial study by the scientific community in recent years. According to the FCC, the results of these studies to date have been inconclusive. However, public perception of possible health risks associated with cellular and other wireless communications media could slow the growth of wireless companies, which could in turn slow our growth. In particular, negative public perception of, and regulations regarding, health risks could cause a decrease in the demand for wireless communications services. Moreover, if a connection between exposure to low levels of RF energy and possible negative health effects, including cancer, were demonstrated, we could be subject to numerous claims. If we were subject to claims relating to exposure to RF energy, even if such claims were not ultimately found to have merit, our financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

Our articles of incorporation, our bylaws and Florida law provide for anti-takeover provisions that could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us.

Provisions of our articles of incorporation, our bylaws and Florida law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if doing so would be beneficial to our shareholders. These provisions, alone or in combination with each other, may discourage transactions involving actual or potential changes of control, including transactions that otherwise could involve payment of a premium over prevailing market prices to holders of our Class A common stock, or could limit the ability of our shareholders to approve transactions that they may deem to be in their best interests.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

We are headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, where we currently lease approximately 103,000 square feet of office space in multiple buildings. These leases expire at different dates extending through February 28, 2022. We have entered into long-term leases for regional and certain site development office locations where we expect our activities to be longer-term. We open and close project offices from time to time in connection with our site development business. We believe our existing facilities are adequate for our current and planned levels of operations and that additional office space suited for our needs is reasonably available in the markets within which we operate.

Our interests in towers are comprised of a variety of fee interests, leasehold interests created by long-term lease agreements, perpetual easements, easements, licenses, rights-of-way, and other similar interests. For the quarter ended December 31, 2012, approximately 70% of our tower sites were located on parcels of land that we own, land subject to perpetual easements, or parcels of land that have an interest that extends beyond 20 years. The average remaining life under our ground leases, including renewal options under our control, has been extended to 31 years. In rural areas, a wireless communications site typically consists of up to a 10,000 square foot tract, which supports towers, equipment shelters and related equipment. Less than 2,500 square feet is required for a monopole or self-supporting tower structure of the kind typically used in metropolitan areas for wireless communications tower sites. Land leases generally have an initial term of five years with five or more additional automatic renewal periods of five years, for a total of thirty years or more.

 

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ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are involved in various legal proceedings relating to claims arising in the ordinary course of business. We do not believe that the ultimate resolution of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

Not Applicable.

 

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PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market for our Class A Common Stock

Our Class A common stock commenced trading under the symbol “SBAC” on The NASDAQ National Market System on June 16, 1999. We now trade on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, a segment of the NASDAQ Global Market, formally known as the NASDAQ National Market System.

The following table presents the high and low sales price for our Class A common stock for the periods indicated:

 

     High      Low  

Quarter ended December 31, 2012

   $ 71.17       $ 62.25   

Quarter ended September 30, 2012

   $ 63.22       $ 55.56   

Quarter ended June 30, 2012

   $ 57.88       $ 49.37   

Quarter ended March 31, 2012

   $ 51.51       $ 42.53   

Quarter ended December 31, 2011

   $ 43.12       $ 32.36   

Quarter ended September 30, 2011

   $ 40.13       $ 32.76   

Quarter ended June 30, 2011

   $ 40.35       $ 36.10   

Quarter ended March 31, 2011

   $ 44.44       $ 36.36   

As of February 16, 2013, there were 108 record holders of our Class A common stock.

Dividends

We have never paid a dividend on any class of common stock and anticipate that we will retain future earnings, if any, to fund the development and growth of our business. Consequently, we do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our Class A common stock in the foreseeable future. In addition, our ability to pay dividends is limited by the terms of our debt instruments.

Equity Compensation Plan

 

    Equity Compensation Plan Information  
    (in thousands except exercise price)  
    Number of Securities to be
Issued Upon Exercise of
Outstanding Options,
Warrants and Rights
    Weighted Average Exercise
Price of Outstanding
Options, Warrants and
Rights
    Number of Securities Remaining
Available for Future Issuance
Under Equity Compensation
Plans (Excluding Securities
Reflected in first column (a))
 
    (a)     (b)     (c)  

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

     

2001 Plan

    1,765 (1)    $ 26.06 (1)      —   (3) 

2010 Plan

    1,361 (2)    $ 37.07 (2)      13,540   

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

    —            —     
 

 

 

     

 

 

 

Total

    3,126      $ 30.85        13,540   
 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

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(1) 

Included in the number of securities in column (a) is approximately 56,000 restricted stock units, which have no exercise price. The weighted average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights (excluding restricted stock units) is $26.90.

(2) 

Included in the number of securities in column (a) is approximately 239,000 restricted stock units, which have no exercise price. The weighted average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights (excluding restricted stock units) is $44.95

(3) 

This plan has been terminated and we are no longer eligible to issue shares pursuant to the plan.

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth selected historical financial data as of and for each of the five years ended December 31, 2012. The financial data for the fiscal years ended 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. You should read the information set forth below in conjunction with our “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes to those consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K.

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012  
     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)  
     (in thousands, except for per share data)  

Operating data:

          

Revenues:

          

Site leasing

   $ 395,541      $ 477,007      $ 535,444      $ 616,294      $ 846,094   

Site development

     79,413        78,506        91,175        81,876        107,990   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     474,954        555,513        626,619        698,170        954,084   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

          

Cost of revenues (exclusive of depreciation, accretion and amortization shown below):

          

Cost of site leasing

     96,175        111,842        119,141        131,916        188,951   

Cost of site development

     71,990        68,701        80,301        71,005        90,556   

Selling, general and administrative

     48,721        52,785        58,209        62,828        72,148   

Asset impairment

     921        3,884        5,862        5,472        6,383   

Acquisition related expenses

     120        4,810        10,106        7,144        40,433   

Depreciation, accretion and amortization

     211,445        258,537        278,727        309,146        408,467   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     429,372        500,559        552,346        587,511        806,938   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     45,582        54,954        74,273        110,659        147,146   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

          

Interest income

     6,883        1,123        432        136        1,128   

Interest expense

     (105,328     (130,853     (149,921     (160,896     (196,241

Non-cash interest expense

     (33,309     (49,897     (60,070     (63,629     (70,110

Amortization of deferred financing fees

     (10,746     (10,456     (9,099     (9,188     (12,870

(Loss) gain from extinguishment of debt, net

     44,269        (5,661     (49,060     (1,696     (51,799

Other income (expense)

     (13,478     163        29        (165     5,654   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense

     (111,709     (195,581     (267,689     (235,438     (324,238
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before provision for income taxes

     (66,127     (140,627     (193,416     (124,779     (177,092

Provision for income taxes

     (1,037     (492     (1,005     (2,113     (6,594
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations

     (67,164     (141,119     (194,421     (126,892     (183,686

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

     —         —         —         —         2,296   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (67,164     (141,119     (194,421     (126,892     (181,390

Net loss (income) attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     —         248        (253     436        353   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications Corporation

   $ (67,164   $ (140,871   $ (194,674   $ (126,456   $ (181,037
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted per common share amounts:

          

Loss from continuing operations

   $ (0.61   $ (1.20   $ (1.68   $ (1.14   $ (1.53

Income from discontinued operations

     —         —         —         —         0.02   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per common share

   $ (0.61   $ (1.20   $ (1.68   $ (1.14   $ (1.51
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted weighted average number of common shares

     109,882        117,165        115,591        111,595        120,280   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     As of December 31,  
     2008      2009      2010      2011     2012  
     (audited)      (audited)      (audited)      (audited)     (audited)  
Balance Sheet Data:    (in thousands)  

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 78,856       $ 161,317       $ 64,254       $ 47,316      $ 233,099   

Restricted cash - current (1)

     38,599         30,285         29,456         22,266        27,708   

Short-term investments

     162         5,352         4,016         5,773        5,471   

Property and equipment, net

     1,502,672         1,496,938         1,534,318         1,583,393        2,671,317   

Intangibles, net

     1,425,132         1,435,591         1,500,012         1,639,784        3,134,133   

Total assets

     3,207,829         3,313,646         3,400,175         3,606,399        6,595,617   

Total debt

     2,392,230         2,489,050         2,827,450         3,354,485        5,356,103   

Total shareholders’ equity (deficit) (2)

     650,510         599,949         317,110         (11,313     652,991   

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012  
     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)     (audited)  
Other Data:    (in thousands)  

Cash provided by (used in):

          

Operating activities

   $ 173,696      $ 222,572      $ 201,140      $ 249,058      $ 340,914   

Investing activities

     (580,549     (229,075     (425,039     (507,888     (2,275,051

Financing activities

     415,437        88,978        126,821        242,047        2,116,412   

 

(1) Restricted cash of $27.7 million as of December 31, 2012 consisted of $26.8 million related to the Tower Securities loan requirements and $0.9 million related to surety bonds issued for our benefit. Restricted cash of $22.3 million as of December 31, 2011 consisted of $21.4 million related to 2010 Tower Securities loan requirements and $0.9 million related to surety bonds issued for our benefit. Restricted cash of $29.5 million as of December 31, 2010 consisted of $28.6 million related to 2010 Tower Securities loan requirements and $0.9 million related to surety bonds issued for our benefit. Restricted cash of $30.3 million as of December 31, 2009 consisted of $29.1 million related to CMBS Mortgage loan requirements and $1.2 million related to surety bonds issued for our benefit. Restricted cash of $38.6 million as of December 31, 2008 consisted of $36.2 million related to CMBS Mortgage loan requirements and $2.4 million related to surety bonds issued for our benefit.
(2) Includes deferred loss from the termination of nine interest rate swap agreements of $4.3 million as of December 31, 2009 and $7.4 million as of December 31, 2008. Includes deferred gain from the termination of interest rate swap agreements of $5.9 million as of December 31, 2008.

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the information contained in our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto. The following discussion includes forward-looking statements that involve certain risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, those described in Item 1A. Risk Factors. Our actual results may differ materially from those discussed below. See “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and Item 1A. Risk Factors.

We are a leading independent owner and operator of wireless communications towers. Our principal operations are in the United States and its territories. In addition, we own and operate towers in Canada, Central America and South America. Our primary business line is our site leasing business, which contributed approximately 97.4% of our total segment operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2012. In our site leasing business, we lease antenna space to wireless service providers on towers and other structures that we own, manage or lease from others. The towers that we own have been constructed by us at the request of a wireless service provider, built or constructed based on our own initiative, or acquired. As of December 31, 2012, we owned 17,491 tower sites, the majority of which have been built by us or built by other tower owners or operators who, like us, have built such towers to lease space to multiple wireless service providers. We also managed or leased approximately 4,800 actual or potential communications sites, approximately 500 of which were revenue producing as of December 31, 2012. Our other business line is our site development business, through which we assist wireless service providers in developing and maintaining their own wireless service networks.

Site Leasing Services

Our primary focus is the leasing of antenna space on our multi-tenant towers to a variety of wireless service providers under long-term lease contracts in the United States, Canada, Central America and South America. Site leasing revenues are received primarily from wireless service provider tenants, including AT&T, Sprint, Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile, Digicel, Claro, and Telefonica. Wireless service providers enter into numerous different tenant leases with us, each of which relates to the lease or use of space at an individual tower site. In the United States and Canada our tenant leases are generally for an initial term of five to ten years with five 5-year renewal periods at the option of the tenant. These tenant leases typically contain specific rent escalators, which average 3-4% per year, including the renewal option periods. Tenant leases in our Central and South America markets typically have an initial term of 10 years with 5-year renewal periods. In Central America, we have similar rent escalators to that of leases in the United States and Canada while our leases in South America typically escalate in accordance with a standard cost of living index.

Cost of site leasing revenue primarily consists of:

 

   

Rental payments on ground leases and other underlying property interests;

 

   

Straight-line rent adjustment for the difference between rental payments made and the expense recorded as if the payments had been made evenly throughout the lease term (which may include renewal terms) of the underlying property interests;

 

   

Property taxes;

 

   

Site maintenance and monitoring costs (exclusive of employee related costs);

 

   

Utilities;

 

   

Property insurance; and

 

   

Deferred lease origination cost amortization.

 

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Ground leases are generally for an initial term of five years or more with multiple renewal terms of five year periods at our option and provide for rent escalators which typically average 3-4% annually or provide for term escalators of approximately 15%. Of the 17,491 tower sites we owned as of December 31, 2012, approximately 70% were located on parcels of land that we own, land subject to perpetual easements, or parcels of land in which we have a leasehold or other interest that extends beyond 20 years. For any given tower, costs are relatively fixed over a monthly or an annual time period. As such, operating costs for owned towers do not generally increase as a result of adding additional customers to the tower. The amount of direct costs associated with operating a tower varies from site to site depending on the taxing jurisdiction and the height and age of the tower. The ongoing maintenance requirements are typically minimal and include replacing lighting systems, painting a tower or upgrading or repairing an access road or fencing.

As indicated in the table below, our site leasing business generates substantially all of our total segment operating profit. For information regarding our operating segments, see Note 21 of our Consolidated Financial Statements included in this annual report.

 

     Revenues  
     For the year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     (in thousands)  

Site leasing revenue

   $ 535,444      $ 616,294      $ 846,094   

Total revenues

   $ 626,619      $ 698,170      $ 954,084   

Site leasing revenue percentage of total revenues

     85.4     88.3     88.7

 

     Segment Operating Profit  
     For the year ended December 31,  
     2010     2011     2012  
     (in thousands)  

Site leasing segment operating profit (1)

   $ 416,303      $ 484,378      $ 657,143   

Total segment operating profit (1)

   $ 427,177      $ 495,249      $ 674,577   

Site leasing segment operating profit percentage of total segment operating profit (1)

     97.5     97.8     97.4

 

(1) Site leasing segment operating profit and total segment operating profit are non-GAAP financial measures. We reconcile these measures and other Regulation G disclosures in this annual report in the section entitled Non-GAAP Financial Measures.

We believe that over the long-term, site leasing revenues will continue to grow as wireless service providers lease additional antenna space on our towers due to increasing minutes of network use and data transfer, network expansion and network coverage requirements. We believe our site leasing business is characterized by stable and long-term recurring revenues, predictable operating costs and minimal non-discretionary capital expenditures. Due to the relatively young age and mix of our tower portfolio, we expect future expenditures required to maintain these towers to be minimal. Consequently, we expect to grow our cash flows by (1) adding tenants to our towers at minimal incremental costs by using existing tower capacity or requiring wireless service providers to bear all or a portion of the cost of tower modifications and (2) executing monetary amendments as wireless service providers upgrade their equipment. Furthermore, because our towers are strategically positioned and our customers typically do not relocate, we have historically experienced low tenant lease terminations as a percentage of revenue.

 

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Site Development Services

Our site development business, which is conducted in the United States only, is complementary to our site leasing business and provides us the ability to keep in close contact with the wireless service providers who generate substantially all of our site leasing revenue and to capture ancillary revenues that are generated by our site leasing activities, such as antenna and equipment installation at our tower locations. Site development services revenues are received primarily from providing a full range of end to end services to wireless service providers or companies providing development or project management services to wireless service providers. Our services include: (1) network pre-design; (2) site audits; (3) identification of potential locations for towers and antennas; (4) support in buying or leasing of the location; (5) assistance in obtaining zoning approvals and permits; (6) tower and related site construction; (7) antenna installation; and (8) radio equipment installation, commissioning and maintenance.

For information regarding our operating segments, see Note 21 of our Consolidated Financial Statements included in this annual report.

International Operations

As of December 31, 2012, we had operations in Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, and Brazil. Our operations in these countries are solely in the site leasing business, and we expect to expand operations through new builds and acquisitions. Tenant leases in the Canadian market typically have similar terms and conditions as those in the United States, with an initial term of five years, and specific rent escalators. Tenant leases in Central America and Brazil typically have a ten year initial term. Tenant leases in Central America typically have similar renewal terms and rent escalators as those in the United States and Canada while those in Brazil are based on a standard cost of living index.

In our Central American markets, significantly all of our revenue, expenses, and capital expenditures arising from our new build activities are denominated in U.S. dollars. Specifically, our ground leases, our tenant leases and most of our tower related expenses are due, and paid, in U.S. dollars. In our Central American markets, our local currency obligations are principally limited to (1) permitting and other local fees, (2) utilities and (3) taxes. In our Canadian and Brazilian operations, significantly all of our revenue, expenses and capital expenditures, including tenant leases, ground leases and other tower-related expenses, are denominated in local currency.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

We have identified the policies and significant estimation processes below as critical to our business operations and the understanding of our results of operations. The listing is not intended to be a comprehensive list. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, with no need for management’s judgment in their application. In other cases, management is required to exercise judgment in the application of accounting principles with respect to particular transactions. The impact and any associated risks related to these policies on our business operations is discussed throughout “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” where such policies affect reported and expected financial results. For a detailed discussion on the application of these and other accounting policies, see Note 2 of our Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2012, included herein. Our preparation of our financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of our financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. There can be no assurance that actual results will not differ from those estimates and such differences could be significant.

Revenue Recognition and Accounts Receivable

Revenue from site leasing is recorded monthly and recognized on a straight-line basis over the current term of the related lease agreements, which are generally five to ten years. Receivables recorded related to the straight-lining of site leases are reflected in other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. Rental amounts received in advance are recorded as deferred revenue on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Site development projects in which we perform consulting services include contracts on a time and materials basis or a fixed price basis. Time and materials based contracts are billed at contractual rates as the services are rendered. For those site development contracts in which we perform work on a fixed price basis, site development billing (and revenue recognition) is based on the completion of agreed upon phases of the project on a per site basis. Upon the completion of each phase on a per site basis, we recognize the revenue related to that phase. Site development projects generally take from 3 to 12 months to complete.

Revenue from construction projects is recognized on the percentage-of-completion method of accounting, determined by the percentage of cost incurred to date compared to management’s estimated total cost for each contract. This method is used because management considers total cost to be the best available measure of progress on the contracts. These amounts are based on estimates, and the uncertainty inherent in the estimates initially is reduced as work on the contracts nears completion. The asset “costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts” represents costs incurred and revenues recognized in excess of amounts billed. The liability “billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts,” included within other current liabilities on our Consolidated Balance Sheets, represents billings in excess of costs incurred and revenues recognized. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined to be probable.

On October 31, 2011, we entered into a Master Amendment with one of our wireless service provider customers. The Master Amendment serves as a separate amendment to each individual existing tenant lease agreement that we are currently a party to with that customer. Among other items, the Master Amendment (1) extends the current term of the individual leases, (2) permits the customer limited early termination rights which will be exercisable over a multi-year period, commencing in the second half of 2013, on a specific number of the existing leases, (3) allows the customer to make certain specific equipment changes at the tower sites in exchange for an increase in monthly rental payment due from the customer, and (4) slightly modifies the existing monthly lease rates of certain leases. The customer’s early termination rights are limited with respect to the aggregate

 

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number of leases that may be terminated and the number that may be terminated in any quarter. The specific leases to be terminated early and the timing of such terminations has not been determined as of the date of this filing. As a result, for accounting and financial statement purposes, we have made assumptions with regard to the leases to be terminated and the timing of the terminations. We have assumed that the customer will terminate the maximum number of leases allowable in each quarter, selecting the highest rental rate leases at the earliest allowable dates. We believe that these assumptions will ensure that only the minimum known revenue for the pool of leases covered by the Master Agreement will be accrued on a straight-line basis. Our balance sheet and statement of operations reflect these assumptions. The actual leases that the customer terminates and the timing and number of terminations may or may not be those that we have identified in our assumptions. We will monitor actual results and elections under the Master Amendment and record any differences from previously made assumptions on a quarterly basis. To the extent that the actual results materially differ from the assumptions made, we will disclose the impact of these adjustments.

We perform periodic credit evaluations of our customers. We monitor collections and payments from our customers and maintain a provision for estimated credit losses based upon historical experience, specific customer collection issues identified, and past due balances as determined based on contractual terms. Interest is charged on outstanding receivables from customers on a case by case basis in accordance with the terms of the respective contracts or agreements with those customers. Amounts determined to be uncollectible are written off against the allowance for doubtful accounts in the period in which uncollectibility is determined to be probable.

Asset Impairment

We evaluate individual long-lived and related assets with finite lives for indicators of impairment to determine when an impairment analysis should be performed. We evaluate our tower assets and current contract intangibles at the tower level, which is the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows exists. We evaluate our network location intangibles for impairment at the tower leasing business level whenever indicators of impairment are present. We have established a policy to at least annually evaluate our tower assets and current contract intangibles for impairment.

We record an impairment charge when we believe an investment in towers or related assets has been impaired, such that future undiscounted cash flows would not recover the then current carrying value of the investment in the tower site and related intangible. Estimates and assumptions inherent in the impairment evaluation include, but are not limited to, general market and economic conditions, historical operating results, geographic location, lease-up potential and expected timing of lease-up. In addition, we make certain assumptions in determining an asset’s fair value for the purpose of calculating the amount of an impairment charge.

Property Tax Expense

We typically receive notifications and invoices in arrears for property taxes associated with the tangible personal property and real property used in our site leasing business. As a result, we recognize property tax expense, which is reflected as a component of site leasing cost of revenue, based on our best estimate of anticipated property tax payments related to the current period. We consider several factors in establishing this estimate, including our historical level of incurred property taxes, the location of the property, our awareness of jurisdictional property value assessment methods and industry related property tax information. If our estimates regarding anticipated property tax expenses are incorrect, a future increase or decrease in site leasing cost of revenue may be required.

 

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KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

This report contains certain non-GAAP measures, including Segment Operating Profit and Adjusted EBITDA information. We have provided below a description of such non-GAAP measures, a reconciliation of such non-GAAP measures to their most directly comparable GAAP measures and an explanation as to why management utilizes these measures.

Segment Operating Profit:

We believe that Segment Operating Profit is an indicator of the operating performance of our site leasing and site development segments and is used to provide management with the ability to monitor the operating results and margin of each segment, while excluding the impact of depreciation, accretion and amortization, which is largely fixed and non-cash in nature. Segment Operating Profit is not intended to be an alternative measure of revenue or segment gross profit as determined in accordance with GAAP.

 

     For the year  ended
December 31,
     Dollar
Change
     Percentage
Change
    For the year ended
December 31,
     Dollar
Change
    Percentage
Change
 
Segment Operating Profit    2012      2011           2011      2010       
     (in thousands)            (in thousands)        

Site leasing

   $ 657,143       $ 484,378       $ 172,765         35.7   $ 484,378       $ 416,303       $ 68,075        16.4

Site development

     17,434         10,871         6,563         60.4     10,871         10,874         (3     0.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total

   $ 674,577       $ 495,249       $ 179,328         36.2   $ 495,249       $ 427,177       $ 68,072        15.9
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

The increase in site leasing segment operating profit of $172.8 million in 2012 is primarily due to additional profit generated by the towers that we acquired or constructed in the latter half of 2011 and during the year ended December 31, 2012, organic site leasing growth from new leases, contractual rent escalators, and lease amendments with current tenants which increased the related rent to reflect additional equipment added to our towers, control of our site leasing cost of revenue, and the positive impact of our ground lease purchase program.

The increase in site leasing segment operating profit of $68.1 million in 2011 is primarily related to additional profit generated by the revenues from the towers that we acquired or constructed in the latter half of 2010 and subsequent to December 31, 2010, organic site leasing growth from new leases, contractual rent escalators, and lease amendments with current tenants which increased the related rent to reflect additional equipment added to our towers in the year ended December 31, 2011, control of our site leasing cost of revenue, and the positive impact of our ground lease purchase program.

The increase in site development segment operating profit of $6.6 million in 2012 is primarily due to the higher volume of work performed compared to the prior year associated with the deployment of next generation networks by wireless carriers including Sprint’s Network Vision initiative.

Each respective Segment Operating Profit is defined as segment revenues less segment cost of revenues (excluding depreciation, accretion and amortization). Total Segment Operating Profit is the total of the operating profits of the two segments. The reconciliation of Segment Operating Profit is as follows:

 

     Site leasing segment  
     For the year ended December 31,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (in thousands)  

Segment revenue

   $ 846,094      $ 616,294      $ 535,444   

Segment cost of revenues (excluding depreciation, accretion and amortization)

     (188,951     (131,916     (119,141
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Segment operating profit

   $ 657,143      $ 484,378      $ 416,303   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     Site development segment  
     For the year ended December 31,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (in thousands)  

Segment revenue

   $ 107,990      $ 81,876      $ 91,175   

Segment cost of revenues (excluding depreciation, accretion and amortization)

     (90,556     (71,005     (80,301
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Segment operating profit

   $ 17,434      $ 10,871      $ 10,874   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

We define Adjusted EBITDA as net loss excluding the impact of net interest expenses, provision for taxes, depreciation, accretion and amortization, asset impairment and other charges, non-cash compensation, net loss from extinguishment of debt, other income and expenses, acquisition related expenses, non-cash straight-line leasing revenue, non-cash straight-line ground lease expense, and income from discontinued operations.

We believe that Adjusted EBITDA is an indicator of the financial performance of our core businesses. Adjusted EBITDA is a component of the calculation that has been used by our lenders to determine compliance with certain covenants under our Senior Credit Agreement, 8.25% Notes, 5.625% Notes, and 5.75% Notes. Adjusted EBITDA is not intended to be an alternative measure of operating income or gross profit margin as determined in accordance with GAAP.

The reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA is as follows:

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (in thousands)  

Net loss

   $ (181,390   $ (126,892   $ (194,421

Interest income

     (1,128     (136     (432

Total interest expense (1)

     279,221        233,713        219,090   

Depreciation, accretion and amortization

     408,467        309,146        278,727   

Asset impairment

     6,383        5,472        5,862   

Provision for taxes (2)

     7,689        4,091        2,904   

Loss from extinguishment of debt, net

     51,799        1,696        49,060   

Acquisition related expenses

     40,433        7,144        10,106   

Non-cash compensation

     13,968        11,469        10,501   

Non-cash straight-line leasing revenue

     (52,009     (12,762     (5,289

Non-cash straight-line ground lease expense

     22,463        11,811        11,300   

Other (income) expense

     (5,654     165        (29

Income from discontinued operations

     (2,296     —         —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 587,946      $ 444,917      $ 387,379   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) Total interest expense includes cash interest expense, non-cash interest expense and amortization of deferred financing fees.
(2) Includes $1,095, $1,978 and $1,899 of franchise taxes reflected on the Statement of Operations in selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

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Adjusted EBITDA was $587.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to $444.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The increase of $143.0 million is primarily the result of increased segment operating profit from our site leasing and site development segments offset partially by the increase in our cash selling, general, and administrative expenses.

Adjusted EBITDA was $444.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 as compared to $387.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The increase of $57.5 million is primarily the result of increased segment operating profit from our site leasing segment.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Year Ended 2012 Compared to Year Ended 2011

 

     For the year ended December 31,     Dollar
Change
    Percentage
Change
 
     2012     2011      
     (in thousands, except for percentages)        

Revenues:

        

Site leasing

   $ 846,094      $ 616,294      $ 229,800        37.3

Site development

     107,990        81,876        26,114        31.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues

     954,084        698,170        255,914        36.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Operating expenses:

        

Cost of revenues (exclusive of depreciation, accretion and amortization shown below):

        

Cost of site leasing

     188,951        131,916        57,035        43.2

Cost of site development

     90,556        71,005        19,551        27.5

Selling, general and administrative

     72,148        62,828        9,320        14.8

Asset impairment

     6,383        5,472        911        16.6

Acquisition related expenses

     40,433        7,144        33,289        466.0

Depreciation, accretion and amortization

     408,467        309,146        99,321        32.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total operating expenses

     806,938        587,511        219,427        37.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Operating income

     147,146        110,659        36,487        33.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Other income (expense):

        

Interest income

     1,128        136        992        729.4

Interest expense

     (196,241     (160,896     (35,345     22.0

Non-cash interest expense

     (70,110     (63,629     (6,481     10.2

Amortization of deferred financing fees

     (12,870     (9,188     (3,682     40.1

Loss from extinguishment of debt, net

     (51,799     (1,696     (50,103     2954.2

Other (expense) income

     5,654        (165     5,819        (3526.7 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total other expense

     (324,238     (235,438     (88,800     37.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Loss before provision for income taxes

     (177,092     (124,779     (52,313     41.9

Provision for income taxes

     (6,594     (2,113     (4,481     212.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Loss from continuing operations

     (183,686     (126,892     (56,794     44.8

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

     2,296        —         2,296        0.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net loss

     (181,390     (126,892     (54,498     42.9

Net loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     353        436        (83     (19.0 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications Corporation

   $ (181,037   $ (126,456   $ (54,581     43.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Revenues:

Site leasing revenue increased $229.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 largely due to (i) revenues from towers acquired in the latter half of fiscal year 2011 and during the year ended December 31, 2012 including $125.7 million of additional revenue from the Mobilitie and TowerCo acquisitions, (ii) Towers constructed in the latter half of 2011 and during the year ended December 31, 2012, (iii) organic site leasing growth from new leases, contractual rent escalators with current tenants and lease amendments with current tenants which increased the related rent to reflect additional equipment added to our towers, and (iv) increased straight-line leasing revenue associated with the Sprint Network Vision Agreement entered into in the fourth quarter of 2011 and the master lease amendment entered into with T-Mobile in September 2012.

 

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Site development revenue increased $26.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2011, as a result of a higher volume of work performed during 2012 as compared to 2011 associated with the deployment of next generation networks by wireless carriers including Sprint’s Network Vision initiative.

Operating Expenses:

Site leasing cost of revenues increased $57 million primarily as a result of the growth in the number of tower sites owned by us, including $31.3 million (the majority of which is reimbursable to us) from the Mobilitie towers acquired in the second quarter and $17.9 million from the TowerCo towers acquired in the fourth quarter.

Site development cost of revenues increased $19.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, as compared to the prior year due to a higher volume of work performed during 2012 as compared to 2011 associated with the deployment of next generation networks by wireless carriers including Sprint’s Network Vision initiative.

Selling, general, and administrative expenses increased $9.3 million primarily as a result of an increase in personnel, salaries and benefits, and non-cash compensation expense due in part to the Company’s continued portfolio expansion as well as costs incurred in connection with our international expansion.

Acquisition related expenses increased $33.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, as compared to the prior year, primarily as a result of an increase in acquisition and integration related expenses related to tower acquisitions. Acquisition related costs incurred during the year ended December 31, 2012 associated with the Mobilitie and TowerCo acquisitions were $30.6 million.

Depreciation, accretion and amortization expense increased $99.3 million to $408.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 from $309.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 due to an increase in the number of tower sites built and acquired by us, including through the Mobilitie and TowerCo acquisitions. Depreciation, accretion, and amortization expense recorded during the year ended December 31, 2012 includes $73.1 million related to Mobilitie and TowerCo.

Operating Income:

Operating income increased $36.5 million for year ended December 31, 2012 to $147.1 million compared to $110.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 primarily due to higher segment operating profit in both the site leasing and site development segments offset by increases in depreciation, accretion and amortization expense, acquisition related expenses, and selling, general and administrative expenses.

Other Income (Expense):

Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2012 increased $35.3 million from the year ended December 31, 2011 primarily due to the higher weighted average principal amount of cash-interest bearing debt outstanding during the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to December 31, 2011 resulting from the issuance of the 2011 Term Loan, 2012-1 Term Loan, 5.75% Notes, Mobilitie Bridge Loan, 2012 Tower Securities, 5.625% Notes, and the 2012-2 Term Loan. These were offset by the full redemption of $375.0 million of principal balance of the 8.0% Notes and the redemption of $131.3 million in aggregate principal balance of the 8.25% Notes.

Non-cash interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2012 increased $6.5 million from the year ended December 31, 2011 primarily as a result of accretion of debt discounts using the effective interest method on the

 

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1.875% Notes, the 4.0% Notes, and the Senior Notes. This was offset by the repurchase of $15.0 million in principal amount of the 1.875% Notes in the first quarter of 2011, the repurchase of $66.2 million in principal amount of the 1.875% Notes in the fourth quarter of 2012, and by the redemption of $375.0 million of the 8.0% Notes and $131.3 million of the 8.25% Notes in 2012.

Loss from extinguishment of debt was $51.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, an increase of $50.1 million from the year ended December 31, 2011. The increase reflects the premium paid on the redemption of $375.0 million of our 8.0% Notes and $131.3 million of our 8.25% Notes and the write off of their related debt discount and deferred financing fees of $2.5 million and $7.7 million, respectively. Additionally, the loss includes the write off of $3.6 million of deferred financing fees related to the early extinguishment of the Mobilitie Bridge Loan and $2.0 million from the repurchase of $66.2 million of principal balance of the 1.875% Notes. Comparatively, the loss from extinguishment of debt was $1.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 which was due to the repurchase of $15.0 million in principal amount of the 1.875% Notes.

Net Loss:

Net loss was $181.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to $126.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The net loss increased in 2012 primarily due to increases in the loss on extinguishment of debt, acquisition related expenses, depreciation, accretion, and amortization expense as well as interest expense, non-cash interest expense, and selling, general, and administrative costs. This was offset by an increase in our site leasing segment and site development segment operating profit.

 

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Year Ended 2011 Compared to Year Ended 2010

 

     For the year ended December 31,     Dollar
Change
    Percentage
Change
 
     2011     2010      
     (in thousands, except for percentages)        

Revenues:

        

Site leasing

   $ 616,294      $ 535,444      $ 80,850        15.1

Site development

     81,876        91,175        (9,299     (10.2 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total revenues

     698,170        626,619        71,551        11.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Operating expenses:

        

Cost of revenues (exclusive of depreciation, accretion and amortization shown below):

        

Cost of site leasing

     131,916        119,141        12,775        10.7

Cost of site development

     71,005        80,301        (9,296     (11.6 %) 

Selling, general and administrative

     62,828        58,209        4,619        7.9

Asset impairment

     5,472        5,862        (390     (6.7 %) 

Acquisition related expenses

     7,144        10,106        (2,962     (29.3 %) 

Depreciation, accretion and amortization

     309,146        278,727        30,419        10.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total operating expenses

     587,511        552,346        35,165        6.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Operating income

     110,659        74,273        36,386        49.0
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Other income (expense):

        

Interest income

     136        432        (296     (68.5 %) 

Interest expense

     (160,896     (149,921     (10,975     7.3

Non-cash interest expense

     (63,629     (60,070     (3,559     5.9

Amortization of deferred financing fees

     (9,188     (9,099     (89     1.0

Loss from extinguishment of debt, net

     (1,696     (49,060     47,364        (96.5 %) 

Other income

     (165     29        (194     (669.0 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total other expense

     (235,438     (267,689     32,251        (12.0 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Loss before provision for income taxes

     (124,779     (193,416     68,637        (35.5 %) 

Provision for income taxes

     (2,113     (1,005     (1,108     110.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net loss

     (126,892     (194,421     67,529        (34.7 %) 

Net (gain) loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     436        (253     689        (272.3 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications Corporation

   $ (126,456   $ (194,674   $ 68,218        (35.0 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Revenues

Site leasing revenue increased $80.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 largely due to (i) organic site leasing growth from new leases, contractual rent escalators with current tenants and lease amendments with current tenants which increased the related rent to reflect additional equipment added to our towers and (ii) revenues from the towers that we acquired or constructed in the latter half of 2010 and subsequent to December 31, 2010.

Site development revenue decreased $9.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2010, as a result of a lower volume of work performed compared to the prior year.

Operating Expenses

Site leasing cost of revenues increased $12.8 million primarily as a result of the growth in the number of tower sites owned by us, which was 10,524 at December 31, 2011 up from 9,111 at December 31, 2010 offset by the positive impact of our ground lease purchase program.

 

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Site development cost of revenues decreased $9.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the prior year, as a result of a lower volume of work performed during 2011 as compared to 2010.

Selling, general, and administrative expenses increased $4.6 million primarily as a result of an increase in salaries, benefits and other employee related expenses resulting primarily from a higher number of employees, increased non-cash compensation expense as well as costs incurred in connection with our international expansion.

Acquisition related expenses decreased $3.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2011, as compared to the prior year, primarily as a result of the timing of due diligence and other acquisition related costs for towers acquired or under contract in 2011 compared to 2010.

We recognized an asset impairment charge of $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 and $5.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. These asset impairment charges resulted from a reevaluation of future cash flow expectations, using a discounted cash flow analysis, for those towers that have not achieved expected lease-up results, compared to the related net book value of those towers.

Depreciation, accretion and amortization expense increased $30.4 million to $309.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 from $278.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 due to an increase in the number of towers and associated intangible assets owned for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to those owned at December 31, 2010.

Operating Income

Operating income increased $36.4 million for year ended December 31, 2011 to $110.7 million compared to $74.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 primarily due to higher segment operating profit in the site leasing segment offset by increases in depreciation, accretion and amortization expense, and selling, general and administrative expenses.

Other Income (Expense)

Interest income decreased $0.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 compared to the year ended December 31, 2010 primarily as a result of a lower amount of investments held during 2011 compared to 2010.

Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2011 increased $11.0 million from the year ended December 31, 2010 primarily due to the higher weighted average amount of cash-interest bearing debt outstanding driven by an issuance of a new $500.0 million Term Loan in June 30, 2011. This increase was offset by a lower weighted average interest rate on borrowings for the year ended December 31, 2011 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2010.

Non-cash interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2011 increased $3.6 million from the year ended December 31, 2010 primarily as a result of accretion of debt discounts using the effective interest method on the 1.875% Notes, the 4.0% Notes, and the Senior Notes, offset by a reduction of accretion due to final payoff of the 0.375% Notes in December of 2010.

The loss from extinguishment of debt of $1.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 is associated with the repurchase of $15.0 million of the 1.875% Notes in the first quarter of 2011. The net loss from extinguishment of debt of $49.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 is associated with the repayment of the outstanding balance of $938.6 million in principal of our 2006 CMBS Certificates.

 

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Net Loss

Net loss was $126.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 as compared to $194.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The net loss decreased in 2011 primarily due to an increase in site leasing segment operating profit and a decrease in loss from the extinguishment of debt, offset by increases in interest expense, non-cash interest expense, and depreciation, accretion and amortization expense.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

SBA Communications Corporation is a holding company with no business operations of its own. SBA Communications’ only significant asset is the outstanding capital stock of Telecommunications, which is also a holding company that owns equity interests in entities that directly or indirectly own all of our domestic and international towers and assets. We conduct all of our business operations through Telecommunications’ subsidiaries. Accordingly, our only source of cash to pay our obligations, other than financings, is distributions with respect to our ownership interest in our subsidiaries from the net earnings and cash flow generated by these subsidiaries.

A summary of our cash flows is as follows:

 

     For the years ended December 31,     2010  
     2012     2011    
     (in thousands)        

Summary cash flow information:

      

Cash provided by operating activities

   $ 340,914      $ 249,058      $ 201,140   

Cash used in investing activities

     (2,275,051     (507,888     (425,039

Cash provided by financing activities

     2,116,412        242,047        126,821   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     182,275        (16,783     (97,078

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     1,212        (155     15   

Cash provided by discontinued operations from operating activities

     2,296        —         —    

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

     47,316        64,254        161,317   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

   $ 233,099      $ 47,316      $ 64,254   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Sources of Liquidity

We fund our growth, including our tower portfolio growth, through cash flows from operations, long-term indebtedness and equity issuances. With respect to our debt financing, we have issued secured and unsecured debt instruments at various levels of our organizational structure to minimize our financing costs while maximizing our operational flexibility.

Cash provided by operating activities was $340.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to $249.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase was primarily due to an increase in segment operating profit from the site leasing segment partially offset by increased cash interest payments relating to the higher average amount of cash-interest bearing debt outstanding for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the same period in the prior year.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, we borrowed $584.0 million and repaid $484.0 million under the Revolving Credit Facility. As of December 31, 2012, the availability under the Revolving Credit Facility was $600.0 million, subject to compliance with financial ratios.

 

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On March 7, 2012, we sold 6,005,000 shares of our Class A common stock at $47.30 per share resulting in proceeds of $283.9 million, net of related fees.

On April 2, 2012, we completed our acquisition of the equity interests in certain entities affiliated with Mobilitie LLC. In connection with the acquisition, we paid approximately $850 million in cash, which we funded from (i) borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility and (ii) $400 million from a new bridge loan (“Mobilitie Bridge Loan”). Additionally, we issued 5,250,000 shares of our Class A common stock.

On May 9, 2012, we obtained a new $200.0 million senior secured term loan (“2012-1 Term Loan”).

On July 13, 2012, we issued $800 million of our 5.75% unsecured senior notes due July 15, 2020 at par with interest due semi-annually on July 15 and January 15 of each year beginning on January 15, 2013.

On August 9, 2012, we issued $610 million of the 2012-1 Tower Securities (as defined below) which have an anticipated repayment date of December 2017 and a final maturity date of December 2042. The fixed coupon interest rate of the 2012-1 Tower Securities is 2.933% per annum, payable monthly.

On September 6, 2012, we sold certain DAS networks located in New York, Chicago and Las Vegas, to ExteNet Systems, Inc. for approximately $94.3 million in cash and $25 million in the form of a promissory note. On October 23, 2012, an additional DAS network in Auburn, Alabama was sold to ExteNet for cash consideration of $5.7 million.

On September 28, 2012, we issued $500 million of our 5.625% unsecured senior notes due October 1, 2019 at par with interest payable semi-annually on October 1 and April 1 of each year, beginning on April 1, 2013.

On September 28, 2012, we obtained a new $300 million 2012-2 Term Loan (as defined below).

On October 1, 2012, the Company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, completed the acquisition of TowerCo II Holdings LLC, which owned 3,256 tower sites in 47 states across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. As consideration for the acquisition, the Company paid $1.2 billion in cash and issued 4,588,840 shares of its Class A common stock.

Registration Statements

We have on file with the Commission a shelf registration statement on Form S-4 registering shares of Class A common stock that we may issue in connection with the acquisition of wireless communication towers or antenna sites and related assets or companies who own wireless communication towers, antenna sites or related assets. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we did not issue any shares of Class A common stock under this registration statement. As of December 31, 2012, we had approximately 1.7 million shares of Class A common stock remaining under this shelf registration statement.

On February 27, 2012, we filed with the Commission an automatic shelf registration statement for well-known seasoned issuers on Form S-3ASR. This registration statement enables us to issue shares of our Class A common stock, preferred stock or debt securities either separately or represented by warrants, or depositary shares as well as units that include any of these securities. Under the rules governing automatic shelf registration statements, we will file a prospectus supplement and advise the Commission of the amount and type of securities each time we issue securities under this registration statement. For the year ended December 31, 2012, we issued 6,005,000 shares of our Class A common stock under the automatic shelf registration statement and the prospectus supplement related thereto.

Uses of Liquidity

We believe that our principal use of liquidity will be to fund tower portfolio growth and, secondarily, to fund our stock repurchase program. In the future, in order to manage our leverage and liquidity positions, we may repurchase, for cash or equity, our outstanding indebtedness in privately-negotiated or open market transactions in order to optimize our liquidity and leverage and take advantage of market opportunities. If we undertake debt repurchases or exchanges, these actions could materially impact the amount and composition of indebtedness outstanding or dilute our existing shareholders.

 

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Our cash capital expenditures, including cash used for acquisitions, for the year ended December 31, 2012 were $2,371.9 million. The $2,371.9 million includes cash capital expenditures of $2,211.8 million that we incurred primarily in connection with the acquisition of 6,630 completed towers, net of related working capital adjustments and earnouts associated with previous acquisitions. The $2,371.9 million also includes $76.0 million for construction and related costs associated with the completion of 356 new towers during the year ended December 31, 2012 and for the sites in process at December 31, 2012, $8.6 million for tower maintenance capital expenditures, $24.4 million for augmentations and tower upgrades (of which, $16.7 was recovered from our tenants), $3.7 million for general corporate expenditures, and $46.9 million for ground lease purchases (excluding $9.7 million spent to extend ground lease terms).

On April 2, 2012, we completed our acquisition of the equity interests in certain entities affiliated with Mobilitie LLC. In connection with the acquisition, we paid approximately $850 million in cash, which we funded from (i) borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility and (ii) $400 million from a new bridge loan (“Mobilitie Bridge Loan”). Additionally, we issued 5,250,000 shares of our Class A common stock.

On April 13, 2012, the proceeds from the equity offering of 6,005,000 shares of our Class A common stock were used to redeem $131.3 million in aggregate principal amount of our 8.0% Notes and $131.3 million in aggregate principal amount of our 8.25% Notes and to pay the applicable premium for the redemption.

On May 9, 2012, we used the proceeds from the $200.0 million 2012-1 Term Loan to pay off the outstanding balance on the Revolving Credit Facility.

On July 13, 2012, we used the net proceeds from the issuance of the 5.75% Notes to repay the $400.0 million outstanding balance under the Mobilitie Bridge Loan and to repay the $284.0 million outstanding balance under our Revolving Credit Facility. The remaining proceeds were used for general corporate purposes.

On August 9, 2012, we used the net proceeds from the issuance of the 2012-1 Tower Securities to repay in full the remaining $243.8 million balance of the 8.0% Notes plus $19.0 million in applicable premium and fees associated with early redemption. The remaining net proceeds were used to pay a portion of the cash consideration in connection with our acquisition of TowerCo and for general corporate purposes.

On October 1, 2012, we completed our previously announced acquisition of TowerCo II Holdings LLC, which owns 3,256 tower sites in 47 states across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. As consideration for the acquisition, we paid $1.2 billion in cash and issued 4,588,840 shares of our Class A common stock.

In November 2012, we repurchased $66.2 million of aggregate principal balance of the 1.875% Notes for $107.5 million in cash through multiple transactions.

On December 20, 2012, we acquired 800 freestanding wireless towers in Brazil from Vivo S.A. for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $175.9 million which was paid on January 4, 2013 from cash on hand and borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, we did not repurchase any shares of our Class A common stock under our stock repurchase program. As of December 31, 2012, we had a remaining authorization to repurchase $150.0 million of Class A common stock under our current $300.0 million stock repurchase program.

 

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In order to manage our leverage and liquidity positions, take advantage of market opportunities and ensure continued compliance with our financial covenants, we may decide to pursue a variety of other financial transactions. These transactions may include the issuance of additional indebtedness, the repurchase of our outstanding indebtedness for cash or equity, selling certain assets or lines of business, issuing common stock or securities convertible into shares of common stock, or pursuing other financing alternatives, including securitization transactions. If either our debt repurchases or exchanges or any of the other financial transactions are implemented, these actions could materially impact the amount and composition of indebtedness outstanding, increase our interest expense and/or dilute our existing shareholders. We cannot assure you that we will not implement any of these strategies or that, if implemented, these strategies could be implemented on terms favorable to us and our shareholders.

During 2013, we expect to incur non-discretionary cash capital expenditures associated with tower maintenance and general corporate expenditures of $16.0 million to $21.0 million and discretionary cash capital expenditures, based on current obligations, of $355.0 million to $385.0 million primarily associated with the towers we intend to build in 2013, tower acquisitions closed or currently under contract, tower augmentations and ground lease purchases. We may spend additional capital in 2013 on acquiring revenue producing or expense reducing assets not yet identified and under contract, or possibly stock repurchases.

We estimate we will incur less than $1,000 per tower per year for non-discretionary maintenance capital improvements related to our towers. We expect to fund cash capital expenditures from cash on hand, cash flow from operations and borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility. The exact amount of our future capital expenditures will depend on a number of factors including amounts necessary to support our tower portfolio, our new tower build and tower acquisition programs, and our ground lease purchase program.

Debt Instruments and Debt Service Requirements

Senior Credit Agreement

On February 11, 2010, SBA Senior Finance II, LLC (“SBA Senior Finance II”), an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of our Company, entered into a credit agreement for a $500.0 million senior secured revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility,” formerly referred to as the 2010 Credit Facility) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the credit agreement.

On June 30, 2011, SBA Senior Finance II entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (as amended, supplemented or modified from time to time, the “Senior Credit Agreement”) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the Senior Credit Agreement, to extend the maturity of the Revolving Credit Facility, to obtain a new $500.0 million senior secured term loan (the “2011 Term Loan”), and to amend certain terms of the existing credit agreement. In addition, at the time of entering into the Senior Credit Agreement, the remaining deferred financing fees balance related to the existing Credit Agreement prior to the amendment was transferred to the Revolving Credit Facility in accordance with accounting guidance for revolving credit facilities.

On April 2, 2012 and again on May 9, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II exercised its right to increase the aggregate principal amount of the Revolving Credit Facility under the Senior Credit Agreement from $500.0 million to $600.0 million and from $600.0 million to $700.0 million, respectively. We incurred deferred financing fees of approximately $1.1 million in relation to these increases.

On May 9, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II entered into a First Amendment to the Senior Credit Agreement (the “First Amendment”) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the Senior Credit Agreement, to extend the maturity date of the Revolving Credit Facility to May 9, 2017.

 

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Also on May 9, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II entered into a Second Amendment to the Senior Credit Agreement (the “Second Amendment”) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the Senior Credit Agreement, to obtain a new $200.0 million senior secured term loan (the “2012-1 Term Loan”). We incurred financing fees of $2.7 million associated with the closing of this transaction which are being amortized through the maturity date.

On September 28, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II entered into a Third Amendment to the Senior Credit Agreement (the “Third Amendment”) and Fourth Amendment to the Senior Credit Agreement (the “Fourth Amendment”) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the Senior Credit Agreement, to amend certain definitions related to the calculation of leverage at the SBA level to be consistent with the method for calculating leverage at the SBA Senior Finance II level and to amend the Senior Credit Agreement to permit SBA Senior Finance II, without the consent of the other lenders, to request that one or more lenders provide SBA Senior Finance II with additional term loans or to increase the commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility. SBA Senior Finance II’s ability to request such additional term loans or increases in the Revolving Credit Facility is subject to its compliance with the conditions set forth in the Senior Credit Agreement.

On September 28, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II also entered into a Fifth Amendment to the Senior Credit Agreement (the “Fifth Amendment”) with several banks and other financial institutions or entities from time to time parties to the Senior Credit Agreement, to obtain a new $300.0 million senior secured term loan (the “2012-2 Term Loan” collectively with the 2011 Term Loan and the 2012-1 Term Loan, the “Term Loans”). We incurred financing fees of $3.5 million associated with the closing of this transaction which are being amortized through the maturity date.

On January 28, 2013, SBA Senior Finance II exercised its right to increase the aggregate principal amount of the Revolving Credit Facility from $700.0 million to $730.0 million.

Revolving Credit Facility under the Senior Credit Agreement

The Revolving Credit Facility consists of a revolving loan under which up to $700.0 million aggregate principal amount as of December 31, 2012 ($730.0 million as of January 28, 2013) may be borrowed, repaid and redrawn, subject to compliance with specific financial ratios and the satisfaction of other customary conditions to borrowing. Amounts borrowed under the Revolving Credit Facility accrue interest at the Eurodollar Rate plus a margin that ranges from 187.5 basis points to 237.5 basis points or at a Base Rate plus a margin that ranges from 87.5 basis points to 137.5 basis points, in each case based on the ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Annualized Borrower EBITDA, calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement. If not earlier terminated by SBA Senior Finance II, the Revolving Credit Facility will terminate on, and SBA Senior Finance II will repay all amounts outstanding on or before, May 9, 2017. The proceeds available under the Revolving Credit Facility may be used for general corporate purposes. A per annum commitment fee of 0.375% to 0.5% of the unused commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility is charged based on the ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Annualized Borrower EBITDA (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement). SBA Senior Finance II may, from time to time, borrow from and repay the Revolving Credit Facility. Consequently, the amount outstanding under the Revolving Credit Facility at the end of a period may not be reflective of the total amounts outstanding during such period. As of December 31, 2012, the amount outstanding of $100 million was accruing interest at 2.335% per annum.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, we borrowed $584.0 million and repaid $484.0 million of the outstanding balance under the Revolving Credit Facility using proceeds from the 2012-1 Term Loan and the 5.75% Notes (as defined below). As of December 31, 2012, the availability under the Revolving Credit Facility was $600.0 million, subject to compliance with specified financial ratios and the satisfaction of other customary conditions to borrowing.

 

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Term Loans under the Senior Credit Agreement

2011 Term Loan

The 2011 Term Loan consists of a senior secured term loan in an initial aggregate principal amount of $500.0 million and matures on June 30, 2018. The 2011 Term Loan accrues interest, at SBA Senior Finance II’s election, at either the Base Rate plus a margin of 175 basis points (with a Base Rate floor of 2%) or Eurodollar Rate plus a margin of 275 basis points (with a Eurodollar Rate floor of 1%). As of December 31, 2012, the 2011 Term Loan was accruing interest at 3.75% per annum. The proceeds from the 2011 Term Loan were used to pay down $270.0 million of the existing balance on the Revolving Credit Facility during the year ended 2011 and for general corporate purposes. Principal on the 2011 Term Loan is repaid in quarterly installments of $1.25 million on the last day of each March, June, September and December, which commenced on September 30, 2011. The remaining principal balance of the 2011 Term Loan will be due and payable on the maturity date. SBA Senior Finance II has the ability to prepay any or all amounts under the 2011 Term Loan. The 2011 Term Loan was issued at 99.75% of par value. We incurred financing fees of $4.9 million associated with the closing of this transaction.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, we made repayments totaling $5.0 million on the 2011 Term Loan. As of December 31, 2012, the 2011 Term Loan had a principal balance of $492.5 million.

2012-1 Term Loan

The 2012-1 Term Loan consists of a senior secured term loan in an initial aggregate principal amount of $200.0 million and matures on May 9, 2017. The 2012-1 Term Loan accrues interest, at SBA Senior Finance II’s election, at either the Base Rate plus a margin that ranges from 100 to 150 basis points or the Eurodollar Rate plus a margin that ranges from 200 to 250 basis points, in each case based on the ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Annualized Borrower EBITDA (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement). As of December 31, 2012, the 2012-1 Term Loan was accruing interest at 2.47% per annum. Having commenced on September 30, 2012, principal of the 2012-1 Term Loan is being repaid in quarterly installments on the last day of each March, June, September and December, in an amount equal to $2.5 million for each of the first eight quarters, $3.75 million for the next four quarters and $5.0 million for each quarter thereafter. SBA Senior Finance II has the ability to prepay any or all amounts under the 2012-1 Term Loan without premium or penalty. To the extent not previously paid, the 2012-1 Term Loan will be due and payable on the maturity date. The 2012-1 Term Loan was issued at par. We incurred deferred financing fees of approximately $2.7 million in relation to this transaction which are being amortized through the maturity date. Proceeds from the 2012-1 Term Loan were used to pay amounts outstanding under the Revolving Credit Facility during the second quarter of 2012.

During the year ended December 31, 2012, We made repayments totaling $5.0 million on the 2012-1 Term Loan. As of December 31, 2012, the 2012-1 Term Loan had a principal balance of $195.0 million.

2012-2 Term Loan

The 2012-2 Term Loan consists of a senior secured term loan in an initial aggregate principal amount of $300.0 million and matures on September 28, 2019. The 2012-2 Term Loan accrues interest, at SBA Senior Finance II’s election, at either the Base Rate plus 175 basis points (with a Base Rate floor of 2%) or Eurodollar Rate plus 275 basis points (with a Eurodollar Rate floor of 1%). As of December 31, 2012, the 2012-2 Term Loan was accruing interest at 3.75% per annum. Principal of the 2012-2 Term Loan is to be repaid in equal quarterly installments on the last day of each March, June, September and December, commencing in March 2013, in an aggregate amount equal to $3.0 million per year. SBA Senior Finance II has the ability to prepay any or all amounts under the 2012-2 Term Loan without premium or penalty, with the exception of a 1% premium if

 

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prepayment occurs during the first year of the loan with proceeds from certain refinancing or repricing transactions. To the extent not previously paid, the 2012-2 Term Loan will be due and payable on the maturity date. The 2012-2 Term Loan was issued at 99.75% of par value. We incurred deferred financing fees of approximately $3.5 million in relation to this transaction which are being amortized through the maturity date. We used borrowings under the 2012-2 Term Loan to pay a part of the cash consideration in the TowerCo II Holdings LLC acquisition. The remaining proceeds under the 2012-2 Term Loan were used for general corporate purposes.

As of December 31, 2012, the 2012-2 Term Loan had a principal balance of $300.0 million.

Terms of the Senior Credit Agreement

The Senior Credit Agreement, as amended, requires SBA Senior Finance II and SBA Communications Corporation (“SBAC”) to maintain specific financial ratios, including, at the SBA Senior Finance II level, (1) a ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Annualized Borrower EBITDA not to exceed 6.0 times for any fiscal quarter, (2) a ratio of Consolidated Total Debt and Net Hedge Exposure (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) to Annualized Borrower EBITDA for the most recently ended fiscal quarter not to exceed 6.0 times for 30 consecutive days and (3) a ratio of Annualized Borrower EBITDA to Annualized Cash Interest Expense (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) of not less than 2.0 times for any fiscal quarter. In addition, SBAC’s ratio of Consolidated Total Net Debt to Consolidated Adjusted EBITDA (calculated in accordance with the Senior Credit Agreement) for any fiscal quarter on an annualized basis cannot exceed 9.5 times. The Senior Credit Agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants that, among other things, limit the ability of SBA Senior Finance II and its subsidiaries to incur indebtedness, grant certain liens, make certain investments, enter into sale leaseback transactions, merge or consolidate, make certain restricted payments, enter into transactions with affiliates, and engage in certain asset dispositions, including a sale of all or substantially all of their property. As of December 31, 2012, SBA Senior Finance II and SBAC were in compliance with the financial covenants contained in the Senior Credit Agreement. The Senior Credit Agreement is also subject to customary events of default. Pursuant to an Amended and Restated Guarantee and Collateral Agreement, amounts borrowed under the Revolving Credit Facility, the Term Loans and certain hedging transactions that may be entered into by SBA Senior Finance II or the Subsidiary Guarantors (as defined in the Senior Credit Agreement) with lenders or their affiliates are secured by a first lien on the capital stock of SBA Telecommunications, LLC (formerly known as SBA Telecommunications Inc.), SBA Senior Finance, LLC (formerly known as SBA Senior Finance, Inc.) and SBA Senior Finance II and on substantially all of the assets (other than leasehold, easement and fee interests in real property) of SBA Senior Finance II and the Subsidiary Guarantors.

As of December 31, 2012, the Senior Credit Agreement permits SBA Senior Finance II, without the consent of the other lenders, to request that one or more lenders provide SBA Senior Finance II with additional term loans in an aggregate principal amount of up to $700.0 million of which up to $200.0 million may be a Term Loan A, provided that up to $200.0 million of incremental capacity may instead be used to increase the commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility. SBA Senior Finance II’s ability to request such increases in the Revolving Credit Facility or additional term loans is subject to its compliance with customary conditions set forth in the Senior Credit Agreement including, with respect to any additional term loan, compliance, on a pro forma basis, with the financial covenants and ratios set forth therein and an increase in the margin on existing term loans, to the extent required by the terms of the Senior Credit Agreement. Upon SBA Senior Finance II’s request, each lender may decide, in its sole discretion, whether to increase all or a portion of its Revolving Credit Facility commitment or whether to provide SBA Senior Finance II with additional term loans and, if so, upon what terms. On January 28, 2013, $30.0 million of this incremental capacity was committed under the Revolving Credit Facility, leaving $670 million of total available incremental capacity.

 

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Mobilitie Bridge Loan

Simultaneous with the closing of the Mobilitie acquisition, our wholly-owned subsidiary, SBA Monarch, as borrower, entered into a credit agreement with the several lenders from time to time parties thereto (the “Bridge Loan Credit Agreement”). Pursuant to the Bridge Loan Credit Agreement, SBA Monarch borrowed an aggregate principal amount of $400 million under a senior secured bridge loan (the “Mobilitie Bridge Loan”). The Mobilitie Bridge Loan bore interest, at SBA Monarch’s election, at either the Base Rate plus a margin that ranged from 2.00% to 2.50% or the Eurodollar Rate plus a margin that ranged from 3.00% to 3.50%, in each case based on SBA Monarch’s ratio of Consolidated Total Debt to Consolidated Adjusted EBITDA (calculated in accordance with the Bridge Loan Credit Agreement).

On July 13, 2012, we repaid the $400 million principal outstanding under the Mobilitie Bridge Loan from the proceeds of the 5.75% Senior Notes.

Secured Tower Revenue Securities

2010 Tower Securities

On April 16, 2010, a New York common law trust (the “Trust”), initially formed by our indirect subsidiary, issued $680.0 million of 2010-1 Tower Securities and $550.0 million of 2010-2 Tower Securities (together the “2010 Tower Securities”). The 2010-1 Tower Securities have an annual interest rate of 4.254% and the 2010-2 Tower Securities have an annual interest rate of 5.101%. The weighted average annual fixed coupon interest rate of the 2010 Tower Securities is 4.7%, including borrowers’ fees, payable monthly. The anticipated repayment date and the final maturity date for the 2010–1 Tower Securities is April 15, 2015 and April 16, 2040, respectively. The anticipated repayment date and the final maturity date for the 2010–2 Tower Securities is April 17, 2017 and April 15, 2042, respectively. The sole asset of the Trust consists of a non-recourse mortgage loan made in favor of the Borrowers (as defined below). We incurred deferred financing fees of approximately $17.9 million in relation to this transaction which are being amortized through the anticipated repayment date of each of the 2010 Tower Securities. Net proceeds from the 2010 Tower Securities were used to repay in full the outstanding 2006 CMBS Certificates in the amount of $938.6 million and pay the related prepayment consideration plus accrued interest and fees. The remaining net proceeds were used for general corporate purposes.

2012-1 Tower Securities

On August 9, 2012, we, through our Trust, issued $610 million of Secured Tower Revenue Securities Series 2012-1 (the “2012-1 Tower Securities”) which have an anticipated repayment date of December 15, 2017 and a final maturity date of December 15, 2042. The fixed coupon interest rate of the 2012-1 Tower Securities is 2.933% per annum, payable monthly. A portion of the net proceeds from the 2012-1 Tower Securities were used to repay in full the remaining $243.8 million balance of the 8.0% Senior Notes due 2016 plus $14.6 million in applicable premium associated with early redemption. The remaining net proceeds were used (1) to pay a portion of the cash consideration in connection with our acquisition of TowerCo II Holdings LLC and (2) for general corporate purposes.

In connection with the issuance of the 2012-1 Tower Securities, the parties entered into the Fifth Loan and Security Agreement Supplement and Amendment, dated as of August 9, 2012 (the “Fifth Loan Supplement”), which amended and supplemented the Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of November 18, 2005. The Fifth Loan Supplement was executed by and among SBA Properties, LLC (formerly known as SBA Properties, Inc.), SBA Sites, LLC (formerly known as SBA Sites, Inc.), and SBA Structures, LLC (formerly known as SBA Structures, Inc.) (the “Initial Borrowers”) and SBA Infrastructure, LLC, SBA Monarch Towers III, LLC and SBA Towers USVI II, Inc. (the “Additional Borrowers” and together with the Initial Borrowers, the “Borrowers”) and other parties. Pursuant to the Fifth Loan Supplement, the Additional Borrowers were added as obligors under the mortgage loan and, with the Initial Borrowers, became jointly and severally liable for the aggregate $1.84 billion borrowed under the mortgage loan corresponding to the 2010 Tower Securities and 2012-1 Tower Securities.

 

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Tower Revenue Securities Terms

The mortgage loan underlying the 2010 Tower Securities and the 2012-1 Tower Securities (together the “Tower Securities”) will be paid from the operating cash flows from the aggregate 5,152 tower sites owned by the Borrowers. The mortgage loan is secured by (i) mortgages, deeds of trust and deeds to secure debt on a substantial portion of the tower sites, (ii) a security interest in the towers and substantially all of the Borrowers’ personal property and fixtures, (iii) the Borrowers’ rights under certain tenant leases, and (iv) all of the proceeds of the foregoing. For each calendar month, SBA Network Management, Inc., our indirect subsidiary, is entitled to receive a management fee equal to 7.5% of the Borrowers’ operating revenues for the immediately preceding calendar month.

The Borrowers may prepay any of the mortgage loan components, in whole or in part, with no prepayment consideration, (i) within nine months (in the case of the components corresponding to the 2010 Tower Securities) or twelve months (in the case of the component corresponding to the 2012-1 Tower Securities) of the anticipated repayment date of such mortgage loan component, (ii) with proceeds received as a result of any condemnation or casualty of any tower site owned by the Borrowers or (iii) during an amortization period. In all other circumstances, the Borrowers may prepay the mortgage loan, in whole or in part, upon payment of the applicable prepayment consideration. The prepayment consideration is determined based on the class of the Tower Securities to which the prepaid mortgage loan component corresponds and consists of an amount equal to the excess, if any, of (1) the present value associated with the portion of the principal balance being prepaid, calculated in accordance with the formula set forth in the mortgage loan agreement, on the date of prepayment of all future installments of principal and interest required to be paid from the date of prepayment to and including the first due date within nine months (in the case of the components corresponding to the 2010 Tower Securities) or twelve months (in the case of the component corresponding to the 2012-1 Tower Securities) of the anticipated repayment date of such mortgage loan component over (2) that portion of the principal balance of such class prepaid on the date of such prepayment.

To the extent that the mortgage loan components corresponding to the Tower Securities are not fully repaid by their respective anticipated repayment dates, the interest rate of each such component will increase by the greater of (i) 5% and (ii) the amount, if any, by which the sum of (x) the ten-year U.S. treasury rate plus (y) the credit-based spread for such component (as set forth in the mortgage loan agreement) plus (z) 5%, exceeds the original interest rate for such component.

Pursuant to the terms of the Tower Securities, all rents and other sums due on any of the tower sites owned by the Borrowers are directly deposited by the lessees into a controlled deposit account and are held by the indenture trustee. The monies held by the indenture trustee after the release date are classified as restricted cash on our Consolidated Balance Sheets (see Note 4). However, if the Debt Service Coverage Ratio, defined as the net cash flow (as defined in the mortgage loan agreement) divided by the amount of interest on the mortgage loan, servicing fees and trustee fees that the Borrowers are required to pay over the succeeding twelve months, as of the end of any calendar quarter, falls to 1.30x or lower, then all cash flow in excess of amounts required to make debt service payments, to fund required reserves, to pay management fees and budgeted operating expenses and to make other payments required under the loan documents, referred to as “excess cash flow,” will be deposited into a reserve account instead of being released to the Borrowers. The funds in the reserve account will not be released to the Borrowers unless the Debt Service Coverage Ratio exceeds 1.30x for two consecutive calendar quarters. If the Debt Service Coverage Ratio falls below 1.15x as of the end of any calendar quarter, then an “amortization period” will commence and all funds on deposit in the reserve account will be applied to prepay the mortgage loan until such time that the Debt Service Coverage Ratio exceeds 1.15x for a calendar quarter. In addition, if either the 2010-1 Tower Securities, 2010-2 Tower Securities or the 2012-1 Tower Securities are not fully repaid

 

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by their respective anticipated repayment dates, the cash flow from the tower sites owned by the Borrowers will be trapped by the trustee for the Tower Securities and applied first to repay the interest, at the original interest rates, on the mortgage loan components underlying the Tower Securities, second to fund all reserve accounts and operating expenses associated with those tower sites, third to pay the management fees due to SBA Network Management, Inc., fourth to repay principal of the Tower Securities and fifth to repay the additional interest discussed above. The mortgage loan agreement, as amended, also includes covenants customary for mortgage loans subject to rated securitizations. Among other things, the Borrowers are prohibited from incurring other indebtedness for borrowed money or further encumbering their assets. As of December 31, 2012, the Borrowers met the required Debt Service Coverage Ratio as set forth in the mortgage loan agreement and were in compliance with all other covenants.

1.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2013

As of December 31, 2012, we had $468.8 million outstanding of 1.875% Convertible Senior Notes (the “1.875% Notes”) which were recorded at their discounted carrying value of $457.4 million. The maturity date of the 1.875% Notes is May 1, 2013, and as such they are included in current maturities of long term debt in current liabilities. Interest on the 1.875% Notes is payable semi-annually each May 1 and November 1. The 1.875% Notes are convertible, at the holder’s option, into shares of our Class A common stock, at an initial conversion rate of 24.1196 shares of Class A common stock per $1,000 principal amount of 1.875% Notes (subject to certain customary adjustments), which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of $41.46 per share or a 20% conversion premium based on the last reported sale price of $34.55 per share of Class A common stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on May 12, 2008, the purchase agreement date. Effective February 4, 2013, we elected to settle all of our conversion obligations pursuant to the Indenture governing the 1.875% Notes in cash.

During the first quarter of 2011, we repurchased $15.0 million of the 1.875% Notes resulting in a principal balance of $535.0 million. Additionally, during the year ended December 31, 2012, we repurchased $66.2 million of the aggregate principal balance of the 1.875% Notes for $107.5 million in cash.

Concurrently with the pricing of our 1.875% Notes, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions and warrant transactions with affiliates of certain of the initial purchasers of the convertible note offerings. The initial strike price of the convertible note hedge transactions relating to our 1.875% Notes is $41.46 per share of our Class A common stock (the same as the initial conversion price of our 1.875% Notes) and the upper strike price of the warrants is $67.37 per share. Although we initially entered into convertible note hedge and warrant transactions to cover the full amount of the shares that were issuable upon conversion of the 1.875% Notes, as a result of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc. (“Lehman Derivatives”), on November 7, 2008, we terminated the convertible note hedge transaction with Lehman Derivatives which covered 55% of the 13,265,780 shares of our Class A common stock potentially issuable upon conversion of our 1.875% Notes. Consequently, we do not currently have a hedge with respect to those shares and, to the extent that the market price of our Class A common stock exceeds $41.46 per share upon conversion of the notes, we will be subject to dilution, or if we settle in cash, additional costs, upon conversion of that portion of the 1.875% Notes.

During the year ended 2012, we received partial settlements of $4.9 million relating to the Chapter 11 bankruptcy case of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. and its affiliated debtors related to the Lehman Derivatives. The amounts received were recorded as a gain in other income in the statement of operations and reflected as an inflow of cash from financing activities in the statement of cash flow.

4.0% Convertible Senior Notes due 2014

As of December 31, 2012, we had outstanding $500.0 million of our 4.0% Convertible Senior Notes (the “4.0% Notes”) which were recorded at their discounted carrying value of $430.8 million. The maturity date of the 4.0% Notes is October 1, 2014. Interest on the 4.0% Notes is payable semi-annually on April 1 and October 1.

 

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The 4.0% Notes are convertible, at the holder’s option, into shares of our Class A common stock, at an initial conversion rate of 32.9164 shares of our Class A common stock per $1,000 principal amount of 4.0% Notes (subject to certain customary adjustments), which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $30.38 per share or a 22.5% conversion premium based on the last reported sale price of $24.80 per share of our Class A common stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on April 20, 2009, the purchase agreement date.

Concurrently with the pricing of our 4.0% Notes, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions and warrant transactions with affiliates of certain of the initial purchasers of the convertible note offerings. The initial strike price of the convertible note hedge transactions relating to our 4.0% Notes is $30.38 per share of our Class A common stock (the same as the initial conversion price of the 4.0% Notes) and the upper strike price of the warrant transactions is $44.64 per share.

Convertible Senior Notes Conversion Options

The 1.875% Notes and 4.0% Notes (collectively “the Notes”) are convertible only under the following circumstances:

 

   

during any calendar quarter, if the last reported sale price of our Class A common stock for at least 20 trading days in the 30 consecutive trading day period ending on the last trading day of the preceding calendar quarter is more than 130% of the applicable conversion price per share of Class A common stock on the last day of such preceding calendar quarter,

 

   

during the five business day period after any ten consecutive trading day period in which the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of the Notes for each day in the measurement period was less than 95% of the product of the last reported sale price of Class A common stock and the applicable conversion rate,

 

   

if specified distributions to holders of Class A common stock are made or specified corporate transactions occur, and

 

   

at any time on or after February 19, 2013 for the 1.875% Notes and July 22, 2014 for the 4.0% Notes.

Upon conversion, we have the right to settle our conversion obligation in cash, shares of Class A common stock or a combination of cash and shares of our Class A common stock. From time to time, upon notice to the holders of the Notes, we may change our election regarding the form of consideration that we will use to settle our conversion obligation; provided, however, that we are not permitted to change its settlement election after February 18, 2013 for the 1.875% Notes and July 21, 2014 for the 4.0% Notes. As of February 4, 2013, we had elected to settle 100% of our conversion obligation pursuant to the Indenture governing the 1.875% Notes in cash.

At the end of the first quarter of 2012 the 4.0% Notes became convertible by the note holders because our Class A common stock closing price per share exceeded $39.49 for at least 20 trading days during the 30 consecutive trading day period ending on March 31, 2012. During each of the second, third, and fourth quarters, the 4.0% Notes remained convertible by the note holders. The 4.0% Notes will continue to be convertible through March 31, 2013, and will still be convertible thereafter, if one or more of the conversion conditions specified in the Indenture, dated as of April 24, 2009, are satisfied during future measurement periods. During 2012, we received 5 conversion notices totaling 17 notes valued at $1,000 per note. A portion of these notes were settled in shares of our Class A common stock and cash for fractional shares during the fourth quarter of 2012. The remaining portion is expected to settle during the first quarter of 2013.

 

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At the end of the third quarter of 2012, the conversion right for the 1.875% Notes was triggered because our Class A common stock closing price per share exceeded $53.90 for at least 20 trading days during the 30 consecutive trading day period ending on September 30, 2012. The 1.875% Notes remained convertible by the noteholders as of December 31, 2012. During 2012, we received 8 conversion notices totaling 5,314 notes valued at $1,000 per note. A portion of these notes were settled in shares of our Class A common stock and cash for fractional shares during the fourth quarter of 2012. The remaining portion is expected to settle during the first quarter of 2013. Furthermore, during the first quarter of 2013, we received 4 conversion notices totaling 12,810 notes valued at $1,000 per note. These notes will be settled in shares of our Class A common stock and cash for fractional shares during the first and second quarter of 2013.

Senior Notes

8.0% Senior Notes and 8.25% Senior Notes

On July 24, 2009, Telecommunications issued $750.0 million of unsecured senior notes (the “Senior Notes”), $375.0 million of which were due August 15, 2016 (the “8.0% Notes”) and $375.0 million of which were due August 15, 2019 (the “8.25% Notes”). The 8.0% Notes had an interest rate of 8.00% per annum and were issued at a price of 99.330% of their face value. The 8.25% Notes have an interest rate of 8.25% per annum and were issued at a price of 99.152% of their face value. Interest on each of the Senior Notes is due semi-annually on February 15 and August 15 of each year beginning on February 15, 2010. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we redeemed the full $375.0 million in aggregate principal amount of our 8.0% Notes and $131.3 million in aggregate principal amount of our 8.25% Notes and paid the applicable premium for the redemption. The 8.25% Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by SBAC.

5.75% Senior Notes

On July 13, 2012, we issued $800.0 million of unsecured senior notes (the “5.75% Notes”) due July 15, 2020. The Notes accrue interest at a rate of 5.75% and were issued at par. Interest on the 5.75% Notes is due semi-annually on July 15 and January 15 of each year beginning on January 15, 2013. We used the net proceeds from this offering to (1) repay all amounts outstanding under the Mobilitie Bridge Loan and (2) repay all amounts outstanding under our Revolving Credit Facility. The remaining proceeds were used for general corporate purposes.

In connection with the issuance of the 5.75% Notes, we entered into a Registration Rights Agreement (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the Initial Purchasers. Pursuant to the terms of the Registration Rights Agreement, we agreed to use our respective reasonable best efforts to file and have declared effective a registration statement with respect to an offer to exchange the 5.75% Notes for new notes guaranteed by us registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), on or prior to July 8, 2013. If we fail to satisfy certain filings and other obligations with respect to the exchange, we will be obligated to pay additional interest of 0.25% per annum for the first 90-day period and an additional 0.25% per annum with respect to each subsequent 90-day period thereafter, until our registration obligations are fulfilled, up to a maximum of 1.00% per annum.

5.625% Senior Notes

On September 28, 2012, we issued $500.0 million of unsecured senior notes (the “5.625% Notes”) due October 1, 2019. The Notes accrue interest at a rate of 5.625% and were issued at par. Interest on the 5.625% Notes is due semi-annually on October 1 and April 1 of each year beginning on April 1, 2013. We used the proceeds from the issuance of the 5.625% Notes to pay a portion of the cash consideration in the TowerCo II Holdings LLC acquisition.

 

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In connection with the issuance of the 5.625% Notes, we entered into a Registration Rights Agreement (the “Registration Rights Agreement”) with J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the Initial Purchasers. Pursuant to the terms of the Registration Rights Agreement, we agreed to use our reasonable best efforts to file and have declared effective a registration statement with respect to an offer to exchange the 5.625% Notes for new notes registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), on or prior to September 23, 2013. If we fail to satisfy certain filings and other obligations with respect to the exchange, we will be obligated to pay additional interest of 0.25% per annum for the first 90-day period and an additional 0.25% per annum with respect to each subsequent 90-day period thereafter, until our registration obligations are fulfilled, up to a maximum of 1.00% per annum.

Debt Service

As of December 31, 2012, we believe that our cash on hand, capacity available under our Revolving Credit Facility and our cash flows from operations for the next twelve months will be sufficient to service our outstanding debt during the next twelve months.

The following table illustrates our estimate of our debt service requirement over the next twelve months based on the amounts outstanding as of December 31, 2012 and the interest rates accruing on those amounts on such date (in thousands):

 

1.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2013

   $ 471,733   

4.0% Convertible Senior Notes due 2014

     19,999   

8.25% Senior Notes due 2019

     20,109   

5.625% Senior Notes due 2019

     28,125   

5.75% Senior Notes due 2020

     46,000   

4.254% and 5.101 % Tower Securities 2010-1 & 2

     57,373   

2.933% Tower Securities 2012-1

     18,085   

Revolving Credit Facility

     5,335   

2011 Term Loan

     23,398   

2012-1 Term Loan

     14,724   

2012-2 Term Loan

     14,208   
  

 

 

 

Total debt service for next 12 months:

   $ 719,089   
  

 

 

 

Inflation

The impact of inflation on our operations has not been significant to date. However, we cannot assure you that a high rate of inflation in the future will not adversely affect our operating results particularly in light of the fact that our site leasing revenues are governed by long-term contracts with pre-determined pricing that we will not be able to increase in response to increases in inflation.

 

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Commitments and Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes our scheduled contractual commitments as of December 31, 2012:

 

Contractual Obligations

   2013      2014      2015      2016      2017      Thereafter      Total  
     (in thousands)  

Debt

   $ 486,836       $ 520,487       $ 705,500       $ 28,000       $ 1,403,000       $ 2,296,250       $ 5,440,073   

Interest payments (1)

     232,254         223,802         187,505         178,234         150,963         226,123         1,198,881   

Operating leases

     141,711         143,636         144,337         143,442         144,149         5,385,802         6,103,077   

Capital leases

     1,640         1,437         1,039         353         24         —          4,493   

Employment agreements

     1,670         1,670         1,045         —          —          —          4,385   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 864,111       $ 891,032       $ 1,039,426       $ 350,029       $ 1,698,136       $ 7,908,175       $ 12,750,909   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Represents interest payments based on the 2010-1 Tower Securities interest rate of 4.254%, the 2010-2 Tower Securities interest rate of 5.1010%, the 2012-1 Tower Securities interest rate of 2.933%, the Revolving Credit Facility interest rate of 2.335% as of December 31, 2012, the 2011 Term Loan at an interest rate of 3.750% as of December 31, 2012, 2012-1 Term Loan at an interest rate of 2.470% as of December 31, 2012, 2012-2 Term Loan at an interest rate of 3.750% as of December 31, 2012, the Convertible Senior Notes interest rate of 1.875% and 4.0%, and the Senior Notes interest rate of 8.25%, 5.625%, and 5.750%.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We are not involved in any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

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ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are exposed to certain market risks that are inherent in our financial instruments. These instruments arise from transactions entered into in the normal course of business.

The following table presents the future principal payment obligations and fair values associated with our long-term debt instruments assuming our actual level of long-term indebtedness as of December 31, 2012:

 

      2013      2014      2015      2016      2017      Thereafter      Total      Fair
Value
 
     (in thousands)  

Debt:

                       

1.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2013 (1)

   $ 468,836       $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 468,836       $ 714,094   

4.0% Convertible Senior Notes due 2014 (1)

     —          499,987         —          —          —          —        $ 499,987       $ 1,060,620   

8.25% Senior Notes due 2019

     —          —          —          —          —          243,750       $ 243,750       $ 272,391   

5.625% Senior Notes due 2019

     —          —          —          —          —          500,000       $ 500,000       $ 523,750   

5.75% Senior Notes due 2020

     —          —          —          —          —          800,000       $ 800,000       $ 848,000   

4.254% 2010-1 Tower Securities (2)

     —          —          680,000         —          —          —        $ 680,000       $ 713,619   

5.101% 2010-2 Tower Securities (2)

     —          —          —          —          550,000         —        $ 550,000       $ 621,379   

2.933% 2012-1 Tower Securities (2)

     —          —          —          —          610,000         —        $ 610,000       $ 635,614   

Revolving Credit Facility

     —          —          —          —          100,000         —        $ 100,000       $ 100,000   

2011 Term Loan

     5,000         5,000         5,000         5,000         5,000         467,500       $ 492,500       $ 493,731   

2012-1 Term Loan

     10,000         12,500         17,500         20,000         135,000         —        $ 195,000       $ 194,513   

2012-2 Term Loan

     3,000         3,000         3,000         3,000         3,000         285,000       $ 300,000       $ 300,750   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total debt obligation

   $ 486,836       $ 520,487       $ 705,500       $ 28,000       $ 1,403,000       $ 2,296,250       $ 5,440,073       $ 6,478,461   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Amounts set forth reflect the principal amount of the relevant convertible notes and do not reflect the total obligations that may be due on the convertible notes if they are converted prior to their maturity date. As of December 31, 2012, both the 1.875% Notes and the 4.0% Notes are convertible pursuant to the terms of their applicable indenture.
(2) The anticipated repayment date and the final maturity date for the 2010-1 Tower Securities is April 15, 2015 and April 16, 2040, respectively. The anticipated repayment date and the final maturity date for the 2010-2 Tower Securities is April 17, 2017 and April 15, 2042, respectively. The anticipated repayment date and the final maturity date for the 2012-1 Tower Securities is December 15, 2017 and December 15, 2042, respectively.

Our current primary market risk exposure is interest rate risk relating to (1) our ability to meet financial covenants and (2) the impact of interest rate movements on our 2011 Term Loan, 2012-1 Term Loan, 2012-2 Term Loan and any borrowings that we may incur under our Revolving Credit Facility, which are at floating rates. We manage the interest rate risk on our outstanding debt through our large percentage of fixed rate debt. While we cannot predict our ability to refinance existing debt or the impact interest rate movements will have on our existing debt, we continue to evaluate our financial position on an ongoing basis. In addition, in connection with our convertible notes, we are subject to market risk associated with the market price of our common stock.

Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This annual report contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These statements concern expectations, beliefs, projections, plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts. Specifically, this annual report contains forward-looking statements regarding:

 

   

our expectations on the future growth and financial health of the wireless industry and the industry participants, and the drivers of such growth;

 

   

our beliefs regarding our ability to capture and capitalize on industry growth and the impact of such growth on our financial and operational results;

 

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our expectations regarding the opportunities in the international wireless markets in which we currently operate or have targeted for growth, our beliefs regarding how we can capitalize on such opportunities, and our intent to continue expanding internationally;

 

   

our belief that our site leasing business is characterized by stable and long-term recurring revenues, predictable operating costs and minimal non-discretionary capital expenditures;

 

   

our belief that our towers have significant capacity to accommodate additional tenants, that our tower operations are highly scalable, that we can add tenants to our towers at minimal incremental costs, and the impact of these economies of scale on our cash flow and financial results;

 

   

our expectation that we will grow our cash flows by adding tenants to our towers at minimal incremental costs and executing monetary amendments;

 

   

our intent to grow our tower portfolio, domestically and internationally, by 5% to 10% through tower acquisitions and the construction of new towers;

 

   

our intent to build between 380 and 400 new towers in 2013, domestically and internationally, and our expectation regarding the number of tenants on our new build towers;

 

   

our expectation that we will continue our ground lease purchase program and the estimates of the impact of such program on our financial results;

 

   

our expectation that we will continue to incur losses;

 

   

our expectations regarding our future cash capital expenditures, both discretionary and non-discretionary, including expenditures required to maintain, improve and modify our towers and general corporate expenditures, and the source of funds for these expenditures;

 

   

our intended use of our liquidity;

 

   

our expectations regarding our annual debt service in 2013 and thereafter, and our belief that our cash on hand, cash flows from operations for the next twelve months and availability under our Revolving Credit Facility will be sufficient to service our outstanding debt during the next twelve months;

 

   

our expectation that our revenues from our international operations will grow in the future;

 

   

our expectations regarding the effectiveness of our convertible note hedge transactions to minimize the dilution and costs associated with our outstanding convertible notes;

 

   

our expectations regarding the settlement of our convertible notes;

 

   

our belief regarding our credit risk; and

 

   

our belief regarding our compliance with applicable laws and litigation matters, and our estimates regarding certain accounting and tax matters.

These forward-looking statements reflect our current views about future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions. We wish to caution readers that certain important factors may have affected and could in the future affect our actual results and could cause actual results to differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statement. The most important factors that could prevent us from achieving our goals, and cause the assumptions underlying forward-looking statements and the actual results to differ materially from those expressed in or implied by those forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

   

the impact of consolidation among wireless service providers on our leasing revenue;

 

   

our ability to continue to comply with covenants and the terms of our credit instruments, our ability to obtain additional financing to fund our capital expenditures and our ability to refinance our 1.875% Notes on expected terms;

 

   

our ability to successfully manage the risks associated with international operations, including risks relating to political or economic conditions, tax laws, currency restrictions legal or judicial systems, and land ownership;

 

   

our ability to successfully manage the risks associated with our acquisition initiatives, including our ability to effectively integrate acquired towers into our business and to achieve the financial results projected in our valuation models for the acquired towers;

 

   

developments in the wireless communications industry in general, and for wireless communications infrastructure providers in particular, that may slow growth or affect the willingness or ability of the wireless service providers to expend capital to fund network expansion or enhancements;

 

   

our ability to secure as many site leasing tenants as anticipated, recognize our expected economies of scale with respect to new tenants on our towers, and retain current leases on towers;

 

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our ability to secure and deliver anticipated services business at contemplated margins;

 

   

our ability to build new towers, including our ability to identify and acquire land that would be attractive for our clients and to successfully and timely address zoning, permitting, weather, availability of labor and supplies and other issues that arise in connection with the building of new towers;

 

   

competition for the acquisition of towers and other factors that may adversely affect our ability to purchase towers that meet our investment criteria and are available at prices which we believe will be accretive to our shareholders and allow us to maintain our long-term target leverage ratios;

 

   

our ability to protect our rights to the land under our towers, and our ability to acquire land underneath our towers on terms that are accretive;

 

   

our ability to sufficiently increase our revenues and maintain expenses and cash capital expenditures at appropriate levels to permit us to meet our anticipated uses of liquidity for operations, debt service and estimated portfolio growth;

 

   

our ability to successfully estimate the impact of regulatory and litigation matters;

 

   

our ability to successfully estimate the impact of certain accounting and tax matters, including the effect on our company of adopting certain accounting pronouncements and the availability of sufficient net operating losses to offset future taxable income;

 

   

natural disasters and other unforeseen damage for which our insurance may not provide adequate coverage;

 

   

a decrease in demand for our communications sites; and

 

   

the introduction of new technologies or changes in a tenant’s business model that may make our tower leasing business less desirable to potential tenants.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Financial statements and supplementary data are on pages F-1 through F-52.

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure Controls and Procedures – We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, as ours are designed to do, and management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

In connection with the preparation of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as of December 31, 2012, an evaluation was performed under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the CEO and CFO, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act). Based on such evaluation, our CEO and CFO concluded that, as of December 31, 2012, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2012 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting – Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, and for performing an assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012. Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Our system of internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of SBA; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of SBA are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of SBA; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of SBA’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Management performed an assessment of the effectiveness of SBA’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012 based upon criteria in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on our assessment, management determined that SBA’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2012 based on the criteria in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by COSO.

 

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Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Ernst & Young LLP, the independent registered certified public accounting firm that audited the financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, has issued an attestation report on SBA’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries

We have audited SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries’ management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive loss, shareholders’ (deficit) equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2012 of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries and our report dated February 27, 2013 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Certified Public Accountants

Boca Raton, Florida

February 27, 2013

 

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Item 9B. Other Information

Item 1.01 Entry into a Material Definitive Agreement.

On January 28, 2013, SBA Senior Finance II LLC entered into a Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, with Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender, pursuant to which SBA Senior Finance II exercised its right to upsize the aggregate principal amount of its Revolving Credit Facility from $700 million to $730 million. All other terms of the Senior Credit Agreement remained the same.

SBA Communications and certain of its affiliates have previously entered into commercial financial arrangements with Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas and its affiliates, and they have in the past provided financial, advisory, investment banking and other services to SBA Communications and its affiliates. Specifically, (i) Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas acts as trustee in connection with our 2010 Tower Securities, (ii) Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. and Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas have served as bookrunner and lender, respectively, in connection with amounts borrowed under the Senior Credit Agreement, and (iii) Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. acted as one of the underwriters in connection with (a) the issuance by SBA Telecommunications, Inc. of the 5.75% Senior Notes due 2020, (b) the issuance by SBA Communications of the 5.625% Senior Notes due 2019 and (c) the issuance by SBA Tower Trust of the Secured Tower Revenue Securities Series 2012-1.

Item 2.03 Creation of a Direct Financial Obligation or an Obligation under an Off-Balance Sheet Arrangement of a Registrant.

The information set forth under Item  1.01 is incorporated by reference herein.

PART III

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERANCE

We have adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accounting Officer. The Code of Ethics is located on our internet web site at www.sbasite.com under “Investor Relations – Corporate Governance – Governance Documents.” We intend to provide disclosure of any amendments or waivers of our Code of Ethics on our website within four business days following the date of the amendment or waiver.

The remaining items required by Part III, Item 10 are incorporated herein by reference from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or before April 30, 2013.

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The items required by Part III, Item 11 are incorporated herein by reference from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or before April 30, 2013.

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The items required by Part III, Item 12 are incorporated herein by reference from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or before April 30, 2013.

 

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ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The items required by Part III, Item 13 are incorporated herein by reference from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or before April 30, 2013.

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

The items required by Part III, Item 14 are incorporated herein by reference from the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for its 2013 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or before April 30, 2013.

 

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PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

(a) Documents filed as part of this report:

(1) Financial Statements

See Item 8 for Financial Statements included with this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

(2) Financial Statement Schedules

None.

(3) Exhibits

 

Exhibit No.   Description of Exhibits

        1.1

  Underwriting Agreement, dated March 7, 2012, by and among SBA Communications Corporation, Citigroup Global Markets Inc. and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC. (1)

        1.2

  Underwriting Agreement, dated April 2, 2012, by and among SBA Communications Corporation, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, Mobilitie Holdings, L.L.C., Mobilitie Holdings II, L.L.C., Mobilitie Investments, LLC (f/k/a New Mobilitie Investments, LLC), Mobilitie Investments II, LLC (f/k/a New Mobilitie Investments II, LLC), Orlin Properties, LLC and Chicago Deferred Exchange Company, LLC. (2)

        1.3

  Underwriting Agreement, dated October 1, 2012, by and among SBA Communications Corporation, Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and the selling shareholders listed on Schedule 1 thereto. (3)

        2.1

  Purchase and Sale Agreement, dated February 18, 2012, by and among SBA Communications Corporation, Monarch Towers Acquisition, LLC, Mobilitie Investments, LLC, Mobilitie Investments II, LLC, MPGJ-I, LLC, MPMA-I, LLC, MPGJ-II, LLC, and the Sellers identified on the signature pages thereto. (4)

        2.2

  Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated June 25, 2012, by and among SBA Communications Corporation, SBA 2012 Acquisition, LLC, TowerCo II Holdings LLC and TowerCo III Holdings LLC. (5)

        3.4

  Fourth Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation, as Amended, of SBA Communications Corporation. (6)

        3.5A

  Amended and Restated Bylaws of SBA Communications Corporation, effective as of January 16, 2012. (7)

        4.6

  Rights Agreement, dated as of January 11, 2002, between SBA Communications Corporation and the Rights Agent. (8)

        4.6A

  First Amendment to Rights Agreement, dated as of March 17, 2006, between SBA Communications Corporation and Computershare Trust Company, N.A (9)

        4.13

  Indenture, dated May 16, 2008, between SBA Communications Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association. (10)

        4.14

  Form of 1.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2013 (included in Exhibit 4.13). (10)

        4.15

  Indenture, dated April 24, 2009, between SBA Communications Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association. (11)

        4.15A

  Form of Senior Indenture. (12)

        4.16

  Form of 4.0% Convertible Senior Note due 2014 (included in Exhibit 4.15). (11)

        4.16A

  Form of Subordinated Indenture. (12)

        4.17

  Indenture, dated July 24, 2009, between SBA Communications Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association. (13)

        4.18

  Form of 8.000% Senior Notes due 2016 (included in Exhibit 4.17). (13)

        4.19

  Form of 8.250% Senior Notes due 2019 (included in Exhibit 4.17). (13)

        4.20

  Indenture, dated July 13, 2012, between SBA Telecommunications, Inc., SBA Communications Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association. (14)

        4.21

  Form of 5.75% Senior Notes due 2020 (included in Exhibit 4.20). (14)

        4.22

  Indenture, dated as of September 28, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association. (15)

        4.23

  Form of 5.625% Senior Notes due 2019 (included in Exhibit 4.22). (15)

      10.1

  SBA Communications Corporation Registration Rights Agreement dated as of March 5, 1997, among the Company, Steven E. Bernstein, Ronald G. Bizick, II and Robert Grobstein. (16)

 

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      10.2

  Purchase Agreement, dated July 26, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance, LLC, Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as trustee, and the several initial purchasers listed on Schedule I thereto. (17)

      10.3

  Fifth Loan and Security Agreement Supplement and Amendment, dated as of August 9, 2012, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., SBA Sites, Inc. and SBA Structures, Inc., as Borrowers, SBA Infrastructure, LLC, SBA Towers USVI II, Inc. and SBA Monarch Towers III, LLC, as Additional Borrowers, and Midland Loan Services, a Division of PNC Bank, National Association, as Servicer on behalf of Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as Trustee. (17)

      10.24

  1999 Equity Participation Plan. (18)+

      10.25

  1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan. (18)+

      10.33

  2001 Equity Participation Plan as Amended and Restated on May 16, 2002. (19)+

      10.35E

  Employment Agreement, dated July 1, 2011, between SBA Communications Corporation and Jeffrey A. Stoops. (20)+

      10.49

  Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of November 18, 2005, by and between SBA Properties, Inc. and the Additional Borrower or Borrowers that may become a party thereto and SBA CMBS 1 Depositor LLC. (21)

      10.50

  Management Agreement, dated as of November 18, 2005, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., SBA Network Management, Inc. and SBA Senior Finance, Inc. (21)

      10.57B

  Amended and Restated Employment Agreement, made and entered into as of January 1, 2010, between SBA Communications Corporation and Kurt L. Bagwell. (22)+

      10.57C

  Amended and Restated Employment Agreement, dated as of July 30, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and Kurt L. Bagwell. (23)+

      10.58B

  Amended and Restated Employment Agreement, made and entered into as of January 1, 2010, between SBA Communications Corporation and Thomas P. Hunt. (22)+

      10.58C

  Amended and Restated Employment Agreement, dated as of July 30, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and Thomas P. Hunt. (23)+

      10.60

  Joinder and Amendment to Management Agreement, dated November 6, 2006, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., SBA Towers, Inc., SBA Puerto Rico, Inc., SBA Sites, Inc., SBA Towers USVI, Inc., and SBA Structures, Inc., and SBA Network Management, Inc., and SBA Senior Finance, Inc. (24)

      10.61

  Second Loan and Security Agreement Supplement and Amendment, dated as of November 6, 2006, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., and SBA Towers, Inc., SBA Puerto Rico, Inc., SBA Sites, Inc., SBA Towers USVI, Inc., and SBA Structures, Inc. and Midland Loan Services, Inc., as Servicer on behalf of LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee. (24)

      10.71

  Form of Convertible Bond Hedge Transaction Agreement entered into by SBA Communications Corporation with each of Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc., Citibank, N.A., Deutsche Bank AG London Branch, and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC and Wachovia Bank, National Association. (25)

      10.72

  Form of Issuer Warrant Transaction Letter Agreement entered into by SBA Communications Corporation with each of Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc., Citibank, N.A., Deutsche Bank AG London Branch, and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC and Wachovia Bank, National Association. (25)

      10.75A

  SBA Communications Corporation 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as amended on May 4, 2011. (26)+

      10.76

  Form of Indemnification Agreement dated January 15, 2009 between SBA Communications Corporation and its directors and certain officers. (27)

      10.79

  Form of Convertible Bond Hedge Transaction Agreement entered into by SBA Communications Corporation with each of Citibank, N.A., Barclays Bank PLC, Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch, JP Morgan Chase Bank, National Association and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC. (28)

      10.80

  Form of Issuer Warrant Transaction Letter Agreement entered into by SBA Communications Corporation with each of Citibank, N.A., Barclays Bank PLC, Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch, JP Morgan Chase Bank, National Association and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC. (28)

      10.85

  Employment Agreement, made and entered into as of October 28, 2009, between SBA Communications Corporation and Brendan T. Cavanagh. (29)+

      10.85B

  Amended and Restated Employment Agreement, dated as of July 30, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and Brendan T. Cavanagh. (23)+

      10.86A

  Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated as of June 30, 2011, among SBA Senior Finance II, as borrower, the several lenders from time to time parties thereto, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as term loan syndication agent, Barclays Capital, as co-term loan syndication agent, The Royal Bank of Scotland plc and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as co-term loan documentation agents, Citibank, N.A. and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as co-revolving facility documentation agents, and the other agents thereto. (30)

      10.86D

  First Amendment, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, the Extending Revolving Lenders (as defined therein) and Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent. (31)

      10.86E

  Second Amendment, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, the Incremental Tranche A Term Lenders (as defined therein) and Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, TD Securities (USA) LLC and Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, as joint lead arrangers, and TD Securities (USA) LLC, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, RBS Securities Inc., Citibank, N.A. and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., as bookrunners. (31)

      10.86F

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Citibank, N.A., Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (31)

 

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      10.86G

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (31)

      10.86H

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (31)

      10.86I

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Toronto Dominion (New York) LLC, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (31)

      10.86J

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of May 9, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (31)

      10.86K

  Third Amendment, dated as of September 28, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, the several lenders from time to time parties thereto, and Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as joint lead arrangers, and Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC, J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, TD Securities (USA) LLC, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, RBS Securities Inc. and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., as bookrunners. (15)

      10.86L

  Fourth Amendment, dated as of September 28, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, the several lenders from time to time parties thereto, and Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as joint lead arrangers, and Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC, J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, TD Securities (USA) LLC, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, RBS Securities Inc. and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., as bookrunners. (15)

      10.86M

  Fifth Amendment, dated as of September 28, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, the Incremental Tranche B Term Lenders (as defined therein) and Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as joint lead arrangers, and Citigroup Global Markets Inc., Barclays Bank PLC, J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, TD Securities (USA) LLC, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, RBS Securities Inc. and Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., as bookrunners. (15)

      10.86N

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of January 28, 2013, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. *

      10.87A

  Amended and Restated Guarantee and Collateral Agreement, dated as of June 30, 2011, among SBAC, SBA Telecommunications, Inc., SBA Senior Finance, Inc., SBA Senior Finance II and certain of SBA Senior Finance II’s subsidiaries, as identified in the Guarantee and Collateral Agreement, in favor of Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent. (30)

      10.89

  SBA Communications Corporation 2010 Performance and Equity Incentive Plan. (32)+

      10.90

  Third Loan and Security Agreement Supplement and Amendment, dated as of April 16, 2010, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., SBA Sites, Inc. and SBA Structures, Inc., as Borrowers, and Midland Loan Services, Inc., as Servicer on behalf of Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as Trustee. (33)

      10.91

  Fourth Loan and Security Agreement Supplement and Amendment, dated as of April 16, 2010, by and among SBA Properties, Inc., SBA Sites, Inc. and SBA Structures, Inc., as Borrowers, and Midland Loan Services, Inc., as Servicer on behalf of Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as Trustee. (33)

      10.92

  Credit Agreement, dated as of April 2, 2012, among SBA Monarch Acquisition, LLC (formerly known as Monarch Towers Acquisition, LLC), as borrower, the several lenders from time to time parties thereto, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as administrative agent, and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC and Barclays Bank PLC, as joint lead arrangers and bookrunners. (34)

      10.93

  Guarantee and Collateral Agreement, dated as of April 2, 2012, among SBA Telecommunications, Inc., SBA Monarch Acquisition, LLC (formerly known as Monarch Towers Acquisition, LLC) and certain of its subsidiaries, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as administrative agent. (34)

      10.94

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of April 2, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (34)

      10.95

  Revolving Credit Commitment Increase Supplement, dated as of April 2, 2012, among SBA Senior Finance II LLC, as borrower, Barclays Bank PLC, Toronto Dominion (Texas) LLC, as administrative agent, and The Toronto-Dominion Bank, New York Branch, as issuing lender. (34)

      10.96

  Purchase Agreement, dated July 10, 2012, among SBA Communications Corporation, SBA Telecommunications, Inc. and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the several initial purchasers listed on Schedule 1 thereto. (14)

      10.97

  Registration Rights Agreement, dated July 13, 2012, among SBA Communications Corporation, SBA Telecommunications, Inc. and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the several initial purchasers listed on Schedule 2 thereto. (14)

      10.98

  Purchase Agreement, dated September 20, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the several initial purchasers listed on Schedule 1 thereto. (35)

      10.99

  Registration Rights Agreement, dated September 28, 2012, between SBA Communications Corporation and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, as representative of the several initial purchasers listed on Schedule 2 thereto. (15)

    *21

  Subsidiaries.

    *23.1

  Consent of Ernst & Young LLP.

    *31.1

  Certification by Jeffrey A. Stoops, Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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    *31.2

  Certification by Brendan T. Cavanagh, Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

    *32.1

  Certification by Jeffrey A. Stoops, Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

    *32.2

  Certification by Brendan T. Cavanagh, Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

**101.INS

  XBRL Instance Document.

**101.SCH

  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.

**101.DEF

  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.

**101.CAL

  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.

**101.LAB

  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.

**101.PRE

  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.

 

+ Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.
* Filed herewith
** Furnished herewith.
(1) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated March 12, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(2) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated April 5, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(3) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated October 4, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(4) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated February 27, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(5) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated June 28, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(6) Incorporated by reference to the Form S-4 dated May 19, 2010, previously filed by the Registrant.
(7) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated February 1, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(8) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated January 14, 2002, previously filed by the Registrant.
(9) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2006, previously filed by the Registrant.
(10) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated May 22, 2008, previously filed by the Registrant.
(11) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2009, previously filed by the Registrant.
(12) Incorporated by reference to the Form S-3ASR dated February 27, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(13) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2009, previously filed by the Registrant.
(14) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated July 16, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(15) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated September 28, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(16) Incorporated by reference to the Registration Statement on Form S-4, previously filed by the Registrant (Registration No. 333-50219).
(17) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(18) Incorporated by reference to the Registration Statement on Form S-1/A, previously filed by the Registrant (Registration No. 333-76547).
(19) Incorporated by reference to the Schedule 14A Preliminary Proxy Statement dated April 16, 2002, previously filed by the Registrant.
(20) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, previously filed by the Registrant.
(21) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005, previously filed by the Registrant.
(22) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009, previously filed by the Registrant.
(23) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(24) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006, previously filed by the Registrant.
(25) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2008, previously filed by the Registrant.
(26) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2011, previously filed by the Registrant.
(27) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008, previously filed by the Registrant.
(28) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2009, previously filed by the Registrant.
(29) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009, previously filed by the Registrant.
(30) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated July 7, 2011, previously filed by the Registrant.
(31) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated May 14, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(32) Incorporated by reference to the Form S-8 dated May 20, 2010, previously filed by the Registrant.
(33) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2010, previously filed by the Registrant.
(34) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated April 2, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.
(35) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K dated September 25, 2012, previously filed by the Registrant.

 

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION
By:  

/s/ Jeffrey A. Stoops

 

Jeffrey A. Stoops

Chief Executive Officer and President

Date:   February 27, 2013

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature

  

Title

 

Date

/s/ Steven E. Bernstein

   Chairman of the Board of Directors   February 27, 2013
Steven E. Bernstein     

/s/ Jeffrey A. Stoops

   Chief Executive Officer and President   February 27, 2013
Jeffrey A. Stoops    (Principal Executive Officer)  

/s/ Brendan T. Cavanagh

   Chief Financial Officer   February 27, 2013
Brendan T. Cavanagh    (Principal Financial Officer)  

/s/ Brian D. Lazarus

   Chief Accounting Officer   February 27, 2013
Brian D. Lazarus    (Principal Accounting Officer)  

/s/ Brian C. Carr

   Director   February 27, 2013
Brian C. Carr     

/s/ Duncan H. Cocroft

   Director   February 27, 2013
Duncan H. Cocroft     

/s/ George R. Krouse Jr.

   Director   February 27, 2013
George R. Krouse Jr.     

/s/ Jack Langer

   Director   February 27, 2013
Jack Langer     

/s/ Kevin L. Beebe

   Director   February 27, 2013
Kevin L. Beebe     

 

67


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SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Table of Contents

 

     Page  

Report of Independent Registered Certified Public Accounting Firm

     F-1   

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2012 and 2011

     F-2   

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010

     F-3   

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the years ended December  31, 2012, 2011 and 2010

     F-4   

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the years ended December  31, 2012, 2011 and 2010

     F-5   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010

     F-7   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     F-9   


Table of Contents

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive loss, shareholders’ equity (deficit) and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2012. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries at December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2012, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), SBA Communications Corporation and Subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, and our report dated February 27, 2013 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

 

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP
Certified Public Accountants

Boca Raton, Florida

February 27, 2013

 

F-1


Table of Contents

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except par values)

 

     December 31,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 
ASSETS     

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 233,099      $ 47,316   

Restricted cash

     27,708        22,266   

Short-term investments

     5,471        5,773   

Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $246 and $135 at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively

     39,099        22,100   

Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts

     23,644        17,655   

Prepaid and other current assets

     39,542        14,246   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     368,563        129,356   

Property and equipment, net

     2,671,317        1,583,393   

Intangible assets, net

     3,134,133        1,639,784   

Deferred financing fees, net

     66,324        42,064   

Other assets

     355,280        211,802   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 6,595,617      $ 3,606,399   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)     

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable

   $ 27,694      $ 12,755   

Accrued expenses

     42,052        23,746   

Current maturities of long-term debt

     475,351        5,000   

Deferred revenue

     76,668        49,779   

Accrued interest

     46,233        32,351   

Other current liabilities

     195,690        3,250   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     863,688        126,881   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term liabilities:

    

Long-term debt

     4,880,752        3,349,485   

Other long-term liabilities

     186,475        129,282   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long-term liabilities

     5,067,227        3,478,767   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interests

     11,711        12,064   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity (deficit):

    

Preferred stock - par value $.01, 30,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding

     —         —    

Common stock - Class A, par value $.01, 400,000 shares authorized 126,933 and 109,675 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively

     1,269        1,097   

Additional paid-in capital

     3,111,107        2,268,244   

Accumulated deficit

     (2,462,176     (2,281,139

Accumulated other comprehensive income, net

     2,791        485   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)

     652,991        (11,313
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)

   $ 6,595,617      $ 3,606,399   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-2


Table of Contents

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2012     2011     2010  

Revenues:

      

Site leasing

   $ 846,094      $ 616,294      $ 535,444   

Site development

     107,990        81,876        91,175   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     954,084        698,170        626,619   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

      

Cost of revenues (exclusive of depreciation, accretion and amortization shown below):

      

Cost of site leasing

     188,951        131,916        119,141   

Cost of site development

     90,556        71,005        80,301   

Selling, general and administrative

     72,148        62,828        58,209   

Acquisition related expenses

     40,433        7,144        10,106   

Asset impairment

     6,383        5,472        5,862   

Depreciation, accretion and amortization

     408,467        309,146        278,727   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     806,938        587,511        552,346   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     147,146        110,659        74,273   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

      

Interest income

     1,128        136        432   

Interest expense

     (196,241     (160,896     (149,921

Non-cash interest expense

     (70,110     (63,629     (60,070

Amortization of deferred financing fees

     (12,870     (9,188     (9,099

Loss from extinguishment of debt, net

     (51,799     (1,696     (49,060

Other income (expense)

     5,654        (165     29   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense

     (324,238     (235,438     (267,689
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before provision for income taxes

     (177,092     (124,779     (193,416

Provision for income taxes

     (6,594     (2,113     (1,005
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

     (183,686     (126,892     (194,421

Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

     2,296        —         —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (181,390     (126,892     (194,421

Net loss (income) attributable to the noncontrolling interest

     353        436        (253
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications Corporation

   $ (181,037   $ (126,456   $ (194,674
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted per common share amounts:

      

Loss from continuing operations

   $ (1.53   $ (1.14   $ (1.68

Income from discontinued operations

     0.02        —         —    
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per common share

   $ (1.51   $ (1.14   $ (1.68
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic and diluted weighted average number of common shares

     120,280        111,595        115,591   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3


Table of Contents

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012, 2011 AND 2010

(in thousands)

 

     For the year ended December 31,  
     2012     2011     2010  

Net loss from continuing operations

   $ (183,686   $ (126,892   $ (194,421

Income from discontinued operations, net of taxes

     2,296        —         —    

Other comprehensive loss associated with derivative instruments:

      

Amortization of net deferred loss from settlement of derivative financial instruments

     —         —         632   

Write-off of net deferred loss from derivative instruments related to repurchase of debt

     —         —         3,645   

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     2,306        (1,728     701   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

     (179,084     (128,620     (189,443

Other comprehensive loss (gain) attributable to noncontrolling interest

     353        436        (298
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss attributable to SBA Communications Corporation

   $ (178,731   $ (128,184   $ (189,741
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying condensed notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4


Table of Contents

SBA COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012, 2011 AND 2010

(in thousands)

 

    

 

Class A
Common Stock

    Additional
Paid-In

Capital
    Accumulated
Deficit
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

(Loss) Income
    Noncontrolling
Interests
    Total  
     Shares     Amount            

BALANCE, December 31, 2009

     117,082      $ 1,171      $ 2,228,268      $ (1,627,602   $ (2,803   $ 915      $ 599,949   

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications

     —         —         —         (194,674     —         253        (194,421

Amortization of net deferred loss from settlement of derivative financial instruments

     —         —         —         —         632        —         632   

Write-off of net deferred loss from derivative instruments related to repurchase of debt

     —         —         —         —         3,645        —         3,645   

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     —         —         —         —         701        —         701   

Non-cash compensation

     —         —         10,560        —         —         —         10,560   

Common stock issued in connection with stock purchase/option plans

     924        9        16,124        —         —         —         16,133   

Proceeds from the settlement of convertible note hedges

     —         —         8,497        —         —         —         8,497   

Purchase of redeemable noncontrolling interests

     —         —         (7,500     —         —         (703     (8,203

Exchange of redeemable noncontrolling interests

     —         —         (12,492     —         —         (465     (12,957

Repurchase and retirement of common stock

     (3,174     (32     —         (107,394     —         —         (107,426
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

BALANCE, December 31, 2010

     114,832      $ 1,148      $ 2,243,457      $ (1,929,670   $ 2,175      $ —       $ 317,110   

Net loss attributable to SBA Communications

     —         —         —         (126,456     —         —         (126,456

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     —         —         (38     —         (1,690     —         (1,728

Equity component related to repurchases of the 1.875% convertible debt

     —         —         (2,607     —         —         —         (2,607

Non-cash compensation

     —         —         11,639        —         —         —         11,639   

Common stock issued in connection with stock purchase/option plans

     761        8        15,793        —         —         —         15,801   

Repurchase and retirement of common stock

     (5,918     (59     —&nbs